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Sample records for gras proteins form

  1. Nanocarriers from GRAS Zein Proteins to Encapsulate Hydrophobic Actives.

    PubMed

    Weissmueller, Nikolas T; Lu, Hoang D; Hurley, Amanda; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-11-14

    One factor limiting the expansion of nanomedicines has been the high cost of the materials and processes required for their production. We present a continuous, scalable, low cost nanoencapsulation process, Flash Nanoprecipitation (FNP) that enables the production of nanocarriers (NCs) with a narrow size distribution using zein corn proteins. Zein is a low cost, GRAS protein (having the FDA status of "Generally Regarded as Safe") currently used in food applications, which acts as an effective encapsulant for hydrophobic compounds using FNP. The four-stream FNP configuration allows the encapsulation of very hydrophobic compounds in a way that is not possible with previous precipitation processes. We present the encapsulation of several model active compounds with as high as 45 wt % drug loading with respect to zein concentration into ∼100 nm nanocarriers. Three examples are presented: (1) the pro-drug antioxidant, vitamin E-acetate, (2) an anticholera quorum-sensing modulator CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one; CAI-1 that reduces Vibrio cholerae virulence by modulating cellular communication), and (3) hydrophobic fluorescent dyes with a range of hydrophobicities. The specific interaction between zein and the milk protein, sodium caseinate, provides stabilization of the NCs in PBS, LB medium, and in pH 2 solutions. The stability and size changes in the three media provide information on the mechanism of assembly of the zein/active/casein NC.

  2. Structural and Functional Analysis of the GRAS Gene Family in Grapevine Indicates a Role of GRAS Proteins in the Control of Development and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Grimplet, Jérôme; Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Teixeira, Rita T.; Martinez-Zapater, Jose M.; Fortes, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    GRAS transcription factors are involved in many processes of plant growth and development (e.g., axillary shoot meristem formation, root radial patterning, nodule morphogenesis, arbuscular development) as well as in plant disease resistance and abiotic stress responses. However, little information is available concerning this gene family in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), an economically important woody crop. We performed a model curation of GRAS genes identified in the latest genome annotation leading to the identification of 52 genes. Gene models were improved and three new genes were identified that could be grapevine- or woody-plant specific. Phylogenetic analysis showed that GRAS genes could be classified into 13 groups that mapped on the 19 V. vinifera chromosomes. Five new subfamilies, previously not characterized in other species, were identified. Multiple sequence alignment showed typical GRAS domain in the proteins and new motifs were also described. As observed in other species, both segmental and tandem duplications contributed significantly to the expansion and evolution of the GRAS gene family in grapevine. Expression patterns across a variety of tissues and upon abiotic and biotic conditions revealed possible divergent functions of GRAS genes in grapevine development and stress responses. By comparing the information available for tomato and grapevine GRAS genes, we identified candidate genes that might constitute conserved transcriptional regulators of both climacteric and non-climacteric fruit ripening. Altogether this study provides valuable information and robust candidate genes for future functional analysis aiming at improving the quality of fleshy fruits. PMID:27065316

  3. Bacterial GRAS domain proteins throw new light on gibberellic acid response mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2012-10-01

    Gibberellic acids (GAs) are key plant hormones, regulating various aspects of growth and development, which have been at the center of the 'green revolution'. GRAS family proteins, the primary players in GA signaling pathways, remain poorly understood. Using sequence-profile searches, structural comparisons and phylogenetic analysis, we establish that the GRAS family first emerged in bacteria and belongs to the Rossmann fold methyltransferase superfamily. All bacterial and a subset of plant GRAS proteins are likely to function as small-molecule methylases. The remaining plant versions have lost one or more AdoMet (SAM)-binding residues while preserving their substrate-binding residues. We predict that GRAS proteins might either modify or bind small molecules such as GAs or their derivatives. aravind@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary Material for this article is available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Bacterial GRAS domain proteins throw new light on gibberellic acid response mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Gibberellic acids (GAs) are key plant hormones, regulating various aspects of growth and development, which have been at the center of the ‘green revolution’. GRAS family proteins, the primary players in GA signaling pathways, remain poorly understood. Using sequence-profile searches, structural comparisons and phylogenetic analysis, we establish that the GRAS family first emerged in bacteria and belongs to the Rossmann fold methyltransferase superfamily. All bacterial and a subset of plant GRAS proteins are likely to function as small-molecule methylases. The remaining plant versions have lost one or more AdoMet (SAM)-binding residues while preserving their substrate-binding residues. We predict that GRAS proteins might either modify or bind small molecules such as GAs or their derivatives. Contact: aravind@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary Information: Supplementary Material for this article is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22829623

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from moss, lycophyte and vascular plant lineages reveals that GRAS genes arose and underwent substantial diversification in the ancestral lineage common to bryophytes and vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    GRAS genes are a large family of streptophyte specific transcription factors that function in a diverse set of physiological and developmental processes. GRAS proteins of the HAIRY MERISTEM (HAM) sub-family are required for maintenance of shoot and root indeterminacy. The transcriptional targets of HAM proteins and the signaling inputs regulating HAM activity are completely unknown. Understanding the relationship of HAM proteins to other members of the GRAS family may inform hypotheses relating to cellular level HAM functions. Here I report a phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins employing the complete set of known and probable GRAS proteins from the sequenced genomes of the flowering plants Arabidopsis and Rice, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. HAM proteins are most closely related to DELLA proteins, key components of gibberellin perception. However, GRAS proteins diversified into a minimum of 12 discreet monophyletic lineages, including the HAM and DELLA subfamilies, prior to divergence of the moss and flowering plant lineages. Substantial diversification of GRAS proteins at so early a point in land plant evolution suggests that relative relatedness among GRAS protein sub-families may not substantially reflect shared protein function. PMID:21543899

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from moss, lycophyte and vascular plant lineages reveals that GRAS genes arose and underwent substantial diversification in the ancestral lineage common to bryophytes and vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Eric M

    2011-06-01

    GRAS genes are a large family of streptophyte specific transcription factors that function in a diverse set of physiological and developmental processes. GRAS proteins of the HAIRY MERISTEM (HAM) sub-family are required for maintenance of shoot and root indeterminacy. The transcriptional targets of HAM proteins and the signaling inputs regulating HAM activity are completely unknown. Understanding the relationship of HAM proteins to other members of the GRAS family may inform hypotheses relating to cellular level HAM functions. I here report a phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins employing the complete set of known and probable GRAS proteins from the sequenced genomes of the flowering plants Arabidopsis and Rice, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. HAM proteins are most closely related to DELLA proteins, key components of gibberellin perception. However, GRAS proteins diversified into a minimum of twelve discreet monophyletic lineages, including the HAM and DELLA subfamilies, prior to divergence of the moss and flowering plant lineages. Substantial diversification of GRAS proteins at so early a point in land plant evolution suggests that relative relatedness sequence homology among GRAS proteins sub-families may not substantially reflect shared protein function. 

  7. Protein matrix involved in the lipid retention of foie gras during cooking: a multimodal hyperspectral imaging study.

    PubMed

    Théron, Laëtitia; Vénien, Annie; Jamme, Frédéric; Fernandez, Xavier; Peyrin, Frédéric; Molette, Caroline; Dumas, Paul; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Astruc, Thierry

    2014-06-25

    Denaturation of the protein matrix during heat treatment of duck foie gras was studied in relationship to the amount of fat loss during cooking. A low fat loss group was compared with a high fat loss group by histochemistry, FT-IR, and synchrotron UV microspectroscopy combination to characterize their protein matrix at different scales. After cooking, the high fat loss group showed higher densification of its matrix, higher ultraviolet tyrosine autofluorescence, and an infrared shift of the amide I band. These results revealed a higher level of protein denaturation and aggregation during cooking in high fat loss than in low fat loss foie gras. In addition, the fluorescence and infrared responses of the raw tissue revealed differences according to the level of fat losses after cooking. These findings highlight the importance of the supramolecular state of the protein matrix in determining the fat loss of foie gras.

  8. Amyloidogenic potential of foie gras.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Alan; Richey, Tina; Murphy, Charles L; Weiss, Deborah T; Wall, Jonathan S; Westermark, Gunilla T; Westermark, Per

    2007-06-26

    The human cerebral and systemic amyloidoses and prion-associated spongiform encephalopathies are acquired or inherited protein folding disorders in which normally soluble proteins or peptides are converted into fibrillar aggregates. This is a nucleation-dependent process that can be initiated or accelerated by fibril seeds formed from homologous or heterologous amyloidogenic precursors that serve as an amyloid enhancing factor (AEF) and has pathogenic significance in that disease may be transmitted by oral ingestion or parenteral administration of these conformationally altered components. Except for infected brain tissue, specific dietary sources of AEF have not been identified. Here we report that commercially available duck- or goose-derived foie gras contains birefringent congophilic fibrillar material composed of serum amyloid A-related protein that acted as a potent AEF in a transgenic murine model of secondary (amyloid A protein) amyloidosis. When such mice were injected with or fed amyloid extracted from foie gras, the animals developed extensive systemic pathological deposits. These experimental data provide evidence that an amyloid-containing food product hastened the development of amyloid protein A amyloidosis in a susceptible population. On this basis, we posit that this and perhaps other forms of amyloidosis may be transmissible, akin to the infectious nature of prion-related illnesses.

  9. Mardi Gras Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladson, Henrietta O.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a kindergarten art activity in which students created masks in celebration of Mardi Gras (New Orleans, Louisiana). Explains that the students learned about Mardi Gras and saw a coloring demonstration to prepare them for the project. Discusses in detail the process of creating the masks. (CMK)

  10. Mardi Gras Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladson, Henrietta O.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a kindergarten art activity in which students created masks in celebration of Mardi Gras (New Orleans, Louisiana). Explains that the students learned about Mardi Gras and saw a coloring demonstration to prepare them for the project. Discusses in detail the process of creating the masks. (CMK)

  11. Genome-wide analysis of the GRAS gene family in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Tong-Kun; Duan, Wei-Ke; Ma, Qing-Hua; Ren, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Li, Ying; Hou, Xi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The GRAS gene family is one of the most important families of transcriptional regulators. In this study, 48 GRAS genes are identified from Chinese cabbage, and they are classified into eight groups according to the classification of Arabidopsis. The characterization, classification, gene structure and phylogenetic construction of GRAS proteins are performed. Distribution mapping shows that GRAS proteins are nonrandomly localized in 10 chromosomes. Fifty-five orthologous gene pairs are shared by Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis, and interaction networks of these orthologous genes are constructed. The expansion of GRAS genes in Chinese cabbage results from genome triplication. Among the 17 species examined, 14 higher plants carry the GRAS genes, whereas two lower plants and one fungi species do not. Furthermore, the expression patterns of GRAS genes exhibit differences in three tissues based on RNA-seq data. Taken together, this comprehensive analysis will provide rich resources for studying GRAS protein functions in Chinese cabbage.

  12. More than Mardi Gras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Telling art students to do anything they want can be dangerous. It's not something teachers often do, but this is a project where anything goes. In this article, the author describes how her students created a Mardi Gras type mask, then incorporated it into a mixed-media composition.

  13. More than Mardi Gras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Telling art students to do anything they want can be dangerous. It's not something teachers often do, but this is a project where anything goes. In this article, the author describes how her students created a Mardi Gras type mask, then incorporated it into a mixed-media composition.

  14. Genome-wide identification and characterization of GRAS transcription factors in sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Zhou, Yu; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The GRAS gene family is one of the most important plant-specific gene families, which encodes transcriptional regulators and plays an essential role in plant development and physiological processes. The GRAS gene family has been well characterized in many higher plants such as Arabidopsis, rice, Chinese cabbage, tomato and tobacco. In this study, we identified 38 GRAS genes in sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera), analyzed their physical and chemical characteristics and performed phylogenetic analysis using the GRAS genes from eight representative plant species to show the evolution of GRAS genes in Planta. In addition, the gene structures and motifs of the sacred lotus GRAS proteins were characterized in detail. Comparative analysis identified 42 orthologous and 9 co-orthologous gene pairs between sacred lotus and Arabidopsis, and 35 orthologous and 22 co-orthologous gene pairs between sacred lotus and rice. Based on publically available RNA-seq data generated from leaf, petiole, rhizome and root, we found that most of the sacred lotus GRAS genes exhibited a tissue-specific expression pattern. Eight of the ten PAT1-clade GRAS genes, particularly NnuGRAS-05, NnuGRAS-10 and NnuGRAS-25, were preferentially expressed in rhizome and root. In summary, this is the first in silico analysis of the GRAS gene family in sacred lotus, which will provide valuable information for further molecular and biological analyses of this important gene family. PMID:27635351

  15. Evolutionary Analyses of GRAS Transcription Factors in Angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Alberto; Rouard, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    GRAS transcription factors (TFs) play critical roles in plant growth and development such as gibberellin and mycorrhizal signaling. Proteins belonging to this gene family contain a typical GRAS domain in the C-terminal sequence, whereas the N-terminal region is highly variable. Although, GRAS genes have been characterized in a number of plant species, their classification is still not completely resolved. Based on a panel of eight representative species of angiosperms, we identified 29 orthologous groups or orthogroups (OGs) for the GRAS gene family, suggesting that at least 29 ancestor genes were present in the angiosperm lineage before the “Amborella” evolutionary split. Interestingly, some taxonomic groups were missing members of one or more OGs. The gene number expansion usually observed in transcription factors was not observed in GRAS while the genome triplication ancestral to the eudicots (γ hexaploidization event) was detectable in a limited number of GRAS orthogroups. We also found conserved OG-specific motifs in the variable N-terminal region. Finally, we could regroup OGs in 17 subfamilies for which names were homogenized based on a literature review and described 5 new subfamilies (DLT, RAD1, RAM1, SCLA, and SCLB). This study establishes a consistent framework for the classification of GRAS members in angiosperm species, and thereby a tool to correctly establish the orthologous relationships of GRAS genes in most of the food crops in order to facilitate any subsequent functional analyses in the GRAS gene family. The multi-fasta file containing all the sequences used in our study could be used as database to perform diagnostic BLASTp to classify GRAS genes from other non-model species. PMID:28303145

  16. Evolutionary Analyses of GRAS Transcription Factors in Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Cenci, Alberto; Rouard, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    GRAS transcription factors (TFs) play critical roles in plant growth and development such as gibberellin and mycorrhizal signaling. Proteins belonging to this gene family contain a typical GRAS domain in the C-terminal sequence, whereas the N-terminal region is highly variable. Although, GRAS genes have been characterized in a number of plant species, their classification is still not completely resolved. Based on a panel of eight representative species of angiosperms, we identified 29 orthologous groups or orthogroups (OGs) for the GRAS gene family, suggesting that at least 29 ancestor genes were present in the angiosperm lineage before the "Amborella" evolutionary split. Interestingly, some taxonomic groups were missing members of one or more OGs. The gene number expansion usually observed in transcription factors was not observed in GRAS while the genome triplication ancestral to the eudicots (γ hexaploidization event) was detectable in a limited number of GRAS orthogroups. We also found conserved OG-specific motifs in the variable N-terminal region. Finally, we could regroup OGs in 17 subfamilies for which names were homogenized based on a literature review and described 5 new subfamilies (DLT, RAD1, RAM1, SCLA, and SCLB). This study establishes a consistent framework for the classification of GRAS members in angiosperm species, and thereby a tool to correctly establish the orthologous relationships of GRAS genes in most of the food crops in order to facilitate any subsequent functional analyses in the GRAS gene family. The multi-fasta file containing all the sequences used in our study could be used as database to perform diagnostic BLASTp to classify GRAS genes from other non-model species.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the GRAS gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Z Y; Wu, P Z; Chen, Y P; Li, M R; Wu, G J; Jiang, H W

    2015-12-29

    GRAS proteins play vital roles in plant growth and development. Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) was found to have a total of 48 GRAS family members (JcGRAS), 15 more than those found in Arabidopsis. The JcGRAS genes were divided into 12 subfamilies or 15 ancient monophyletic lineages based on the phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from both flowering and lower plants. The functions of GRAS genes in 9 subfamilies have been reported previously for several plants, while the genes in the remaining 3 subfamilies were of unknown function; we named the latter families U1 to U3. No member of U3 subfamily is present in Arabidopsis and Poaceae species according to public genome sequence data. In comparison with the number of GRAS genes in Arabidopsis, more were detected in physic nut, resulting from the retention of many ancient GRAS subfamilies and the formation of tandem repeats during evolution. No evidence of recent duplication among JcGRAS genes was observed in physic nut. Based on digital gene expression data, 21 of the 48 genes exhibited differential expression in four tissues analyzed. Two members of subfamily U3 were expressed only in buds and flowers, implying that they may play specific roles. Our results provide valuable resources for future studies on the functions of GRAS proteins in physic nut.

  18. The Arabidopsis GRAS protein SCL14 interacts with class II TGA transcription factors and is essential for the activation of stress-inducible promoters.

    PubMed

    Fode, Benjamin; Siemsen, Tanja; Thurow, Corinna; Weigel, Ralf; Gatz, Christiane

    2008-11-01

    The plant signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) and/or xenobiotic chemicals like the auxin mimic 2,4-D induce transcriptional activation of defense- and stress-related genes that contain activation sequence-1 (as-1)-like cis-elements in their promoters. as-1-like sequences are recognized by basic/leucine zipper transcription factors of the TGA family. Expression of genes related to the SA-dependent defense program systemic acquired resistance requires the TGA-interacting protein NPR1. However, a number of as-1-containing promoters can be activated independently from NPR1. Here, we report the identification of Arabidopsis thaliana SCARECROW-like 14 (SCL14), a member of the GRAS family of regulatory proteins, as a TGA-interacting protein that is required for the activation of TGA-dependent but NPR1-independent SA- and 2,4-D-inducible promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that class II TGA factors TGA2, TGA5, and/or TGA6 are needed to recruit SCL14 to promoters of selected SCL14 target genes identified by whole-genome transcript profiling experiments. The coding regions and the expression profiles of the SCL14-dependent genes imply that they might be involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and possibly endogenous harmful metabolites. Consistently, plants ectopically expressing SCL14 showed increased tolerance to toxic doses of the chemicals isonicotinic acid and 2,4,6-triiodobenzoic acid, whereas the scl14 and the tga2 tga5 tga6 mutants were more susceptible. Hence, the TGA/SCL14 complex seems to be involved in the activation of a general broad-spectrum detoxification network upon challenge of plants with xenobiotics.

  19. Network of GRAS Transcription Factors Involved in the Control of Arbuscule Development in Lotus japonicus1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Li; Cui, Haitao; Buer, Benjamin; Vijayakumar, Vinod; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Junkermann, Stefanie; Bucher, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, in symbiosis with plants, facilitate acquisition of nutrients from the soil to their host. After penetration, intracellular hyphae form fine-branched structures in cortical cells termed arbuscules, representing the major site where bidirectional nutrient exchange takes place between the host plant and fungus. Transcriptional mechanisms underlying this cellular reprogramming are still poorly understood. GRAS proteins are an important family of transcriptional regulators in plants, named after the first three members: GIBBERELLIC ACID-INSENSITIVE, REPRESSOR of GAI, and SCARECROW. Here, we show that among 45 transcription factors up-regulated in mycorrhizal roots of the legume Lotus japonicus, expression of a unique GRAS protein particularly increases in arbuscule-containing cells under low phosphate conditions and displays a phylogenetic pattern characteristic of symbiotic genes. Allelic rad1 mutants display a strongly reduced number of arbuscules, which undergo accelerated degeneration. In further studies, two RAD1-interacting proteins were identified. One of them is the closest homolog of Medicago truncatula, REDUCED ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZATION1 (RAM1), which was reported to regulate a glycerol-3-phosphate acyl transferase that promotes cutin biosynthesis to enhance hyphopodia formation. As in M. truncatula, the L. japonicus ram1 mutant lines show compromised AM colonization and stunted arbuscules. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, new insight into the transcriptional program underlying the host’s response to AM colonization and propose a function of GRAS transcription factors including RAD1 and RAM1 during arbuscule development. PMID:25560877

  20. Crystal Structure of the GRAS Domain of SCARECROW-LIKE7 in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengping; Zhao, Yanhe; Zhao, Zheng; Wu, Xiuling; Sun, Lifang; Liu, Qingsong; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    GRAS proteins belong to a plant-specific protein family with many members and play essential roles in plant growth and development, functioning primarily in transcriptional regulation. Proteins in the family are minimally defined as containing the conserved GRAS domain. Here, we determined the structure of the GRAS domain of Os-SCL7 from rice (Oryza sativa) to 1.82 Å. The structure includes cap and core subdomains and elucidates the features of the conserved GRAS LRI, VHIID, LRII, PFYRE, and SAW motifs. The structure is a dimer, with a clear groove to accommodate double-stranded DNA. Docking a DNA segment into the groove to generate an Os-SCL7/DNA complex provides insight into the DNA binding mechanism of GRAS proteins. Furthermore, the in vitro DNA binding property of Os-SCL7 and model-defined recognition residues are assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and mutagenesis assays. These studies reveal the structure and preliminary DNA interaction mechanisms of GRAS proteins and open the door to in-depth investigation and understanding of the individual pathways in which they play important roles. PMID:27081181

  1. Studying how protein crystals form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Watching molecules of the iron-storing protein apoferritin come together to form a nucleus reveals some interesting behavior. In this series of images, researchers observed clusters of four molecules at the corners of a diamond shape (top). As more molecules attach to the cluster, they arrange themselves into rods (second from top), and a raft-like configuration of molecules forms the critical nucleus (third from top), suggesting that crystal growth is much slower than it could be were the molecules arranged in a more compact formation. In the final image, a crystallite consisting of three layers containing approximately 60 to 70 molecules each is formed. Atomic force microscopy made visualizing the process of nucleation possible for the first time. The principal investigator is Peter Vekilov, of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Vekilov's team at UAH studies protein solutions as they change phases from liquids to crystalline solids. They want to know if the molecules in the solution interact with one another, and if so, how, from the perspectives of thermodynamics and kinetics. They want to understand which forces -- electrical, electrostatic, hydrodynamic, or other kinds of forces -- are responsible for the interactions. They also study nucleation, the begirning stage of crystallization. This process is important to understand because it sets the stage for crystal growth in all kinds of solutions and liquid melts that are important in such diverse fields as agriculture, medicine, and the fabrication of metal components. Nucleation can determine the rate of crystal growth, the number of crystals that will be formed, and the quality and size of the crystals.

  2. Studying how protein crystals form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Watching molecules of the iron-storing protein apoferritin come together to form a nucleus reveals some interesting behavior. In this series of images, researchers observed clusters of four molecules at the corners of a diamond shape (top). As more molecules attach to the cluster, they arrange themselves into rods (second from top), and a raft-like configuration of molecules forms the critical nucleus (third from top), suggesting that crystal growth is much slower than it could be were the molecules arranged in a more compact formation. In the final image, a crystallite consisting of three layers containing approximately 60 to 70 molecules each is formed. Atomic force microscopy made visualizing the process of nucleation possible for the first time. The principal investigator is Peter Vekilov, of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Vekilov's team at UAH studies protein solutions as they change phases from liquids to crystalline solids. They want to know if the molecules in the solution interact with one another, and if so, how, from the perspectives of thermodynamics and kinetics. They want to understand which forces -- electrical, electrostatic, hydrodynamic, or other kinds of forces -- are responsible for the interactions. They also study nucleation, the begirning stage of crystallization. This process is important to understand because it sets the stage for crystal growth in all kinds of solutions and liquid melts that are important in such diverse fields as agriculture, medicine, and the fabrication of metal components. Nucleation can determine the rate of crystal growth, the number of crystals that will be formed, and the quality and size of the crystals.

  3. Knockdown of a JmjC domain-containing gene JMJ524 confers altered gibberellin responses by transcriptional regulation of GRAS protein lacking the DELLA domain genes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Yu, Chuying; Wu, Hua; Luo, Zhidan; Ouyang, Bo; Cui, Long; Zhang, Junhong; Ye, Zhibiao

    2015-03-01

    Plants integrate responses to independent hormonal and environmental signals to survive adversity. In particular, the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) regulates a variety of developmental processes and stress responses. In this study, the Jumonji-C (JmjC) domain-containing gene JMJ524 was characterized in tomato. JMJ524 responded to circadian rhythms and was upregulated by GA treatment. Knockdown of JMJ524 by RNAi caused a GA-insensitive dwarf phenotype with shrunken leaves and shortened internodes. However, in these transgenic plants, higher levels of endogenous GAs were detected. A genome-wide gene expression analysis by RNA-seq indicated that the expression levels of two DELLA-like genes, SlGLD1 ('GRAS protein Lacking the DELLA domain') and SlGLD2, were increased in JMJ524-RNAi transgenic plants. Nevertheless, only the overexpression of SlGLD1 in tomato resulted in a GA-insensitive dwarf phenotype, suggesting that SlGLD1 acts as a repressor of GA signalling. This study proposes that JMJ524 is required for stem elongation by altering GA responses, at least partially by regulating SlGLD1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. GRAS NRT Precise Orbit Determination: Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MartinezFadrique, Francisco M.; Mate, Alberto Agueda; Rodriquez-Portugal, Francisco Sancho

    2007-01-01

    EUMETSAT launched the meteorological satellite MetOp-A in October 2006; it is the first of the three satellites that constitute the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) space segment. This satellite carries a challenging and innovative instrument, the GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding (GRAS). The goal of the GRAS instrument is to support the production of atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity with high accuracy, in an operational context, based on the bending of the GPS signals traversing the atmosphere during the so-called occultation periods. One of the key aspects associated to the data processing of the GRAS instrument is the necessity to describe the satellite motion and GPS receiver clock behaviour with high accuracy and within very strict timeliness limitations. In addition to these severe requirements, the GRAS Product Processing Facility (PPF) must be integrated in the EPS core ground segment, which introduces additional complexity from the data integration and operational procedure points of view. This paper sets out the rationale for algorithm selection and the conclusions from operational experience. It describes in detail the rationale and conclusions derived from the selection and implementation of the algorithms leading to the final orbit determination requirements (0.1 mm/s in velocity and 1 ns in receiver clock error at 1 Hz). Then it describes the operational approach and extracts the ideas and conclusions derived from the operational experience.

  5. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary Analysis, and Stress Responses of the GRAS Gene Family in Castor Beans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Chen, Zexi; Ahmed, Naeem; Han, Bing; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-06-24

    Plant-specific GRAS transcription factors play important roles in regulating growth, development, and stress responses. Castor beans (Ricinus communis) are important non-edible oilseed plants, cultivated worldwide for its seed oils and its adaptability to growth conditions. In this study, we identified and characterized a total of 48 GRAS genes based on the castor bean genome. Combined with phylogenetic analysis, the castor bean GRAS members were divided into 13 distinct groups. Functional divergence analysis revealed the presence of mostly Type-I functional divergence. The gene structures and conserved motifs, both within and outside the GRAS domain, were characterized. Gene expression analysis, performed in various tissues and under a range of abiotic stress conditions, uncovered the potential functions of GRAS members in regulating plant growth development and stress responses. The results obtained from this study provide valuable information toward understanding the potential molecular mechanisms of GRAS proteins in castor beans. These findings also serve as a resource for identifying the genes that allow castor beans to grow in stressful conditions and to enable further breeding and genetic improvements in agriculture.

  6. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary Analysis, and Stress Responses of the GRAS Gene Family in Castor Beans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Chen, Zexi; Ahmed, Naeem; Han, Bing; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specific GRAS transcription factors play important roles in regulating growth, development, and stress responses. Castor beans (Ricinus communis) are important non-edible oilseed plants, cultivated worldwide for its seed oils and its adaptability to growth conditions. In this study, we identified and characterized a total of 48 GRAS genes based on the castor bean genome. Combined with phylogenetic analysis, the castor bean GRAS members were divided into 13 distinct groups. Functional divergence analysis revealed the presence of mostly Type-I functional divergence. The gene structures and conserved motifs, both within and outside the GRAS domain, were characterized. Gene expression analysis, performed in various tissues and under a range of abiotic stress conditions, uncovered the potential functions of GRAS members in regulating plant growth development and stress responses. The results obtained from this study provide valuable information toward understanding the potential molecular mechanisms of GRAS proteins in castor beans. These findings also serve as a resource for identifying the genes that allow castor beans to grow in stressful conditions and to enable further breeding and genetic improvements in agriculture. PMID:27347937

  7. [Isolation of proteins with complex forming agents].

    PubMed

    Schwenke, K D; Raab, B; Ender, B

    1975-01-01

    Taking vegetable albumins for models, the authors report of the possibilities of isolating proteins (which cannot be precipitated isoelectrically) by using their property of forming complexes with tannin or poly-anions. The precipitation of proteins with dextran sulphate or polyphosphates, which is due to electrostatic interaction, depends on the pH value and the electrolyte content of the solution. Under appropriate experimental conditions, protein yields of 100% are achieved. By means of tannin, the proteins are completely precipitated in a wide range of pH. The protein component of the poly-anion-containing complexes is isolated by precipitation with salt or by thermal coagulation after dissolving of the complexes. The isolation of protein from the tannin complexes is preferably realized by reaction with coffeine.

  8. Membrane injury by pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Mirko; Gonzalez, Manuel R; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2009-08-01

    The plasma membrane defines the boundary of every living cell, and its integrity is essential for life. The plasma membrane may, however, be challenged by mechanical stress or pore-forming proteins produced by the organism itself or invading pathogens. We will here review recent findings about pore-forming proteins from different organisms, highlighting their structural and functional similarities, and describe the mechanisms that lead to membrane repair, since remarkably, cells can repair breaches in their plasma membrane of up to 10,000 microm(2).

  9. Mule duck "foie gras" shows different metabolic states according to its quality phenotype by using a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    François, Yoannah; Marie-Etancelin, Christel; Vignal, Alain; Viala, Didier; Davail, Stéphane; Molette, Caroline

    2014-07-23

    This study aimed at identifying the mechanisms implicated in "foie gras" quality variability through the study of the relationships between liver protein compositions and four liver quality phenotypes: liver weight, melting rate, and protein contents on crude or dry matter. Spots of soluble proteins were separated by bidimensional electrophoresis, and the relative abundance of proteins according to quality traits values was investigated. Twenty-three protein spots (19 unique identified proteins) showed different levels of abundance according to one or more of the traits' values. These abundance differences highlighted two groups of livers with opposite trends of abundance levels. Proteins of the first group, associated with low liver weight and melting rate, are involved in synthesis and anabolism processes, whereas proteins of the second group, associated with high liver weight and melting rate, are proteins involved in stress response. Altogether, these results highlight the variations in metabolic states underlying foie gras quality traits.

  10. Letter to the editor regarding "GRAS from the ground up: Review of the Interim Pilot Program for GRAS notification" by.

    PubMed

    Sewalt, Vincent; LaMarta, James; Shanahan, Diane; Gregg, Lori; Carrillo, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    Present letter is aimed at clarifying some critical points highlighted by Hanlon et al. regarding the common knowledge element of the safety of food enzymes in support of their GRAS designation. Particularly, we outline the development of peer-reviewed, generally recognized safety evaluation methodology for microbial enzymes and its adoption by the enzyme industry, which provides the US FDA with a review framework for enzyme GRAS Notices. This approach may serve as a model to other food ingredient categories for a scientifically sound, rigorous, and transparent application of the GRAS concept. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. GPS occultation data products from the GRAS SAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, G. B.; Lauritsen, K. B.; Rubek, F.; Soerensen, M. B.

    2003-04-01

    The EUMETSAT network of Satellite Application Facilities (SAFs) will, together with the EUMETSAT central facilities, constitute the future EUMETSAT Application Ground Segments (AGS) for the MSG and EPS/Metop satellites. The developments of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding (GRAS) Meteorology SAF (hereafter the GRAS SAF) started in 1999 with participation from the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), IEEC (Spain), and Met Office (UK). The host institute is the DMI and this will also be the physical location of the operational GRAS SAF data facility. The GRAS SAF will receive raw and preprocessed GPS radio occultation data from the GRAS instrument onboard the Metop satellite, process these into vertical height profiles of refractivity, temperature, pressure, and humidity, and distribute these products continuously in near real time to numerical weather prediction and climate monitoring users. A second objective of the GRAS SAF is to supply software for 4DVAR-assimilation of radio occultation data into numerical weather prediction models. The GRAS SAF will enter into the operational phase and deliver products in the last half of 2006 given the current launch plans for Metop. The basic principle in the GRAS SAF project is the radio occultation method where a receiver onboard a low-orbiting satellite tracks GNSS signals as the transmitting satellite sets or rises behind the Earth (occultation). Due to refraction in the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere the signal is delayed and its path bent, enabling calculation of the refractivity and subsequently temperature, pressure and humidity as a function of height. The main users of the GRAS SAF products will be meteorologists doing data assimilation (Near-Real Time Products, delivered less than three hours after measurement) and users from the climate research and atmospheric science communities (improved Offline Products, delivered less than 30 days after measurement

  12. GRAS radio occultation on-board of Metop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Engeln, A.; Andres, Y.; Marquardt, C.; Sancho, F.

    2011-01-01

    The GRAS radio occultation instrument is flying on Metop-A and belongs to the EPS (EUMETSAT Polar System). GRAS observes GPS satellites in occultation. Within this work, validation of GRAS closed-loop bending angle data against co-located ECMWF profiles extracted from model fields and occultations from the COSMIC constellation of radio occultation instruments is shown. Results confirm the high data quality and robustness, where GRAS shows lower bending angle noise against ECMWF than COSMIC and in terms of occultations per day, one GRAS ≈ two COSMIC satellites. This is partly due to the operational setup of EPS. For the investigation we focus on two observation periods where updates in the ECMWF (March 2009) and COSMIC processing (October 2009) have improved the statistics further. Bending angles biases agree to within 0.5% against ECMWF and to within 0.1% against COSMIC after the updates for altitudes between 8 and 40 km. In addition, we also analyze the impact of the Metop orbit processing on the derived GRAS bending angle data, where different GPS and Metop orbit solutions are analyzed. Results show that a batch based orbit processing would improve in particular the bending angle bias behavior at higher altitudes. Requirements for the operational processing of GRAS data are briefly outlined, options to ease the use of other positioning system satellites in the near future are discussed. A simplified analysis on the observation of several of these systems, e.g. GPS and Galileo, from one platform shows that about 16% of occultations are found within 300 km, ±3 h, thus providing similar information. A constellation of 2 GRAS like instruments would have only about 10% close-by.

  13. A hard look at FDA's review of GRAS notices.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ashley; Haighton, Lois A

    2016-08-01

    Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) substances are exempt from premarket approval; however, the standard of "reasonable certainty of no harm" is the same. In 1997, the voluntary GRAS affirmation process was replaced with the voluntary U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) GRAS notice process. Under the GRAS notice process, pivotal safety data are required to be in the public domain, and consensus of safety among experts is required. FDA issues responses of "FDA has no questions", "Notice does not provide a basis for a GRAS determination", or, "At Notifier's request, FDA ceased to evaluate the notice." Of 528 notices reviewed, there were 393 "no questions letters", 17 "insufficient basis letters", and 84 "cease to evaluate letters". Of those deemed to be insufficient, most failed to meet the general recognition criteria. Only four raised questions about potential safety, of which three received a no questions letter upon providing more data. Of the 84 withdrawn notices, 22 received a no questions letter upon resubmission. In spite of criticisms, the FDA GRAS notice process is clearly defined, efficient, and cost-effective, and there have been no known public health issues following its implementation.

  14. Honey dressing versus paraffin tulle gras following toenail surgery.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, C D; Thomson, C E

    2006-03-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that certain honey dressings have a positive effect on wound healing. However, there is limited empirical evidence supporting its use. This double-blind randomised controlled trial investigated the effect of a honey dressing on wound healing following toenail surgery with matrix phenolisation. Participants (n=100) were randomly assigned to receive either an active manuka honey dressing (n=52) or paraffin-impregnated tulle gras (n=48). The primary outcome was time (days) taken for complete re-epithelialisation of the nail bed. Mean healing times were 40.30 days (SD 18.21) for the honey group and 39.98 days (SD 25.42) for the paraffin tulle gras group. Partial avulsion wounds healed statistically significantly faster (p=0.01) with paraffin tulle gras (19.62 days, SD 9.31) than with the honey dressing (31.76 days, SD 18.8), but no significant difference (p=0.21) was found following total avulsion when comparing honey (45.28 days, SD 18.03.) with paraffin tulle gras dressings (52.03 days, SD 21.3). The results suggest that patients may benefit more from paraffin tulle gras dressings than honey dressings following partial toenail avulsion. No statistically significant difference was found for healing times after total toenail avulsion, although the marginal benefit of the honey dressing on these healing times warrants further investigation.

