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Sample records for graph ramsey numbers

  1. Restricted size Ramsey number for P3 versus dense connected graphs of order six

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaban, D. R.; Baskoro, E. T.; Uttunggadewa, S.

    2017-07-01

    Let F, G, and H be simple graphs. We say F → (G, H) if for every 2-coloring of the edges of F there exist a monochromatic G or H in F. The Ramsey number r(G, H) is min {v(F): F → (G, H)}, the size Ramsey number r*(G, H) is min {e(F): F → (G, H)}, and the restricted size Ramsey number r*(G, H) is min {e(F): F → (G, H), v(F) = r(G, H)}. In 1972, Chvá tal and Harary gave the Ramsey number for P3 versus any graph H with no isolates. In 1983, Harary and Miller started the investigation of the (restricted) size Ramsey number for some pairs of small graphs with order at most four. In 1983, Faudree and Sheehan continued the investigation and summarized the complete results on the (restricted) size Ramsey number for all pairs of small graphs with order at most four. In 1998, Lortz and Mengenser gave both the size Ramsey number and the restricted size Ramsey number for all pairs of small forests with order at most five. Lately, we investigate the restricted size Ramsey number for a path of order three versus all connected graphs of order five. In this work, we continue the investigation on the restricted size Ramsey number for a pair of small graphs. In particularly, for a path of order three versus connected graphs of order six.

  2. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  3. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  4. Experimental Determination of Ramsey Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  5. Experimental determination of Ramsey numbers.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-27

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  6. On Ramsey (3K2, K3) - minimal graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Kristiana; Baskoro, Edy Tri; Assiyatun, Hilda; Suprijanto, Djoko

    2016-02-01

    The Ramsey graph theory has many interesting applications, such as in the fields of communications, information retrieval, and decision making. One of growing topics in Ramsey theory is Ramsey minimal graph. For any given graphs G and H, find graphs F such that any red-blue coloring of all edges of F contains either a red copy of G or a blue copy of H. If this condition is not satisfied by the graph F - e, then we call the graph F as a Ramsey (G, H) - minimal. In this paper, we derive the properties of (3K2, K3) - minimal graphs. We, then, characterize all Ramsey (3K2, K3) - minimal graphs.

  7. Connected size Ramsey numbers of matchings and stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahadjeng, Budi; Baskoro, Edy Tri; Assiyatun, Hilda

    2016-02-01

    Let F, G, and H be finite, simple, and undirected graphs. The notation F → (G, H) means that if the edge set of F is arbitrarily colored by red or blue, then there always exists either a red copy of G or a blue copy of H. The connected size Ramsey number r̂c(G, H) is min{|E(F)| : F → (G, H), F is connected}. In this paper, we determine the connected size Ramsey numbers r̂c(nK2, mK2), for n, m ≥ 2. Furthermore, an upper bound of r̂c(nK2, K1,m), for n ≥ 2 and m ≥ 3, and the exact value of r̂c(nK2, K1,m), for n = 2, 3, are presented.

  8. Computing the isoperimetric number of a graph

    SciTech Connect

    Golovach, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Let G be a finite graph. Denote by {partial_derivative}X, where X {contained_in} VG, the set of edges of the graph G with one end in X and the other end in the set VG{backslash}X. The ratio i(G) = min {vert_bar}{vert_bar}X{vert_bar}/{vert_bar}X{vert_bar}, where the minimum is over all nonempty subsets X of the set VG such that {vert_bar}X{vert_bar} {le} {vert_bar} VG {vert_bar}/2, is called the isoperimetric number of the graph G. It is easy to see that the isoperimetric number may be used as a {open_quotes}measure of connectivity{close_quotes} of the graph. The problem of determining the isoperimetric number is clearly linked with graph partition problems, which often arise in various applications. The isoperimetric number is also important for studying Riemann surfaces. These and other applications of the isoperimetric number justify the analysis of graphs of this kind. The properties of the isoperimetric number are presented in more detail elsewhere. It is shown elsewhere that the computation of the isoperimetric number is an NP-hard problem for graphs with multiple edges. We will show that the decision problem {open_quotes}given the graph G and two integers s and t decide if i(G) {le} s/t{close_quotes} is NP-complete even for simple graphs with vertex degrees not exceeding 3. Note that the isoperimetric number of a tree can be computed by a known polynomial-time algorithm.

  9. Graphing Powers and Roots of Complex Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embse, Charles Vonder

    1993-01-01

    Using De Moivre's theorem and a parametric graphing utility, examines powers and roots of complex numbers and allows students to establish connections between the visual and numerical representations of complex numbers. Provides a program to numerically verify the roots of complex numbers. (MDH)

  10. Noise-assisted Ramsey interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, U.

    2013-12-01

    I analyze a metrological strategy for improving the precision of frequency estimation via Ramsey interferometry with strings of atoms in the presence of correlated dephasing. This strategy does not employ entangled states but rather a product state which evolves into a stationary state under the influence of correlated dephasing. It is shown that by using this state an improvement in precision compared to standard Ramsey interferometry can be gained. This improvement is not an improvement in scaling; i.e., the estimation precision has the same scaling with the number of atoms as the standard quantum limit but gains an improvement proportional to the free evolution time in the Ramsey interferometer. Since a stationary state is used, this evolution time can be substantially larger than in standard Ramsey interferometry which is limited by the coherence time of the atoms.

  11. Domination Number of Vertex Amalgamation of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuni, Y.; Utoyo, M. I.; Slamin

    2017-06-01

    For a graph G = (V, E), a subset S of V is called a dominating set if every vertex x in V is either in S or adjacent to a vertex in S. The domination number γ ( G ) is the minimum cardinality of the dominating set of G. The dominating set of G with a minimum cardinality denoted by γ ( G )-set. Let G 1, G 2, …, Gt be subgraphs of the graph G. If the union of all these subgraphs is G and their intersection is {v}, then we say that G is the vertex-amalgamation of G 1, G 2, …, Gt at vertex v. Based on the membership of the common vertex v in the γ ( Gi )-set, there exist three conditions to be considered. First, if v elements of every γ ( Gi )-set, second if there is no γ ( Gi )-set containing v, and third if either v is element of γ ( Gi )-set for 1 ≤ i ≤ p or there is no γ ( Gi )-set containing v for p < i ≤ t . For these three conditions, the domination number of G as vertex-amalgamation of G 1, G 2, …, Gt at vertex v can be determined.

  12. Colour mathematics: with graphs and numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presto, Michael C.

    2009-07-01

    The different combinations involved in additive and subtractive colour mixing can often be difficult for students to remember. Using transmission graphs for filters of the primary colours and a numerical scheme to write out the relationships are good exercises in analytical thinking that can help students recall the combinations rather than just attempting to memorize them.

  13. Colour Mathematics: With Graphs and Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The different combinations involved in additive and subtractive colour mixing can often be difficult for students to remember. Using transmission graphs for filters of the primary colours and a numerical scheme to write out the relationships are good exercises in analytical thinking that can help students recall the combinations rather than just…

  14. Optomechanical Ramsey interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Kenan; Dong, Chunhua; Wang, Hailin; Agarwal, G. S.

    2014-11-01

    We adopt Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields to study coherences of the mechanical system in an optomechanical resonator. The high-resolution Ramsey fringes are observed in the emission optical field, when two pulses separated in time are applied. We develop a theory to describe the transient optomechanical behavior underlying the Ramsey fringes. We also perform the experimental demonstration using a silica microresonator. The method is versatile and can be adopted for different types of mechanical resonators and electromechanical resonators.

  15. The rainbow connection number of some subdivided roof graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, Bety Hayat; Salman, A. N. M.; Simanjuntak, Rinovia

    2016-02-01

    Let G be an edge-colored graph where adjacent edges may have the same color. A path in G is called rainbow if its edges have distinct colors. A graph G is rainbow connected if any two distinct vertices in G are connected by a rainbow path. The smallest number of colors that are needed in order to make G rainbow connected is called the rainbow connection number of G, denoted by rc(G). In this paper, we determine the rainbow connection number of some subdivided roof graphs.

  16. Explicit and probabilistic constructions of distance graphs with small clique numbers and large chromatic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupavskii, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    We study distance graphs with exponentially large chromatic numbers and without k-cliques, that is, complete subgraphs of size k. Explicit constructions of such graphs use vectors in the integer lattice. For a large class of graphs we find a sharp threshold for containing a k-clique. This enables us to improve the lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers of such graphs. We give a new probabilistic approach to the construction of distance graphs without k-cliques, and this yields better lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers for large k.

  17. The (strong) rainbow connection number of stellar graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulhany, M. A.; Salman, A. N. M.

    2016-02-01

    Let G = (V,E) be a simple, connected, and finite graph. A function c from E to {1, 2, …, k} is said rainbow k-coloring of G, if for any pair of vertices u and v in V, there exists au - vpath whose edges have different colors. The rainbow connection number of G, denoted by rc(G), is the smallest positive integer k such that Ghas a rainbow k-coloring. Furthermore, such the function c is said strong rainbow k-coloring, if for any pair of vertices u and v in V, there exists a rainbow u-v path with its length is equal to distance betweenu and v. The smallest positive integer k such that G has a strong rainbow k-coloring is defined as the strong rainbow connection number, denoted by src(G).In this paper, we introduce a new class of graphs, namely stellar graphs. A stellar graph on 2mn+1 vertices, denoted by Stm,n, is the corona product of a trivial graph and mcopies ladder graph on 2n vertices (K1⊙m.Ln). We determine the (strong) rainbow connection number of stellar graphs.

  18. Computing the Edge-Neighbour-Scattering Number of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zongtian; Qi, Nannan; Yue, Xiaokui

    2013-11-01

    A set of edges X is subverted from a graph G by removing the closed neighbourhood N[X] from G. We denote the survival subgraph by G=X. An edge-subversion strategy X is called an edge-cut strategy of G if G=X is disconnected, a single vertex, or empty. The edge-neighbour-scattering number of a graph G is defined as ENS(G) = max{ω(G/X)-|X| : X is an edge-cut strategy of G}, where w(G=X) is the number of components of G=X. This parameter can be used to measure the vulnerability of networks when some edges are failed, especially spy networks and virus-infected networks. In this paper, we prove that the problem of computing the edge-neighbour-scattering number of a graph is NP-complete and give some upper and lower bounds for this parameter.

  19. Protected subspace Ramsey spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, L.; Plankensteiner, D.; Ritsch, H.; Genes, C.

    2014-11-01

    We study a modified Ramsey spectroscopy technique employing slowly decaying states for quantum metrology applications using dense ensembles. While closely positioned atoms exhibit super-radiant collective decay and dipole-dipole induced frequency shifts, recent results [L. Ostermann, H. Ritsch, and C. Genes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 123601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.123601] suggest the possibility to suppress such detrimental effects and achieve an even better scaling of the frequency sensitivity with interrogation time than for noninteracting particles. Here we present an in-depth analysis of this "protected subspace Ramsey technique" using improved analytical modeling and numerical simulations including larger three-dimensional (3D) samples. Surprisingly we find that using subradiant states of N particles to encode the atomic coherence yields a scaling of the optimal sensitivity better than 1 /√{N } . Applied to ultracold atoms in 3D optical lattices we predict a precision beyond the single atom linewidth.

  20. On Ramsey's conjecture.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Tapan; Sorger, Gerhard

    2013-09-01

    Studying a one-sector economy populated by finitely many heterogeneous households that are subject to no-borrowing constraints, we confirm a conjecture by Frank P. Ramsey according to which, in the long run, society would be divided into the set of patient households who own the entire capital stock and impatient ones without any physical wealth. More specifically, we prove (i) that there exists a unique steady state equilibrium that is globally asymptotically stable and (ii) that along every equilibrium the most patient household owns the entire capital of the economy after some finite time. Furthermore, we prove that despite the presence of the no-borrowing constraints all equilibria are efficient. Our results are derived for the continuous-time formulation of the model that was originally used by Ramsey, and they stand in stark contrast to results that - over the last three decades - have been found in the discrete-time version of the model.

  1. Obstructions to the realization of distance graphs with large chromatic numbers on spheres of small radii

    SciTech Connect

    Kupavskii, A B; Raigorodskii, A M

    2013-10-31

    We investigate in detail some properties of distance graphs constructed on the integer lattice. Such graphs find wide applications in problems of combinatorial geometry, in particular, such graphs were employed to answer Borsuk's question in the negative and to obtain exponential estimates for the chromatic number of the space. This work is devoted to the study of the number of cliques and the chromatic number of such graphs under certain conditions. Constructions of sequences of distance graphs are given, in which the graphs have unit length edges and contain a large number of triangles that lie on a sphere of radius 1/√3 (which is the minimum possible). At the same time, the chromatic numbers of the graphs depend exponentially on their dimension. The results of this work strengthen and generalize some of the results obtained in a series of papers devoted to related issues. Bibliography: 29 titles.

  2. Independence numbers and chromatic numbers of the random subgraphs of some distance graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogolubsky, L. I.; Gusev, A. S.; Pyaderkin, M. M.; Raigorodskii, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    This work is concerned with the Nelson-Hadwiger classical problem of finding the chromatic numbers of distance graphs in ℝn. Most consideration is given to the class of graphs G(n, r, s)= (V(n, r), E(n, r, s)) defined as follows: \\displaystyle V(n, r)=\\bigl\\{\\mathbf{x}=(x_1,\\dots,x_n) : x_i\\in\\{0, 1\\}, x_1+\\dots+x_n=r\\bigr\\},//\\displaystyle E(n, r, s)=\\bigl\\{\\{\\mathbf{x}, \\mathbf{y}: (\\mathbf{x}, \\mathbf{y})=s\\}\\bigr\\}, where (x, y) is the Euclidean inner product. In particular, the chromatic number of G(n, 3, 1) was recently found by Balogh, Kostochka and Raigorodskii. The objects of the study are the random subgraphs 𝒢(G(n, r, s), p) whose edges are independently taken from the set E(n, r, s), each with probability p. The independence number and the chromatic number of such graphs are estimated both from below and from above. In the case when r - s is a prime power and r <= 2s + 1, the order of growth of α(𝒢(G(n, r, s), p)) and χ(𝒢(G(n, r, s), p)) is established. Bibliography: 51 titles.

  3. On Rainbow k-Connection Number of Special Graphs and It’s Sharp Lower Bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesti Agustin, Ika; Dafik; Gembong, A. W.; Alfarisi, Ridho

    2017-06-01

    Let G = (V, E) be a simple, nontrivial, finite, connected and undirected graph. Let c be a coloring c : E(G) → {1, 2, …, s}, s ∈ N. A path of edge colored graph is said to be a rainbow path if no two edges on the path have the same color. An edge colored graph G is said to be a rainbow connected graph if there exists a rainbow u - v path for every two vertices u and v of G. The rainbow connection number of a graph G, denoted by rc(G), is the smallest number of k colors required to edge color the graph such that the graph is rainbow connected. Furthermore, for an l-connected graph G and an integer k with 1 ≤ k ≤ l, the rainbow k-connection number rck (G) of G is defined to be the minimum number of colors required to color the edges of G such that every two distinct vertices of G are connected by at least k internally disjoint rainbow paths. In this paper, we determine the exact values of rainbow connection number of some special graphs and obtain a sharp lower bound.

  4. A Graph Theoretic Criterion for Determining the Number of Clusters in a Data Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine; Eckes, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for determining the number of clusters in a data set are explored. A proposed stopping rule, the GRAPH criterion, is compared to four stopping rules currently in use. The GRAPH criterion's mathematically attractive properties and utility in solving the number-of-clusters problem are demonstrated. (SLD)

  5. Locating-coloring on Halin graphs with a certain number of inner faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwasih, I. A.; Baskoro, E. T.; Assiyatun, H.; Suprijanto, D.

    2016-02-01

    For any tree T with at least four vertices and no vertices of degree two, define a Halin graph H(T) as a planar graph constructed from an embedding of T in a plane by connecting all the leaves (the vertices of degree 1) of T to form a cycle C that passes around T in the natural cyclic order defined by the embedding of T . The study of the properties of a Halin graph has received much attention. For instances, it has been shown that every Halin graph is 3-connected and Hamiltonian. A Halin graph has also treewidth at most three, so that many graph optimization problems that are NP-complete for arbitrary planar graphs may be solved in linear time on Halin graphs using dynamic programming. In this paper, we characterize all Halin graphs with 3,4,5,6, and 7 inner faces and give their locating-chromatic number. Furthermore, we show that there exist a Halin graph having locating-chromatic number k ≥ 4 with r ≥max {3 ,(k/-2) 3-(k-2 ) 2 2 +1 } inner faces.

  6. Designing better graphs by including distributional information and integrating words, numbers, and images.

    PubMed

    Lane, David M; Sándor, Anikó

    2009-09-01

    Statistical graphs are commonly used in scientific publications. Unfortunately, graphs in psychology journals rarely portray distributional information beyond central tendency, and few graphs portray inferential statistics. Moreover, those that do portray inferential information generally do not portray it in a way that is useful for interpreting the data. The authors present several recommendations for improving graphs including the following: (a) bar charts of means with or without standard errors should be supplanted by graphs containing distributional information, (b) good design should be used to allow more information to be included in a graph without obscuring trends in the data, and (c) figures should include both graphic images and inferential statistics presented in words and numbers.

  7. Some notes on the Roman domination number and Italian domination number in graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajibaba, Maryam; Jafari Rad, Nader

    2017-09-01

    An Italian dominating function (or simply, IDF) on a graph G = (V, E) is a function f : V → {0, 1, 2} that satisfies the property that for every vertex v ∈ V, with f(v) = 0, Σ u∈N(v) f(u) ≥ 2. The weight of an Italian dominating function f is defined as w(f) = f(V ) = Σ u∈V f(u). The minimum weight among all of the Italian dominating functions on a graph G is called the Italian domination number of G, and is denoted by γI (G). A double Roman dominating function (or simply, DRDF) is a function f : V → {0, 1, 2, 3} having the property that if f(v) = 0 for a vertex v, then v has at least two adjacent vertices assigned 2 under f or one adjacent vertex assigned 3 under f, and if f(v) = 1, then v has at least one neighbor with f(w) ≥ 2. The weight of a DRDF f is defined as the sum f(V) = Σ v∈V f(v), and the minimum weight of a DRDF on G is the double Roman domination number of G, denoted by γdR (G). In this paper we show that γdR (G)/2 ≤ γI (G) ≤ 2γdR (G)/3, and characterize all trees T with γI (T) = 2γdR (T)/3.

  8. On the characterization of claw-free graphs with given total restrained domination number.

    PubMed

    Pi, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    A set S of vertices in graph [Formula: see text] is a [Formula: see text], abbreviated TRDS, of G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S and every vertex of [Formula: see text] is adjacent to a vertex in [Formula: see text]. The [Formula: see text] of G, denoted by [Formula: see text], is the minimum cardinality of a TRDS of G. Jiang and Kang (J Comb Optim. 19:60-68, 2010) characterized the connected claw-free graph G of order n with [Formula: see text]. This paper studies the total restrained domination number of claw-free graphs and characterizes the connected claw-free graph G of order n with [Formula: see text].

  9. Ramsey Interference with Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Farsi, Alessandro; Ramelow, Sven; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2016-11-01

    Interferometry using discrete energy levels of nuclear, atomic, or molecular systems is the foundation for a wide range of physical phenomena and enables powerful techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, Ramsey-based spectroscopy, and laser or maser technology. It also plays a unique role in quantum information processing as qubits may be implemented as energy superposition states of simple quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference involving energy states of single quanta of light. In full analogy to the energy levels of atoms or nuclear spins, we implement a Ramsey interferometer with single photons. We experimentally generate energy superposition states of a single photon and manipulate them with unitary transformations to realize arbitrary projective measurements. Our approach opens the path for frequency-encoded photonic qubits in quantum information processing and quantum communication.

  10. A PVS Graph Theory Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Sjogren, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper documents the NASA Langley PVS graph theory library. The library provides fundamental definitions for graphs, subgraphs, walks, paths, subgraphs generated by walks, trees, cycles, degree, separating sets, and four notions of connectedness. Theorems provided include Ramsey's and Menger's and the equivalence of all four notions of connectedness.

  11. Distance graphs having large chromatic numbers and containing no cliques or cycles of a given size

    SciTech Connect

    Demekhin, Evgenii E; Raigorodskii, Andrei M; Rubanov, Oleg I

    2013-04-30

    It is established that there exist sequences of distance graphs G{sub n} subset of R{sup n}, with chromatic numbers which grow exponentially, but, at the same time, without cliques or cycles of a given size. Bibliography: 42 titles.

  12. From Number Lines to Graphs in the Coordinate Plane: Investigating Problem Solving across Mathematical Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earnest, Darrell

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on students' problem-solving approaches across three representations--number lines, coordinate planes, and function graphs--the axes of which conventional mathematics treats in terms of consistent geometric and numeric coordinations. I consider these representations to be a part of a "hierarchical representational…

  13. Supporting Generative Thinking about Number Lines, the Cartesian Plane, and Graphs of Linear Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earnest, Darrell Steven

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores fifth and eighth grade students' interpretations of three kinds of mathematical representations: number lines, the Cartesian plane, and graphs of linear functions. Two studies were conducted. In Study 1, I administered the paper-and-pencil Linear Representations Assessment (LRA) to examine students'…

  14. Ring perception: proof of a formula calculating the number of the smallest rings in connected graphs

    PubMed

    Petitjean; Fan; Panaye; Doucet

    2000-07-01

    A general mathematical proof of a formula proposed and used by Fan et al. for calculating the number of the smallest rings in their smallest set of the smallest rings search algorithm is reported. This proof generalizes this formula to all connected cyclic graphs.

  15. From Number Lines to Graphs in the Coordinate Plane: Investigating Problem Solving across Mathematical Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earnest, Darrell

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on students' problem-solving approaches across three representations--number lines, coordinate planes, and function graphs--the axes of which conventional mathematics treats in terms of consistent geometric and numeric coordinations. I consider these representations to be a part of a "hierarchical representational…

  16. 1 / n Expansion for the Number of Matchings on Regular Graphs and Monomer-Dimer Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernici, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Using a 1 / n expansion, that is an expansion in descending powers of n, for the number of matchings in regular graphs with 2 n vertices, we study the monomer-dimer entropy for two classes of graphs. We study the difference between the extensive monomer-dimer entropy of a random r-regular graph G (bipartite or not) with 2 n vertices and the average extensive entropy of r-regular graphs with 2 n vertices, in the limit n → ∞. We find a series expansion for it in the numbers of cycles; with probability 1 it converges for dimer density p < 1 and, for G bipartite, it diverges as |ln(1-p)| for p → 1. In the case of regular lattices, we similarly expand the difference between the specific monomer-dimer entropy on a lattice and the one on the Bethe lattice; we write down its Taylor expansion in powers of p through the order 10, expressed in terms of the number of totally reducible walks which are not tree-like. We prove through order 6 that its expansion coefficients in powers of p are non-negative.

  17. Ramsey effect of coherent population trapping in anti-relaxation-coated Rb vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Joon; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-08-01

    We examine experimentally and theoretically the Ramsey effects on the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance in a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell. The observed CPT spectrum in the Hanle configuration of the 5 S 1/2( F = 2)-5 P 1/2( F' = 1) transition of 87Rb atoms consists of a narrow structure with a spectral width of 0.10 mG due to the wall-induced Ramsey effect and a broad structure with a spectral width of 23 mG due to the transit effect. Considering the velocity distribution of atoms and the number of wall-atom collisions, we numerically calculated the transmittance of the laser beam as a function of the longitudinal magnetic field. The experimental results of the CPT Ramsey interference were in good agreement with the theoretical results, and the dependences of the CPT Ramsey effects on the atom-laser interaction time were investigated in detail.

  18. Large Deviation Function for the Number of Eigenvalues of Sparse Random Graphs Inside an Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Fernando L.; Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2016-09-01

    We present a general method to obtain the exact rate function Ψ[a ,b ](k ) controlling the large deviation probability Prob[IN[a ,b ]=k N ]≍e-N Ψ[a ,b ](k ) that an N ×N sparse random matrix has IN[a ,b ]=k N eigenvalues inside the interval [a ,b ]. The method is applied to study the eigenvalue statistics in two distinct examples: (i) the shifted index number of eigenvalues for an ensemble of Erdös-Rényi graphs and (ii) the number of eigenvalues within a bounded region of the spectrum for the Anderson model on regular random graphs. A salient feature of the rate function in both cases is that, unlike rotationally invariant random matrices, it is asymmetric with respect to its minimum. The asymmetric character depends on the disorder in a way that is compatible with the distinct eigenvalue statistics corresponding to localized and delocalized eigenstates. The results also show that the level compressibility κ2/κ1 for the Anderson model on a regular graph satisfies 0 <κ2/κ1<1 in the bulk regime, in contrast with the behavior found in Gaussian random matrices. Our theoretical findings are thoroughly compared to numerical diagonalization in both cases, showing a reasonable good agreement.

  19. Large Deviation Function for the Number of Eigenvalues of Sparse Random Graphs Inside an Interval.

    PubMed

    Metz, Fernando L; Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2016-09-02

    We present a general method to obtain the exact rate function Ψ_{[a,b]}(k) controlling the large deviation probability Prob[I_{N}[a,b]=kN]≍e^{-NΨ_{[a,b]}(k)} that an N×N sparse random matrix has I_{N}[a,b]=kN eigenvalues inside the interval [a,b]. The method is applied to study the eigenvalue statistics in two distinct examples: (i) the shifted index number of eigenvalues for an ensemble of Erdös-Rényi graphs and (ii) the number of eigenvalues within a bounded region of the spectrum for the Anderson model on regular random graphs. A salient feature of the rate function in both cases is that, unlike rotationally invariant random matrices, it is asymmetric with respect to its minimum. The asymmetric character depends on the disorder in a way that is compatible with the distinct eigenvalue statistics corresponding to localized and delocalized eigenstates. The results also show that the level compressibility κ_{2}/κ_{1} for the Anderson model on a regular graph satisfies 0<κ_{2}/κ_{1}<1 in the bulk regime, in contrast with the behavior found in Gaussian random matrices. Our theoretical findings are thoroughly compared to numerical diagonalization in both cases, showing a reasonable good agreement.

  20. The maximum number of 3- and 4-cliques within a planar maximally filtered graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Jenna; Pantelous, Athanasios A.; Zuev, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Planar Maximally Filtered Graphs (PMFG) are an important tool for filtering the most relevant information from correlation based networks such as stock market networks. One of the main characteristics of a PMFG is the number of its 3- and 4-cliques. Recently in a few high impact papers it was stated that, based on heuristic evidence, the maximum number of 3- and 4-cliques that can exist in a PMFG with n vertices is 3 n - 8 and n - 4 respectively. In this paper, we prove that this is indeed the case.

  1. The Fibonacci Number of a Grid Graph and a New Class of Integer Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Reinhardt

    2005-05-01

    Given a grid graph G of size mn, we study the number i(m,n) of independent sets in G, as well as b(m,n), the number of maximal such sets. It turns out that the initial cases b(1,n) and b(2,n) lead to a Padovan and a Fibonacci sequence. To determine b(m,n) for m > 2 we present an adaptation of the transfer matrix method, well known for calculating i(m,n). Finally, we apply our method to obtain explicit values of b(m,n) for m=3,4,5 and provide the corresponding generating functions.

  2. Graph Embedding Techniques for Bounding Condition Numbers of Incomplete Factor Preconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guattery, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    We extend graph embedding techniques for bounding the spectral condition number of preconditioned systems involving symmetric, irreducibly diagonally dominant M-matrices to systems where the preconditioner is not diagonally dominant. In particular, this allows us to bound the spectral condition number when the preconditioner is based on an incomplete factorization. We provide a review of previous techniques, describe our extension, and give examples both of a bound for a model problem, and of ways in which our techniques give intuitive way of looking at incomplete factor preconditioners.

  3. Embeddings of graphs into Euclidean space under which the number of points that belong to a hyperplane is minimal

    SciTech Connect

    Oblakov, Konstantin I; Oblakova, Tat'yana A

    2012-10-31

    The paper is devoted to the characteristic of a graph that is the minimal (over all embeddings of the graph into a space of given dimension) number of points that belong to the same hyperplane. Upper and lower estimates for this number are given that linearly depend on the dimension of the space. For trees a more precise upper estimate is obtained, which asymptotically coincides with the lower one for large dimension of the space. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  4. Designing Better Graphs by Including Distributional Information and Integrating Words, Numbers, and Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, David M.; Sandor, Aniko

    2009-01-01

    Statistical graphs are commonly used in scientific publications. Unfortunately, graphs in psychology journals rarely portray distributional information beyond central tendency, and few graphs portray inferential statistics. Moreover, those that do portray inferential information generally do not portray it in a way that is useful for interpreting…

  5. Designing Better Graphs by Including Distributional Information and Integrating Words, Numbers, and Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, David M.; Sandor, Aniko

    2009-01-01

    Statistical graphs are commonly used in scientific publications. Unfortunately, graphs in psychology journals rarely portray distributional information beyond central tendency, and few graphs portray inferential statistics. Moreover, those that do portray inferential information generally do not portray it in a way that is useful for interpreting…

  6. Optimal Segmentation of Directed Graph and the Minimum Number of Feedback Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi-Zhi; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2017-08-01

    The minimum feedback arc set problem asks to delete a minimum number of arcs (directed edges) from a digraph (directed graph) to make it free of any directed cycles. In this work we approach this fundamental cycle-constrained optimization problem by considering a generalized task of dividing the digraph into D layers of equal size. We solve the D-segmentation problem by the replica-symmetric mean field theory and belief-propagation heuristic algorithms. The minimum feedback arc density of a given random digraph ensemble is then obtained by extrapolating the theoretical results to the limit of large D. A divide-and-conquer algorithm (nested-BPR) is devised to solve the minimum feedback arc set problem with very good performance and high efficiency.

  7. A Novel Graph-based Algorithm to Infer Recurrent Copy Number Variations in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chen; Ajwad, Rasif; Kuang, Qin; Hu, Pingzhao

    2016-01-01

    Many cancers have been linked to copy number variations (CNVs) in the genomic DNA. Although there are existing methods to analyze CNVs from individual samples, cancer-causing genes are more frequently discovered in regions where CNVs are common among tumor samples, also known as recurrent CNVs. Integrating multiple samples and locating recurrent CNV regions remain a challenge, both computationally and conceptually. We propose a new graph-based algorithm for identifying recurrent CNVs using the maximal clique detection technique. The algorithm has an optimal solution, which means all maximal cliques can be identified, and guarantees that the identified CNV regions are the most frequent and that the minimal regions have been delineated among tumor samples. The algorithm has successfully been applied to analyze a large cohort of breast cancer samples and identified some breast cancer-associated genes and pathways.

  8. Optimal Segmentation of Directed Graph and the Minimum Number of Feedback Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi-Zhi; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2017-10-01

    The minimum feedback arc set problem asks to delete a minimum number of arcs (directed edges) from a digraph (directed graph) to make it free of any directed cycles. In this work we approach this fundamental cycle-constrained optimization problem by considering a generalized task of dividing the digraph into D layers of equal size. We solve the D-segmentation problem by the replica-symmetric mean field theory and belief-propagation heuristic algorithms. The minimum feedback arc density of a given random digraph ensemble is then obtained by extrapolating the theoretical results to the limit of large D. A divide-and-conquer algorithm (nested-BPR) is devised to solve the minimum feedback arc set problem with very good performance and high efficiency.

  9. A Novel Graph-based Algorithm to Infer Recurrent Copy Number Variations in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chen; Ajwad, Rasif; Kuang, Qin; Hu, Pingzhao

    2016-01-01

    Many cancers have been linked to copy number variations (CNVs) in the genomic DNA. Although there are existing methods to analyze CNVs from individual samples, cancer-causing genes are more frequently discovered in regions where CNVs are common among tumor samples, also known as recurrent CNVs. Integrating multiple samples and locating recurrent CNV regions remain a challenge, both computationally and conceptually. We propose a new graph-based algorithm for identifying recurrent CNVs using the maximal clique detection technique. The algorithm has an optimal solution, which means all maximal cliques can be identified, and guarantees that the identified CNV regions are the most frequent and that the minimal regions have been delineated among tumor samples. The algorithm has successfully been applied to analyze a large cohort of breast cancer samples and identified some breast cancer-associated genes and pathways. PMID:27773988

  10. Synthetic frequency protocol in the Ramsey spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, V. I.; Basalaev, M. Yu; Taichenachev, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We develop an universal method to significantly suppress probe-induced shifts in any types of atomic clocks using the Ramsey spectroscopy. The frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably below a fractional level of 10‑18 practically for any optical atomic clocks.

  11. Ramsey-Bordé interferometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzlin, Karl-Peter

    2013-10-01

    A scheme to realize an electron interferometer using low-intensity, bichromatic laser pulses as beam splitter is proposed. The splitting process is based on a modification of the Kapitza-Dirac effect, which produces a momentum kick for electrons with a specific initial momentum. A full interferometric setup in Ramsey-Bordé configuration is theoretically analyzed.

  12. More Fibonacci numbers arising from the suborbital graphs for the congruence subgroup Γ0(n/h )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Seda

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we study suborbital graphs for the congruence subgroup Γ0(n/h ) acting on the subset ℚ ^(h ) and it is proved that the subgraph F1,n gives very useful number theoretical results such as Fibonacci numbers and some inequalities.

  13. Ramsey interference in a multilevel quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. P.; Bennett, A. J.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Ellis, D. J. P.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    We report Ramsey interference in the excitonic population of a negatively charged quantum dot measured in resonant fluorescence. Our experiments show that the decay time of the Ramsey interference is limited by the spectral width of the transition. Applying a vertical magnetic field induces Zeeman split transitions that can be addressed by changing the laser detuning to reveal two-, three-, and four-level system behavior. We show that under finite field the phase-sensitive control of two optical pulses from a single laser can be used to prepare both population and spin states simultaneously. We also demonstrate the coherent optical manipulation of a trapped spin in a quantum dot in a Faraday geometry magnetic field.

  14. Bayesian pedigree inference with small numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms via a factor-graph representation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eric C; Ng, Thomas C

    2016-02-01

    We develop a computational framework for addressing pedigree inference problems using small numbers (80-400) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our approach relaxes the assumptions, which are commonly made, that sampling is complete with respect to the pedigree and that there is no genotyping error. It relies on representing the inferred pedigree as a factor graph and invoking the Sum-Product algorithm to compute and store quantities that allow the joint probability of the data to be rapidly computed under a large class of rearrangements of the pedigree structure. This allows efficient MCMC sampling over the space of pedigrees, and, hence, Bayesian inference of pedigree structure. In this paper we restrict ourselves to inference of pedigrees without loops using SNPs assumed to be unlinked. We present the methodology in general for multigenerational inference, and we illustrate the method by applying it to the inference of full sibling groups in a large sample (n=1157) of Chinook salmon typed at 95 SNPs. The results show that our method provides a better point estimate and estimate of uncertainty than the currently best-available maximum-likelihood sibling reconstruction method. Extensions of this work to more complex scenarios are briefly discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Probing Macroscopic Realism via Ramsey Correlation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadian, A.; Brukner, C.; Rabl, P.

    2014-05-01

    We describe a new and experimentally feasible protocol for performing fundamental tests of quantum mechanics with massive objects. In our approach, a single two-level system is used to probe the motion of a nanomechanical resonator via multiple Ramsey interference measurements. This scheme enables the measurement of modular variables of macroscopic continuous-variable systems; we show that correlations thereof violate a Leggett-Garg inequality and can be applied for tests of quantum contextuality. Our method can be implemented with a variety of different solid-state or photonic qubit-resonator systems, and it provides a clear experimental signature to distinguish the predictions of quantum mechanics from those of other alternative theories at a macroscopic scale.

  16. Time-domain Ramsey interferometry with interacting Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Christian; Pupillo, Guido; Takei, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Shuntaro; Tanaka, Akira; Ohmori, Kenji; Genes, Claudiu

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of a gas of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms subject to a time-domain Ramsey interferometry protocol. The many-body dynamics is governed by an Ising-type Hamiltonian with long-range interactions of tunable strength. We analyze and model the contrast degradation and phase accumulation of the Ramsey signal and identify scaling laws for varying interrogation times, ensemble densities, and ensemble dimensionalities.

  17. Interval Graph Limits

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2015-01-01

    We work out a graph limit theory for dense interval graphs. The theory developed departs from the usual description of a graph limit as a symmetric function W (x, y) on the unit square, with x and y uniform on the interval (0, 1). Instead, we fix a W and change the underlying distribution of the coordinates x and y. We find choices such that our limits are continuous. Connections to random interval graphs are given, including some examples. We also show a continuity result for the chromatic number and clique number of interval graphs. Some results on uniqueness of the limit description are given for general graph limits. PMID:26405368

  18. A physical mechanism for the prediction of the sunspot number during solar cycle 21. [graphs (charts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Scherrer, P. H.; Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    On physical grounds it is suggested that the sun's polar field strength near a solar minimum is closely related to the following cycle's solar activity. Four methods of estimating the sun's polar magnetic field strength near solar minimum are employed to provide an estimate of cycle 21's yearly mean sunspot number at solar maximum of 140 plus or minus 20. This estimate is considered to be a first order attempt to predict the cycle's activity using one parameter of physical importance.

  19. A Robust Ramsey Interferometer for Atomic Timekeeping in Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Brown, Justin; Butts, David; Choy, Jennifer; Galfond, Marissa; Johnson, David M.; Kinast, Joseph; Timmons, Brian; Stoner, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present a laser-based approach to atomic timekeeping, in which atomic phase information is extracted using modified Raman pulses in a Ramsey sequence. We overcome systematic effects associated with differential AC Stark shifts by employing atom optics derived from Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). ARP drives coherent transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two optical fields and maintaining a large single-photon detuning. Compared to resonant, pulsed Raman transitions, ARP atom optics afford a >150x reduction in sensitivity to differential AC Stark shifts in a Ramsey interferometer. We also demonstrate that ARP preserves fringe contrast in Ramsey interferometers for cloud displacements reaching the 1/e2 intensity radius of the laser beam. ARP can thus be expected to improve the robustness of clock interferometers operating in dynamic environments. Copyright ©2014 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    DOE PAGES

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; ...

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implementmore » a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.« less

  1. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.

  2. Complexity and approximability for a problem of intersecting of proximity graphs with minimum number of equal disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobylkin, Konstantin

    2016-10-01

    Computational complexity and approximability are studied for the problem of intersecting of a set of straight line segments with the smallest cardinality set of disks of fixed radii r > 0 where the set of segments forms straight line embedding of possibly non-planar geometric graph. This problem arises in physical network security analysis for telecommunication, wireless and road networks represented by specific geometric graphs defined by Euclidean distances between their vertices (proximity graphs). It can be formulated in a form of known Hitting Set problem over a set of Euclidean r-neighbourhoods of segments. Being of interest computational complexity and approximability of Hitting Set over so structured sets of geometric objects did not get much focus in the literature. Strong NP-hardness of the problem is reported over special classes of proximity graphs namely of Delaunay triangulations, some of their connected subgraphs, half-θ6 graphs and non-planar unit disk graphs as well as APX-hardness is given for non-planar geometric graphs at different scales of r with respect to the longest graph edge length. Simple constant factor approximation algorithm is presented for the case where r is at the same scale as the longest edge length.