  15. Risk assessment of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in canned foie gras.

    PubMed

    Membré, Jeanne-Marie; Diao, Moctar; Thorin, Chantal; Cordier, Grégoire; Zuber, François; André, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a risk assessment of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in canned foie gras was performed, the number of illnesses per year in France due to C. botulinum in foie gras was estimated. Data on initial level in raw materials were collected at manufacturers and analysed using a Negative Binomial distribution. The effect of the usual foie gras heat treatment (equivalent time at 121 °C: F0=0.5 min) was considered at two levels: first, it led to an inactivation (estimated to 2.3 log); second it led to a spore injury and then to a spore inhibition. This latter effect was assessed by analysing data from a challenge test study carried out with Clostridium sporogenes spores in the foie gras product. The probability of spore recovering after thermal inhibition was estimated to 9.5×10(-8) (corresponding to 7.0 log). The data on the consumption pattern were collected on the French market. The Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) model and all the assumptions are reported in detail in the study. The initial contamination of raw materials, effect of thermal treatment on microbial inactivation and spore inhibition were handled mathematically using a probabilistic framework, considering only the variability dimension. The model was implemented in Excel and run through Monte Carlo simulation, using @Risk software. In parallel, epidemiological data collected from the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance during the period 2001-2012 were used to estimate an Appropriate Level Of Protection (ALOP) and then a Food Safety Objective (FSO): ALOP equalled to 2.5×10(-3) illnesses per million inhabitant per year, FSO equalled to 1.4×10(-9) foie gras portions containing C. botulinum spore (expressed in decimal logarithm, FSO=-8.9). The QMRA model output values were smaller, but on the same order of magnitude as these two figures: 8.0×10(-4) illnesses per million inhabitants per year, and, 4.5×10(-10) (-9.3 log) foie gras portions containing C

  16. Were protein internal repeats formed by "bricolage"?

    PubMed

    Lavorgna, G; Patthy, L; Boncinelli, E

    2001-03-01

    Is evolution an engineer, or is it a tinkerer--a "bricoleur"--building up complex molecules in organisms by increasing and adapting the materials at hand? An analysis of completely sequenced genomes suggests the latter, showing that increasing repetition of modules within the proteins encoded by these genomes is correlated with increasing complexity of the organism.

  17. 76 FR 7701 - Special Local Regulations; Krewe of Charleston Mardi Gras Boat Parade, Charleston Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Gras Boat Parade, Charleston Harbor, Charleston, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... Mardi Gras Boat Parade on the Ashley River and in Charleston Harbor in Charleston, South Carolina. This... Guard did not receive notice of the Krewe of Charleston Mardi Gras Boat Parade with sufficient time to...

  18. Acides gras oméga-3 et dyslexie

    PubMed Central

    Zelcer, Michal; Goldman, Ran D.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Question À la lumière de la hausse du nombre d’enfants d’âge scolaire ayant reçu un diagnostic de dyslexie, quel est le rôle des suppléments d’acides gras oméga-3 dans la prise en charge de cette affection? Réponse La dyslexie est le trouble d’apprentissage le plus répandu et elle est connue pour ses causes multifactorielles. De récentes données probantes pointent vers une corrélation entre le métabolisme défectueux des acides gras polyinsaturés et les troubles de neurodéveloppement, tels que la dyslexie. Bien que l’administration de suppléments d’acides gras oméga-3 aux enfants dyslexiques ait fait l’objet d’études, les données probantes sont limitées. Les critères diagnostiques homogènes de dyslexie, les mesures objectives de carence en acides gras et la surveillance étroite de l’apport alimentaire ne sont que quelques-uns des facteurs pouvant améliorer la qualité de la recherche dans ce domaine.

  19. The cross-sectional GRAS sample: A comprehensive phenotypical data collection of schizophrenic patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is the collective term for an exclusively clinically diagnosed, heterogeneous group of mental disorders with still obscure biological roots. Based on the assumption that valuable information about relevant genetic and environmental disease mechanisms can be obtained by association studies on patient cohorts of ≥ 1000 patients, if performed on detailed clinical datasets and quantifiable biological readouts, we generated a new schizophrenia data base, the GRAS (Göttingen Research Association for Schizophrenia) data collection. GRAS is the necessary ground to study genetic causes of the schizophrenic phenotype in a 'phenotype-based genetic association study' (PGAS). This approach is different from and complementary to the genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on schizophrenia. Methods For this purpose, 1085 patients were recruited between 2005 and 2010 by an invariable team of traveling investigators in a cross-sectional field study that comprised 23 German psychiatric hospitals. Additionally, chart records and discharge letters of all patients were collected. Results The corresponding dataset extracted and presented in form of an overview here, comprises biographic information, disease history, medication including side effects, and results of comprehensive cross-sectional psychopathological, neuropsychological, and neurological examinations. With >3000 data points per schizophrenic subject, this data base of living patients, who are also accessible for follow-up studies, provides a wide-ranging and standardized phenotype characterization of as yet unprecedented detail. Conclusions The GRAS data base will serve as prerequisite for PGAS, a novel approach to better understanding 'the schizophrenias' through exploring the contribution of genetic variation to the schizophrenic phenotypes. PMID:21067598

  20. A GRAS-like gene of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) alters the gibberellin content and axillary meristem outgrowth in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Fambrini, M; Mariotti, L; Parlanti, S; Salvini, M; Pugliesi, C

    2015-11-01

    The GRAS proteins belong to a plant transcriptional regulator family that function in the regulation of plant growth and development. Despite their important roles, in sunflower only one GRAS gene (HaDella1) with the DELLA domain has been reported. Here, we provide a functional characterisation of a GRAS-like gene from Helianthus annuus (Ha-GRASL) lacking the DELLA motif. The Ha-GRASL gene contains an intronless open reading frame of 1,743 bp encoding 580 amino acids. Conserved motifs in the GRAS domain are detected, including VHIID, PFYRE, SAW and two LHR motifs. Within the VHII motif, the P-H-N-D-Q-L residues are entirely maintained. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that Ha-GRASL belongs to the SCARECROW LIKE4/7 (SCL4/7) subfamily of the GRAS consensus tree. Accumulation of Ha-GRASL mRNA at the adaxial boundaries from P6/P7 leaf primordia suggests a role of Ha-GRASL in the initiation of median and basal axillary meristems (AMs) of sunflower. When Ha-GRASL is over-expressed in Arabidopsis wild-type plants, the number of lateral bolts increases differently from untransformed plants. However, Ha-GRASL slightly affects the lateral suppressor (las-4-) mutation. Therefore, we hypothesise that Ha-GRASL and LAS are not functionally equivalent. The over-expression of Ha-GRASL reduces metabolic flow of gibberellins (GAs) in Arabidopsis and this modification could be relevant in AM development. Phylogenetic analysis includes LAS and SCL4/7 in the same major clade, suggesting a more recent separation of these genes with respect to other GRAS members. We propose that some features of their ancestor, as well as AM initiation and outgrowth, are partially retained in both LAS and SCL4/7.

  1. Structure and assembly of pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Iacovache, Ioan; Bischofberger, Mirko; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2010-04-01

    Pore-forming proteins (PFPs), involved in host-pathogen interactions, are produced as soluble, generally monomeric, proteins. To convert from the soluble to the transmembrane form, PFPs assemble, in the vicinity of the target membrane, into ring-like structures, which expose sufficient hydrophobicity to drive spontaneous bilayer insertion. Recent findings have highlighted two interesting aspects: (1) that pores form via similar overall mechanisms even if originating from vastly different structures and (2) specific folds found in PFPs can be found in widely different organisms, as distant as prokaryotes and mammals, highlighting that pore formation is an ancient form of attack that has been remarkably conserved.

  2. Highly viscous dough-forming properties of marama protein.

    PubMed

    Amonsou, Eric O; Taylor, John R N; Naushad Emmambux, M; Gyebi Duodu, K; Minnaar, Amanda

    2012-10-01

    Marama bean is an indigenous southern African oilseed legume with an unusual protein composition. Hence, its rheological properties were studied. Marama protein formed a highly viscous and extensible dough when compared to soya and gluten. With a dough of 38% moisture, marama protein extensibility was very high (304% of its original length), twice that of gluten and soya, and this increased considerably (>3-fold) when the moisture content was increased to 45%. With added peroxidase, the storage modulus (G') of marama protein dough increased with time, suggesting the formation of new and strong protein networks. Dityrosine crosslinks were detected in the doughs. Marama protein showed a single transition with a denaturation temperature higher than soya glycinin. Marama protein was more hydrophobic and contained more β-sheet structure than did soya. Thus, the highly viscous and extensible rheological behaviour of marama protein is probably related to its high β-sheet conformation, hydrophobic interactions and tyrosine crosslinks.

  3. Synthesis of peptide sequences derived from fibril-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Denis B; Karas, John A

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), is associated with protein aggregation and the formation of amyloid, fibrillar deposits. Peptide fragments of amyloid-forming proteins have been found to form fibrils in their own right and have become important tools for unlocking the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation and the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases. The synthesis and purification of peptide sequences derived from amyloid fibril-forming proteins can be extremely challenging. The synthesis may not proceed well, generating a very low quality crude product which can be difficult to purify. Even clean crude peptides can be difficult to purify, as they are often insoluble or form fibrils rapidly in solution. This chapter presents methods to recognise and to overcome the difficulties associated with the synthesis, and purification of fibril-forming peptides, illustrating the points with three synthetic examples.

  4. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  5. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  6. Pathogenic pore-forming proteins: function and host response.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Mirko; Iacovache, Ioan; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2012-09-13

    Organisms from all kingdoms produce pore-forming proteins, with the best-characterized being of bacterial origin. The last decade of research has revealed that the channels formed by these proteins can be very diverse, thus differentially affecting target cell-membrane permeability and consequent cellular outcome. The responses to these toxins are also extremely diverse due to multiple downstream effects of pore-induced changes in ion balance. Determining the secondary effects of pore-forming toxins is essential to understand their contribution to infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of GRAS Gene Family in Malus domestica

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Sheng; Zhang, Dong; Gao, Cai; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Haiqin; Li, Youmei; Shen, Yawen; Han, Mingyu

    2017-01-01

    GRAS genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth and development. However, little is known about the GRAS gene family in apple. In this study, 127 GRAS genes were identified in the apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) genome and named MdGRAS1 to MdGRAS127 according to their chromosomal locations. The chemical characteristics, gene structures and evolutionary relationships of the MdGRAS genes were investigated. The 127 MdGRAS genes could be grouped into eight subfamilies based on their structural features and phylogenetic relationships. Further analysis of gene structures, segmental and tandem duplication, gene phylogeny and tissue-specific expression with ArrayExpress database indicated their diversification in quantity, structure and function. We further examined the expression pattern of MdGRAS genes during apple flower induction with transcriptome sequencing. Eight higher MdGRAS (MdGRAS6, 26, 28, 44, 53, 64, 107, and 122) genes were surfaced. Further quantitative reverse transcription PCR indicated that the candidate eight genes showed distinct expression patterns among different tissues (leaves, stems, flowers, buds, and fruits). The transcription levels of eight genes were also investigated with various flowering related treatments (GA3, 6-BA, and sucrose) and different flowering varieties (Yanfu No. 6 and Nagafu No. 2). They all were affected by flowering-related circumstance and showed different expression level. Changes in response to these hormone or sugar related treatments indicated their potential involvement during apple flower induction. Taken together, our results provide rich resources for studying GRAS genes and their potential clues in genetic improvement of apple flowering, which enriches biological theories of GRAS genes in apple and their involvement in flower induction of fruit trees. PMID:28503152

  8. Sampling Protein Form and Function with the Atomic Force Microscope*

    PubMed Central

    Baclayon, Marian; Roos, Wouter H.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2010-01-01

    To study the structure, function, and interactions of proteins, a plethora of techniques is available. Many techniques sample such parameters in non-physiological environments (e.g. in air, ice, or vacuum). Atomic force microscopy (AFM), however, is a powerful biophysical technique that can probe these parameters under physiological buffer conditions. With the atomic force microscope operating under such conditions, it is possible to obtain images of biological structures without requiring labeling and to follow dynamic processes in real time. Furthermore, by operating in force spectroscopy mode, it can probe intramolecular interactions and binding strengths. In structural biology, it has proven its ability to image proteins and protein conformational changes at submolecular resolution, and in proteomics, it is developing as a tool to map surface proteomes and to study protein function by force spectroscopy methods. The power of AFM to combine studies of protein form and protein function enables bridging various research fields to come to a comprehensive, molecular level picture of biological processes. We review the use of AFM imaging and force spectroscopy techniques and discuss the major advances of these experiments in further understanding form and function of proteins at the nanoscale in physiologically relevant environments. PMID:20562411

  9. The SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein--forms and functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-ke; Hou, Ming-Hon; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Tai-huang

    2014-03-01

    The nucleocapsid phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV N protein) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid (RNP) and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. It is a protein with multifarious activities. In this article we will review our current understanding of the N protein structure and its interaction with nucleic acid. Highlights of the progresses include uncovering the modular organization, determining the structures of the structural domains, realizing the roles of protein disorder in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, and visualizing the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structure inside the virions. It was also demonstrated that N-protein binds to nucleic acid at multiple sites with a coupled-allostery manner. We propose a SARS-CoV RNP model that conforms to existing data and bears resemblance to the existing RNP structures of RNA viruses. The model highlights the critical role of modular organization and intrinsic disorder of the N protein in the formation and functions of the dynamic RNP capsid in RNA viruses. This paper forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Overview of the ISRTP October 2014 workshop on GRAS determinations.

    PubMed

    McColl, Diane B; Janus, Erik R

    2016-08-01

    On October 12-13, 2014 the ISRTP held a very successful Workshop on GRAS Determinations in Washington DC that was not only well-attended by seasoned public and private professionals from a wide swath of food safety disciplines but featured a series of very insightful and informative presentations from current and past officials from the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA). To stay true to our international nature as a Society, we had regulatory and industry representatives from Canada and Europe. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. The relevance of international assessments to GRAS determinations.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Claire

    2016-08-01

    A discussion of the risk assessment process as applied to the Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) determination of safety for new ingredients can benefit from an international perspective. When we think about how risk assessments are performed around the world it is critical to assess what can be learned. What are the similarities? What are the differences? What are the takeaways? It is important to talk about the similarities in processes, because it validates the approach taken by risk assessors who are charged with protecting the food supply. It is also instructive to evaluate the differences in order to determine where improvements can be made to our process.

  12. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies. PMID:20053306

  13. Tagatose, the new GRAS sweetener and health product.

    PubMed

    Levin, Gilbert V

    2002-01-01

    Tagatose, a low-calorie, full-bulk natural sugar, has just attained GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status under U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, thereby permitting its use as a sweetener in foods and beverages. This paper presents all current aspects of tagatose with respect to demonstrated food and beverage applications and the potential health and medical benefits of this unique substance. Summarized studies are referenced to detailed peer-reviewed papers. The safety studies followed the recommendations in the FDA "Red Book." Results were submitted to an Expert Panel for determination of GRAS status under FDA regulation. Small phase 2 clinical trials showed tagatose to be effective in treating type 2 diabetes. The results, buttressed by the references cited, support the efficacy of the various applications disclosed for tagatose. Tagatose has been found to be safe and efficacious for use as a low-calorie, full-bulk sweetener in a wide variety of foods, beverages, health foods, and dietary supplements. It fills broad, heretofore unmet needs for a low-calorie sweetener in products in which the bulk of sugar is important, such as chocolates, chewing gum, cakes, ice cream, and frosted cereals. Its synergism with high-intensity sweeteners also makes it useful in sodas. Various health and medical benefits are indicated, including the treatment of type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, anemia, and hemophilia and the improvement of fetal development.

  14. Identification and characterization of two new members of the GRAS gene family in rice responsive to N-acetylchitooligosaccharide elicitor.

    PubMed

    Day, R Bradley; Shibuya, Naoto; Minami, Eiichi

    2003-02-20

    We identified two new members of the GRAS gene family from rice, CIGR1 and CIGR2, which are rapidly induced upon N-acetylchitooligosaccharide elicitor perception. The predicated proteins encoded by CIGR1 and CIGR2 possess significant sequence similarity with previously identified members of the GRAS family, such as Arabidopsis SCARECROW, GAI, RGA, tomato Lateral suppressor, and rice SLR1, all of which have VHIID regions, likely to play a role in cellular signaling. Fusions of CIGR1 and CIGR2 with Green Fluorescent Protein were detected exclusively in the nuclei of onion epidermal cells. The expression of CIGR1 and CIGR2 was dependent on the structure of N-acetylchitooligosaccharides, which parallels the structural specificity for chitin binding to the plasma membrane-localized chitin-binding protein, and independent of de novo protein synthesis. Co-cultivation of rice cells with rice blast fungus strongly induced the expression of CIGR1 and CIGR2, whereas inoculation of suspension cells with phytopathogenic bacteria did not. We hypothesize that CIGR1 and CIGR2 act as transcriptional regulators in the early events of the elicitor-induced defense response in rice.

  15. Oligomeric forms of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Oligomerization is a general characteristic of cell membrane receptors that is shared by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) together with their G protein partners. Recent studies of these complexes, both in vivo and in purified reconstituted forms, unequivocally support this contention for GPCRs, perhaps with only rare exceptions. As evidence has evolved from experimental cell lines to more relevant in vivo studies and from indirect biophysical approaches to well defined isolated complexes of dimeric receptors alone and complexed with G proteins, there is an expectation that the structural basis of oligomerization and the functional consequences for membrane signaling will be elucidated. Oligomerization of cell membrane receptors is fully supported by both thermodynamic calculations and the selectivity and duration of signaling required to reach targets located in various cellular compartments. PMID:20538466

  16. Oligomeric and polymeric aggregates formed by proteins containing expanded polyglutamine

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S.; Hoffner, G.; Verbeke, P.; Djian, P.; Green, H.

    2003-01-01

    Neurological diseases resulting from proteins containing expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) are characteristically associated with insoluble neuronal inclusions, usually intranuclear, and neuronal death. We describe here oligomeric and polymeric aggregates formed in cells by expanded polyQ. These aggregates are not dissociated by concentrated formic acid, an extremely effective solvent for otherwise insoluble proteins. Perinuclear inclusions formed in cultured cells by expanded polyQ can be completely dissolved in concentrated formic acid, but a soluble protein oligomer containing the expanded polyQ and released by the formic acid is not dissociated to monomer. In Huntington's disease, a formic acid-resistant oligomer is present in cerebral cortex, but not in cerebellum. Cortical nuclei contain a polymeric aggregate of expanded polyQ that is insoluble in formic acid, does not enter polyacrylamide gels, but is retained on filters. This finding shows that the process of polymerization is more advanced in the cerebral cortex than in cultured cells. The resistance of oligomer and polymer to formic acid suggests the participation of covalent bonds in their stabilization. PMID:12591956

  17. Chromatographic resolution of altered forms of protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashendel, C.L.; Minor, P.L.; Baudoin, P.A.; Carlos, M.

    1987-05-01

    Rapid chromatographic resolution of protein kinase C (PKC) in extracts of rat brain on DEAE-cellulose yielded two major peaks of activity. These fractions bound phorbol esters with identical affinity and specificity and had similar ratios of PKC to phorbol ester-binding activities. Chicken egg yolk antibodies raised to PKC in the first fraction reacted with 74 to 76 kilodalton peptides in the second fraction. Chromatography of each fraction on hydroxylapatite yielded similar distributions of three PKC isozymes. Rechromatography of the DEAE-cellulose fractions on DEAE-cellulose confirmed that these forms of PKC were not rapidly interconvertible. Results of experiments in which extracts or fractions were incubated with MgATP and phosphatase inhibitors were consistent with elution of dephospho-PKC in the first fraction while the second fraction contained phospho-PKC. If confirmed, this suggests that a substantial fraction of PKC in rat and mouse tissues exists in the phosphorylated form.

  18. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  19. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  20. Systematic mining of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) flavor chemicals for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Mayorga, Karina; Peppard, Terry L; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Yongye, Austin B; Medina-Franco, José L

    2013-08-07

    Bioactive food compounds can be both therapeutically and nutritionally relevant. Screening strategies are widely employed to identify bioactive compounds from edible plants. Flavor additives contained in the so-called FEMA GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list of approved flavoring ingredients is an additional source of potentially bioactive compounds. This work used the principles of molecular similarity to identify compounds with potential mood-modulating properties. The ability of certain GRAS molecules to inhibit histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), proposed as an important player in mood modulation, was assayed. Two GRAS chemicals were identified as HDAC1 inhibitors in the micromolar range, results similar to what was observed for the structurally related mood prescription drug valproic acid. Additional studies on bioavailability, toxicity at higher concentrations, and off-target effects are warranted. The methodology described in this work could be employed to identify potentially bioactive flavor chemicals present in the FEMA GRAS list.

  1. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    King, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Background Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walkability effects. Purpose This paper assesses within-neighborhood correlation of CRP, and whether three features of walkable urban form (residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix) are associated with CRP levels. Methods CRP measures (n=610) and sociodemographic data come from the 2001–3 Chicago Community Adult Health Study, linked with objective built environment data. Results Within-neighborhood correlations of CRP are greater than those of related health measures. A one standard deviation increase in residential density predicts significantly higher log CRP (e.g. β=0.11, p<.01) in Chicago, while a one standard deviation increase in land use mix predicts significantly lower CRP (e.g. β=−0. 19, p<0.01). Street connectivity is unrelated to CRP in this highly walkable city. Discussion Results suggest residential density may be a risk factor for inflammation, while greater walkability of mixed land use areas may be protective. It may be that negative aspects of density overcome the inflammatory benefits of walking. PMID:24096140

  2. Neighborhood walkable urban form and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    King, Katherine

    2013-12-01

    Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walkability effects. This paper assesses within-neighborhood correlation of CRP, and whether three features of walkable urban form (residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix) are associated with CRP levels. CRP measures (n=610) and sociodemographic data come from the 2001-3 Chicago Community Adult Health Study, linked with objective built environment data. Within-neighborhood correlations of CRP are greater than those of related health measures. A one standard deviation increase in residential density predicts significantly higher log CRP (e.g. β=0.11, p<.01) in Chicago, while a one standard deviation increase in land use mix predicts significantly lower CRP (e.g. β=-0. 19, p<0.01). Street connectivity is unrelated to CRP in this highly walkable city. Results suggest that residential density may be a risk factor for inflammation, while greater walkability of mixed land use areas may be protective. It may be that negative aspects of density overcome the inflammatory benefits of walking. © 2013.

  3. Calculation of protein form birefringence using the finite element method.

    PubMed Central

    Pantic-Tanner, Z; Eden, D

    1999-01-01

    An approach based on the finite element method (FEM) is employed to calculate the optical properties of macromolecules, specifically form birefringence. Macromolecules are treated as arbitrarily shaped particles suspended in a solvent of refraction index n1. The form birefringence of the solution is calculated as the difference in its refractive index when all the particles of refractive index n2 are either parallel to or normal to the direction of the polarization of light. Since the particles of interest are small compared to the wavelength of light, a quasi-static approximation for the refractive index is used, i.e., that it is equal to the square root of the dielectric constant of the suspension. The average dielectric constant of the mixture is calculated using the finite element method. This approach has been tested for ellipsoidal particles and a good agreement with theoretical results has been obtained. Also, numerical results for the motor domains of ncd and kinesin, small arbitrarily shaped proteins with known x-ray structures, show reasonable agreement with the experimental data obtained from transient electric birefringence experiments. PMID:10354422

  4. TaSCL14, a novel wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) GRAS gene, regulates plant growth, photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunmei; Li, Hongwei; Chen, Yaofeng; Zheng, Qi; Li, Bin; Li, Zhensheng

    2015-01-20

    Rates of photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence are all important physiological factors that affect plant development and thus agricultural productivity. GRAS proteins play essential roles in plant growth and development as well as in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far few GRAS genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have been characterized. A previous transcriptome analysis indicated that the expression of a GRAS gene (TaSCL14) was induced by high-light stress in Xiaoyan 54 (XY54), a common wheat cultivar with strong tolerance to high-light stress. In this study, TaSCL14 gene was isolated from XY54 and mapped on chromosome 4A. TaSCL14 was expressed in various wheat organs, with high levels in stems and roots. Our results confirmed that TaSCL14 expression was indeed responsive to high-light stress. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of TaSCL14 in wheat was performed to help characterize its potential functions. Silencing of TaSCL14 resulted in inhibited plant growth, decreased photosynthetic capacity, and reduced tolerance to photooxidative stress. In addition, silencing of TaSCL14 in wheat promoted leaf senescence induced by darkness. These results suggest that TaSCL14 may act as a multifunctional regulator involved in plant growth, photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence.

  5. Association of the protein D and protein E forms of rat CRISP1 with epididymal sperm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth P; Ensrud-Bowlin, Kathy M; Piehl, Laura B; Parent, Karlye R; Bernhardt, Miranda L; Hamilton, David W

    2008-12-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 1 (CRISP1) is a secretory glycoprotein produced by the rat epididymal epithelium in two forms, referred to as proteins D and E. CRISP1 has been implicated in sperm-egg fusion and has been shown to suppress capacitation in rat sperm. Several studies have suggested that CRISP1 associates transiently with the sperm surface, whereas others have shown that at least a portion of CRISP1 persists on the surface. In the present study, we demonstrate that protein D associates transiently with the sperm surface in a concentration-dependent manner, exhibiting saturable binding to both caput and cauda sperm in a concentration range that is consistent with its capacitation-inhibiting activity. In contrast, protein E persists on the sperm surface after all exogenous protein D has been dissociated. Comparison of caput and cauda sperm reveal that protein E becomes bound to the sperm in the cauda epididymidis. We show that protein E associates with caput sperm, which do not normally have it on their surfaces, in vitro in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. These studies demonstrate that most CRISP1 interacts with sperm transiently, possibly with a specific receptor on the sperm surface, consistent with its action in suppressing capacitation during epididymal storage of sperm. These studies also confirm a tightly bound population of protein E that could act in the female tract.

  6. Structure of Haze Forming Proteins in White Wines: Vitis vinifera Thaumatin-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marangon, Matteo; Van Sluyter, Steven C.; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Menz, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Grape thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. Different isoforms of TLPs have different hazing potential and aggregation behavior. Here we present the elucidation of the molecular structures of three grape TLPs that display different hazing potential. The three TLPs have very similar structures despite belonging to two different classes (F2/4JRU is a thaumatin-like protein while I/4L5H and H2/4MBT are VVTL1), and having different unfolding temperatures (56 vs. 62°C), with protein F2/4JRU being heat unstable and forming haze, while I/4L5H does not. These differences in properties are attributable to the conformation of a single loop and the amino acid composition of its flanking regions. PMID:25463627

  7. Structure of haze forming proteins in white wines: Vitis vinifera thaumatin-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Matteo; Van Sluyter, Steven C; Waters, Elizabeth J; Menz, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Grape thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. Different isoforms of TLPs have different hazing potential and aggregation behavior. Here we present the elucidation of the molecular structures of three grape TLPs that display different hazing potential. The three TLPs have very similar structures despite belonging to two different classes (F2/4JRU is a thaumatin-like protein while I/4L5H and H2/4MBT are VVTL1), and having different unfolding temperatures (56 vs. 62°C), with protein F2/4JRU being heat unstable and forming haze, while I/4L5H does not. These differences in properties are attributable to the conformation of a single loop and the amino acid composition of its flanking regions.

  8. Proapoptotic Bax and Bak Proteins Form Stable Protein-permeable Pores of Tunable Size

    PubMed Central

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Landeta, Olatz; Landajuela, Ane; Basañez, Gorka; García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2013-01-01

    The Bcl-2 proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bak mediate the permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Current models consider that Bax and Bak form pores at the mitochondrial outer membrane that are responsible for the release of cytochrome c and other larger mitochondrial apoptotic factors (i.e. Smac/DIABLO, AIF, and endoglycosidase G). However, the properties and nature of Bax/Bak apoptotic pores remain enigmatic. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the membrane permeabilizing activity of Bax and Bak at the single vesicle level. We directly visualized that cBid-activated Bax and BakΔC21 can form membrane pores large enough to release not only cytochrome c, but also allophycocyanine, a protein of 104 kDa. Interestingly, the size of Bax and BakΔC21 pores is not constant, as typically observed in purely proteinaceous channels, but evolves with time and depends on protein concentration. We found that Bax and BakΔC21 formed long-lived pores, whose areas changed with the amount of Bax/BakΔC21 but not with cardiolipin concentration. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Bax and BakΔC21 follow similar mechanisms of membrane permeabilization characterized by the formation of protein-permeable pores of dynamic size, in agreement with the proteolipidic nature of these apoptotic pores. PMID:24100034

  9. Chemoinformatic analysis of GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) flavor chemicals and natural products.

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, José L; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Peppard, Terry L; Del Rio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Food materials designated as "Generally Recognized as Safe" (GRAS) are attracting the attention of researchers in their attempts to systematically identify compounds with putative health-related benefits. In particular, there is currently a great deal of interest in exploring possible secondary benefits of flavor ingredients, such as those relating to health and wellness. One step in this direction is the comprehensive characterization of the chemical structures contained in databases of flavoring substances. Herein, we report a comprehensive analysis of the recently updated FEMA GRAS list of flavoring substances (discrete chemical entities only). Databases of natural products, approved drugs and a large set of commercial molecules were used as references. Remarkably, natural products continue to be an important source of bioactive compounds for drug discovery and nutraceutical purposes. The comparison of five collections of compounds of interest was performed using molecular properties, rings, atom counts and structural fingerprints. It was found that the molecular size of the GRAS flavoring substances is, in general, smaller cf. members of the other databases analyzed. The lipophilicity profile of the GRAS database, a key property to predict human bioavailability, is similar to approved drugs. Several GRAS chemicals overlap to a broad region of the property space occupied by drugs. The GRAS list analyzed in this work has high structural diversity, comparable to approved drugs, natural products and libraries of screening compounds. This study represents one step towards the use of the distinctive features of the flavoring chemicals contained in the GRAS list and natural products to systematically search for compounds with potential health-related benefits.

  10. Characterisation and toxicological assessment of Neutral Methacrylate Copolymer for GRAS evaluation.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Johanna; Haynes, Geoff; Kreuzer, Knut; Rosamilia, Tiana

    2013-12-01

    Neutral Methacrylate Copolymer is a fully polymerised copolymer used in the pharmaceutical industry to permit pH-independent delayed release of active ingredients from oral dosage forms. This function has potential use with food supplements and this article describes available information on the safety of the substance. Oral administration of radiolabelled copolymer to rats resulted in the detection of chemically unchanged copolymer in the faeces, with negligible absorption. Safety studies revealed no adverse toxicity following repeated administration at doses of up to 2000 mg/kg bw/d in a sub-chronic study in rats or 250 mg/kg bw/d in a sub-chronic study in dogs. No reproductive toxicity occurred at up to 2000 mg/kg bw/d in rats or rabbits. The substance shows no evidence of genotoxicity, has low acute toxicity and no irritation or sensitisation potential. An ADI value of 20 mg/kg bw was concluded from two alternative approaches. Daily exposure from use in dietary supplements is estimated as up to 10.0 mg/kg bw in adults and 13.3 mg/kg bw in children. There would therefore appear to be no safety concerns under the intended conditions of use. The information provided is intended to support an evaluation that the substance may be "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS).

  11. [Protein glaucoma, a formerly unknown form of glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Zirm, M; Egger-Büssing, C

    1981-06-11

    As a possible reason for a secondary glaucoma generally an unphysiological aggregation of proteins or blood in the aqueous humor is discussed. A positive Tyndall-phenomenon shows an increase of proteins in aqueous humor. We were able to demonstrate earlier that a negative Tyndall-phenomenon does not exclude this as well. In this contribution examples are given that disruption of vessel-membranes in retina and uvea lead to an increase of low molecular proteins in aqueous humor. Contrary to current knowledge we found that an overtaxing of active flow mechanisms by these additional proteins can cause a so-called protein-glucoma.

  12. The 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with heat shock protein Hsp60 and cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Arima, Kunimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family consists of acidic 30-kDa proteins composed of 7 isoforms expressed abundantly in neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The 14-3-3 protein identified in the cerebrospinal fluid provides a surrogate marker for premortem diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although an active involvement of 14-3-3 in the pathogenesis of prion diseases remains unknown. By protein overlay and mass spectrometric analysis of protein extract of NTera2-derived differentiated neurons, we identified heat shock protein Hsp60 as a 14-3-3-interacting protein. The 14-3-3zeta and gamma isoforms interacted with Hsp60, suggesting that the interaction is not isoform-specific. Furthermore, the interaction was identified in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma, U-373MG astrocytoma, and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells. The cellular prion protein (PrPC) along with Hsp60 was coimmunoprecipitated with 14-3-3 in the human brain protein extract. By protein overlay, 14-3-3 interacted with both recombinant human Hsp60 and PrPC produced by Escherichia coli, indicating that the molecular interaction is phosphorylation-independent. The 14-3-3-binding domain was located in the N-terminal half (NTF) of Hsp60 spanning amino acid residues 27-287 and the NTF of PrPC spanning amino acid residues 23-137. By immunostaining, the 14-3-3 protein Hsp60 and PrPC were colocalized chiefly in the mitochondria of human neuronal progenitor cells in culture, and were coexpressed most prominently in neurons and reactive astrocytes in the human brain. These observations indicate that the 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with Hsp60 and PrPC in the human CNS under physiological conditions and suggest that this complex might become disintegrated in the pathologic process of prion diseases.

  13. Chemistry, manufacturing and exposure assessments to support generally recognized as safe (GRAS) determinations.

    PubMed

    Barraj, Leila; Murphy, Mary; Tran, Nga; Petersen, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Identity, stability, purity, intended use levels in what foods and technical effects, and probable intake are among the key components in an assessment to support GRAS determinations. The specifications of identity of a food substance are an important component of the safety assessment as changes in the physical and chemical properties of a food substance can influence its technical effect in food and can influence its nutritional or toxicological properties of the food substance. Estimating exposure is a key determining step in the safety evaluation of a food substance. Intake assessment in GRAS determination is necessarily comprehensive based on cumulative exposure, i.e. proposed new uses plus background dietary exposure. Intake estimates for safety assurance in a GRAS determination also represent conservative overestimate of chronic exposure as they are based on 2-day average daily intake and the upper percentile (90th) intake among consumers. In contrast, in a nutrient assessment where realistic intake estimates are of interest, usual intake estimates are relied upon. It should also be noted that intake estimates for GRAS determinations are also more conservative than estimate of dietary exposure by EPA (FIFRA), where mean per capita are used to assess chronic exposure. Overall, for safety assurance, intake assessments in GRAS determinations are comprehensively cumulative and typically conservative overestimate of exposures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Folding of Aggregated Proteins to Functionally Active Form

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    detergent [31]. The detergent is then removed by washes with cyclodextrin . Because the pro- cedure can be carried out on gravity-flow columns, it can be...capitalizes on the ability of chemicals such as cyclodextrin to prevent the aggregation of renatured protein when denaturants and/or detergents are removed... cyclodextrin . The cyclodextrin is then removed by another solvent exchange and the properly folded protein released from the column. In a variation of this

  15. Synaptic vesicle membrane proteins interact to form a multimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Potential interactions between membrane components of rat brain synaptic vesicles were analyzed by detergent solubilization followed by size fractionation or immunoprecipitation. The behavior of six synaptic vesicle membrane proteins as well as a plasma membrane protein was monitored by Western blotting. Solubilization of synaptic vesicle membranes in CHAPS resulted in the recovery of a large protein complex that included SV2, p65, p38, vesicle-associated membrane protein, and the vacuolar proton pump. Solubilization in octylglucoside resulted in the preservation of interactions between SV2, p38, and rab3A, while solubilization of synaptic vesicles with Triton X-100 resulted in two predominant interactions, one involving p65 and SV2, and the other involving p38 and vesicle-associated membrane protein. The multicomponent complex preserved with CHAPS solubilization was partially reconstituted following octylglucoside solubilization and subsequent dialysis against CHAPS. Reduction of the CHAPS concentration by gel filtration chromatography resulted in increased recovery of the multicomponent complex. Examination of the large complex isolated from CHAPS-solubilized vesicles by negative stain EM revealed structures with multiple globular domains, some of which were specifically labeled with gold-conjugated antibodies directed against p65 and SV2. The protein interactions defined in this report are likely to underlie aspects of neurotransmitter secretion, membrane traffic, and the spatial organization of vesicles within the nerve terminal. PMID:1730776

  16. GraXSR Proteins Interact with the VraFG ABC Transporter To Form a Five-Component System Required for Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Sensing and Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Falord, Mélanie; Karimova, Gouzel; Hiron, Aurélia

    2012-01-01

    The GraSR two-component system (TCS) controls cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) resistance in Staphylococcus aureus through the synthesis of enzymes that increase bacterial cell surface positive charges, by d-alanylation of teichoic acids and lysylination of phosphatidylglycerol, leading to electrostatic repulsion of CAMPs. The GraS histidine kinase belongs to the “intramembrane-sensing kinases” subfamily, with a structure featuring a short amino-terminal sensing domain, and two transmembrane helices separated only by a short loop, thought to be buried in the cytoplasmic membrane. The GraSR TCS is in fact a multicomponent system, requiring at least one accessory protein, GraX, in order to function, which, as we show here, acts by signaling through the GraS kinase. The graXRS genes are located immediately upstream from genes encoding an ABC transporter, vraFG, whose expression is controlled by GraSR. We demonstrated that the VraFG transporter does not act as a detoxification module, as it cannot confer resistance when produced on its own, but instead plays an essential role by sensing the presence of CAMPs and signaling through GraS to activate GraR-dependent transcription. A bacterial two-hybrid approach, designed to identify interactions between the GraXSR and VraFG proteins, was carried out in order to understand how they act in detecting and signaling the presence of CAMPs. We identified many interactions between these protein pairs, notably between the GraS kinase and both GraX and the VraG permease, indicating the existence of an original five-component system involved in CAMP sensing and signal transduction to promote S. aureus resistance. PMID:22123691

  17. Punching Holes in Membranes: How Oligomeric Pore-Forming Proteins and Lipids Cooperate to Form Aqueous Channels in Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradin, Cécile; Satsoura, Dmitri; Andrews, David W.

    Many important biological processes are carried out by a small number of proteins working together as a team to accomplish a specific task. Cooperation between the different proteins is often accomplished through the formation of a supramolecular complex, comprised of either identical or different subunits. Although the formation of protein assemblies is a favored mechanism throughout the cell, it becomes especially important in lipid membranes, as evidenced by the numerous cellular events that are either triggered by or result in the formation of protein complexes in membranes. However, due to the difficulties associated with the study of membrane proteins, the formation of oligomers in lipid membranes is perhaps one of the least understood cellular processes. In this chapter we focus our attention on a subset of membrane complexes — namely, those formed by proteins that are able to pass from a water-soluble to a transmembrane form in order to create a water-filled channel through the lipid membrane. These pore-forming proteins (PFPs) are found in many organisms throughout different kingdoms of life, from bacteria to human. They are often involved in cell death mechanisms through their capacity to break membrane permeability barriers, which can lead to dissipation of the membrane potential as well as introduction or leakage of enzymatic proteins. In fact, a large subset of the PFPs are toxins, and referred to in the literature as pore-forming toxins (PFTs). The association of several monomers into an oligomer is almost always an important aspect of the modus operandi of these proteins. Oligomerization can be useful in several ways: it results in structures large enough to delineate nanometer-size water-filled channels in lipid bilayers, it ensures the presence of large hydrophobic surfaces that can support insertion in the membrane, and it permits cooperative formation and insertion mechanisms.

  18. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID.

    PubMed

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês C R; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-06-19

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the--in many cells--asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant.

  19. 21 CFR 170.35 - Affirmation of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... food. Published scientific literature, evidence that the substance is identical to a GRAS counterpart... relies on public file in the office of the Division of Dockets Management and will publish in the Federal... interested person may review the data and information and/or file comments with the Division of Dockets...

  20. 21 CFR 170.35 - Affirmation of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... food. Published scientific literature, evidence that the substance is identical to a GRAS counterpart... relies on public file in the office of the Division of Dockets Management and will publish in the Federal... interested person may review the data and information and/or file comments with the Division of Dockets...

  1. 21 CFR 170.35 - Affirmation of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... food. Published scientific literature, evidence that the substance is identical to a GRAS counterpart... relies on public file in the office of the Division of Dockets Management and will publish in the Federal... interested person may review the data and information and/or file comments with the Division of Dockets...

  2. 21 CFR 170.35 - Affirmation of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... food. Published scientific literature, evidence that the substance is identical to a GRAS counterpart... relies on public file in the office of the Division of Dockets Management and will publish in the Federal... interested person may review the data and information and/or file comments with the Division of Dockets...

  3. 21 CFR 170.35 - Affirmation of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... office of the Division of Dockets Management and will publish in the Federal Register a notice giving the... review the data and information and/or file comments with the Division of Dockets Management. Copies of... convincing evidence that the substance is GRAS as described in § 170.30, he will publish a notice in the...

  4. Genome-wide characterization of GRAS family genes in Medicago truncatula reveals their evolutionary dynamics and functional diversification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hailing; Cao, Yingping; Shang, Chen; Li, Jikai; Wang, Jianli; Wu, Zhenying; Ma, Lichao; Qi, Tianxiong; Fu, Chunxiang; Bai, Zetao; Hu, Baozhong

    2017-01-01

    The GRAS gene family is a large plant-specific family of transcription factors that are involved in diverse processes during plant development. Medicago truncatula is an ideal model plant for genetic research in legumes, and specifically for studying nodulation, which is crucial for nitrogen fixation. In this study, 59 MtGRAS genes were identified and classified into eight distinct subgroups based on phylogenetic relationships. Motifs located in the C-termini were conserved across the subgroups, while motifs in the N-termini were subfamily specific. Gene duplication was the main evolutionary force for MtGRAS expansion, especially proliferation of the LISCL subgroup. Seventeen duplicated genes showed strong effects of purifying selection and diverse expression patterns, highlighting their functional importance and diversification after duplication. Thirty MtGRAS genes, including NSP1 and NSP2, were preferentially expressed in nodules, indicating possible roles in the process of nodulation. A transcriptome study, combined with gene expression analysis under different stress conditions, suggested potential functions of MtGRAS genes in various biological pathways and stress responses. Taken together, these comprehensive analyses provide basic information for understanding the potential functions of GRAS genes, and will facilitate further discovery of MtGRAS gene functions.

  5. Origins and Evolution of the HET-s Prion-Forming Protein: Searching for Other Amyloid-Forming Solenoids

    PubMed Central

    Gendoo, Deena M. A.; Harrison, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The HET-s prion-forming domain from the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina is gaining considerable interest since it yielded the first well-defined atomic structure of a functional amyloid fibril. This structure has been identified as a left-handed beta solenoid with a triangular hydrophobic core. To delineate the origins of the HET-s prion-forming protein and to discover other amyloid-forming proteins, we searched for all homologs of the HET-s protein in a database of protein domains and fungal genomes, using a combined application of HMM, psi-blast and pGenThreader techniques, and performed a comparative evolutionary analysis of the N-terminal alpha-helical domain and the C-terminal prion-forming domain of HET-s. By assessing the tandem evolution of both domains, we observed that the prion-forming domain is restricted to Sordariomycetes, with a marginal additional sequence homolog in Arthroderma otae as a likely case of horizontal transfer. This suggests innovation and rapid evolution of the solenoid fold in the Sordariomycetes clade. In contrast, the N-terminal domain evolves at a slower rate (in Sordariomycetes) and spans many diverse clades of fungi. We performed a full three-dimensional protein threading analysis on all identified HET-s homologs against the HET-s solenoid fold, and present detailed structural annotations for identified structural homologs to the prion-forming domain. An analysis of the physicochemical characteristics in our set of structural models indicates that the HET-s solenoid shape can be readily adopted in these homologs, but that they are all less optimized for fibril formation than the P. anserina HET-s sequence itself, due chiefly to the presence of fewer asparagine ladders and salt bridges. Our combined structural and evolutionary analysis suggests that the HET-s shape has “limited scope” for amyloidosis across the wider protein universe, compared to the ‘generic’ left-handed beta helix. We discuss the implications of

  6. Integral and differential form of the protein folding problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontano, Anna

    2004-07-01

    The availability of the complete genomic sequences of many species, including human, has raised enormous expectations in medicine, pharmacology, ecology, biotechnology and forensic sciences. However, knowledge is only a first step toward understanding, and we are only at the early stage of a scientific process that might lead us to satisfy all the expectations raised by the genomic projects. In this review I will discuss the present status of computational methods that attempt to infer the unique three-dimensional structure of proteins from their amino acid sequences. Although this problem has been defined as the “holy grail” of biology, it represents only one of the many hurdles in our path towards the understanding of life at a molecular level.

  7. Diarylthiophenes as inhibitors of the pore-forming protein perforin

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christian K.; Huttunen, Kristiina M.; Denny, William A.; Jaiswal, Jagdish K.; Ciccone, Annette; Browne, Kylie A.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Spicer, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution from a furan-containing high-throughput screen (HTS) hit (1) resulted in isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (2) as a potent inhibitor of the function of both isolated perforin protein and perforin delivered in situ by intact KHYG-1 NK cells. In the current study, structure–activity relationship (SAR) development towards a novel series of diarylthiophene analogues has continued through the use of substituted-benzene and -pyridyl moieties as bioisosteres for 2-thioxoimidazolidin-4-one (A) on a thiophene (B) -isobenzofuranone (C) scaffold. The resulting compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit perforin lytic activity in vitro. Carboxamide (23) shows a 4-fold increase over (2) in lytic activity against isolated perforin and provides good rationale for continued development within this class. PMID:26711151

  8. Arabinogalactan protein 31 (AGP31), a putative network-forming protein in Arabidopsis thaliana cell walls?

    PubMed

    Hijazi, May; Roujol, David; Nguyen-Kim, Huan; Del Rocio Cisneros Castillo, Liliana; Saland, Estelle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-10-01

    Arabinogalactan protein 31 (AGP31) is a remarkable plant cell-wall protein displaying a multi-domain organization unique in Arabidopsis thaliana: it comprises a predicted signal peptide (SP), a short AGP domain of seven amino acids, a His-stretch, a Pro-rich domain and a PAC (PRP-AGP containing Cys) domain. AGP31 displays different O-glycosylation patterns with arabinogalactans on the AGP domain and Hyp-O-Gal/Ara-rich motifs on the Pro-rich domain. AGP31 has been identified as an abundant protein in cell walls of etiolated hypocotyls, but its function has not been investigated thus far. Literature data suggest that AGP31 may interact with cell-wall components. The purpose of the present study was to identify AGP31 partners to gain new insight into its function in cell walls. Nitrocellulose membranes were prepared by spotting different polysaccharides, which were either obtained commercially or extracted from cell walls of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brachypodium distachyon. After validation of the arrays, in vitro interaction assays were carried out by probing the membranes with purified native AGP31 or recombinant PAC-V5-6xHis. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analyses were carried out on an AGP31 purified fraction. It was demonstrated that AGP31 interacts through its PAC domain with galactans that are branches of rhamnogalacturonan I. This is the first experimental evidence that a PAC domain, also found as an entire protein or a domain of AGP31 homologues, can bind carbohydrates. AGP31 was also found to bind methylesterified polygalacturonic acid, possibly through its His-stretch. Finally, AGP31 was able to interact with itself in vitro through its PAC domain. DLS data showed that AGP31 forms aggregates in solution, corroborating the hypothesis of an auto-assembly. These results allow the proposal of a model of interactions of AGP31 with different cell-wall components, in which AGP31 participates in complex supra-molecular scaffolds. Such scaffolds could

  9. Comparison of tertiary structures of proteins in protein-protein complexes with unbound forms suggests prevalence of allostery in signalling proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most signalling and regulatory proteins participate in transient protein-protein interactions during biological processes. They usually serve as key regulators of various cellular processes and are often stable in both protein-bound and unbound forms. Availability of high-resolution structures of their unbound and bound forms provides an opportunity to understand the molecular mechanisms involved. In this work, we have addressed the question “What is the nature, extent, location and functional significance of structural changes which are associated with formation of protein-protein complexes?” Results A database of 76 non-redundant sets of high resolution 3-D structures of protein-protein complexes, representing diverse functions, and corresponding unbound forms, has been used in this analysis. Structural changes associated with protein-protein complexation have been investigated using structural measures and Protein Blocks description. Our study highlights that significant structural rearrangement occurs on binding at the interface as well as at regions away from the interface to form a highly specific, stable and functional complex. Notably, predominantly unaltered interfaces interact mainly with interfaces undergoing substantial structural alterations, revealing the presence of at least one structural regulatory component in every complex. Interestingly, about one-half of the number of complexes, comprising largely of signalling proteins, show substantial localized structural change at surfaces away from the interface. Normal mode analysis and available information on functions on some of these complexes suggests that many of these changes are allosteric. This change is largely manifest in the proteins whose interfaces are altered upon binding, implicating structural change as the possible trigger of allosteric effect. Although large-scale studies of allostery induced by small-molecule effectors are available in literature, this is, to our

  10. [Antirestriction activity of T7 Ocr protein in monomeric and dimeric forms].

    PubMed

    Zavil'gelskiĭ, G B; Kotova, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    The Ocr protein, encoded by 0.3 (ocr) gene of bacteriophage T7, belongs to the family of antirestriction proteins that specifically inhibit the type I restriction-modification systems. Native Ocr forms homodimer (Ocr)2 both in solution and in the crystalline state. The Ocr protein belongs to the family of mimicry proteins. F53D A57E and E53R V77D mutant proteins were obtained, which form monomers. It was shown that the values of the dissociation constants Kd for Ocr, Ocr F53D A57E and Ocr F53RV77D proteins with EcoKI enzyme differ in 1000 times: Kd (Ocr) = 10(-10) M, Kd (Ocr F53D A57E and Ocr F53R V77D) = 10(-7) M. Antimodification activity of the Ocr monomeric forms is significantly reduced. We have shown, that Ocr dimeric form has fundamental importance for high inhibitory activity.

  11. The nanoparticle protein corona formed in human blood or human blood fractions

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Cecilia; Lilja, Malin; Lundkvist, Kristoffer; Dahlbäck, Björn; Linse, Sara; Cedervall, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    The protein corona formed around nanoparticles in protein-rich fluids plays an important role for nanoparticle biocompatibility, as found in several studies during the last decade. Biological fluids have complex compositions and the molecular components interact and function together in intricate networks. Therefore, the process to isolate blood or the preparation of blood derivatives may lead to differences in the composition of the identified protein corona around nanoparticles. Here, we show distinct differences in the protein corona formed in whole blood, whole blood with EDTA, plasma, or serum. Furthermore, the ratio between particle surface area to protein concentration influences the detected corona. We also show that the nanoparticle size per se influences the formed protein corona due to curvature effects. These results emphasize the need of investigating the formation and biological importance of the protein corona in the same environment as the nanoparticles are intended for or released into. PMID:28414772

  12. New Structural Approaches to Understand the Disease Related Forms of the Prion Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0476 TITLE: New Structural Approaches to Understand the Disease Related Forms of the Prion Protein PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER New Structural Approaches to Understand the Disease Related Forms of the Prion Protein 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17...Understanding these fundamental steps in the processes of initiation and propagation of the disease related state of the protein may lead to new

  13. Engineering a pH responsive pore forming protein

    PubMed Central

    Kisovec, Matic; Rezelj, Saša; Knap, Primož; Cajnko, Miša Mojca; Caserman, Simon; Flašker, Ajda; Žnidaršič, Nada; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Ruan, Yi; Scheuring, Simon; Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a cytolysin capable of forming pores in cholesterol-rich lipid membranes of host cells. It is conveniently suited for engineering a pH-governed responsiveness, due to a pH sensor identified in its structure that was shown before to affect its stability. Here we introduced a new level of control of its hemolytic activity by making a variant with hemolytic activity that was pH-dependent. Based on detailed structural analysis coupled with molecular dynamics and mutational analysis, we found that the bulky side chain of Tyr406 allosterically affects the pH sensor. Molecular dynamics simulation further suggested which other amino acid residues may also allosterically influence the pH-sensor. LLO was engineered to the point where it can, in a pH-regulated manner, perforate artificial and cellular membranes. The single mutant Tyr406Ala bound to membranes and oligomerized similarly to the wild-type LLO, however, the final membrane insertion step was pH-affected by the introduced mutation. We show that the mutant toxin can be activated at the surface of artificial membranes or living cells by a single wash with slightly acidic pH buffer. Y406A mutant has a high potential in development of novel nanobiotechnological applications such as controlled release of substances or as a sensor of environmental pH. PMID:28176876

  14. Engineering a pH responsive pore forming protein.

    PubMed

    Kisovec, Matic; Rezelj, Saša; Knap, Primož; Cajnko, Miša Mojca; Caserman, Simon; Flašker, Ajda; Žnidaršič, Nada; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Ruan, Yi; Scheuring, Simon; Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-02-08

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a cytolysin capable of forming pores in cholesterol-rich lipid membranes of host cells. It is conveniently suited for engineering a pH-governed responsiveness, due to a pH sensor identified in its structure that was shown before to affect its stability. Here we introduced a new level of control of its hemolytic activity by making a variant with hemolytic activity that was pH-dependent. Based on detailed structural analysis coupled with molecular dynamics and mutational analysis, we found that the bulky side chain of Tyr406 allosterically affects the pH sensor. Molecular dynamics simulation further suggested which other amino acid residues may also allosterically influence the pH-sensor. LLO was engineered to the point where it can, in a pH-regulated manner, perforate artificial and cellular membranes. The single mutant Tyr406Ala bound to membranes and oligomerized similarly to the wild-type LLO, however, the final membrane insertion step was pH-affected by the introduced mutation. We show that the mutant toxin can be activated at the surface of artificial membranes or living cells by a single wash with slightly acidic pH buffer. Y406A mutant has a high potential in development of novel nanobiotechnological applications such as controlled release of substances or as a sensor of environmental pH.

  15. Engineering a pH responsive pore forming protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisovec, Matic; Rezelj, Saša; Knap, Primož; Cajnko, Miša Mojca; Caserman, Simon; Flašker, Ajda; Žnidaršič, Nada; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Ruan, Yi; Scheuring, Simon; Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a cytolysin capable of forming pores in cholesterol-rich lipid membranes of host cells. It is conveniently suited for engineering a pH-governed responsiveness, due to a pH sensor identified in its structure that was shown before to affect its stability. Here we introduced a new level of control of its hemolytic activity by making a variant with hemolytic activity that was pH-dependent. Based on detailed structural analysis coupled with molecular dynamics and mutational analysis, we found that the bulky side chain of Tyr406 allosterically affects the pH sensor. Molecular dynamics simulation further suggested which other amino acid residues may also allosterically influence the pH-sensor. LLO was engineered to the point where it can, in a pH-regulated manner, perforate artificial and cellular membranes. The single mutant Tyr406Ala bound to membranes and oligomerized similarly to the wild-type LLO, however, the final membrane insertion step was pH-affected by the introduced mutation. We show that the mutant toxin can be activated at the surface of artificial membranes or living cells by a single wash with slightly acidic pH buffer. Y406A mutant has a high potential in development of novel nanobiotechnological applications such as controlled release of substances or as a sensor of environmental pH.

  16. System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Craig, George D.; Glass, Robert; Rupp, Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10.sup.6 V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved.

  17. System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Glass, R.; Rupp, B.

    1997-01-28

    A method is disclosed for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10{sup 6}V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved. 2 figs.

  18. Development of a polymerase chain reaction assay for species identification of goose and mule duck in foie gras products.

    PubMed

    Rodrı X0301 Guez, Miguel A; Garcı X0301 A, Teresa; González, Isabel; Asensio, Luis; Mayoral, Belén; López-Calleja, Inés; Hernández, Pablo E; Martı X0301 N, Rosario

    2003-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of a conserved region of the α-actin gene has been used for the specific identification of goose (Anser anser) and mule duck (Anas platyrhynchos×Cairina moschata) foie gras. Universal primers were used for the amplification of a DNA fragment containing three introns and four exons of the α-actin gene in goose and mule duck. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragments was necessary for the design of forward species-specific primers in the goose and mule duck α-actin genes. The use of species-specific forward primers, together with a reverse universal primer, produced amplicons of different length, allowing clear identification of goose and mule duck foie gras samples. Analysis of experimental mixtures demonstrated that 1% of duck can be easily detected in goose foie gras using the PCR method developed here. This genetic marker can be very useful for the accurate identification of these two species in foie gras products.

  19. Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.

    PubMed

    Ali, Neserin; Mattsson, Karin; Rissler, Jenny; Karlsson, Helen Marg; Svensson, Christian R; Gudmundsson, Anders; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo A G; Cedervall, Tommy; Kåredal, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

  20. Analysis of nanoparticle–protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Neserin; Mattsson, Karin; Rissler, Jenny; Karlsson, Helen Marg; Svensson, Christian R.; Gudmundsson, Anders; Lindh, Christian H.; Jönsson, Bo A. G.; Cedervall, Tommy; Kåredal, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona. PMID:26186033

  1. The HPr Proteins from the Thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus Can Form Domain-swapped Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-07-20

    The study of proteins from extremophilic organisms continues to generate interest in the field of protein folding because paradigms explaining the enhanced stability of these proteins still elude us and such studies have the potential to further our knowledge of the forces stabilizing proteins. We have undertaken such a study with our model protein HPr from a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, and a thermophile, Bacillus stearothermophilus. We report here the high-resolution structures of the wild-type HPr protein from the thermophile and a variant, F29W. The variant proved to crystallize in two forms: a monomeric form with a structure very similar to the wild-type protein as well as a domain-swapped dimer. Interestingly, the structure of the domain-swapped dimer for HPr is very different from that observed for a homologous protein, Crh, from B. subtilis. The existence of a domain-swapped dimer has implications for amyloid formation and is consistent with recent results showing that the HPr proteins can form amyloid fibrils. We also characterized the conformational stability of the thermophilic HPr proteins using thermal and solvent denaturation methods and have used the high-resolution structures in an attempt to explain the differences in stability between the different HPr proteins. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the solution properties of the HPr proteins using a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods.

  2. Structure of the cleavage-activated prefusion form of the parainfluenza virus 5 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brett D; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kors, Christopher A; Leser, George P; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2012-10-09

    The paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) enters cells by fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane through the concerted action of the fusion (F) protein and the receptor binding protein hemagglutinin-neuraminidase. The F protein folds initially to form a trimeric metastable prefusion form that is triggered to undergo large-scale irreversible conformational changes to form the trimeric postfusion conformation. It is thought that F refolding couples the energy released with membrane fusion. The F protein is synthesized as a precursor (F0) that must be cleaved by a host protease to form a biologically active molecule, F1,F2. Cleavage of F protein is a prerequisite for fusion and virus infectivity. Cleavage creates a new N terminus on F1 that contains a hydrophobic region, known as the FP, which intercalates target membranes during F protein refolding. The crystal structure of the soluble ectodomain of the uncleaved form of PIV5 F is known; here we report the crystal structure of the cleavage-activated prefusion form of PIV5 F. The structure shows minimal movement of the residues adjacent to the protease cleavage site. Most of the hydrophobic FP residues are buried in the uncleaved F protein, and only F103 at the newly created N terminus becomes more solvent-accessible after cleavage. The conformational freedom of the charged arginine residues that compose the protease recognition site increases on cleavage of F protein.

  3. Aspartic acid protease from Botrytis cinerea removes haze-forming proteins during white winemaking.

    PubMed

    Van Sluyter, Steven C; Warnock, Nicholas I; Schmidt, Simon; Anderson, Peter; van Kan, Jan A L; Bacic, Antony; Waters, Elizabeth J

    2013-10-09

    White wines suffer from heat-induced protein hazes during transport and storage unless the proteins are removed prior to bottling. Bentonite fining is by far the most commonly used method, but it is inefficient and creates several other process challenges. An alternative to bentonite is the enzymatic removal of haze-forming grape pathogenesis-related proteins using added proteases. The major problem with this approach is that grape pathogenesis-related proteins are highly protease resistant unless they are heat denatured in combination with enzymatic treatment. This paper demonstrates that the protease BcAP8, from the grape fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea , is capable of degrading chitinase, a major class of haze-forming proteins, without heat denaturation. Because BcAP8 effectively removes haze-forming proteins under normal winemaking conditions, it could potentially benefit winemakers by reducing bentonite requirements.

  4. The surface layer protein of Bacillus thuringiensis CTC forms unique intracellular parasporal inclusion body.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenguang; Yu, Ziniu

    2008-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. finitimus strain CTC forms round parasporal inclusion body. The inclusion body protein gene ctc has been cloned and characterized. Sequence homology analysis reveals that the amino acid sequence of CTC protein shows 87% identity with the surface layer (S-layer) protein Sap (GenBank Z36946) in B. anthracis. In this report, transmission electron microscope observation showed that CTC formed intracellular parasporal inclusion body and sheet structure of S-layer-like protein at the spore phase. Furthermore, the ctc gene was transformed into an acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. The resulting transformant could form parasporal body which had the same shape and molecular weight of protein with that of B. thuringiensis CTC. These results, together with the sequence homology analysis of ctc gene, confirmed that the unique intracellular parasporal inclusion body of B. thuringiensis was comprised of S-layer protein.

  5. The fusion of lipid droplets is involved in fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras".

    PubMed

    Théron, L; Astruc, T; Bouillier-Oudot, M; Molette, C; Vénien, A; Peyrin, F; Vitezica, Z G; Fernandez, X

    2011-12-01

    Fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras" is the main quality issue in processing plants. To better understand this phenomenon, a histological and ultrastructural study was conducted. The aim was to characterize changes in lipid droplets of duck "foie gras" related to fat loss during cooking. Ten fatty livers were sampled before and after cooking and prepared for optical and transmission electron microscopy. In raw livers, the lipid droplets were nearly spherical while after cooking, they were larger and lost their spherical shape. We also observed a decrease in the number of droplets after cooking, probably due to droplet fusion caused by the heat treatment. Before cooking, there were fewer lipid droplets and a higher osmium tetroxyde staining intensity in the fatty liver, which later gave a lower technological yield. Fat loss during cooking was higher when there was more fusion of lipid droplets before cooking.

  6. Development of GRAS strains for nutraceutical production using systems and synthetic biology approaches: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Nutraceuticals are food substances with medical and health benefits for humans. Limited by complicated procedures, high cost, low yield, insufficient raw materials, resource waste, and environment pollution, chemical synthesis and extraction are being replaced by microbial synthesis of nutraceuticals. Many microbial strains that are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) have been identified and developed for the synthesis of nutraceuticals, and significant nutraceutical production by these strains has been achieved. In this review, we systematically summarize recent advances in nutraceutical research in terms of physiological effects on health, potential applications, drawbacks of traditional production processes, characteristics of production strains, and progress in microbial fermentation. Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology techniques have enabled comprehensive understanding of GRAS strains and its wider applications. Thus, these microbial strains are promising cell factories for the commercial production of nutraceuticals.

  7. Minor coat protein composition and location of the A protein in bacteriophage f1 spheroids and I-forms.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, J; Webster, R E

    1982-01-01

    The filamentous bacteriophage f1 can be transformed into a spherical particle (spheroid) or an intermediate shortened filament with a flared end (I-forms) by exposure to a chloroform-water interface at 22 or 4 degrees C, respectively. The protein composition of bacteriophage f1 spheroids and I-forms was examined by separating the proteins from the purified. [35S]cysteine-labeled particles by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Quantitation of the radioactivity on the gels showed that I-forms and spheroids contain the same complement of minor coat proteins as do untreated f1 phage. This composition is unchanged after removal of the DNA, either by digestion with micrococcal nuclease or by centrifugation of the particles through CsCl density gradients, indicating that none of the minor coat proteins is held in the particles solely through an interaction with the DNA. We also examined the location of the A protein in I-forms by decoration with ferritin-conjugated antibodies and examination under the electron microscope and found that the A protein is located specifically at the flared end of the I-form particle, through which the DNA is extruded and at which contraction into spheroids begins. The implications of these results with regard to the orientation of the DNA within the capsid and the process of infection are discussed. Images PMID:7097858

  8. The crystal structure of the thiocyanate-forming protein from Thlaspi arvense, a kelch protein involved in glucosinolate breakdown.

    PubMed

    Gumz, Frauke; Krausze, Joern; Eisenschmidt, Daniela; Backenköhler, Anita; Barleben, Leif; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wittstock, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Kelch repeat-containing proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes, but only a small subset of plant kelch proteins has been functionally characterized. Thiocyanate-forming protein (TFP) from field-penny cress, Thlaspi arvense (Brassicaceae), is a representative of specifier proteins, a group of kelch proteins involved in plant specialized metabolism. As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicaceae, specifier proteins determine the profile of bioactive products formed when plant tissue is disrupted and glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases. Here, we describe the crystal structure of TaTFP at a resolution of 1.4 Å. TaTFP crystallized as homodimer. Each monomer forms a six-blade β-propeller with a wide "top" and a narrower "bottom" opening with distinct strand-connecting loops protruding far beyond the lower propeller surface. Molecular modeling and mutational analysis identified residues for glucosinolate aglucone and Fe(2+) cofactor binding within these loops. As the first experimentally determined structure of a plant kelch protein, the crystal structure of TaTFP not only enables more detailed mechanistic studies on glucosinolate breakdown product formation, but also provides a new basis for research on the diverse roles and mechanisms of other kelch proteins in plants.

  9. Effect of different GRAS compounds in the control of apples blue mould.

    PubMed

    Venditti, T; Cubaiu, L; Ladu, G; D'Hallewin, G

    2013-01-01

    The most important pathogen for apples is Penicillium expansum that is the causal organism of blue mould. Postharvest losses are controlled with chemical fungicides such as TBZ but a growing concern for human health and a greater awareness for environmental conservation have multiplied the studies on new ecological technologies. In the search of new environment and consumer friendly technologies that can reduce toxic residues, the use of GRAS compounds represent a valid alternative to the use of synthetic postharvest fungicides. The aims of the present work were: (1) To evaluate the effectiveness of different GRAS compounds in the control of P. expansum in artificially inoculated fruit; (2) To assess the capability of injured and treated fruit with GRAS compounds, used alone or combined, to heal the wounds in order to resist to infection. Fruit was injured with a steel rod and after 1 hour was (1) Inoculated with the pathogen and after 24 hours treated or (2) Treated and after 24 hours inoculated. Treatments were performed with the following compounds: sodium bicarbonate (SBC), boric acid (BA) and calcium chloride (CC) by using a 1% solution for all of them. After 9 or 14 days fruit lesion diameters were assessed. In the trial (1) the combined treatment with BA and SBC was the most effective reducing the lesion diameter by 86.5% with respect to untreated fruit, after 9 days from infection. A good pathogen control was also obtained with BA used alone or combined with CC. When the treatment was performed before infection the best results were achieved with the combination of SBC and CC, with 87% of reduction of the lesion diameter. The addition of CC also reduced the lesion if combined with BA (66.8%). These preliminary results showed that GRAS compounds can be effective in reducing blue mold by a direct effect on the pathogen, and by modulating fruit responses enhancing host resistance.

  10. NMR studies of the membrane bound form of filamentous bacteriophage fd and Pfl major coat proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schiksnis, R.A.; Bogusky, M.J.; Opella, S.J.

    1987-05-01

    The major coat proteins of the fd (M13) and Pf1 filamentous bacteriophage exist as integral membrane proteins during the viral life cycle. These proteins adopt their membrane bound conformations when solubilized by a variety of detergents, and the protein-detergent micelle complexes can be studied using solution NMR techniques. Determination of the structure of the coat proteins in their membrane bound form has been accomplished by qualitative interpretation of 2-dimensional /sup 1/H-/sup 1/H NOE spectra (NOESY). The critical amide proton resonance assignments were made through biosynthetic /sup 15/N labeling and /sup 1/H//sup 15/N heteronuclear chemical shift correlation techniques. The data indicate that both proteins adopt helical conformations within the micelle. The /sup 15/N//sup 1/H heteronuclear NOE has been used to characterize the backbone dynamics of both proteins in micelles. The lipid associated residues of the proteins are rigid on the nanosecond timescale, while the hydrophilic solvent associated N- and C-termini are high mobile. These results complement previously reported protein dynamics studies of membrane bound coat proteins conducted using solid state NMR methods. Solid state NMR studies reported in the literature have also investigated the structure and dynamics of the fd and Pf1 major coat proteins when bound to intact phage. Therefore, structure/dynamics comparisons of the proteins in their structural versus membrane bound forms can be made.

  11. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  12. Identification of lactic acid bacteria involved in the spoilage of pasteurized "foie gras" products.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, S; André, S; Hue, I; Prévost, H; Pilet, M F

    2010-07-01

    The spoiling microflora of a re-packaged French "foie gras" product was studied. A total of 54 isolates, originating from two different factories, were identified using phenotypical and molecular methods (partial 16S rDNA sequencing). Weissella viridescens was the main species detected in the products from factory 1 (64% of the isolates). These products had a low lactic acid concentration and were considered as non-spoiled. The microflora of factory 2 was dominated mainly by the genus Lactobacillus (95% of the isolates), and the high lactic acid concentration of these products was linked with a strong spoilage. Among the 30 Lactobacillus strains, three species were predominant: Lactobacillus sakei (nine isolates), Lactobacillus coryniformis (eight isolates) and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (five isolates). Challenge tests were performed to confirm the involvement of the Lactobacillus strains in the spoilage of the product. Sterile "foie gras" samples were inoculated with 14 LAB strains from the collection. The most acidifying strains belonged to the species L. sakei, Lactobacillus plantarum and L. paraplantarum. This confirmed the role of the strains from the Lactobacillus genus as the main spoilers of "foie gras" products and will be useful to design new quality protocols and extend the shelf-life of these products.

  13. The Structure-Forming Juncture in Oxidative Protein Folding: What Happens in the ER?

    PubMed

    Narayan, Mahesh

    2017-08-17

    The folding of disulfide bond containing proteins proceeds in a biphasic manner. Initially, cysteines are oxidized to form disulfide bonds. Structure is largely absent during this phase. Next, when a minimally correct number of native linkages of disulfide bonds have been acquired, the biopolymer conformationally folds into the native, or a native-like, state. Thus, at the end of this "oxidative folding" process, a stable and biologically active protein is formed. This review focuses on dissecting the "structure-forming step" in oxidative protein folding. The ability to follow this pivotal step in protein maturation in somewhat detail is uniquely facilitated in "oxidative" folding scenarios. We review this step using bovine pancreatic Ribonuclease A as a model while recognizing the impact that this step has in subcellular trafficking and protein aggregation.

  14. Resonance Raman study of the dark-adapted form of the purple membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Aton, B; Doukas, A G; Callender, R H; Becher, B; Ebrey, T G

    1979-02-26

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the dark-adapted form of the purple membrane protein (bacteriorhodopsin) has been obtained and is compared to the light-adapted pigment and model chromophore spectra. As in the light-adapted form, the chromophore-protein linkage is found to be a protonated Schiff base. Electron delocalization appears to play the dominant role in color regulation. The dark-adapted spectrum indicates a conformation closer to 13-cis than the light-adapted spectrum.

  15. Quantitative Protein Profiling of Chlamydia trachomatis Growth Forms Reveals Defense Strategies Against Tryptophan Starvation*

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Ole; Follmann, Frank; Olsen, Anja W.; Heegaard, Niels H.; Andersen, Peter; Rosenkrands, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogens in humans. The infection is often asymptomatic and can lead to chronic manifestations. The infectious elementary body and the replicating reticulate body are the two growth forms in the normal developmental cycle. Under the influence of interferon-γ, the normal cycle is disrupted because of tryptophan degradation, leading to a third persistent form, the aberrant reticulate body. For the genital strain C. trachomatis D/UW-3/CX we established a quantitative, label-free proteomic approach, and identified in total 655 out of 903 (73%) predicted proteins, allowing the first quantitative comparison of all three growth forms. Inclusion membrane proteins and proteins involved in translation were more abundant in the reticulate body (RB)1 and aberrant reticulate body (ARB) forms, whereas proteins of the type III Secretion System and the cell envelope were more abundant in the elementary body (EB) form, reflecting the need for these proteins to establish infection and for host interactions. In the interferon-γ induced ARB proteome, the tryptophan synthase subunits were identified as biomarkers with a strong increase from less than 0.05% to 9% of the total protein content, reflecting an inherent defense strategy for the pathogen to escape interferon-γ mediated immune pressure. Furthermore, the total tryptophan content in the ARB form was 1.9-fold lower compared with the EB form, and we demonstrate that modulation of the protein repertoire toward lower abundance of proteins with high tryptophan content, is a mechanism which contributes to establish and maintain chlamydial persistence. Thus, quantitative proteomics provides insights in the Chlamydia defense mechanisms to escape interferon-γ mediated immune pressure. PMID:27784728

  16. New Structural Approaches to Understanding the Disease Related Forms of the Prion Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    amyloidogenic proteins. Prion diseases are different from other amyloid diseases in that pathogenic (also called scrapie or PrPSc) forms of the prion...that some residues in the 89–145 segment are required for the conformational change to the infectious, scrapie form [16]. A ‘mini-prion’ containing

  17. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fin1 protein forms cell cycle-specific filaments between spindle pole bodies.

    PubMed

    van Hemert, Martijn J; Lamers, Gerda E M; Klein, Dionne C G; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Steensma, H Yde; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2002-04-16

    The FIN1 gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a basic protein with putative coiled-coil regions. Here we show that in large-budded cells a green fluorescent protein-Fin1 fusion protein is visible as a filament between the two spindle pole bodies. In resting cells the protein is undetectable, and in small-budded cells it is localized in the nucleus. During late mitosis it localizes on the spindle pole bodies. Filaments of cyano fluorescent protein-tagged Fin1 colocalize with filaments of green fluorescent protein-tagged Tub1 only in large-budded cells. By electron and atomic force microscopy we showed that purified recombinant Fin1p self-assembles into filaments with a diameter of approximately 10 nm. Our results indicate that the Fin1 protein forms a cell cycle-specific filament, additional to the microtubules, between the spindle pole bodies of dividing yeast cells.

  18. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fin1 protein forms cell cycle-specific filaments between spindle pole bodies

    PubMed Central

    van Hemert, Martijn J.; Lamers, Gerda E. M.; Klein, Dionne C. G.; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Steensma, H. Yde; van Heusden, G. Paul H.