  3. Recognition of Probe Ptolemaic Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Maw-Shang; Hung, Ling-Ju

    Let G denote a graph class. An undirected graph G is called a probe G graph if one can make G a graph in G by adding edges between vertices in some independent set of G. By definition graph class G is a subclass of probe G graphs. Ptolemaic graphs are chordal and induced gem free. They form a subclass of both chordal graphs and distance-hereditary graphs. Many problems NP-hard on chordal graphs can be solved in polynomial time on ptolemaic graphs. We proposed an O(nm)-time algorithm to recognize probe ptolemaic graphs where n and m are the numbers of vertices and edges of the input graph respectively.

  4. Ramsey patterns for multiquantum transitions in fountain experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McColm, D. |

    1996-12-01

    Ramsey patterns for radio-frequency multiquantum transitions among Zeeman levels of the ground state of thallium, cesium, and francium have been calculated. The narrowing of these patterns observed earlier by Gould is predicted to occur only when both static electric and magnetic fields are present. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Crab spiders (Araeneae: Philodromidae, Thomisidae) of Ramsey County, Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Daniel. T. Jennings; Bruce Cutler

    1996-01-01

    Crab spiders of 2 families, 10 genera, and 35 species were collected over a 31-year period in Ramsey County, Minnesota. Rarely collected species included Philodromus keyserlingi, Xysticus pellax, X. chippewa, X. banksi and X. alboniger. Identification source(s), season and collection frequency, and biology are summarized for each species.

  6. Synthetic frequency protocol for Ramsey spectroscopy of clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu.; Zanon-Willette, T.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a universal method to significantly suppress probe-induced shifts in any type of atomic clock using Ramsey spectroscopy. Our approach is based on the adaptation of the synthetic frequency concept [V. I. Yudin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 030801 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.030801] (previously developed for blackbody radiation shift suppression) to Ramsey spectroscopy with the use of interrogations with different dark time intervals. The most significant suppression of the shift is obtained in combination with the so-called hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy technique [V. I. Yudin et al., Phys. Rev. A 82, 011804(R) (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.011804]. In this case, the probe-induced frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably from metrologically significant levels to below a fractional level of 10-18 for practically any optical atomic clocks. The main advantage of our method in comparison with other hyper-Ramsey approaches [R. Hobson et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 010501(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.010501; T. Zanon-Willette et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 042506 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.042506] derives from its much greater efficiency and robustness in the presence of decoherence.

  7. Ramsey-comb spectroscopy: Theory and signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenweg, Jonas; Eikema, Kjeld S. E.

    2014-05-01

    We recently demonstrated that the spectroscopic accuracy and resolution of optical frequency combs can be obtained from a series of Ramsey-like measurements using only two amplified frequency comb pulses at variable delays. In this work we present a comprehensive analytical framework of this Ramsey-comb method in both time and frequency domains. It is shown that as opposed to traditional forms of spectroscopy, the signal analysis can be performed purely in the time domain, based on the temporal phases of the individual Ramsey signals. We give a detailed description of the robust fitting algorithm relying solely on this phase information and discuss special features such as an insensitivity to (transition-independent) spectral line-broadening mechanisms and constant phase shifts, e.g., due to the ac Stark effect from the excitation pulses themselves. The precision and resolution of the Ramsey-comb fitting method is assessed via numerical simulations, including cases of transition-dependent broadening mechanisms and phase shifts.

  8. Optimal reimbursement health insurance and the theory of Ramsey taxation.

    PubMed

    Besley, T J

    1988-12-01

    This paper explores the trade-off between risk sharing and the incentives to consume increased medical care inherent in reimbursement insurance. The results for the theory of reimbursement insurance are compared with those on Ramsey taxation. It is shown that there is a close formal analogy and interpretations are given.

  9. Ramsey interferometry with a two-level generalized Tonks-Girardeau gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, S. V.; Campo, A. del; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.

    2007-09-15

    We propose a solvable generalization of the Tonks-Girardeau model that describes a coherent one-dimensional (1D) gas of cold two-level bosons which interact with two external fields in a Ramsey interferometer. They also interact among themselves by idealized, infinitely strong contact potentials, with interchange of momentum and internal state. We study the corresponding Ramsey fringes and the quantum projection noise which, essentially unaffected by the interactions, remains that for ideal bosons. The dual system of this gas, an ideal gas of two-level fermions coupled by the interaction with the separated fields, produces the same fringes and noise fluctuations. The cases of time-separated and spatially separated fields are studied. For spatially separated fields the fringes may be broadened slightly by increasing the number of particles, but only for large particle numbers far from present experiments with Tonks-Girardeau gases. The uncertainty in the determination of the atomic transition frequency diminishes, essentially with the inverse root of the particle number. The difficulties to implement the model experimentally and possible shortcomings of strongly interacting 1D gases for frequency standards and atomic clocks are discussed.

  10. A Semantic Graph Query Language

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I L

    2006-10-16

    Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

  11. Graphing Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paine, Carolyn

    1983-01-01

    An explanation is given of the uses of graphs for conveying information pictorially. Picture, bar, line, and area graphs are illustrated. Graphing projects for science, social studies, mathematics, economics, and language arts are listed, and teaching tips are suggested. (FG)

  12. Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy of optical clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Oates, C. W.; Barber, Z. W.; Lemke, N. D.; Ludlow, A. D.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.; Riehle, F.

    2010-07-15

    We present nonstandard optical Ramsey schemes that use pulses individually tailored in duration, phase, and frequency to cancel spurious frequency shifts related to the excitation itself. In particular, the field shifts and their uncertainties can be radically suppressed (by two to four orders of magnitude) in comparison with the usual Ramsey method (using two equal pulses) as well as with single-pulse Rabi spectroscopy. Atom interferometers and optical clocks based on two-photon transitions, heavily forbidden transitions, or magnetically induced spectroscopy could significantly benefit from this method. In the latter case, these frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably below a fractional level of 10{sup -17}. Moreover, our approach opens the door for high-precision optical clocks based on direct frequency comb spectroscopy.

  13. Beyond the Spin Model Approximation for Ramsey Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-26

    Ramsey dynamics exactly for two interacting spin-1/2 particles in a harmonic trap. We focus on s-wave-interacting fermions in quasi one- and two ... dimensional geometries. We find that in one dimension the spin model assumption works well over a wide range of experimentally relevant conditions, but can fail...at time scales longer than those set by the mean interaction energy. Surprisingly, in two dimensions a modified version of the spin model is exact to

  14. A Robust Ramsey Interferometer for Atomic Timekeeping in Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Brown, Justin; Butts, David; Choy, Jennifer; Galfond, Marissa; Johnson, David M.; Kinast, Joseph; Timmons, Brian; Stoner, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present a laser-based approach to atomic timekeeping, in which atomic phase information is extracted using modified Raman pulses in a Ramsey sequence. We overcome systematic effects associated with differential AC Stark shifts and variations in laser beam intensity by employing atom optics derived from Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). This technique drives coherent transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two optical fields and maintaining a large single-photon detuning. Compared to a Raman-pulse Ramsey interferometer, we show a >150x reduction in sensitivity to differential AC Stark shifts. We also demonstrate that ARP preserves fringe contrast in Ramsey interferometers for cloud displacements reaching the 1/e2 intensity radius of the laser beam. Deviations of the phase in response to changes in duration, rate, and range of the ARP frequency sweep are bounded to <7 mrad, implying a per-shot fractional frequency uncertainty of 1e-11 for an interrogation time of 10 ms. These characteristics are expected to improve the robustness of clock interferometers operating in dynamic environments. Copyright ©2014 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond the Spin Model Approximation for Ramsey Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, A. P.; Beverland, M.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Rey, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    Ramsey spectroscopy has become a powerful technique for probing nonequilibrium dynamics of internal (pseudospin) degrees of freedom of interacting systems. In many theoretical treatments, the key to understanding the dynamics has been to assume the external (motional) degrees of freedom are decoupled from the pseudospin degrees of freedom. Determining the validity of this approximation—known as the spin model approximation—has not been addressed in detail. Here we shed light in this direction by calculating Ramsey dynamics exactly for two interacting spin-1/2 particles in a harmonic trap. We focus on s-wave-interacting fermions in quasi one- and two-dimensional geometries. We find that in one dimension the spin model assumption works well over a wide range of experimentally relevant conditions, but can fail at time scales longer than those set by the mean interaction energy. Surprisingly, in two dimensions a modified version of the spin model is exact to first order in the interaction strength. This analysis is important for a correct interpretation of Ramsey spectroscopy and has broad applications ranging from precision measurements to quantum information and to fundamental probes of many-body systems.

  16. Graph Library

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Martin; Arnold, Dorian

    2007-06-12

    GraphLib is a support library used by other tools to create, manipulate, store, and export graphs. It provides a simple interface to specifS’ arbitrary directed and undirected graphs by adding nodes and edges. Each node and edge can be associated with a set of attributes describing size, color, and shape. Once created, graphs can be manipulated using a set of graph analysis algorithms, including merge, prune, and path coloring operations. GraphLib also has the ability to export graphs into various open formats such as DOT and GML.

  17. Ramsey pricing and supply-side incentives in physician markets.

    PubMed

    Wedig, G J

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, I develop a theory of optimal prices using a relative value scale where there are fixed costs of medical practice. I consider a regulator constrained to set prices in excess of marginal cost, in markets where physicians can create demand at the margin. Under these conditions, basing prices on physician costs alone is shown to be suboptimal. Instead, prices should anticipate the behavior of physicians by setting profit margins highest for services least susceptible to demand creation. This is equivalent to a form of Ramsey pricing, used in this case to minimize the deadweight loss of oversupply.

  18. Lockheed Solar Observatory and the Discovery of Moreton-Ramsey Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2014-06-01

    Moreton Waves are high-speed disturbances seen traveling away from large solar flares in H-alpha movies of the solar chromosphere. They were discovered by the observer Harry Ramsey in the late 1950s, and then published and publicized by the director Gail Moreton, both of the Lockheed Solar Observatory in the Hollywood Hills of Southern California. These efforts established the scientific reputation and secured continuing funding of the observatory, whose present-day successor is the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab in Palo Alto. Moreton waves are rare, and there was limited interest in them until the EIT instrument on SOHO began seeing large numbers of similar waves in the corona in the late 1990s. The exact relation between the two observations is still a research topic today. This talk will describe some of the history of the observatory and the discovery and early interpretation of the waves.

  19. Free Nano-Object Ramsey Interferometry for Large Quantum Superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, C.; Scala, M.; Morley, G. W.; Rahman, ATM. A.; Ulbricht, H.; Bateman, J.; Barker, P. F.; Bose, S.; Kim, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an interferometric scheme based on an untrapped nano-object subjected to gravity. The motion of the center of mass (c.m.) of the free object is coupled to its internal spin system magnetically, and a free flight scheme is developed based on coherent spin control. The wave packet of the test object, under a spin-dependent force, may then be delocalized to a macroscopic scale. A gravity induced dynamical phase (accrued solely on the spin state, and measured through a Ramsey scheme) is used to reveal the above spatially delocalized superposition of the spin-nano-object composite system that arises during our scheme. We find a remarkable immunity to the motional noise in the c.m. (initially in a thermal state with moderate cooling), and also a dynamical decoupling nature of the scheme itself. Together they secure a high visibility of the resulting Ramsey fringes. The mass independence of our scheme makes it viable for a nano-object selected from an ensemble with a high mass variability. Given these advantages, a quantum superposition with a 100 nm spatial separation for a massive object of 1 09 amu is achievable experimentally, providing a route to test postulated modifications of quantum theory such as continuous spontaneous localization.

  20. Free Nano-Object Ramsey Interferometry for Large Quantum Superpositions.

    PubMed

    Wan, C; Scala, M; Morley, G W; Rahman, Atm A; Ulbricht, H; Bateman, J; Barker, P F; Bose, S; Kim, M S

    2016-09-30

    We propose an interferometric scheme based on an untrapped nano-object subjected to gravity. The motion of the center of mass (c.m.) of the free object is coupled to its internal spin system magnetically, and a free flight scheme is developed based on coherent spin control. The wave packet of the test object, under a spin-dependent force, may then be delocalized to a macroscopic scale. A gravity induced dynamical phase (accrued solely on the spin state, and measured through a Ramsey scheme) is used to reveal the above spatially delocalized superposition of the spin-nano-object composite system that arises during our scheme. We find a remarkable immunity to the motional noise in the c.m. (initially in a thermal state with moderate cooling), and also a dynamical decoupling nature of the scheme itself. Together they secure a high visibility of the resulting Ramsey fringes. The mass independence of our scheme makes it viable for a nano-object selected from an ensemble with a high mass variability. Given these advantages, a quantum superposition with a 100 nm spatial separation for a massive object of 10^{9}  amu is achievable experimentally, providing a route to test postulated modifications of quantum theory such as continuous spontaneous localization.

  1. Fault-tolerant Hahn-Ramsey interferometry with pulse sequences of alternating detuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay V.; Gloger, Timm F.; Kaufmann, Peter; Kaufmann, Delia; Collath, Thomas; Tanveer Baig, M.; Johanning, Michael; Wunderlich, Christof

    2015-03-01

    A scheme for efficient correction of driving-field frequency drifts in Ramsey interferometry is proposed. The two off-resonant π /2 pulses of duration T used in the traditional Ramsey setup are supplemented with an additional pulse of duration 2 T (approximate π pulse), which is applied midway between the Ramsey pulses and has a detuning of opposite sign to theirs. This scheme, which resembles a Hahn's spin-echo pulse embedded into the Ramsey setup, corrects small-to-moderate random errors in the detuning of the driving field. This allows the observation of Ramsey fringes of high contrast even with a noisy driving field or in inhomogeneously broadened atomic ensembles. The contrast is further improved by replacing the refocusing 2 T pulse by a composite π pulse. We demonstrate the validity of the concept by comparing experimental results from usual Ramsey measurements with Hahn-Ramsey measurements. These experimental results are obtained from microwave-optical double-resonance spectroscopy on 171Yb+ ions in a segmented linear Paul trap. In the same way, we verify qualitatively the predicted advantage from using a composite π pulse for refocusing.

  2. Quantum causal graph dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Martiel, Simon

    2017-07-01

    Consider a graph having quantum systems lying at each node. Suppose that the whole thing evolves in discrete time steps, according to a global, unitary causal operator. By causal we mean that information can only propagate at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. Suppose, moreover, that the graph itself is subject to the evolution, and may be driven to be in a quantum superposition of graphs—in accordance to the superposition principle. We show that these unitary causal operators must decompose as a finite-depth circuit of local unitary gates. This unifies a result on quantum cellular automata with another on reversible causal graph dynamics. Along the way we formalize a notion of causality which is valid in the context of quantum superpositions of time-varying graphs, and has a number of good properties. We discuss some of the implications for quantum gravity.

  3. What is a complex graph?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Wilhelm, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Many papers published in recent years show that real-world graphs G(n,m) ( n nodes, m edges) are more or less “complex” in the sense that different topological features deviate from random graphs. Here we narrow the definition of graph complexity and argue that a complex graph contains many different subgraphs. We present different measures that quantify this complexity, for instance C1e, the relative number of non-isomorphic one-edge-deleted subgraphs (i.e. DECK size). However, because these different subgraph measures are computationally demanding, we also study simpler complexity measures focussing on slightly different aspects of graph complexity. We consider heuristically defined “product measures”, the products of two quantities which are zero in the extreme cases of a path and clique, and “entropy measures” quantifying the diversity of different topological features. The previously defined network/graph complexity measures Medium Articulation and Offdiagonal complexity ( OdC) belong to these two classes. We study OdC measures in some detail and compare it with our new measures. For all measures, the most complex graph G has a medium number of edges, between the edge numbers of the minimum and the maximum connected graph n-1number scales exactly with the geometric mean of the extremes: m(G)=√{n/2}(n-1)˜n1.5. All graph complexity measures are characterized with the help of different example graphs. For all measures the corresponding time complexity is given. Finally, we discuss the complexity of 33 real-world graphs of different biological, social and economic systems with the six computationally most simple measures (including OdC). The complexities of the real graphs are compared with average complexities of two different random graph versions: complete random graphs (just fixed n,m) and rewired graphs with fixed node degrees.

  4. Improving Ramsey spectroscopy in the extreme-ultraviolet region with a random-sampling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eramo, R.; Bellini, M.; Corsi, C.; Liontos, I.; Cavalieri, S.

    2011-04-15

    Ramsey-like techniques, based on the coherent excitation of a sample by delayed and phase-correlated pulses, are promising tools for high-precision spectroscopic tests of QED in the extreme-ultraviolet (xuv) spectral region, but currently suffer experimental limitations related to long acquisition times and critical stability issues. Here we propose a random subsampling approach to Ramsey spectroscopy that, by allowing experimentalists to reach a given spectral resolution goal in a fraction of the usual acquisition time, leads to substantial improvements in high-resolution spectroscopy and may open the way to a widespread application of Ramsey-like techniques to precision measurements in the xuv spectral region.

  5. Ramsey-type phase control of free-electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Feist, Armin; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2016-11-01

    Quantum coherent evolution, interference between multiple distinct paths and phase-controlled sequential interactions are the basis for powerful multi-dimensional optical and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, including Ramsey's method of separated fields. Recent developments in the quantum state preparation of free electrons suggest a transfer of such concepts to ultrafast electron imaging and spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate the sequential coherent manipulation of free-electron superposition states in an ultrashort electron pulse, using nanostructures featuring two spatially separated near-fields with polarization anisotropy. The incident light polarization controls the relative phase of these near-fields, yielding constructive and destructive quantum interference of the subsequent interactions. Future implementations of such electron-light interferometers may provide access to optically phase-resolved electronic dynamics and dephasing mechanisms with attosecond precision.

  6. Generalized Ramsey excitation scheme with suppressed light shift.

    PubMed

    Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Okhapkin, M; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I

    2012-11-21

    We experimentally investigate a recently proposed optical excitation scheme V. I. Yudin et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 011804(R) (2010)] that is a generalization of Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields and consists of a sequence of three excitation pulses. The pulse sequence is tailored to produce a resonance signal that is immune to the light shift and other shifts of the transition frequency that are correlated with the interaction with the probe field. We investigate the scheme using a single trapped ^{171}Yb^{+} ion and excite the highly forbidden (2)S(1/2) - (2)F(7/2) electric-octupole transition under conditions where the light shift is much larger than the excitation linewidth, which is in the hertz range. The experiments demonstrate a suppression of the light shift by four orders of magnitude and an immunity against its fluctuations.

  7. RAMSEYS DRAFT WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND ADDITION, VIRGINIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource surveys of the Ramseys Draft Wilderness Study Area and adjoining roadless area addition in George Washington National Forest in the western valley and ridge province, Augusta and Highland Counties, Virginia, were done. The surveys outlined three small areas containing anomalous amounts of copper, lead, and zinc related to stratabound red-bed copper mineralization, but these occurrences are not large and are not considered as having mineral-resource potential. The area contains abundant sandstone suitable for construction materials and shale suitable for making brick, tile, and other low-grade ceramic products, but these commodities occur in abundance outside the wilderness study area. Structural conditions are probably favorable for the accumulation of natural gas, but exploratory drilling has not been done sufficiently near the area to evaluate the gas potential.

  8. Multiphoton- and simultaneous conjugate Ramsey-Borde atom interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Holger; Chiow, Sheng-wey; Herrmann, Sven; Chu, Steven

    2008-03-06

    We report on our experiment to measure h/M, the ratio of the Planck constant to the mass of Cs atoms, and thereby the fine-structure constant. The target accuracy is 1 part per billion or better. We focus on two recent milestones: (i) The first realization of atom interferometers based on light-pulse beam splitters that transfer the momentum of up to 12 photon pairs, which increases the useful signal (matter wave phase shift) by a factor of 144 compared to the beam splitters used in the best present atom interferometers. Moreover, they lead to a cancellation of important systematic effects. (ii) The first realization of a simultaneous pair of conjugate Ramsey-Borde interferometers. In these, the relative sign of the inertial term is reversed so that it can be cancelled. Simultaneous operation means that this holds for a time-dependent inertial term (vibrations) too, which promises a substantial improvement in the signal to noise ratio.

  9. Ultrafast Ramsey interferometry to implement cold atomic qubit gates

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jongseok; Lee, Han-gyeol; Lee, Sangkyung; Park, Chang-Yong; Ahn, Jaewook

    2014-01-01

    Quantum computing is based on unitary operations in a two-level quantum system, a qubit, as the fundamental building block, and the ability to perform qubit operations in an amount of time that is considerably shorter than the coherence time is an essential requirement for quantum computation. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of arbitrary single-qubit SU(2) quantum gate operations achieved at a terahertz clock speed. Implemented by coherent control methods of tailored ultrafast laser interaction with cold rubidium atomic qubits, Bloch vector manipulation about all three rotational axes was successfully demonstrated. The dynamic evolution of the qubits was successfully measured by devised femtosecond Ramsey interferometry. We anticipate this demonstration to be a starting point to process quantum algorithm in a simplified manner by a programmed sequence of femtosecond laser pulses. PMID:25070166

  10. Graph ensemble boosting for imbalanced noisy graph stream classification.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shirui; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Xingquan; Zhang, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    Many applications involve stream data with structural dependency, graph representations, and continuously increasing volumes. For these applications, it is very common that their class distributions are imbalanced with minority (or positive) samples being only a small portion of the population, which imposes significant challenges for learning models to accurately identify minority samples. This problem is further complicated with the presence of noise, because they are similar to minority samples and any treatment for the class imbalance may falsely focus on the noise and result in deterioration of accuracy. In this paper, we propose a classification model to tackle imbalanced graph streams with noise. Our method, graph ensemble boosting, employs an ensemble-based framework to partition graph stream into chunks each containing a number of noisy graphs with imbalanced class distributions. For each individual chunk, we propose a boosting algorithm to combine discriminative subgraph pattern selection and model learning as a unified framework for graph classification. To tackle concept drifting in graph streams, an instance level weighting mechanism is used to dynamically adjust the instance weight, through which the boosting framework can emphasize on difficult graph samples. The classifiers built from different graph chunks form an ensemble for graph stream classification. Experiments on real-life imbalanced graph streams demonstrate clear benefits of our boosting design for handling imbalanced noisy graph stream.

  11. Prospect for development of a pulsed CPT Raman Ramsey clock using atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Gour S.; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Bashkansky, Mark; Shahriar, Selim

    2010-02-01

    The phenomenon of all-optical Ramsey interference using pulsed coherent population trapping (CPT) beams provides a new avenue for developing frequency standards using atomic vapor. In this study, we show that frequency narrowed Ramsey fringes can be produced in rubidium vapor without the effect of power broadening. We observed fringes of width as narrow as 1 kHz using a buffer-gas filled rubidium cell. A compact injection-locked laser (ILL) system was used to generate CPT beams. Studies also show that ac Stark effect on Ramsey fringes can be reduced, and higher frequency stability can be achieved in a clock application. The results are encouraging to propose an architecture for development of a pulsed CPT Ramsey clock. In this paper, we also provide related discussions on clock frequency stability, and our plans for future experiments.

  12. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  13. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  14. Scenario Graphs and Attack Graphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-14

    46 6.1 Vulnerability Analysis of a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 6.2 Sandia Red Team Attack Graph...asymptotic bound. The test machine was a 1Ghz Pentium III with 1GB of RAM, running Red Hat Linux 7.3. Figure 4.1(a) plots running time of the implemen...host scanning tools network information vulnerability Attack Graph network Red

  15. Color genes in the orchid Oncidium Gower Ramsey: identification, expression, and potential genetic instability in an interspecific cross.

    PubMed

    Hieber, A David; Mudalige-Jayawickrama, Rasika G; Kuehnle, Adelheid R

    2006-02-01

    Orchids are one of the most unique and evolved of flowering plants, with many being valuable floricultural crops. Spatial localization of pigments within the flower of the commercially important bi-color Oncidium Gower Ramsey demonstrated a mixture of carotenoids and anthocyanins concentrated in the adaxial epidermis. Chromatography identified the predominant yellow pigment to be an equal mixture of all-trans and 9-cis isomers of violaxanthin, with esterification specific to the 9-cis isomer. Red ornamentation was comprised of the anthocyanins cyanidin and its methylated derivate, peonidin. Five key pigment biosynthesis genes encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), phytoene synthase (PSY), phytoene desaturase, carotenoid isomerase, and the downstream 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase were isolated and their expression profiles determined. Northern analyses showed both phytoene desaturase and carotenoid isomerase expression to be up-regulated in floral tissue relative to leaves whereas PSY was not. Three closely related DFR genes were isolated, including one with an insertion in the 3' coding region. DFR expression occurred throughout flower development in Oncidium, unlike in Dendrobium and Bromheadia orchids. A number of the isolated anthocyanin and carotenoid genes showed variations due to insertion events. These findings raise questions about the genetic stability in interspecific crosses in orchids, such as the tri-specific Oncidium Gower Ramsey.

  16. Graph Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2005-12-27

    Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

  17. Ultracold metastable helium: Ramsey fringes and atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Notermans, R. P. M. J. W.; Rengelink, R. J.; van der Beek, R. F. H. J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on interference studies in the internal and external degrees of freedom of metastable triplet helium atoms trapped near quantum degeneracy in a 1.5 μm optical dipole trap. Applying a single π /2 rf pulse we demonstrate that 50% of the atoms initially in the m=+1 state can be transferred to the magnetic field insensitive m=0 state. Two π /2 pulses with varying time delay allow a Ramsey-type measurement of the Zeeman shift for a high precision measurement of the 2 ^3S_1-2 ^1S_0 transition frequency. We show that this method also allows strong suppression of mean-field effects on the measurement of the Zeeman shift, which is necessary to reach the accuracy goal of 0.1 kHz on the absolute transition frequencies. Theoretically the feasibility of using metastable triplet helium atoms in the m=0 state for atom interferometry is studied demonstrating favorable conditions, compared to the alkali atoms that are used traditionally, for a non-QED determination of the fine structure constant.

  18. Theory of Ramsey spectroscopy and anomalous segregation in ultracold rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. S.; Gardiner, C. W.

    2002-10-01

    The recent anomalous segregation experiment (Lewandowski H J, Harber D M, Whitaker D L and Cornell E A 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 070403) shows dramatic, rapid internal state segregation for two hyperfine levels of 87Rb. We simulate an effective one-dimensional model of the system for experimental parameters and find reasonable agreement with the data. The Ramsey frequency is found to be insensitive to the decoherence of the superposition, and is only equivalent to the interaction energy shift for a pure superposition. A quantum Boltzmann equation describing collisions is derived using quantum kinetic theory, taking into account the different scattering lengths of the internal states. As spin-wave experiments are likely to be attempted at lower temperatures we examine the effect of degeneracy on decoherence by considering the recent experiment, where degeneracy is around 10%. We also find that the segregation effect is only possible when transport terms are included in the equations of motion, and that the interactions only directly alter the momentum distributions of the states. The segregation or spin-wave effect is thus entirely due to coherent atomic motion as foreseen by Lewandowski et al.

  19. Commuting projections on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Zikatanov, Ludmil T.

    2013-02-19

    For a given (connected) graph, we consider vector spaces of (discrete) functions defined on its vertices and its edges. These two spaces are related by a discrete gradient operator, Grad and its adjoint, ₋Div, referred to as (negative) discrete divergence. We also consider a coarse graph obtained by aggregation of vertices of the original one. Then a coarse vertex space is identified with the subspace of piecewise constant functions over the aggregates. We consider the ℓ2-projection QH onto the space of these piecewise constants. In the present paper, our main result is the construction of a projection π H from the original edge-space onto a properly constructed coarse edge-space associated with the edges of the coarse graph. The projections π H and QH commute with the discrete divergence operator, i.e., we have div π H = QH div. The respective pair of coarse edge-space and coarse vertexspace offer the potential to construct two-level, and by recursion, multilevel methods for the mixed formulation of the graph Laplacian which utilizes the discrete divergence operator. The performance of one two-level method with overlapping Schwarz smoothing and correction based on the constructed coarse spaces for solving such mixed graph Laplacian systems is illustrated on a number of graph examples.

  20. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter; Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong; Gu, Sihong

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  1. Laser Frequency Stabilization Using a Calcium Ramsey-Bordé Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Judith; Fox, Richard; de Carlos-Lopez, Eduardo; Oates, Chris; Ludlow, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Ramsey-Bordé (RB) interferometry is a powerful spectroscopic tool for the interrogation of narrow optical resonances. Even for atomic systems with broad velocity distributions, spectral features free from first-order Doppler and transit-time broadening can be resolved using two counterpropagating pairs of copropagating beams. In our system, a high-flux thermal calcium beam is excited from the 1S0 to 3P1 state using the 657 nm intercombination line. The high spectral resolution afforded by RB interferometry allows exploration of spectral features approaching the transition's natural linewidth, 400 Hz. Together with the large atom number from the continuously fed thermal beam, the optical frequency reference has considerable potential for a compact frequency standard with extremely low instability. We previously observed fractional frequency instability of 5 . 5 ×10-15 at 1s using this technique. With the addition of a laser to access the strong 431 nm cycling transition from the 3P1 to the doubly excited 3P0 state, the potential exists to achieve frequency stability below 10-16 at short times. We explore the implementation of this system and future enhancements to further improve the standard's short- and long-term performance.

  2. On Edge Exchangeable Random Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Svante

    2017-06-01

    We study a recent model for edge exchangeable random graphs introduced by Crane and Dempsey; in particular we study asymptotic properties of the random simple graph obtained by merging multiple edges. We study a number of examples, and show that the model can produce dense, sparse and extremely sparse random graphs. One example yields a power-law degree distribution. We give some examples where the random graph is dense and converges a.s. in the sense of graph limit theory, but also an example where a.s. every graph limit is the limit of some subsequence. Another example is sparse and yields convergence to a non-integrable generalized graphon defined on (0,∞).

  3. Adjusting protein graphs based on graph entropy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sheng-Lung; Tsay, Yu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Measuring protein structural similarity attempts to establish a relationship of equivalence between polymer structures based on their conformations. In several recent studies, researchers have explored protein-graph remodeling, instead of looking a minimum superimposition for pairwise proteins. When graphs are used to represent structured objects, the problem of measuring object similarity become one of computing the similarity between graphs. Graph theory provides an alternative perspective as well as efficiency. Once a protein graph has been created, its structural stability must be verified. Therefore, a criterion is needed to determine if a protein graph can be used for structural comparison. In this paper, we propose a measurement for protein graph remodeling based on graph entropy. We extend the concept of graph entropy to determine whether a graph is suitable for representing a protein. The experimental results suggest that when applied, graph entropy helps a conformational on protein graph modeling. Furthermore, it indirectly contributes to protein structural comparison if a protein graph is solid.

  4. Test of Graphing and Graph Interpretation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, J.

    This monograph is a test of graphing and graph interpretation skills which assesses performance on all the skills of graphing which are contained in the AAAS program, Science - A Process Approach. The testing includes construction of bar graphs, interpreting information on graphs, the use of the Cartesian coordinate system, making predictions from…

  5. High-accuracy deep-UV Ramsey-comb spectroscopy in krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Sandrine; Altmann, Robert K.; Dreissen, Laura S.; Eikema, Kjeld S. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed account of the first precision Ramsey-comb spectroscopy in the deep UV. We excite krypton in an atomic beam using pairs of frequency-comb laser pulses that have been amplified to the millijoule level and upconverted through frequency doubling in BBO crystals. The resulting phase-coherent deep-UV pulses at 212.55 nm are used in the Ramsey-comb method to excite the two-photon 4p^6 → 4p^5 5p [1/2 ]_0 transition. For the {}^{84}Kr isotope, we find a transition frequency of 2829833101679(103) kHz. The fractional accuracy of 3.7 × 10^{-11} is 34 times better than previous measurements, and also the isotope shifts are measured with improved accuracy. This demonstration shows the potential of Ramsey-comb excitation for precision spectroscopy at short wavelengths.

  6. The Bryant-Anthony-Ramsey (B-A-R) Project: An Evaluation. Report C-73-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Mildred K.

    The Bryant-Anthony-Ramsey (B-A-R) Project is a desegregation/integration project aimed at assuring a smooth transition from a predominately segregated school environment to a desegregated or integrated environment. The Bryant, Anthony, and Ramsey Junior High Schools are participants in a desegregation effort that is one part of an overall…

  7. Graphing Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science.1 Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations.2 Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary school instruction, the job of graphing skills falls heavily on physics teachers. By virtue of the nature of the topics we cover, it is our mission to develop this skill to the fine art that it is.

  8. Evaluation of Graph Pattern Matching Workloads in Graph Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung-Hwan; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan; Vatsavai, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Graph analysis has emerged as a powerful method for data scientists to represent, integrate, query, and explore heterogeneous data sources. As a result, graph data management and mining became a popular area of research, and led to the development of plethora of systems in recent years. Unfortunately, the number of emerging graph analysis systems and the wide range of applications, coupled with a lack of apples-to-apples comparisons, make it difficult to understand the trade-offs between different systems and the graph operations for which they are designed. A fair comparison of these systems is a challenging task for the following reasons: multiple data models, non-standardized serialization formats, various query interfaces to users, and diverse environments they operate in. To address these key challenges, in this paper we present a new benchmark suite by extending the Lehigh University Benchmark (LUBM) to cover the most common capabilities of various graph analysis systems. We provide the design process of the benchmark, which generalizes the workflow for data scientists to conduct the desired graph analysis on different graph analysis systems. Equipped with this extended benchmark suite, we present performance comparison for nine subgraph pattern retrieval operations over six graph analysis systems, namely NetworkX, Neo4j, Jena, Titan, GraphX, and uRiKA. Through the proposed benchmark suite, this study reveals both quantitative and qualitative findings in (1) implications in loading data into each system; (2) challenges in describing graph patterns for each query interface; and (3) different sensitivity of each system to query selectivity. We envision that this study will pave the road for: (i) data scientists to select the suitable graph analysis systems, and (ii) data management system designers to advance graph analysis systems.

  9. Optical Ramsey spectroscopy in a rotating frame: Sagnac effect in a matter-wave interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Riehle, F.; Kisters, T.; Witte, A.; Helmcke, J. ); Borde, C.J. Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Universite Paris, Villetaneuse, France )

    1991-07-08

    A calcium atomic beam excited in an optical Ramsey geometry was rotated about an axis perpendicular to the plane defined by the laser beams and the atomic beam. A frequency shift of the Ramsey fringes of several kHz has been measured which is proportional to the rotation frequency of the apparatus and to the distance between the laser beams. The results can be interpreted in three equivalent ways as the Sagnac effect in a calcium-atomic-beam interferometer: in the rotating frame of the laser beams either along straight paths or along the curved trajectories of the atoms, or in the inertial atomic frame.

  10. Threshold Graph Limits and Random Threshold Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2010-01-01

    We study the limit theory of large threshold graphs and apply this to a variety of models for random threshold graphs. The results give a nice set of examples for the emerging theory of graph limits. PMID:20811581

  11. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  12. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  13. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  14. GraphBench

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    GraphBench is a benchmark suite for graph pattern mining and graph analysis systems. The benchmark suite is a significant addition to conducting apples-apples comparison of graph analysis software (databases, in-memory tools, triple stores, etc.)

  15. Mathematical foundations of the GraphBLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Kepner, Jeremy; Aaltonen, Peter; Bader, David; ...

    2016-12-01

    The GraphBLAS standard (GraphBlas.org) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix-based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. Mathematically, the GraphBLAS defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This study provides an introduction to the mathematics of the GraphBLAS. Graphs represent connections between vertices with edges. Matrices can represent a wide range of graphs using adjacency matrices or incidence matrices. Adjacency matrices are often easier to analyze while incidence matrices are often better for representing data. Fortunately, themore » two are easily connected by matrix multiplication. A key feature of matrix mathematics is that a very small number of matrix operations can be used to manipulate a very wide range of graphs. This composability of a small number of operations is the foundation of the GraphBLAS. A standard such as the GraphBLAS can only be effective if it has low performance overhead. Finally, performance measurements of prototype GraphBLAS implementations indicate that the overhead is low.« less

  16. Mathematical foundations of the GraphBLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, Jeremy; Aaltonen, Peter; Bader, David; Buluc, Aydin; Franchetti, Franz; Gilbert, John; Hutchison, Dylan; Kumar, Manoj; Lumsdaine, Andrew; Meyerhenke, Henning; McMillan, Scott; Yang, Carl; Owens, John D.; Zalewski, Marcin; Mattson, Timothy; Moreira, Jose

    2016-12-01

    The GraphBLAS standard (GraphBlas.org) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix-based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. Mathematically, the GraphBLAS defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This study provides an introduction to the mathematics of the GraphBLAS. Graphs represent connections between vertices with edges. Matrices can represent a wide range of graphs using adjacency matrices or incidence matrices. Adjacency matrices are often easier to analyze while incidence matrices are often better for representing data. Fortunately, the two are easily connected by matrix multiplication. A key feature of matrix mathematics is that a very small number of matrix operations can be used to manipulate a very wide range of graphs. This composability of a small number of operations is the foundation of the GraphBLAS. A standard such as the GraphBLAS can only be effective if it has low performance overhead. Finally, performance measurements of prototype GraphBLAS implementations indicate that the overhead is low.

  17. Identifying Codes on Directed De Bruijn Graphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Identifying Code; De Bruijn Network; Graph Theory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER...in graphs . IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory , 44(2):599–611, 1998. 1 [10] Samir Khuller, Balaji Raghavachari, and Azriel Rosenfeld. Landmarks in graphs ...JOURNAL ARTICLE (POST PRINT) 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JUN 2013 – AUG 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IDENTIFYING CODES ON DIRECTED DE BRUIJN GRAPHS 5a

  18. Line graphs for fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchalowski, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Malgorzata J.

    2017-03-01

    We found the Lindenmayer systems for line graphs built on selected fractals. We show that the fractal dimension of such obtained graphs in all analysed cases is the same as for their original graphs. Both for the original graphs and for their line graphs we identified classes of nodes which reflect symmetry of the graph.

  19. 76 FR 20034 - Calvin Ramsey, M.D.; Revocation of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    .... Recore, 446 F.3d 324, 330-31 (2d Cir. 2006). Under DEA's longstanding interpretation of the CSA... Enforcement Administration Calvin Ramsey, M.D.; Revocation of Registration On December 18, 2009, the Deputy... the revocation of Respondent's DEA Certificate of Registration, AR7086689, as a practitioner, and...