    2002-01-01

    The FIN1 gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a basic protein with putative coiled-coil regions. Here we show that in large-budded cells a green fluorescent protein-Fin1 fusion protein is visible as a filament between the two spindle pole bodies. In resting cells the protein is undetectable, and in small-budded cells it is localized in the nucleus. During late mitosis it localizes on the spindle pole bodies. Filaments of cyano fluorescent protein-tagged Fin1 colocalize with filaments of green fluorescent protein-tagged Tub1 only in large-budded cells. By electron and atomic force microscopy we showed that purified recombinant Fin1p self-assembles into filaments with a diameter of ≈10 nm. Our results indicate that the Fin1 protein forms a cell cycle-specific filament, additional to the microtubules, between the spindle pole bodies of dividing yeast cells. PMID:11929974

  19. Electrophoretic separation method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tsujimoto, Yusuke; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel electrophoretic separation and analysis method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes (MLMs) in order to overcome the problems related to current separation and analysis methods of membrane proteins, and to obtain a high-performance separation method on the basis of specific properties of the lipid membranes. We constructed MLMs, and subsequently characterized membrane pore-forming protein behavior in MLMs. Through the use of these MLMs, we were able to successfully separate and analyze membrane pore-forming proteins in MLMs. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first example of membrane pore-forming protein separation in lipid membranes. Our method can be expected to be applied for the separation and analysis of other membrane proteins including intrinsic membrane proteins and to result in high-performance by utilizing the specific properties of lipid membranes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. SVP-like MADS-box protein from Carya cathayensis forms higher-order complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Hou, Chuanming; Huang, Jianqin; Wang, Zhengjia; Xu, Yingwu

    2015-03-01

    To properly regulate plant flowering time and construct floral pattern, MADS-domain containing transcription factors must form multimers including homo- and hetero-dimers. They are also active in forming hetero-higher-order complexes with three to five different molecules. However, it is not well known if a MADS-box protein can also form homo-higher-order complex. In this study a biochemical approach is utilized to provide insight into the complex formation for an SVP-like MADS-box protein cloned from hickory. The results indicated that the protein is a heterogeneous higher-order complex with the peak population containing over 20 monomers. Y2H verified the protein to form homo-complex in yeast cells. Western blot of the hickory floral bud sample revealed that the protein exists in higher-order polymers in native. Deletion assays indicated that the flexible C-terminal residues are mainly responsible for the higher-order polymer formation and the heterogeneity. Current results provide direct biochemical evidences for an active MADS-box protein to be a high order complex, much higher than a quartermeric polymer. Analysis suggests that a MADS-box subset may be able to self-assemble into large complexes, and thereby differentiate one subfamily from the other in a higher-order structural manner. Present result is a valuable supplement to the action of mechanism for MADS-box proteins in plant development.

  1. Pore-forming ability of major outer membrane proteins from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238.

    PubMed Central

    Kennell, W L; Egli, C; Hancock, R E; Holt, S C

    1992-01-01

    Three major outer membrane proteins with apparent molecular masses of 43, 45, and 51 kDa were purified from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238, and their pore-forming abilities were determined by the black lipid bilayer method. The non-heat-modifiable 45-kDa protein (Omp 45) showed no pore-forming activity even at high KCl concentrations. The single-channel conductances in 1 M KCl of the heat-modifiable proteins with apparent molecular masses of 43 kDa (Omp 43) and 51 kDa (Omp 51) were 0.49 and 0.60 nS, respectively. The proteins formed nonselective channels and, as determined by experiments of ion selectivity and zero-current potential, were weakly anion selective. Images PMID:1370429

  2. Large Proteins Have a Great Tendency to Aggregate but a Low Propensity to Form Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Ramshini, Hassan; Parrini, Claudia; Relini, Annalisa; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Mannini, Benedetta; Pesce, Alessandra; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of soluble proteins into ordered fibrillar aggregates with cross-β structure is an essential event of many human diseases. The polypeptides undergoing aggregation are generally small in size. To explore if the small size is a primary determinant for the formation of amyloids under pathological conditions we have created two databases of proteins, forming amyloid-related and non-amyloid deposits in human diseases, respectively. The size distributions of the two protein populations are well separated, with the systems forming non-amyloid deposits appearing significantly larger. We have then investigated the propensity of the 486-residue hexokinase-B from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YHKB) to form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. This size is intermediate between the size distributions of amyloid and non-amyloid forming proteins. Aggregation was induced under conditions known to be most effective for amyloid formation by normally globular proteins: (i) low pH with salts, (ii) pH 5.5 with trifluoroethanol. In both situations YHKB aggregated very rapidly into species with significant β-sheet structure, as detected using circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction, but a weak Thioflavin T and Congo red binding. Moreover, atomic force microscopy indicated a morphology distinct from typical amyloid fibrils. Both types of aggregates were cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma cells, as indicated by the MTT assay. This analysis indicates that large proteins have a high tendency to form toxic aggregates, but low propensity to form regular amyloid in vivo and that such a behavior is intrinsically determined by the size of the protein, as suggested by the in vitro analysis of our sample protein. PMID:21249193

  3. Muscle Lim Protein and Myosin Binding Protein C form a complex regulating muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Demetrios A; Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Sanoudou, Despina

    2017-08-31

    Muscle Lim Protein (MLP) is a protein with multiple functional roles in striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Herein, we demonstrate that MLP directly binds to slow, fast, and cardiac myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) during myogenesis, as shown by yeast two-hybrid, and a range of protein-protein interaction assays. The minimal interacting domains involve MLP inter-LIM and MyBP-C C4. The interaction is sensitive to cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations changes and to MyBP-C phosphorylation by PKA or CaMKII. Confocal microscopy of differentiating myoblasts showed MLP and MyBP-C colocalization during myoblast differentiation. Suppression of the complex formation with recombinant MyBP-C C4 peptide overexpression, inhibited myoblast differentiation by 65%. Suppression of both MLP and MyBP-C expression in myoblasts by siRNA revealed negative synergistic effects on differentiation. The MLP/MyBP-C complex modulates the actin activated myosin II ATPase activity in vitro, which could interfere with sarcomerogenesis and myofilaments assembly during differentiation. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the MLP/MyBP-C complex during early myoblast differentiation. Its absence in muscles with mutations or aberrant expression of MLP or MyBP-C could be directly implicated in the development of cardiac and skeletal myopathies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Proteins isolated from regenerating sciatic nerves of rats form aggregates following posttranslational amino acid modification

    SciTech Connect

    Ingoglia, N.A.; Chakroborty, G.; Yu, M.; Luo, D.; Sturman, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Soluble proteins of regenerating sciatic nerves of rats can be posttranslationally, covalently modified by a variety of radioactive amino acids. The present study shows that once modified by a mixture of 15 amino acids, many of those proteins form aggregates that are unable to pass through a 0.45-micron filter and pellet following 20,000g centrifugation (suggesting a size of greater than 2 x 10(6) Da). Aggregation of proteins also occurs following modification by Arg or Lys alone, but does not occur following protein modification in nonregenerating nerves or in brain. Aggregates are not disrupted by treatment with 100 mM beta mercaptoethanol or by exposure to 1.0 M NaCl, but aggregates are solubilized by treatment with urea and by boiling in 1.5% SDS. Amino acid analysis of proteins modified by a mixture of (3H)amino acids shows a similar proportion of posttranslationally incorporated Ser, Pro, Val, Ala, Leu, Phe, Lys, and Arg in the soluble and pelletable fractions. Two-dimensional PAGE profiles of soluble and pelletable modified proteins show that the modified proteins in both fractions are in similar pI and molecular weight ranges, except that the soluble modified proteins include a high-molecular-weight component that is absent in the pelleted modified proteins. Kinetic studies show that while half-maximal levels of protein modification occur within 30 seconds of incubation, the appearance of the pelletable modified protein fraction is delayed significantly. These results indicate that amino acid modification of soluble proteins in regenerating sciatic nerves of rats results in physical changes in those proteins so that they form high-molecular-weight aggregates.

  5. The phosphorylated form of the ORF3 protein of hepatitis E virus interacts with its non-glycosylated form of the major capsid protein, ORF2.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shweta; Korkaya, Hasan; Zafrullah, Mohammad; Jameel, Shahid; Lal, Sunil K

    2002-06-21

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human RNA virus containing three open reading frames. Of these, ORF1 encodes the viral nonstructural polyprotein; ORF2 encodes the major capsid protein, which exists in a glycosylated and non-glycosylated form; and ORF3 codes for a phosphoprotein of undefined function. Using fluorescence-based colocalization, yeast two-hybrid experiments, transiently transfected COS-1 cell co-immunoprecipitation, and cell-free coupled transcription-translation techniques, we have shown that the ORF3 protein interacts with the ORF2 protein. The domains involved in this ORF2-ORF3 association have been identified and mapped. Our deletion analysis showed that a 25-amino acid region (residues 57-81) of the ORF3 protein is required for this interaction. Using a Mexican HEV isolate, site-directed mutagenesis of ORF3, and a phosphatase digestion assay, we showed that the ORF2-ORF3 interaction is dependent upon the phosphorylation at Ser(80) of ORF3. Finally, using COS-1 cell immunoprecipitation experiments, we found that the phosphorylated ORF3 protein preferentially interacts with the non-glycosylated ORF2 protein. These findings were confirmed using tunicamycin inhibition, point mutants, and deletion mutants expressing only non-glycosylated ORF2. ORF3 maps in the structural region of the HEV genome and now interacts with the major capsid protein, ORF2, in a post-translational modification-dependent manner. Such an interaction of ORF2 with ORF3 suggests a possible well regulated role for ORF3 in HEV structural assembly.

  6. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dygut, Jacek; Kalinowska, Barbara; Banach, Mateusz; Piwowar, Monika; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific) hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains—In this context we can distinguish: (1) Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer); (2) Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above) and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model. PMID:27763556

  7. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dygut, Jacek; Kalinowska, Barbara; Banach, Mateusz; Piwowar, Monika; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2016-10-18

    The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific) hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains-In this context we can distinguish: (1) Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer); (2) Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above) and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model.

  8. The Native Form and Maturation Process of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Wakita, Takaji; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Funahashi, Shin-Ichi; Ichikawa, Masumi; Kajita, Tadahiro; Moradpour, Darius; Wands, Jack R.; Kohara, Michinori

    1998-01-01

    The maturation and subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein were investigated with both a vaccinia virus expression system and CHO cell lines stably transformed with HCV cDNA. Two HCV core proteins, with molecular sizes of 21 kDa (p21) and 23 kDa (p23), were identified. The C-terminal end of p23 is amino acid 191 of the HCV polyprotein, and p21 is produced as a result of processing between amino acids 174 and 191. The subcellular localization of the HCV core protein was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although HCV core protein resided predominantly in the cytoplasm, it was also found in the nucleus and had the same molecular size as p21 in both locations, as determined by subcellular fractionation. The HCV core proteins had different immunoreactivities to a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Antibody 5E3 stained core protein in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, C7-50 stained core protein only in the cytoplasm, and 499S stained core protein only in the nucleus. These results clearly indicate that the p23 form of HCV core protein is processed to p21 in the cytoplasm and that the core protein in the nucleus has a higher-order structure different from that of p21 in the cytoplasm. HCV core protein in sera of patients with HCV infection was analyzed in order to determine the molecular size of genuinely processed HCV core protein. HCV core protein in sera was found to have exactly the same molecular weight as the p21 protein. These results suggest that p21 core protein is a component of native viral particles. PMID:9621068

  9. Purification in a functional form of the terminal protein of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29.

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, I; Lázaro, J M; García, J A; Hermoso, J M; Salas, M

    1984-01-01

    Phage phi 29 terminal protein, p3, essentially pure, was isolated in a denatured form from viral particles, and anti-p3 antiserum was obtained. A radioimmunoassay to detect and quantitate protein p3 was developed. By using this assay, native protein p3 was highly purified from Escherichia coli cells harboring a gene 3-containing recombinant plasmid. After three purification steps, the protein was more than 96% pure; its amino acid composition was very similar to that deduced from the nucleotide sequence of gene 3. The purified protein was active in the formation of the covalent p3-dAMP initiation complex when supplemented with extracts of B. subtilis infected with a sus mutant of phi 29 in gene 3. No DNA polymerase or ATPase activities were present in the final preparation of protein p3. Images PMID:6424120

  10. G4IPDB: A database for G-quadruplex structure forming nucleic acid interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subodh Kumar; Tawani, Arpita; Mishra, Amit; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid G-quadruplex structure (G4) Interacting Proteins DataBase (G4IPDB) is an important database that contains detailed information about proteins interacting with nucleic acids that forms G-quadruplex structures. G4IPDB is the first database that provides comprehensive information about this interaction at a single platform. This database contains more than 200 entries with details of interaction such as interacting protein name and their synonyms, their UniProt-ID, source organism, target name and its sequences, ∆Tm, binding/dissociation constants, protein gene name, protein FASTA sequence, interacting residue in protein, related PDB entries, interaction ID, graphical view, PMID, author’s name and techniques that were used to detect their interactions. G4IPDB also provides an efficient web-based “G-quadruplex predictor tool” that searches putative G-quadruplex forming sequences simultaneously in both sense and anti-sense strands of the query nucleotide sequence and provides the predicted G score. Studying the interaction between proteins and nucleic acids forming G-quadruplex structures could be of therapeutic significance for various diseases including cancer and neurological disease, therefore, having detail information about their interactions on a single platform would be helpful for the discovery and development of novel therapeutics. G4IPDB can be routinely updated (twice in year) and freely available on http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/ipdb/index.php. PMID:27905517

  11. Computational methods in preformulation study for pharmaceutical solid dosage forms of therapeutic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majee, Sutapa Biswas; Biswas, Gopa Roy

    2017-06-01

    Design and delivery of protein-based biopharmaceuticals needs detailed planning and strict monitoring of intermediate processing steps, storage conditions and container-closure system to ensure a stable, elegant and biopharmaceutically acceptable dosage form. Selection of manufacturing process variables and conditions along with packaging specifications can be achieved through properly designed preformulation study protocol for the formulation. Thermodynamic stability and biological activity of therapeutic proteins depend on folding-unfolding and three-dimensional packing dynamics of amino acid network in the protein molecule. Lack of favourable environment may cause protein aggregation with loss in activity and even fatal immunological reaction. Although lyophilization can enhance the stability of protein-based formulations in the solid state, it can induce protein unfolding leading to thermodynamic instability. Formulation stabilizers such as preservatives can also result in aggregation of therapeutic proteins. Modern instrumental techniques in conjunction with computational tools enable rapid and accurate prediction of amino acid sequence, thermodynamic parameters associated with protein folding and detection of aggregation "hot-spots." Globular proteins pose a challenge during investigations on their aggregation propensity. Biobetter therapeutic monoclonal antibodies with enhanced stability, solubility and reduced immunogenic potential can be designed through mutation of aggregation-prone zones. The objective of the present review article is to focus on the various analytical methods and computational approaches used in the study of thermodynamic stability and aggregation tendency of therapeutic proteins, with an aim to develop optimal and marketable formulation. Knowledge of protein dynamics through application of computational tools will provide the essential inputs and relevant information for successful and meaningful completion of preformulation studies on

  12. Production in Pichia pastoris of protein-based polymers with small heterodimer-forming blocks.

    PubMed

    Domeradzka, Natalia E; Werten, Marc W T; de Vries, Renko; de Wolf, Frits A

    2016-05-01

    Some combinations of leucine zipper peptides are capable of forming α-helical heterodimeric coiled coils with very high affinity. These can be used as physical cross-linkers in the design of protein-based polymers that form supramolecular structures, for example hydrogels, upon mixing solutions containing the complementary blocks. Such two-component physical networks are of interest for many applications in biomedicine, pharmaceutics, and diagnostics. This article describes the efficient secretory production of A and B type leucine zipper peptides fused to protein-based polymers in Pichia pastoris. By adjusting the fermentation conditions, we were able to significantly reduce undesirable proteolytic degradation. The formation of A-B heterodimers in mixtures of the purified products was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography. Our results demonstrate that protein-based polymers incorporating functional heterodimer-forming blocks can be produced with P. pastoris in sufficient quantities for use in future supramolecular self-assembly studies and in various applications.

  13. Structure of Ocr from bacteriophage T7, a protein that mimics B-form DNA.

    PubMed

    Walkinshaw, M D; Taylor, P; Sturrock, S S; Atanasiu, C; Berge, T; Henderson, R M; Edwardson, J M; Dryden, D T F

    2002-01-01

    We have solved, by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.8 A, the structure of a protein capable of mimicking approximately 20 base pairs of B-form DNA. This ocr protein, encoded by gene 0.3 of bacteriophage T7, mimics the size and shape of a bent DNA molecule and the arrangement of negative charges along the phosphate backbone of B-form DNA. We also demonstrate that ocr is an efficient inhibitor in vivo of all known families of the complex type I DNA restriction enzymes. Using atomic force microscopy, we have also observed that type I enzymes induce a bend in DNA of similar magnitude to the bend in the ocr molecule. This first structure of an antirestriction protein demonstrates the construction of structural mimetics of long segments of B-form DNA.

  14. Cell surface expression of glycosylated, nonglycosylated, and truncated forms of a cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1988-09-01

    The soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase (PK) has been expressed at the cell surface in a membrane-anchored form (APK). The hybrid protein contains the NH2-terminal signal/anchor domain of a class II integral membrane protein (hemagglutinin/neuraminidase, of the paramyxovirus SV5) fused to the PK NH2 terminus. APK contains a cryptic site that is used for N-linked glycosylation but elimination of this site by site-specific mutagenesis does not prevent cell surface localization. Truncated forms of the APK molecule, with up to 80% of the PK region of APK removed, can also be expressed at the cell surface. These data suggest that neither the complete PK molecule nor its glycosylation are necessary for intracellular transport of PK to the cell surface, and it is possible that specific signals may not be needed in the ectodomain of this hybrid protein to specify cell surface localization.

  15. Influenza surveillance on 'foie gras' duck farms in Bulgaria, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Georgiev, Georgi; Petkov, Todor; Darnell, Daniel; Franks, John; Kayali, Ghazi; Walker, David; Seiler, Patrick; Danner, Angela; Graham, Allison; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    Ducks can shed and spread influenza A viruses (IAVs) while showing no disease signs. Our objective was to clarify the role of 'foie gras' ducks in the circulation of IAVs in Bulgaria. Monthly avian influenza surveillance was conducted on 63 'foie gras' duck farms, 52 of which were surveyed throughout the study between November 2008 and April 2012. Virologic and serologic samples were collected and tested. During this time, wild bird samples were collected at major wild bird-resting areas near the Black Sea coast and Danube River. The study showed high isolation frequency of low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses. In the raising population (<75 days old), subtypes H3, H4, and H6 were detected monthly and H5 LPAIV, sporadically. Different subtypes (H1, H10, H11) were isolated from the fattening premises (75- to 100-day-old ducks), suggesting different routes of introduction. Only 6 of the 52 farms that were surveyed both virologically and serologically were influenza-free throughout the study, possibly due to higher biosecurity measures implemented. No evidence of direct transmission of IAV from wild birds was found. Wild bird surveillance showed low isolation frequency of IAV. IAV prevalence of 0·55% for migratory ducks and 0·53% for migratory geese was estimated in November-December 2011 and January-February 2012, respectively, at two ornithologically important locations near the Black Sea coast. The 'foie gras' duck farms in Bulgaria are an optimal niche where Eurasian-like IAVs are maintained and reassorted unapparent to farmers and veterinarians. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1498 - Microparticulated protein product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1498 Microparticulated protein product. (a) Microparticulated protein product is prepared from egg whites or milk protein or a combination of egg whites and milk protein. These protein... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microparticulated protein product....

  17. Rpf Proteins Are the Factors of Reactivation of the Dormant Forms of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Nikitushkin, V D; Demina, G R; Kaprelyants, A S

    2016-12-01

    As the response to unfavorable growth conditions, nonsporulating mycobacteria transform into the dormant state with the concomitant formation of the specialized dormant forms characterized by low metabolic activity and resistance to antibiotics. Such dormant cells can be reactivated under the influence of several factors including proteins of Rpf (Resuscitation promoting factor) family, which possess peptidoglycan hydrolase activity and were considered to belong to the group of the autocrine growth factors of the bacteria. Remarkable interest toward Rpf family is determined by its participation in resuscitation of the dormant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, what in turn is the key element in resuscitation of the latent tuberculosis - an infectious disease that affects one third of the World's population. Experiments with Rpf mutant forms and with strains deleted in these proteins revealed a relationship between the enzymatic activity of this protein and its ability to resuscitate mycobacteria both in vitro and in vivo. This review discusses possible mechanisms of Rpf action including those related to possible participation of the products of mycobacterial Rpf-mediated cell wall hydrolysis (muropeptides) as signaling molecules. The unique ability of Rpf proteins to resuscitate the dormant forms of mycobacteria and to stimulate their proliferation would allow these proteins to occupy their niche in medicine - in diagnostics and in creation of antituberculosis subunit vaccines.

  18. Carbohydrate-reactive, pore-forming outer membrane proteins of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, D M; Atkinson, H M; Bretag, A H; Tester, M; Trust, T J; Wong, C Y; Flower, R L

    1994-01-01

    Two outer membrane proteins of Aeromonas hydrophila A6, isolated in a one-step affinity chromatography process based on carbohydrate reactivity, were found to be pore-forming molecules in artificial planar bilayer membranes. These carbohydrate-reactive outer membrane proteins (CROMPs; M(r)s, 40,000 and 43,000) were subjected to amino acid analysis. The amino acid profiles for these two outer membrane proteins were almost identical. A partial protein sequence of a 14-amino-acid fragment of the 40,000-Da protein revealed homology with outer membrane porins of Escherichia coli and A. hydrophila. CROMPs were compared with carbohydrate-reactive porins also extracted from outer membranes of A. hydrophila A6. These porins were isolated by using standard porin purification techniques (insolubility in 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate, solubility in 0.4 M NaCl, and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration), and then Synsorb H type 2 affinity chromatography was done. The physical and functional properties of the carbohydrate-reactive porins and CROMPs were found to be identical. On the basis of pore-forming properties in planar lipid bilayers and channel inhibition with maltotriose solutions, a nonspecific, general diffusion porin and a LamB-like maltoporin were identified in both CROMP and carbohydrate-reactive porin preparations. To our knowledge, the use of carbohydrate reactivity to isolate channel-forming proteins from bacterial outer membranes has not been reported previously. Images PMID:7520425

  19. Diversity and evolution of ABC proteins in mycorrhiza-forming fungi.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2015-12-28

    Transporter proteins are predicted to have an important role in the mycorrhizal symbiosis, due to the fact that this type of an interaction between plants and fungi requires a continuous nutrient and signalling exchange. ABC transporters are one of the large groups of transporter proteins found both in plants and in fungi. The crucial role of plant ABC transporters in the formation of the mycorrhizal symbiosis has been demonstrated recently. Some of the fungal ABC transporter-encoding genes are also induced during the mycorrhiza formation. However, no experimental evidences of the direct involvement of fungal ABC transporters in this process are available so far. To facilitate the identification of fungal ABC proteins with a potential role in the establishment of the mycorrhizal symbiosis, we have performed an inventory of the ABC protein-encoding genes in the genomes of 25 species of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. We have identified, manually annotated and curated more than 1300 gene models of putative ABC protein-encoding genes. Out of those, more than 1000 models are predicted to encode functional proteins, whereas about 300 models represent gene fragments or putative pseudogenes. We have also performed the phylogenetic analysis of the identified sequences. The sets of ABC proteins in the mycorrhiza-forming species were compared to the related saprotrophic or plant-pathogenic fungal species. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of ABC genes in the genomes of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. Via comparison of transcriptomics data from different species, we have identified candidate groups of ABC transporters that might have a role in the process of the mycorrhiza formation. Results of our inventory will facilitate the identification of fungal transporters with a role in the mycorrhiza formation. We also provide the first data on ABC protein-coding genes for the phylum Glomeromycota and for orders Pezizales, Atheliales, Cantharellales and Sebacinales, contributing to

  20. Statistical analysis of protein structures suggests that buried ionizable residues in proteins are hydrogen bonded or form salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jeffrey; Makhatadze, George I

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that nonpolar residues are largely buried in the interior of proteins, whereas polar and ionizable residues tend to be more localized on the protein surface where they are solvent exposed. Such a distribution of residues between surface and interior is well understood from a thermodynamic point: nonpolar side chains are excluded from the contact with the solvent water, whereas polar and ionizable groups have favorable interactions with the water and thus are preferred at the protein surface. However, there is an increasing amount of information suggesting that polar and ionizable residues do occur in the protein core, including at positions that have no known functional importance. This is inconsistent with the observations that dehydration of polar and in particular ionizable groups is very energetically unfavorable. To resolve this, we performed a detailed analysis of the distribution of fractional burial of polar and ionizable residues using a large set of ˜2600 nonhomologous protein structures. We show that when ionizable residues are fully buried, the vast majority of them form hydrogen bonds and/or salt bridges with other polar/ionizable groups. This observation resolves an apparent contradiction: the energetic penalty of dehydration of polar/ionizable groups is paid off by favorable energy of hydrogen bonding and/or salt bridge formation in the protein interior. Our conclusion agrees well with the previous findings based on the continuum models for electrostatic interactions in proteins.

  1. Effects of substituting yellow corn for sorghum in geese diets on magret and foie gras quality.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, J; Auvergne, A; Dubois, J P; Lavigne, F; Bijja, M; Bannelier, C; Manse, H; Fortun-Lamothe, L

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this trial was to study the effects of substitution of yellow corn with sorghum during the growing-finishing (G period), overfeeding (O period), or both periods on magret and foie gras quality in geese. In total, 260 ganders were divided into 4 groups (65 birds in each) differing in the cereal (yellow corn or sorghum) included in the diet given during the G and the O periods, using a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. The groups differed in the nature of the cereal in the diet offered to birds between 44 and 104 d of age (G period: a diet containing 500 g of sorghum/kg (SS and SC groups) or a diet containing 500 g of yellow corn/kg (CS and CC groups). The groups differed also in the diet offered to birds between 105 and 120 d of age (O period): 967 g of yellow corn/kg (SC and CC groups) or 965 g of sorghum/kg (SS and CS groups). At the end of the O period, the birds were slaughtered after 10 h of fasting to measure foie gras and breast muscle weight, color, and chemical composition. The mortality in the SC group was higher (P < 0.05) than in the other 3 groups (14.29 vs. 3.58%, average of the 3 groups). After overfeeding, birds fed with sorghum had foie gras that were heavier 984 vs. 885 g, in CS+SS vs. CC+SC groups, respectively; P < 0.001) and less yellow (18.03 vs. 23.97 for b*, in CS+SS vs. CC+SC groups, respectively, P < 0.001) than birds fed with corn. The substitution of yellow corn with sorghum during the G and O periods (SS group) increased the weight of the foie gras, but altered its color to a paler yellow. In contrast, a substitution during the G period only (SC group) resulted in increased mortality during the O period.

  2. The FEMA GRAS assessment of pyrazine derivatives used as flavor ingredients. Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association.

    PubMed

    Adams, T B; Doull, J; Feron, V J; Goodman, J I; Marnett, L J; Munro, I C; Newberne, P M; Portoghese, P S; Smith, R L; Waddell, W J; Wagner, B M

    2002-04-01

    This is the fifth in a series of safety evaluations performed by the Expert Panel of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA). In 1993, the Panel initiated a comprehensive program to re-evaluate the safety of more than 1700 GRAS flavoring substances under conditions of intended use. Elements that are fundamental to the safety evaluation of flavor ingredients include exposure, structural analogy, metabolism, pharmacokinetics and toxicology. Flavor ingredients are evaluated individually taking into account the available scientific information on the group of structurally related substances. Scientific data relevant to the safety evaluation of the use of pyrazine derivatives as flavoring ingredients is evaluated.

  3. Thermal effect on Aequorea green fluorescent protein anionic and neutral chromophore forms fluorescence.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Andrea Martins

    2012-01-01

    The emission behaviour of Aequorea green fluorescent protein (A-GFP) chromophore, in both neutral (N) and anionic (A) form, was studied in the temperature range from 20 °C to 75 °C and at pH = 7. Excitation wavelengths of 399 nm and 476 nm were applied to probe the N and A forms environment, respectively. Both forms exhibit distinct fluorescence patterns at high temperature values. The emission quenching rate, following a temperature increase, is higher for the chromophore N form as a result of the hydrogen bond network weakening. The chromophore anionic form emission maximum is red shifted, upon temperature increase, due to a charge transfer process occurring after A form excitation.

  4. More Than a Pore: The Interplay of Pore-Forming Proteins and Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ros, Uris; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2015-06-01

    Pore-forming proteins (PFPs) punch holes in their target cell membrane to alter their permeability. Permeabilization of lipid membranes by PFPs has received special attention to study the basic molecular mechanisms of protein insertion into membranes and the development of biotechnological tools. PFPs act through a general multi-step mechanism that involves (i) membrane partitioning, (ii) insertion into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, (iii) oligomerization, and (iv) pore formation. Interestingly, PFPs and membranes show a dynamic interplay. As PFPs are usually produced as soluble proteins, they require a large conformational change for membrane insertion. Moreover, membrane structure is modified upon PFPs insertion. In this context, the toroidal pore model has been proposed to describe a pore architecture in which not only protein molecules but also lipids are directly involved in the structure. Here, we discuss how PFPs and lipids cooperate and remodel each other to achieve pore formation, and explore new evidences of protein-lipid pore structures.

  5. Principles for designing proteins with cavities formed by curved β sheets.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Enrique; Basanta, Benjamin; Chidyausiku, Tamuka M; Tang, Yuefeng; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Liu, Gaohua; Swapna, G V T; Guan, Rongjin; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Dou, Jiayi; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Xiao, Rong; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2017-01-13

    Active sites and ligand-binding cavities in native proteins are often formed by curved β sheets, and the ability to control β-sheet curvature would allow design of binding proteins with cavities customized to specific ligands. Toward this end, we investigated the mechanisms controlling β-sheet curvature by studying the geometry of β sheets in naturally occurring protein structures and folding simulations. The principles emerging from this analysis were used to design, de novo, a series of proteins with curved β sheets topped with α helices. Nuclear magnetic resonance and crystal structures of the designs closely match the computational models, showing that β-sheet curvature can be controlled with atomic-level accuracy. Our approach enables the design of proteins with cavities and provides a route to custom design ligand-binding and catalytic sites. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Principles for designing proteins with cavities formed by curved β-sheets

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Enrique; Basanta, Benjamin; Chidyausiku, Tamuka M.; Tang, Yuefeng; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Liu, Gaohua; Swapna, G.V.T.; Guan, Rongjin; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Dou, Jiayi; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Xiao, Rong; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2017-01-01

    Active sites and ligand binding cavities in native proteins are often formed by curved β-sheets, and the ability to control β-sheet curvature would allow design of binding proteins with cavities customized to specific ligands. Towards this end, we investigated the mechanisms controlling β-sheet curvature by studying the geometry of β-sheets in naturally occurring protein structures and folding simulations. The principles emerging from this analysis were used to de novo design a series of proteins with curved β-sheets topped with a-helices. NMR and crystal structures of the designs closely match the computational models, showing that β-sheet curvature can be controlled with atomic-level accuracy. Our approach enables the design of proteins with cavities and provides a route to custom design ligand binding and catalytic sites. PMID:28082595

  7. Electrostatics promotes molecular crowding and selects the aggregation pathway in fibril-forming protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccosta, S.; Blanco, M.; J. Roberts, C.; Martorana, V.; Manno, M.

    2016-05-01

    The role of intermolecular interaction in fibril-forming protein solutions and its relation with molecular conformation are crucial aspects for the control and inhibition of amyloid structures. Here, we study the fibril formation and the protein-protein interactions for two proteins at acidic p H, lysozyme and α -chymotrypsinogen. By using light scattering experiments and the Kirkwood-Buff integral approach, we show how concentration fluctuations are damped even at moderate protein concentrations by the dominant long-ranged electrostatic repulsion, which determines an effective crowded environment. In denaturing conditions, electrostatic repulsion keeps the monomeric solution in a thermodynamically metastable state, which is escaped through kinetically populated conformational sub-states. This explains how electrostatics acts as a gatekeeper in selecting a specific aggregation pathway.

  8. Identification of goose, mule duck, chicken, turkey, and swine in foie gras by species-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Miguel A; García, Teresa; González, Isabel; Asensio, Luis; Mayoral, Belén; López-Calleja, Inés; Hernández, Pablo E; Martín, Rosario

    2003-03-12

    A specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has been developed for the identification of goose (Anser anser), mule duck (Anas platyrhynchos x Cairina moschata), chicken (Gallus gallus), turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), and swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) in foie gras. A forward common primer was designed on a conserved DNA sequence in the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA), and reverse primers were designed to hybridize on species-specific DNA sequences of each species considered. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed clear identification of goose, mule duck, chicken, turkey, and swine in foie gras. Analysis of experimental mixtures demonstrated that the detection limit of the assay was approximately 1% for each species analyzed. This genetic marker can be very useful for the accurate identification of these species, avoiding mislabeling or fraudulent species substitution in foie gras.

  9. Isozymic forms of rat brain CA/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.; Huang, F.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three forms of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) were purified from the cytosolic fraction of rat brain. These enzymes, designated as type I, II, and III protein kinase C, all have the similar molecular weight of 80 Kd, bind (/sup 3/H)-phorbol dibutyrate in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, and undergo autophosphorylation in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, phosphatidylserine, and diolein. Autophosphorylation of these kinases resulted in an incorporation of 1- 1.5 mol /sup 32/P/mol of enzyme. Analysis of the /sup 32/P-labeled tryptic peptides derived from the autophosphorylated protein kinase C by two-dimensional peptide mapping revealed that these kinases had different sites of autophosphorylation. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the type I and type III protein kinase C mainly phosphorylated at Ser residue while the type II kinase phosphorylated at both Ser and Thr residues. In addition, polyclonal antibodies previously prepared against a mixed enzyme fraction preferentially inhibited the type I and type II enzymes but less effectively toward the type III enzyme. Monoclonal antibody specifically against the type II protein kinase C did not inhibit the type I or type III enzymes. These kinases also had different susceptibility to limited proteolysis by trypsin and upon proteolytic degradation they generate distinct fragments. These results demonstrate the presence of isozymic forms of protein kinase C in rat brain.

  10. A comparison of the chemical properties of drugs and FEMA/FDA notified GRAS chemical compounds used in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Sprous, D G; Salemme, F R

    2007-08-01

    The range of molecular properties of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) compounds that are typically used in food and beverage products is compared to marketed drugs. It is observed that GRAS compounds differ from marketed drugs with respect to several molecular descriptors, including molecular weight, H-bond acceptor count, H-bond donor count, aromatic ring count, basic group count, acidic group count, molecular flexibility, enhanced ether and ester bearing compound populations, and reduced nitrogen and halogen bearing compound populations. It was observed that log(P) and log(S), which provide computed estimates of compound solubility in organic and aqueous solvents, respectively, have significant overlap in the two populations. On the whole, GRAS compounds are seen to be more flexible, smaller, and composed of a more restricted set of elements than marketed drugs. In addition, a multivariable binary quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model incorporating the parameters listed above can distinguish GRAS and pharmaceutical compounds, further strengthening the distinction between the molecular spaces defining GRAS and pharmaceutical compounds. It is speculated that the difference between the GRAS and pharmaceutical property spaces is a result of the historical legacy of most GRAS compounds, which are primarily natural in origin. Compounds more recently added to the GRAS list appear more similar to pharmaceuticals with respect to their chemical properties.

  11. Protein composition of 6K2-induced membrane structures formed during Potato virus A infection.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Andres; Varjosalo, Markku; Mäkinen, Kristiina

    2016-08-01

    The definition of the precise molecular composition of membranous replication compartments is a key to understanding the mechanisms of virus multiplication. Here, we set out to investigate the protein composition of the potyviral replication complexes. We purified the potyviral 6K2 protein-induced membranous structures from Potato virus A (PVA)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. For this purpose, the 6K2 protein, which is the main inducer of potyviral membrane rearrangements, was expressed in fusion with an N-terminal Twin-Strep-tag and Cerulean fluorescent protein (SC6K) from the infectious PVA cDNA. A non-tagged Cerulean-6K2 (C6K) virus and the SC6K protein alone in the absence of infection were used as controls. A purification scheme exploiting discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation followed by Strep-tag-based affinity chromatography was developed. Both (+)- and (-)-strand PVA RNA and viral protein VPg were co-purified specifically with the affinity tagged PVA-SC6K. The purified samples, which contained individual vesicles and membrane clusters, were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Data analysis revealed that many of the detected viral and host proteins were either significantly enriched or fully specifically present in PVA-SC6K samples when compared with the controls. Eight of eleven potyviral proteins were identified with high confidence from the purified membrane structures formed during PVA infection. Ribosomal proteins were identified from the 6K2-induced membranes only in the presence of a replicating virus, reinforcing the tight coupling between replication and translation. A substantial number of proteins associating with chloroplasts and several host proteins previously linked with potyvirus replication complexes were co-purified with PVA-derived SC6K, supporting the conclusion that the host proteins identified in this study may have relevance in PVA replication. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. A protein-farnesyl transferase inhibitor interferes with the serum-induced conversion of Candida albicans from a cellular yeast form to a filamentous form.