  20. Lost Innocent and Sacrificial Delegate: The JonBenet Ramsey Murder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Joann

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes murder case of 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey as emblematic of American cultural fascination with images of the innocence of children and the perfect family, and of a change in cultural self-awareness as these images prove illusionary. Considers the role of mass media in marketing a cultural fascination with sexualized images of children and…

  1. A high-performance Raman-Ramsey Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Coget, Grégoire; Yun, Peter; Guérandel, Stéphane; de Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a high-performance coherent-population-trapping (CPT) Cs vapor cell atomic clock using the push-pull optical pumping technique in the pulsed regime, allowing the detection of high-contrast and narrow Ramsey-CPT fringes. The impact of several experimental parameters onto the clock resonance and short-term fractional frequency stability, including the laser power, the cell temperature, and the Ramsey sequence parameters, has been investigated. We observe and explain the existence of a slight dependence on laser power of the central Ramsey-CPT fringe line-width in the pulsed regime. We report also that the central fringe line-width is commonly narrower than the expected Ramsey line-width given by 1 / ( 2 T R ) , with TR the free-evolution time, for short values of TR. The clock demonstrates a short-term fractional frequency stability at the level of 2.3 × 10 - 13 τ - 1 / 2 up to 100 s averaging time, mainly limited by the laser amplitude modulation noise. Comparable performances are obtained in the conventional continuous wave regime, with the use of an additional laser power stabilization setup. The pulsed interaction allows to reduce significantly the clock frequency sensitivity to laser power variations, especially for high values of TR. This pulsed CPT clock, ranking among the best microwave vapor cell atomic frequency standards, could find applications in telecommunication, instrumentation, defense or satellite-based navigation systems.

  2. Lost Innocent and Sacrificial Delegate: The JonBenet Ramsey Murder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Joann

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes murder case of 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey as emblematic of American cultural fascination with images of the innocence of children and the perfect family, and of a change in cultural self-awareness as these images prove illusionary. Considers the role of mass media in marketing a cultural fascination with sexualized images of children and…

  3. Ramsey fringes in a Bose-Einstein condensate between atoms and molecules.

    PubMed

    Kokkelmans, S J J M F; Holland, M J

    2002-10-28

    In a recent experiment, a Feshbach scattering resonance was exploited to observe Ramsey fringes in a 85Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. The oscillation frequency corresponded to the binding energy of the molecular state. We show that the observations are remarkably consistent with predictions of a resonance field theory in which the fringes arise from oscillations between atoms and molecules.

  4. Semi-Markov Graph Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Raberto, Marco; Rapallo, Fabio; Scalas, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we outline a model of graph (or network) dynamics based on two ingredients. The first ingredient is a Markov chain on the space of possible graphs. The second ingredient is a semi-Markov counting process of renewal type. The model consists in subordinating the Markov chain to the semi-Markov counting process. In simple words, this means that the chain transitions occur at random time instants called epochs. The model is quite rich and its possible connections with algebraic geometry are briefly discussed. Moreover, for the sake of simplicity, we focus on the space of undirected graphs with a fixed number of nodes. However, in an example, we present an interbank market model where it is meaningful to use directed graphs or even weighted graphs. PMID:21887245

  5. Network reconstruction via graph blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Rolando

    2016-05-01

    Graphs estimated from empirical data are often noisy and incomplete due to the difficulty of faithfully observing all the components (nodes and edges) of the true graph. This problem is particularly acute for large networks where the number of components may far exceed available surveillance capabilities. Errors in the observed graph can render subsequent analyses invalid, so it is vital to develop robust methods that can minimize these observational errors. Errors in the observed graph may include missing and spurious components, as well fused (multiple nodes are merged into one) and split (a single node is misinterpreted as many) nodes. Traditional graph reconstruction methods are only able to identify missing or spurious components (primarily edges, and to a lesser degree nodes), so we developed a novel graph blending framework that allows us to cast the full estimation problem as a simple edge addition/deletion problem. Armed with this framework, we systematically investigate the viability of various topological graph features, such as the degree distribution or the clustering coefficients, and existing graph reconstruction methods for tackling the full estimation problem. Our experimental results suggest that incorporating any topological feature as a source of information actually hinders reconstruction accuracy. We provide a theoretical analysis of this phenomenon and suggest several avenues for improving this estimation problem.

  6. Boosting for multi-graph classification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Pan, Shirui; Zhu, Xingquan; Cai, Zhihua

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we formulate a novel graph-based learning problem, multi-graph classification (MGC), which aims to learn a classifier from a set of labeled bags each containing a number of graphs inside the bag. A bag is labeled positive, if at least one graph in the bag is positive, and negative otherwise. Such a multi-graph representation can be used for many real-world applications, such as webpage classification, where a webpage can be regarded as a bag with texts and images inside the webpage being represented as graphs. This problem is a generalization of multi-instance learning (MIL) but with vital differences, mainly because instances in MIL share a common feature space whereas no feature is available to represent graphs in a multi-graph bag. To solve the problem, we propose a boosting based multi-graph classification framework (bMGC). Given a set of labeled multi-graph bags, bMGC employs dynamic weight adjustment at both bag- and graph-levels to select one subgraph in each iteration as a weak classifier. In each iteration, bag and graph weights are adjusted such that an incorrectly classified bag will receive a higher weight because its predicted bag label conflicts to the genuine label, whereas an incorrectly classified graph will receive a lower weight value if the graph is in a positive bag (or a higher weight if the graph is in a negative bag). Accordingly, bMGC is able to differentiate graphs in positive and negative bags to derive effective classifiers to form a boosting model for MGC. Experiments and comparisons on real-world multi-graph learning tasks demonstrate the algorithm performance.

  7. Positive and Unlabeled Multi-Graph Learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Pan, Shirui; Zhu, Xingquan; Zhang, Chengqi; Wu, Xindong

    2016-03-23

    In this paper, we advance graph classification to handle multi-graph learning for complicated objects, where each object is represented as a bag of graphs and the label is only available to each bag but not individual graphs. In addition, when training classifiers, users are only given a handful of positive bags and many unlabeled bags, and the learning objective is to train models to classify previously unseen graph bags with maximum accuracy. To achieve the goal, we propose a positive and unlabeled multi-graph learning (puMGL) framework to first select informative subgraphs to convert graphs into a feature space. To utilize unlabeled bags for learning, puMGL assigns a confidence weight to each bag and dynamically adjusts its weight value to select "reliable negative bags." A number of representative graphs, selected from positive bags and identified reliable negative graph bags, form a "margin graph pool" which serves as the base for deriving subgraph patterns, training graph classifiers, and further updating the bag weight values. A closed-loop iterative process helps discover optimal subgraphs from positive and unlabeled graph bags for learning. Experimental comparisons demonstrate the performance of puMGL for classifying real-world complicated objects.

  8. A Clustering Graph Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Winlaw, Manda; De Sterck, Hans; Sanders, Geoffrey

    2015-10-26

    In very simple terms a network can be de ned as a collection of points joined together by lines. Thus, networks can be used to represent connections between entities in a wide variety of elds including engi- neering, science, medicine, and sociology. Many large real-world networks share a surprising number of properties, leading to a strong interest in model development research and techniques for building synthetic networks have been developed, that capture these similarities and replicate real-world graphs. Modeling these real-world networks serves two purposes. First, building models that mimic the patterns and prop- erties of real networks helps to understand the implications of these patterns and helps determine which patterns are important. If we develop a generative process to synthesize real networks we can also examine which growth processes are plausible and which are not. Secondly, high-quality, large-scale network data is often not available, because of economic, legal, technological, or other obstacles [7]. Thus, there are many instances where the systems of interest cannot be represented by a single exemplar network. As one example, consider the eld of cybersecurity, where systems require testing across diverse threat scenarios and validation across diverse network structures. In these cases, where there is no single exemplar network, the systems must instead be modeled as a collection of networks in which the variation among them may be just as important as their common features. By developing processes to build synthetic models, so-called graph generators, we can build synthetic networks that capture both the essential features of a system and realistic variability. Then we can use such synthetic graphs to perform tasks such as simulations, analysis, and decision making. We can also use synthetic graphs to performance test graph analysis algorithms, including clustering algorithms and anomaly detection algorithms.

  9. 78 FR 43274 - Ramsey County Regional Railroad Authority-Acquisition Exemption-Right to Restore Rail Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Railway--Aban. Exemption--in Ramsey Cnty., Minn., AB 6 (Sub.-No. 429X) (STB served Aug. 10, 2005). \\2\\ BNSF Railway--Aban. Exemption--in Ramsey Cnty., Minn., AB 6 (Sub.-No. 429X) (STB served Sept. 8, 2005...., AB 6 (Sub.-No. 429X) (filed Oct. 28, 2005). \\4\\ City of Maplewood, Minn.--Aquis. Exemption--Right...

  10. Coherent Population Trapping and Optical Ramsey Interference for Compact Rubidium Clock Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Zachary Aron

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) and optical Ramsey interference provide new avenues for developing compact, high-performance atomic clocks. In this work, I have studied the fundamental aspects of CPT and optical Ramsey interference for Raman clock development. This thesis research is composed of two parts: theoretical and experimental studies. The theoretical component of the research was initially based on pre-existing atomic models of a three-level ?-type system in which the phenomena of CPT and Ramsey interference are formed. This model served as a starting point for studying basic characteristics of CPT and Ramsey interference such as power dependence of CPT, effects of average detuning, and ground-state decoherence on linewidth, which directly impact the performance of the Raman clock. The basic three-level model was also used to model pulsed CPT excitation and measure light shift in Ramsey interference which imposes a fundamental limit on the long-term frequency stability of the Raman clock. The theoretical calculations illustrate reduction (or suppression) of light shift in Ramsey interference as an important advantage over CPT for Raman clock development. To make the model more accurate than an ideal three-level system, I developed a comprehensive atomic model using density-matrix equations including all sixteen Zeeman sublevels in the D1 manifold of 87Rb atoms in a vapor medium. The multi-level atomic model has been used for investigating characteristics of CPT and Ramsey interference under different optical excitation schemes pertaining to the polarization states of the frequency-modulated CPT beam in a Raman clock. It is also used to study the effects of axial and traverse magnetic fields on the contrast of CPT and Ramsey interference. More importantly, the multi-level atomic model is also used to accurately calculate light shift in Ramsey interference in the D1 manifold of 87Rb atoms by taking into account all possible off-resonant excitations and

  11. Adjusting protein graphs based on graph entropy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Measuring protein structural similarity attempts to establish a relationship of equivalence between polymer structures based on their conformations. In several recent studies, researchers have explored protein-graph remodeling, instead of looking a minimum superimposition for pairwise proteins. When graphs are used to represent structured objects, the problem of measuring object similarity become one of computing the similarity between graphs. Graph theory provides an alternative perspective as well as efficiency. Once a protein graph has been created, its structural stability must be verified. Therefore, a criterion is needed to determine if a protein graph can be used for structural comparison. In this paper, we propose a measurement for protein graph remodeling based on graph entropy. We extend the concept of graph entropy to determine whether a graph is suitable for representing a protein. The experimental results suggest that when applied, graph entropy helps a conformational on protein graph modeling. Furthermore, it indirectly contributes to protein structural comparison if a protein graph is solid. PMID:25474347

  12. Cayley Bipolar Fuzzy Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Noura O.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the concept of Cayley bipolar fuzzy graphs and investigate some of their properties. We present some interesting properties of bipolar fuzzy graphs in terms of algebraic structures. We also discuss connectedness in Cayley bipolar fuzzy graphs. PMID:24453797

  13. Accessing Rydberg-dressed interactions using many-body Ramsey dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rick; Killian, Thomas C.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that Ramsey spectroscopy can be used to observe Rydberg-dressed interactions in a many-body system well within experimentally measured lifetimes, in contrast to previous research, which either focused on interactions near Förster resonances or on few-atom systems. We build a spin-1/2 from one level that is Rydberg-dressed and another that is not. These levels may be hyperfine or long-lived electronic states. An Ising spin model governs the Ramsey dynamics, which we demonstrate can be used to characterize the Rydberg-dressed interactions. Furthermore, the dynamics can differ significantly from that observed in other spin systems. As one example, spin echo can increase the rate at which coherence decays. The results also apply to bare (undressed) Rydberg states as a special case, for which we quantitatively reproduce recent ultrafast experiments without fitting.

  14. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Minissale, M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10-18 level.

  15. The Feynman Identity for Planar Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, G. A. T. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Feynman identity (FI) of a planar graph relates the Euler polynomial of the graph to an infinite product over the equivalence classes of closed nonperiodic signed cycles in the graph. The main objectives of this paper are to compute the number of equivalence classes of nonperiodic cycles of given length and sign in a planar graph and to interpret the data encoded by the FI in the context of free Lie superalgebras. This solves in the case of planar graphs a problem first raised by Sherman and sets the FI as the denominator identity of a free Lie superalgebra generated from a graph. Other results are obtained. For instance, in connection with zeta functions of graphs.

  16. Hierarchical structure of the logical Internet graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zihui; Figueiredo, Daniel R.; Jaiswal, Sharad; Gao, Lixin

    2001-07-01

    The study of the Internet topology has recently received much attention from the research community. In particular, the observation that the network graph has interesting properties, such as power laws, that might be explored in a myriad of ways. Most of the work in characterizing the Internet graph is based on the physical network graph, i.e., the connectivity graph. In this paper we investigate how logical relationships between nodes of the AS graph can be used to gain insight to its structure. We characterize the logical graph using various metrics and identify the presence of power laws in the number of customers that a provider has. Using these logical relationships we define a structural model of the AS graph. The model highlights the hierarchical nature of logical relationships and the preferential connection to larger providers. We also investigate the consistency of this model over time and observe interesting properties of the hierarchical structure.

  17. Differentials on graph complexes II: hairy graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshkin, Anton; Willwacher, Thomas; Živković, Marko

    2017-10-01

    We study the cohomology of the hairy graph complexes which compute the rational homotopy of embedding spaces, generalizing the Vassiliev invariants of knot theory. We provide spectral sequences converging to zero whose first pages contain the hairy graph cohomology. Our results yield a way to construct many nonzero hairy graph cohomology classes out of (known) non-hairy classes by studying the cancellations in those sequences. This provide a first glimpse at the tentative global structure of the hairy graph cohomology.

  18. Learning Financial Reports From Mixed Symbolic-Spatial Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanlamai, Uthai; Soongswang, Oranuj

    2011-01-01

    Mixed visuals of numbers and graphs are available in various financial reports that demonstrate the financial status and risks of a firm. GWN (graphs with numbers) and TWG (table of numbers with graphs) were used as two alternative visuals derived from the actual data of two large public companies, one from food manufacturing industry (food) and…

  19. Ramsey's method of separated oscillating fields and its application to gravitationally induced quantum phase shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Abele, H.; Jenke, T.; Leeb, H.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2010-03-15

    We propose to apply Ramsey's method of separated oscillating fields to the spectroscopy of the quantum states in the gravity potential above a horizontal mirror. This method allows a precise measurement of quantum mechanical phaseshifts of a Schroedinger wave packet bouncing off a hard surface in the gravitational field of the Earth. Measurements with ultracold neutrons will offer a sensitivity to Newton's law or hypothetical short-ranged interactions, which is about 21 orders of magnitude below the energy scale of electromagnetism.

  20. Historical overview of Ramsey spectroscopy and its relevance on Time and Frequency Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, M. M.; Tarelho, L. V. G.; de Souza, M. A.; Baratto, A. C.; Garcia, G. A.; Muller, S. T.; De Martin, J., Jr.; Rodriguez, A. S.; Bebeachibuli, A.; Magalhães, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    A brief overview of the historical evolution of the method of successive oscillatory fields developed by Norman Ramsey, and some different implementations of the decurrent methodology are presented. We use time and frequency standards, from Cs atomic beams to optical standards, as examples. The scientific progress and the technological implementation achieved through a partnership between USP-SC and INMETRO are shown on the characterization of each time and frequency standard.

  1. Dephasing in sodium Ramsey interferometry under a weak inhomogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Murakami, Motoyuki; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2015-04-01

    In Ramsey interference of the clock transition of cold sodium atoms, we observed dephasing of the visibility, which was based on the frequency fluctuation due to the second-order Zeeman effect for inhomogeneity of the magnetic field within the atomic cloud. The frequency fluctuation was enhanced with increased strength of the quantization magnetic field, causing the dephasing of the visibility to become large. The theoretical dephasing function with frequency fluctuation was in good agreement with experimental values.

  2. Ramsey Interferometry Using the Zeeman Sublevels in a Spin-2 Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Eto, Yujiro; Sekine, Sawako; Suzuki, Hirosuke; Hirano, Takuya

    2013-09-01

    We perform atom interferometry using the Zeeman sublevels of a spin-2 Bose--Einstein condensate of 87Rb. The observed fringes are strongly peaked, and fringe repetition rates higher than the fundamental Ramsey frequency are found in agreement with a simple theory based on spin rotations. With a suitable choice of initial states, the interferometer could function as a useful tool for magnetometry and studies of spinor dynamics in general.

  3. Constructing splits graphs.

    PubMed

    Dress, Andreas W M; Huson, Daniel H

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees correspond one-to-one to compatible systems of splits and so splits play an important role in theoretical and computational aspects of phylogeny. Whereas any tree reconstruction method can be thought of as producing a compatible system of splits, an increasing number of phylogenetic algorithms are available that compute split systems that are not necessarily compatible and, thus, cannot always be represented by a tree. Such methods include the split decomposition, Neighbor-Net, consensus networks, and the Z-closure method. A more general split system of this kind can be represented graphically by a so-called splits graph, which generalizes the concept of a phylogenetic tree. This paper addresses the problem of computing a splits graph for a given set of splits. We have implemented all presented algorithms in a new program called SplitsTree4.

  4. Understanding the role of spin-motion coupling in Ramsey spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Andrew; Beverland, Michael; Mundinger, Joshua; Gorshkov, Alexey; Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-05-01

    Ramsey spectroscopy has become a powerful technique for probing non-equilibrium dynamics of internal (pseudospin) degrees of freedom of interacting systems. In many theoretical treatments, the key to understanding the dynamics has been to assume the external (motional) degrees of freedom are decoupled from the pseudospin degrees of freedom. Determining the validity of this approximation - known as the spin model approximation - has not been addressed in detail. We shed light in this direction by calculating Ramsey dynamics exactly for two interacting spin-1/2 particles in a harmonic trap. We find that in 1D the spin model assumption works well over a wide range of experimentally-relevant conditions, but can fail at time scales longer than those set by the mean interaction energy. Surprisingly, in 2D a modified version of the spin model is exact to first order in the interaction strength. This analysis is important for a correct interpretation of Ramsey spectroscopy and has broad applications ranging from precision measurements to quantum information and to fundamental probes of many-body systems. Supported by NSF, ARO-DARPA-OLE, AFOSR, NIST, the Lee A. DuBridge and Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations, and the NDSEG program.

  5. How Christian ethics became medical ethics: the case of Paul Ramsey.

    PubMed

    Hauerwas, Stanley

    1995-03-01

    Over the last century Christian ethics has moved from an attempt to Christianize the social order to a quandary over whether being Christian unduly biases how medical ethics is done. This movement can be viewed as the internal development of protestant liberalism to its logical conclusion, and Paul Ramsey can be taken as one of the last great representatives of that tradition. By reducing the Christian message to the 'ethical upshot' of neighbour love, Ramsey did not have the resources to show how Christian practice might make a difference for understanding or forming the practice of medicine. Instead, medicine became the practice that exemplified the moral commitments of Christian civilization, and the goal of the ethicist was to identify the values that were constitutive of medicine. Ramsey thus prepared the way for the Christian ethicist to become a medical ethicist with a difference, and the difference simply involved vague theological presumptions that do no serious intellectual work other than explaining, perhaps, the motivations of the ethicist.

  6. Graph Coloring Used to Model Traffic Lights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John

    1992-01-01

    Two scheduling problems, one involving setting up an examination schedule and the other describing traffic light problems, are modeled as colorings of graphs consisting of a set of vertices and edges. The chromatic number, the least number of colors necessary for coloring a graph, is employed in the solutions. (MDH)

  7. On the centrality of vertices of molecular graphs.

    PubMed

    Randić, Milan; Novič, Marjana; Vračko, Marjan; Plavšić, Dejan

    2013-11-05

    For acyclic systems the center of a graph has been known to be either a single vertex of two adjacent vertices, that is, an edge. It has not been quite clear how to extend the concept of graph center to polycyclic systems. Several approaches to the graph center of molecular graphs of polycyclic graphs have been proposed in the literature. In most cases alternative approaches, however, while being apparently equally plausible, gave the same results for many molecules, but occasionally they differ in their characterization of molecular center. In order to reduce the number of vertices that would qualify as forming the center of the graph, a hierarchy of rules have been considered in the search for graph centers. We reconsidered the problem of "the center of a graph" by using a novel concept of graph theory, the vertex "weights," defined by counting the number of pairs of vertices at the same distance from the vertex considered. This approach gives often the same results for graph centers of acyclic graphs as the standard definition of graph center based on vertex eccentricities. However, in some cases when two nonequivalent vertices have been found as graph center, the novel approach can discriminate between the two. The same approach applies to cyclic graphs without additional rules to locate the vertex or vertices forming the center of polycyclic graphs, vertices referred to as central vertices of a graph. In addition, the novel vertex "weights," in the case of acyclic, cyclic, and polycyclic graphs can be interpreted as vertex centralities, a measure for how close or distant vertices are from the center or central vertices of the graph. Besides illustrating the centralities of a number of smaller polycyclic graphs, we also report on several acyclic graphs showing the same centrality values of their vertices.

  8. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  9. Graph Zeta function and gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui

    2011-03-01

    Along the recently trodden path of studying certain number theoretic properties of gauge theories, especially supersymmetric theories whose vacuum manifolds are non-trivial, we investigate Ihara's Graph Zeta Function for large classes of quiver theories and periodic tilings by bi-partite graphs. In particular, we examine issues such as the spectra of the adjacency and whether the gauge theory satisfies the strong and weak versions of the graph theoretical analogue of the Riemann Hypothesis.

  10. GPD: a graph pattern diffusion kernel for accurate graph classification with applications in cheminformatics.

    PubMed

    Smalter, Aaron; Huan, Jun Luke; Jia, Yi; Lushington, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Graph data mining is an active research area. Graphs are general modeling tools to organize information from heterogeneous sources and have been applied in many scientific, engineering, and business fields. With the fast accumulation of graph data, building highly accurate predictive models for graph data emerges as a new challenge that has not been fully explored in the data mining community. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel technique called graph pattern diffusion (GPD) kernel. Our idea is to leverage existing frequent pattern discovery methods and to explore the application of kernel classifier (e.g., support vector machine) in building highly accurate graph classification. In our method, we first identify all frequent patterns from a graph database. We then map subgraphs to graphs in the graph database and use a process we call "pattern diffusion" to label nodes in the graphs. Finally, we designed a graph alignment algorithm to compute the inner product of two graphs. We have tested our algorithm using a number of chemical structure data. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is significantly better than competing methods such as those kernel functions based on paths, cycles, and subgraphs.

  11. GPD: A Graph Pattern Diffusion Kernel for Accurate Graph Classification with Applications in Cheminformatics

    PubMed Central

    Smalter, Aaron; Huan, Jun (Luke); Jia, Yi; Lushington, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Graph data mining is an active research area. Graphs are general modeling tools to organize information from heterogeneous sources and have been applied in many scientific, engineering, and business fields. With the fast accumulation of graph data, building highly accurate predictive models for graph data emerges as a new challenge that has not been fully explored in the data mining community. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel technique called graph pattern diffusion (GPD) kernel. Our idea is to leverage existing frequent pattern discovery methods and to explore the application of kernel classifier (e.g., support vector machine) in building highly accurate graph classification. In our method, we first identify all frequent patterns from a graph database. We then map subgraphs to graphs in the graph database and use a process we call “pattern diffusion” to label nodes in the graphs. Finally, we designed a graph alignment algorithm to compute the inner product of two graphs. We have tested our algorithm using a number of chemical structure data. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is significantly better than competing methods such as those kernel functions based on paths, cycles, and subgraphs. PMID:20431140

  12. Chromatic polynomials of random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bussel, Frank; Ehrlich, Christoph; Fliegner, Denny; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Timme, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Chromatic polynomials and related graph invariants are central objects in both graph theory and statistical physics. Computational difficulties, however, have so far restricted studies of such polynomials to graphs that were either very small, very sparse or highly structured. Recent algorithmic advances (Timme et al 2009 New J. Phys. 11 023001) now make it possible to compute chromatic polynomials for moderately sized graphs of arbitrary structure and number of edges. Here we present chromatic polynomials of ensembles of random graphs with up to 30 vertices, over the entire range of edge density. We specifically focus on the locations of the zeros of the polynomial in the complex plane. The results indicate that the chromatic zeros of random graphs have a very consistent layout. In particular, the crossing point, the point at which the chromatic zeros with non-zero imaginary part approach the real axis, scales linearly with the average degree over most of the density range. While the scaling laws obtained are purely empirical, if they continue to hold in general there are significant implications: the crossing points of chromatic zeros in the thermodynamic limit separate systems with zero ground state entropy from systems with positive ground state entropy, the latter an exception to the third law of thermodynamics.

  13. Inferring Pedigree Graphs from Genetic Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Takeyuki; Ito, Hiro

    In this paper, we study a problem of inferring blood relationships which satisfy a given matrix of genetic distances between all pairs of n nodes. Blood relationships are represented by our proposed graph class, which is called a pedigree graph. A pedigree graph is a directed acyclic graph in which the maximum indegree is at most two. We show that the number of pedigree graphs which satisfy the condition of given genetic distances may be exponential, but they can be represented by one directed acyclic graph with n nodes. Moreover, an O(n3) time algorithm which solves the problem is also given. Although phylogenetic trees and phylogenetic networks are similar data structures to pedigree graphs, it seems that inferring methods for phylogenetic trees and networks cannot be applied to infer pedigree graphs since nodes of phylogenetic trees and networks represent species whereas nodes of pedigree graphs represent individuals. We also show an O(n2) time algorithm which detects a contradiction between a given pedigreee graph and distance matrix of genetic distances.

  14. A notion of graph likelihood and an infinite monkey theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Mansour, Toufik; Severini, Simone

    2014-01-01

    We play with a graph-theoretic analogue of the folklore infinite monkey theorem. We define a notion of graph likelihood as the probability that a given graph is constructed by a monkey in a number of time steps equal to the number of vertices. We present an algorithm to compute this graph invariant and closed formulas for some infinite classes. We have to leave the computational complexity of the likelihood as an open problem.

  15. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in time at most ο(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.

  16. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    DOE PAGES

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in timemore » at most ο(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.« less

  17. The star arboricity of graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algor, Ilan

    1988-03-01

    The problem concerns the minimum time in which a number of messages can be transmitted through a communication network in which each node can transmit to many other nodes simultaneously but can receive only one message at a time. In the undirected version of the problem, the graphs, G, representing the messages are finite, undirected and simple; the messages transmitted in unit time form a subgraph which is a star. The star aboricity, st(G) of a graph G is the minimum number of star forests whose union covers all edges of G. A maximum value is derived for the star aboricity of any d-regular graph G, and is proved through probabilistic arguments.

  18. Intrinsic graph structure estimation using graph Laplacian.

    PubMed

    Noda, Atsushi; Hino, Hideitsu; Tatsuno, Masami; Akaho, Shotaro; Murata, Noboru

    2014-07-01

    A graph is a mathematical representation of a set of variables where some pairs of the variables are connected by edges. Common examples of graphs are railroads, the Internet, and neural networks. It is both theoretically and practically important to estimate the intensity of direct connections between variables. In this study, a problem of estimating the intrinsic graph structure from observed data is considered. The observed data in this study are a matrix with elements representing dependency between nodes in the graph. The dependency represents more than direct connections because it includes influences of various paths. For example, each element of the observed matrix represents a co-occurrence of events at two nodes or a correlation of variables corresponding to two nodes. In this setting, spurious correlations make the estimation of direct connection difficult. To alleviate this difficulty, a digraph Laplacian is used for characterizing a graph. A generative model of this observed matrix is proposed, and a parameter estimation algorithm for the model is also introduced. The notable advantage of the proposed method is its ability to deal with directed graphs, while conventional graph structure estimation methods such as covariance selections are applicable only to undirected graphs. The algorithm is experimentally shown to be able to identify the intrinsic graph structure.

  19. Raman-Ramsey multizone spectroscopy in a pure rubidium vapor cell

    SciTech Connect

    Failache, H.; Lenci, L.; Lezama, A.

    2010-02-15

    In view of application to a miniaturized spectroscopy system, we consider an optical setup that splits a laser beam into several parallel narrow light sheets allowing an effective beam expansion and consequently longer atom-light interaction times. We analyze the multizone coherent population trapping (MZCPT) spectroscopy of alkali-metal-vapor atoms, without buffer gas, in the presence of a split light beam. We show that the MZCPT signal is largely insensitive to intensity broadening. Experimentally observed spectra are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of a simplified model that describes each spectrum as an integral over the atomic velocity distribution of Ramsey multizone spectra.

  20. The Ramsey phase-change hypothesis. [for development of earth core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Ramsey's (1948, 1949, 1950, 1954) arguments for the phase-change interpretation of the nature of the terrestrial core are summarized. Some of the successes of the phase-change theory in accounting for hitherto unexplained properties of earth's interior are discussed. Evidence in favor of the phase-change theory is reviewed, and calculations are examined which indicate that the liquid-core material is far more compressible at any relevant pressure than is the mantle material. Implications of the phase-change theory for Venus, Mars, Mercury, and the moon are considered.

  1. Ramsey Fringes in an Electric-Field-Tunable Quantum Dot System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stufler, S.; Ester, P.; Zrenner, A.; Bichler, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on Ramsey fringes measured in a single InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot two-level system. We are able to control the transition energy of the system by Stark effect tuning. In combination with double pulse excitation this allows for a voltage controlled preparation of the phase and the occupancy of the two-level system. For long pulse delay times we observe extremely narrow fringes with spectral width below the homogeneous linewidth of the system. Implications on quantum information processing are discussed.

  2. Ramsey fringes in an electric-field-tunable quantum dot system.

    PubMed

    Stufler, S; Ester, P; Zrenner, A; Bichler, M

    2006-01-27

    We report on Ramsey fringes measured in a single InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot two-level system. We are able to control the transition energy of the system by Stark effect tuning. In combination with double pulse excitation this allows for a voltage controlled preparation of the phase and the occupancy of the two-level system. For long pulse delay times we observe extremely narrow fringes with spectral width below the homogeneous linewidth of the system. Implications on quantum information processing are discussed.

  3. The Ramsey phase-change hypothesis. [for development of earth core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Ramsey's (1948, 1949, 1950, 1954) arguments for the phase-change interpretation of the nature of the terrestrial core are summarized. Some of the successes of the phase-change theory in accounting for hitherto unexplained properties of earth's interior are discussed. Evidence in favor of the phase-change theory is reviewed, and calculations are examined which indicate that the liquid-core material is far more compressible at any relevant pressure than is the mantle material. Implications of the phase-change theory for Venus, Mars, Mercury, and the moon are considered.

  4. Rabi-oscillation-induced π phase flip in an unbalanced Ramsey atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. B.; Yao, Z. W.; Wang, K.; Lu, S. B.; Cao, L.; Wang, J.; Zhan, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    We present an observation of zero-to-π phase flips induced by Rabi oscillation in an unbalanced Ramsey atom interferometer. The phase shift and visibility are experimentally investigated by modulating either the polarization or duration of Raman lasers, and they are well explained by a theoretical model. In an atom interferometer, the π phase flips are caused not only by the sign of Rabi frequency but also by the Rabi oscillation. Considering the π phase flips, we propose the composite-light-pulse sequences for realizing the large-momentum-transfer beam splitter and mirror, which have the high immunity to the external phase noise in building the cold atom interferometer.

  5. Optical velocity meter based on Ramsey oscillations in a double-grating setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preclíková, J.; Kozák, M.; Fregenal, D.; Hansen, J. P.

    2014-04-01

    We propose a method for measuring velocities of atoms or molecules in a gas phase based on time-resolved laser experiments. Two intensity gratings of electromagnetic field with variable time delay τ are created by interfering of four laser pulses. Using first-order perturbation theory, we show that such arrangement can be used for measuring particle velocities, which have an optical transition to a long-living excited state. It is shown that the optical Ramsey oscillations obtain a characteristic modulation that reflects the distribution of velocities.

  6. Ramsey-CPT spectrum with the Faraday effect and its application to atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bo-Zhong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Si-Hong

    2015-06-01

    A method that obtains the Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) spectrum with the Faraday effect is investigated. An experiment is implemented to detect the light polarization components generated from the Faraday effect. The experimental results agree with the theoretical calculations based on the Liouville equation. By comparing with the method without using the Faraday effect, the potential of this method for a CPT-based atomic clock is assessed. The results indicate that this method should improve the short-term frequency stability by several times. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304362 and 11204351).

  7. Ramsey spectroscopy of high-contrast CPT resonances with push-pull optical pumping in Cs vapor.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Mérolla, J-M; Guérandel, S; de Clercq, E; Boudot, R

    2013-05-20

    We report on the detection of high-contrast and narrow Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) Ramsey fringes in a Cs vapor cell using a simple-architecture laser system. The latter allows the combination of push-pull optical pumping (PPOP) and a temporal Ramsey-like pulsed interrogation. An originality of the optics package is the use of a single Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator (MZ EOM) both for optical sidebands generation and light switch for pulsed interaction. Typical Ramsey fringes with a linewidth of 166 Hz and a contrast of 33 % are detected in a cm-scale buffer-gas filled Cs vapor cell. This technique could be interesting for the development of high-performance and low power consumption compact vapor cell clocks based on CPT.

  8. Graph mining: procedure, application to drug discovery and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry has generated chemical libraries and databases with a huge number of chemical compounds, which include prospective drugs. Chemical structures of compounds can be molecular graphs, to which a variety of graph-based techniques in computer science, specifically graph mining, can be applied. The most basic way for analyzing molecular graphs is using structural fragments, so-called subgraphs in graph theory. The mainstream technique in graph mining is frequent subgraph mining, by which we can retrieve essential subgraphs in given molecular graphs. In this article we explain the idea and procedure of mining frequent subgraphs from given molecular graphs, raising some real applications, and we describe the recent advances of graph mining.

  9. Loops in Reeb Graphs of 2-Manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Cole-McLaughlin, K; Edelsbrunner, H; Harer, J; Natarajan, V; Pascucci, V

    2003-02-11

    Given a Morse function f over a 2-manifold with or without boundary, the Reeb graph is obtained by contracting the connected components of the level sets to points. We prove tight upper and lower bounds on the number of loops in the Reeb graph that depend on the genus, the number of boundary components, and whether or not the 2-manifold is orientable. We also give an algorithm that constructs the Reeb graph in time O(n log n), where n is the number of edges in the triangulation used to represent the 2-manifold and the Morse function.

  10. Loops in Reeb Graphs of 2-Manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Cole-McLaughlin, K; Edelsbrunner, H; Harer, J; Natarajan, V; Pascucci, V

    2004-12-16

    Given a Morse function f over a 2-manifold with or without boundary, the Reeb graph is obtained by contracting the connected components of the level sets to points. We prove tight upper and lower bounds on the number of loops in the Reeb graph that depend on the genus, the number of boundary components, and whether or not the 2-manifold is orientable. We also give an algorithm that constructs the Reeb graph in time O(n log n), where n is the number of edges in the triangulation used to represent the 2-manifold and the Morse function.

  11. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  12. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  13. The Oriented Graph Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willwacher, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The oriented graph complexes are complexes of directed graphs without directed cycles. They govern, for example, the quantization of Lie bialgebras and infinite dimensional deformation quantization. Similar to the ordinary graph complexes GC n introduced by Kontsevich they come in two essentially different versions, depending on the parity of n. It is shown that, surprisingly, the oriented graph complex is quasi-isomorphic to the ordinary commutative graph complex of opposite parity GC n-1, up to some known classes. This yields in particular a combinatorial description of the action of on Lie bialgebras, and shows that a cycle-free formality morphism in the sense of Shoikhet can be constructed rationally without reference to configuration space integrals. Curiously, the obstruction class in the oriented graph complex found by Shoikhet corresponds to the well known theta graph in the ordinary graph complex.

  14. On molecular graph comparison.

    PubMed

    Melo, Jenny A; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Since the last half of the nineteenth century, molecular graphs have been present in several branches of chemistry. When used for molecular structure representation, they have been compared after mapping the corresponding graphs into mathematical objects. However, direct molecular comparison of molecular graphs is a research field less explored. The goal of this mini-review is to show some distance and similarity coefficients which were proposed to directly compare molecular graphs or which could be useful to do so.

  15. Optimal preparation of graph states

    SciTech Connect

    Cabello, Adan; Lopez-Tarrida, Antonio J.; Danielsen, Lars Eirik; Portillo, Jose R.

    2011-04-15

    We show how to prepare any graph state of up to 12 qubits with (a) the minimum number of controlled-Z gates and (b) the minimum preparation depth. We assume only one-qubit and controlled-Z gates. The method exploits the fact that any graph state belongs to an equivalence class under local Clifford operations. We extend up to 12 qubits the classification of graph states according to their entanglement properties, and identify each class using only a reduced set of invariants. For any state, we provide a circuit with both properties (a) and (b), if it does exist, or, if it does not, one circuit with property (a) and one with property (b), including the explicit one-qubit gates needed.

  16. Graph-Plotting Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    Plotter routine for IBM PC (AKPLOT) designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as integral parts of their documentation. Allows user to generate graph and edit its appearance on cathode-ray tube. Graph may undergo many interactive alterations before finally dumped from screen to be plotted by printer. Written in BASIC.

  17. Graphs in Scientific Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, William S.

    Two surveys were carried out to help increase knowledge of current graph usage in science. A detailed analysis of all graphs in one volume of the journal "Science" revealed that 30 percent had errors. Graphs are used more in some disciplines than in others; a survey of 57 journals revealed natural science journals use far more graphs…

  18. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  19. Are Graphs Finally Surfacing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beineke, Lowell W.

    1989-01-01

    Explored are various aspects of drawing graphs on surfaces. The Euler's formula, Kuratowski's theorem and the drawing of graphs in the plane with as few crossings as possible are discussed. Some applications including embedding of graphs and coloring of maps are included. (YP)

  20. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  1. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  2. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  3. Two-Player Graph Pebbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudente, Matthew James

    Given a graph G with pebbles on the vertices, we define a pebbling move as removing two pebbles from a vertex u, placing one pebble on a neighbor v, and discarding the other pebble, like a toll. The pebbling number pi( G) is the least number of pebbles needed so that every arrangement of pi(G) pebbles can place a pebble on any vertex through a sequence of pebbling moves. We introduce a new variation on graph pebbling called two-player pebbling. In this, players called the mover and the defender alternate moves, with the stipulation that the defender cannot reverse the previous move. The mover wins only if they can place a pebble on a specified vertex and the defender wins if the mover cannot. We define η(G), analogously, as the minimum number of pebbles such that given every configuration of the η( G) pebbles and every specified vertex r, the mover has a winning strategy. First, we will investigate upper bounds for η( G) on various classes of graphs and find a certain structure for which the defender has a winning strategy, no matter how many pebbles are in a configuration. Then, we characterize winning configurations for both players on a special class of diameter 2 graphs. Finally, we show winning configurations for the mover on paths using a recursive argument.

  4. Methods of visualizing graphs

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, James J.

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  5. Hyperbolic graph generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Orsini, Chiara; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    Networks representing many complex systems in nature and society share some common structural properties like heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering. Recent research on network geometry has shown that those real networks can be adequately modeled as random geometric graphs in hyperbolic spaces. In this paper, we present a computer program to generate such graphs. Besides real-world-like networks, the program can generate random graphs from other well-known graph ensembles, such as the soft configuration model, random geometric graphs on a circle, or Erdős-Rényi random graphs. The simulations show a good match between the expected values of different network structural properties and the corresponding empirical values measured in generated graphs, confirming the accurate behavior of the program.

  6. Activities: Relating to Graphs in Introductory Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyke, Frances

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities designed to help students bridge the gap between the graphical representation of a function and a verbal description. Includes a number of nonstandard graphs and reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

  7. The value of urban tree cover: A hedonic property price model in Ramsey and Dakota Counties, Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Heather Sander; Stephen Polasky; Robert. Haight

    2010-01-01

    Urban tree cover benefits communities. These benefits' economic values, however, are poorly recognized and often ignored by landowners and planners. We use hedonic property price modeling to estimate urban tree cover's value in Dakota and Ramsey Counties, MN, USA, predicting housing value as a function of structural, neighborhood, and environmental variables...

  8. Actively tunable double-Fano and Ramsey-Fano resonances in photonic molecules and improved sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Optical Fano resonances are an increasingly important line-shape engineering tool with applications ranging from high-sensitivity sensing and ultrasmall lasers to low-power optical switching or modulating. Here we demonstrate a fully on-chip resonant nanostructure on a photonic crystal molecule platform exhibiting typical double- and Ramsey-Fano resonances, which can be actively controlled by the modification of the blockade transmittance in the waveguide. First, we investigate the transmission spectrum of a coupled double-cavity setting, showing a kind of double-Fano resonance line shape which consists of an asymmetric low-frequency Fano (LF) resonance and a high-frequency Fano (HF) resonance. At the same time, we elucidate the influences of various physical quantities on the generated LF and HF resonances. Second, and more interestingly, we reveal the occurrence of the Ramsey-Fano resonance profile by extending a double-cavity arrangement to a coupled-cavity-array arrangement. This Ramsey-Fano resonance can be attributed to the multiple quantum interference among a variety of light pathways. Finally, as an application, we discuss how to use an asymmetric double-Fano resonance line shape, which features the steep spectral slope, to improve the sensing performance. Our obtained results may stimulate future experimental efforts in controlling the double- and Ramsey-Fano resonance line shapes of this system more accurately.

  9. Enabling Graph Appliance for Genome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rina; Graves, Jeffrey A; Lee, Sangkeun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a huge growth in the amount of genomic data available as reads generated from various genome sequencers. The number of reads generated can be huge, ranging from hundreds to billions of nucleotide, each varying in size. Assembling such large amounts of data is one of the challenging computational problems for both biomedical and data scientists. Most of the genome assemblers developed have used de Bruijn graph techniques. A de Bruijn graph represents a collection of read sequences by billions of vertices and edges, which require large amounts of memory and computational power to store and process. This is the major drawback to de Bruijn graph assembly. Massively parallel, multi-threaded, shared memory systems can be leveraged to overcome some of these issues. The objective of our research is to investigate the feasibility and scalability issues of de Bruijn graph assembly on Cray s Urika-GD system; Urika-GD is a high performance graph appliance with a large shared memory and massively multithreaded custom processor designed for executing SPARQL queries over large-scale RDF data sets. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no research on representing a de Bruijn graph as an RDF graph or finding Eulerian paths in RDF graphs using SPARQL for potential genome discovery. In this paper, we address the issues involved in representing a de Bruin graphs as RDF graphs and propose an iterative querying approach for finding Eulerian paths in large RDF graphs. We evaluate the performance of our implementation on real world ebola genome datasets and illustrate how genome assembly can be accomplished with Urika-GD using iterative SPARQL queries.

  10. Vortices and superfields on a graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Nahomi; Kobayashi, Koichiro; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2009-08-01

    We extend the dimensional deconstruction by utilizing the knowledge of graph theory. In the dimensional deconstruction, one uses the moose diagram to exhibit the structure of the “theory space.” We generalize the moose diagram to a general graph with oriented edges. In the present paper, we consider only the U(1) gauge symmetry. We also introduce supersymmetry into our model by use of superfields. We suppose that vector superfields reside at the vertices and chiral superfields at the edges of a given graph. Then we can consider multivector, multi-Higgs models. In our model, [U(1)]p (where p is the number of vertices) is broken to a single U(1). Therefore, for specific graphs, we get vortexlike classical solutions in our model. We show some examples of the graphs admitting the vortex solutions of simple structure as the Bogomolnyi solution.

  11. Vortices and superfields on a graph

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Nahomi; Kobayashi, Koichiro; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2009-08-15

    We extend the dimensional deconstruction by utilizing the knowledge of graph theory. In the dimensional deconstruction, one uses the moose diagram to exhibit the structure of the 'theory space'. We generalize the moose diagram to a general graph with oriented edges. In the present paper, we consider only the U(1) gauge symmetry. We also introduce supersymmetry into our model by use of superfields. We suppose that vector superfields reside at the vertices and chiral superfields at the edges of a given graph. Then we can consider multivector, multi-Higgs models. In our model, [U(1)]{sup p} (where p is the number of vertices) is broken to a single U(1). Therefore, for specific graphs, we get vortexlike classical solutions in our model. We show some examples of the graphs admitting the vortex solutions of simple structure as the Bogomolnyi solution.

  12. A model of language inflection graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukś, Henryk; Farzad, Babak; Cao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Inflection graphs are highly complex networks representing relationships between inflectional forms of words in human languages. For so-called synthetic languages, such as Latin or Polish, they have particularly interesting structure due to the abundance of inflectional forms. We construct the simplest form of inflection graphs, namely a bipartite graph in which one group of vertices corresponds to dictionary headwords and the other group to inflected forms encountered in a given text. We, then, study projection of this graph on the set of headwords. The projection decomposes into a large number of connected components, to be called word groups. Distribution of sizes of word group exhibits some remarkable properties, resembling cluster distribution in a lattice percolation near the critical point. We propose a simple model which produces graphs of this type, reproducing the desired component distribution and other topological features.

  13. Evolutionary graph theory: breaking the symmetry between interaction and replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Pacheco, Jorge M.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    We study evolutionary dynamics in a population whose structure is given by two graphs: the interaction graph determines who plays with whom in an evolutionary game; the replacement graph specifies the geometry of evolutionary competition and updating. First, we calculate the fixation probabilities of frequency dependent selection between two strategies or phenotypes. We consider three different update mechanisms: birth-death, death-birth and imitation. Then, as a particular example, we explore the evolution of cooperation. Suppose the interaction graph is a regular graph of degree h, the replacement graph is a regular graph of degree g and the overlap between the two graphs is a regular graph of degree l. We show that cooperation is favored by natural selection if b/c > hg/l. Here, b and c denote the benefit and cost of the altruistic act. This result holds for death-birth updating, weak selection and large population size. Note that the optimum population structure for cooperators is given by maximum overlap between the interaction and the replacement graph (g = h = l), which means that the two graphs are identical. We also prove that a modified replicator equation can describe how the expected values of the frequencies of an arbitrary number of strategies change on replacement and interaction graphs: the two graphs induce a transformation of the payoff matrix. PMID:17350049

  14. Pattern vectors from algebraic graph theory.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard C; Hancock, Edwin R; Luo, Bin

    2005-07-01

    Graph structures have proven computationally cumbersome for pattern analysis. The reason for this is that, before graphs can be converted to pattern vectors, correspondences must be established between the nodes of structures which are potentially of different size. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we turn to the spectral decomposition of the Laplacian matrix. We show how the elements of the spectral matrix for the Laplacian can be used to construct symmetric polynomials that are permutation invariants. The coefficients of these polynomials can be used as graph features which can be encoded in a vectorial manner. We extend this representation to graphs in which there are unary attributes on the nodes and binary attributes on the edges by using the spectral decomposition of a Hermitian property matrix that can be viewed as a complex analogue of the Laplacian. To embed the graphs in a pattern space, we explore whether the vectors of invariants can be embedded in a low-dimensional space using a number of alternative strategies, including principal components analysis (PCA), multidimensional scaling (MDS), and locality preserving projection (LPP). Experimentally, we demonstrate that the embeddings result in well-defined graph clusters. Our experiments with the spectral representation involve both synthetic and real-world data. The experiments with synthetic data demonstrate that the distances between spectral feature vectors can be used to discriminate between graphs on the basis of their structure. The real-world experiments show that the method can be used to locate clusters of graphs.

  15. Quantum discord of states arising from graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Supriyo; Adhikari, Bibhas; Banerjee, Subhashish

    2017-08-01

    Quantum discord refers to an important aspect of quantum correlations for bipartite quantum systems. In our earlier works, we have shown that corresponding to every graph (combinatorial) there are quantum states whose properties are reflected in the structure of the corresponding graph. Here, we attempt to develop a graph theoretic study of quantum discord that corresponds to a necessary and sufficient condition of zero quantum discord states which says that the blocks of density matrix corresponding to a zero quantum discord state are normal and commute with each other. These blocks have a one-to-one correspondence with some specific subgraphs of the graph which represents the quantum state. We obtain a number of graph theoretic properties representing normality and commutativity of a set of matrices which are indeed arising from the given graph. Utilizing these properties, we define graph theoretic measures for normality and commutativity that results in a formulation of graph theoretic quantum discord. We identify classes of quantum states with zero discord using the developed formulation.

  16. Graphing trillions of triangles

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size of Big Data is often heralded but how data are transformed and represented is also profoundly important to knowledge discovery, and this is exemplified in Big Graph analytics. Much attention has been placed on the scale of the input graph but the product of a graph algorithm can be many times larger than the input. This is true for many graph problems, such as listing all triangles in a graph. Enabling scalable graph exploration for Big Graphs requires new approaches to algorithms, architectures, and visual analytics. A brief tutorial is given to aid the argument for thoughtful representation of data in the context of graph analysis. Then a new algebraic method to reduce the arithmetic operations in counting and listing triangles in graphs is introduced. Additionally, a scalable triangle listing algorithm in the MapReduce model will be presented followed by a description of the experiments with that algorithm that led to the current largest and fastest triangle listing benchmarks to date. Finally, a method for identifying triangles in new visual graph exploration technologies is proposed. PMID:28690426

  17. Multi-delay, phase coherent pulse pair generation for precision Ramsey-frequency comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morgenweg, J; Eikema, K S E

    2013-03-11

    We demonstrate the generation of phase-stable mJ-pulse pairs at programmable inter-pulse delays up to hundreds of nanoseconds. A detailed investigation of potential sources for phase shifts during the parametric amplification of the selected pulses from a Ti:Sapphire frequency comb is presented, both numerically and experimentally. It is shown that within the statistical error of the phase measurement of 10 mrad, there is no dependence of the differential phase shift over the investigated inter-pulse delay range of more than 300 ns. In combination with nonlinear upconversion of the amplified pulses, the presented system will potentially enable short wavelength (<100 nm), multi-transition Ramsey-frequency comb spectroscopy at the kHz-level.

  18. Quantum-projection-noise-limited interferometry with coherent atoms in a Ramsey-type setup

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, D.; McDonald, G.; Debs, J. E.; Figl, C.; Altin, P. A.; Bachor, H.-A.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D.

    2010-04-15

    Every measurement of the population in an uncorrelated ensemble of two-level systems is limited by what is known as the quantum projection noise limit. Here, we present quantum-projection-noise-limited performance of a Ramsey-type interferometer using freely propagating coherent atoms. The experimental setup is based on an electro-optic modulator in an inherently stable Sagnac interferometer, optically coupling the two interfering atomic states via a two-photon Raman transition. Going beyond the quantum projection noise limit requires the use of reduced quantum uncertainty (squeezed) states. The experiment described demonstrates atom interferometry at the fundamental noise level and allows the observation of possible squeezing effects in an atom laser, potentially leading to improved sensitivity in atom interferometers.

  19. Bernoulli substitution in the Ramsey model: Optimal trajectories under control constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasovskii, A. A.; Lebedev, P. D.; Tarasyev, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    We consider a neoclassical (economic) growth model. A nonlinear Ramsey equation, modeling capital dynamics, in the case of Cobb-Douglas production function is reduced to the linear differential equation via a Bernoulli substitution. This considerably facilitates the search for a solution to the optimal growth problem with logarithmic preferences. The study deals with solving the corresponding infinite horizon optimal control problem. We consider a vector field of the Hamiltonian system in the Pontryagin maximum principle, taking into account control constraints. We prove the existence of two alternative steady states, depending on the constraints. A proposed algorithm for constructing growth trajectories combines methods of open-loop control and closed-loop regulatory control. For some levels of constraints and initial conditions, a closed-form solution is obtained. We also demonstrate the impact of technological change on the economic equilibrium dynamics. Results are supported by computer calculations.

  20. Probe light-shift elimination in generalized hyper-Ramsey quantum clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; de Clercq, E.; Arimondo, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present an interrogation scheme for the next generation of quantum clocks to suppress frequency shifts induced by laser probing fields that are themselves based on generalized hyper-Ramsey resonances. Sequences of composite laser pulses with a specific selection of phases, frequency detunings, and durations are combined to generate a very efficient and robust frequency locking signal with an almost perfect elimination of the light shift from off-resonant states and to decouple the unperturbed frequency measurement from the laser's intensity. The frequency lock point generated from synthesized error signals using either π /4 or 3 π /4 laser phase steps during the intermediate pulse is tightly protected against large laser-pulse area variations and errors in potentially applied frequency shift compensations. Quantum clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden optical transitions in atoms, ions, molecules, and nuclei will benefit from these hyperstable laser frequency stabilization schemes to reach relative accuracies below the 10-18 level.

  1. Nested Tracking Graphs

    DOE PAGES

    Lukasczyk, Jonas; Weber, Gunther; Maciejewski, Ross; ...

    2017-06-01

    Tracking graphs are a well established tool in topological analysis to visualize the evolution of components and their properties over time, i.e., when components appear, disappear, merge, and split. However, tracking graphs are limited to a single level threshold and the graphs may vary substantially even under small changes to the threshold. To examine the evolution of features for varying levels, users have to compare multiple tracking graphs without a direct visual link between them. We propose a novel, interactive, nested graph visualization based on the fact that the tracked superlevel set components for different levels are related to eachmore » other through their nesting hierarchy. This approach allows us to set multiple tracking graphs in context to each other and enables users to effectively follow the evolution of components for different levels simultaneously. We show the effectiveness of our approach on datasets from finite pointset methods, computational fluid dynamics, and cosmology simulations.« less

  2. Cigarette Smoking Among Urban American Indian Adults - Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, Minnesota, 2011.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jean; Poupart, John; Rhodes, Kristine; Peterson-Hickey, Melanie; Lamont, Genelle; D'Silva, Joanne; Erickson, Darin

    2016-06-03

    In 2013, it was estimated that the prevalence of cigarette smoking among American Indians was 36.5%, the highest of all racial/ethnic groups in the continental United States (1). Among American Indians, considerable cultural and geographic variation in cigarette smoking exists. Smoking prevalence among American Indians is lowest in the Southwest and highest in the Upper Midwest/Northern Plains (2). Little information is available about tobacco use among urban American Indians, who might not have ever lived on a reservation or be enrolled in or affiliated with a tribe. In Minnesota, a significant proportion of American Indians reside in urban areas. Among Minnesota's residents who identify as American Indian alone or in combination with another race, 30% live in Hennepin County and Ramsey County, which encompass Minneapolis and St. Paul, respectively (collectively known as the Twin Cities). The predominant tribes (Ojibwe [Chippewa] and Dakota/Lakota/Nakota [Sioux]) traditionally have used locally grown tobacco (Nicotiana rustica), red willow, and other plants for religious ceremonies, although nonceremonial tobacco is often substituted for traditional plants. To assess prevalence of cigarette smoking among this population, it is important to distinguish ceremonial tobacco use (smoked or used in other ways) from nonceremonial tobacco use. To obtain estimates of cigarette smoking prevalence among American Indians in Hennepin and Ramsey counties, the American Indian Adult Tobacco Survey was administered to 964 American Indian residents in 2011, using respondent-driven sampling. Among all participants, 59% were current smokers, 19% were former smokers, and 22% had never smoked. Approximately 40% of employed participants reported that someone smoked in their workplace area during the preceding week. High prevalences of cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke exposure among urban American Indians in Minnesota underscores the need for a comprehensive and culturally

  3. On the length of the drift region in the Ramsey cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of atoms in a beam with the microwave field in a separated field geometry such as a Ramsey cavity is generally described in terms of the three regions traversed successively by the atoms, namely two interaction regions of length (l) separated by a drift, or free precession, region of length L. For a monokinetic beam of velocity v, the linewidth of the central fringe in the Ramsey resonance pattern is usually expressed as delta omega equals pi v/L. A more detailed calculation shows, however, that the linewidth is equal to pi v/L asterisk, where the equivalent drift L asterisk is larger than L by an amount of the order of l/L. The correction depends on the field distribution in the interaction regions. Its origin lies in the fact that atomic precession is not limited to the field-free regions but also occurs in the interaction regions, where atomic coherence builds up or decreases continuously. Although the correction to the equivalent length of the drift region is small, it may be relevant to the evaluation of the second-order Doppler effect bias in primary cesium-beam standards to the extent that the atomic velocity is deduced from the lineshape and from the geometrical parameters of the cavity. It is shown that in current and projected standards with atoms of average thermal velocity, use of corrected dimensions may lead to a change of the calculated bias of the order of 10(exp -14), which is significant at the levels of accuracy considered nowadays.

  4. Topologies on directed graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Given a directed graph, a natural topology is defined and relationships between standard topological properties and graph theoretical concepts are studied. In particular, the properties of connectivity and separatedness are investigated. A metric is introduced which is shown to be related to separatedness. The topological notions of continuity and homeomorphism. A class of maps is studied which preserve both graph and topological properties. Applications involving strong maps and contractions are also presented.

  5. Graph-Based Object Class Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shengping; Hancock, Edwin R.

    We are interested in the problem of discovering the set of object classes present in a database of images using a weakly supervised graph-based framework. Rather than making use of the ”Bag-of-Features (BoF)” approach widely used in current work on object recognition, we represent each image by a graph using a group of selected local invariant features. Using local feature matching and iterative Procrustes alignment, we perform graph matching and compute a similarity measure. Borrowing the idea of query expansion , we develop a similarity propagation based graph clustering (SPGC) method. Using this method class specific clusters of the graphs can be obtained. Such a cluster can be generally represented by using a higher level graph model whose vertices are the clustered graphs, and the edge weights are determined by the pairwise similarity measure. Experiments are performed on a dataset, in which the number of images increases from 1 to 50K and the number of objects increases from 1 to over 500. Some objects have been discovered with total recall and a precision 1 in a single cluster.

  6. Do Visual Chunks and Planning Impact Performance on the Graph Description Task in the SPEAK Exam?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xi, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    This study examines how task characteristics (the number of visual chunks and the amount of planning time) and test-taker characteristics (graph familiarity) influence the perceptual and cognitive processes involved in graph comprehension, the strategies used in describing graphs, and the scores obtained on the graph description task in a…

  7. Online dynamic graph drawing.

    PubMed

    Frishman, Yaniv; Tal, Ayellet

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for drawing a sequence of graphs online. The algorithm strives to maintain the global structure of the graph and thus the user's mental map, while allowing arbitrary modifications between consecutive layouts. The algorithm works online and uses various execution culling methods in order to reduce the layout time and handle large dynamic graphs. Techniques for representing graphs on the GPU allow a speedup by a factor of up to 17 compared to the CPU implementation. The scalability of the algorithm across GPU generations is demonstrated. Applications of the algorithm to the visualization of discussion threads in Internet sites and to the visualization of social networks are provided.

  8. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  9. Supporting interactive graph exploration using edge plucking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Nelson; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2007-01-01

    Excessive edge density in graphs can cause serious readability issues, which in turn can make the graphs difficult to understand or even misleading. Recently, we introduced the idea of providing tools that offer interactive edge bending as a method by which edge congestion can be disambiguated. We extend this direction, presenting a new tool, Edge Plucking, which offers new interactive methods to clarify node-edge relationships. Edge Plucking expands the number of situations in which interactive graph exploration tools can be used to address edge congestion.

  10. Extending Matchings in Graphs: A Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    of pm’s in the graph. Moreover, the determination of all such "forbidden" lines can be carried out in polynomial time by applying Edmonds matching...the list can be determined in polynomial time.. (See [22].) Denote the number of such bricks of G by O(G). We then can exactly compute rt(G) via the...classes of graphs for which O(G) can always be ezactly determined in polynomial time? The best known such class is the class of planar graphs. This was

  11. Topological structure of dictionary graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukś, Henryk; Krzemiński, Mark

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the topological structure of the subgraphs of dictionary graphs constructed from WordNet and Moby thesaurus data. In the process of learning a foreign language, the learner knows only a subset of all words of the language, corresponding to a subgraph of a dictionary graph. When this subgraph grows with time, its topological properties change. We introduce the notion of the pseudocore and argue that the growth of the vocabulary roughly follows decreasing pseudocore numbers—that is, one first learns words with a high pseudocore number followed by smaller pseudocores. We also propose an alternative strategy for vocabulary growth, involving decreasing core numbers as opposed to pseudocore numbers. We find that as the core or pseudocore grows in size, the clustering coefficient first decreases, then reaches a minimum and starts increasing again. The minimum occurs when the vocabulary reaches a size between 103 and 104. A simple model exhibiting similar behavior is proposed. The model is based on a generalized geometric random graph. Possible implications for language learning are discussed.

  12. On Lazy Representations and Sturmian Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epifanio, Chiara; Frougny, Christiane; Gabriele, Alessandra; Mignosi, Filippo; Shallit, Jeffrey

    In this paper we establish a strong relationship between the set of lazy representations and the set of paths in a Sturmian graph associated with a real number α. We prove that for any non-negative integer i the unique path weighted i in the Sturmian graph associated with α represents the lazy representation of i in the Ostrowski numeration system associated with α. Moreover, we provide several properties of the representations of the natural integers in this numeration system.

  13. Empirical Determination of Pattern Match Confidence in Labeled Graphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-07

    valid, and the indicated false positive rates could be misleading . Further study of real-world datasets should reveal if such graphs appear within...labeled graphs Dr. Ben Migliori, Dr. Daniel Grady, and Dr. James Law Prepared by Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego...to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Empirical determination of pattern match confidence in labeled graphs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  14. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  15. Graphing from Everyday Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, David; Schliemann, Analucia; Nemirousky, Ricardo

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching grounded in the everyday experiences and concerns of the learners. Studies how people with limited school experience can understand graphs and concludes that individuals with limited academic education can clarify the role of everyday experiences in learning about graphs. (ASK)

  16. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  17. Learning graph matching.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Tibério S; McAuley, Julian J; Cheng, Li; Le, Quoc V; Smola, Alex J

    2009-06-01

    As a fundamental problem in pattern recognition, graph matching has applications in a variety of fields, from computer vision to computational biology. In graph matching, patterns are modeled as graphs and pattern recognition amounts to finding a correspondence between the nodes of different graphs. Many formulations of this problem can be cast in general as a quadratic assignment problem, where a linear term in the objective function encodes node compatibility and a quadratic term encodes edge compatibility. The main research focus in this theme is about designing efficient algorithms for approximately solving the quadratic assignment problem, since it is NP-hard. In this paper we turn our attention to a different question: how to estimate compatibility functions such that the solution of the resulting graph matching problem best matches the expected solution that a human would manually provide. We present a method for learning graph matching: the training examples are pairs of graphs and the 'labels' are matches between them. Our experimental results reveal that learning can substantially improve the performance of standard graph matching algorithms. In particular, we find that simple linear assignment with such a learning scheme outperforms Graduated Assignment with bistochastic normalisation, a state-of-the-art quadratic assignment relaxation algorithm.

  18. Walking Out Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

  19. Using Specialized Graph Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of logarithm and reciprocal graphs in the college physics classroom. Provides examples, such as electrical conductivity, reliability function in the Weibull model, and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for latent heat of vaporation. Shows graphs with weighting of points. (YP)

  20. ACTIVITIES: Graphs and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1975-01-01

    Using a set of worksheets, students will discover and apply Euler's formula regarding connected planar graphs and play and analyze the game of Sprouts. One sheet leads to the discovery of Euler's formula; another concerns traversability of a graph; another gives an example and a game involving these ideas. (Author/KM)

  1. Reflections on "The Graph"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article responds to arguments by Skidmore and Thompson (this issue of "Educational Researcher") that a graph published more than 10 years ago was erroneously reproduced and "gratuitously damaged" perceptions of the quality of education research. After describing the purpose of the original graph, the author counters assertions that the graph…

  2. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  3. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  4. ACTIVITIES: Graphs and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1975-01-01

    Using a set of worksheets, students will discover and apply Euler's formula regarding connected planar graphs and play and analyze the game of Sprouts. One sheet leads to the discovery of Euler's formula; another concerns traversability of a graph; another gives an example and a game involving these ideas. (Author/KM)

  5. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  6. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  7. Object Discovery: Soft Attributed Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanshi; Song, Xuan; Shao, Xiaowei; Zhao, Huijing; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-03-01

    We categorize this research in terms of its contribution to both graph theory and computer vision. From the theoretical perspective, this study can be considered as the first attempt to formulate the idea of mining maximal frequent subgraphs in the challenging domain of messy visual data, and as a conceptual extension to the unsupervised learning of graph matching. We define a soft attributed pattern (SAP) to represent the common subgraph pattern among a set of attributed relational graphs (ARGs), considering both their structure and attributes. Regarding the differences between ARGs with fuzzy attributes and conventional labeled graphs, we propose a new mining strategy that directly extracts the SAP with the maximal graph size without applying node enumeration. Given an initial graph template and a number of ARGs, we develop an unsupervised method to modify the graph template into the maximal-size SAP. From a practical perspective, this research develops a general platform for learning the category model (i.e., the SAP) from cluttered visual data (i.e., the ARGs) without labeling "what is where," thereby opening the possibility for a series of applications in the era of big visual data. Experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method on RGB/RGB-D images and videos.

  8. Evolutionary stability on graphs.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A

    2008-04-21

    Evolutionary stability is a fundamental concept in evolutionary game theory. A strategy is called an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS), if its monomorphic population rejects the invasion of any other mutant strategy. Recent studies have revealed that population structure can considerably affect evolutionary dynamics. Here we derive the conditions of evolutionary stability for games on graphs. We obtain analytical conditions for regular graphs of degree k > 2. Those theoretical predictions are compared with computer simulations for random regular graphs and for lattices. We study three different update rules: birth-death (BD), death-birth (DB), and imitation (IM) updating. Evolutionary stability on sparse graphs does not imply evolutionary stability in a well-mixed population, nor vice versa. We provide a geometrical interpretation of the ESS condition on graphs.

  9. Evolutionary stability on graphs

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary stability is a fundamental concept in evolutionary game theory. A strategy is called an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS), if its monomorphic population rejects the invasion of any other mutant strategy. Recent studies have revealed that population structure can considerably affect evolutionary dynamics. Here we derive the conditions of evolutionary stability for games on graphs. We obtain analytical conditions for regular graphs of degree k > 2. Those theoretical predictions are compared with computer simulations for random regular graphs and for lattices. We study three different update rules: birth-death (BD), death-birth (DB), and imitation (IM) updating. Evolutionary stability on sparse graphs does not imply evolutionary stability in a well-mixed population, nor vice versa. We provide a geometrical interpretation of the ESS condition on graphs. PMID:18295801

  10. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  11. Constrained Markovian Dynamics of Random Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, A. C. C.; de Martino, A.; Annibale, A.

    2009-09-01

    We introduce a statistical mechanics formalism for the study of constrained graph evolution as a Markovian stochastic process, in analogy with that available for spin systems, deriving its basic properties and highlighting the role of the `mobility' (the number of allowed moves for any given graph). As an application of the general theory we analyze the properties of degree-preserving Markov chains based on elementary edge switchings. We give an exact yet simple formula for the mobility in terms of the graph's adjacency matrix and its spectrum. This formula allows us to define acceptance probabilities for edge switchings, such that the Markov chains become controlled Glauber-type detailed balance processes, designed to evolve to any required invariant measure (representing the asymptotic frequencies with which the allowed graphs are visited during the process). As a corollary we also derive a condition in terms of simple degree statistics, sufficient to guarantee that, in the limit where the number of nodes diverges, even for state-independent acceptance probabilities of proposed moves the invariant measure of the process will be uniform. We test our theory on synthetic graphs and on realistic larger graphs as studied in cellular biology, showing explicitly that, for instances where the simple edge swap dynamics fails to converge to the uniform measure, a suitably modified Markov chain instead generates the correct phase space sampling.

  12. Asymptote Misconception on Graphing Functions: Does Graphing Software Resolve It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öçal, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Graphing function is an important issue in mathematics education due to its use in various areas of mathematics and its potential roles for students to enhance learning mathematics. The use of some graphing software assists students' learning during graphing functions. However, the display of graphs of functions that students sketched by hand may…

  13. The Effect of Using Graphing Calculators in Complex Function Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocak, Mehmet Akif

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the role of graphing calculators in multiple representations for knowledge transfer and the omission of oversimplification in complex function graphs. The main aim is to examine whether graphing calculators were used efficiently to see different cases and multiple perspectives among complex function graphs, or whether…

  14. Kernel-Based Reconstruction of Graph Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Daniel; Ma, Meng; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2017-02-01

    A number of applications in engineering, social sciences, physics, and biology involve inference over networks. In this context, graph signals are widely encountered as descriptors of vertex attributes or features in graph-structured data. Estimating such signals in all vertices given noisy observations of their values on a subset of vertices has been extensively analyzed in the literature of signal processing on graphs (SPoG). This paper advocates kernel regression as a framework generalizing popular SPoG modeling and reconstruction and expanding their capabilities. Formulating signal reconstruction as a regression task on reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces of graph signals permeates benefits from statistical learning, offers fresh insights, and allows for estimators to leverage richer forms of prior information than existing alternatives. A number of SPoG notions such as bandlimitedness, graph filters, and the graph Fourier transform are naturally accommodated in the kernel framework. Additionally, this paper capitalizes on the so-called representer theorem to devise simpler versions of existing Thikhonov regularized estimators, and offers a novel probabilistic interpretation of kernel methods on graphs based on graphical models. Motivated by the challenges of selecting the bandwidth parameter in SPoG estimators or the kernel map in kernel-based methods, the present paper further proposes two multi-kernel approaches with complementary strengths. Whereas the first enables estimation of the unknown bandwidth of bandlimited signals, the second allows for efficient graph filter selection. Numerical tests with synthetic as well as real data demonstrate the merits of the proposed methods relative to state-of-the-art alternatives.

  15. Reaction route graphs. III. Non-minimal kinetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fishtik, Ilie; Callaghan, Caitlin A; Datta, Ravindra

    2005-02-24

    The concept of reaction route (RR) graphs introduced recently by us for kinetic mechanisms that produce minimal graphs is extended to the problem of non-minimal kinetic mechanisms for the case of a single overall reaction (OR). A RR graph is said to be minimal if all of the stoichiometric numbers in all direct RRs of the mechanism are equal to +/-1 and non-minimal if at least one stoichiometric number in a direct RR is non-unity, e.g., equal to +/-2. For a given mechanism, four unique topological characteristics of RR graphs are defined and enumerated, namely, direct full routes (FRs), empty routes (ERs), intermediate nodes (INs), and terminal nodes (TNs). These are further utilized to construct the RR graphs. One algorithm involves viewing each IN as a central node in a RR sub-graph. As a result, the construction and enumeration of RR graphs are reduced to the problem of balancing the peripheral nodes in the RR sub-graphs according to the list of FRs, ERs, INs, and TNs. An alternate method involves using an independent set of RRs to draw the RR graph while satisfying the INs and TNs. Three examples are presented to illustrate the application of non-minimal RR graph theory.

  16. Deitmar schemes, graphs and zeta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mérida-Angulo, Manuel; Thas, Koen

    2017-07-01

    In Thas (2014) it was explained how one can naturally associate a Deitmar scheme (which is a scheme defined over the field with one element, F1) to a so-called ;loose graph; (which is a generalization of a graph). Several properties of the Deitmar scheme can be proven easily from the combinatorics of the (loose) graph, and known realizations of objects over F1 such as combinatorial F1-projective and F1-affine spaces exactly depict the loose graph which corresponds to the associated Deitmar scheme. In this paper, we first modify the construction of loc. cit., and show that Deitmar schemes which are defined by finite trees (with possible end points) are ;defined over F1; in Kurokawa's sense; we then derive a precise formula for the Kurokawa zeta function for such schemes (and so also for the counting polynomial of all associated Fq-schemes). As a corollary, we find a zeta function for all such trees which contains information such as the number of inner points and the spectrum of degrees, and which is thus very different than Ihara's zeta function (which is trivial in this case). Using a process called ;surgery,; we show that one can determine the zeta function of a general loose graph and its associated {Deitmar, Grothendieck}-schemes in a number of steps, eventually reducing the calculation essentially to trees. We study a number of classes of examples of loose graphs, and introduce the Grothendieck ring ofF1-schemes along the way in order to perform the calculations. Finally, we include a computer program for performing more tedious calculations, and compare the new zeta function to Ihara's zeta function for graphs in a number of examples.

  17. A general method for computing Tutte polynomials of self-similar graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Helin; Jin, Xian'an

    2017-10-01

    Self-similar graphs were widely studied in both combinatorics and statistical physics. Motivated by the construction of the well-known 3-dimensional Sierpiński gasket graphs, in this paper we introduce a family of recursively constructed self-similar graphs whose inner duals are of the self-similar property. By combining the dual property of the Tutte polynomial and the subgraph-decomposition trick, we show that the Tutte polynomial of this family of graphs can be computed in an iterative way and in particular the exact expression of the formula of the number of their spanning trees is derived. Furthermore, we show our method is a general one that is easily extended to compute Tutte polynomials for other families of self-similar graphs such as Farey graphs, 2-dimensional Sierpiński gasket graphs, Hanoi graphs, modified Koch graphs, Apollonian graphs, pseudofractal scale-free web, fractal scale-free network, etc.

  18. High-Precision Ramsey-Comb Spectroscopy at Deep Ultraviolet Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Altmann, R K; Galtier, S; Dreissen, L S; Eikema, K S E

    2016-10-21

    High-precision spectroscopy in systems such as molecular hydrogen and helium ions is very interesting in view of tests of quantum electrodynamics and the proton radius puzzle. However, the required deep ultraviolet and shorter wavelengths pose serious experimental challenges. Here we show Ramsey-comb spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet for the first time, thereby demonstrating its enabling capabilities for precision spectroscopy at short wavelengths. We excite ^{84}Kr in an atomic beam on the two-photon 4p^{6}→4p^{5}5p[1/2]_{0} transition at 212.55 nm. It is shown that the ac-Stark shift is effectively eliminated, and combined with a counterpropagating excitation geometry to suppress Doppler effects, a transition frequency of 2 820 833 101 679(103) kHz is found. The uncertainty of our measurement is 34 times smaller than the best previous measurement, and only limited by the 27 ns lifetime of the excited state.

  19. Ramsey interferometry for resonant Auger decay through core-excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Nakajima, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron dynamics in Ne atoms involving core-excited states through the Ramsey scheme with a pair of time-delayed x-ray pulses. Irradiation of Ne atoms by the ˜1 femtosecond x-ray pulse simultaneously populates two core-excited states, and an identical but time-delayed x-ray pulse probes the dynamics of the core-excited electron wave packet which is subject to the resonant Auger decay. The energy-integrated total Auger electron yield and energy-resolved Auger electron spectra in the time domain show periodic structures due to the temporal evolution of the wave packet, from which we can obtain the counterpart in the frequency domain through the Fourier transformation. The Auger electron energy spectra in the time as well as frequency domains show the interference patterns between the two Auger electron wave packets released into the continuum from the superposition of two core-excited states at different times. These spectra are important to clarify the individual contribution of the different Auger decay channels upon core excitation by the x-ray pulse.

  20. Tailored Random Graph Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, E. S.; Annibale, A.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2013-02-01

    Tailored graph ensembles are a developing bridge between biological networks and statistical mechanics. The aim is to use this concept to generate a suite of rigorous tools that can be used to quantify and compare the topology of cellular signalling networks, such as protein-protein interaction networks and gene regulation networks. We calculate exact and explicit formulae for the leading orders in the system size of the Shannon entropies of random graph ensembles constrained with degree distribution and degree-degree correlation. We also construct an ergodic detailed balance Markov chain with non-trivial acceptance probabilities which converges to a strictly uniform measure and is based on edge swaps that conserve all degrees. The acceptance probabilities can be generalized to define Markov chains that target any alternative desired measure on the space of directed or undirected graphs, in order to generate graphs with more sophisticated topological features.

  1. Reaction spreading on graphs.

    PubMed

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension d{s}, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension d{l}. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)∼t{d{l}}. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)e{αt} with α proportional to ln(k), where (k) is the average degree of the graph.

  2. Assortativity of complementary graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Winterbach, W.; van Mieghem, P.

    2011-09-01

    Newman's measure for (dis)assortativity, the linear degree correlationρD, is widely studied although analytic insight into the assortativity of an arbitrary network remains far from well understood. In this paper, we derive the general relation (2), (3) and Theorem 1 between the assortativity ρD(G) of a graph G and the assortativityρD(Gc) of its complement Gc. Both ρD(G) and ρD(Gc) are linearly related by the degree distribution in G. When the graph G(N,p) possesses a binomial degree distribution as in the Erdős-Rényi random graphs Gp(N), its complementary graph Gpc(N) = G1-p(N) follows a binomial degree distribution as in the Erdős-Rényi random graphs G1-p(N). We prove that the maximum and minimum assortativity of a class of graphs with a binomial distribution are asymptotically antisymmetric: ρmax(N,p) = -ρmin(N,p) for N → ∞. The general relation (3) nicely leads to (a) the relation (10) and (16) between the assortativity range ρmax(G)-ρmin(G) of a graph with a given degree distribution and the range ρmax(Gc)-ρmin(Gc) of its complementary graph and (b) new bounds (6) and (15) of the assortativity. These results together with our numerical experiments in over 30 real-world complex networks illustrate that the assortativity range ρmax-ρmin is generally large in sparse networks, which underlines the importance of assortativity as a network characterizer.