    PubMed

    McGeady, Paul; Logan, David A; Wansley, Daniel L

    2002-07-16

    A commercially available, cell permeable, protein-farnesyl transferase inhibitor interfered with the serum-induced morphological change in Candida albicans from a cellular yeast form to a filamentous form. The inhibitor has a negligible effect on the growth of C. albicans cells in the cellular yeast form, at the levels used to interfere with the morphological change. Conversion of C. albicans from the yeast form to filamentous form is associated with pathogenicity and hence protein-farnesyl transferase inhibitors are potentially of therapeutic value against C. albicans infection.

  13. Mammalian prion protein (PrP) forms conformationally different amyloid intracellular aggregates in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Bruno; Sant'Anna, Ricardo; Navarro, Susanna; Cordeiro, Yraima; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-11-04

    An increasing number of proteins are being shown to assemble into amyloid structures that lead to pathological states. Among them, mammalian prions outstand due to their ability to transmit the pathogenic conformation, becoming thus infectious. The structural conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), into its misfolded pathogenic form (PrP(Sc)) is the central event of prion-driven pathologies. The study of the structural properties of intracellular amyloid aggregates in general and of prion-like ones in particular is a challenging task. In this context, the evidence that the inclusion bodies formed by amyloid proteins in bacteria display amyloid-like structural and functional properties make them a privileged system to model intracellular amyloid aggregation. Here we provide the first demonstration that recombinant murine PrP and its C-terminal domain (90-231) attain amyloid conformations inside bacteria. Moreover, the inclusions formed by these two PrP proteins display conformational diversity, since they differ in fibril morphology, binding affinity to amyloid dyes, stability, resistance to proteinase K digestion and neurotoxicity. Overall, our results suggest that modelling PrP amyloid formation in microbial cell factories might open an avenue for a better understanding of the structural features modulating the pathogenic impact of this intriguing protein.

  14. Soluble Proteins Form Film by the Treatment of Low Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, Sanae; Sakakita, Hajime; Ishikawa, Kenji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hori, Masaru; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2015-09-01

    It has been pointed out that low temperature plasma in atmosphere was feasible to use for hemostasis without heat injury. Indeed, earlier studies demonstrated that low temperature plasma played an important role to stimulate platelets to aggregate and turned on the proteolytic activities of coagulation factors, resulting in the acceleration of the natural blood coagulation process. On the other hands, our developed equips could immediately form clots upon the contact with plasma flair, while the histological appearance was different from natural coagulation. Based on these findings in formed clots, we sought to determine if plasma flair supplied by our devices was capable of forming film using a series of soluble proteins Following plasma treatment, films were formed from bovine serum albumin, and the other plasma proteins at physiological concentration. Analysis of trans-electron microscope demonstrated that plasma treatment generated small protein particles and made them fuse to be larger aggregations The combined results demonstrated that plasma are capable of aggregating soluble proteins and that platelets and coagulation factors are not necessary for plasma induced blood coagulation. Supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area (21590454, 24590498, and 24108006 to Y. I.).

  15. Detection of the disease associated form of the prion protein in biological samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are neurodegenerative diseases that occur in a variety of mammals. In these diseases, a chromosomally encoded protein (PrP**c) undergoes a conformational change to the disease associated form (PrP**d), and PrP**d is capable inducing ...

  16. Data on structural transitions in domains of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2016-09-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled "in vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes" (Makarov et al., 2015 [1]), demonstrating that upon incubation with viral RNA the poa semilatent hordeivirus (PSLV) TGB1 protein (the movement 63 K protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block) in vitro forms RNP structures resembling filamentous virus-like particles and its internal domain (ID) performs a major structural role in this process. This article reports the additional results on the structural lability of ID and the structural transitions in the C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain (HELD) induced by interaction with tRNA and phosphorylation.

  17. The Postsynaptic Density Proteins Homer and Shank Form a Polymeric Network Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, M.; Tang, C; Verpelli, C; Narayanan, R; Stearns, M; Xu, R; Li, H; Sala, C; Hayashi, Y

    2009-01-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) is crucial for synaptic functions, but the molecular architecture retaining its structure and components remains elusive. Homer and Shank are among the most abundant scaffolding proteins in the PSD, working synergistically for maturation of dendritic spines. Here, we demonstrate that Homer and Shank, together, form a mesh-like matrix structure. Crystallographic analysis of this region revealed a pair of parallel dimeric coiled coils intercalated in a tail-to-tail fashion to form a tetramer, giving rise to the unique configuration of a pair of N-terminal EVH1 domains at each end of the coiled coil. In neurons, the tetramerization is required for structural integrity of the dendritic spines and recruitment of proteins to synapses. We propose that the Homer-Shank complex serves as a structural framework and as an assembly platform for other PSD proteins.

  18. Pore-Forming Proteins as Mediators of Novel Epigenetic Mechanism of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Surguchov, Andrei; Surgucheva, Irina; Sharma, Mukut; Sharma, Ram; Singh, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. In the last two decades, numerous gene defects underlying different forms of epilepsy have been identified with most of these genes encoding ion channel proteins. Despite these developments, the etiology of majority of non-familial epilepsies has no known associated genetic mutations and cannot be explained by defects in identified ion channels alone. We hypothesize that de novo formation of ion channels by naturally unfolded proteins (NUPs) increases neuronal excitability. Altered ionic homeostasis may initiate/contribute to cellular cascades related to epileptogenesis in susceptible individuals. Here, we consider two small proteins, namely, α-synuclein and stefin B, as prototypical candidates to illustrate the underlying mechanism(s). Previous work points to an association between epilepsy and α-synuclein or stefin B, but the mechanism(s) underlying such association remains elusive. We review the evidence to link the structure–function of these proteins with disease processes. Epigenetic mechanisms unrelated to altered DNA sequence(s) that may affect epileptogenesis include transcriptional or posttranscriptional regulation. Such epigenetic mechanisms or their combination(s) enhance the levels of these proteins and as a result the ability to form annular structures, which upon incorporation into membrane form novel ion channels and disturb intracellular ion homeostasis. Alternative epigenetic mechanisms may change amyloidogenic proteins by posttranslational modifications, thereby increasing their propensity to form channels. Further research elucidating the details about the formation of ion channels through these mechanisms and their role in epileptogenesis may define new molecular targets and guide the development of new drug targets. PMID:28149289

  19. The FEMA GRAS assessment of aliphatic and aromatic terpene hydrocarbons used as flavor ingredients.

    PubMed

    Adams, T B; Gavin, C Lucas; McGowen, M M; Waddell, W J; Cohen, S M; Feron, V J; Marnett, L J; Munro, I C; Portoghese, P S; Rietjens, I M C M; Smith, R L

    2011-10-01

    This publication is the thirteenth in a series of safety evaluations performed by the Expert Panel of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA). In 1993, the Panel initiated a comprehensive program to re-evaluate the safety of more than 1700 GRAS flavoring substances under conditions of intended use. Since then, the number of flavoring substances has grown to more than 2600 substances. Elements that are fundamental to the safety evaluation of flavor ingredients include exposure, structural analogy, metabolism, pharmacokinetics and toxicology. Flavor ingredients are evaluated individually and in the context of the available scientific information on the group of structurally related substances. Scientific data relevant to the safety evaluation of the use of aliphatic and aromatic terpene hydrocarbons as flavoring ingredients are evaluated. The group of aliphatic and aromatic terpene hydrocarbons was reaffirmed as GRAS (GRASr) based, in part, on their self-limiting properties as flavoring substances in food; their rapid absorption, metabolic detoxication, and excretion in humans and other animals; their low level of flavor use; the wide margins of safety between the conservative estimates of intake and the no-observed-adverse effect levels determined from subchronic and chronic studies and the lack of significant genotoxic potential.

  20. EGCG disaggregates amyloid-like fibrils formed by Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekaran, Indu R.; Adda, Christopher G.; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2), one of the most abundant proteins on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites, is a promising malaria vaccine candidate. MSP2 is intrinsically unstructured and forms amyloid-like fibrils in solution. As this propensity of MSP2 to form fibrils in solution has the potential to impede its development as a vaccine candidate, finding an inhibitor that inhibits fibrillogenesis may enhance vaccine development. We have shown previously that EGCG inhibits the formation of MSP2 fibrils. Here we show that EGCG can alter the β-sheet-like structure of the fibril and disaggregate pre-formed fibrils of MSP2 into soluble oligomers. The fibril remodelling effects of EGCG and other flavonoids were characterized using Thioflavin T fluorescence assays, electron microscopy and other biophysical methods. PMID:21784057

  1. Assembling the puzzle: Oligomerization of α-pore forming proteins in membranes☆

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2016-01-01

    Pore forming proteins (PFPs) share the ability of creating pores that allow the passage of ions, proteins or other constituents through a wide variety of target membranes, ranging from bacteria to humans. They often cause cell death, as pore formation disrupts the membrane permeability barrier required for maintaining cell homeostasis. The organization into supramolecular complexes or oligomers that pierce the membrane is a common feature of PFPs. However, the molecular pathway of self-assembly and pore opening remains unclear. Here, we review the most recent discoveries in the mechanism of membrane oligomerization and pore formation of a subset of PFPs, the α-PFPs, whose pore-forming domains are formed by helical segments. Only now we are starting to grasp the molecular details of their function, mainly thanks to the introduction of single molecule microscopy and nanoscopy techniques. PMID:26375417

  2. Differential range and activity of various forms of the Hedgehog protein

    PubMed Central

    Dawber, Rebecca J; Hebbes, Stephen; Herpers, Bram; Docquier, France; van den Heuvel, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins act as extracellular messengers to control and coordinate growth and differentiation. The mechanism by which Hh protein travels across a field of cells, and results in a range of specific effects relating to the distance from the source, has been the subject of much debate. It has been suggested that the range and activity of the pathway can be linked to modifications of the Hh protein, specifically the addition of lipid groups at N- and C-terminal sites. Results Here we have addressed the potency of different forms of Hh protein by expressing these in Drosophila, where we are able to precisely establish pathway activity and range in naïve but responsive tissues. As expected, a construct that can produce all forms of Hh recapitulates endogenous signaling potencies. In comparison, expression of a form that lacks the cholesterol moiety (HhN) leads to an extended range, but the product is less effective at inducing maximal Hh responses. Expression of a point mutant that lacks the N-terminal palmitate binding site shows that the palmitoylation of Hh is absolutely required for activity in this system. Conclusion We conclude that the addition of the cholesterol moiety limits the range of the protein and is required for maximal activity, while addition of palmitate is required for all activity. These findings have implications for understanding how Hedgehog proteins move, and thus their potential at influencing distant sites, and concomitantly, how modifications of the signaling protein can affect the efficacy of the response in exposed cells. PMID:16197551

  3. Complement Protein C1q Forms a Complex with Cytotoxic Prion Protein Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Paul; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Ling, Wai Li; Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Schoehn, Guy; Arlaud, Gérard J.; Thielens, Nicole M.; Gagnon, Jean; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of studies have investigated the interaction between C1q and PrP, but the oligomeric form of PrP involved in this interaction remains to be determined. Aggregation of recombinant full-length murine PrP in the presence of 100 mm NaCl allowed us to isolate three different types of oligomers by size-exclusion chromatography. In contrast to PrP monomers and fibrils, these oligomers activate the classical complement pathway, the smallest species containing 8–15 PrP protomers being the most efficient. We used Thioflavine T fluorescence to monitor PrP aggregation and showed that, when added to the reaction, C1q has a cooperative effect on PrP aggregation and leads to the formation of C1q-PrP complexes. In these complexes, C1q interacts through its globular domains preferentially with the smallest oligomers, as shown by electron microscopy, and retains the ability to activate the classical complement pathway. Using two cell lines, we also provide evidence that C1q inhibits the cytotoxicity induced by the smallest PrP oligomers. The cooperative interaction between C1q and PrP could represent an early step in the disease, where it prevents elimination of the prion seed, leading to further aggregation. PMID:20410306

  4. Functional analysis of stress protein data in a flor yeast subjected to a biofilm forming condition.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    In this data article, an OFFGEL fractionator coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL MS equipment and a SGD filtering were used to detect in a biofilm-forming flor yeast strain, the maximum possible number of stress proteins under the first stage of a biofilm formation conditions (BFC) and under an initial stage of fermentation used as reference, so-called non-biofilm formation condition (NBFC). Protein functional analysis - based on cellular components and biological process GO terms - was performed for these proteins through the SGD Gene Ontology Slim Mapper tool. A detailed analysis and interpretation of the data can be found in "Stress responsive proteins of a flor yeast strain during the early stages of biofilm formation" [1].

  5. Members of the evolutionarily conserved PMT family of protein O-mannosyltransferases form distinct protein complexes among themselves.

    PubMed

    Girrbach, Verena; Strahl, Sabine

    2003-04-04

    Protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs) initiate the assembly of O-mannosyl glycans, an essential protein modification. Since PMTs are evolutionarily conserved in fungi but are absent in green plants, the PMT family is a putative target for new antifungal drugs, particularly in fighting the threat of phytopathogenic fungi. The PMT family is phylogenetically classified into PMT1, PMT2, and PMT4 subfamilies, which differ in protein substrate specificity. In the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as in many other fungi the PMT family is highly redundant, and only the simultaneous deletion of PMT1/PMT2 and PMT4 subfamily members is lethal. In this study we analyzed the molecular organization of PMT family members in S. cerevisiae. We show that members of the PMT1 subfamily (Pmt1p and Pmt5p) interact in pairs with members of the PMT2 subfamily (Pmt2p and Pmt3p) and that Pmt1p-Pmt2p and Pmt5p-Pmt3p complexes represent the predominant forms. Under certain physiological conditions, however, Pmt1p interacts also with Pmt3p, and Pmt5p with Pmt2p, suggesting a compensatory cooperation that guarantees the maintenance of O-mannosylation. Unlike the PMT1/PMT2 subfamily members, the single member of the PMT4 subfamily (Pmt4p) acts as a homomeric complex. Using mutational analyses we demonstrate that the same conserved protein domains underlie both heteromeric and homomeric interactions, and we identify an invariant arginine residue of transmembrane domain two as essential for the formation and/or stability of PMT complexes in general. Our data suggest that protein-protein interactions between the PMT family members offer a point of attack to shut down overall protein O-mannosylation in fungi.

  6. Imbalanced Expression of Vcan mRNA Splice Form Proteins Alters Heart Morphology and Cellular Protein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Tara A.; Dours-Zimmermann, Maria T.; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Krug, Edward L.; Comte-Walters, Susana; Reyes, Leticia; Davis, Monica A.; Schey, Kevin L.; Schwacke, John H.; Kern, Christine B.; Mjaatvedt, Corey H.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental importance of the proteoglycan versican to early heart formation was clearly demonstrated by the Vcan null mouse called heart defect (hdf). Total absence of the Vcan gene halts heart development at a stage prior to the heart’s pulmonary/aortic outlet segment growth. This creates a problem for determining the significance of versican’s expression in the forming valve precursors and vascular wall of the pulmonary and aortic roots. This study presents data from a mouse model, Vcan(tm1Zim), of heart defects that results from deletion of exon 7 in the Vcan gene. Loss of exon 7 prevents expression of two of the four alternative splice forms of the Vcan gene. Mice homozygous for the exon 7 deletion survive into adulthood, however, the inability to express the V2 or V0 forms of versican results in ventricular septal defects, smaller cushions/valve leaflets with diminished myocardialization and altered pulmonary and aortic outflow tracts. We correlate these phenotypic findings with a large-scale differential protein expression profiling to identify compensatory alterations in cardiac protein expression at E13.5 post coitus that result from the absence of Vcan exon 7. The Vcan(tm1Zim) hearts show significant changes in the relative abundance of several cytoskeletal and muscle contraction proteins including some previously associated with heart disease. These alterations define a protein fingerprint that provides insight to the observed deficiencies in pre-valvular/septal cushion mesenchyme and the stability of the myocardial phenotype required for alignment of the outflow tract with the heart ventricles. PMID:24586547

  7. β-hairpin-forming peptides; models of early stages of protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    Formation of β-hairpins is considered the initial step of folding of many proteins and, consequently, peptides constituting the β-hairpin sequence of proteins (the β-hairpin-forming peptides) are considered as models of early stages of protein folding. In this article, we discuss the results of experimental studies (circular-dichroism, infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry) of the structure of β-hairpin-forming peptides excised from the B1 domain of protein G, which are known to fold on their own. We demonstrate that local interactions at the turn sequence and hydrophobic interactions between nonpolar residues are the dominant structure-determining factors, while there is no convincing evidence that stable backbone hydrogen bonds are formed in these peptides in aqueous solution. Consequently, the most plausible mechanism for folding of the β-hairpin sequence appears to be the broken-zipper mechanism consisting of the following three steps: (i) bending the chain at the turn sequence owing to favorable local interactions, (ii) formation of loose hydrophobic contacts between nonpolar residues, which occur close to the contacts in the native structure of the protein but not exactly in the same position and, finally, (iii) formation of backbone hydrogen bonds and locking the hydrophobic contacts in the native positions as a hydrophobic core develops, sufficient to dehydrate the backbone peptide groups. This mechanism provides sufficient uniqueness (contacts form between residues that become close together because the chain is bent at the turn position) and robustness (contacts need not occur at once in the native positions) for folding a β-hairpin sequence. PMID:20494507

  8. Protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis isolates in stage-specific forms and during cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Salem-Izacc, S M; Jesuino, R S; Brito, W A; Pereira, M; Felipe, M S; Soares, C M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we compared the protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates. The protein profiles were compared for both yeast and mycelial forms and similarity analysis among them was performed by calculating similarity matrices and grouping the isolates in dendrograms. The examined isolates exhibited highly variable cellular morphology at 36 degrees C, when typical yeast cells were expected. On the other hand, at 26 degrees C all the isolates showed mycelial morphology. The analysis of protein synthesis profiles made it possible to cluster the P. brasiliensis isolates into groups that correlated with the morphological data. Interestingly, growth at 36 degrees C strongly decreased the heterogeneity of protein synthesis patterns seen in mycelial isolates. It was possible to cluster the isolates grown at 36 degrees C in three groups based on their two-dimensional protein synthesis analysis. The similarity index observed among the mycelial isolates was lower than that obtained with yeast cells, suggesting a more homogenous gene expression pattern in the host-adapted form than in the saprobic phase.

  9. Proteomic analysis of duck fatty liver during post-mortem storage related to the variability of fat loss during cooking of "foie gras".

    PubMed

    Theron, Laetitia; Fernandez, Xavier; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Chambon, Christophe; Viala, Didier; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Astruc, Thierry; Molette, Caroline

    2013-01-30

    Fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras" is the main problem for both manufacturers and consumers. Despite the efforts of the processing industry to control fat loss, the variability of fatty liver cooking yields remains high and uncontrolled. To understand the biochemical effects of postslaughter processing on fat loss during cooking, this study characterizes for the first time the protein expression of fatty liver during chilling using a proteomic approach. For this purpose the proteins were separated according to their solubility: the protein fraction soluble in a buffer of low ionic strength (S) and the protein fraction insoluble in the same buffer (IS). Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the S fraction and mass spectrometry for the identification of spots of interest. This analysis revealed 36 (21 identified proteins) and 34 (26 identified proteins) spots of interests in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. The expression of proteins was lower after chilling, which revealed a suppressive effect of chilling on biological processes. The shot-gun strategy was used to analyze the IS fraction, with the identification of all the proteins by mass spectrometry. This allowed identification of 554 and 562 proteins in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. Among these proteins, only the proteins that were up-regulated in the high-fat-loss group were significant (p value = 3.17 × 10(-3)) and corresponded to protein from the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that the variability of technological yield observed in processing plants could be explained by different aging states of fatty livers during chilling, most likely associated with different proteolytic patterns.

  10. On photoabsorption of the neutral form of the green fluorescent protein chromophore.

    PubMed

    Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Polyakov, Igor; Grigorenko, Bella; Nemukhin, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    We present results of theoretical studies of the photoabsorption band corresponding to the vertical electronic transition S(0)-S(1) between first two singlet states of the model chromophore from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in its neutral form. Predictions of quantum chemical approaches including ab initio and semi-empirical approximations are compared for the model systems which mimic the GFP chromophore in different environments. We provide evidences that the protein matrix in GFP accounts for a fairly large shift of about 40 nm in the S(0)-S(1) absorption band as compared to the gas phase.

  11. Apoptotic activity of a nuclear form of mitogaligin, a cell death protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Patrick; Robinet, Pauline; Charpentier, Stephane; Mollet, Lucile; Normand, Thierry; Dubois, Martine; Legrand, Alain

    2009-01-23

    Galig, an internal gene to the galectin-3 gene, encodes two proteins and induces cell death in human cells. Mitogaligin, one of these proteins, contains a mitochondrial targeting sequence and promotes the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Here, we show that mitogaligin can also localize to nucleus. The nuclear form of mitogaligin induced cell death through a pathway exhibiting typical properties of apoptosis. These observations indicate for the first time that mitogaligin expresses cytotoxic properties not only when addressed to mitochondria but also when targeted to the nucleus.

  12. Functional analysis of the AUG- and CUG-initiated forms of the c-Myc protein.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, E M; Lugo, T G; Kretzner, L; King, M W; Street, A J; Witte, O N; Eisenman, R N

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the c-myc proto-oncogene by chromosomal translocation or proviral insertion frequently results in the separation of the c-myc coding region from its normal regulatory elements. Such rearrangements are often accompanied by loss or mutation of c-myc exon 1 sequences. These genetic alterations do not affect synthesis of the major c-myc protein, p64, which is initiated from the first AUG codon in exon 2. However they can result in mutation or loss of the CUG codon located in exon 1 that normally serves as an alternative translational initiation codon for synthesis of an N-terminally extended form of c-Myc (p67). It has been hypothesized that p67 is a functionally distinct form of c-Myc whose specific loss during c-myc rearrangements confers a selective growth advantage. Here we describe experiments designed to test the functional properties of the two c-Myc protein forms. We introduced mutations within the translational initiation codons of a normal human c-myc cDNA that alter the pattern of Myc protein synthesis (p64 vs. p67). The functions of each of these proteins were experimentally addressed using co-transformation and transcriptional activation assays. Both the p64 and p67 c-Myc proteins were independently able to collaborate with bcr-abl in the transformation of Rat-1 fibroblasts. In addition, both the exon 1- and exon 2-initiated forms of the c-Myc protein stimulated transcription of a Myc/Max-responsive reporter construct to a similar level. Given the apparent absence of functional differences between p64 and p67, we conclude that the basis for c-Myc oncogenic activation lies primarily in the overall deregulation of its expression and not in alterations in the protein. The existence of the CUG translational initiator may reflect a mechanism for the continued synthesis of c-Myc protein under conditions where AUG initiation is inhibited. Images PMID:7919540

  13. A genetic screen in zebrafish identifies the mutants vps18, nf2 and foie gras as models of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Kirsten C; Amsterdam, Adam; Soroka, Carol; Boyer, James; Hopkins, Nancy

    2005-08-01

    Hepatomegaly is a sign of many liver disorders. To identify zebrafish mutants to serve as models for hepatic pathologies, we screened for hepatomegaly at day 5 of embryogenesis in 297 zebrafish lines bearing mutations in genes that are essential for embryonic development. Seven mutants were identified, and three have phenotypes resembling different liver diseases. Mutation of the class C vacuolar protein sorting gene vps18 results in hepatomegaly associated with large, vesicle-filled hepatocytes, which we attribute to the failure of endosomal-lysosomal trafficking. Additionally, these mutants develop defects in the bile canaliculi and have marked biliary paucity, suggesting that vps18 also functions to traffic vesicles to the hepatocyte apical membrane and may play a role in the development of the intrahepatic biliary tree. Similar findings have been reported for individuals with arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, which is due to mutation of another class C vps gene. A second mutant, resulting from disruption of the tumor suppressor gene nf2, develops extrahepatic choledochal cysts in the common bile duct, suggesting that this gene regulates division of biliary cells during development and that nf2 may play a role in the hyperplastic tendencies observed in biliary cells in individuals with choledochal cysts. The third mutant is in the novel gene foie gras, which develops large, lipid-filled hepatocytes, resembling those in individuals with fatty liver disease. These mutants illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for studying liver development and disease, and provide valuable tools for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of congenital biliary disorders and fatty liver disease.

  14. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  15. Comparative methods for analysis of protein covalent modification by electrophilic quinoids formed from xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bolan; Qin, Zhihui; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Edirisinghe, Praneeth; Bolton, Judy L.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Conjugation of biotin and fluorophore tags is useful for assaying covalent protein modification. Oxidative bioactivation of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) yields reactive quinoid electrophiles that covalently modify proteins; bioactivation is associated with carcinogenic and chemopreventive effects. Identification of the protein targets of electrophilic metabolites is of general important for xenobiotics. Four methodologies, using SERM derivatives and biotin/fluorophore tags, were compared for purification and quantification: (1) covert oxidatively activated tags (COATags; SERM conjugated to biotin); (2) dansylTags (SERM conjugated to fluorophore); and azidoTags (SERM azide derivatives) in a 2-step conjugation to biotin, either using (3) Staudinger ligation; or (4) click chemistry. All synthetic derivatives retained the estrogen receptor ligand characteristics of the parent SERMs. Model proteins with bioactivation by tyrosinase in buffer or cell lysates and liver proteins with in situ bioactivation in rat primary hepatocytes were studied by immunoassay and fluorescence. Comparison showed: the azidoTag/Staudinger method was sensitive but nonspecific; the azidoTag/click methodology had low sensitivity; and, the dansylTag methodology failed to detect modified proteins in hepatocytes. The COATag methodology was adjudged superior, detecting 5 ng of modified protein in vitro and identifying protein targets in hepatocytes. In metabolism studies in rat liver microsomes, the azide group was metabolically labile, one contributing factor in not selecting an azidoTag methodology in the highly oxidative environments required for bioactivation. For study of the protein targets of electrophilic metabolites formed by in situ oxidative bioactivation, the COATag is both sensitive and specific, and does not appear to suffer from poor cell permeability. PMID:19301905

  16. CotG-Like Modular Proteins Are Common among Spore-Forming Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Saggese, Anella; Isticato, Rachele; Cangiano, Giuseppina; Ricca, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CotG is an abundant protein initially identified as an outer component of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat. It has an unusual structure characterized by several repeats of positively charged amino acids that are probably the outcome of multiple rounds of gene elongation events in an ancestral minigene. CotG is not highly conserved, and its orthologues are present in only two Bacillus and two Geobacillus species. In B. subtilis, CotG is the target of extensive phosphorylation by a still unidentified enzyme and has a role in the assembly of some outer coat proteins. We report now that most spore-forming bacilli contain a protein not homologous to CotG of B. subtilis but sharing a central “modular” region defined by a pronounced positive charge and randomly coiled tandem repeats. Conservation of the structural features in most spore-forming bacilli suggests a relevant role for the CotG-like protein family in the structure and function of the bacterial endospore. To expand our knowledge on the role of CotG, we dissected the B. subtilis protein by constructing deletion mutants that express specific regions of the protein and observed that they have different roles in the assembly of other coat proteins and in spore germination. IMPORTANCE CotG of B. subtilis is not highly conserved in the Bacillus genus; however, a CotG-like protein with a modular structure and chemical features similar to those of CotG is common in spore-forming bacilli, at least when CotH is also present. The conservation of CotG-like features when CotH is present suggests that the two proteins act together and may have a relevant role in the structure and function of the bacterial endospore. Dissection of the modular composition of CotG of B. subtilis by constructing mutants that express only some of the modules has allowed a first characterization of CotG modules and will be the basis for a more detailed functional analysis. PMID:26953338

  17. Heterogeneity of normal prion protein in two- dimensional immunoblot: presence of various glycosylated and truncated forms.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Li, Ruliang; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-06-01

    The common use of one-dimensional (1-D) immunoblot with a single monoclonal antibody (Mab) engenders the notion that the normal or cellular prion protein (PrP(C) ) comprises few and simple forms. In this study we used two-dimensional (2-D) immunoblot with a panel Mabs to various regions of the prion protein to demonstrate the complexity of the PrP(C) present in human brain. We distinguished over 50 immunoblot spots, each representing a distinct PrP(C) species based on combinations of different molecular weights and isoelectric points (pIs). The PrP(C) heterogeneity is due to the presence of a full-length and two major truncated forms as well as to the diversity of the glycans linked to most of these forms. The two major truncated forms result from distinct cleavage sites located at the N-terminus. In addition, enzymatic removal of sialic acid and lectin binding studies indicate that the glycans linked to the full-length and truncated PrP(C) forms differ in their structure and ratios of the glycoforms. The truncation of PrP(C) and the heterogeneity of the linked glycans may play a role in regulating PrP(C) function. Furthermore, the presence of relatively large quantities of different PrP(C) species may provide additional mechanisms by which the diversity of prion strains could be generated.

  18. The cellular prion protein traps Alzheimer's Aβ in an oligomeric form and disassembles amyloid fibers

    PubMed Central

    Younan, Nadine D.; Sarell, Claire J.; Davies, Paul; Brown, David R.; Viles, John H.

    2013-01-01

    There is now strong evidence to show that the presence of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) mediates amyloid-β (Aβ) neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we probe the molecular details of the interaction between PrPC and Aβ and discover that substoichiometric amounts of PrPC, as little as 1/20, relative to Aβ will strongly inhibit amyloid fibril formation. This effect is specific to the unstructured N-terminal domain of PrPC. Electron microscopy indicates PrPC is able to trap Aβ in an oligomeric form. Unlike fibers, this oligomeric Aβ contains antiparallel β sheet and binds to a oligomer specific conformational antibody. Our NMR studies show that a specific region of PrPC, notably residues 95–113, binds to Aβ oligomers, but only once Aβ misfolds. The ability of PrPC to trap and concentrate Aβ in an oligomeric form and disassemble mature fibers suggests a mechanism by which PrPC might confer Aβ toxicity in AD, as oligomers are thought to be the toxic form of Aβ. Identification of a specific recognition site on PrPC that traps Aβ in an oligomeric form is potentially a therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.—Younan, N. D., Sarell, C. J., Davies, P., Brown, D. R., Viles, J. H. The cellular prion protein traps Alzheimer's Aβ in an oligomeric form and disassembles amyloid fibers. PMID:23335053

  19. Quantitation of mule duck in goose foie gras using TaqMan real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Miguel A; García, Teresa; González, Isabel; Asensio, Luis; Hernández, Pablo E; Martín, Rosario

    2004-03-24

    A real-time quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method has been developed for the quantitation of mule duck (Anas platyrhynchos x Cairina moschata) in binary duck/goose foie gras mixtures. The method combines the use of real-time PCR with duck-specific and endogenous control "duck + goose" primers to measure duck content and total foie gras content, respectively. Both PCR systems (duck-specific and duck + goose) were designed on the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA). The duck-specific system amplifies a 96 bp fragment from duck DNA, whereas the duck + goose system amplifies a 120 bp fragment from duck and goose DNA. The method measures PCR product accumulation through a FAM-labeled fluorogenic probe (TaqMan). The C(t) (threshold cycle) values obtained from the duck + goose system are used to normalize the ones obtained from the duck-specific system. Analysis of experimental duck/goose foie gras binary mixtures demonstrated the suitability of the assay for the detection and quantitation of duck in the range of 1-25%. This genetic marker can be very useful to avoid mislabeling or fraudulent species substitution of goose by duck in foie gras.

  20. 21 CFR 186.1 - Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed... added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) The indirect human... ingredient in this part does not authorize the use of such substance for the purpose of adding the...

  1. 21 CFR 186.1 - Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed... added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) The indirect human... ingredient in this part does not authorize the use of such substance for the purpose of adding the...

  2. 21 CFR 186.1 - Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed... added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) The indirect human... ingredient in this part does not authorize the use of such substance for the purpose of adding the...

  3. 21 CFR 186.1 - Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of food-contact surface(s), the functional use(s) of the ingredient, and the level(s) of use. Any use... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Substances added indirectly to human food affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). 186.1 Section 186.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND...

  4. Comprehensive analysis of multi-tissue transcriptome data and the genome-wide investigation of GRAS family in Phyllostachys edulis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hansheng; Dong, Lili; Sun, Huayu; Li, Lichao; Lou, Yongfeng; Wang, Lili; Li, Zuyao; Gao, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    GRAS family is one of plant specific transcription factors and plays diverse roles in the regulation of plant growth and development as well as in the plant disease resistance and abiotic stress responses. However, the investigation of GRAS family and multi-tissue gene expression profiles still remains unavailable in bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis). Here, we applied RNA-Seq analysis to monitor global transcriptional changes and investigate expression patterns in the five tissues of Ph. edulis, and analyzed a large-scale transcriptional events and patterns. Moreover, the tissue-specific genes and DEGs in different tissues were detected. For example, DEGs in panicle and leaf tissues were abundant in photosynthesis, glutathione, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, whereas those in shoot and rhizome were majority in glycerophospholipid metabolism. In the portion of Ph. edulis GRAS (PeGRAS) analyses, we performed the analysis of phylogenetic, gene structure, conserved motifs, and analyzed the expression profiles of PeGRASs in response to high light and made a co-expression analysis. Additionally, the expression profiles of PeGRASs were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Thus, PeGRASs based on dynamics profiles of gene expression is helpful in uncovering the specific biological functions which might be of critical values for bioengineering to improve bamboo breeding in future. PMID:27325361

  5. Protein stretching V: two forms of carbonic dehydratase detected by force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. T.; Ikai, A.

    Two conformers of the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) counterpart, bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CAB), which has 259 amino acid residues, were detected using the force mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Genetically engineered CAB (named CAB253Cys) was prepared by adding a cysteine residue at its N-terminus as well as replacing Glu253 with Cys to sandwich the protein molecule between silanized surfaces of silicon wafer and functionalized tip in the AFM. The genetically inserted Cys253 was located upstream of the protein's previously established knot structure, such that the protein could be stretched without forming the ``knot''. Two distinct types of force-extension curves were observed when the protein was stretched using the force-extension mode of the AFM. One represents a native-like state and the other a rather relaxed conformation relative to the native one. The relaxed CAB conformation was not affected by the addition of enzyme's specific inhibitor p-aminomethylbenzenesulfonamide, indicating that, in this state, the protein lacks its active site. As the AFM was able to identify two newly found conformers of CAB by mechanical means, results of this study indicate that AFM is a useful means to describe multiple competent conformations for a variety of biologically important proteins.

  6. A new bright green-emitting fluorescent protein: Engineered monomeric and dimeric forms

    PubMed Central

    Ilagan, Robielyn P.; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Gruber, David F.; Kao, Hung-Teh; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Regan, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Summary Fluorescent proteins (FP) have become essential tools in molecular and biological applications. Here, we present a novel fluorescent protein isolated from warm water coral, Cyphastrea microphthalma. The protein, which we named VFP (vivid Verde FP), matures readily at 37 °C and emits bright green light. Further characterizations revealed that VFP has a tendency to form dimers. By creating a homology model of VFP, based on the structure of red fluorescent protein DsRed, we were able to make mutations that alter the protein’s oligomerization state. We present two proteins, mVFP and mVFP1, that are both exclusively monomeric, and one, dVFP, which is dimeric. We characterized the spectroscopic properties of VFP and its variants in comparison with enhance green fluorescent protein (EGFP), a widely use variant of GFP. All the VFP variants are at least twice as bright as EGFP. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the VFP variants both in vitro and in vivo detection applications. PMID:20345907

  7. Perforin-2/Mpeg1 and other pore-forming proteins throughout evolution

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan; Podack, Eckhard R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of the ancient innate immune system required not only a mechanism to recognize foreign organisms from self but also to destroy them. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane attack complex Perforin domain were one of the first triumphs of an innate immune system needing to eliminate microbes and virally infected cells. Membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain proteins is unique from other immune effector molecules in that the mechanism of attack is strictly physical and unspecific. The large water-filled holes created by membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain pore formation allow access for additional effectors to complete the destruction of the foreign organism via chemical or enzymatic attack. Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 is one of the oldest membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain protein involved in immune defense, and it is still functional today in vertebrates. Here, we trace the impact of Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 from the earliest multicellular organisms to modern vertebrates, as well as review the development of other membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain member proteins. PMID:26307549

  8. Iron-sulfur Proteins Are the Major Source of Protein-bound Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes Formed in Escherichia coli Cells under Nitric Oxide Stress

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Aaron P.; Duan, Xuewu; Huang, Hao; Ding, Huangen

    2011-01-01

    Protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) have been observed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells under nitric oxide (NO) stress. The identity of proteins that bind DNICs, however, still remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that iron-sulfur proteins are the major source of protein-bound DNICs formed in Escherichia coli cells under NO stress. Expression of recombinant iron-sulfur proteins, but not the proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, almost doubles the amount of protein-bound DNICs formed in E. coli cells after NO exposure. Purification of recombinant proteins from the NO-exposed E. coli cells further confirms that iron-sulfur proteins, but not the proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, are modified forming protein-bound DINCs. Deletion of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins IscA and SufA to block the [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis in E. coli cells largely eliminates the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, suggesting that iron-sulfur clusters are mainly responsible for the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs in cells. Furthermore, depletion of “chelatable iron pool” in the wild-type E. coli cells effectively removes iron-sulfur clusters from proteins and concomitantly diminishes the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, indicating that iron-sulfur clusters in proteins constitute at least part of “chelatable iron pool” in cells. PMID:21420489

  9. Bax and Bif-1 proteins interact on Bilayer Lipid Membrane and form pore.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajeev; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2015-08-07

    Bax and Bax interacting factor-1(Bif-1) are cytosolic proteins, which translocate towards mitochondria during mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Bif-1 has been identified to co-immunoprecipitate with Bax in apoptotic cells. We have studied the interaction of Bax and Bif-1 on Bilayer Lipid Membrane (BLM) through electrophysiological experiments. It has been observed that Bax-Bif-1 equimolar mixture can form a pore. The pore conductance is in the range of 4.96-5.41 nS. It also displays a sub-state with a conductance of 2.6 nS. No pore activity is observed on BLM when monomeric Bax and Bif-1 proteins are tested independently. The above-mentioned pore forming activity could be relevant in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of struthiocalcin-1, an intramineral protein from Struthio camelus eggshell, in two crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arellano, Rayana R; Medrano, Francisco J; Moreno, Abel; Romero, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms produce minerals. One remarkable example is the formation of eggshells in birds. Struthiocalcins present in the ostrich (Struthio camellus) eggshell matrix act as biosensors of calcite growth during eggshell formation. Here, the crystal structure of struthiocalcin-1 (SCA-1) is reported in two different crystal forms. The structure is a compact single domain with an α/β fold characteristic of the C-type lectin family. In contrast to the related avian ovocleidin OC17, the electrostatic potential on the molecular surface is dominated by an acidic patch. Scanning electron microscopy combined with Raman spectroscopy indicates that these intramineral proteins (SCA-1 and SCA-2) induce calcium carbonate precipitation, leading to the formation of a stable form of calcite in the mature eggshell. Finally, the implications of these two intramineral proteins SCA-1 and SCA-2 in the nucleation of calcite during the formation of eggshells in ratite birds are discussed.