  3. On c_2 invariants of some 4-regular Feynman graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doryn, Dmitry

    2017-03-01

    The obstruction for application of techniques like denominator reduction for the computation of the c_2 invariant of Feynman graphs in general is the absence of a 3-valent vertex. In this paper such a formula for a 4-valent vertex is derived. The formula allows us to compute the c_2 invariant of new graphs, for instance, some 4-regular graphs with small loop number.

  4. On c_2 invariants of some 4-regular Feynman graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doryn, Dmitry

    2017-08-01

    The obstruction for application of techniques like denominator reduction for the computation of the c_2 invariant of Feynman graphs in general is the absence of a 3-valent vertex. In this paper such a formula for a 4-valent vertex is derived. The formula allows us to compute the c_2 invariant of new graphs, for instance, some 4-regular graphs with small loop number.

  5. Total Flooding Time and Rumor Propagation on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, Darcy; Popov, Serguei

    2017-03-01

    We study the discrete time version of the flooding time problem as a model of rumor propagation where each site in the graph has initially a distinct piece of information; we are interested in the number of "conversations" before the entire graph knows all pieces of information. For the complete graph we compare the ratio between the expected propagation time for all pieces of information and the corresponding time for a single piece of information, obtaining the asymptotic ratio 3 / 2 between them.

  6. Khovanov homology of links and graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, Marko

    2006-05-01

    In this thesis we work with Khovanov homology of links and its generalizations, as well as with the homology of graphs. Khovanov homology of links consists of graded chain complexes which are link invariants, up to chain homotopy, with graded Euler characteristic equal to the Jones polynomial of the link. Hence, it can be regarded as the "categorification" of the Jones polynomial. We prove that the first homology group of positive braid knots is trivial. Futhermore, we prove that non-alternating torus knots are homologically thick. In addition, we show that we can decrease the number of full twists of torus knots without changing low-degree homology and consequently that there exists stable homology for torus knots. We also prove most of the above properties for Khovanov-Rozansky homology. Concerning graph homology, we categorify the dichromatic (and consequently Tutte) polynomial for graphs, by categorifying an infinite set of its one-variable specializations. We categorify explicitly the one-variable specialization that is an analog of the Jones polynomial of an alternating link corresponding to the initial graph. Also, we categorify explicitly the whole two-variable dichromatic polynomial of graphs by using Koszul complexes. textbf{Key-words:} Khovanov homology, Jones polynomial, link, torus knot, graph, dichromatic polynomial

  7. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  8. On the rainbow coloring for some graph operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafik, Agustin, Ika Hesti; Fajariyato, Anang; Alfarisi, Ridho

    2016-02-01

    Let G = (V, E) be a nontrivial, finite, simple and undirected connected graph on which is defined a coloring f : E(G) → {1,2, …, k}, k ∈ N. The adjacent edges may be colored the same colors. A path in an edge colored graph is said to be a rainbow path if no two edges on the path have the same color. An edge colored graph G is rainbow connected if there exists a rainbow u - v path for every two vertices u and v of G. The rainbow connection number of a graph G, denoted by rc(G), is the smallest number of k colors required to edge color the graph such that the graph is rainbow connected. In this paper, we determine the exact values of rainbow connection number of some special graph operations, namely cartesian product, tensor product, composition of two special graphs and also amalgamation of special graphs. The result shows that all exact values of rc(G) attain a lower bound of the rainbow connectivity, namely diam(G).

  9. Proxy Graph: Visual Quality Metrics of Big Graph Sampling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quan-Hoang; Hong, Seok-Hee; Eades, Peter; Meidiana, Amyra

    2017-02-24

    Data sampling has been extensively studied for large scale graph mining. Many analyses and tasks become more efficient when performed on graph samples of much smaller size. The use of proxy objects is common in software engineering for analysis and interaction with heavy objects or systems. In this paper, we coin the term 'proxy graph' and empirically investigate how well a proxy graph visualization can represent a big graph. Our investigation focuses on proxy graphs obtained by sampling; this is one of the most common proxy approaches. Despite the plethora of data sampling studies, this is the first evaluation of sampling in the context of graph visualization. For an objective evaluation, we propose a new family of quality metrics for visual quality of proxy graphs. Our experiments cover popular sampling techniques. Our experimental results lead to guidelines for using sampling-based proxy graphs in visualization.

  10. Quasiperiodic graphs at the onset of chaos.

    PubMed

    Luque, B; Cordero-Gracia, M; Gómez, M; Robledo, A

    2013-12-01

    We examine the connectivity fluctuations across networks obtained when the horizontal visibility (HV) algorithm is used on trajectories generated by nonlinear circle maps at the quasiperiodic transition to chaos. The resultant HV graph is highly anomalous as the degrees fluctuate at all scales with amplitude that increases with the size of the network. We determine families of Pesin-like identities between entropy growth rates and generalized graph-theoretical Lyapunov exponents. An irrational winding number with pure periodic continued fraction characterizes each family. We illustrate our results for the so-called golden, silver, and bronze numbers.

  11. Well-Covered Graphs: A Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Although the problem of independence number is well-known to be NP-complete, it is trivially polynomial for well-covered graphs. The concept of well...general is NP-complete. Thus it is considered most unlikely that a polynomial algorithm will ever 5.u.2 be found to compute a(G). ." It is natural...therefore, to look for interesting families of graphs for which this parame- er is polynomially computable. A number of such families have been found

  12. Quasiperiodic graphs at the onset of chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, B.; Cordero-Gracia, M.; Gómez, M.; Robledo, A.

    2013-12-01

    We examine the connectivity fluctuations across networks obtained when the horizontal visibility (HV) algorithm is used on trajectories generated by nonlinear circle maps at the quasiperiodic transition to chaos. The resultant HV graph is highly anomalous as the degrees fluctuate at all scales with amplitude that increases with the size of the network. We determine families of Pesin-like identities between entropy growth rates and generalized graph-theoretical Lyapunov exponents. An irrational winding number with pure periodic continued fraction characterizes each family. We illustrate our results for the so-called golden, silver, and bronze numbers.

  13. Higher-order graph wavelets and sparsity on circulant graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzagiannidis, Madeleine S.; Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    2015-08-01

    The notion of a graph wavelet gives rise to more advanced processing of data on graphs due to its ability to operate in a localized manner, across newly arising data-dependency structures, with respect to the graph signal and underlying graph structure, thereby taking into consideration the inherent geometry of the data. In this work, we tackle the problem of creating graph wavelet filterbanks on circulant graphs for a sparse representation of certain classes of graph signals. The underlying graph can hereby be data-driven as well as fixed, for applications including image processing and social network theory, whereby clusters can be modelled as circulant graphs, respectively. We present a set of novel graph wavelet filter-bank constructions, which annihilate higher-order polynomial graph signals (up to a border effect) defined on the vertices of undirected, circulant graphs, and are localised in the vertex domain. We give preliminary results on their performance for non-linear graph signal approximation and denoising. Furthermore, we provide extensions to our previously developed segmentation-inspired graph wavelet framework for non-linear image approximation, by incorporating notions of smoothness and vanishing moments, which further improve performance compared to traditional methods.

  14. Generalized Graphs, Methods for Obtaining Graph Spectra. Application of Graph Spectra in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mingzuo

    Various graphical methods in the literature for getting at some features of the MO energy level spectra of especially pi systems and some related three-dimensional molecules are studied in detail. These include the graphical methods of Sinanoglu (although its mathematical, quantum-physical foundations, e.g. Sinanoglu's structural-covariance theory, are not discussed in this thesis), the edge-deletion method of Jiang, the specialized method of Sheng for benzenoid graphs, pairing theorems, graph splitting methods of e.g. McClelland, and more general one of R. A. Davidson. Of these the Sinanoglu method is found to be the only one generally applicable to diverse types of molecules without the need to introduce additional and complicated rules for each new graph type. The Sinanoglu method however is intended to be only a qualitative tool (giving the number of bonding, nonbonding, and antibonding levels and their changes upon reaction or geometrical distortions, large or small, of the molecule). Thus the other methods, although highly specialized, could be of help in getting some further information on the spectra. In particular, the "negative graph" concept in Chapter 3 of this thesis would be found useful in ascertaining the energy gap between the lowest and highest MO levels. In case where the Sinanoglu method cannot distinguish between differing stabilities of two molecules with the same signature and number of elections, this energy gap will be particularly useful. In the thesis, many alternative and simpler derivations of the graph-theoretic methods of Jiang, Davidson and others mentioned above are given. Some methods are generalized further. In the last chapter of the thesis starting with S 5.3, the graphical method is applied extensively to various types of molecules thought to have through-space interactions. Especially the Sinanoglu method is used to obtain the signature (instead of using a computer) and qualitative stabilities of these molecules are discussed

  15. Key-Node-Separated Graph Clustering and Layouts for Human Relationship Graph Visualization.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takayuki; Klein, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Many graph-drawing methods apply node-clustering techniques based on the density of edges to find tightly connected subgraphs and then hierarchically visualize the clustered graphs. However, users may want to focus on important nodes and their connections to groups of other nodes for some applications. For this purpose, it is effective to separately visualize the key nodes detected based on adjacency and attributes of the nodes. This article presents a graph visualization technique for attribute-embedded graphs that applies a graph-clustering algorithm that accounts for the combination of connections and attributes. The graph clustering step divides the nodes according to the commonality of connected nodes and similarity of feature value vectors. It then calculates the distances between arbitrary pairs of clusters according to the number of connecting edges and the similarity of feature value vectors and finally places the clusters based on the distances. Consequently, the technique separates important nodes that have connections to multiple large clusters and improves the visibility of such nodes' connections. To test this technique, this article presents examples with human relationship graph datasets, including a coauthorship and Twitter communication network dataset.

  16. Two linear time, low overhead algorithms for graph layout

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, Brian; Baumes, Jeff

    2008-01-10

    The software comprises two algorithms designed to perform a 2D layout of a graph structure in time linear with respect to the vertices and edges in the graph, whereas most other layout algorithms have a running time that is quadratic with respect to the number of vertices or greater. Although these layout algorithms run in a fraction of the time as their competitors, they provide competitive results when applied to most real-world graphs. These algorithms also have a low constant running time and small memory footprint, making them useful for small to large graphs.

  17. Quasiperiodic Graphs: Structural Design, Scaling and Entropic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, B.; Ballesteros, F. J.; Núñez, A. M.; Robledo, A.

    2013-04-01

    A novel class of graphs, here named quasiperiodic, are constructed via application of the Horizontal Visibility algorithm to the time series generated along the quasiperiodic route to chaos. We show how the hierarchy of mode-locked regions represented by the Farey tree is inherited by their associated graphs. We are able to establish, via Renormalization Group (RG) theory, the architecture of the quasiperiodic graphs produced by irrational winding numbers with pure periodic continued fraction. Finally, we demonstrate that the RG fixed-point degree distributions are recovered via optimization of a suitably defined graph entropy.

  18. A Graph Search Heuristic for Shortest Distance Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, E

    2005-03-24

    This paper presents a heuristic for guiding A* search for finding the shortest distance path between two vertices in a connected, undirected, and explicitly stored graph. The heuristic requires a small amount of data to be stored at each vertex. The heuristic has application to quickly detecting relationships between two vertices in a large information or knowledge network. We compare the performance of this heuristic with breadth-first search on graphs with various topological properties. The results show that one or more orders of magnitude improvement in the number of vertices expanded is possible for large graphs, including Poisson random graphs.

  19. Laplacian Estrada and normalized Laplacian Estrada indices of evolving graphs.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale time-evolving networks have been generated by many natural and technological applications, posing challenges for computation and modeling. Thus, it is of theoretical and practical significance to probe mathematical tools tailored for evolving networks. In this paper, on top of the dynamic Estrada index, we study the dynamic Laplacian Estrada index and the dynamic normalized Laplacian Estrada index of evolving graphs. Using linear algebra techniques, we established general upper and lower bounds for these graph-spectrum-based invariants through a couple of intuitive graph-theoretic measures, including the number of vertices or edges. Synthetic random evolving small-world networks are employed to show the relevance of the proposed dynamic Estrada indices. It is found that neither the static snapshot graphs nor the aggregated graph can approximate the evolving graph itself, indicating the fundamental difference between the static and dynamic Estrada indices.

  20. Quantitative analysis of electrically detected Ramsey fringes in P-doped Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenland, P. T.; Matmon, G.; Villis, B. J.; Bowyer, E. T.; Li, Juerong; Murdin, B. N.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Redlich, B.; Pidgeon, C. R.; Aeppli, G.

    2015-10-01

    This work describes detection of the laser preparation and subsequent coherent manipulation of the quantum states of orbital levels of donors in doped Si, by measuring the voltage drop across an irradiated Si sample. This electrical signal, which arises from thermal ionization of excited orbital states, and which is detected on a millisecond time scale by a voltmeter, leads to much more sensitive detection than can be had using optical methods, but has not before been quantitatively described from first principles. We present here a unified theory which relates the voltage drop across the sample to the wave function of the excited donors, and compare its predictions to experiments in which pairs of picosecond pulses from the Dutch free-electron laser FELIX are used to resonantly and coherently excite P donors in Si. Although the voltage drop varies on a millisecond time scale we are able to measure Ramsey oscillation of the excitation on a picosecond time scale, thus confirming that the donor wave function, and not just its excited state population, is crucial in determining the electrical signal. We are also able to extract the recombination rate coefficient to the ground state of the donor as well as the photoionization cross section of the excited state and phonon induced thermal ionization rate from the excited state. These quantities, which were previously of limited interest, are here shown to be important in the description of electrical detection, which, in our unoptimized configuration, is sensitive enough to enable us to detect the excitation of ˜107 donors.

  1. A local search for a graph clustering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrotskaya, Anna; Il'ev, Victor

    2016-10-01

    In the clustering problems one has to partition a given set of objects (a data set) into some subsets (called clusters) taking into consideration only similarity of the objects. One of most visual formalizations of clustering is graph clustering, that is grouping the vertices of a graph into clusters taking into consideration the edge structure of the graph whose vertices are objects and edges represent similarities between the objects. In the graph k-clustering problem the number of clusters does not exceed k and the goal is to minimize the number of edges between clusters and the number of missing edges within clusters. This problem is NP-hard for any k ≥ 2. We propose a polynomial time (2k-1)-approximation algorithm for graph k-clustering. Then we apply a local search procedure to the feasible solution found by this algorithm and hold experimental research of obtained heuristics.

  2. Optimized Graph Search Using Multi-Level Graph Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, Rahul; Shukla, Anupam; Tiwari, Ritu

    Graphs find a variety of use in numerous domains especially because of their capability to model common problems. The social networking graphs that are used for social networking analysis, a feature given by various social networking sites are an example of this. Graphs can also be visualized in the search engines to carry search operations and provide results. Various searching algorithms have been developed for searching in graphs. In this paper we propose that the entire network graph be clustered. The larger graphs are clustered to make smaller graphs. These smaller graphs can again be clustered to further reduce the size of graph. The search is performed on the smallest graph to identify the general path, which may be further build up to actual nodes by working on the individual clusters involved. Since many searches are carried out on the same graph, clustering may be done once and the data may be used for multiple searches over the time. If the graph changes considerably, only then we may re-cluster the graph.

  3. Filtering Random Graph Processes Over Random Time-Varying Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isufi, Elvin; Loukas, Andreas; Simonetto, Andrea; Leus, Geert

    2017-08-01

    Graph filters play a key role in processing the graph spectra of signals supported on the vertices of a graph. However, despite their widespread use, graph filters have been analyzed only in the deterministic setting, ignoring the impact of stochastic- ity in both the graph topology as well as the signal itself. To bridge this gap, we examine the statistical behavior of the two key filter types, finite impulse response (FIR) and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) graph filters, when operating on random time- varying graph signals (or random graph processes) over random time-varying graphs. Our analysis shows that (i) in expectation, the filters behave as the same deterministic filters operating on a deterministic graph, being the expected graph, having as input signal a deterministic signal, being the expected signal, and (ii) there are meaningful upper bounds for the variance of the filter output. We conclude the paper by proposing two novel ways of exploiting randomness to improve (joint graph-time) noise cancellation, as well as to reduce the computational complexity of graph filtering. As demonstrated by numerical results, these methods outperform the disjoint average and denoise algorithm, and yield a (up to) four times complexity redution, with very little difference from the optimal solution.

  4. K-theory of locally finite graph C∗-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyudu, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    We calculate the K-theory of the Cuntz-Krieger algebra OE associated with an infinite, locally finite graph, via the Bass-Hashimoto operator. The formulae we get express the Grothendieck group and the Whitehead group in purely graph theoretic terms. We consider the category of finite (black-and-white, bi-directed) subgraphs with certain graph homomorphisms and construct a continuous functor to abelian groups. In this category K0 is an inductive limit of K-groups of finite graphs, which were calculated in Cornelissen et al. (2008) [3]. In the case of an infinite graph with the finite Betti number we obtain the formula for the Grothendieck group K0(OE)=Z, where β(E) is the first Betti number and γ(E) is the valency number of the graph E. We note that in the infinite case the torsion part of K0, which is present in the case of a finite graph, vanishes. The Whitehead group depends only on the first Betti number: K1(OE)=Z. These allow us to provide a counterexample to the fact, which holds for finite graphs, that K1(OE) is the torsion free part of K0(OE).

  5. Tutte polynomial of a small-world Farey graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yunhua; Hou, Yaoping; Shen, Xiaoling

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we find recursive formulas for the Tutte polynomials of a family of small-world Farey graphs, which are modular, and has an exponential degree hierarchy. As applications of the recursive formula, the exact expressions for the chromatic polynomial and the reliability polynomial of Fare graphs are derived and the number of connected spanning subgraphs is also obtained.

  6. Generating loop graphs via Hopf algebra in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mestre, Angela; Oeckl, Robert

    2006-12-15

    We use the Hopf algebra structure of the time-ordered algebra of field operators to generate all connected weighted Feynman graphs in a recursive and efficient manner. The algebraic representation of the graphs is such that they can be evaluated directly as contributions to the connected n-point functions. The recursion proceeds by loop order and vertex number.

  7. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  8. Subdominant pseudoultrametric on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dovgoshei, A A; Petrov, E A

    2013-08-31

    Let (G,w) be a weighted graph. We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which the weight w:E(G)→R{sup +} can be extended to a pseudoultrametric on V(G), and establish a criterion for the uniqueness of such an extension. We demonstrate that (G,w) is a complete k-partite graph, for k≥2, if and only if for any weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric, among all such extensions one can find the least pseudoultrametric consistent with w. We give a structural characterization of graphs for which the subdominant pseudoultrametric is an ultrametric for any strictly positive weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  9. Quantum ergodicity on graphs.

    PubMed

    Gnutzmann, S; Keating, J P; Piotet, F

    2008-12-31

    We investigate the equidistribution of the eigenfunctions on quantum graphs in the high-energy limit. Our main result is an estimate of the deviations from equidistribution for large well-connected graphs. We use an exact field-theoretic expression in terms of a variant of the supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model. Our estimate is based on a saddle-point analysis of this expression and leads to a criterion for when equidistribution emerges asymptotically in the limit of large graphs. Our theory predicts a rate of convergence that is a significant refinement of previous estimates, long assumed to be valid for quantum chaotic systems, agreeing with them in some situations but not all. We discuss specific examples for which the theory is tested numerically.

  10. Quantum Ergodicity on Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Gnutzmann, S.; Keating, J. P.; Piotet, F.

    2008-12-31

    We investigate the equidistribution of the eigenfunctions on quantum graphs in the high-energy limit. Our main result is an estimate of the deviations from equidistribution for large well-connected graphs. We use an exact field-theoretic expression in terms of a variant of the supersymmetric nonlinear {sigma} model. Our estimate is based on a saddle-point analysis of this expression and leads to a criterion for when equidistribution emerges asymptotically in the limit of large graphs. Our theory predicts a rate of convergence that is a significant refinement of previous estimates, long assumed to be valid for quantum chaotic systems, agreeing with them in some situations but not all. We discuss specific examples for which the theory is tested numerically.

  11. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  12. Complete chloroplast genome of Oncidium Gower Ramsey and evaluation of molecular markers for identification and breeding in Oncidiinae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oncidium spp. produce commercially important orchid cut flowers. However, they are amenable to intergeneric and inter-specific crossing making phylogenetic identification very difficult. Molecular markers derived from the chloroplast genome can provide useful tools for phylogenetic resolution. Results The complete chloroplast genome of the economically important Oncidium variety Onc. Gower Ramsey (Accession no. GQ324949) was determined using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger based ABI sequencing. The length of the Oncidium chloroplast genome is 146,484 bp. Genome structure, gene order and orientation are similar to Phalaenopsis, but differ from typical Poaceae, other monocots for which there are several published chloroplast (cp) genome. The Onc. Gower Ramsey chloroplast-encoded NADH dehydrogenase (ndh) genes, except ndhE, lack apparent functions. Deletion and other types of mutations were also found in the ndh genes of 15 other economically important Oncidiinae varieties, except ndhE in some species. The positions of some species in the evolution and taxonomy of Oncidiinae are difficult to identify. To identify the relationships between the 15 Oncidiinae hybrids, eight regions of the Onc. Gower Ramsey chloroplast genome were amplified by PCR for phylogenetic analysis. A total of 7042 bp derived from the eight regions could identify the relationships at the species level, which were supported by high bootstrap values. One particular 1846 bp region, derived from two PCR products (trnHGUG -psbA and trnFGAA-ndhJ) was adequate for correct phylogenetic placement of 13 of the 15 varieties (with the exception of Degarmoara Flying High and Odontoglossum Violetta von Holm). Thus the chloroplast genome provides a useful molecular marker for species identifications. Conclusion In this report, we used Phalaenopsis. aphrodite as a prototype for primer design to complete the Onc. Gower Ramsey genome sequence. Gene annotation showed that most of the ndh

  13. Labeled Graph Kernel for Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruiqi; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2016-01-01

    Automatic behavior analysis from video is a major topic in many areas of research, including computer vision, multimedia, robotics, biology, cognitive science, social psychology, psychiatry, and linguistics. Two major problems are of interest when analyzing behavior. First, we wish to automatically categorize observed behaviors into a discrete set of classes (i.e., classification). For example, to determine word production from video sequences in sign language. Second, we wish to understand the relevance of each behavioral feature in achieving this classification (i.e., decoding). For instance, to know which behavior variables are used to discriminate between the words apple and onion in American Sign Language (ASL). The present paper proposes to model behavior using a labeled graph, where the nodes define behavioral features and the edges are labels specifying their order (e.g., before, overlaps, start). In this approach, classification reduces to a simple labeled graph matching. Unfortunately, the complexity of labeled graph matching grows exponentially with the number of categories we wish to represent. Here, we derive a graph kernel to quickly and accurately compute this graph similarity. This approach is very general and can be plugged into any kernel-based classifier. Specifically, we derive a Labeled Graph Support Vector Machine (LGSVM) and a Labeled Graph Logistic Regressor (LGLR) that can be readily employed to discriminate between many actions (e.g., sign language concepts). The derived approach can be readily used for decoding too, yielding invaluable information for the understanding of a problem (e.g., to know how to teach a sign language). The derived algorithms allow us to achieve higher accuracy results than those of state-of-the-art algorithms in a fraction of the time. We show experimental results on a variety of problems and datasets, including multimodal data. PMID:26415154

  14. Labeled Graph Kernel for Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiqi; Martinez, Aleix M

    2016-08-01

    Automatic behavior analysis from video is a major topic in many areas of research, including computer vision, multimedia, robotics, biology, cognitive science, social psychology, psychiatry, and linguistics. Two major problems are of interest when analyzing behavior. First, we wish to automatically categorize observed behaviors into a discrete set of classes (i.e., classification). For example, to determine word production from video sequences in sign language. Second, we wish to understand the relevance of each behavioral feature in achieving this classification (i.e., decoding). For instance, to know which behavior variables are used to discriminate between the words apple and onion in American Sign Language (ASL). The present paper proposes to model behavior using a labeled graph, where the nodes define behavioral features and the edges are labels specifying their order (e.g., before, overlaps, start). In this approach, classification reduces to a simple labeled graph matching. Unfortunately, the complexity of labeled graph matching grows exponentially with the number of categories we wish to represent. Here, we derive a graph kernel to quickly and accurately compute this graph similarity. This approach is very general and can be plugged into any kernel-based classifier. Specifically, we derive a Labeled Graph Support Vector Machine (LGSVM) and a Labeled Graph Logistic Regressor (LGLR) that can be readily employed to discriminate between many actions (e.g., sign language concepts). The derived approach can be readily used for decoding too, yielding invaluable information for the understanding of a problem (e.g., to know how to teach a sign language). The derived algorithms allow us to achieve higher accuracy results than those of state-of-the-art algorithms in a fraction of the time. We show experimental results on a variety of problems and datasets, including multimodal data.

  15. Investigation of Zero Knowledge Proof Approaches Based on Graph Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In House 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62702F 6. AUTHOR(S) Victoria Horan Michael Gudaitis 5d...interactive proof system for the graph isomorphism problem and proves that it is a zero-knowledge proof system in a thorough manner. 19. J. Rothe ... Rothe . “Heuristics versus Completeness for Graph Coloring.” Chicago Journal of Theoretical Computer Science, 2000(1): 1-16, 2000. Notes

  16. Random graph models of social networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, M. E. J.; Watts, D. J.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2002-01-01

    We describe some new exactly solvable models of the structure of social networks, based on random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. We give models both for simple unipartite networks, such as acquaintance networks, and bipartite networks, such as affiliation networks. We compare the predictions of our models to data for a number of real-world social networks and find that in some cases, the models are in remarkable agreement with the data, whereas in others the agreement is poorer, perhaps indicating the presence of additional social structure in the network that is not captured by the random graph. PMID:11875211

  17. Graphing techniques for materials laboratory using Excel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1994-01-01

    Engineering technology curricula stress hands on training and laboratory practices in most of the technical courses. Laboratory reports should include analytical as well as graphical evaluation of experimental data. Experience shows that many students neither have the mathematical background nor the expertise for graphing. This paper briefly describes the procedure and data obtained from a number of experiments such as spring rate, stress concentration, endurance limit, and column buckling for a variety of materials. Then with a brief introduction to Microsoft Excel the author explains the techniques used for linear regression and logarithmic graphing.

  18. Eigenvalues of the Laplacian of a graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. N., Jr.; Morley, T. D.

    1971-01-01

    Let G be a finite undirected graph with no loops or multiple edges. The Laplacian matrix of G, Delta(G), is defined by Delta sub ii = degree of vertex i and Delta sub ij = -1 if there is an edge between vertex i and vertex j. The structure of the graph G is related to the eigenvalues of Delta(G); in particular, it is proved that all the eigenvalues of Delta(G) are nonnegative, less than or equal to the number of vertices, and less than or equal to twice the maximum vertex degree. Precise conditions for equality are given.

  19. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  20. Cookies and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Carol

    1975-01-01

    Teachers of an integrated elementary classroom used cookie-sharing time as a learning experience for students. Responsible for dividing varying amounts of cookies daily, the students learned to translate their experiences to graphs of differing sophistication and analyses. Further interpretation and application were done by individual students…

  1. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  2. Straight Line Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares one effective lesson idea on straight line graphs that he applied in his lower ability Y9 class. The author wanted something interesting for his class to do, something that was fun and engaging with direct feedback, and something that worked because someone else had tried it before. In a word, the author admits…

  3. Hidden Behavior in Graphs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, H. Edward; George, Elizabeth Ann

    1993-01-01

    Demonstrates how to construct rational, exponential, and sinusoidal functions that appear normal on one scale but exhibit interesting hidden behavior when viewed on another scale. By exploring these examples, students learn the importance of scale, window size, and resolution effects in computer and calculator graphing. (MAZ)

  4. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  5. GraphLib

    SciTech Connect

    2013-02-19

    This library is used in several LLNL projects, including STAT (the Stack Trace Analysis Tool for scalable debugging) and some modules in P^nMPI (a tool MPI tool infrastructure). It can also be used standalone for creating and manipulationg graphs, but its API is primarily tuned to support these other projects

  6. Graph-theoretical exorcism

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Given a graph G and an ordering phi of the vertices, V(G), we define a parsimonious proper coloring (PPC) of V(G) under phi to be a proper coloring of V(G) in the order phi, where a new color is introduced only when a vertex cannot be properly colored in its order with any of the colors already used.

  7. Introduction to Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    In this autoinstructional packet, the student is given an experimental situation which introduces him to the process of graphing. The lesson is presented for secondary school students in chemistry. Algebra I and a Del Mod System program (indicated as SE 018 020) are suggested prerequisites for the use of this program. Behavioral objectives are…

  8. Straight Line Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares one effective lesson idea on straight line graphs that he applied in his lower ability Y9 class. The author wanted something interesting for his class to do, something that was fun and engaging with direct feedback, and something that worked because someone else had tried it before. In a word, the author admits…

  9. Learning a Nonnegative Sparse Graph for Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung

    2015-09-01

    Previous graph-based semisupervised learning (G-SSL) methods have the following drawbacks: 1) they usually predefine the graph structure and then use it to perform label prediction, which cannot guarantee an overall optimum and 2) they only focus on the label prediction or the graph structure construction but are not competent in handling new samples. To this end, a novel nonnegative sparse graph (NNSG) learning method was first proposed. Then, both the label prediction and projection learning were integrated into linear regression. Finally, the linear regression and graph structure learning were unified within the same framework to overcome these two drawbacks. Therefore, a novel method, named learning a NNSG for linear regression was presented, in which the linear regression and graph learning were simultaneously performed to guarantee an overall optimum. In the learning process, the label information can be accurately propagated via the graph structure so that the linear regression can learn a discriminative projection to better fit sample labels and accurately classify new samples. An effective algorithm was designed to solve the corresponding optimization problem with fast convergence. Furthermore, NNSG provides a unified perceptiveness for a number of graph-based learning methods and linear regression methods. The experimental results showed that NNSG can obtain very high classification accuracy and greatly outperforms conventional G-SSL methods, especially some conventional graph construction methods.

  10. Random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Strogatz, S. H.; Watts, D. J.

    2001-08-01

    Recent work on the structure of social networks and the internet has focused attention on graphs with distributions of vertex degree that are significantly different from the Poisson degree distributions that have been widely studied in the past. In this paper we develop in detail the theory of random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. In addition to simple undirected, unipartite graphs, we examine the properties of directed and bipartite graphs. Among other results, we derive exact expressions for the position of the phase transition at which a giant component first forms, the mean component size, the size of the giant component if there is one, the mean number of vertices a certain distance away from a randomly chosen vertex, and the average vertex-vertex distance within a graph. We apply our theory to some real-world graphs, including the world-wide web and collaboration graphs of scientists and Fortune 1000 company directors. We demonstrate that in some cases random graphs with appropriate distributions of vertex degree predict with surprising accuracy the behavior of the real world, while in others there is a measurable discrepancy between theory and reality, perhaps indicating the presence of additional social structure in the network that is not captured by the random graph.

  11. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-15

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

  12. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  13. Speed of evolution on graphs.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiukai; Wu, Bin; Wang, Long

    2015-12-01

    The likelihood that a mutant fixates in the wild population, i.e., fixation probability, has been intensively studied in evolutionary game theory, where individuals' fitness is frequency dependent. However, it is of limited interest when it takes long to take over. Thus the speed of evolution becomes an important issue. In general, it is still unclear how fixation times are affected by the population structure, although the fixation times have already been addressed in the well-mixed populations. Here we theoretically address this issue by pair approximation and diffusion approximation on regular graphs. It is shown (i) that under neutral selection, both unconditional and conditional fixation time are shortened by increasing the number of neighbors; (ii) that under weak selection, for the simplified prisoner's dilemma game, if benefit-to-cost ratio exceeds the degree of the graph, then the unconditional fixation time of a single cooperator is slower than that in the neutral case; and (iii) that under weak selection, for the conditional fixation time, limited neighbor size dilutes the counterintuitive stochastic slowdown which was found in well-mixed populations. Interestingly, we find that all of our results can be interpreted as that in the well-mixed population with a transformed payoff matrix. This interpretation is also valid for both death-birth and birth-death processes on graphs. This interpretation bridges the fixation time in the structured population and that in the well-mixed population. Thus it opens the avenue to investigate the challenging fixation time in structured populations by the known results in well-mixed populations.

  14. Speed of evolution on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Xiukai; Wu, Bin; Wang, Long

    2015-12-01

    The likelihood that a mutant fixates in the wild population, i.e., fixation probability, has been intensively studied in evolutionary game theory, where individuals' fitness is frequency dependent. However, it is of limited interest when it takes long to take over. Thus the speed of evolution becomes an important issue. In general, it is still unclear how fixation times are affected by the population structure, although the fixation times have already been addressed in the well-mixed populations. Here we theoretically address this issue by pair approximation and diffusion approximation on regular graphs. It is shown (i) that under neutral selection, both unconditional and conditional fixation time are shortened by increasing the number of neighbors; (ii) that under weak selection, for the simplified prisoner's dilemma game, if benefit-to-cost ratio exceeds the degree of the graph, then the unconditional fixation time of a single cooperator is slower than that in the neutral case; and (iii) that under weak selection, for the conditional fixation time, limited neighbor size dilutes the counterintuitive stochastic slowdown which was found in well-mixed populations. Interestingly, we find that all of our results can be interpreted as that in the well-mixed population with a transformed payoff matrix. This interpretation is also valid for both death-birth and birth-death processes on graphs. This interpretation bridges the fixation time in the structured population and that in the well-mixed population. Thus it opens the avenue to investigate the challenging fixation time in structured populations by the known results in well-mixed populations.

  15. Geometric crossovers for multiway graph partitioning.

    PubMed

    Moraglio, Alberto; Kim, Yong-Hyuk; Yoon, Yourim; Moon, Byung-Ro

    2007-01-01

    Geometric crossover is a representation-independent generalization of the traditional crossover defined using the distance of the solution space. By choosing a distance firmly rooted in the syntax of the solution representation as a basis for geometric crossover, one can design new crossovers for any representation. Using a distance tailored to the problem at hand, the formal definition of geometric crossover allows us to design new problem-specific crossovers that embed problem-knowledge in the search. The standard encoding for multiway graph partitioning is highly redundant: each solution has a number of representations, one for each way of labeling the represented partition. Traditional crossover does not perform well on redundant encodings. We propose a new geometric crossover for graph partitioning based on a labeling-independent distance that filters out the redundancy of the encoding. A correlation analysis of the fitness landscape based on this distance shows that it is well suited to graph partitioning. A second difficulty with designing a crossover for multiway graph partitioning is that of feasibility: in general recombining feasible partitions does not lead to feasible offspring partitions. We design a new geometric crossover for permutations with repetitions that naturally suits partition problems and we test it on the graph partitioning problem. We then combine it with the labeling-independent crossover and obtain a much superior geometric crossover inheriting both advantages.

  16. Distributed Adaptive Learning of Graph Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lorenzo, Paolo; Banelli, Paolo; Barbarossa, Sergio; Sardellitti, Stefania

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose distributed strategies for adaptive learning of signals defined over graphs. Assuming the graph signal to be bandlimited, the method enables distributed reconstruction, with guaranteed performance in terms of mean-square error, and tracking from a limited number of sampled observations taken from a subset of vertices. A detailed mean square analysis is carried out and illustrates the role played by the sampling strategy on the performance of the proposed method. Finally, some useful strategies for distributed selection of the sampling set are provided. Several numerical results validate our theoretical findings, and illustrate the performance of the proposed method for distributed adaptive learning of signals defined over graphs.

  17. Clustering gene expression data using graph separators.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Bangaly; Pinet, Nicolas; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Sigayret, Alain; Berry, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has used graphs to modelize expression data from microarray experiments, in view of partitioning the genes into clusters. In this paper, we introduce the use of a decomposition by clique separators. Our aim is to improve the classical clustering methods in two ways: first we want to allow an overlap between clusters, as this seems biologically sound, and second we want to be guided by the structure of the graph to define the number of clusters. We test this approach with a well-known yeast database (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results are good, as the expression profiles of the clusters we find are very coherent. Moreover, we are able to organize into another graph the clusters we find, and order them in a fashion which turns out to respect the chronological order defined by the the sporulation process.

  18. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  19. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  20. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  1. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs.

  2. Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

  3. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  4. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  5. Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

  6. Graphs as a Problem-Solving Tool in 1-D Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desbien, Dwain M.

    2008-01-01

    In this age of the microcomputer-based lab (MBL), students are quite accustomed to looking at graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time. A number of textbooks argue convincingly that the slope of the velocity graph gives the acceleration, the area under the velocity graph yields the displacement, and the area under the…

  7. Less Is Less: A Systematic Review of Graph Use in Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schild, Anne H. E.; Voracek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are an essential part of scientific communication. Complex datasets, of which meta-analyses are textbook examples, benefit the most from visualization. Although a number of graph options for meta-analyses exist, the extent to which these are used was hitherto unclear. A systematic review on graph use in meta-analyses in three disciplines…

  8. Less Is Less: A Systematic Review of Graph Use in Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schild, Anne H. E.; Voracek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are an essential part of scientific communication. Complex datasets, of which meta-analyses are textbook examples, benefit the most from visualization. Although a number of graph options for meta-analyses exist, the extent to which these are used was hitherto unclear. A systematic review on graph use in meta-analyses in three disciplines…

  9. Using Combinatorica/Mathematica for Student Projects in Random Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Thomas J.; Zaret, Michele

    2006-01-01

    We give an example of a student project that experimentally explores a topic in random graph theory. We use the "Combinatorica" package in "Mathematica" to estimate the minimum number of edges needed in a random graph to have a 50 percent chance that the graph is connected. We provide the "Mathematica" code and compare it to the known theoretical…

  10. Graphs as a Problem-Solving Tool in 1-D Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desbien, Dwain M.

    2008-01-01

    In this age of the microcomputer-based lab (MBL), students are quite accustomed to looking at graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time. A number of textbooks argue convincingly that the slope of the velocity graph gives the acceleration, the area under the velocity graph yields the displacement, and the area under the…

  11. Using Combinatorica/Mathematica for Student Projects in Random Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Thomas J.; Zaret, Michele

    2006-01-01

    We give an example of a student project that experimentally explores a topic in random graph theory. We use the "Combinatorica" package in "Mathematica" to estimate the minimum number of edges needed in a random graph to have a 50 percent chance that the graph is connected. We provide the "Mathematica" code and compare it to the known theoretical…

  12. Transient development of Zeeman electromagnetically induced transparency during propagation of Raman-Ramsey pulses through Rb buffer gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, S. N.; Radonjić, M.; Lučić, N. M.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate, experimentally and theoretically, time development of Zeeman electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) during propagation of two time separated polarization laser pulses, preparatory and probe, through Rb vapour. The pulses were produced by modifying laser intensity and degree of elliptical polarization. The frequency of the single laser beam is locked to the hyperfine {{F}g}=2\\to {{F}e}=1 transition of the D1 line in 87Rb. Transients in the intensity of {{σ }-} component of the transmitted light are measured or calculated at different values of the external magnetic field, during both preparatory and probe pulse. Zeeman EIT resonances at particular time instants of the pulse propagation are reconstructed by appropriate sampling of the transients. We observe how laser intensity, Ramsey sequence and the Rb cell temperature affect the time dependence of EIT line shapes, amplitudes and linewidths. We show that at early times of the probe pulse propagation, several Ramsey fringes are present in EIT resonances, while at later moments a single narrow peak prevails. Time development of EIT amplitudes are determined by the transmitted intensity of the {{σ }-} component during the pulse propagation.

  13. Ancestral recombinations graph: a reconstructability perspective using random-graphs framework.

    PubMed

    Parida, Laxmi

    2010-10-01

    We present a random graphs framework to study pedigree history in an ideal (Wright Fisher) population. This framework correlates the underlying mathematical objects in, for example, pedigree graph, mtDNA or NRY Chr tree, ARG (Ancestral Recombinations Graph), and HUD used in literature, into a single unified random graph framework. It also gives a natural definition, based solely on the topology, of an ARG, one of the most interesting as well as useful mathematical objects in this area. The random graphs framework gives an alternative parametrization of the ARG that does not use the recombination rate q and instead uses a parameter M based on the (estimate of ) the number of non-mixing segments in the extant units. This seems more natural in a setting that attempts to tease apart the population dynamics from the biology of the units. This framework also gives a purely topological definition of GMRCA, analogous to MRCA on trees (which has a purely topological description i.e., it is a root, graph-theoretically speaking, of a tree). Secondly, with a natural extension of the ideas from random-graphs we present a sampling (simulation) algorithm to construct random instances of ARG/unilinear transmission graph. This is the first (to the best of the author's knowledge) algorithm that guarantees uniform sampling of the space of ARG instances, reflecting the ideal population model. Finally, using a measure of reconstructability of the past historical events given a collection of extant sequences, we conclude for a given set of extant sequences, the joint history of local segments along a chromosome is reconstructible.

  14. Multithreaded Algorithms for Graph Coloring

    SciTech Connect

    Catalyurek, Umit V.; Feo, John T.; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Pothen, Alex

    2012-10-21

    Graph algorithms are challenging to parallelize when high performance and scalability are primary goals. Low concurrency, poor data locality, irregular access pattern, and high data access to computation ratio are among the chief reasons for the challenge. The performance implication of these features is exasperated on distributed memory machines. More success is being achieved on shared-memory, multi-core architectures supporting multithreading. We consider a prototypical graph problem, coloring, and show how a greedy algorithm for solving it can be e*ectively parallelized on multithreaded architectures. We present in particular two di*erent parallel algorithms. The first relies on speculation and iteration, and is suitable for any shared-memory, multithreaded system. The second uses data ow principles and is targeted at the massively multithreaded Cray XMT system. We benchmark the algorithms on three di*erent platforms and demonstrate scalable runtime performance. In terms of quality of solution, both algorithms use nearly the same number of colors as the serial algorithm.

  15. Orthocomplemented complete lattices and graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollech, Astrid

    1995-08-01

    The problem I consider originates from Dörfler, who found a construction to assign an Orthocomplemented lattice H(G) to a graph G. By Dörfler it is known that for every finite Orthocomplemented lattice L there exists a graph G such that H(G)=L. Unfortunately, we can find more than one graph G with this property, i.e., orthocomplemented lattices which belong to different graphs can be isomorphic. I show some conditions under which two graphs have the same orthocomplemented lattice.

  16. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-10-15

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  17. Regular homotopy for immersions of graphs into surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permyakov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    We study invariants of regular immersions of graphs into surfaces up to regular homotopy. The concept of the winding number is used to introduce a new simple combinatorial invariant of regular homotopy. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  18. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  19. Optical tomography on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Francis J.; Gilbert, Anna C.; Hoskins, Jeremy G.; Schotland, John C.

    2017-05-01

    We present an algorithm for solving inverse problems on graphs analogous to those arising in diffuse optical tomography for continuous media. In particular, we formulate and analyze a discrete version of the inverse Born series, proving estimates characterizing the domain of convergence, approximation errors, and stability of our approach. We also present a modification which allows additional information on the structure of the potential to be incorporated, facilitating recovery for a broader class of problems.

  20. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  1. Convex Graph Invariants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    evaluating the function ΘP (A) for any fixed A,P is equivalent to solving the so-called Quadratic Assignment Problem ( QAP ), and thus we can employ various...tractable linear programming, spectral, and SDP relaxations of QAP [40, 11, 33]. In particular we discuss recent work [14] on exploiting group...symmetry in SDP relaxations of QAP , which is useful for approximately computing elementary convex graph invariants in many interesting cases. Finally in

  2. Factorized Graph Matching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; de la Torre, Fernando

    2015-11-19

    Graph matching (GM) is a fundamental problem in computer science, and it plays a central role to solve correspondence problems in computer vision. GM problems that incorporate pairwise constraints can be formulated as a quadratic assignment problem (QAP). Although widely used, solving the correspondence problem through GM has two main limitations: (1) the QAP is NP-hard and difficult to approximate; (2) GM algorithms do not incorporate geometric constraints between nodes that are natural in computer vision problems. To address aforementioned problems, this paper proposes factorized graph matching (FGM). FGM factorizes the large pairwise affinity matrix into smaller matrices that encode the local structure of each graph and the pairwise affinity between edges. Four are the benefits that follow from this factorization: (1) There is no need to compute the costly (in space and time) pairwise affinity matrix; (2) The factorization allows the use of a path-following optimization algorithm, that leads to improved optimization strategies and matching performance; (3) Given the factorization, it becomes straight-forward to incorporate geometric transformations (rigid and non-rigid) to the GM problem. (4) Using a matrix formulation for the GM problem and the factorization, it is easy to reveal commonalities and differences between different GM methods. The factorization also provides a clean connection with other matching algorithms such as iterative closest point; Experimental results on synthetic and real databases illustrate how FGM outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for GM. The code is available at http://humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/fgm.

  3. Graph State-Based Quantum Group Authentication Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Longxia; Peng, Xiaoqi; Shi, Jinjing; Guo, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by the elegant structure of the graph state, we design an ingenious quantum group authentication scheme, which is implemented by operating appropriate operations on the graph state and can solve the problem of multi-user authentication. Three entities, the group authentication server (GAS) as a verifier, multiple users as provers and the trusted third party Trent are included. GAS and Trent assist the multiple users in completing the authentication process, i.e., GAS is responsible for registering all the users while Trent prepares graph states. All the users, who request for authentication, encode their authentication keys on to the graph state by performing Pauli operators. It demonstrates that a novel authentication scheme can be achieved with the flexible use of graph state, which can synchronously authenticate a large number of users, meanwhile the provable security can be guaranteed definitely.

  4. Entanglement witnesses for graph states: General theory and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Jungnitsch, Bastian; Moroder, Tobias; Guehne, Otfried

    2011-09-15

    We present a general theory for the construction of witnesses that detect genuine multipartite entanglement in graph states. First, we present explicit witnesses for all graph states of up to six qubits which are better than all criteria so far. Therefore, lower fidelities are required in experiments that aim at the preparation of graph states. Building on these results, we develop analytical methods to construct two different types of entanglement witnesses for general graph states. For many classes of states, these operators exhibit white noise tolerances that converge to 1 when increasing the number of particles. We illustrate our approach for states such as the linear and the 2D cluster state. Finally, we study an entanglement monotone motivated by our approach for graph states.

  5. Applying Graph Theory to Problems in Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrahi, Amir Hossein; Goldbert, Alan; Bagasol, Leonard Neil; Jung, Jaewoo

    2017-01-01

    Graph theory is used to investigate three different problems arising in air traffic management. First, using a polynomial reduction from a graph partitioning problem, it is shown that both the airspace sectorization problem and its incremental counterpart, the sector combination problem are NP-hard, in general, under several simple workload models. Second, using a polynomial time reduction from maximum independent set in graphs, it is shown that for any fixed e, the problem of finding a solution to the minimum delay scheduling problem in traffic flow management that is guaranteed to be within n1-e of the optimal, where n is the number of aircraft in the problem instance, is NP-hard. Finally, a problem arising in precision arrival scheduling is formulated and solved using graph reachability. These results demonstrate that graph theory provides a powerful framework for modeling, reasoning about, and devising algorithmic solutions to diverse problems arising in air traffic management.

  6. A system for routing arbitrary directed graphs on SIMD architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomboulian, Sherryl

    1987-01-01

    There are many problems which can be described in terms of directed graphs that contain a large number of vertices where simple computations occur using data from connecting vertices. A method is given for parallelizing such problems on an SIMD machine model that is bit-serial and uses only nearest neighbor connections for communication. Each vertex of the graph will be assigned to a processor in the machine. Algorithms are given that will be used to implement movement of data along the arcs of the graph. This architecture and algorithms define a system that is relatively simple to build and can do graph processing. All arcs can be transversed in parallel in time O(T), where T is empirically proportional to the diameter of the interconnection network times the average degree of the graph. Modifying or adding a new arc takes the same time as parallel traversal.

  7. Lung segmentation with graph cuts: Graph size versus performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazokifard, Banafsheh; Sowmya, Arcot

    2013-10-01

    The effect of graph size on segmentation performance and speed is investigated, where segmentation is based on the graph cuts algorithm. The study is performed on lung extraction in 50 complete multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) datasets, and a fully automatic procedure. The experiments were performed on different graph sizes for both 2-D (4 and 8 neighbours) and 3-D (6 and 26 neighbours) graphs. Five slices from each segmented dataset were compared to the reference delineation provided by a radiologist. Our evaluations highlight the fact that when medical image segmentation is performed using graph cuts, increasing graph and neighbourhood connection size does not necessarily improve the segmentation performance, but also increase the running time dramatically.

  8. Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping

    SciTech Connect

    John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-09-01

    Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

  9. GOGrapher: A Python library for GO graph representation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Muller, Brian; Richards, Adam J; Jin, Bo; Lu, Xinghua

    2009-07-07

    The Gene Ontology is the most commonly used controlled vocabulary for annotating proteins. The concepts in the ontology are organized as a directed acyclic graph, in which a node corresponds to a biological concept and a directed edge denotes the parent-child semantic relationship between a pair of terms. A large number of protein annotations further create links between proteins and their functional annotations, reflecting the contemporary knowledge about proteins and their functional relationships. This leads to a complex graph consisting of interleaved biological concepts and their associated proteins. What is needed is a simple, open source library that provides tools to not only create and view the Gene Ontology graph, but to analyze and manipulate it as well. Here we describe the development and use of GOGrapher, a Python library that can be used for the creation, analysis, manipulation, and visualization of Gene Ontology related graphs. An object-oriented approach was adopted to organize the hierarchy of the graphs types and associated classes. An Application Programming Interface is provided through which different types of graphs can be pragmatically created, manipulated, and visualized. GOGrapher has been successfully utilized in multiple research projects, e.g., a graph-based multi-label text classifier for protein annotation. The GOGrapher project provides a reusable programming library designed for the manipulation and analysis of Gene Ontology graphs. The library is freely available for the scientific community to use and improve.

  10. Join-Graph Propagation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Mateescu, Robert; Kask, Kalev; Gogate, Vibhav; Dechter, Rina

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates parameterized approximate message-passing schemes that are based on bounded inference and are inspired by Pearl's belief propagation algorithm (BP). We start with the bounded inference mini-clustering algorithm and then move to the iterative scheme called Iterative Join-Graph Propagation (IJGP), that combines both iteration and bounded inference. Algorithm IJGP belongs to the class of Generalized Belief Propagation algorithms, a framework that allowed connections with approximate algorithms from statistical physics and is shown empirically to surpass the performance of mini-clustering and belief propagation, as well as a number of other state-of-the-art algorithms on several classes of networks. We also provide insight into the accuracy of iterative BP and IJGP by relating these algorithms to well known classes of constraint propagation schemes. PMID:20740057

  11. Automated Program Recognition by Graph Parsing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    programs are represented as attributed dataflow graphs and a library of clichis is encoded as an attributed graph grammar . Graph parsing is used to...recognition. Second, we investigate the expressiveness of our graph grammar formalism for capturing pro- gramming cliches. Third, we empirically and...library of cliches is encoded as an attributed graph grammar . Graph parsing is used to recognize clich6s in the code. We demonstrate that this graph

  12. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  13. Thinking Graphically: Connecting Vision and Cognition during Graph Comprehension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...References Bertin, J. (1983). Semiology of graphs. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. Bravo, M. J., & Farid, H. (2002). Object

  14. Potts model and graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F. Y.

    1988-07-01

    Elementary exposition is given of some recent developments in studies of graphtheoretic aspects of the Potts model. Topics discussed include graphical expansions of the Potts partition function and correlation functions and their relationships with the chromatic, dichromatic, and flow polynomials occurring in graph theory. It is also shown that the Potts model realization of these classic graph-theoretic problems provides alternate and direct proofs of properties established heretofore only in the context of formal graph theory.

  15. Figure-Ground Segmentation Using Factor Graphs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huiying; Coughlan, James; Ivanchenko, Volodymyr

    2009-06-04

    Foreground-background segmentation has recently been applied [26,12] to the detection and segmentation of specific objects or structures of interest from the background as an efficient alternative to techniques such as deformable templates [27]. We introduce a graphical model (i.e. Markov random field)-based formulation of structure-specific figure-ground segmentation based on simple geometric features extracted from an image, such as local configurations of linear features, that are characteristic of the desired figure structure. Our formulation is novel in that it is based on factor graphs, which are graphical models that encode interactions among arbitrary numbers of random variables. The ability of factor graphs to express interactions higher than pairwise order (the highest order encountered in most graphical models used in computer vision) is useful for modeling a variety of pattern recognition problems. In particular, we show how this property makes factor graphs a natural framework for performing grouping and segmentation, and demonstrate that the factor graph framework emerges naturally from a simple maximum entropy model of figure-ground segmentation.We cast our approach in a learning framework, in which the contributions of multiple grouping cues are learned from training data, and apply our framework to the problem of finding printed text in natural scenes. Experimental results are described, including a performance analysis that demonstrates the feasibility of the approach.

  16. Contact Graph Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic

  17. Eigensolutions of dodecahedron graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Piyali; Karmakar, Somnath; Mandal, Bholanath

    2014-02-01

    Eigensolutions of 20-vertex cage (i.e. dodecahedron) have been determined with the use of fivefold rotational symmetry. For homo-dodecahedron the eigensolutions become analytical but for the hetero-dodecahedron having two different types of atoms ((C,N),(C,B),(B,N)) the eigensolutions are found to be factored out into five 4-degree polynomials with one corresponding to nondegenerate and other four corresponding to two degenerate eigensolutions. Eigenspectra and total π-electron energies of homo- and hetero-dodecahedron graphs have been calculated.

  18. Strongly Regular Graphs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    The theory of strongly regular graphs was introduced by Bose r7 1 in 1963, in connection with partial geometries and 2 class association schemes. One...non adjacent vertices is constant and equal to ~. We shall denote by ~(p) (reap.r(p)) the set of vertices adjacent (resp.non adjacent) to a vertex p...is the complement of .2’ if the set of vertices of ~ is the set of vertices of .2’ and if two vertices in .2’ are adjacent if and only if they were

  19. Graph Theory of Tower Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Andreas M.

    2012-01-01

    The appropriate mathematical model for the problem space of tower transformation tasks is the state graph representing positions of discs or balls and their moves. Graph theoretical quantities like distance, eccentricities or degrees of vertices and symmetries of graphs support the choice of problems, the selection of tasks and the analysis of performance of subjects whose solution paths can be projected onto the graph. The mathematical model is also at the base of a computerized test tool to administer various types of tower tasks. PMID:22207419

  20. Noncommutative Riemannian geometry on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn

    2013-07-01

    We show that arising out of noncommutative geometry is a natural family of edge Laplacians on the edges of a graph. The family includes a canonical edge Laplacian associated to the graph, extending the usual graph Laplacian on vertices, and we find its spectrum. We show that for a connected graph its eigenvalues are strictly positive aside from one mandatory zero mode, and include all the vertex degrees. Our edge Laplacian is not the graph Laplacian on the line graph but rather it arises as the noncommutative Laplace-Beltrami operator on differential 1-forms, where we use the language of differential algebras to functorially interpret a graph as providing a 'finite manifold structure' on the set of vertices. We equip any graph with a canonical 'Euclidean metric' and a canonical bimodule connection, and in the case of a Cayley graph we construct a metric compatible connection for the Euclidean metric. We make use of results on bimodule connections on inner calculi on algebras, which we prove, including a general relation between zero curvature and the braid relations.

  1. Spectral partitioning in equitable graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    Graph partitioning problems emerge in a wide variety of complex systems, ranging from biology to finance, but can be rigorously analyzed and solved only for a few graph ensembles. Here, an ensemble of equitable graphs, i.e., random graphs with a block-regular structure, is studied, for which analytical results can be obtained. In particular, the spectral density of this ensemble is computed exactly for a modular and bipartite structure. Kesten-McKay's law for random regular graphs is found analytically to apply also for modular and bipartite structures when blocks are homogeneous. An exact solution to graph partitioning for two equal-sized communities is proposed and verified numerically, and a conjecture on the absence of an efficient recovery detectability transition in equitable graphs is suggested. A final discussion summarizes results and outlines their relevance for the solution of graph partitioning problems in other graph ensembles, in particular for the study of detectability thresholds and resolution limits in stochastic block models.

  2. Reproducibility of graph metrics of human brain structural networks.

    PubMed

    Duda, Jeffrey T; Cook, Philip A; Gee, James C

    2014-01-01

    Recent interest in human brain connectivity has led to the application of graph theoretical analysis to human brain structural networks, in particular white matter connectivity inferred from diffusion imaging and fiber tractography. While these methods have been used to study a variety of patient populations, there has been less examination of the reproducibility of these methods. A number of tractography algorithms exist and many of these are known to be sensitive to user-selected parameters. The methods used to derive a connectivity matrix from fiber tractography output may also influence the resulting graph metrics. Here we examine how these algorithm and parameter choices influence the reproducibility of proposed graph metrics on a publicly available test-retest dataset consisting of 21 healthy adults. The dice coefficient is used to examine topological similarity of constant density subgraphs both within and between subjects. Seven graph metrics are examined here: mean clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, largest connected component size, assortativity, global efficiency, local efficiency, and rich club coefficient. The reproducibility of these network summary measures is examined using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Graph curves are created by treating the graph metrics as functions of a parameter such as graph density. Functional data analysis techniques are used to examine differences in graph measures that result from the choice of fiber tracking algorithm. The graph metrics consistently showed good levels of reproducibility as measured with ICC, with the exception of some instability at low graph density levels. The global and local efficiency measures were the most robust to the choice of fiber tracking algorithm.

  3. On the spectrum discreteness of the quantum graph Hamiltonian with δ-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolkina, M. O.; Popov, I. Yu

    2015-11-01

    The condition on the potential ensuring the discreteness of the spectrum of infinite quantum graph Hamiltonian is considered. The corresponding necessary and sufficient condition was obtained by Molchanov 50 years ago. In the present paper, the analogous condition is obtained for a quantum graph. A quantum graph with infinite leads (edges) or/and infinite chains of vertices such that neighbor ones are connected by finite number of edges and with δ-type conditions at the graph vertices is suggested. The Molchanov-type theorem for the quantum graph Hamiltonian spectrum discreteness is proved.

  4. Graph Visualization for RDF Graphs with SPARQL-EndPoints

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Bond, Nathaniel

    2014-07-11

    RDF graphs are hard to visualize as triples. This software module is a web interface that connects to a SPARQL endpoint and retrieves graph data that the user can explore interactively and seamlessly. The software written in python and JavaScript has been tested to work on screens as little as the smart phones to large screens such as EVEREST.

  5. Quantum Graph Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Sterk, Jonathan David; Lobser, Daniel; Parekh, Ojas D.; Ryan-Anderson, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, advanced network analytics have become increasingly important to na- tional security with applications ranging from cyber security to detection and disruption of ter- rorist networks. While classical computing solutions have received considerable investment, the development of quantum algorithms to address problems, such as data mining of attributed relational graphs, is a largely unexplored space. Recent theoretical work has shown that quan- tum algorithms for graph analysis can be more efficient than their classical counterparts. Here, we have implemented a trapped-ion-based two-qubit quantum information proces- sor to address these goals. Building on Sandia's microfabricated silicon surface ion traps, we have designed, realized and characterized a quantum information processor using the hyperfine qubits encoded in two 171 Yb + ions. We have implemented single qubit gates using resonant microwave radiation and have employed Gate set tomography (GST) to characterize the quan- tum process. For the first time, we were able to prove that the quantum process surpasses the fault tolerance thresholds of some quantum codes by demonstrating a diamond norm distance of less than 1 . 9 x 10 [?] 4 . We used Raman transitions in order to manipulate the trapped ions' motion and realize two-qubit gates. We characterized the implemented motion sensitive and insensitive single qubit processes and achieved a maximal process infidelity of 6 . 5 x 10 [?] 5 . We implemented the two-qubit gate proposed by Molmer and Sorensen and achieved a fidelity of more than 97 . 7%.

  6. Comparing pedigree graphs.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Bonnie; Reshef, Yakir; Finucane, Hilary; Jiang, Haitao; Zhu, Binhai; Karp, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    Pedigree graphs, or family trees, are typically constructed by an expensive process of examining genealogical records to determine which pairs of individuals are parent and child. New methods to automate this process take as input genetic data from a set of extant individuals and reconstruct ancestral individuals. There is a great need to evaluate the quality of these methods by comparing the estimated pedigree to the true pedigree. In this article, we consider two main pedigree comparison problems. The first is the pedigree isomorphism problem, for which we present a linear-time algorithm for leaf-labeled pedigrees. The second is the pedigree edit distance problem, for which we present (1) several algorithms that are fast and exact in various special cases, and (2) a general, randomized heuristic algorithm. In the negative direction, we first prove that the pedigree isomorphism problem is as hard as the general graph isomorphism problem, and that the sub-pedigree isomorphism problem is NP-hard. We then show that the pedigree edit distance problem is APX-hard in general and NP-hard on leaf-labeled pedigrees. We use simulated pedigrees to compare our edit-distance algorithms to each other as well as to a branch-and-bound algorithm that always finds an optimal solution.

  7. The Use of Spatial Cognition in Graph Interpretation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Graph Interpretation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Research Laboratory,Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence...NCARAI),4555 Overlook Avenue SW,Washington,DC,20375 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES

  8. Voter model on the two-clique graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2014-07-01

    I examine the mean consensus time (i.e., exit time) of the voter model in the so-called two-clique graph. The two-clique graph is composed of two cliques interconnected by some links and considered as a toy model of networks with community structure or multilayer networks. I analytically show that, as the number of interclique links per node is varied, the mean consensus time experiences a crossover between a fast consensus regime [i.e., O (N)] and a slow consensus regime [i.e., O (N2)], where N is the number of nodes. The fast regime is consistent with the result for homogeneous well-mixed graphs such as the complete graph. The slow regime appears only when the entire network has O (1) interclique links. The present results suggest that the effect of community structure on the consensus time of the voter model is fairly limited.

  9. Voter model on the two-clique graph.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki

    2014-07-01

    I examine the mean consensus time (i.e., exit time) of the voter model in the so-called two-clique graph. The two-clique graph is composed of two cliques interconnected by some links and considered as a toy model of networks with community structure or multilayer networks. I analytically show that, as the number of interclique links per node is varied, the mean consensus time experiences a crossover between a fast consensus regime [i.e., O(N)] and a slow consensus regime [i.e., O(N(2))], where N is the number of nodes. The fast regime is consistent with the result for homogeneous well-mixed graphs such as the complete graph. The slow regime appears only when the entire network has O(1) interclique links. The present results suggest that the effect of community structure on the consensus time of the voter model is fairly limited.

  10. Statistics of Gaussian packets on metric and decorated graphs

    PubMed Central

    Chernyshev, V. L.; Shafarevich, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    We study a semiclassical asymptotics of the Cauchy problem for a time-dependent Schrödinger equation on metric and decorated graphs with a localized initial function. A decorated graph is a topological space obtained from a graph via replacing vertices with smooth Riemannian manifolds. The main term of an asymptotic solution at an arbitrary finite time is a sum of Gaussian packets and generalized Gaussian packets (localized near a certain set of codimension one). We study the number of packets as time tends to infinity. We prove that under certain assumptions this number grows in time as a polynomial and packets fill the graph uniformly. We discuss a simple example of the opposite situation: in this case, a numerical experiment shows a subexponential growth. PMID:24344346

  11. Statistics of Gaussian packets on metric and decorated graphs.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, V L; Shafarevich, A I

    2014-01-28

    We study a semiclassical asymptotics of the Cauchy problem for a time-dependent Schrödinger equation on metric and decorated graphs with a localized initial function. A decorated graph is a topological space obtained from a graph via replacing vertices with smooth Riemannian manifolds. The main term of an asymptotic solution at an arbitrary finite time is a sum of Gaussian packets and generalized Gaussian packets (localized near a certain set of codimension one). We study the number of packets as time tends to infinity. We prove that under certain assumptions this number grows in time as a polynomial and packets fill the graph uniformly. We discuss a simple example of the opposite situation: in this case, a numerical experiment shows a subexponential growth.

  12. Fracture and Fragmentation of Simplicial Finite Elements Meshes using Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, A; Knap, J; Ortiz, M

    2006-10-18

    An approach for the topological representation of simplicial finite element meshes as graphs is presented. It is shown that by using a graph, the topological changes induced by fracture reduce to a few, local kernel operations. The performance of the graph representation is demonstrated and analyzed, using as reference the 3D fracture algorithm by Pandolfi and Ortiz [22]. It is shown that the graph representation initializes in O(N{sub E}{sup 1.1}) time and fractures in O(N{sub I}{sup 1.0}) time, while the reference implementation requires O(N{sub E}{sup 2.1}) time to initialize and O(N{sub I}{sup 1.9}) time to fracture, where NE is the number of elements in the mesh and N{sub I} is the number of interfaces to fracture.

  13. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  14. Graph theoretical model of a sensorimotor connectome in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stobb, Michael; Peterson, Joshua M; Mazzag, Borbala; Gahtan, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Mapping the detailed connectivity patterns (connectomes) of neural circuits is a central goal of neuroscience. The best quantitative approach to analyzing connectome data is still unclear but graph theory has been used with success. We present a graph theoretical model of the posterior lateral line sensorimotor pathway in zebrafish. The model includes 2,616 neurons and 167,114 synaptic connections. Model neurons represent known cell types in zebrafish larvae, and connections were set stochastically following rules based on biological literature. Thus, our model is a uniquely detailed computational representation of a vertebrate connectome. The connectome has low overall connection density, with 2.45% of all possible connections, a value within the physiological range. We used graph theoretical tools to compare the zebrafish connectome graph to small-world, random and structured random graphs of the same size. For each type of graph, 100 randomly generated instantiations were considered. Degree distribution (the number of connections per neuron) varied more in the zebrafish graph than in same size graphs with less biological detail. There was high local clustering and a short average path length between nodes, implying a small-world structure similar to other neural connectomes and complex networks. The graph was found not to be scale-free, in agreement with some other neural connectomes. An experimental lesion was performed that targeted three model brain neurons, including the Mauthner neuron, known to control fast escape turns. The lesion decreased the number of short paths between sensory and motor neurons analogous to the behavioral effects of the same lesion in zebrafish. This model is expandable and can be used to organize and interpret a growing database of information on the zebrafish connectome.

  15. Graph Theoretical Model of a Sensorimotor Connectome in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stobb, Michael; Peterson, Joshua M.; Mazzag, Borbala; Gahtan, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Mapping the detailed connectivity patterns (connectomes) of neural circuits is a central goal of neuroscience. The best quantitative approach to analyzing connectome data is still unclear but graph theory has been used with success. We present a graph theoretical model of the posterior lateral line sensorimotor pathway in zebrafish. The model includes 2,616 neurons and 167,114 synaptic connections. Model neurons represent known cell types in zebrafish larvae, and connections were set stochastically following rules based on biological literature. Thus, our model is a uniquely detailed computational representation of a vertebrate connectome. The connectome has low overall connection density, with 2.45% of all possible connections, a value within the physiological range. We used graph theoretical tools to compare the zebrafish connectome graph to small-world, random and structured random graphs of the same size. For each type of graph, 100 randomly generated instantiations were considered. Degree distribution (the number of connections per neuron) varied more in the zebrafish graph than in same size graphs with less biological detail. There was high local clustering and a short average path length between nodes, implying a small-world structure similar to other neural connectomes and complex networks. The graph was found not to be scale-free, in agreement with some other neural connectomes. An experimental lesion was performed that targeted three model brain neurons, including the Mauthner neuron, known to control fast escape turns. The lesion decreased the number of short paths between sensory and motor neurons analogous to the behavioral effects of the same lesion in zebrafish. This model is expandable and can be used to organize and interpret a growing database of information on the zebrafish connectome. PMID:22624008

  16. Exploring and Making Sense of Large Graphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    number of its neighbors. In a directed graph, the in-degree of a vertex is the number of incoming edges, and its out-degree is the number of outgoing...upper bound for hh is obtained by considering the Frobenius norm of matrix W and 66 solving the inequality ‖W ‖F= √√√√ n∑ i=1 n∑ j=1 |Wij|2 < 1 with...and heterophily. Concretely, if H(i, i) > H(j, i) for all i 6= j, we say homophily is present. If the opposite inequality is true for all i, then

  17. Graph-Based Dynamic Assignment Of Multiple Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul J.; Andrews, Asa M.

    1994-01-01

    Algorithm-to-architecture mapping model (ATAMM) is strategy minimizing time needed to periodically execute graphically described, data-driven application algorithm on multiple data processors. Implemented as operating system managing flow of data and dynamically assigns nodes of graph to processors. Predicts throughput versus number of processors available to execute given application algorithm. Includes rules ensuring application algorithm represented by graph executed periodically without deadlock and in shortest possible repetition time. ATAMM proves useful in maximizing effectiveness of parallel computing systems.

  18. Graph-Based Dynamic Assignment Of Multiple Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul J.; Andrews, Asa M.

    1994-01-01

    Algorithm-to-architecture mapping model (ATAMM) is strategy minimizing time needed to periodically execute graphically described, data-driven application algorithm on multiple data processors. Implemented as operating system managing flow of data and dynamically assigns nodes of graph to processors. Predicts throughput versus number of processors available to execute given application algorithm. Includes rules ensuring application algorithm represented by graph executed periodically without deadlock and in shortest possible repetition time. ATAMM proves useful in maximizing effectiveness of parallel computing systems.

  19. Graphs as Statements of Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David

    2002-01-01

    Identifies points where beliefs are important when making decisions about how graphs are drawn. Describes a simple case of the reaction between 'bicarb soda' and orange or lemon juice and discusses how drawing a graph becomes a statement of belief. (KHR)

  20. Graphs and Zero-Divisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axtell, M.; Stickles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The last ten years have seen an explosion of research in the zero-divisor graphs of commutative rings--by professional mathematicians "and" undergraduates. The objective is to find algebraic information within the geometry of these graphs. This topic is approachable by anyone with one or two semesters of abstract algebra. This article gives the…

  1. Blind Identification of Graph Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segarra, Santiago; Mateos, Gonzalo; Marques, Antonio G.; Ribeiro, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    Network processes are often represented as signals defined on the vertices of a graph. To untangle the latent structure of such signals, one can view them as outputs of linear graph filters modeling underlying network dynamics. This paper deals with the problem of joint identification of a graph filter and its input signal, thus broadening the scope of classical blind deconvolution of temporal and spatial signals to the less-structured graph domain. Given a graph signal $\\mathbf{y}$ modeled as the output of a graph filter, the goal is to recover the vector of filter coefficients $\\mathbf{h}$, and the input signal $\\mathbf{x}$ which is assumed to be sparse. While $\\mathbf{y}$ is a bilinear function of $\\mathbf{x}$ and $\\mathbf{h}$, the filtered graph signal is also a linear combination of the entries of the lifted rank-one, row-sparse matrix $\\mathbf{x} \\mathbf{h}^T$. The blind graph-filter identification problem can thus be tackled via rank and sparsity minimization subject to linear constraints, an inverse problem amenable to convex relaxations offering provable recovery guarantees under simplifying assumptions. Numerical tests using both synthetic and real-world networks illustrate the merits of the proposed algorithms, as well as the benefits of leveraging multiple signals to aid the blind identification task.

  2. Graphs and Zero-Divisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axtell, M.; Stickles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The last ten years have seen an explosion of research in the zero-divisor graphs of commutative rings--by professional mathematicians "and" undergraduates. The objective is to find algebraic information within the geometry of these graphs. This topic is approachable by anyone with one or two semesters of abstract algebra. This article gives the…

  3. Graphs as Statements of Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David

    2002-01-01

    Identifies points where beliefs are important when making decisions about how graphs are drawn. Describes a simple case of the reaction between 'bicarb soda' and orange or lemon juice and discusses how drawing a graph becomes a statement of belief. (KHR)

  4. A Collection of Features for Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi-Rad, T; Fodor, I K; Gallagher, B

    2007-05-02

    Semantic graphs are commonly used to represent data from one or more data sources. Such graphs extend traditional graphs by imposing types on both nodes and links. This type information defines permissible links among specified nodes and can be represented as a graph commonly referred to as an ontology or schema graph. Figure 1 depicts an ontology graph for data from National Association of Securities Dealers. Each node type and link type may also have a list of attributes. To capture the increased complexity of semantic graphs, concepts derived for standard graphs have to be extended. This document explains briefly features commonly used to characterize graphs, and their extensions to semantic graphs. This document is divided into two sections. Section 2 contains the feature descriptions for static graphs. Section 3 extends the features for semantic graphs that vary over time.

  5. Jamming graphs: A local approach to global mechanical rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jorge H.; Cao, L.; Schwarz, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We revisit the concept of minimal rigidity as applied to frictionless, repulsive soft sphere packings in two dimensions with the introduction of the jamming graph. Minimal rigidity is a purely combinatorial property encoded via Laman's theorem in two dimensions. It constrains the global, average coordination number of the graph, for example. However, minimal rigidity does not address the geometry of local mechanical stability. The jamming graph contains both properties of global mechanical stability at the onset of jamming and local mechanical stability. We demonstrate how jamming graphs can be constructed using local moves via the Henneberg construction such that these graphs fall under the jurisdiction of correlated percolation. We then probe how jamming graphs destabilize, or become unjammed, by deleting a bond and computing the resulting rigid cluster distribution. We also study how the system restabilizes with the addition of new contacts and how a jamming graph with extra (redundant) contacts destabilizes. The latter endeavor allows us to probe a disk packing in the rigid phase and uncover a potentially new diverging length scale associated with the random deletion of contacts as compared to the study of cut-out (or frozen-in) subsystems.

  6. The R *-operation for Feynman graphs with generic numerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Franz; Ruijl, Ben

    2017-05-01

    The R *-operation by Chetyrkin, Tkachov, and Smirnov is a generalisation of the BPHZ R-operation, which subtracts both ultraviolet and infrared divergences of euclidean Feynman graphs with non-exceptional external momenta. It can be used to compute the divergent parts of such Feynman graphs from products of simpler Feynman graphs of lower loops. In this paper we extend the R *-operation to Feynman graphs with arbitrary numerators, including tensors. We also provide a novel way of defining infrared counterterms which closely resembles the definition of its ultraviolet counterpart. We further express both infrared and ultraviolet counterterms in terms of scaleless vacuum graphs with a logarithmic degree of divergence. By exploiting symmetries, integrand and integral relations, which the counterterms of scaleless vacuum graphs satisfy, we can vastly reduce their number and complexity. A FORM implementation of this method was used to compute the five loop beta function in QCD for a general gauge group. To illustrate the procedure, we compute the poles in the dimensional regulator of all top-level propagator graphs at five loops in four dimensional ϕ 3 theory.

  7. Classification of domain movements in proteins using dynamic contact graphs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: "free", "open-closed", "anchored", "sliding-twist", and "see-saw." A directed graph is introduced called the "Dynamic Contact Graph" which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified.

  8. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  9. Quantum Ergodicity on Regular Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaman, Nalini

    2017-07-01

    We give three different proofs of the main result of Anantharaman and Le Masson (Duke Math J 164(4):723-765, 2015), establishing quantum ergodicity—a form of delocalization—for eigenfunctions of the laplacian on large regular graphs of fixed degree. These three proofs are much shorter than the original one, quite different from one another, and we feel that each of the four proofs sheds a different light on the problem. The goal of this exploration is to find a proof that could be adapted for other models of interest in mathematical physics, such as the Anderson model on large regular graphs, regular graphs with weighted edges, or possibly certain models of non-regular graphs. A source of optimism in this direction is that we are able to extend the last proof to the case of anisotropic random walks on large regular graphs.

  10. On the Extremal Wiener Polarity Index of Hückel Graphs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhuan

    2016-01-01

    Graphs are used to model chemical compounds and drugs. In the graphs, each vertex represents an atom of molecule and edges between the corresponding vertices are used to represent covalent bounds between atoms. The Wiener polarity index W p (G) of a graph G is the number of unordered pairs of vertices u, v of G such that the distance between u and v is equal to 3. The trees and unicyclic graphs with perfect matching, of which all vertices have degrees not greater than three, are referred to as the Hückel trees and unicyclic Hückel graphs, respectively. In this paper, we first consider the smallest and the largest Wiener polarity index among all Hückel trees on 2n vertices and characterize the corresponding extremal graphs. Then we obtain an upper and lower bound for the Wiener polarity index of unicyclic Hückel graphs on 2n vertices.

  11. Completeness and regularity of generalized fuzzy graphs.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sovan; Sarkar, Biswajit; Shin, Dongmin; Pal, Madhumangal

    2016-01-01

    Fuzzy graphs are the backbone of many real systems like networks, image, scheduling, etc. But, due to some restriction on edges, fuzzy graphs are limited to represent for some systems. Generalized fuzzy graphs are appropriate to avoid such restrictions. In this study generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. In this study, matrix representation of generalized fuzzy graphs is described. Completeness and regularity are two important parameters of graph theory. Here, regular and complete generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. Some properties of them are discussed. After that, effective regular graphs are exemplified.

  12. Comparison and enumeration of chemical graphs.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nagamochi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compounds are usually represented as graph structured data in computers. In this review article, we overview several graph classes relevant to chemical compounds and the computational complexities of several fundamental problems for these graph classes. In particular, we consider the following problems: determining whether two chemical graphs are identical, determining whether one input chemical graph is a part of the other input chemical graph, finding a maximum common part of two input graphs, finding a reaction atom mapping, enumerating possible chemical graphs, and enumerating stereoisomers. We also discuss the relationship between the fifth problem and kernel functions for chemical compounds.