  11. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  12. Gadd45a Protein Promotes Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Forming a Complex with the Protein Kinase MEKK4*♦

    PubMed Central

    Bullard, Steven A.; Seo, Seongjin; Schilling, Birgit; Dyle, Michael C.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Ebert, Scott M.; DeLau, Austin D.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a serious and highly prevalent condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Previous work found that skeletal muscle atrophy involves an increase in skeletal muscle Gadd45a expression, which is necessary and sufficient for skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. However, the direct mechanism by which Gadd45a promotes skeletal muscle atrophy was unknown. To address this question, we biochemically isolated skeletal muscle proteins that associate with Gadd45a as it induces atrophy in mouse skeletal muscle fibers in vivo. We found that Gadd45a interacts with multiple proteins in skeletal muscle fibers, including, most prominently, MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase that was not previously known to play a role in skeletal muscle atrophy. Furthermore, we found that, by forming a complex with MEKK4 in skeletal muscle fibers, Gadd45a increases MEKK4 protein kinase activity, which is both sufficient to induce skeletal muscle fiber atrophy and required for Gadd45a-mediated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. Together, these results identify a direct biochemical mechanism by which Gadd45a induces skeletal muscle atrophy and provide new insight into the way that skeletal muscle atrophy occurs at the molecular level. PMID:27358404

  13. Gadd45a Protein Promotes Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Forming a Complex with the Protein Kinase MEKK4.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Steven A; Seo, Seongjin; Schilling, Birgit; Dyle, Michael C; Dierdorff, Jason M; Ebert, Scott M; DeLau, Austin D; Gibson, Bradford W; Adams, Christopher M

    2016-08-19

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a serious and highly prevalent condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Previous work found that skeletal muscle atrophy involves an increase in skeletal muscle Gadd45a expression, which is necessary and sufficient for skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. However, the direct mechanism by which Gadd45a promotes skeletal muscle atrophy was unknown. To address this question, we biochemically isolated skeletal muscle proteins that associate with Gadd45a as it induces atrophy in mouse skeletal muscle fibers in vivo We found that Gadd45a interacts with multiple proteins in skeletal muscle fibers, including, most prominently, MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase that was not previously known to play a role in skeletal muscle atrophy. Furthermore, we found that, by forming a complex with MEKK4 in skeletal muscle fibers, Gadd45a increases MEKK4 protein kinase activity, which is both sufficient to induce skeletal muscle fiber atrophy and required for Gadd45a-mediated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. Together, these results identify a direct biochemical mechanism by which Gadd45a induces skeletal muscle atrophy and provide new insight into the way that skeletal muscle atrophy occurs at the molecular level. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Preliminary validation efforts of GRAS radio occultation data recorded in raw-sampling mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, Florian; Marquardt, Christian; Bonnedal, Magnus

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric remote soundings of tropo-/stratospheric temperature profiles by the GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) radio occultation (RO) method provide valuable input for numerical weather prediction models and climate change studies. The RO-instrument GRAS (GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding) on-board of EUMETSAT's (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites) MetOp satellite has been designed for observing setting and rising occultations from the GPS (Global Positioning System) satellite constellation. A dedicated ESA (European Space Agency, contract 21995/08/NL/FM) funded study was set up to investigate the potential of RO data recorded in RS (raw-sampling) mode. First results from GRAS RO data recorded in RS mode processed at the GFZ are presented. The experimental processing software POCS-X includes full spectrum inversion in order to cope with multi-path regions and enables (in connection with RS data) to retrieve bending angle/refractivity profiles down to the Earth's surface. The retrievals are validated against co-located ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) profiles. The focus is on data from October 2007 provided by EUMETSAT. The intercomparison indicates good quality of the retrieved profiles: The global mean fractional refractivity deviation from 0 to 5 km varies between -1.8% to +0.4%. The meridional distribution of the fractional refractivity deviation at low altitudes shows that the observed negative/positive bias mainly stems from the tropical lower troposhere. This feature can be probably attributed to the presence of superrefraction/subrefraction. From 10 to 35 km we notice an increasing bias with altitude in the global mean fractional refractivity ranging from -0.1% to -0.8%. Sensitivity tests indicate that the climatology (MSIS), which is used in the statistical optimization at high altitudes, contributes to this bias. However, excluding the climatology from the processing, at the

  15. Psp Stress Response Proteins Form a Complex with Mislocalized Secretins in the Yersinia enterocolitica Cytoplasmic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Disha; Moumene, Amal; Flores-Kim, Josué

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial phage shock protein system (Psp) is a conserved extracytoplasmic stress response that is essential for the virulence of some pathogens, including Yersinia enterocolitica. It is induced by events that can compromise inner membrane (IM) integrity, including the mislocalization of outer membrane pore-forming proteins called secretins. In the absence of the Psp system, secretin mislocalization permeabilizes the IM and causes rapid cell death. The Psp proteins PspB and PspC form an integral IM complex with two independent roles. First, the PspBC complex is required to activate the Psp response in response to some inducing triggers, including a mislocalized secretin. Second, PspBC are sufficient to counteract mislocalized secretin toxicity. Remarkably, secretin mislocalization into the IM induces psp gene expression without significantly affecting the expression of any other genes. Furthermore, psp null strains are killed by mislocalized secretins, whereas no other null mutants have been found to share this specific secretin sensitivity. This suggests an exquisitely specific relationship between secretins and the Psp system, but there has been no mechanism described to explain this. In this study, we addressed this deficiency by using a coimmunoprecipitation approach to show that the Psp proteins form a specific complex with mislocalized secretins in the Y. enterocolitica IM. Importantly, analysis of different secretin mutant proteins also revealed that this interaction is absolutely dependent on a secretin adopting a multimeric state. Therefore, the Psp system has evolved with the ability to detect and detoxify dangerous secretin multimers while ignoring the presence of innocuous monomers. PMID:28900025

  16. Apolipoprotein E forms stable complexes with recombinant Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, C; Cazorla, P; Miguel, C D; Valdivieso, F; Vázquez, J

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a protein genetically linked to the incidence of Alzheimer's disease, forms SDS-stable complexes in vitro with beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), the primary component of senile plaques. In the present study, we investigated whether apoE was able to bind full-length Abeta precursor protein (APP). Using a maltose-binding-protein-APP fusion protein and human very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), we detected an interaction of apoE with APP that was inhibited by Abeta or anti-apoE antibody. Saturation-binding experiments indicated a single binding equilibrium with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry and a dissociation constant of 15 nM. An interaction was also observed using apoE from cerebrospinal fluid or delipidated VLDL, as well as recombinant apoE. APP.apoE complexes were SDS-stable, and their formation was not inhibited by reducing conditions; however, they were dissociated by SDS under reducing conditions. ApoE.APP complexes formed high-molecular-mass aggregates, and competition experiments suggested that amino acids 14-23 of Abeta are responsible for complex-formation. Finally, no differences were found when studying the interaction of APP with apoE3 or apoE4. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apoE may form stable complexes with the Abeta moiety of APP with characteristics similar to those of complexes formed with isolated Abeta, and suggest the intriguing possibility that apoE-APP interactions may be pathologically relevant in vivo. PMID:9224643

  17. The four-transmembrane protein IP39 of Euglena forms strands by a trimeric unit repeat.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Uji, Masami; Abe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Tsukita, Sachiko

    2013-01-01

    Euglenoid flagellates have striped surface structures comprising pellicles, which allow the cell shape to vary from rigid to flexible during the characteristic movement of the flagellates. In Euglena gracilis, the pellicular strip membranes are covered with paracrystalline arrays of a major integral membrane protein, IP39, a putative four-membrane-spanning protein with the conserved sequence motif of the PMP-22/EMP/MP20/Claudin superfamily. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of Euglena IP39 determined by electron crystallography. Two-dimensional crystals of IP39 appear to form a striated pattern of antiparallel double-rows in which trimeric IP39 units are longitudinally polymerised, resulting in continuously extending zigzag-shaped lines. Structural analysis revealed an asymmetric molecular arrangement in the trimer, and suggested that at least four different interactions between neighbouring protomers are involved. A combination of such multiple interactions would be important for linear strand formation of membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer.

  18. Conditioning nerve crush accelerates cytoskeletal protein transport in sprouts that form after a subsequent crush

    SciTech Connect

    McQuarrie, I.G.; Jacob, J.M. )

    1991-03-01

    To examine the relationship between axonal outgrowth and the delivery of cytoskeletal proteins to the growing axon tip, outgrowth was accelerated by using a conditioning nerve crush. Because slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport is the most rapid vehicle for carrying cytoskeletal proteins to the axon tip, the rate of SCb was measured in conditioned vs. sham-conditioned sprouts. In young Sprague-Dawley rats, the conditioning crush was made to sciatic nerve branches at the knee; 14 days later, the test crush was made where the L4 and L5 spinal nerves join to form the sciatic nerve in the flank. Newly synthesized proteins were labeled in motor neurons by injecting {sup 35}S-methionine into the lumbar spinal cord 7 days before the test crush. The wave of pulse-labeled SCb proteins reached the crush by the time it was made and subsequently entered sprouts. The nerve was removed and sectioned for SDS-PAGE and fluorography 4-12 days after the crush. Tubulins, neurofilament proteins, and representative 'cytomatrix' proteins (actin, calmodulin, and putative microtubule-associated proteins) were removed from gels for liquid scintillation counting. Labeled SCb proteins entered sprouts without first accumulating in parent axon stumps, presumably because sprouts begin to grow within hours after axotomy. The peak of SCb moved 11% faster in conditioned than in sham-conditioned sprouts: 3.0 vs. 2.7 mm/d (p less than 0.05). To confirm that sprouts elongate more rapidly when a test crush is preceded by a conditioning crush, outgrowth distances were measured in a separate group of rats by labeling fast axonal transport with {sup 3}H-proline 24 hours before nerve retrieval.

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Lifecycle and Identification of 3 Forms of the ORF2 Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Montpellier, Claire; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Sayed, Ibrahim M; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Ankavay, Maliki; Bull, Anne; Pillez, André; Abravanel, Florence; Helle, François; Brochot, Etienne; Drobecq, Hervé; Farhat, Rayan; Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie; Haddad, Juliano G; Izopet, Jacques; Meuleman, Philip; Goffard, Anne; Dubuisson, Jean; Cocquerel, Laurence

    2017-09-25

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a major cause of acute hepatitis worldwide. Approximately 2 billion people live in areas endemic for HEV and are at risk of infection. The HEV genome encodes 3 proteins, including the ORF2 capsid protein. Detailed analyses of the HEV lifecycle has been hampered by the lack of an efficient viral culture system. We performed studies with gt3 HEV cell culture-produced particles (HEVcc) and patient blood and stool samples. Samples were fractionated on iodixanol gradients and cushions. Infectivity assays were performed in vitro and in human liver chimeric mice. Proteins were analyzed by biochemical and proteomic approaches. Infectious particles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. HEV antigen levels were measured with the Wantaï ELISA. We developed an efficient cell culture system and isolated HEV particles that were infectious in vitro and in vivo. Using transmission electron microscopy, we defined the ultrastructure of HEVcc and particles from patient sera and stool samples. We also identified the precise sequence of the infectious particle-associated ORF2 capsid protein. In cultured cells and in samples from patients, HEV produced 3 forms of the ORF2 capsid protein: infectious/intracellular ORF2 (ORF2i), glycosylated ORF2 (ORF2g), and cleaved ORF2 (ORF2c). The ORF2i protein associated with infectious particles, whereas the ORF2g and ORF2c proteins were massively secreted glycoproteins not associated with infectious particles. ORF2g and ORF2c were the most abundant antigens detected in sera from patients. We developed a cell culture system and characterized HEV particles; we identified 3 ORF2 capsid proteins (ORF2i, ORF2g, and ORFc). These findings will advance our understanding of the HEV lifecycle and improve diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Organ distribution and molecular forms of human xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase protein.

    PubMed

    Sarnesto, A; Linder, N; Raivio, K O

    1996-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is a major cytoplasmic source of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, and it is considered important in the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion damage. Because little is known about the enzyme in human tissues, the aims of this study were to purify human XDH/XO and to produce Ab for detection of the protein in Western blots and for quantification by ELISA. We purified human milk XDH/XO, produced Ab for Western blotting and ELISA of the protein, and evaluated the molecular forms and activity-protein relationships in human tissues. The molecular size of the purified protein under nondenaturing conditions was approximately 300 kd. On SDS-PAGE, it was fragmented into four main bands of 143, 125, 87, and 59 kd. Ab recognized bands of similar size in Western blots of the purified preparation and human milk. In fresh liver homogenates treated with anti-proteases, the three largest bands were observed; in the intestine, only the two largest were observed. Serum, brain, heart, and skeletal muscle were negative, whereas some lung and kidney samples showed one faint band of 143 kd. Trypsin treatment of the enzyme converted the large molecular-weight bands into smaller bands, as did incubation of a liver homogenate without anti-proteases. XDH/XO protein concentrations (ng/mg total protein) were 146 +/- 70 in liver and 556 +/- 320 in intestine and less than 5 ng/ml in serum. The relationship of activity to protein (2.7-3.0 mumol/min/mg XDH/XO protein) was constant in liver and intestine during development. We conclude that 1) human XDH/XO has molecular size and subunit structure similar to other mammalian enzymes; 2) the polypeptide chain is unstable, also in the intact cell, despite retained activity; and 3) the amount of inactive XDH/XO in human liver and intestine is apparently small.

  1. Freeze-drying of proteins with glass-forming oligosaccharide-derived sugar alcohols.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Saori; Fujii, Kahori; Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru

    2010-04-15

    Physical properties and protein-stabilizing effects of sugar alcohols in frozen aqueous solutions and freeze-dried solids were studied. Various frozen sugar alcohol solutions showed a glass transition of the maximally freeze-concentrated phase at temperatures (T(g)'s) that depended largely on the solute molecular weights. Some oligosaccharide-derived sugar alcohols (e.g., maltitol, lactitol, maltotriitol) formed glass-state amorphous cake-structure freeze-dried solids. Microscopic observation of frozen maltitol and lactitol solutions under vacuum (FDM) indicated onset of physical collapse at temperatures (T(c)) several degrees higher than their T(g)'s. Freeze-drying of pentitols (e.g., xylitol) and hexitols (e.g., sorbitol, mannitol) resulted in collapsed or crystallized solids. The glass-forming sugar alcohols prevented activity loss of a model protein (LDH: lactate dehydrogenase) during freeze-drying and subsequent storage at 50 degrees C. They also protected bovine serum albumin (BSA) from lyophilization-induced secondary structure perturbation. The glass-forming sugar alcohols showed lower susceptibility to Maillard reaction with co-lyophilized L-lysine compared to reducing and non-reducing disaccharides during storage at elevated temperature. Application of the oligosaccharide-derived sugar alcohols as alternative stabilizers in lyophilized protein formulations was discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Physicochemical and biological properties of biomimetic mineralo-protein nanoparticles formed spontaneously in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsin-Hsin; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Young, David; Martel, Jan; Young, Andrew; Ojcius, David M; Lee, Yu-Hsiu; Young, John D

    2013-07-08

    Recent studies indicate that mineral nanoparticles (NPs) form spontaneously in human body fluids. These biological NPs represent mineral precursors that are associated with ectopic calcifications seen in various human diseases. However, the parameters that control the formation of mineral NPs and their possible effects on human cells remain poorly understood. Here a nanomaterial approach to study the formation of biomimetic calcium phosphate NPs comparable to their physiological counterparts is described. Particle sizing using dynamic light scattering reveals that serum and ion concentrations within the physiological range yield NPs below 100 nm in diameter. While the particles are phagocytosed by macrophages in a size-independent manner, only large particles or NP aggregates in the micrometer range induce cellular responses that include production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, caspase-1 activation, and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). A comprehensive proteomic analysis reveals that the particle-bound proteins are similar in terms of their identity and number, regardless of particle size, suggesting that protein adsorption is independent of particle size and curvature. In conclusion, the conditions underlying the formation of mineralo-protein particles are similar to the ones that form in vivo. While mineral NPs do not activate immune cells, they may become pro-inflammatory and contribute to pathological processes once they aggregate and form larger mineral particles. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pxmp2 Is a Channel-Forming Protein in Mammalian Peroxisomal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rokka, Aare; Soininen, Raija; Immonen, Hanna L.; Pirilä, Päivi L.; Bergmann, Ulrich; Sormunen, Raija T.; Weckström, Matti; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxisomal metabolic machinery requires a continuous flow of organic and inorganic solutes across peroxisomal membrane. Concerning small solutes, the molecular nature of their traffic has remained an enigma. Methods/Principal Findings In this study, we show that disruption in mice of the Pxmp2 gene encoding Pxmp2, which belongs to a family of integral membrane proteins with unknown function, leads to partial restriction of peroxisomal membrane permeability to solutes in vitro and in vivo. Multiple-channel recording of liver peroxisomal preparations reveals that the channel-forming components with a conductance of 1.3 nS in 1.0 M KCl were lost in Pxmp2−/− mice. The channel-forming properties of Pxmp2 were confirmed with recombinant protein expressed in insect cells and with native Pxmp2 purified from mouse liver. The Pxmp2 channel, with an estimated diameter of 1.4 nm, shows weak cation selectivity and no voltage dependence. The long-lasting open states of the channel indicate its functional role as a protein forming a general diffusion pore in the membrane. Conclusions/Significance Pxmp2 is the first peroxisomal channel identified, and its existence leads to prediction that the mammalian peroxisomal membrane is permeable to small solutes while transfer of “bulky” metabolites, e.g., cofactors (NAD/H, NADP/H, and CoA) and ATP, requires specific transporters. PMID:19352492

  4. An oxazetidine amino acid for chemical protein synthesis by rapid, serine-forming ligations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusterla, Ivano; Bode, Jeffrey W.

    2015-08-01

    Amide-forming ligation reactions allow the chemical synthesis of proteins by the union of unprotected peptide segments, and enable the preparation of protein derivatives not accessible by expression or bioengineering approaches. The native chemical ligation (NCL) of thioesters and N-terminal cysteines is unquestionably the most successful approach, but is not ideal for all synthetic targets. Here we describe the synthesis of an Fmoc-protected oxazetidine amino acid for use in the α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine (KAHA) amide ligation. When incorporated at the N-terminus of a peptide segment, this four-membered cyclic hydroxylamine can be used for rapid serine-forming ligations with peptide α-ketoacids. This ligation operates at low concentration (100 μM-5 mM) and mild temperatures (20-25 °C). The utility of the reaction was demonstrated by the synthesis of S100A4, a 12 kDa calcium-binding protein not easily accessible by NCL or other amide-forming reactions due to its primary sequence and properties.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the protein corona on FePt nanoparticles formed by transferrin binding.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiue; Weise, Stefan; Hafner, Margit; Röcker, Carlheinz; Zhang, Feng; Parak, Wolfgang J; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2010-02-06

    Nanoparticles are finding a rapidly expanding range of applications in research and technology, finally entering our daily life in medical, cosmetic or food products. Their ability to invade all regions of an organism including cells and cellular organelles offers new strategies for medical diagnosis and therapy (nanomedicine), but their safe use requires a deep knowledge about their interactions with biological systems at the molecular level. Upon incorporation, nanoparticles are exposed to biological fluids from which they adsorb proteins and other biomolecules to form a 'protein corona'. These nanoparticle-protein interactions are still poorly understood and quantitative studies to characterize them remain scarce. Here we have quantitatively analysed the adsorption of human transferrin onto small (radius approx. 5 nm) polymer-coated FePt nanoparticles by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Transferrin binds to the negatively charged nanoparticles with an affinity of approximately 26 microM in a cooperative fashion and forms a monolayer with a thickness of 7 nm. By using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we have observed that the uptake of FePt nanoparticles by HeLa cells is suppressed by the protein corona compared with the bare nanoparticles.

  6. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP(C) in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP(C) protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP(C) protein was generated by fusion of human PrP(C) with the Fc portion of human IgG1 (PrP(C)-Fc). PrP(C)-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56(dim) NK cells. PrP(C)-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP(C)-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP(C)-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP(C)-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP(C)-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  7. EsxB, a secreted protein from Bacillus anthracis forms two distinct helical bundles

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Yao; Tan, Kemin; Chhor, Gekleng; ...

    2015-07-03

    The EsxB protein from Bacillus anthracis belongs to the WXG100 family, a group of proteins secreted by a specialized secretion system. We have determined the crystal structures of recombinant EsxB and discovered that the small protein (~10 kDa), comprised of a helix-loop-helix (HLH) hairpin, is capable of associating into two different helical bundles. The two basic quaternary assemblies of EsxB are an antiparallel (AP) dimer and a rarely observed bisecting U (BU) dimer. This structural duality of EsxB is believed to originate from the heptad repeat sequence diversity of the first helix of its HLH hairpin, which allows for twomore » alternative helix packing. The flexibility of EsxB and the ability to form alternative helical bundles underscore the possibility that this protein can serve as an adaptor in secretion and can form hetero-oligomeric helix bundle(s) with other secreted members of the WXG100 family, such as EsxW. The highly conserved WXG motif is located within the loop of the HLH hairpin and is mostly buried within the helix bundle suggesting that its role is mainly structural. The exact functions of the motif, including a proposed role as a secretion signal, remain unknown.« less

  8. EsxB, a secreted protein from Bacillus anthracis forms two distinct helical bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yao; Tan, Kemin; Chhor, Gekleng; Butler, Emily K.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Missiakas, Dominique; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    The EsxB protein from Bacillus anthracis belongs to the WXG100 family, a group of proteins secreted by a specialized secretion system. We have determined the crystal structures of recombinant EsxB and discovered that the small protein (~10 kDa), comprised of a helix-loop-helix (HLH) hairpin, is capable of associating into two different helical bundles. The two basic quaternary assemblies of EsxB are an antiparallel (AP) dimer and a rarely observed bisecting U (BU) dimer. This structural duality of EsxB is believed to originate from the heptad repeat sequence diversity of the first helix of its HLH hairpin, which allows for two alternative helix packing. The flexibility of EsxB and the ability to form alternative helical bundles underscore the possibility that this protein can serve as an adaptor in secretion and can form hetero-oligomeric helix bundle(s) with other secreted members of the WXG100 family, such as EsxW. The highly conserved WXG motif is located within the loop of the HLH hairpin and is mostly buried within the helix bundle suggesting that its role is mainly structural. The exact functions of the motif, including a proposed role as a secretion signal, remain unknown.

  9. Crystal Structures of Protein Glutaminase and Its Pro Forms Converted into Enzyme-Substrate Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Ryota; Maki, Yukiko; Mizutani, Kimihiko; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Akiko; Sato, Kimihiko; Yamaguchi, Shotaro; Mikami, Bunzo

    2011-01-01

    Protein glutaminase, which converts a protein glutamine residue to a glutamate residue, is expected to be useful as a new food-processing enzyme. The crystal structures of the mature and pro forms of the enzyme were refined at 1.15 and 1.73 Å resolution, respectively. The overall structure of the mature enzyme has a weak homology to the core domain of human transglutaminase-2. The catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asp) common to transglutaminases and cysteine proteases is located in the bottom of the active site pocket. The structure of the recombinant pro form shows that a short loop between S2 and S3 in the proregion covers and interacts with the active site of the mature region, mimicking the protein substrate of the enzyme. Ala-47 is located just above the pocket of the active site. Two mutant structures (A47Q-1 and A47Q-2) refined at 1.5 Å resolution were found to correspond to the enzyme-substrate complex and an S-acyl intermediate. Based on these structures, the catalytic mechanism of protein glutaminase is proposed. PMID:21926168

  10. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Gene Product (PML) Forms Stable Complexes with the Retinoblastoma Protein

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, Myriam; Tomassoni, Lucia; Colombo, Emanuela; Stoldt, Stephan; Grignani, Francesco; Fagioli, Marta; Szekely, Laszlo; Helin, Kristian; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    PML is a nuclear protein with growth-suppressive properties originally identified in the context of the PML-retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) fusion protein of acute promyelocytic leukemia. PML localizes within distinct nuclear structures, called nuclear bodies, which are disrupted by the expression of PML-RARα. We report that PML colocalizes with the nonphosphorylated fraction of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) within nuclear bodies and that pRB is delocalized by PML-RARα expression. Both PML and PML-RARα form complexes with the nonphosphorylated form of pRB in vivo, and they interact with the pocket region of pRB. The regions of PML and PML-RARα involved in pRB binding differ; in fact, the B boxes and the C-terminal region of PML, the latter of which is not present in PML-RARα, are essential for the formation of stable complexes with pRB. Functionally, PML abolishes activation of glucocorticoid receptor-regulated transcription by pRB, whereas PML-RARα further increases it. Our results suggest that PML may be part of transcription-regulatory complexes and that the oncogenic potential of the PML-RARα protein may derive from the alteration of PML-regulated transcription. PMID:9448006

  11. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    SciTech Connect

    Galat, Andrzej Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  12. In vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Makhotenko, Antonida V; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2015-11-01

    Hordeivirus movement protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block (TGB1 protein, TGBp1) interacts in vivo with viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that are considered to be a form of viral genome (non-virion transport form) capable of cell-to-cell and long-distance transport in infected plants. The structures of these RNPs have not been elucidated. The poa semilatent virus (PSLV) TGBp1 contains a structured C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain and an N-terminal extension region consisting of two domains - a completely intrinsically disordered extreme N-terminal domain and an internal domain (ID) with structure resembling a partially disordered molten globule. Here, we characterized the structures assembled in vitro by the full-length PSLV TGBp1 alone or in the presence of viral RNA. The PSLV TGBp1 was capable of multimerization and self-assembly into extended high-molecular-mass complexes. These complexes disassembled to apparent monomers upon incubation with ATP. Upon incubation with viral RNA, the PSLV TGBp1 in vitro formed RNP structures that appeared as filamentous particles resembling virions of helical filamentous plant viruses in morphology and dimensions. By comparing the biophysical characteristics of PSLV TGBp1 and its domains in the presence and absence of RNA, we show that the ID plays the main structural role in the self-interactions and RNA interactions of TGBp1 leading to the assembly of virus-like RNP particles.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric Form of Lassa Virus Matrix Protein Z

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Kathryn M.; Zandonatti, Michelle; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus matrix protein Z is highly multifunctional and occurs in both monomeric and oligomeric forms. The crystal structure of a dodecamer of Z from Lassa virus, presented here, illustrates a ring-like structure with a highly basic center. Mutagenesis demonstrates that the dimeric interface within the dodecamer and a Lys-Trp-Lys triad at the center of the ring are important for oligomerization. This structure provides an additional template to explore the many functions of Z. IMPORTANCE The arenavirus Lassa virus causes hundreds of thousands of infections each year, many of which develop into fatal hemorrhagic fever. The arenavirus matrix protein Z is multifunctional, with at least four distinct roles. Z exists in both monomeric and oligomeric forms, each of which likely serves a specific function in the viral life cycle. Here we present the dodecameric form of Lassa virus Z and demonstrate that Z forms a “wreath” with a highly basic center. This structure and that of monomeric Z now provide a pair of critical templates by which the multiple roles of Z in the viral life cycle may be interpreted. PMID:26912609

  14. Blood cell markers in Alzheimer Disease: Amyloid Precursor Protein form ratio in platelets.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Barbara; Agosti, Chiara; Marcello, Elena; Di Luca, Monica; Padovani, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    A correct clinical diagnosis in the early stage of Alzheimer Disease (AD) is mandatory given the current available treatment with acetylcholine esterase inhibitors. Moreover, a early to preclinical diagnosis would allow to identify patients eligible for future disease-modifying therapies. In the last ten years, we have focused our attention on peripheral markers, evaluating the role of platelet Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) forms as a reliable tool for AD diagnosis since preclinical stages. APP is the key player in AD pathogenesis, and platelets contain all the enzymatic machinery to its processing, thus being the ideal candidate where to study AD pathogenetic mechanisms. In this review, we summarise the published data regarding the usefulness of platelet APP form ratio in the diagnosis of early AD. Approaches combining APP form ratio along with neuroimaging markers show the promise to accurately identify AD, even in the pre-symptomatic stage.

  15. Identification by proteomic analysis of early post-mortem markers involved in the variability in fat loss during cooking of mule duck "foie gras".

    PubMed

    Theron, Laetitia; Fernandez, Xavier; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Chambon, Christophe; Viala, Didier; Astruc, Thierry; Molette, Caroline

    2011-12-14

    Fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras" is the main quality issue for both processors and consumers. Despite the efforts of the processing industry to control fat loss, the variability of fatty liver cooking yield remains high and uncontrolled. To better understand the biological basis of this phenomenon, a proteomic study was conducted. To analyze the protein fraction soluble at low ionic strength (LIS), we used bidimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry for the identification of spots of interest. To analyze the protein fraction not soluble at low ionic strength (NS), we used the shotgun strategy. The analysis of data acquired from both protein fractions suggested that at the time of slaughter, livers with low fat loss during cooking were still in anabolic processes with regard to energy metabolism and protein synthesis, whereas livers with high fat loss during cooking developed cell protection mechanisms. The variability in the technological yield observed in processing plants could be explained by a different physiological stage of liver steatosis.

  16. A mass weighted chemical elastic network model elucidates closed form domain motions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Seo, Sangjae; Jeong, Jay Il; Kim, Bum Joon; Liu, Wing Kam; Lim, Byeong Soo; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki

    2013-01-01

    An elastic network model (ENM), usually Cα coarse-grained one, has been widely used to study protein dynamics as an alternative to classical molecular dynamics simulation. This simple approach dramatically saves the computational cost, but sometimes fails to describe a feasible conformational change due to unrealistically excessive spring connections. To overcome this limitation, we propose a mass-weighted chemical elastic network model (MWCENM) in which the total mass of each residue is assumed to be concentrated on the representative alpha carbon atom and various stiffness values are precisely assigned according to the types of chemical interactions. We test MWCENM on several well-known proteins of which both closed and open conformations are available as well as three α-helix rich proteins. Their normal mode analysis reveals that MWCENM not only generates more plausible conformational changes, especially for closed forms of proteins, but also preserves protein secondary structures thus distinguishing MWCENM from traditional ENMs. In addition, MWCENM also reduces computational burden by using a more sparse stiffness matrix. PMID:23456820

  17. CAG Expansions Are Genetically Stable and Form Nontoxic Aggregates in Cells Lacking Endogenous Polyglutamine Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zurawel, Ashley A.; Kabeche, Ruth; DiGregorio, Sonja E.; Deng, Lin; Menon, Kartikeya M.; Opalko, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins containing polyglutamine (polyQ) regions are found in almost all eukaryotes, albeit with various frequencies. In humans, proteins such as huntingtin (Htt) with abnormally expanded polyQ regions cause neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD). To study how the presence of endogenous polyQ aggregation modulates polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we expressed polyQ expanded Htt fragments (polyQ Htt) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In stark contrast to other unicellular fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. pombe is uniquely devoid of proteins with more than 10 Q repeats. We found that polyQ Htt forms aggregates within S. pombe cells only with exceedingly long polyQ expansions. Surprisingly, despite the presence of polyQ Htt aggregates in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, no significant growth defect was observed in S. pombe cells. Further, PCR analysis showed that the repetitive polyQ-encoding DNA region remained constant following transformation and after multiple divisions in S. pombe, in contrast to the genetic instability of polyQ DNA sequences in other organisms. These results demonstrate that cells with a low content of polyQ or other aggregation-prone proteins can show a striking resilience with respect to polyQ toxicity and that genetic instability of repetitive DNA sequences may have played an important role in the evolutionary emergence and exclusion of polyQ expansion proteins in different organisms. PMID:27677791

  18. A family of small coiled-coil-forming proteins functioning at the late endosome in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kranz, A; Kinner, A; Kölling, R

    2001-03-01

    The multispanning membrane protein Ste6, a member of the ABC-transporter family, is transported to the yeast vacuole for degradation. To identify functions involved in the intracellular trafficking of polytopic membrane proteins, we looked for functions that block Ste6 transport to the vacuole upon overproduction. In our screen, we identified several known vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) genes (SNF7/VPS32, VPS4, and VPS35) and a previously uncharacterized open reading frame, which we named MOS10 (more of Ste6). Sequence analysis showed that Mos10 is a member of a small family of coiled-coil-forming proteins, which includes Snf7 and Vps20. Deletion mutants of all three genes stabilize Ste6 and show a "class E vps phenotype." Maturation of the vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y was affected in the mutants and the endocytic tracer FM4-64 and Ste6 accumulated in a dot or ring-like structure next to the vacuole. Differential centrifugation experiments demonstrated that about half of the hydrophilic proteins Mos10 and Vps20 was membrane associated. The intracellular distribution was further analyzed for Mos10. On sucrose gradients, membrane-associated Mos10 cofractionated with the endosomal t-SNARE Pep12, pointing to an endosomal localization of Mos10. The growth phenotypes of the mutants suggest that the "Snf7-family" members are involved in a cargo-specific event.

  19. Amphipathic polymers: tools to fold integral membrane proteins to their active form.

    PubMed

    Pocanschi, Cosmin L; Dahmane, Tassadite; Gohon, Yann; Rappaport, Fabrice; Apell, Hans-Jürgen; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2006-11-28

    Among the major obstacles to pharmacological and structural studies of integral membrane proteins (MPs) are their natural scarcity and the difficulty in overproducing them in their native form. MPs can be overexpressed in the non-native state as inclusion bodies, but inducing them to achieve their functional three-dimensional structure has proven to be a major challenge. We describe here the use of an amphipathic polymer, amphipol A8-35, as a novel environment that allows both beta-barrel and alpha-helical MPs to fold to their native state, in the absence of detergents or lipids. Amphipols, which are extremely mild surfactants, appear to favor the formation of native intramolecular protein-protein interactions over intermolecular or protein-surfactant ones. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated using as models OmpA and FomA, two outer membrane proteins from the eubacteria Escherichia coli and Fusobacterium nucleatum, respectively, and bacteriorhodopsin, a light-driven proton pump from the plasma membrane of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarium.

  20. Bromodomain Proteins Contribute to Maintenance of Bloodstream Form Stage Identity in the African Trypanosome

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R.; Paulsen, Eda-Margaret; Kim, Hee-Sook; Chung, Chun-wa W.; Tough, David F.; Rioja, Inmaculada; Prinjha, Rab K.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Debler, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is transmitted to its mammalian host by the tsetse. In the fly, the parasite’s surface is covered with invariant procyclin, while in the mammal it resides extracellularly in its bloodstream form (BF) and is densely covered with highly immunogenic Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). In the BF, the parasite varies this highly immunogenic surface VSG using a repertoire of ~2500 distinct VSG genes. Recent reports in mammalian systems point to a role for histone acetyl-lysine recognizing bromodomain proteins in the maintenance of stem cell fate, leading us to hypothesize that bromodomain proteins may maintain the BF cell fate in trypanosomes. Using small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants for individual bromodomain proteins, we performed RNA-seq experiments that revealed changes in the transcriptome similar to those seen in cells differentiating from the BF to the insect stage. This was recapitulated at the protein level by the appearance of insect-stage proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, bromodomain inhibition disrupts two major BF-specific immune evasion mechanisms that trypanosomes harness to evade mammalian host antibody responses. First, monoallelic expression of the antigenically varied VSG is disrupted. Second, rapid internalization of antibodies bound to VSG on the surface of the trypanosome is blocked. Thus, our studies reveal a role for trypanosome bromodomain proteins in maintaining bloodstream stage identity and immune evasion. Importantly, bromodomain inhibition leads to a decrease in virulence in a mouse model of infection, establishing these proteins as potential therapeutic drug targets for trypanosomiasis. Our 1.25Å resolution crystal structure of a trypanosome bromodomain in complex with I-BET151 reveals a novel binding mode of the inhibitor, which serves as a promising starting point for rational drug design. PMID:26646171

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF THREE GRAS COMPOUNDS IN THE IN VITRO CONTROL OF TWO PENICILLIUM ITALICUM STRAINS.

    PubMed

    Venditti, T; Cubaiu, L; D'Hallewin, G; Ladu, G

    2014-01-01

    One of the main etiological agents of postharvest citrus decay is blue mould caused by Penicillium italicum. This pathogen is currently controlled by the application of synthetic fungicides. The use of postharvest chemicals is essential if fruit is destined for storage, since postharvest life would be significantly reduced. However, concerns regarding human health and environmental risks, associated with chemicals residues in food have driven the search for alternative safe control methods. In the present study three substances as referred as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Save) compounds, previously found active against some phytopathogenic fungi, have been tested in vitro against two Penicillium italicum strains. The tested compounds were acetic acid, acetaldehyde and cinnamic aldehyde used at different concentrations (5, 10, 20 and 50 ppm) and applied as fumigation after 0, 24 and 48 h from inoculation, in order to evaluate the control of the pathogen radial growth. The effectiveness of the treatments was affected by the investigated parameters: characteristics of the GRAS, concentration and time elapsed between inoculation and treatment. The treatment performed after 0 h showed a significant difference, by the three compounds, in the control of the radial growth of the pathogen. Acetic acid revealed the main ability by completely inhibiting the pathogen development at 20 ppm, while acetaldehyde and cinnamic aldehyde were less effective in the control. The treatment applied after 24 h, in general, showed a greater capability in the control, probably related to particular pathogen sensitivity during the different vegetative stages. The treatments carried out after 48 h showed a very low effectiveness for acetaldehyde and cinnamic aldehyde in controlling the pathogen development and significantly reduced for acetic acid. Furthermore the experiment demonstrated that the pathogen strains also affected the effectiveness of the treatments.

  2. Data archiving and serving system implementation in CLEP's GRAS Core System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wei; Zeng, Xingguo; Zhang, Zhoubin; Geng, Liang; Li, Chunlai

    2017-04-01

    The Ground Research & Applications System(GRAS) is one of the five systems of China's Lunar Exploration Project(CLEP), it is responsible for data acquisition, processing, management and application, and it is also the operation control center during satellite in-orbit and payload operation management. Chang'E-1, Chang'E-2 and Chang'E-3 have collected abundant lunar exploration data. The aim of this work is to present the implementation of data archiving and Serving in CLEP's GRAS Core System software. This first approach provides a client side API and server side software allowing the creation of a simplified version of CLEPDB data archiving software, and implements all required elements to complete data archiving flow from data acquisition until its persistent storage technology. The client side includes all necessary components that run on devices that acquire or produce data, distributing and streaming to configure remote archiving servers. The server side comprises an archiving service that stores into PDS files all received data. The archiving solution aims at storing data coming for the Data Acquisition Subsystem, the Operation Management Subsystem, the Data Preprocessing Subsystem and the Scientific Application & Research Subsystem. The serving solution aims at serving data for the various business systems, scientific researchers and public users. The data-driven and component clustering methods was adopted in this system, the former is used to solve real-time data archiving and data persistence services; the latter is used to keep the continuous supporting ability of archive and service to new data from Chang'E Mission. Meanwhile, it can save software development cost as well.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1979c - Whey protein concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..._locations.html. (3) The whey protein concentrate shall be derived from milk that has been pasteurized, or... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Whey protein concentrate. 184.1979c Section 184... as GRAS § 184.1979c Whey protein concentrate. (a) Whey protein concentrate is the substance...

  4. Transthyretin suppresses the toxicity of oligomers formed by misfolded proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Roberta; Conti, Simona; Mannini, Benedetta; Li, Xinyi; Buxbaum, Joel N; Tiribilli, Bruno; Chiti, Fabrizio; Cecchi, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Although human transthyretin (TTR) is associated with systemic amyloidoses, an anti-amyloidogenic effect that prevents Aβ fibril formation in vitro and in animal models has been observed. Here we studied the ability of three different types of TTR, namely human tetramers (hTTR), mouse tetramers (muTTR) and an engineered monomer of the human protein (M-TTR), to suppress the toxicity of oligomers formed by two different amyloidogenic peptides/proteins (HypF-N and Aβ42). muTTR is the most stable homotetramer, hTTR can dissociate into partially unfolded monomers, whereas M-TTR maintains a monomeric state. Preformed toxic HypF-N and Aβ42 oligomers were incubated in the presence of each TTR then added to cell culture media. hTTR, and to a greater extent M-TTR, were found to protect human neuroblastoma cells and rat primary neurons against oligomer-induced toxicity, whereas muTTR had no protective effect. The thioflavin T assay and site-directed labeling experiments using pyrene ruled out disaggregation and structural reorganization within the discrete oligomers following incubation with TTRs, while confocal microscopy, SDS-PAGE, and intrinsic fluorescence measurements indicated tight binding between oligomers and hTTR, particularly M-TTR. Moreover, atomic force microscopy (AFM), light scattering and turbidimetry analyses indicated that larger assemblies of oligomers are formed in the presence of M-TTR and, to a lesser extent, with hTTR. Overall, the data suggest a generic capacity of TTR to efficiently neutralize the toxicity of oligomers formed by misfolded proteins and reveal that such neutralization occurs through a mechanism of TTR-mediated assembly of protein oligomers into larger species, with an efficiency that correlates inversely with TTR tetramer stability. © 2013.

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L.; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. PMID:27612497

  6. Abacavir forms novel cross-linking abacavir protein adducts in patients.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoli; Lawrenson, Alexandre S; Berry, Neil G; Maggs, James L; French, Neil S; Back, David J; Khoo, Saye H; Naisbitt, Dean J; Park, B Kevin

    2014-04-21

    Abacavir (ABC), a nucleoside-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions that are thought to involve the activation of CD8+ T cells in a HLA-B*57:01-restricted manner. Recent studies have claimed that noncovalent interactions of ABC with HLA-B*57:01 are responsible for the immunological reactions associated with ABC. However, the formation of hemoglobin-ABC aldehyde (ABCA) adducts in patients exposed to ABC suggests that protein conjugation might represent a pathway for antigen formation. To further characterize protein conjugation reactions, we used mass spectrometric methods to define ABCA modifications in patients receiving ABC therapy. ABCA formed a novel intramolecular cross-linking adduct on human serum albumin (HSA) in patients and in vitro via Michael addition, followed by nucleophilic adduction of the aldehyde with a neighboring protein nucleophile. Adducts were detected on Lys159, Lys190, His146, and Cys34 residues in the subdomain IB of HSA. Only a cysteine adduct and a putative cross-linking adduct were detected on glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP). These findings reveal that ABC forms novel types of antigens in all patients taking the drug. It is therefore vital that the immunological consequences of such pathways of haptenation are explored in the in vitro models that have been used by various groups to define new mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity exemplified by ABC.

  7. MinCD cell division proteins form alternating co-polymeric cytomotive filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Debnath; Trambaiolo, Daniel; Amos, Linda A.; Löwe, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Summary During bacterial cell division, filaments of the tubulin-like protein FtsZ assemble at midcell to form the cytokinetic Z-ring. Its positioning is regulated by the oscillation of MinCDE proteins. MinC is activated by MinD through an unknown mechanism and prevents Z-ring assembly anywhere but midcell. Here, using X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and in vivo analyses we show that MinD activates MinC by forming a new class of alternating copolymeric filaments that show similarity to eukaryotic septin filaments A non-polymerising mutation in MinD causes aberrant cell division in E. coli. MinCD copolymers bind to membrane, interact with FtsZ, and are disassembled by MinE. Imaging a functional msfGFP-MinC fusion protein in MinE deleted cells reveals filamentous structures. EM imaging of our reconstitution of the MinCD-FtsZ interaction on liposome surfaces reveals a plausible mechanism for regulation of FtsZ ring assembly by MinCD copolymers. PMID:25500731

  8. KAHA ligations that form aspartyl aldehyde residues as synthetic handles for protein modification and purification.

    PubMed

    Murar, Claudia E; Thuaud, Frédéric; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2014-12-31

    Aldehydes are widely recognized as valuable synthetic handles for the chemoselective manipulation of peptides and proteins. In this report, we show that peptides and small proteins containing the aspartic acid semialdehyde (Asa) side chain can be easily prepared by a chemoselective amide-forming ligation that results in the formation of the Asa residue at the ligation site. This strategy employs the α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine (KAHA) ligation in combination with a new isoxazolidine monomer that forms a side-chain aldehyde upon ligation. This monomer is easily prepared on a preparative scale by a catalytic, enantioselective approach and is readily introduced onto the N-terminus of a peptide segment by solid phase peptide synthesis. The ligated product can be further functionalized by bioorthogonal reactions between the aldehyde residue and alkoxyamines or hydrazides. We demonstrated that glucagon aldehyde, an unprotected 29-mer peptide prepared by KAHA ligation, can be site specifically and chemoselectively modified with biotin, dyes, aliphatic oximes, and hydroxylamines. We further describe a simple and high recovery one-step purification process based on the capture of a 29-mer glucagon aldehyde and a 76-mer ubiquitin aldehyde by an alkoxyamine-functionalized polyethylene glycol resin. The peptide or protein was released from the resin by addition of a hydroxylamine to provide the corresponding oximes.

  9. [Some properties of complexes formed by small heat shock proteins with denatured actin].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, A V; Chebotareva, N A; Guseev, N B; Levitskiĭ, D I

    2008-01-01

    We applied different methods to analyze the effects of the recombinant wild-type small heat shock protein with an apparent molecular mass of 27 kD (Hsp27-wt) and its S15,78,82D mutant (Hsp27-3D), which mimics the naturally occurring phosphorylation of this protein, on the thermal denaturation and aggregation of F-actin. It has been shown that, at the weight ratio of Hsp27/actin equal to 1/4, both Hsp27-wt and Hsp27-3D do not affect the thermal unfolding of F-actin but effectively prevent the aggregation of F-actin by forming soluble complexes with denatured actin. The formation of these complexes occurs upon heating and accompanies the F-actin thermal denaturation. It is known that Hsp27-wt forms high-molecular-mass oligomers, whereas Hsp27-3D forms small dimers or tetramers. However, the complexes formed by Hsp27-wt and Hsp27-3D with denatured actin did not differ in their size, as measured by dynamic light scattering, and demonstrated the same hydrodynamic radius of 17-18 nm. On the other hand, the sedimentation coefficients of these complexes were distributed within the range 10-45 S in the case of Hsp27-3D and 18-60 S in the case of Hsp27-wt. Thus, the ability of Hsp27 to form soluble complexes with denatured actin does not significantly depend on the initial oligomeric state of Hsp27.

  10. Trapping Open and Closed Forms of FitE-A Group III Periplasmic Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, R.; Proteau, A; Wagner, J; Cui, Q; Purisima, E; Matte, A; Cygler, M

    2009-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single {alpha}-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore.

  11. Efficiency of detergents at maintaining membrane protein structures in their biologically relevant forms.

    PubMed

    Tulumello, David V; Deber, Charles M

    2012-05-01

    High-resolution structural analysis of membrane proteins by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy often requires their solubilization in the membrane-mimetic environments of detergents. Yet the choice of a detergent suitable for a given study remains largely empirical. In the present work, we considered the micelle-crystallized structures of lactose permease (LacY), the sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT), the vitamin B(12) transporter (BtuCD), and the arginine/agmatine antiporter (AdiC). Representative transmembrane (TM) segments were selected from these proteins based on their relative contact(s) with water, lipid, and/or within the protein, and were synthesized as Lys-tagged peptides. Each peptide was studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy in water, and in the presence of the detergents sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS, anionic); n-dodecyl phosphatidylcholine (DPC, zwitterionic); n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM, neutral); and n-octyl-β-d-glucoside (OG, neutral, varying acyl tail length). We found that (i) the secondary structures of the TM segments were statistically indistinguishable in the four detergents studied; and (ii) a strong correlation exists between the extent of helical structure of each individual TM segment in detergents with its helicity level as it exists in the full-length protein, indicating that helix adoption is fundamentally the same in both environments. The denaturing properties of so-called 'harsh' detergents may thus largely be due to their interactions with non-membranous regions of proteins. Given the consistency of structural features observed for each TM segment in a variety of micellar media, the overall results suggest that the structure likely corresponds to its relevant biological form in the intact protein in its native lipid bilayer environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Partially Unfolded Forms of the Prion Protein Populated under Misfolding-promoting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moulick, Roumita; Das, Ranabir; Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to convert to an alternative misfolded conformation (PrPSc), which is the key event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases, is indicative of a conformationally flexible native (N) state. In the present study, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in conjunction with mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used for the structural and energetic characterization of the N state of the full-length mouse prion protein, moPrP(23–231), under conditions that favor misfolding. The kinetics of HDX of 34 backbone amide hydrogens in the N state were determined at pH 4. In contrast to the results of previous HDX studies on the human and Syrian hamster prion proteins at a higher pH, various segments of moPrP were found to undergo different extents of subglobal unfolding events at pH 4, a pH at which the protein is known to be primed to misfold to a β-rich conformation. No residual structure around the disulfide bond was observed for the unfolded state at pH 4. The N state of the prion protein was observed to be at equilibrium with at least two partially unfolded forms (PUFs). These PUFs, which are accessed by stochastic fluctuations of the N state, have altered surface area exposure relative to the N state. One of these PUFs resembles a conformation previously implicated to be an initial intermediate in the conversion of monomeric protein into misfolded oligomer at pH 4. PMID:26306043

  13. Proteins in aggregates functionally impact multiple neurodegenerative disease models by forming proteasome-blocking complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Gao, Yuan; Yu, Li-Rong; Alla, Ramani; Shmookler Reis, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases progressively form aggregates containing both shared components (e.g., TDP-43, phosphorylated tau) and proteins specific to each disease. We investigated whether diverse neuropathies might have additional aggregation-prone proteins in common, discoverable by proteomics. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing unc-54p/Q40::YFP, a model of polyglutamine array diseases such as Huntington's, accrues aggregates in muscle 2–6 days posthatch. These foci, isolated on antibody-coupled magnetic beads, were characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Three Q40::YFP-associated proteins were inferred to promote aggregation and cytotoxicity, traits reduced or delayed by their RNA interference knockdown. These RNAi treatments also retarded aggregation/cytotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease models, nematodes with muscle or pan-neuronal Aβ1–42 expression and behavioral phenotypes. The most abundant aggregated proteins are glutamine/asparagine-rich, favoring hydrophobic interactions with other random-coil domains. A particularly potent modulator of aggregation, CRAM-1/HYPK, contributed < 1% of protein aggregate peptides, yet its knockdown reduced Q40::YFP aggregates 72–86% (P < 10−6). In worms expressing Aβ1–42, knockdown of cram-1 reduced β-amyloid 60% (P < 0.002) and slowed age-dependent paralysis > 30% (P < 10−6). In wild-type worms, cram-1 knockdown reduced aggregation and extended lifespan, but impaired early reproduction. Protection against seeded aggregates requires proteasome function, implying that normal CRAM-1 levels promote aggregation by interfering with proteasomal degradation of misfolded proteins. Molecular dynamic modeling predicts spontaneous and stable interactions of CRAM-1 (or human orthologs) with ubiquitin, and we verified that CRAM-1 reduces degradation of a tagged-ubiquitin reporter. We propose that CRAM-1 exemplifies a class of primitive chaperones that are initially protective and highly

  14. Peptide tag forming a rapid covalent bond to a protein, through engineering a bacterial adhesin.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Fierer, Jacob O; Celik, Emrah; Chittock, Emily C; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich; Moy, Vincent T; Howarth, Mark

    2012-03-20

    Protein interactions with peptides generally have low thermodynamic and mechanical stability. Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB contains a domain with a spontaneous isopeptide bond between Lys and Asp. By splitting this domain and rational engineering of the fragments, we obtained a peptide (SpyTag) which formed an amide bond to its protein partner (SpyCatcher) in minutes. Reaction occurred in high yield simply upon mixing and amidst diverse conditions of pH, temperature, and buffer. SpyTag could be fused at either terminus or internally and reacted specifically at the mammalian cell surface. Peptide binding was not reversed by boiling or competing peptide. Single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy showed that SpyTag did not separate from SpyCatcher until the force exceeded 1 nN, where covalent bonds snap. The robust reaction conditions and irreversible linkage of SpyTag shed light on spontaneous isopeptide bond formation and should provide a targetable lock in cells and a stable module for new protein architectures.

  15. Claudin-2 Forms Homodimers and Is a Component of a High Molecular Weight Protein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Mitic, Laura L.; Anderson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Tight junctions are multiprotein complexes that form the fundamental physiologic and anatomic barrier between epithelial and endothelial cells, yet little information is available about their molecular organization. To begin to understand how the transmembrane proteins of the tight junction are organized into multiprotein complexes, we used blue native-PAGE (BN-PAGE) and cross-linking techniques to identify complexes extracted from MDCK II cells and mouse liver. In nonionic detergent extracts from MDCK II cells, the tight junction integral membrane protein claudin-2 was preferentially isolated as a homodimer, whereas claudin-4 was monomeric. Analysis of the interactions between chimeras of claudin-2 and -4 are consistent with the transmembrane domains of claudin-2 being responsible for dimerization, and mutational analysis followed by cross-linking indicated that the second transmembrane domains were arranged in close proximity in homodimers. BN-PAGE of mouse liver membrane identified a relatively discrete high molecular weight complex containing at least claudin-1, claudin-2, and occludin; the difference in the protein complex sizes between cultured cells and tissues may reflect differences in tight junction protein or lipid composition or post-translational modifications. Our results suggest that BN-PAGE may be a useful tool in understanding tight junction structure. PMID:21098027

  16. Zinc-dependent mechanical properties of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-forming surface protein SasG.

    PubMed

    Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-01-12

    Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SasG promotes cell-cell adhesion during the accumulation phase of biofilm formation, but the molecular basis of this interaction remains poorly understood. Here, we unravel the mechanical properties of SasG on the surface of living bacteria, that is, in its native cellular environment. Nanoscale multiparametric imaging of living bacteria reveals that Zn(2+) strongly increases cell wall rigidity and activates the adhesive function of SasG. Single-cell force measurements show that SasG mediates cell-cell adhesion via specific Zn(2+)-dependent homophilic bonds between β-sheet-rich G5-E domains on neighboring cells. The force required to unfold individual domains is remarkably strong, up to ∼500 pN, thus explaining how SasG can withstand physiological shear forces. We also observe that SasG forms homophilic bonds with the structurally related accumulation-associated protein of Staphylococcus epidermidis, suggesting the possibility of multispecies biofilms during host colonization and infection. Collectively, our findings support a model in which zinc plays a dual role in activating cell-cell adhesion: adsorption of zinc ions to the bacterial cell surface increases cell wall cohesion and favors the projection of elongated SasG proteins away from the cell surface, thereby enabling zinc-dependent homophilic bonds between opposing cells. This work demonstrates an unexpected relationship between mechanics and adhesion in a staphylococcal surface protein, which may represent a general mechanism among bacterial pathogens for activating cell association.

  17. Native and denatured forms of proteins can be discriminated at edge plane carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ostatná, Veronika; Cernocká, Hana; Kurzątkowska, Katarzyna; Paleček, Emil

    2012-07-20

    In an attempt to develop a label-free electrochemical method for detection of changes in protein structures based on oxidizability of tyrosine and tryptophan residues we tested different types of carbon electrodes. We found that using edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPGE) we can discriminate between native and denatured forms of human serum albumin (HSA) and of other proteins, such as bovine and chicken serum albumin, aldolase and concanavalin. Treatment of natively unfolded α-synuclein with 8 M urea resulted only in a small change in the tyrosine oxidation peak, in a good agreement with absence of highly ordered structure in this protein. Using square wave voltammetry with EPGE we were able to follow the course of HSA denaturation at different urea concentrations. The electrochemical denaturation curve agreed reasonably well with that based on intrinsic fluorescence of tyrosine and tryptophan. It can be expected that the electrochemical method will be applicable to a large number of proteins and may become useful in biomedicine and proteomics.

  18. Small molecular weight proteins/peptides present in the in vivo formed human acquired enamel pellicle.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Walter L; Oppenheim, Frank G

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the type and the nature of peptides present in the in vivo formed human acquired enamel pellicle. Pellicle material was collected from 10 volunteers and subjected to sample preparations consisting of centrifugal filtration using a 10 kDa molecular weight cut-off membrane and high-resolution gel filtration chromatography. The fractions containing peptides <10 kDa obtained by both methods were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. 78 natural pellicle peptides with molecular weights ranging from 766.9 Da to 3981.4 Da were identified originating from 29 different proteins. The number of peptides present in acquired enamel pellicle appears to be large and this is likely to enhance the functional spectrum of this protein film. The presence of small peptides in pellicle may be functionally important since structure/function studies of many salivary proteins have shown that specific domains within these native proteins retain or even exhibit enhanced biological activities. The data present the basis for determining the precise function of these pellicle peptides and for gaining insights into the role pellicle plays in the oral cavity.

  19. Monitoring the function of membrane transport proteins in detergent-solubilized form

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Matthias; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    Transport proteins constitute ≈10% of most proteomes and play vital roles in the translocation of solutes across membranes of all organisms. Their (dys)function is implicated in many disorders, making them frequent targets for pharmacotherapy. The identification of substrates for members of this large protein family, still replete with many orphans of unknown function, has proven difficult, in part because high-throughput screening is greatly complicated by endogenous transporters present in many expression systems. In addition, direct structural studies require that transporters be extracted from the membrane with detergent, thereby precluding transport measurements because of the lack of a vectorial environment and necessitating reconstitution into proteoliposomes for activity measurements. Here, we describe a direct scintillation proximity-based radioligand-binding assay for determining transport protein function in crude cell extracts and in purified form. This rapid and universally applicable assay with advantages over cell-based platforms will greatly facilitate the identification of substrates for many orphan transporters and allows monitoring the function of transport proteins in a nonmembranous environment. PMID:17360689

  20. Frameshift proteins in autosomal dominant forms of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, F W; van Tijn, P; Sonnemans, M A F; Hobo, B; Mann, D M A; Van Broeckhoven, C; Kumar-Singh, S; Cras, P; Leuba, G; Savioz, A; Maat-Schieman, M L C; Yamaguchi, H; Kros, J M; Kamphorst, W; Hol, E M; de Vos, R A I; Fischer, D F

    2006-01-24

    Frameshift (+1) proteins such as APP(+1) and UBB(+1) accumulate in sporadic cases of Alzheimer disease (AD) and in older subjects with Down syndrome (DS). We investigated whether these proteins also accumulate at an early stage of neuropathogenesis in young DS individuals without neuropathology and in early-onset familial forms of AD (FAD), as well as in other tauopathies, such as Pick disease (PiD) or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). APP(+1) is present in many neurons and beaded neurites in very young cases of DS, which suggests that it is axonally transported. In older DS patients (>37 years), a mixed pattern of APP(+1) immunoreactivity was observed in healthy looking neurons and neurites, dystrophic neurites, in association with neuritic plaques, as well as neurofibrillary tangles. UBB(+1) immunoreactivity was exclusively present in AD type of neuropathology. A similar pattern of APP(+1) and UBB(+1) immunoreactivity was also observed for FAD and much less explicit in nondemented controls after the age of 51 years. Furthermore, we observed accumulation of +1 proteins in other types of tauopathies, such as PiD, frontotemporal dementia, PSP and argyrophylic grain disease. These data suggest that accumulation of +1 proteins contributes to the early stages of dementia and plays a pathogenic role in a number of diseases that involve the accumulation of tau.

  1. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  2. Protein kinase A inhibits a consolidated form of memory in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Junjiro; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Naganos, Shintaro; Aigaki, Toshiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2008-12-30

    Increasing activity of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway has often been proposed as an approach to improve memory in various organisms. However, here we demonstrate that single-point mutations, which decrease PKA activity, dramatically improve aversive olfactory memory in Drosophila. These mutations do not affect formation of early memory phases or of protein synthesis-dependent long-term memory but do cause a significant increase in a specific consolidated form of memory, anesthesia-resistant memory. Significantly, heterozygotes of null mutations in PKA are sufficient to cause this memory increase. Expressing a PKA transgene in the mushroom bodies, brain structures critical for memory formation in Drosophila, reduces memory back to wild-type levels. These results indicate that although PKA is critical for formation of several memory phases, it also functions to inhibit at least one memory phase.

  3. A collective form of cell death requires homeodomain interacting protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Link, Nichole; Chen, Po; Lu, Wan-Jin; Pogue, Kristi; Chuong, Amy; Mata, Miguel; Checketts, Joshua; Abrams, John M

    2007-08-13

    We examined post-eclosion elimination of the Drosophila wing epithelium in vivo where collective "suicide waves" promote sudden, coordinated death of epithelial sheets without a final engulfment step. Like apoptosis in earlier developmental stages, this unique communal form of cell death is controlled through the apoptosome proteins, Dronc and Dark, together with the IAP antagonists, Reaper, Grim, and Hid. Genetic lesions in these pathways caused intervein epithelial cells to persist, prompting a characteristic late-onset blemishing phenotype throughout the wing blade. We leveraged this phenotype in mosaic animals to discover relevant genes and establish here that homeodomain interacting protein kinase (HIPK) is required for collective death of the wing epithelium. Extra cells also persisted in other tissues, establishing a more generalized requirement for HIPK in the regulation of cell death and cell numbers.

  4. Peptides Released by Physiological Cleavage of Semen Coagulum Proteins Form Amyloids that Enhance HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roan, Nadia R.; Müller, Janis A.; Liu, Haichuan; Chu, Simon; Arnold, Franziska; Stürzel, Christina; Walther, Paul; Dong, Ming; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Kirchhoff, Frank; Münch, Jan; Greene, Warner C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Semen serves as a vehicle for HIV and promotes sexual transmission of the virus, which accounts for the majority of new HIV cases. The major component of semen is the coagulum, a viscous structure composed predominantly of spermatozoa and semenogelin proteins. Due to the activity of the semen protease PSA, the coagulum is liquefied and semenogelins are cleaved into smaller fragments. Here, we report that a subset of these semenogelin fragments form amyloid fibrils that greatly enhance HIV infection. Like SEVI, another amyloid fibril previously identified in semen, the semenogelin fibrils exhibit a cationic surface and enhance HIV virion attachment and entry. Whereas semen samples from healthy individuals greatly enhance HIV infection, semenogelin-deficient semen samples from patients with ejaculatory duct obstruction are completely deficient in enhancing activity. Semen thus harbors distinct amyloidogenic peptides derived from different precursor proteins that commonly enhance HIV infection and likely contribute to HIV transmission. PMID:22177559

  5. Production of a recombinant full-length prion protein in a soluble form without refolding or detergents.

    PubMed

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Oshiro, Satoshi; Wada, Keita; Fukuoka, Shin-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant prion protein has been produced in insoluble form and refolded following solubilization with denaturants. It is, however, preferable to use a soluble recombinant protein prepared without artificial solubilization. In this study, a soluble recombinant prion protein was produced in Escherichia coli cells by coexpression of neuregulin I-β1 and purified to high purity.

  6. FIE, a nuclear PRC2 protein, forms cytoplasmic complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Moran; Butenko, Yana; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Hakim, Ofir; Katz, Aviva; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Michaeli, Daphna; Fischer, Robert L; Ohad, Nir

    2016-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers that regulate developmental pathways in plants. PcGs form nuclear multi-subunit Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs). The PRC2 complex mediates gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3, which consequently leads to chromatin condensation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several PRC2 complexes with different compositions were identified, each controlling a particular developmental program.The core subunit FIE is crucial for PRC2 function throughout the plant life cycle, yet accurate information on its spatial and temporal localization was absent. This study focused on identifying FIE accumulation patterns, using microscopy and biochemical approaches. Analysing endogenous FIE and transgenic gFIE-green fluorescent protein fusion protein (gFIE-GFP) showed that FIE accumulates in the nuclei of every cell type examined. Interestingly, gFIE-GFP, as well as the endogenous FIE, also localized to the cytoplasm in all examined tissues. In both vegetative and reproductive organs, FIE formed cytoplasmic high-molecular-mass complexes, in parallel to the nuclear PRC2 complexes. Moreover, size-exclusion chromatography and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays indicated that in inflorescences FIE formed a cytoplasmic complex with MEA, a PRC2 histone methyltransferase subunit. In contrast, CLF and SWN histone methyltransferases were strictly nuclear. Presence of PRC2 subunits in cytoplasmic complexes has not been previously described in plants. Our findings are in agreement with accumulating evidence demonstrating cytoplasmic localization and function of PcGs in metazoa. The cytosolic accumulation of PRC2 components in plants supports the model that PcGs have alternative non-nuclear functions that go beyond chromatin methylation.

  7. FIE, a nuclear PRC2 protein, forms cytoplasmic complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Moran; Butenko, Yana; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Hakim, Ofir; Katz, Aviva; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Michaeli, Daphna; Fischer, Robert L.; Ohad, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers that regulate developmental pathways in plants. PcGs form nuclear multi-subunit Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs). The PRC2 complex mediates gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3, which consequently leads to chromatin condensation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several PRC2 complexes with different compositions were identified, each controlling a particular developmental program. The core subunit FIE is crucial for PRC2 function throughout the plant life cycle, yet accurate information on its spatial and temporal localization was absent. This study focused on identifying FIE accumulation patterns, using microscopy and biochemical approaches. Analysing endogenous FIE and transgenic gFIE–green fluorescent protein fusion protein (gFIE-GFP) showed that FIE accumulates in the nuclei of every cell type examined. Interestingly, gFIE-GFP, as well as the endogenous FIE, also localized to the cytoplasm in all examined tissues. In both vegetative and reproductive organs, FIE formed cytoplasmic high-molecular-mass complexes, in parallel to the nuclear PRC2 complexes. Moreover, size-exclusion chromatography and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays indicated that in inflorescences FIE formed a cytoplasmic complex with MEA, a PRC2 histone methyltransferase subunit. In contrast, CLF and SWN histone methyltransferases were strictly nuclear. Presence of PRC2 subunits in cytoplasmic complexes has not been previously described in plants. Our findings are in agreement with accumulating evidence demonstrating cytoplasmic localization and function of PcGs in metazoa. The cytosolic accumulation of PRC2 components in plants supports the model that PcGs have alternative non-nuclear functions that go beyond chromatin methylation. PMID:27811080

  8. Pressure effects on structures formed by entropically driven self-assembly: illustration for denaturation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    We propose a general framework of pressure effects on the structures formed by the self-assembly of solute molecules immersed in solvent. The integral equation theory combined with the morphometric approach is employed for a hard-body model system. Our picture is that protein folding and ordered association of proteins are driven by the solvent entropy: At low pressures, the structures almost minimizing the excluded volume (EV) generated for solvent particles are stabilized. Such structures appear to be even more stabilized at high pressures. However, it is experimentally known that the native structure of a protein is unfolded, and ordered aggregates such as amyloid fibrils and actin filaments are dissociated by applying high pressures. This initially puzzling result can also be elucidated in terms of the solvent entropy. A clue to the basic mechanism is in the phenomenon that, when a large hard-sphere solute is immersed in small hard spheres forming the solvent, the small hard spheres are enriched near the solute and this enrichment becomes greater as the pressure increases. We argue that "attraction" is entropically provided between the solute surface and solvent particles, and the attraction becomes higher with rising pressure. Due to this effect, at high pressures, the structures possessing the largest possible solvent-accessible surface area together with sufficiently small EV become more stable in terms of the solvent entropy. To illustrate this concept, we perform an analysis of pressure denaturation of three different proteins. It is shown that only the structures that have the characteristics described above exhibit interesting behavior. They first become more destabilized relative to the native structure as the pressure increases, but beyond a threshold pressure the relative instability begins to decrease and they eventually become more stable than the native structure.

  9. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  10. Nucleocapsid protein from fig mosaic virus forms cytoplasmic agglomerates that are hauled by endoplasmic reticulum streaming.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly throughout the cell, and we

  11. Type III secretion as a generalizable strategy for the production of full-length biopolymer-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Azam, Anum; Li, Cheng; Metcalf, Kevin J; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-11-01

    Biopolymer-forming proteins are integral in the development of customizable biomaterials, but recombinant expression of these proteins is challenging. In particular, biopolymer-forming proteins have repetitive, glycine-rich domains and, like many heterologously expressed proteins, are prone to incomplete translation, aggregation, and proteolytic degradation in the production host. This necessitates tailored purification processes to isolate each full-length protein of interest from the truncated forms as well as other contaminating proteins; owing to the repetitive nature of these proteins, the truncated polypeptides can have very similar chemistry to the full-length form and are difficult to separate from the full-length protein. We hypothesized that bacterial expression and secretion would be a promising alternative option for biomaterials-forming proteins, simplifying isolation of the full-length target protein. By using a selective secretion system, truncated forms of the protein are not secreted and thus are not found in the culture harvest. We show that a synthetically upregulated type III secretion system leads to a general increase in secretion titer for each protein that we tested. Moreover, we observe a substantial enhancement in the homogeneity of full-length forms of pro-resilin, tropo-elastin crosslinking domains, and silk proteins produced in this manner, as compared with proteins purified from the cytosol. Secretion via the type III apparatus limits co-purification of truncated forms of the target protein and increases protein purity without extensive purification steps. Demonstrating the utility of such a system, we introduce several modifications to resilin-based peptides and use an un-optimized, single-column process to purify these proteins. The resulting materials are of sufficiently high quantity and yield for the production of antimicrobial hydrogels with highly reproducible rheological properties. The ease of this process and its

  12. Early stages of probable Alzheimer disease are associated with changes in platelet amyloid precursor protein forms.

    PubMed

    Borroni, B; Colciaghi, F; Corsini, P; Akkawi, N; Rozzini, L; Del Zotto, E; Talarico, G; Cattabeni, F; Lenzi, G L; Di Luca, M; Padovani, A

    2002-12-01

    Previous findings demonstrated an altered pattern of amyloid precursor protein (APP) forms in platelets of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, compared both with healthy control subjects or patients with non-Alzheimer-type dementia. The present study aims to evaluate whether platelet APP form ratio (APPr) is altered in patients with early stage AD. We selected 40 patients with early stage AD and 40 age-matched healthy controls. Compared with controls (mean+/-SD=0.91+/-0.3), mean APPr was decreased in AD (mean+/-SD=0.46+/-0.26, p<0.0001). Sixteen very mild AD patients (clinical dementia rating=0.5), identified among the AD group, showed a significant decrease of APPr values (mean+/-SD=0.50+/-0.3, p<0.0001). These findings indicate that alteration of APP processing in platelets is an early event and suggest that this assay might be of diagnostic value in differentiating mild AD from normal ageing.

  13. Toxicity and oxidative stress of different forms of organic selenium and dietary protein in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Eisemann, J.D.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of over 100 ppm (mg/kg) selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic plants and insects associated with irrigation drainwater and toxicity to fish and wildlife. Composition of diet for wild ducklings may vary in selenium-contaminated environments. Earlier studies have compared toxicities and oxidative stress of Se as selenite to those of seleno-DL-methionine (DL) in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). This study compares DL, seleno-L-methionine (L), selenized yeast (Y) and selenized wheat (W). Day-old mallard ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 75% wheat (22% protein) or the same diet containing 15 or 30 ppm Se in the above forms except for 30 ppm Se as W. After 2 weeks blood and liver samples were collected for biochemical assays and Se analysis. All forms of selenium caused significant increases in plasma and hepatic glutathione peroxidase activities. Se as L at 30 ppm in the diet was the most toxic form, resulting in high mortality (64%) and impaired growth (>50%) in survivors and the greatest increase in ratio of oxidized to reduced hepatic glutathione (GSH). Se as both L and DL decreased the concentrations of hepatic GSH and total thiols. Se as Y accumulated the least in liver (approximately 50% of other forms) and had less effect on GSH and total thiols. In a second experiment, in which the basal diet was a commercial duck feed (22 % protein), survival was not affected by 30 ppm Se as DL, L, or Y and oxidative effects on GSH metabolism were less pronounced than with the wheat diet.