  13. Comparison and Enumeration of Chemical Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nagamochi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compounds are usually represented as graph structured data in computers. In this review article, we overview several graph classes relevant to chemical compounds and the computational complexities of several fundamental problems for these graph classes. In particular, we consider the following problems: determining whether two chemical graphs are identical, determining whether one input chemical graph is a part of the other input chemical graph, finding a maximum common part of two input graphs, finding a reaction atom mapping, enumerating possible chemical graphs, and enumerating stereoisomers. We also discuss the relationship between the fifth problem and kernel functions for chemical compounds. PMID:24688697

  14. GRAPH III: a digitizing and graph plotting program

    SciTech Connect

    Selleck, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    GRAPH is an interactive program that allows the user to perform two functions. The first is to plot two dimensional graphs and the second is to digitize graphs or plots to create data files of points. The program is designed to allow the user to get results quickly and easily. It is written in RATIV (a FORTRAN preprocessor) and is currently in use at Sandia under VMS on a VAX computer and CTSS on a Cray supercomputer. The program provides graphical output through all of the Sandia Virtual Device Interface (VDI) graphics devices. 2 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The asymptotics of large constrained graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radin, Charles; Ren, Kui; Sadun, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    We show, through local estimates and simulation, that if one constrains simple graphs by their densities ɛ of edges and τ of triangles, then asymptotically (in the number of vertices) for over 95% of the possible range of those densities there is a well-defined typical graph, and it has a very simple structure: the vertices are decomposed into two subsets V1 and V2 of fixed relative size c and 1 - c, and there are well-defined probabilities of edges, gjk, between vj ∈ Vj, and vk ∈ Vk. Furthermore the four parameters c, g11, g22 and g12 are smooth functions of (ɛ, τ) except at two smooth ‘phase transition’ curves.

  16. Dimension theory of graphs and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, Thomas; Requardt, Manfred

    1998-03-01

    Starting from the working hypothesis that both physics and the corresponding mathematics have to be described by means of discrete concepts on the Planck scale, one of the many problems one has to face in this enterprise is to find the discrete protoforms of the building blocks of continuum physics and mathematics. A core concept is the notion of dimension. In the following we develop such a notion for irregular structures such as (large) graphs and networks and derive a number of its properties. Among other things we show its stability under a wide class of perturbations which is important if one has ` dimensional phase transitions' in mind. Furthermore we systematically construct graphs with almost arbitrary ` fractal dimension' which may be of some use in the context of ` dimensional renormalization' or statistical mechanics on irregular sets.

  17. Spectral graph optimization for instance reduction.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Konstantinos; Rodriguez-Martinez, Eduardo; Goulermas, John Yannis; Wu, Q H

    2012-07-01

    The operation of instance-based learning algorithms is based on storing a large set of prototypes in the system's database. However, such systems often experience issues with storage requirements, sensitivity to noise, and computational complexity, which result in high search and response times. In this brief, we introduce a novel framework that employs spectral graph theory to efficiently partition the dataset to border and internal instances. This is achieved by using a diverse set of border-discriminating features that capture the local friend and enemy profiles of the samples. The fused information from these features is then used via graph-cut modeling approach to generate the final dataset partitions of border and nonborder samples. The proposed method is referred to as the spectral instance reduction (SIR) algorithm. Experiments with a large number of datasets show that SIR performs competitively compared to many other reduction algorithms, in terms of both objectives of classification accuracy and data condensation.

  18. Crunching Large Graphs with Commodity Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Jacob E; Myers, Brandon D; Hunter, Andrew H; Briggs, Preston; Ceze, Luis; Ebeling, William C; Grossman, Dan; Kahan, Simon H; Oskin, Mark

    2011-05-26

    Crunching large graphs is the basis of many emerging appli- cations, such as social network analysis and bioinformatics. Graph analytics algorithms exhibit little locality and therefore present significant performance challenges. Hardware multi- threading systems (e.g, Cray XMT) show that with enough concurrency, we can tolerate long latencies. Unfortunately, this solution is not available with commodity parts. Our goal is to develop a latency-tolerant system built out of commodity parts and mostly in software. The proposed system includes a runtime that supports a large number of lightweight contexts, full-bit synchronization and a memory manager that provides a high-latency but high-bandwidth global shared memory. This paper lays out the vision for our system, and justifies its feasibility with a performance analysis of the run- time for latency tolerance.

  19. TopoLayout: multilevel graph layout by topological features.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Daniel; Munzner, Tamara; Auber, David

    2007-01-01

    We describe TopoLayout, a feature-based, multilevel algorithm that draws undirected graphs based on the topological features they contain. Topological features are detected recursively inside the graph, and their subgraphs are collapsed into single nodes, forming a graph hierarchy. Each feature is drawn with an algorithm tuned for its topology. As would be expected from a feature-based approach, the runtime and visual quality of TopoLayout depends on the number and types of topological features present in the graph. We show experimental results comparing speed and visual quality for TopoLayout against four other multilevel algorithms on a variety of data sets with a range of connectivities and sizes. TopoLayout frequently improves the results in terms of speed and visual quality on these data sets.

  20. Multiple Illuminant Colour Estimation via Statistical Inference on Factor Graphs.

    PubMed

    Mutimbu, Lawrence; Robles-Kelly, Antonio

    2016-08-31

    This paper presents a method to recover a spatially varying illuminant colour estimate from scenes lit by multiple light sources. Starting with the image formation process, we formulate the illuminant recovery problem in a statistically datadriven setting. To do this, we use a factor graph defined across the scale space of the input image. In the graph, we utilise a set of illuminant prototypes computed using a data driven approach. As a result, our method delivers a pixelwise illuminant colour estimate being devoid of libraries or user input. The use of a factor graph also allows for the illuminant estimates to be recovered making use of a maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference process. Moreover, we compute the probability marginals by performing a Delaunay triangulation on our factor graph. We illustrate the utility of our method for pixelwise illuminant colour recovery on widely available datasets and compare against a number of alternatives. We also show sample colour correction results on real-world images.

  1. A Hybrid Graph Representation for Recursive Backtracking Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Khzam, Faisal N.; Langston, Michael A.; Mouawad, Amer E.; Nolan, Clinton P.

    Many exact algorithms for NP-hard graph problems adopt the old Davis-Putman branch-and-reduce paradigm. The performance of these algorithms often suffers from the increasing number of graph modifications, such as deletions, that reduce the problem instance and have to be "taken back" frequently during the search process. The use of efficient data structures is necessary for fast graph modification modules as well as fast take-back procedures. In this paper, we investigate practical implementation-based aspects of exact algorithms by providing a hybrid graph representation that addresses the take-back challenge and combines the advantage of {O}(1) adjacency-queries in adjacency-matrices with the advantage of efficient neighborhood traversal in adjacency-lists.

  2. Open-system dynamics of graph-state entanglement.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel; Chaves, Rafael; Aolita, Leandro; Davidovich, Luiz; Acín, Antonio

    2009-07-17

    We consider graph states of an arbitrary number of particles undergoing generic decoherence. We present methods to obtain lower and upper bounds for the system's entanglement in terms of that of considerably smaller subsystems. For an important class of noisy channels, namely, the Pauli maps, these bounds coincide and thus provide the exact analytical expression for the entanglement evolution. All of the results apply also to (mixed) graph-diagonal states and hold true for any convex entanglement monotone. Since any state can be locally depolarized to some graph-diagonal state, our method provides a lower bound for the entanglement decay of any arbitrary state. Finally, this formalism also allows for the direct identification of the robustness under size scaling of graph states in the presence of decoherence, merely by inspection of their connectivities.

  3. Pathlength scaling in graphs with incomplete navigational information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Holme, Petter

    2011-10-01

    The graph-navigability problem concerns how one can find as short paths as possible between a pair of vertices, given an incomplete picture of a graph. We study the navigability of graphs where the vertices are tagged by a number (between 1 and the total number of vertices) in a way to aid navigation. This information is too little to ensure errorfree navigation but enough, as we will show, for the agents to do significantly better than a random walk. In our setup, given a graph, we first assign information to the vertices that agents can utilize for their navigation. To evaluate the navigation, we calculate the average distance traveled over random pairs of source and target and different graph realizations. We show that this type of embedding can be made quite efficiently; the more information is embedded, the more efficient it gets. We also investigate the embedded navigational information in a standard graph layout algorithm and find that although this information does not make algorithms as efficient as the above-mentioned schemes, it is significantly helpful.

  4. Flying through Graphs: An Introduction to Graph Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Amy Roth

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity incorporating basic terminology, concepts, and solution methods of graph theory in the context of solving problems related to air travel. Discusses prerequisite knowledge and resources and includes a teacher's guide with a student worksheet. (KHR)

  5. Flying through Graphs: An Introduction to Graph Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Amy Roth

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity incorporating basic terminology, concepts, and solution methods of graph theory in the context of solving problems related to air travel. Discusses prerequisite knowledge and resources and includes a teacher's guide with a student worksheet. (KHR)

  6. Young Students Investigate Number Cubes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Alex

    1997-01-01

    Describes a series of learning activities built around number cubes. Sample activities introduce elementary properties of the cube, the magic rule of seven, and basic concepts related to graphs in the plane coordinate system. (PVD)

  7. DNA Rearrangements through Spatial Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    The paper is a short overview of a recent model of homologous DNA recombination events guided by RNA templates that have been observed in certain species of ciliates. This model uses spatial graphs to describe DNA rearrangements and show how gene recombination can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent rigid vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

  8. Multigraph: Reusable Interactive Data Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    There are surprisingly few good software tools available for presenting time series data on the internet. The most common practice is to use a desktop program such as Excel or Matlab to save a graph as an image which can be included in a web page like any other image. This disconnects the graph from the data in a way that makes updating a graph with new data a cumbersome manual process, and it limits the user to one particular view of the data. The Multigraph project defines an XML format for describing interactive data graphs, and software tools for creating and rendering those graphs in web pages and other internet connected applications. Viewing a Multigraph graph is extremely simple and intuitive, and requires no instructions; the user can pan and zoom by clicking and dragging, in a familiar "Google Maps" kind of way. Creating a new graph for inclusion in a web page involves writing a simple XML configuration file. Multigraph can read data in a variety of formats, and can display data from a web service, allowing users to "surf" through large data sets, downloading only those the parts of the data that are needed for display. The Multigraph XML format, or "MUGL" for short, provides a concise description of the visual properties of a graph, such as axes, plot styles, data sources, labels, etc, as well as interactivity properties such as how and whether the user can pan or zoom along each axis. Multigraph reads a file in this format, draws the described graph, and allows the user to interact with it. Multigraph software currently includes a Flash application for embedding graphs in web pages, a Flex component for embedding graphs in larger Flex/Flash applications, and a plugin for creating graphs in the WordPress content management system. Plans for the future include a Java version for desktop viewing and editing, a command line version for batch and server side rendering, and possibly Android and iPhone versions. Multigraph is currently in use on several web

  9. Fast Robust PCA on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Nauman; Perraudin, Nathanael; Kalofolias, Vassilis; Puy, Gilles; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Mining useful clusters from high dimensional data has received significant attention of the computer vision and pattern recognition community in the recent years. Linear and non-linear dimensionality reduction has played an important role to overcome the curse of dimensionality. However, often such methods are accompanied with three different problems: high computational complexity (usually associated with the nuclear norm minimization), non-convexity (for matrix factorization methods) and susceptibility to gross corruptions in the data. In this paper we propose a principal component analysis (PCA) based solution that overcomes these three issues and approximates a low-rank recovery method for high dimensional datasets. We target the low-rank recovery by enforcing two types of graph smoothness assumptions, one on the data samples and the other on the features by designing a convex optimization problem. The resulting algorithm is fast, efficient and scalable for huge datasets with O(nlog(n)) computational complexity in the number of data samples. It is also robust to gross corruptions in the dataset as well as to the model parameters. Clustering experiments on 7 benchmark datasets with different types of corruptions and background separation experiments on 3 video datasets show that our proposed model outperforms 10 state-of-the-art dimensionality reduction models. Our theoretical analysis proves that the proposed model is able to recover approximate low-rank representations with a bounded error for clusterable data.

  10. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael

    2011-01-11

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  11. Multibody graph transformations and analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This two-part paper uses graph transformation methods to develop methods for partitioning, aggregating, and constraint embedding for multibody systems. This first part focuses on tree-topology systems and reviews the key notion of spatial kernel operator (SKO) models for such systems. It develops systematic and rigorous techniques for partitioning SKO models in terms of the SKO models of the component subsystems based on the path-induced property of the component subgraphs. It shows that the sparsity structure of key matrix operators and the mass matrix for the multibody system can be described using partitioning transformations. Subsequently, the notions of node contractions and subgraph aggregation and their role in coarsening graphs are discussed. It is shown that the tree property of a graph is preserved after subgraph aggregation if and only if the subgraph satisfies an aggregation condition. These graph theory ideas are used to develop SKO models for the aggregated tree multibody systems. PMID:24288438

  12. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  13. Manipulation of Zeeman coherence in solids at room temperature: Ramsey interference in the coherent-population-trapping spectrum of ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Roman; Scully, Marlan O.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2006-11-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) in a three-level atomic medium pumped by two subsequent short optical pulses is considered under the condition of negligible population decay from the excited optical state. It is shown that the amount of atomic population transferred to the excited state by the combined action of the pulses strongly depends on the phase of the ground-state coherence excited by the first pulse at the arrival time of the second pulse. Oscillatory behavior of optical excitation efficiency on the time delay between the pulses is predicted. It is also shown that saturating optical pulses can produce population inversion in a resonantly pumped quasi-two-level system. A class of solid materials in which the predicted phenomena can be observed at room temperature is found. It includes some rare-earth and transition-metal doped dielectric crystals where Orbach relaxation between ground-state Zeeman states is suppressed: ruby, alexandrite, and several others. On the basis of the theoretical predictions, experimental observation of Ramsey fringes in CPT spectrum of ruby is reported.

  14. Manipulation of Zeeman coherence in solids at room temperature: Ramsey interference in the coherent-population-trapping spectrum of ruby

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesov, Roman; Scully, Marlan O.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2006-11-15

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) in a three-level atomic medium pumped by two subsequent short optical pulses is considered under the condition of negligible population decay from the excited optical state. It is shown that the amount of atomic population transferred to the excited state by the combined action of the pulses strongly depends on the phase of the ground-state coherence excited by the first pulse at the arrival time of the second pulse. Oscillatory behavior of optical excitation efficiency on the time delay between the pulses is predicted. It is also shown that saturating optical pulses can produce population inversion in a resonantly pumped quasi-two-level system. A class of solid materials in which the predicted phenomena can be observed at room temperature is found. It includes some rare-earth and transition-metal doped dielectric crystals where Orbach relaxation between ground-state Zeeman states is suppressed: ruby, alexandrite, and several others. On the basis of the theoretical predictions, experimental observation of Ramsey fringes in CPT spectrum of ruby is reported.

  15. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Jeremy T.

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  16. Robust (semi) nonnegative graph embedding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwang; Zha, Zheng-Jun; Yang, Yang; Yan, Shuicheng; Chua, Tat-Seng

    2014-07-01

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has received considerable attention in image processing, computer vision, and patter recognition. An important variant of NMF is nonnegative graph embedding (NGE), which encodes the statistical or geometric information of data in the process of matrix factorization. The NGE offers a general framework for unsupervised/supervised settings. However, NGE-like algorithms often suffer from noisy data, unreliable graphs, and noisy labels, which are commonly encountered in real-world applications. To address these issues, in this paper, we first propose a robust nonnegative graph embedding (RNGE) framework, where the joint sparsity in both graph embedding and data reconstruction endues robustness to undesirable noises. Next, we present a robust seminonnegative graph embedding (RsNGE) framework, which only constrains the coefficient matrix to be nonnegative while places no constraint on the base matrix. This extends the applicable range of RNGE to data which are not nonnegative and endows more discriminative power of the learnt base matrix. The RNGE/RsNGE provides a general formulation such that all the algorithms unified within the graph embedding framework can be easily extended to obtain their robust nonnegative/seminonnegative solutions. Further, we develop elegant multiplicative updating solutions that can solve RNGE/RsNGE efficiently and offer a rigorous convergence analysis. We conduct extensive experiments on four real-world data sets and compare the proposed RNGE/RsNGE to other representative NMF variants and data factorization methods. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  17. The average distances in random graphs with given expected degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Fan; Lu, Linyuan

    2002-12-01

    Random graph theory is used to examine the "small-world phenomenon"; any two strangers are connected through a short chain of mutual acquaintances. We will show that for certain families of random graphs with given expected degrees the average distance is almost surely of order log n/log , where is the weighted average of the sum of squares of the expected degrees. Of particular interest are power law random graphs in which the number of vertices of degree k is proportional to 1/k for some fixed exponent . For the case of > 3, we prove that the average distance of the power law graphs is almost surely of order log n/log β < 3 for which the power law random graphs have average distance almost surely of order log log n, but have diameter of order log n (provided having some mild constraints for the average distance and maximum degree). In particular, these graphs contain a dense subgraph, which we call the core, having nc/log log n vertices. Almost all vertices are within distance log log n of the core although there are vertices at distance log n from the core.


  18. Fitness landscapes, memetic algorithms, and greedy operators for graph bipartitioning.

    PubMed

    Merz, P; Freisleben, B

    2000-01-01

    The fitness landscape of the graph bipartitioning problem is investigated by performing a search space analysis for several types of graphs. The analysis shows that the structure of the search space is significantly different for the types of instances studied. Moreover, with increasing epistasis, the amount of gene interactions in the representation of a solution in an evolutionary algorithm, the number of local minima for one type of instance decreases and, thus, the search becomes easier. We suggest that other characteristics besides high epistasis might have greater influence on the hardness of a problem. To understand these characteristics, the notion of a dependency graph describing gene interactions is introduced. In particular, the local structure and the regularity of the dependency graph seems to be important for the performance of an algorithm, and in fact, algorithms that exploit these properties perform significantly better than others which do not. It will be shown that a simple hybrid multi-start local search exploiting locality in the structure of the graphs is able to find optimum or near optimum solutions very quickly. However, if the problem size increases or the graphs become unstructured, a memetic algorithm (a genetic algorithm incorporating local search) is shown to be much more effective.

  19. Classification of Domain Movements in Proteins Using Dynamic Contact Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: “free”, “open-closed”, “anchored”, “sliding-twist”, and “see-saw.” A directed graph is introduced called the “Dynamic Contact Graph” which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified. PMID:24260562

  20. Efficient and scalable graph similarity joins in MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Zhao, Xiang; Xiao, Chuan; Zhang, Weiming; Tang, Jiuyang

    2014-01-01

    Along with the emergence of massive graph-modeled data, it is of great importance to investigate graph similarity joins due to their wide applications for multiple purposes, including data cleaning, and near duplicate detection. This paper considers graph similarity joins with edit distance constraints, which return pairs of graphs such that their edit distances are no larger than a given threshold. Leveraging the MapReduce programming model, we propose MGSJoin, a scalable algorithm following the filtering-verification framework for efficient graph similarity joins. It relies on counting overlapping graph signatures for filtering out nonpromising candidates. With the potential issue of too many key-value pairs in the filtering phase, spectral Bloom filters are introduced to reduce the number of key-value pairs. Furthermore, we integrate the multiway join strategy to boost the verification, where a MapReduce-based method is proposed for GED calculation. The superior efficiency and scalability of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated by extensive experimental results.

  1. Digital News Graph Clustering using Chinese Whispers Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, M. F. E.; Kemas, R. S. W.; Anisa, H.

    2017-01-01

    As the exponential growth of news creation on the internet, the amount of digital news has reached out billion numbers. Digital news is naturally linked each other but it needs to be grouped so that user can easily classify the news that they read. Graph is the most suitable data model to represent digital news since its can describing relation in easy and flexible manner. Thus, to overcome grouping problems, in this paper we using Chinese Whispers Algorithm as the graph clustering approach. We choose Chinese Whisper Algorithm based on consideration that the algorithm is able to make clusters from a big graph data with a relatively fast process [8], that appropriate with the characteristics of digital news. In this research, we examine the graph quality by comparing intra and inter-cluster weights of every node. This scenario gives us a quite high result that 95% of nodes have intra-cluster weight higher than its inter-cluster weight. We also investigate the graph accuracy by comparing the cluster results with expert judgement. As the result, the average accuracy of digital news graph clustering using Chinese Whisper algorithm is 80%.

  2. The peculiar phase structure of random graph bisection

    SciTech Connect

    Percus, Allon G; Istrate, Gabriel; Goncalves, Bruno T; Sumi, Robert Z

    2008-01-01

    The mincut graph bisection problem involves partitioning the n vertices of a graph into disjoint subsets, each containing exactly n/2 vertices, while minimizing the number of 'cut' edges with an endpoint in each subset. When considered over sparse random graphs, the phase structure of the graph bisection problem displays certain familiar properties, but also some surprises. It is known that when the mean degree is below the critical value of 2 log 2, the cutsize is zero with high probability. We study how the minimum cutsize increases with mean degree above this critical threshold, finding a new analytical upper bound that improves considerably upon previous bounds. Combined with recent results on expander graphs, our bound suggests the unusual scenario that random graph bisection is replica symmetric up to and beyond the critical threshold, with a replica symmetry breaking transition possibly taking place above the threshold. An intriguing algorithmic consequence is that although the problem is NP-hard, we can find near-optimal cutsizes (whose ratio to the optimal value approaches 1 asymptotically) in polynomial time for typical instances near the phase transition.

  3. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Igor M

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  4. A Graph Decomposition Technique Based on a High-Density Clustering Model on Graphs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    ADAO90 3A8 ALFRED P SLOAN SCHOOL OF MANAGEMNT CAMBRIDGE MA CEN-ETC FIG 12 GRAPH DECOMPOSITION TECHNIQUE BASEO ON A HIGH-DENSITY CLUSTER-ETC(U) JUL 0...ELEMENT.’ PROJECT, TASK Center for Information Systems Research AREAO G ORK UNIT NUMBERS Sloan School of Management, M.I.T. V Cambridge,_MA__02139...See Kernighan and Lin (1970), Lukes (1974, 1975), anc Christofides and Brooker (1976) for methods that operate under some size constraints on the

  5. GraphCom: A multidimensional measure of graphic complexity applied to 131 written languages.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Yun; Chen, Yen-Chi; Perfetti, Charles A

    2017-04-19

    We report a new multidimensional measure of visual complexity (GraphCom) that captures variability in the complexity of graphs within and across writing systems. We applied the measure to 131 written languages, allowing comparisons of complexity and providing a basis for empirical testing of GraphCom. The measure includes four dimensions whose value in capturing the different visual properties of graphs had been demonstrated in prior reading research-(1) perimetric complexity, sensitive to the ratio of a written form to its surrounding white space (Pelli, Burns, Farell, & Moore-Page, 2006); (2) number of disconnected components, sensitive to discontinuity (Gibson, 1969); (3) number of connected points, sensitive to continuity (Lanthier, Risko, Stolz, & Besner, 2009); and (4) number of simple features, sensitive to the strokes that compose graphs (Wu, Zhou, & Shu, 1999). In our analysis of the complexity of 21,550 graphs, we (a) determined the complexity variation across writing systems along each dimension, (b) examined the relationships among complexity patterns within and across writing systems, and (c) compared the dimensions in their abilities to differentiate the graphs from different writing systems, in order to predict human perceptual judgments (n = 180) of graphs with varying complexity. The results from the computational and experimental comparisons showed that GraphCom provides a measure of graphic complexity that exceeds previous measures in its empirical validation. The measure can be universally applied across writing systems, providing a research tool for studies of reading and writing.

  6. Principal Graph and Structure Learning Based on Reversed Graph Embedding.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qi; Wang, Li; Tsang, Ivor; Sun, Yijun

    2016-12-05

    Many scientific datasets are of high dimension, and the analysis usually requires retaining the most important structures of data. Principal curve is a widely used approach for this purpose. However, many existing methods work only for data with structures that are mathematically formulated by curves, which is quite restrictive for real applications. A few methods can overcome the above problem, but they either require complicated human-made rules for a specific task with lack of adaption flexibility to different tasks, or cannot obtain explicit structures of data. To address these issues, we develop a novel principal graph and structure learning framework that captures the local information of the underlying graph structure based on reversed graph embedding. As showcases, models that can learn a spanning tree or a weighted undirected `1 graph are proposed, and a new learning algorithm is developed that learns a set of principal points and a graph structure from data, simultaneously. The new algorithm is simple with guaranteed convergence. We then extend the proposed framework to deal with large-scale data. Experimental results on various synthetic and six real world datasets show that the proposed method compares favorably with baselines and can uncover the underlying structure correctly.

  7. Private Graphs - Access Rights on Graphs for Seamless Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, W.; Hau, F.; Pagany, R.

    2016-06-01

    After the success of GNSS (Global Navigational Satellite Systems) and navigation services for public streets, indoor seems to be the next big development in navigational services, relying on RTLS - Real Time Locating Services (e.g. WIFI) and allowing seamless navigation. In contrast to navigation and routing services on public streets, seamless navigation will cause an additional challenge: how to make routing data accessible to defined users or restrict access rights for defined areas or only to parts of the graph to a defined user group? The paper will present case studies and data from literature, where seamless and especially indoor navigation solutions are presented (hospitals, industrial complexes, building sites), but the problem of restricted access rights was only touched from a real world, but not a technical perspective. The analysis of case studies will show, that the objective of navigation and the different target groups for navigation solutions will demand well defined access rights and require solutions, how to make only parts of a graph to a user or application available to solve a navigational task. The paper will therefore introduce the concept of private graphs, which is defined as a graph for navigational purposes covering the street, road or floor network of an area behind a public street and suggest different approaches how to make graph data for navigational purposes available considering access rights and data protection, privacy and security issues as well.

  8. GraphMeta: Managing HPC Rich Metadata in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Zhang, Wei; Ross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems face increasingly critical metadata management challenges, especially in the approaching exascale era. These challenges arise not only from exploding metadata volumes, but also from increasingly diverse metadata, which contains data provenance and arbitrary user-defined attributes in addition to traditional POSIX metadata. This ‘rich’ metadata is becoming critical to supporting advanced data management functionality such as data auditing and validation. In our prior work, we identified a graph-based model as a promising solution to uniformly manage HPC rich metadata due to its flexibility and generality. However, at the same time, graph-based HPC rich metadata anagement also introduces significant challenges to the underlying infrastructure. In this study, we first identify the challenges on the underlying infrastructure to support scalable, high-performance rich metadata management. Based on that, we introduce GraphMeta, a graphbased engine designed for this use case. It achieves performance scalability by introducing a new graph partitioning algorithm and a write-optimal storage engine. We evaluate GraphMeta under both synthetic and real HPC metadata workloads, compare it with other approaches, and demonstrate its advantages in terms of efficiency and usability for rich metadata management in HPC systems.

  9. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part I. Fundamentals and Topological Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Explores graph theory and use of topological indices to predict boiling points. Lists three indices: Wiener Number, Randic Branching Index and Molecular Connectivity, and Molecular Identification numbers. Warns of inadequacies with stereochemistry. (ML)

  10. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part I. Fundamentals and Topological Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Explores graph theory and use of topological indices to predict boiling points. Lists three indices: Wiener Number, Randic Branching Index and Molecular Connectivity, and Molecular Identification numbers. Warns of inadequacies with stereochemistry. (ML)

  11. A review on eigen values of adjacency matrix of graph with cliques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnia, Ema; Suyudi, Moch.; Aisah, Isah; Supriatna, Asep K.

    2017-08-01

    The paper reviews the applications of eigen value in different areas. One of the area is in the analysis of graphs coming from networks. The development of theory regarding the eigenvalues and its maximum eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix arising from a general graph is already well-established. Here we review some notions from different context, i.e. led by observation of some simple experiments regarding the relation between graph, cliques, and the eigen values of the adjacency matrix. We focus on regular graphs having one or more cliques in their graph structures. We do some numerical experiment on the computation of the eigen values of the adjacency matrix and show some patterns on the relation between the structure of the graph (e.g. the maximum cliques, chromatic number) and the eigen values of the adjacency matrix. By observing these patterns we find some conclusion, such as: i. the maximum clique of a complete graph is given by the largest eigen value plus one; ii. the maximum clique of a cycle graph (simple incomplete regular graph) equals the largest eigen value, in which the value is two; iii. the maximum multiplicity of the eigen values of a cycle graph is two. Future direction of the development is also presented based on the careful analysis of the existing development.

  12. Sharing Teaching Ideas: Graphing Families of Curves Using Transformations of Reference Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, David

    2007-01-01

    This article provides for a fast extremely accurate approach to graphing functions that is based on learning function reference graphs and then applying algebraic transformations to these reference graphs.

  13. Some Recent Results on Graph Matching,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    VJ and • work supported by ONR Contract # N00014-85-K-0488 I 1 1JI IIIII 2 the line-coloring problem [H]), there are others the polynomial -time sol...theorem of Tutte [T]. 2.1. THEOREM. A graph G has a perfect matching if and only if for every X 9_ V(G), the number of odd components of G - X is at most...here because our approach is different, being based upon the work of Edmonds, Lovasz and PuUeyblank [ELP], who gave a polynomial -time algorithm to com

  14. Vertex Connectivity of Graphs: Algorithms and Bounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    section might be greater than polynomial in n. The parallel algo- rithm is very similar to the sequential one, but every step of it will use a parallel...34’- , Connection of Nodes in a Graph," Networks, vol. 10, pp. 311-327, 1980. . [8] C. J. Colbourn, "The Reliability Polynomial ," ARS Combinatorica, vol. 21...Time Polynomial in the Number of Cuts," Operation Research, vol. 32, pp. 516-526, 1984. [41] V. Ramachandran and U. Vishkin, "Efficient Parallel

  15. Bonabeau model on a fully connected graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malarz, K.; Stauffer, D.; Kułakowski, K.

    2006-03-01

    Numerical simulations are reported on the Bonabeau model on a fully connected graph, where spatial degrees of freedom are absent. The control parameter is the memory factor f. The phase transition is observed at the dispersion of the agents power hi. The critical value fC shows a hysteretic behavior with respect to the initial distribution of hi. fC decreases with the system size; this decrease can be compensated by a greater number of fights between a global reduction of the distribution width of hi. The latter step is equivalent to a partial forgetting.

  16. Time-varying Reeb Graphs for Continuous Space-Time Data

    SciTech Connect

    Edelsbrunner, H; Harer, J; Mascarenhas, A; Pascucci, V; Snoeyink, J

    2008-04-22

    The Reeb graph is a useful tool in visualizing real-valued data obtained from computational simulations of physical processes. We characterize the evolution of the Reeb graph of a time-varying continuous function defined in three-dimensional space. We show how to maintain the Reeb graph over time and compress the entire sequence of Reeb graphs into a single, partially persistent data structure, and augment this data structure with Betti numbers to describe the topology of level sets and with path seeds to assist in the fast extraction of level sets for visualization.

  17. A conjecture on the maximum cut and bisection width in random regular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdeborová, Lenka; Boettcher, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The asymptotic properties of random regular graphs are objects of extensive study in mathematics and physics. In this paper we argue, using the theory of spin glasses in physics, that in random regular graphs the maximum cut size asymptotically equals the number of edges in the graph minus the minimum bisection size. Maximum cut and minimal bisection are two famous NP-complete problems with no known general relation between them; hence our conjecture is a surprising property for random regular graphs. We further support the conjecture with numerical simulations. A rigorous proof of this relation is an obvious challenge.

  18. On Molchanov's Condition for the Spectrum Discreteness of a Quantum Graph Hamiltonian with δ-Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Maria O.; Popov, Igor Yu.

    2015-10-01

    The spectrum discreteness Molchanov's condition for a potential on the real axis (or half-axis) is well known. The goal of this work is to obtain an analogous condition for a quantum graph. We deal with δ-type conditions at the graph vertices. The Schrödinger operator with a potential is considered at each edge. It is assumed that the graph has infinite leads (edges) or/and infinite chains of vertices such that the neighbouring vertices are connected by finite number of edges. Molchanov-type theorem for the quantum graph Hamiltonian spectrum discreteness is proved.

  19. Decision net, directed graph, and neural net processing of imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Liu, Shiaw-Dong; Yoneyama, Hideyuki; Barnard, Etienne

    1989-01-01

    A decision-net solution involving a novel hierarchical classifier and a set of multiple directed graphs, as well as a neural-net solution, are respectively presented for large-class problem and mixture problem treatments of imaging spectrometer data. The clustering method for hierarchical classifier design, when used with multiple directed graphs, yields an efficient decision net. New directed-graph rules for reducing local maxima as well as the number of perturbations required, and the new starting-node rules for extending the reachability and reducing the search time of the graphs, are noted to yield superior results, as indicated by an illustrative 500-class imaging spectrometer problem.

  20. Solving Graph Laplacian Systems Through Recursive Bisections and Two-Grid Preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, Colin; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2016-02-18

    We present a parallelizable direct method for computing the solution to graph Laplacian-based linear systems derived from graphs that can be hierarchically bipartitioned with small edge cuts. For a graph of size n with constant-size edge cuts, our method decomposes a graph Laplacian in time O(n log n), and then uses that decomposition to perform a linear solve in time O(n log n). We then use the developed technique to design a preconditioner for graph Laplacians that do not have this property. Finally, we augment this preconditioner with a two-grid method that accounts for much of the preconditioner's weaknesses. We present an analysis of this method, as well as a general theorem for the condition number of a general class of two-grid support graph-based preconditioners. Numerical experiments illustrate the performance of the studied methods.

  1. Searches on star graphs and equivalent oracle problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaehak; Lee, Hai-Woong; Hillery, Mark

    2011-02-15

    We examine a search on a graph among a number of different kinds of objects (vertices), one of which we want to find. In a standard graph search, all of the vertices are the same, except for one, the marked vertex, and that is the one we wish to find. We examine the case in which the unmarked vertices can be of different types, so the background against which the search is done is not uniform. We find that the search can still be successful, but the probability of success is lower than in the uniform background case, and that probability decreases with the number of types of unmarked vertices. We also show how the graph searches can be rephrased as equivalent oracle problems.

  2. Graph classification by means of Lipschitz embedding.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Kaspar; Bunke, Horst

    2009-12-01

    In pattern recognition and related fields, graph-based representations offer a versatile alternative to the widely used feature vectors. Therefore, an emerging trend of representing objects by graphs can be observed. This trend is intensified by the development of novel approaches in graph-based machine learning, such as graph kernels or graph-embedding techniques. These procedures overcome a major drawback of graphs, which consists of a serious lack of algorithms for classification. This paper is inspired by the idea of representing graphs through dissimilarities and extends our previous work to the more general setting of Lipschitz embeddings. In an experimental evaluation, we empirically confirm that classifiers that rely on the original graph distances can be outperformed by a classification system using the Lipschitz embedded graphs.

  3. VISAGE: Interactive Visual Graph Querying.

    PubMed

    Pienta, Robert; Navathe, Shamkant; Tamersoy, Acar; Tong, Hanghang; Endert, Alex; Chau, Duen Horng

    2016-06-01

    Extracting useful patterns from large network datasets has become a fundamental challenge in many domains. We present VISAGE, an interactive visual graph querying approach that empowers users to construct expressive queries, without writing complex code (e.g., finding money laundering rings of bankers and business owners). Our contributions are as follows: (1) we introduce graph autocomplete, an interactive approach that guides users to construct and refine queries, preventing over-specification; (2) VISAGE guides the construction of graph queries using a data-driven approach, enabling users to specify queries with varying levels of specificity, from concrete and detailed (e.g., query by example), to abstract (e.g., with "wildcard" nodes of any types), to purely structural matching; (3) a twelve-participant, within-subject user study demonstrates VISAGE's ease of use and the ability to construct graph queries significantly faster than using a conventional query language; (4) VISAGE works on real graphs with over 468K edges, achieving sub-second response times for common queries.

  4. VISAGE: Interactive Visual Graph Querying

    PubMed Central

    Pienta, Robert; Navathe, Shamkant; Tamersoy, Acar; Tong, Hanghang; Endert, Alex; Chau, Duen Horng

    2017-01-01

    Extracting useful patterns from large network datasets has become a fundamental challenge in many domains. We present VISAGE, an interactive visual graph querying approach that empowers users to construct expressive queries, without writing complex code (e.g., finding money laundering rings of bankers and business owners). Our contributions are as follows: (1) we introduce graph autocomplete, an interactive approach that guides users to construct and refine queries, preventing over-specification; (2) VISAGE guides the construction of graph queries using a data-driven approach, enabling users to specify queries with varying levels of specificity, from concrete and detailed (e.g., query by example), to abstract (e.g., with “wildcard” nodes of any types), to purely structural matching; (3) a twelve-participant, within-subject user study demonstrates VISAGE’s ease of use and the ability to construct graph queries significantly faster than using a conventional query language; (4) VISAGE works on real graphs with over 468K edges, achieving sub-second response times for common queries. PMID:28553670

  5. Effects of Self-Graphing on Written Expression of Fourth Grade Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotz, Kate E.; Itoi, Madoka; Konrad, Moira; Alber-Morgan, Sheila R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of self-graphing on the writing of 3 fourth grade students with high-incidence disabilities. Measures of written expression included total number of words written and number of correct word sequences. During intervention, students self-graphed their total number of words written in response to…

  6. A generalized Beraha conjecture for non-planar graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Salas, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    We study the partition function ZG(nk,k)(Q,v) of the Q-state Potts model on the family of (non-planar) generalized Petersen graphs G(nk,k). We study its zeros in the plane (Q,v) for 1⩽k⩽7. We also consider two specializations of ZG(nk,k), namely the chromatic polynomial PG(nk,k)(Q) (corresponding to v=-1), and the flow polynomial ΦG(nk,k)(Q) (corresponding to v=-Q). In these two cases, we study their zeros in the complex Q-plane for 1⩽k⩽7. We pay special attention to the accumulation loci of the corresponding zeros when n→∞. We observe that the Berker-Kadanoff phase that is present in two-dimensional Potts models, also exists for non-planar recursive graphs. Their qualitative features are the same; but the main difference is that the role played by the Beraha numbers for planar graphs is now played by the non-negative integers for non-planar graphs. At these integer values of Q, there are massive eigenvalue cancellations, in the same way as the eigenvalue cancellations that happen at the Beraha numbers for planar graphs.

  7. Exact Algorithms for Coloring Graphs While Avoiding Monochromatic Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talla Nobibon, Fabrice; Hurkens, Cor; Leus, Roel; Spieksma, Frits C. R.

    We consider the problem of deciding whether a given directed graph can be vertex partitioned into two acyclic subgraphs. Applications of this problem include testing rationality of collective consumption behavior, a subject in micro-economics. We identify classes of directed graphs for which the problem is easy and prove that the existence of a constant factor approximation algorithm is unlikely for an optimization version which maximizes the number of vertices that can be colored using two colors while avoiding monochromatic cycles. We present three exact algorithms, namely an integer-programming algorithm based on cycle identification, a backtracking algorithm, and a branch-and-check algorithm. We compare these three algorithms both on real-life instances and on randomly generated graphs. We find that for the latter set of graphs, every algorithm solves instances of considerable size within few seconds; however, the CPU time of the integer-programming algorithm increases with the number of vertices in the graph while that of the two other procedures does not. For every algorithm, we also study empirically the transition from a high to a low probability of YES answer as function of a parameter of the problem. For real-life instances, the integer-programming algorithm fails to solve the largest instance after one hour while the other two algorithms solve it in about ten minutes.

  8. The Use of Graphs in Specific Situations of the Initial Conditions of Linear Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buendía, Gabriela; Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a discussion on the role of graphs and its significance in the relation between the number of initial conditions and the order of a linear differential equation, which is known as the initial value problem. We propose to make a functional framework for the use of graphs that intends to broaden the explanations of the…

  9. Hierarchical sequencing of online social graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjelković, Miroslav; Tadić, Bosiljka; Maletić, Slobodan; Rajković, Milan

    2015-10-01

    In online communications, patterns of conduct of individual actors and use of emotions in the process can lead to a complex social graph exhibiting multilayered structure and mesoscopic communities. Using simplicial complexes representation of graphs, we investigate in-depth topology of the online social network constructed from MySpace dialogs which exhibits original community structure. A simulation of emotion spreading in this network leads to the identification of two emotion-propagating layers. Three topological measures are introduced, referred to as the structure vectors, which quantify graph's architecture at different dimension levels. Notably, structures emerging through shared links, triangles and tetrahedral faces, frequently occur and range from tree-like to maximal 5-cliques and their respective complexes. On the other hand, the structures which spread only negative or only positive emotion messages appear to have much simpler topology consisting of links and triangles. The node's structure vector represents the number of simplices at each topology level in which the node resides and the total number of such simplices determines what we define as the node's topological dimension. The presented results suggest that the node's topological dimension provides a suitable measure of the social capital which measures the actor's ability to act as a broker in compact communities, the so called Simmelian brokerage. We also generalize the results to a wider class of computer-generated networks. Investigating components of the node's vector over network layers reveals that same nodes develop different socio-emotional relations and that the influential nodes build social capital by combining their connections in different layers.

  10. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  11. Graph modeling systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Neergaard, Mike

    2015-10-13

    An apparatus and a method for vulnerability and reliability modeling are provided. The method generally includes constructing a graph model of a physical network using a computer, the graph model including a plurality of terminating vertices to represent nodes in the physical network, a plurality of edges to represent transmission paths in the physical network, and a non-terminating vertex to represent a non-nodal vulnerability along a transmission path in the physical network. The method additionally includes evaluating the vulnerability and reliability of the physical network using the constructed graph model, wherein the vulnerability and reliability evaluation includes a determination of whether each terminating and non-terminating vertex represents a critical point of failure. The method can be utilized to evaluate wide variety of networks, including power grid infrastructures, communication network topologies, and fluid distribution systems.

  12. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  13. Quantum snake walk on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2011-02-15

    I introduce a continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First, I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states that most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next, I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem, which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. To the best of my knowledge, no efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  14. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  15. Synchronizability of random rectangular graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, Ernesto Chen, Guanrong

    2015-08-15

    Random rectangular graphs (RRGs) represent a generalization of the random geometric graphs in which the nodes are embedded into hyperrectangles instead of on hypercubes. The synchronizability of RRG model is studied. Both upper and lower bounds of the eigenratio of the network Laplacian matrix are determined analytically. It is proven that as the rectangular network is more elongated, the network becomes harder to synchronize. The synchronization processing behavior of a RRG network of chaotic Lorenz system nodes is numerically investigated, showing complete consistence with the theoretical results.

  16. Interacting particle systems on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Vishal

    In this dissertation, the dynamics of socially or biologically interacting populations are investigated. The individual members of the population are treated as particles that interact via links on a social or biological network represented as a graph. The effect of the structure of the graph on the properties of the interacting particle system is studied using statistical physics techniques. In the first chapter, the central concepts of graph theory and social and biological networks are presented. Next, interacting particle systems that are drawn from physics, mathematics and biology are discussed in the second chapter. In the third chapter, the random walk on a graph is studied. The mean time for a random walk to traverse between two arbitrary sites of a random graph is evaluated. Using an effective medium approximation it is found that the mean first-passage time between pairs of sites, as well as all moments of this first-passage time, are insensitive to the density of links in the graph. The inverse of the mean-first passage time varies non-monotonically with the density of links near the percolation transition of the random graph. Much of the behavior can be understood by simple heuristic arguments. Evolutionary dynamics, by which mutants overspread an otherwise uniform population on heterogeneous graphs, are studied in the fourth chapter. Such a process underlies' epidemic propagation, emergence of fads, social cooperation or invasion of an ecological niche by a new species. The first part of this chapter is devoted to neutral dynamics, in which the mutant genotype does not have a selective advantage over the resident genotype. The time to extinction of one of the two genotypes is derived. In the second part of this chapter, selective advantage or fitness is introduced such that the mutant genotype has a higher birth rate or a lower death rate. This selective advantage leads to a dynamical competition in which selection dominates for large populations

  17. COMPLEX DIFFUSION ON IMAGE GRAPHS

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dohyung; Vemuri, Baba C

    2009-01-01

    Complex diffusion was introduced in image processing literature as a means to achieve simultaneous denoising and enhancement of scalar valued images. In this paper, we present a novel geometric framework for achieving complex diffusion on color images expressed as image graphs. In this framework, we develop a new variational formulation for achieving complex diffusion. This formulation involves a modified harmonic map functional and is quite distinct from the Polyakov action described in earlier work by Sochen et al. Our formulation provides a framework for simultaneous (feature preserving) denoising and enhancement. We present results of comparison between the complex diffusion, and Beltrami flow all in the image graph framework. PMID:20490365

  18. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. Results To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. Conclusion The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. PMID:23157331

  19. Approximate Graph Edit Distance in Quadratic Time.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Kaspar; Ferrer, Miquel; Bunke, Horst

    2015-09-14

    Graph edit distance is one of the most flexible and general graph matching models available. The major drawback of graph edit distance, however, is its computational complexity that restricts its applicability to graphs of rather small size. Recently the authors of the present paper introduced a general approximation framework for the graph edit distance problem. The basic idea of this specific algorithm is to first compute an optimal assignment of independent local graph structures (including substitutions, deletions, and insertions of nodes and edges). This optimal assignment is complete and consistent with respect to the involved nodes of both graphs and can thus be used to instantly derive an admissible (yet suboptimal) solution for the original graph edit distance problem in O(n3) time. For large scale graphs or graph sets, however, the cubic time complexity may still be too high. Therefore, we propose to use suboptimal algorithms with quadratic rather than cubic time for solving the basic assignment problem. In particular, the present paper introduces five different greedy assignment algorithms in the context of graph edit distance approximation. In an experimental evaluation we show that these methods have great potential for further speeding up the computation of graph edit distance while the approximated distances remain sufficiently accurate for graph based pattern classification.

  20. SNAP: A General Purpose Network Analysis and Graph Mining Library

    PubMed Central

    Leskovec, Jure; Sosič, Rok

    2016-01-01

    Large networks are becoming a widely used abstraction for studying complex systems in a broad set of disciplines, ranging from social network analysis to molecular biology and neuroscience. Despite an increasing need to analyze and manipulate large networks, only a limited number of tools are available for this task. Here, we describe Stanford Network Analysis Platform (SNAP), a general-purpose, high-performance system that provides easy to use, high-level operations for analysis and manipulation of large networks. We present SNAP functionality, describe its implementational details, and give performance benchmarks. SNAP has been developed for single big-memory machines and it balances the trade-off between maximum performance, compact in-memory graph representation, and the ability to handle dynamic graphs where nodes and edges are being added or removed over time. SNAP can process massive networks with hundreds of millions of nodes and billions of edges. SNAP offers over 140 different graph algorithms that can efficiently manipulate large graphs, calculate structural properties, generate regular and random graphs, and handle attributes and meta-data on nodes and edges. Besides being able to handle large graphs, an additional strength of SNAP is that networks and their attributes are fully dynamic, they can be modified during the computation at low cost. SNAP is provided as an open source library in C++ as well as a module in Python. We also describe the Stanford Large Network Dataset, a set of social and information real-world networks and datasets, which we make publicly available. The collection is a complementary resource to our SNAP software and is widely used for development and benchmarking of graph analytics algorithms. PMID:28344853

  1. SNAP: A General Purpose Network Analysis and Graph Mining Library.

    PubMed

    Leskovec, Jure; Sosič, Rok

    2016-10-01

    Large networks are becoming a widely used abstraction for studying complex systems in a broad set of disciplines, ranging from social network analysis to molecular biology and neuroscience. Despite an increasing need to analyze and manipulate large networks, only a limited number of tools are available for this task. Here, we describe Stanford Network Analysis Platform (SNAP), a general-purpose, high-performance system that provides easy to use, high-level operations for analysis and manipulation of large networks. We present SNAP functionality, describe its implementational details, and give performance benchmarks. SNAP has been developed for single big-memory machines and it balances the trade-off between maximum performance, compact in-memory graph representation, and the ability to handle dynamic graphs where nodes and edges are being added or removed over time. SNAP can process massive networks with hundreds of millions of nodes and billions of edges. SNAP offers over 140 different graph algorithms that can efficiently manipulate large graphs, calculate structural properties, generate regular and random graphs, and handle attributes and meta-data on nodes and edges. Besides being able to handle large graphs, an additional strength of SNAP is that networks and their attributes are fully dynamic, they can be modified during the computation at low cost. SNAP is provided as an open source library in C++ as well as a module in Python. We also describe the Stanford Large Network Dataset, a set of social and information real-world networks and datasets, which we make publicly available. The collection is a complementary resource to our SNAP software and is widely used for development and benchmarking of graph analytics algorithms.

  2. Component evolution in general random intersection graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Hagberg, Aric; Hengartner, Nick; Percus, Allon G

    2010-01-01

    We analyze component evolution in general random intersection graphs (RIGs) and give conditions on existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize the existing methods for analysis on component evolution in RIGs. That is, we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts from the study on component evolution in Erdos-Renyi graphs. The main challenge becomes from the underlying structure of RIGs, when the number of offsprings follows a binomial distribution with a different number of nodes and different rate at each step during the evolution. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. Besides the mathematical analysis on component evolution, which we provide in this work, we perceive RIGs as an important random structure which has already found applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, or wireless sensor networks.

  3. Generalized multiprocessor scheduling for directed acylic graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanna, G.N.S.; Musicus, B.R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper considerably extends the multiprocessor scheduling techniques in the authors` previous work, and applies it to matrix arithmetic compilation. In that paper, they presented several new results in the theory of homogeneous multiprocessor scheduling. A directed acyclic graph (DAG) of tasks is to be scheduled. Tasks are assumed to be parallelizable -- as more processors are applied to a task, the time taken to compute it decreases, yielding some speedup. Because of communication, synchronization, and task scheduling overhead, this speedup increases less than linearly with the number of processors applied. The optimal scheduling problem is to determine the number of processors assigned to each task, and task sequencing, to minimize the finishing time. Using optimal control theory, in the special case where the speedup function of each task is p{sup {alpha}}, where p is the amount of processing power applied to the task, a closed form solution for task graphs formed from parallel and series connections was derived. This paper extends these results for arbitrary DAGS. The optimality conditions impose nonlinear constraints on the flow of processing power from predecessors to successors, and on the finishing times of siblings. This paper presents a fast algorithm for determining and solving these nonlinear equations. The algorithm utilizes the structure of the finishing time equations to efficiently run a conjugate gradient minimization, leading to the optimal solution. The algorithm has been tested on a variety of DAGS. The results presented show that it is superior to alternative heuristic approaches.

  4. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, B.; Markham, D.; Anders, J.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of \\dot{H} as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

  5. Thermodynamic characterization of networks using graph polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Cheng; Comin, César H.; Peron, Thomas K. DM.; Silva, Filipi N.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Costa, Luciano da F.; Torsello, Andrea; Hancock, Edwin R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method for characterizing the evolution of time-varying complex networks by adopting a thermodynamic representation of network structure computed from a polynomial (or algebraic) characterization of graph structure. Commencing from a representation of graph structure based on a characteristic polynomial computed from the normalized Laplacian matrix, we show how the polynomial is linked to the Boltzmann partition function of a network. This allows us to compute a number of thermodynamic quantities for the network, including the average energy and entropy. Assuming that the system does not change volume, we can also compute the temperature, defined as the rate of change of entropy with energy. All three thermodynamic variables can be approximated using low-order Taylor series that can be computed using the traces of powers of the Laplacian matrix, avoiding explicit computation of the normalized Laplacian spectrum. These polynomial approximations allow a smoothed representation of the evolution of networks to be constructed in the thermodynamic space spanned by entropy, energy, and temperature. We show how these thermodynamic variables can be computed in terms of simple network characteristics, e.g., the total number of nodes and node degree statistics for nodes connected by edges. We apply the resulting thermodynamic characterization to real-world time-varying networks representing complex systems in the financial and biological domains. The study demonstrates that the method provides an efficient tool for detecting abrupt changes and characterizing different stages in network evolution.

  6. Comment on ``Ramsey spectroscopy, matter-wave interferometry, and the microwave-lensing frequency shift''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Barlow, S. E.; Ashby, N.

    2015-06-01

    The theory of a frequency shift in primary frequency standards due to microwave lensing in Gibble [Phys. Rev. A 90, 015601 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.015601] contains a number of problems that undermine its validity. Furthermore, because the exposition of the theory has multiple errors and because the shift has never been experimentally observed, we believe this possible shift should not be included as a correction to primary frequency standards contributing to international atomic time. Although the theory may describe the basic mechanisms of a possible frequency shift, we argue it is not possible to use this theory to make reliable corrections to a primary frequency standard at the δ f /f ˜10-16 level.

  7. Edge connectivity and the spectral gap of combinatorial and quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkolaiko, Gregory; Kennedy, James B.; Kurasov, Pavel; Mugnolo, Delio

    2017-09-01

    We derive a number of upper and lower bounds for the first nontrivial eigenvalue of Laplacians on combinatorial and quantum graph in terms of the edge connectivity, i.e. the minimal number of edges which need to be removed to make the graph disconnected. On combinatorial graphs, one of the bounds corresponds to a well-known inequality of Fiedler, of which we give a new variational proof. On quantum graphs, the corresponding bound generalizes a recent result of Band and Lévy. All proofs are general enough to yield corresponding estimates for the p-Laplacian and allow us to identify the minimizers. Based on the Betti number of the graph, we also derive upper and lower bounds on all eigenvalues which are ‘asymptotically correct’, i.e. agree with the Weyl asymptotics for the eigenvalues of the quantum graph. In particular, the lower bounds improve the bounds of Friedlander on any given graph for all but finitely many eigenvalues, while the upper bounds improve recent results of Ariturk. Our estimates are also used to derive bounds on the eigenvalues of the normalized Laplacian matrix that improve known bounds of spectral graph theory.

  8. Graphing and Social Studies: An Interdisciplinary Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehm, Julia L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a graphing activity that promotes mathematical connections with social studies lessons. Students should be familiar with graphing on the Cartesian coordinate system to play this variation of the game Battleship on maps of various regions of the world. (AIM)

  9. Mathematical Minute: Rotating a Function Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Using calculus only, we find the angles you can rotate the graph of a differentiable function about the origin and still obtain a function graph. We then apply the solution to odd and even degree polynomials.

  10. Understanding Conic Sections Using Alternate Graph Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This article describes two alternative coordinate systems and their use in graphing conic sections. This alternative graph paper helps students explore the idea of eccentricity using the definitions of the conic sections.

  11. Mathematical Minute: Rotating a Function Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Using calculus only, we find the angles you can rotate the graph of a differentiable function about the origin and still obtain a function graph. We then apply the solution to odd and even degree polynomials.

  12. Standard Distributions: One Graph Fits All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Clifford H.

    2007-01-01

    Standard distributions are ubiquitous but not unique. With suitable scaling, the graph of a standard distribution serves as the graph for every distribution in the family. The standard exponential can easily be taught in elementary statistics courses.

  13. Torsional rigidity, isospectrality and quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colladay, Don; Kaganovskiy, Leon; McDonald, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    We study torsional rigidity for graph and quantum graph analogs of well-known pairs of isospectral non-isometric planar domains. We prove that such isospectral pairs are distinguished by torsional rigidity.

  14. Comparison Graph of Sea Ice Minimum - 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animated graph tracks the retreat of sea ice, measured in millions of square kilometers, averaged from the start of the satellite record in 1979 through 2000 (white). Next, the graph follows t...

  15. Multiple directed graph large-class multi-spectral processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Liu, Shiaw-Dong; Yoneyama, Hideyuki

    1988-01-01

    Numerical analysis techniques for the interpretation of high-resolution imaging-spectrometer data are described and demonstrated. The method proposed involves the use of (1) a hierarchical classifier with a tree structure generated automatically by a Fisher linear-discriminant-function algorithm and (2) a novel multiple-directed-graph scheme which reduces the local maxima and the number of perturbations required. Results for a 500-class test problem involving simulated imaging-spectrometer data are presented in tables and graphs; 100-percent-correct classification is achieved with an improvement factor of 5.

  16. Eigenvalue asymptotics for the damped wave equation on metric graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Pedro; Lipovský, Jiří

    2017-09-01

    We consider the linear damped wave equation on finite metric graphs and analyse its spectral properties with an emphasis on the asymptotic behaviour of eigenvalues. In the case of equilateral graphs and standard coupling conditions we show that there is only a finite number of high-frequency abscissas, whose location is solely determined by the averages of the damping terms on each edge. We further describe some of the possible behaviour when the edge lengths are no longer necessarily equal but remain commensurate.

  17. The Expected Time Complexity of Parallel Graph and Digraph Algorithms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    2n) processors [Hirschberg, Chandra, Sarwate, 79] and O(log n) time in SP-RAM with O(n+m) processors [Shiloah, Vishkin, 80 ]. [ JaJa , 78J has an O(log...n log d) time and O(n 3/log n) processors algorithm for the P-RAM where d is the depth of the graph. For the biconnected components, [ Savage, JaJa ...log n) processors where k is the number of components and m =edges of the graph. For the minimum spanning tree [-Savace, Jaja , 81] given an O(log 2n

  18. Multiple directed graph large-class multi-spectral processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Liu, Shiaw-Dong; Yoneyama, Hideyuki

    1988-01-01

    Numerical analysis techniques for the interpretation of high-resolution imaging-spectrometer data are described and demonstrated. The method proposed involves the use of (1) a hierarchical classifier with a tree structure generated automatically by a Fisher linear-discriminant-function algorithm and (2) a novel multiple-directed-graph scheme which reduces the local maxima and the number of perturbations required. Results for a 500-class test problem involving simulated imaging-spectrometer data are presented in tables and graphs; 100-percent-correct classification is achieved with an improvement factor of 5.

  19. Situating Graphs as Workplace Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard; Bakker, Arthur; Hoyles, Celia; Kent, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use and knowledge of graphs in the context of a large industrial factory. We are particularly interested in the question of "transparency", a question that has been extensively considered in the general literature on tool use and, more recently, by Michael Roth and his colleagues in the context of scientific work. Roth uses the…

  20. Ancestral Genres of Mathematical Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerofsky, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from sources in gesture studies, cognitive science, the anthropology of religion and art/architecture history, this article explores cultural, bodily and cosmological resonances carried (unintentionally) by mathematical graphs on Cartesian coordinates. Concepts of asymmetric bodily spaces, grids, orthogonality, mapping and sacred spaces…

  1. Ancestral Genres of Mathematical Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerofsky, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from sources in gesture studies, cognitive science, the anthropology of religion and art/architecture history, this article explores cultural, bodily and cosmological resonances carried (unintentionally) by mathematical graphs on Cartesian coordinates. Concepts of asymmetric bodily spaces, grids, orthogonality, mapping and sacred spaces…

  2. Graphs and Enhancing Maple Multiplication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2002-01-01

    Description of a technique in Maple programming language that automatically prints all paths of any desired length along with the name of each vertex, proceeding in order from the beginning vertex to the ending vertex for a given graph. (Author/MM)

  3. Affect and Graphing Calculator Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Allison W.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study of six high school calculus students designed to build an understanding about the affect associated with graphing calculator use in independent situations. DeBellis and Goldin's (2006) framework for affect as a representational system was used as a lens through which to understand the ways in which…

  4. Humidity Graphs for All Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esmael, F.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous article in this journal (Vol. 17, p358, 1979), a wet-bulb depression table was recommended for two simple experiments to determine relative humidity. However, the use of a graph is suggested because it gives the relative humidity directly from the wet and dry bulb readings. (JN)

  5. Humidity Graphs for All Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esmael, F.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous article in this journal (Vol. 17, p358, 1979), a wet-bulb depression table was recommended for two simple experiments to determine relative humidity. However, the use of a graph is suggested because it gives the relative humidity directly from the wet and dry bulb readings. (JN)

  6. Situating Graphs as Workplace Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard; Bakker, Arthur; Hoyles, Celia; Kent, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use and knowledge of graphs in the context of a large industrial factory. We are particularly interested in the question of "transparency", a question that has been extensively considered in the general literature on tool use and, more recently, by Michael Roth and his colleagues in the context of scientific work. Roth uses the…

  7. Parameterized Complexity and Inapproximability of Dominating Set Problem in Chordal and Near Chordal Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Song, Yinglei

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the parameterized complexity of Dominating Set problem in chordal graphs and near chordal graphs. We show the problem is W[2]-hard and cannot be solved in time no(k) in chordal and s-chordal (s > 3) graphs unless W[1]=FPT. In addition, we obtain inapproximability results for computing a minimum dominating set in chordal and near chordal graphs. Our results prove that unless NP=P, the minimum dominating set in a chordal or s-chordal (s > 3) graph cannot be approximated within a ratio of c3 ln n in polynomial time, where n is the number of vertices in the graph and 0 < c < 1 is the constant from the inapproximability of the minimum dominating set in general graphs. In other words, our results suggest that restricting to chordal or s-chordal graphs can improve the approximation ratio by no more than a factor of 3. We then extend our techniques to find similar results for the Independent Dominating Set problem and the Connected Dominating Set problem in chordal or near chordal graphs. PMID:23874144

  8. Chemical graphs, molecular matrices and topological indices in chemoinformatics and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu

    2013-06-01

    Chemical and molecular graphs have fundamental applications in chemoinformatics, quantitative structureproperty relationships (QSPR), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), virtual screening of chemical libraries, and computational drug design. Chemoinformatics applications of graphs include chemical structure representation and coding, database search and retrieval, and physicochemical property prediction. QSPR, QSAR and virtual screening are based on the structure-property principle, which states that the physicochemical and biological properties of chemical compounds can be predicted from their chemical structure. Such structure-property correlations are usually developed from topological indices and fingerprints computed from the molecular graph and from molecular descriptors computed from the three-dimensional chemical structure. We present here a selection of the most important graph descriptors and topological indices, including molecular matrices, graph spectra, spectral moments, graph polynomials, and vertex topological indices. These graph descriptors are used to define several topological indices based on molecular connectivity, graph distance, reciprocal distance, distance-degree, distance-valency, spectra, polynomials, and information theory concepts. The molecular descriptors and topological indices can be developed with a more general approach, based on molecular graph operators, which define a family of graph indices related by a common formula. Graph descriptors and topological indices for molecules containing heteroatoms and multiple bonds are computed with weighting schemes based on atomic properties, such as the atomic number, covalent radius, or electronegativity. The correlation in QSPR and QSAR models can be improved by optimizing some parameters in the formula of topological indices, as demonstrated for structural descriptors based on atomic connectivity and graph distance.

  9. Label-based routing for a family of small-world Farey graphs

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yinhu; Wang, Yinhe

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an informative labelling method for vertices in a family of Farey graphs, and deduce a routing algorithm on all the shortest paths between any two vertices in Farey graphs. The label of a vertex is composed of the precise locating position in graphs and the exact time linking to graphs. All the shortest paths routing between any pair of vertices, which number is exactly the product of two Fibonacci numbers, are determined only by their labels, and the time complexity of the algorithm is O(n). It is the first algorithm to figure out all the shortest paths between any pair of vertices in a kind of deterministic graphs. For Farey networks, the existence of an efficient routing protocol is of interest to design practical communication algorithms in relation to dynamical processes (including synchronization and structural controllability) and also to understand the underlying mechanisms that have shaped their particular structure. PMID:27167605

  10. Label-based routing for a family of small-world Farey graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yinhu; Wang, Yinhe

    2016-05-01

    We introduce an informative labelling method for vertices in a family of Farey graphs, and deduce a routing algorithm on all the shortest paths between any two vertices in Farey graphs. The label of a vertex is composed of the precise locating position in graphs and the exact time linking to graphs. All the shortest paths routing between any pair of vertices, which number is exactly the product of two Fibonacci numbers, are determined only by their labels, and the time complexity of the algorithm is O(n). It is the first algorithm to figure out all the shortest paths between any pair of vertices in a kind of deterministic graphs. For Farey networks, the existence of an efficient routing protocol is of interest to design practical communication algorithms in relation to dynamical processes (including synchronization and structural controllability) and also to understand the underlying mechanisms that have shaped their particular structure.

  11. Label-based routing for a family of small-world Farey graphs.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yinhu; Wang, Yinhe

    2016-05-11

    We introduce an informative labelling method for vertices in a family of Farey graphs, and deduce a routing algorithm on all the shortest paths between any two vertices in Farey graphs. The label of a vertex is composed of the precise locating position in graphs and the exact time linking to graphs. All the shortest paths routing between any pair of vertices, which number is exactly the product of two Fibonacci numbers, are determined only by their labels, and the time complexity of the algorithm is O(n). It is the first algorithm to figure out all the shortest paths between any pair of vertices in a kind of deterministic graphs. For Farey networks, the existence of an efficient routing protocol is of interest to design practical communication algorithms in relation to dynamical processes (including synchronization and structural controllability) and also to understand the underlying mechanisms that have shaped their particular structure.

  12. Diversity of Graphs with Highly Variable Connectivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    of acyclic graphs i.e., trees and then later comment on how our results apply to general graphs. Our experiment uses in- cremental growth via...generate a tree having n=100 nodes using pref- erential attachment rule given by 7. That is, each trial re- sults in a tree having its own degree...studied graph properties. First, high-degree nodes in the smax graph have high centrality, and for trees this relationship was shown to be monotonic

  13. Claw-Free Maximal Planar Graphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    0, 1,2 and 3 points of degree 6 respectively.) Now suppose G,. has no claws for 3 < r < i and consider graph G ,+,. Graph G,+ 1 is obtained from Gr by...adjacent to a point v by N(v) and call the induced subgraph GiN(v)] the neighborhood graph of v in G . Graph G is said to be locally n-connected if for all

  14. Conceptual graphs for semantics and knowledge processing

    SciTech Connect

    Fargues, J.; Landau, M.C.; Dugourd, A.; Catach, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the representational and algorithmic power of the conceptual graph model for natural language semantics and knowledge processing. Also described is a Prolog-like resolution method for conceptual graphs, which allows to perform deduction on very large semantic domains. The interpreter developed is similar to a Prolog interpreter in which the terms are any conceptual graphs and in which the unification algorithm is replaced by a specialized algorithm for conceptual graphs.

  15. Algorithms and architectures for high performance analysis of semantic graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, Bruce Alan

    2005-09-01

    Semantic graphs offer one promising avenue for intelligence analysis in homeland security. They provide a mechanism for describing a wide variety of relationships between entities of potential interest. The vertices are nouns of various types, e.g. people, organizations, events, etc. Edges in the graph represent different types of relationships between entities, e.g. 'is friends with', 'belongs-to', etc. Semantic graphs offer a number of potential advantages as a knowledge representation system. They allow information of different kinds, and collected in differing ways, to be combined in a seamless manner. A semantic graph is a very compressed representation of some of relationship information. It has been reported that the semantic graph can be two orders of magnitude smaller than the processed intelligence data. This allows for much larger portions of the data universe to be resident in computer memory. Many intelligence queries that are relevant to the terrorist threat are naturally expressed in the language of semantic graphs. One example is the search for 'interesting' relationships between two individuals or between an individual and an event, which can be phrased as a search for short paths in the graph. Another example is the search for an analyst-specified threat pattern, which can be cast as an instance of subgraph isomorphism. It is important to note than many kinds of analysis are not relationship based, so these are not good candidates for semantic graphs. Thus, a semantic graph should always be used in conjunction with traditional knowledge representation and interface methods. Operations that involve looking for chains of relationships (e.g. friend of a friend) are not efficiently executable in a traditional relational database. However, the semantic graph can be thought of as a pre-join of the database, and it is ideally suited for these kinds of operations. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories are working to facilitate semantic graph

  16. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part II. Isomer Enumeration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of graph theory to aid in the depiction of organic molecular structures. Gives a historical perspective of graph theory and explains graph theory terminology with organic examples. Lists applications of graph theory to current research projects. (ML)

  17. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part II. Isomer Enumeration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of graph theory to aid in the depiction of organic molecular structures. Gives a historical perspective of graph theory and explains graph theory terminology with organic examples. Lists applications of graph theory to current research projects. (ML)

  18. Dynamic modeling of electrochemical systems using linear graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Thanh-Son; McPhee, John

    An electrochemical cell is a multidisciplinary system which involves complex chemical, electrical, and thermodynamical processes. The primary objective of this paper is to develop a linear graph-theoretical modeling for the dynamic description of electrochemical systems through the representation of the system topologies. After a brief introduction to the topic and a review of linear graphs, an approach to develop linear graphs for electrochemical systems using a circuitry representation is discussed, followed in turn by the use of the branch and chord transformation techniques to generate final dynamic equations governing the system. As an example, the application of linear graph theory to modeling a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery will be presented. Results show that not only the number of equations are reduced significantly, but also the linear graph model simulates faster compared to the original lumped parameter model. The approach presented in this paper can be extended to modeling complex systems such as an electric or hybrid electric vehicle where a battery pack is interconnected with other components in many different domains.

  19. A maxent-stress model for graph layout.

    PubMed

    Gansner, Emden R; Hu, Yifan; North, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    In some applications of graph visualization, input edges have associated target lengths. Dealing with these lengths is a challenge, especially for large graphs. Stress models are often employed in this situation. However, the traditional full stress model is not scalable due to its reliance on an initial all-pairs shortest path calculation. A number of fast approximation algorithms have been proposed. While they work well for some graphs, the results are less satisfactory on graphs of intrinsically high dimension, because some nodes may be placed too close together, or even share the same position. We propose a solution, called the maxent-stress model, which applies the principle of maximum entropy to cope with the extra degrees of freedom. We describe a force-augmented stress majorization algorithm that solves the maxent-stress model. Numerical results show that the algorithm scales well, and provides acceptable layouts for large, nonrigid graphs. This also has potential applications to scalable algorithms for statistical multidimensional scaling (MDS) with variable distances.

  20. Clifford Algebras, Random Graphs, and Quantum Random Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, René; Staples, G. Stacey

    2008-08-01

    For fixed n > 0, the space of finite graphs on n vertices is canonically associated with an abelian, nilpotent-generated subalgebra of the Clifford algebra {C}l2n,2n which is canonically isomorphic to the 2n-particle fermion algebra. Using the generators of the subalgebra, an algebraic probability space of "Clifford adjacency matrices" associated with finite graphs is defined. Each Clifford adjacency matrix is a quantum random variable whose mth moment corresponds to the number of m-cycles in the graph G. Each matrix admits a canonical "quantum decomposition" into a sum of three algebraic random variables: a = aΔ + aΥ + aΛ, where aΔ is classical while aΥ and aΛ are quantum. Moreover, within the Clifford algebra context the NP problem of cycle enumeration is reduced to matrix multiplication, requiring no more than n4 Clifford (geo-metric) multiplications within the algebra.

  1. L(d,2,1)-labeling of sun graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriati, Diari; Martini, Titin S.; Herlinawati, Novita

    2014-03-01

    For positive integer d, L(d,2,1)-labeling of a graph G is a function f from V(G) to the positive integers, f:V(G)→{1,2,...} such that |f(u)-f(v)|≥d if the distance between any 2 vertices u and v is 1 (D(u,v) = 1), |f(u)-f(v)|≥2 if D(u,v) = 2, and |f(u)-f(v)|≥1 if D(u,v) = 3. The L(d,2,1)-labeling number kd(G) of a graph G is the smallest positive integer kd such that G has an L(d,2,1)-labeling with kd as the maximum label. This paper presents a general kd-value of sun graphs Sn for any d ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3.

  2. Browsing schematics: Query-filtered graphs with context nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciccarelli, Eugene C.; Nardi, Bonnie A.

    1988-01-01

    The early results of a research project to create tools for building interfaces to intelligent systems on the NASA Space Station are reported. One such tool is the Schematic Browser which helps users engaged in engineering problem solving find and select schematics from among a large set. Users query for schematics with certain components, and the Schematic Browser presents a graph whose nodes represent the schematics with those components. The query greatly reduces the number of choices presented to the user, filtering the graph to a manageable size. Users can reformulate and refine the query serially until they locate the schematics of interest. To help users maintain orientation as they navigate a large body of data, the graph also includes nodes that are not matches but provide global and local context for the matching nodes. Context nodes include landmarks, ancestors, siblings, children and previous matches.

  3. Comparing Unlabeled Pedigree Graphs via Covering with Bipartite and Path.

    PubMed

    Amar, Lamiaa A; Belal, Nahla A; Rashwan, Shaheera

    2016-11-01

    Family trees, also called pedigrees, have important information about an individual's past and future life. It can be used as a diagnostic tool and help guide decisions about genetic testing for the patient and at-risk family members. There are 2% to 10% of parent-child relationships missing, and this can cause large differences in the pedigree graphs created. Hence, the evaluation of pedigrees is an essential task. In this article, we focus on the problem of isomorphism of unlabeled subpedigrees with a large number of individuals and hundreds of families, given that the two pedigrees being evaluated are generational and mating is between external parents. We address two restricted versions of the unlabeled subpedigree graph problem, Cover Unlabeled subPedigree with a Bipartite graph (CUPB), and Cover Unlabeled subPedigree with a Path (CUPP) problems. Fixed parameter algorithms are presented to solve the two problems, CUPB and CUPP.

  4. Exact epidemic models on graphs using graph-automorphism driven lumping.

    PubMed

    Simon, Péter L; Taylor, Michael; Kiss, Istvan Z

    2011-04-01

    The dynamics of disease transmission strongly depends on the properties of the population contact network. Pair-approximation models and individual-based network simulation have been used extensively to model contact networks with non-trivial properties. In this paper, using a continuous time Markov chain, we start from the exact formulation of a simple epidemic model on an arbitrary contact network and rigorously derive and prove some known results that were previously mainly justified based on some biological hypotheses. The main result of the paper is the illustration of the link between graph automorphisms and the process of lumping whereby the number of equations in a system of linear differential equations can be significantly reduced. The main advantage of lumping is that the simplified lumped system is not an approximation of the original system but rather an exact version of this. For a special class of graphs, we show how the lumped system can be obtained by using graph automorphisms. Finally, we discuss the advantages and possible applications of exact epidemic models and lumping.

  5. Systematic and Deterministic Graph-Minor Embedding of Cartesian Products of Complete Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaribafiyan, Arman; Marchand, Dominic J. J.; Changiz Rezaei, Seyed Saeed

    The limited connectivity of current and next-generation quantum annealers motivates the need for efficient graph-minor embedding methods. The overhead of the widely used heuristic techniques is quickly proving to be a significant bottleneck for real-world applications. To alleviate this obstacle, we propose a systematic deterministic embedding method that exploits the structures of both the input graph of the specific combinatorial optimization problem and the quantum annealer. We focus on the specific case of the Cartesian product of two complete graphs, a regular structure that occurs in many problems. We first divide the problem by embedding one of the factors of the Cartesian product in a repeatable unit. The resulting simplified problem consists of placing copies of this unit and connecting them together appropriately. Aside from the obvious speed and efficiency advantages of a systematic deterministic approach, the embeddings produced can be easily scaled for larger processors and show desirable properties with respect to the number of qubits used and the chain length distribution.

  6. Teaching and Assessing Graphing Using Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    As a college biology instructor, I often see graphs in lab reports that do not meet my expectations. I also observe that many college students do not always adequately differentiate between good and poor (or misleading) graphs. The activity described in this paper is the result of my work with students to improve their graphing literacy. The…

  7. Collaborative Robotic Instruction: A Graph Teaching Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitnik, Ruben; Recabarren, Matias; Nussbaum, Miguel; Soto, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Graphing is a key skill in the study of Physics. Drawing and interpreting graphs play a key role in the understanding of science, while the lack of these has proved to be a handicap and a limiting factor in the learning of scientific concepts. It has been observed that despite the amount of previous graph-working experience, students of all ages…

  8. Around the Sun in a Graphing Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of graphing calculators for polar and parametric equations. Presents eight lines of the program for the graph of a parametric equation and 11 lines of the program for a graph of a polar equation. Illustrates the application of the programs for planetary motion and free-fall motion. (YP)

  9. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  10. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  11. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  12. My Bar Graph Tells a Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

  13. So Many Graphs, So Little Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Jennifer J.; Benson, Christine C.

    2009-01-01

    Interpreting graphs found in various content areas is an important skill for students, especially in light of high-stakes testing. In addition, reading and understanding graphs is an important part of numeracy, or numeric literacy, a skill necessary for informed citizenry. This article explores the different categories of graphs, provides…

  14. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  15. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  16. Some Applications of Graph Theory to Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubert, Lawrence J.

    1974-01-01

    The connection between graph theory and clustering is reviewed and extended. Major emphasis is on restating, in a graph-theoretic context, selected past work in clustering, and conversely, developing alternative strategies from several standard concepts used in graph theory per se. (Author/RC)

  17. Teaching and Assessing Graphing Using Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    As a college biology instructor, I often see graphs in lab reports that do not meet my expectations. I also observe that many college students do not always adequately differentiate between good and poor (or misleading) graphs. The activity described in this paper is the result of my work with students to improve their graphing literacy. The…

  18. Collaborative Robotic Instruction: A Graph Teaching Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitnik, Ruben; Recabarren, Matias; Nussbaum, Miguel; Soto, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Graphing is a key skill in the study of Physics. Drawing and interpreting graphs play a key role in the understanding of science, while the lack of these has proved to be a handicap and a limiting factor in the learning of scientific concepts. It has been observed that despite the amount of previous graph-working experience, students of all ages…

  19. Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

    1999-03-02

    Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

  20. Some Applications of Graph Theory to Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubert, Lawrence J.

    1974-01-01

    The connection between graph theory and clustering is reviewed and extended. Major emphasis is on restating, in a graph-theoretic context, selected past work in clustering, and conversely, developing alternative strategies from several standard concepts used in graph theory per se. (Author/RC)