  14. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in the Pro-Mature Complex Form Enhances Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence

    PubMed Central

    Sudiman, Jaqueline; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; White, Melissa A.; Mottershead, David G.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Gilchrist, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental competence of in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes needs to be improved and this can potentially be achieved by adding recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) or growth differentiation factor (GDF9) to IVM. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a purified pro-mature complex form of recombinant human BMP15 versus the commercially available bioactive forms of BMP15 and GDF9 (both isolated mature regions) during IVM on bovine embryo development and metabolic activity. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in vitro in control medium or treated with 100 ng/ml pro-mature BMP15, mature BMP15 or mature GDF9 +/− FSH. Metabolic measures of glucose uptake and lactate production from COCs and autofluorescence of NAD(P)H, FAD and GSH were measured in oocytes after IVM. Following in vitro fertilisation and embryo culture, day 8 blastocysts were stained for cell numbers. COCs matured in medium +/− FSH containing pro-mature BMP15 displayed significantly improved blastocyst development (57.7±3.9%, 43.5±4.2%) compared to controls (43.3±2.4%, 28.9±3.7%) and to mature GDF9+FSH (36.1±3.0%). The mature form of BMP15 produced intermediate levels of blastocyst development; not significantly different to control or pro-mature BMP15 levels. Pro-mature BMP15 increased intra-oocyte NAD(P)H, and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were increased by both forms of BMP15 in the absence of FSH. Exogenous BMP15 in its pro-mature form during IVM provides a functional source of oocyte-secreted factors to improve bovine blastocyst development. This form of BMP15 may prove useful for improving cattle and human artificial reproductive technologies. PMID:25058588

  15. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 in the pro-mature complex form enhances bovine oocyte developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Sudiman, Jaqueline; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Ritter, Lesley J; White, Melissa A; Mottershead, David G; Thompson, Jeremy G; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Developmental competence of in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes needs to be improved and this can potentially be achieved by adding recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) or growth differentiation factor (GDF9) to IVM. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a purified pro-mature complex form of recombinant human BMP15 versus the commercially available bioactive forms of BMP15 and GDF9 (both isolated mature regions) during IVM on bovine embryo development and metabolic activity. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in vitro in control medium or treated with 100 ng/ml pro-mature BMP15, mature BMP15 or mature GDF9 +/- FSH. Metabolic measures of glucose uptake and lactate production from COCs and autofluorescence of NAD(P)H, FAD and GSH were measured in oocytes after IVM. Following in vitro fertilisation and embryo culture, day 8 blastocysts were stained for cell numbers. COCs matured in medium +/- FSH containing pro-mature BMP15 displayed significantly improved blastocyst development (57.7±3.9%, 43.5±4.2%) compared to controls (43.3±2.4%, 28.9±3.7%) and to mature GDF9+FSH (36.1±3.0%). The mature form of BMP15 produced intermediate levels of blastocyst development; not significantly different to control or pro-mature BMP15 levels. Pro-mature BMP15 increased intra-oocyte NAD(P)H, and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were increased by both forms of BMP15 in the absence of FSH. Exogenous BMP15 in its pro-mature form during IVM provides a functional source of oocyte-secreted factors to improve bovine blastocyst development. This form of BMP15 may prove useful for improving cattle and human artificial reproductive technologies.

  16. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  17. Chlorophyll ring deformation modulates Qy electronic energy in chlorophyll-protein complexes and generates spectral forms.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giuseppe; Brogioli, Doriano; Casazza, Anna Paola; Garlaschi, Flavio M; Jennings, Robert C

    2007-09-15

    The possibility that the chlorophyll (chl) ring distortions observed in the crystal structures of chl-protein complexes are involved in the transition energy modulation, giving rise to the spectral forms, is investigated. The out-of-plane chl-macrocycle distortions are described using an orthonormal set of deformations, defined by the displacements along the six lowest-frequency, out-of-plane normal coordinates. The total chl-ring deformation is the linear combination of these six deformations. The two higher occupied and the two lower unoccupied chl molecular orbitals, which define the Q(y) electronic transition, have the same symmetry as four of the six out-of-plane lowest frequency modes. We assume that a deformation along the normal-coordinate having the same symmetry as a given molecular orbital will perturb that orbital and modify its energy. The changes in the chl Q(y) transition energies are evaluated in the Peridinin-Chl-Protein complex and in light harvesting complex II (LHCII), using crystallographic data. The macrocycle deformations induce a distribution of the chl Q(y) electronic energy transitions which, for LHCII, is broader for chla than for chlb. This provides the physical mechanism to explain the long-held view that the chla spectral forms in LHCII are both more numerous and cover a wider energy range than those of chlb.

  18. Evolution of the Cytolytic Pore-Forming Proteins (Actinoporins) in Sea Anemones

    PubMed Central

    Macrander, Jason; Daly, Marymegan

    2016-01-01

    Sea anemones (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, and Actiniaria) use toxic peptides to incapacitate and immobilize prey and to deter potential predators. Their toxin arsenal is complex, targeting a variety of functionally important protein complexes and macromolecules involved in cellular homeostasis. Among these, actinoporins are one of the better characterized toxins; these venom proteins form a pore in cellular membranes containing sphingomyelin. We used a combined bioinformatic and phylogenetic approach to investigate how actinoporins have evolved across three superfamilies of sea anemones (Actinioidea, Metridioidea, and Actinostoloidea). Our analysis identified 90 candidate actinoporins across 20 species. We also found clusters of six actinoporin-like genes in five species of sea anemone (Nematostella vectensis, Stomphia coccinea, Epiactis japonica, Heteractis crispa, and Diadumene leucolena); these actinoporin-like sequences resembled actinoporins but have a higher sequence similarity with toxins from fungi, cone snails, and Hydra. Comparative analysis of the candidate actinoporins highlighted variable and conserved regions within actinoporins that may pertain to functional variation. Although multiple residues are involved in initiating sphingomyelin recognition and membrane binding, there is a high rate of replacement for a specific tryptophan with leucine (W112L) and other hydrophobic residues. Residues thought to be involved with oligomerization were variable, while those forming the phosphocholine (POC) binding site and the N-terminal region involved with cell membrane penetration were highly conserved. PMID:27941639

  19. Killing machines: three pore-forming proteins of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan; de Armas, Lesley; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of early multicellular eukaryotes 400–500 million years ago required a defensive strategy against microbial invasion. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane-attack-complex-perforin (MACPF) domain were selected as the most efficient means to destroy bacteria or virally infected cells. The mechanism of pore formation by the MACPF domain is distinctive in that pore formation is purely physical and unspecific. The MACPF domain polymerizes, refolds, and inserts itself into bilayer membranes or bacterial outer cell walls. The displacement of surface lipid/carbohydrate molecules by the polymerizing MACPF domain creates clusters of large, water-filled holes that destabilize the barrier function and provide access for additional anti-bacterial or anti-viral effectors to sensitive sites that complete the destruction of the invader via enzymatic or chemical attack. The highly efficient mechanism of anti-microbial defense by a combined physical and chemical strategy using pore-forming MACPF-proteins has been retargeted during evolution of vertebrates and mammals for three purposes: (1) to kill extracellular bacteria C9/polyC9 evolved in conjunction with complement, (2) to kill virus infected and cancer cells perforin-1/polyperforin-1 CTL evolved targeted by NK and CTL, and (3) to kill intracellular bacteria transmembrane perforin-2/putative polyperforin-2 evolved targeted by phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. Our laboratory has been involved in the discovery and description of each of the three pore-formers that will be reviewed here. PMID:24293008

  20. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 misfolding forms toxic amyloidogenic assemblies that induce neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Zeinolabediny, Yasmin; Caccuri, Francesca; Colombo, Laura; Morelli, Federica; Romeo, Margherita; Rossi, Alessandro; Schiarea, Silvia; Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Airoldi, Cristina; Weston, Ria; Donghui, Liu; Krupinski, Jerzy; Corpas, Rubén; García-Lara, Elisa; Sarroca, Sara; Sanfeliu, Coral; Slevin, Mark; Caruso, Arnaldo; Salmona, Mario; Diomede, Luisa

    2017-09-04

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains an important neurological manifestation that adversely affects a patient's quality of life. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 (p17) has been detected in autoptic brain tissue of HAND individuals who presented early with severe AIDS encephalopathy. We hypothesised that the ability of p17 to misfold may result in the generation of toxic assemblies in the brain and may be relevant for HAND pathogenesis. A multidisciplinary integrated approach has been applied to determine the ability of p17 to form soluble amyloidogenic assemblies in vitro. To provide new information into the potential pathogenic role of soluble p17 species in HAND, their toxicological capability was evaluated in vivo. In C. elegans, capable of recognising toxic assemblies of amyloidogenic proteins, p17 induces a specific toxic effect which can be counteracted by tetracyclines, drugs able to hinder the formation of large oligomers and consequently amyloid fibrils. The intrahippocampal injection of p17 in mice reduces their cognitive function and induces behavioral deficiencies. These findings offer a new way of thinking about the possible cause of neurodegeneration in HIV-1-seropositive patients, which engages the ability of p17 to form soluble toxic assemblies.

  1. Molecular interactions and inhibition of the staphylococcal biofilm-forming protein SdrC

    PubMed Central

    Feuillie, Cécile; Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Hays, Leanne M. C.; Vervaeck, Ophélie; Derclaye, Sylvie; Brennan, Marian P.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus forms biofilms on indwelling medical devices using a variety of cell-surface proteins. There is growing evidence that specific homophilic interactions between these proteins represent an important mechanism of cell accumulation during biofilm formation, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not well-understood. Here we report the direct measurement of homophilic binding forces by the serine-aspartate repeat protein SdrC and their inhibition by a peptide. Using single-cell and single-molecule force measurements, we find that SdrC is engaged in low-affinity homophilic bonds that promote cell–cell adhesion. Low-affinity intercellular adhesion may play a role in favoring biofilm dynamics. We show that SdrC also mediates strong cellular interactions with hydrophobic surfaces, which are likely to be involved in the initial attachment to biomaterials, the first stage of biofilm formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a peptide derived from β-neurexin is a powerful competitive inhibitor capable of efficiently blocking surface attachment, homophilic adhesion, and biofilm accumulation. Molecular modeling suggests that this blocking activity may originate from binding of the peptide to a sequence of SdrC involved in homophilic interactions. Our study opens up avenues for understanding the role of homophilic interactions in staphylococcal adhesion, and for the design of new molecules to prevent biofilm formation during infection. PMID:28320940

  2. Pore-forming activity of OmpA protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, E; Nikaido, H

    1992-02-05

    Escherichia coli outer membrane protein OmpA was purified to homogeneity, as a monomer, from a K12 derivative deficient in both OmpF and OmpC porins. When proteoliposomes reconstituted from the purified OmpA, phospholipids, and lithium dodecyl sulfate were tested for permeability to small molecules by osmotic swelling, it was found that OmpA produced apparently nonspecific diffusion channels that allowed the penetration of various solutes. The pore-forming activity was destroyed by the heat denaturation of the OmpA protein, and the use of an OmpA-deficient mutant showed that the activity was not caused by copurifying contaminants. The size of the OmpA channel, estimated by comparison of diffusion rates of solutes of different sizes, was rather similar to that of E. coli OmpF and OmpC porins, i.e. about 1 nm in diameter. The rate of penetration of L-arabinose caused by a given amount of OmpA protein, however, was about a hundredfold lower than the rate produced by the same amount of E. coli OmpF porin. The addition of large amounts of lithium dodecyl sulfate to the reconstitution mixture increased the permeability through the OmpA channel, apparently by facilitating the correct insertion of OmpA into the bilayer.

  3. Aragonite-Associated Mollusk Shell Protein Aggregates To Form Mesoscale “Smart” Hydrogels

    DOE PAGES

    Perovic, Iva; Davidyants, Anastasia; Evans, John Spencer

    2016-11-30

    In the mollusk shell there exists a framework silk fibroin-polysaccharide hydrogel coating around nacre aragonite tablets, and this coating facilitates the synthesis and organization of mineral nanoparticles into mesocrystals. In this report, we identify that a protein component of this coating, n16.3, is a hydrogelator. Due to the presence of intrinsic disorder, aggregation-prone regions, and nearly equal balance of anionic and cationic side chains, this protein assembles to form porous mesoscale hydrogel particles in solution and on mica surfaces. These hydrogel particles change their dimensionality, organization, and internal structure in response to pH and ions, particularly Ca(II), which indicates thatmore » these behave as ion-responsive or “smart” hydrogels. Thus, in addition to silk fibroins, the gel phase of the mollusk shell nacre framework layer may actually consist of several framework hydrogelator proteins, such as n16.3, which can promote mineral nanoparticle organization and assembly during the nacre biomineralization process and also serve as a model system for designing ion-responsive, composite, and smart hydrogels.« less

  4. A Clostridium difficile-Specific, Gel-Forming Protein Required for Optimal Spore Germination

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, M. Lauren; Li, William; Li, Yong-qing; Hinkel, Lauren; Setlow, Peter

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore-forming obligate anaerobe that is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea worldwide. In order for C. difficile to initiate infection, its aerotolerant spore form must germinate in the gut of mammalian hosts. While almost all spore-forming organisms use transmembrane germinant receptors to trigger germination, C. difficile uses the pseudoprotease CspC to sense bile salt germinants. CspC activates the related subtilisin-like protease CspB, which then proteolytically activates the cortex hydrolase SleC. Activated SleC degrades the protective spore cortex layer, a step that is essential for germination to proceed. Since CspC incorporation into spores also depends on CspA, a related pseudoprotease domain, Csp family proteins play a critical role in germination. However, how Csps are incorporated into spores remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that incorporation of the CspC, CspB, and CspA germination regulators into spores depends on CD0311 (renamed GerG), a previously uncharacterized hypothetical protein. The reduced levels of Csps in gerG spores correlate with reduced responsiveness to bile salt germinants and increased germination heterogeneity in single-spore germination assays. Interestingly, asparagine-rich repeat sequences in GerG’s central region facilitate spontaneous gel formation in vitro even though they are dispensable for GerG-mediated control of germination. Since GerG is found exclusively in C. difficile, our results suggest that exploiting GerG function could represent a promising avenue for developing C. difficile-specific anti-infective therapies. PMID:28096487

  5. 21 CFR 184.1979c - Whey protein concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... derived from milk that has been pasteurized, or the whey protein concentrate shall be subjected to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Whey protein concentrate. 184.1979c Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979c Whey protein concentrate. (a) Whey...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1979c - Whey protein concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... derived from milk that has been pasteurized, or the whey protein concentrate shall be subjected to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Whey protein concentrate. 184.1979c Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979c Whey protein concentrate. (a) Whey...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1979c - Whey protein concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... derived from milk that has been pasteurized, or the whey protein concentrate shall be subjected to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Whey protein concentrate. 184.1979c Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979c Whey protein concentrate. (a) Whey...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1979c - Whey protein concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... derived from milk that has been pasteurized, or the whey protein concentrate shall be subjected to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Whey protein concentrate. 184.1979c Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979c Whey protein concentrate. (a) Whey...

  9. Purification and biochemical characterization of a monomeric form of papaya mosaic potexvirus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Lecours, Katia; Tremblay, Marie-Hélène; Gagné, Marie-Eve Laliberté; Gagné, Stéphane M; Leclerc, Denis

    2006-05-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a flexuous rod shape virus made of 1400 subunits that assemble around a plus sense genomic RNA. The structure determination of PapMV and of flexuous viruses in general is a major challenge for both NMR and X-ray crystallography. In this report, we present the characterization of a truncated version of the PapMV coat protein (CP) that is suitable for NMR study. The deletion of the N-terminal 26 amino acids of the PapMV CP (CP27-215) generates a monomer that can be expressed to high level and easily purified for production of an adequate NMR sample. The RNA gel shift assay showed that CP27-215 lost its ability to bind RNA in vitro, suggesting that the multimerization of the subunit is important for this function. The fusion of a 6x His tag at the C-terminus improved the solubility of the monomer and allowed its concentration to 0.2 mM. The CD spectra of the truncated and the wild-type proteins were similar, suggesting that both proteins are well ordered and have a similar secondary structure. CP27-215 was 15N labeled for NMR studies and a 2D 1H-15N-HSQC spectrum confirmed the presence of a well-ordered structure and the monomeric form of the protein. These results show that CP27-215 is amenable to a complete and exhaustive NMR study that should lead to the first three-dimensional structure determination of a flexuous rod shape virus.

  10. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    PubMed

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states.

  11. Phospholipase A2-activating protein is associated with a novel form of leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Falik Zaccai, Tzipora C; Savitzki, David; Zivony-Elboum, Yifat; Vilboux, Thierry; Fitts, Eric C; Shoval, Yishay; Kalfon, Limor; Samra, Nadra; Keren, Zohar; Gross, Bella; Chasnyk, Natalia; Straussberg, Rachel; Mullikin, James C; Teer, Jamie K; Geiger, Dan; Kornitzer, Daniel; Bitterman-Deutsch, Ora; Samson, Abraham O; Wakamiya, Maki; Peterson, Johnny W; Kirtley, Michelle L; Pinchuk, Iryna V; Baze, Wallace B; Gahl, William A; Kleta, Robert; Anikster, Yair; Chopra, Ashok K

    2017-02-01

    Leukoencephalopathies are a group of white matter disorders related to abnormal formation, maintenance, and turnover of myelin in the central nervous system. These disorders of the brain are categorized according to neuroradiological and pathophysiological criteria. Herein, we have identified a unique form of leukoencephalopathy in seven patients presenting at ages 2 to 4 months with progressive microcephaly, spastic quadriparesis, and global developmental delay. Clinical, metabolic, and imaging characterization of seven patients followed by homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis were performed. Next generation sequencing, bioinformatics, and segregation analyses followed, to determine a loss of function sequence variation in the phospholipase A2-activating protein encoding gene (PLAA). Expression and functional studies of the encoded protein were performed and included measurement of prostaglandin E2 and cytosolic phospholipase A2 activity in membrane fractions of fibroblasts derived from patients and healthy controls. Plaa-null mice were generated and prostaglandin E2 levels were measured in different tissues. The novel phenotype of our patients segregated with a homozygous loss-of-function sequence variant, causing the substitution of leucine at position 752 to phenylalanine, in PLAA, which causes disruption of the protein's ability to induce prostaglandin E2 and cytosolic phospholipase A2 synthesis in patients' fibroblasts. Plaa-null mice were perinatal lethal with reduced brain levels of prostaglandin E2 The non-functional phospholipase A2-activating protein and the associated neurological phenotype, reported herein for the first time, join other complex phospholipid defects that cause leukoencephalopathies in humans, emphasizing the importance of this axis in white matter development and maintenance.

  12. Amylopectin biosynthetic enzymes from developing rice seed form enzymatically active protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Natsuko; Oitome, Naoko F.; Matsushima, Ryo; Hayashi, Mari; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Amylopectin is a highly branched, organized cluster of glucose polymers, and the major component of rice starch. Synthesis of amylopectin requires fine co-ordination between elongation of glucose polymers by soluble starch synthases (SSs), generation of branches by branching enzymes (BEs), and removal of misplaced branches by debranching enzymes (DBEs). Among the various isozymes having a role in amylopectin biosynthesis, limited numbers of SS and BE isozymes have been demonstrated to interact via protein–protein interactions in maize and wheat amyloplasts. This study investigated whether protein–protein interactions are also found in rice endosperm, as well as exploring differences between species. Gel permeation chromatography of developing rice endosperm extracts revealed that all 10 starch biosynthetic enzymes analysed were present at larger molecular weights than their respective monomeric sizes. SSIIa, SSIIIa, SSIVb, BEI, BEIIb, and PUL co-eluted at mass sizes >700kDa, and SSI, SSIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 co-eluted at 200–400kDa. Zymogram analyses showed that SSI, SSIIIa, BEI, BEIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 eluted in high molecular weight fractions were active. Comprehensive co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed associations of SSs–BEs, and, among BE isozymes, BEIIa–Pho1, and pullulanase-type DBE–BEI interactions. Blue-native-PAGE zymogram analyses confirmed the glucan-synthesizing activity of protein complexes. These results suggest that some rice starch biosynthetic isozymes are physically associated with each other and form active protein complexes. Detailed analyses of these complexes will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the unique branch and cluster structure of amylopectin, and the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:25979995

  13. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  14. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2015-10-16

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. Copyright © 2015 Johnson et al.

  15. A novel CCCH protein which modulates differentiation of Trypanosoma brucei to its procyclic form

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Edward F.; Robinson, Derrick R.; Hinkins, Matthew; Matthews, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    Cell differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei involves highly regulated changes in morphology, proliferation and metabolism. However, the controls of these developmental processes are unknown. We have identified two novel proteins from the rare CCCH zinc finger family, each <140 amino acids in length and implicated in life cycle regulation. TbZFP1 is transiently enriched during differentiation from the bloodstream to procyclic form, whereas tbZFP2, when ablated in bloodstream forms by RNA interference, inhibits this developmental step. Moreover, expressing an ectopic copy of tbZFP2 results in a dramatic procyclic stage-specific remodelling of the trypanosome cytoskeleton similar to the morphogenic events of differentiation. This phenotype, we term ‘nozzle’, involves polar extension of microtubules at the posterior end of the cell and is dependent upon a motif hitherto restricted to E3 ubiquitin ligases. TbZFP1 and tbZFP2 represent the first molecules implicated in the control of trypanosome differentiation to the procyclic form. PMID:11726506

  16. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release

    PubMed Central

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M.; Romano, Fabian B.; Heuck, Alejandro P.; Hebert, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results found that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with bodipy-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of between 1 and 5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers. PMID:23651212

  17. Gastro-resistant characteristics of GRAS-grade enteric coatings for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products.

    PubMed

    Czarnocka, Justyna K; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    The use of naturally derived excipients to develop enteric coatings offers significant advantages over conventional synthetic polymers. Unlike synthetic polymers, they are biodegradable, relatively abundant, have no daily intake limits or restrictions on use for dietary and nutraceutical products. However, little information is available on their dissolution properties under different gastrointestinal conditions and in comparison to each other. This work investigated the gastric resistance properties of commercially available GRAS-based coating technologies. Three coating systems were evaluated: ethyl cellulose+carboxymethyl cellulose (EC-CMC), ethyl cellulose+sodium alginate (EC-Alg) and shellac+sodium alginate (Sh-Alg) combinations. The minimum coating levels were optimized to meet USP pharmacopoeial criteria for delayed release formulations (<10% release after 2h in pH 1.2 followed by >80% release after 45 min of pH change). Theophylline 150 mg tablets were coated with 6.5%, 7%, and 2.75% coating levels of formulations EC-CMC, EC-Alg and Sh-Alg, respectively. In vitro dissolution test revealed a fast release in pH 6.8 for ethyl cellulose based coatings: t80% value of 65 and 45 min for EC-CMC and EC-Alg respectively, while a prolonged drug release from Sh-Alg coating was observed in both pH 6.8 and 7.4 phosphate buffers. However, when more biologically relevant bicarbonate buffer was used, all coatings showed slower drug release. Disintegration test, carried out in both simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, confirmed good mechanical resistance of EC-CMC and EC-Alg coating, and revealed poor durability of the thinner Sh-Alg. Under elevated gastric pH conditions (pH 2, 3 and 4), EC-CMC and EC-Alg coatings were broken after 70, 30, 55 min and after 30, 15, 15 min, respectively, while Sh-Alg coated tablets demonstrated gastric resistance at all pH values. In conclusion, none of the GRAS-grade coatings fully complied with the different biological demands of delayed

  18. Reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco cheese by a combination of listericidal and listeriostatic GRAS antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Soni, Kamlesh A; Desai, Monil; Oladunjoye, Ademola; Skrobot, Frederick; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna

    2012-04-02

    Single and combined effects of three GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobials including, bacteriophage P100 (phage P100), lauric arginate (LAE), and potassium lactate-sodium diacetate mixture (PL-SD) were evaluated against Listeria monocytogenes cold growth in queso fresco cheese (QFC). The fate of phage P100 when exposed to LAE (200 ppm) or PL-SD (2.8% PL and 0.2% SD) was determined at 4°C and 30°C in a broth model. Phage P100 was found to be stable in the presence of these antimicrobial agents as plaque forming units (PFU) did not vary between control, LAE or PL-SD treatments. When 9 log CFU/ml of stationary phase cells of L. monocytogenes was exposed to these antimicrobials in tryptic soy broth, there was a 3 to 5 log CFU/ml reduction with phage P100 and a complete 9 log CFU/ml reduction with LAE but no measurable reduction with PL-SD after 24h at 4°C or 30°C. In QFC, the L. monocytogenes populations increased from the initial 3.5 log CFU/cm(2) to 7.7 log CFU/cm(2) in 28 days at 4°C. Treatment with 7.8 log PFU/cm(2) of phage P100 or 200 ppm of LAE showed strong listericidal effect initially by reducing L. monocytogenes counts by 2 to 3.5-4 log CFU/cm(2) while there was a subsequent regrowth of L. monocytogenes at 4°C. Treatment with PL-SD showed strong listeriostatic effect without decreasing L. monocytogenes counts but growth was prevented for 28 days at 4°C. Only the combined treatment of listericidal phage P100 or LAE with listeriostatic PL-SD reduced the initial L. monocytogenes counts by 2-4 log CFU/cm(2) and also kept the L. monocytogenes counts at that reduced level in QFC for 28 days at 4°C.

  19. HIV Tat protein and amyloid-β peptide form multifibrillar structures that cause neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hategan, Alina; Bianchet, Mario A; Steiner, Joseph; Karnaukhova, Elena; Masliah, Eliezer; Fields, Adam; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Dickens, Alex M; Haughey, Norman; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Nath, Avindra

    2017-02-20

    Deposition of amyloid-β plaques is increased in the brains of HIV-infected individuals, and the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein affects amyloidogenesis through several indirect mechanisms. Here, we investigated direct interactions between Tat and amyloid-β peptide. Our in vitro studies showed that in the presence of Tat, uniform amyloid fibrils become double twisted fibrils and further form populations of thick unstructured filaments and aggregates. Specifically, Tat binding to the exterior surfaces of the Aβ fibrils increases β-sheet formation and lateral aggregation into thick multifibrillar structures, thus producing fibers with increased rigidity and mechanical resistance. Furthermore, Tat and Aβ aggregates in complex synergistically induced neurotoxicity both in vitro and in animal models. Increased rigidity and mechanical resistance of the amyloid-β-Tat complexes coupled with stronger adhesion due to the presence of Tat in the fibrils may account for increased damage, potentially through pore formation in membranes.

  20. Detection of the disease-associated form of the prion protein in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are neurodegenerative diseases that occur in a variety of mammals. In TSEs, a chromosomally encoded protein (PrPC) undergoes a conformational change to the disease-associated form (PrPd). PrPd is capable of inducing a change in additional molecules of PrPC to the PrPd conformation. TSEs are inevitably fatal and cross-species transmission is known to occur, and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusion and organ transplantation in humans. Thus, there is interest in high-quality diagnostics for both humans and animals. This review summarizes methods of TSE detection currently in use in diagnostic settings and discusses recent advances in PrPd detection that afford substantial enhancements in sensitivity over currently approved methods for use in clinical settings.

  1. Structure of an octameric form of the minichromosome maintenance protein from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Giuseppe; Visentin, Silvia; Palud, Adeline; Henneke, Ghislaine; Spagnolo, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Cell division is a complex process that requires precise duplication of genetic material. Duplication is concerted by replisomes. The Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) replicative helicase is a crucial component of replisomes. Eukaryotic and archaeal MCM proteins are highly conserved. In fact, archaeal MCMs are powerful tools for elucidating essential features of MCM function. However, while eukaryotic MCM2-7 is a heterocomplex made of different polypeptide chains, the MCM complexes of many Archaea form homohexamers from a single gene product. Moreover, some archaeal MCMs are polymorphic, and both hexameric and heptameric architectures have been reported for the same polypeptide. Here, we present the structure of the archaeal MCM helicase from Pyrococcus abyssi in its single octameric ring assembly. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a full-length octameric MCM helicase. PMID:28176822

  2. The Caenorhabditis elegans protein SAS-5 forms large oligomeric assemblies critical for centriole formation.

    PubMed

    Rogala, Kacper B; Dynes, Nicola J; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Yan, Jun; Pong, Sheng Kai; Robinson, Carol V; Deane, Charlotte M; Gönczy, Pierre; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2015-05-29

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles crucial for cell division, sensing and motility. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the onset of centriole formation requires notably the proteins SAS-5 and SAS-6, which have functional equivalents across eukaryotic evolution. Whereas the molecular architecture of SAS-6 and its role in initiating centriole formation are well understood, the mechanisms by which SAS-5 and its relatives function is unclear. Here, we combine biophysical and structural analysis to uncover the architecture of SAS-5 and examine its functional implications in vivo. Our work reveals that two distinct self-associating domains are necessary to form higher-order oligomers of SAS-5: a trimeric coiled coil and a novel globular dimeric Implico domain. Disruption of either domain leads to centriole duplication failure in worm embryos, indicating that large SAS-5 assemblies are necessary for function in vivo.

  3. Different forms of MARCKS protein are involved in memory formation in the learning process of imprinting.

    PubMed

    Solomonia, Revaz O; Apkhazava, David; Nozadze, Maia; Jackson, Antony P; McCabe, Brian J; Horn, Gabriel

    2008-06-01

    There is strong evidence that a restricted part of the chick forebrain, the IMM (formerly IMHV), stores information acquired through the learning process of visual imprinting. Twenty-four hours after imprinting training, a learning-specific increase in amount of myristoylated, alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) protein is known to occur in the homogenate fraction of IMM. We investigated the two components of this fraction, membrane-bound and cytoplasmic-phosphorylated MARCKS. In IMM, amount of membrane-bound MARCKS, but not of cytoplasmic-phosphorylated MARCKS, increased as chicks learned. No changes were observed for either form of MARCKS in PPN, a control forebrain region. The results indicate that there is a learning-specific increase in membrane-bound, non-phosphorylated MARCKS 24 h after training. This increase might contribute to stabilization of synaptic morphology.

  4. The Caenorhabditis elegans protein SAS-5 forms large oligomeric assemblies critical for centriole formation

    PubMed Central

    Rogala, Kacper B; Dynes, Nicola J; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Yan, Jun; Pong, Sheng Kai; Robinson, Carol V; Deane, Charlotte M; Gönczy, Pierre; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles crucial for cell division, sensing and motility. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the onset of centriole formation requires notably the proteins SAS-5 and SAS-6, which have functional equivalents across eukaryotic evolution. Whereas the molecular architecture of SAS-6 and its role in initiating centriole formation are well understood, the mechanisms by which SAS-5 and its relatives function is unclear. Here, we combine biophysical and structural analysis to uncover the architecture of SAS-5 and examine its functional implications in vivo. Our work reveals that two distinct self-associating domains are necessary to form higher-order oligomers of SAS-5: a trimeric coiled coil and a novel globular dimeric Implico domain. Disruption of either domain leads to centriole duplication failure in worm embryos, indicating that large SAS-5 assemblies are necessary for function in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07410.001 PMID:26023830

  5. Crystal structure of the fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. in both green and photoconverted red forms.

    PubMed

    Pletneva, Nadya V; Pletnev, Sergei; Pakhomov, Alexey A; Chertkova, Rita V; Martynov, Vladimir I; Muslinkina, Liya; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir Z

    2016-08-01

    The fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) is a member of the Kaede-like group of photoconvertible fluorescent proteins with a His62-Tyr63-Gly64 chromophore-forming sequence. Upon irradiation with UV and blue light, the fluorescence of DendFP irreversibly changes from green (506 nm) to red (578 nm). The photoconversion is accompanied by cleavage of the peptide backbone at the C(α)-N bond of His62 and the formation of a terminal carboxamide group at the preceding Leu61. The resulting double C(α)=C(β) bond in His62 extends the conjugation of the chromophore π system to include imidazole, providing the red fluorescence. Here, the three-dimensional structures of native green and photoconverted red forms of DendFP determined at 1.81 and 2.14 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. This is the first structure of photoconverted red DendFP to be reported to date. The structure-based mutagenesis of DendFP revealed an important role of positions 142 and 193: replacement of the original Ser142 and His193 caused a moderate red shift in the fluorescence and a considerable increase in the photoconversion rate. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bonding of the chromophore to the Gln116 and Ser105 cluster is crucial for variation of the photoconversion rate. The single replacement Gln116Asn disrupts the hydrogen bonding of Gln116 to the chromophore, resulting in a 30-fold decrease in the photoconversion rate, which was partially restored by a further Ser105Asn replacement.

  6. How Does the VSG Coat of Bloodstream Form African Trypanosomes Interact with External Proteins?

    PubMed

    Schwede, Angela; Macleod, Olivia J S; MacGregor, Paula; Carrington, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Variations on the statement "the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat that covers the external face of the mammalian bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei acts a physical barrier" appear regularly in research articles and reviews. The concept of the impenetrable VSG coat is an attractive one, as it provides a clear model for understanding how a trypanosome population persists; each successive VSG protects the plasma membrane and is immunologically distinct from previous VSGs. What is the evidence that the VSG coat is an impenetrable barrier, and how do antibodies and other extracellular proteins interact with it? In this review, the nature of the extracellular surface of the bloodstream form trypanosome is described, and past experiments that investigated binding of antibodies and lectins to trypanosomes are analysed using knowledge of VSG sequence and structure that was unavailable when the experiments were performed. Epitopes for some VSG monoclonal antibodies are mapped as far as possible from previous experimental data, onto models of VSG structures. The binding of lectins to some, but not to other, VSGs is revisited with more recent knowledge of the location and nature of N-linked oligosaccharides. The conclusions are: (i) Much of the variation observed in earlier experiments can be explained by the identity of the individual VSGs. (ii) Much of an individual VSG is accessible to antibodies, and the barrier that prevents access to the cell surface is probably at the base of the VSG N-terminal domain, approximately 5 nm from the plasma membrane. This second conclusion highlights a gap in our understanding of how the VSG coat works, as several plasma membrane proteins with large extracellular domains are very unlikely to be hidden from host antibodies by VSG.

  7. Purification in an active form of the phage phi 29 protein p4 that controls the viral late transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Barthelemy, I; Lázaro, J M; Méndez, E; Mellado, R P; Salas, M

    1987-01-01

    The phage phi 29 protein p4, that controls viral late transcription, was highly purified from Escherichia coli cells harbouring a gene 4-containing plasmid. This protein, representing about 6% of the total cellular protein, was obtained in a highly purified form. The protein was characterized as p4 by amino acid analysis and NH2-terminal sequence determination. The purified protein was active in an in vitro transcription assay, allowing specific initiation of transcription at the phi 29 A3 late promoter in the presence of Bacillus subtilis sigma 43-RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Images PMID:3671066

  8. Sexual risk behavior in men attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Benotsch, Eric G; Nettles, Christopher D; Wong, Felicia; Redmann, Jean; Boschini, Jill; Pinkerton, Steven D; Ragsdale, Kathleen; Mikytuck, John J

    2007-10-01

    Previous research with travelers points to higher risk behaviors during vacations. Relative to their day-to-day lives, leisure travelers have more free time to pursue sexual activities and are likely to engage in higher rates of substance use than when at home. Risk behaviors during vacation have not been thoroughly examined in men who have sex with men (MSM), a key group at risk for HIV. The present investigation examined substance use, sexual risk behaviors, and components of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model in MSM attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans. Almost half of the sexually active men reported having sex with a partner of unknown HIV status while in New Orleans and a similar number did not disclose their own HIV status to all of their sexual partners. Drug use and excessive alcohol use were associated with unprotected sex (ps < .05). Components of the IMB model also predicted sexual risk behavior: individuals with more accurate HIV transmission information reported fewer unprotected sex acts, and motivation to engage in sexual activity on vacation was associated with more unprotected sex (ps < .05). Findings suggest that some MSM on vacation are placing themselves at risk for HIV. Traditional HIV prevention interventions do not readily lend themselves for use with transient populations. New intervention approaches are needed to reduce sexual risk behaviors in persons traveling for leisure.

  9. SEXUAL RISK BEHAVIOR IN MEN ATTENDING MARDI GRAS CELEBRATIONS IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

    PubMed Central

    Benotsch, Eric G.; Nettles, Christopher D.; Wong, Felicia; Redmann, Jean; Boschini, Jill; Pinkerton, Steven D.; Ragsdale, Kathleen; Mikytuck, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research with travelers points to higher risk behaviors during vacations. Relative to their day-to-day lives, leisure travelers have more free time to pursue sexual activities and are likely to engage in higher rates of substance use than when at home. Risk behaviors during vacation have not been thoroughly examined in men who have sex with men (MSM), a key group at risk for HIV. The present investigation examined substance use, sexual risk behaviors, and components of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model in MSM attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans. Almost half of the sexually active men reported having sex with a partner of unknown HIV status while in New Orleans and a similar number did not disclose their own HIV status to all of their sexual partners. Drug use and excessive alcohol use were associated with unprotected sex (ps < .05). Components of the IMB model also predicted sexual risk behavior: individuals with more accurate HIV transmission information reported fewer unprotected sex acts, and motivation to engage in sexual activity on vacation was associated with more unprotected sex (ps < .05). Findings suggest that some MSM on vacation are placing themselves at risk for HIV. Traditional HIV prevention interventions do not readily lend themselves for use with transient populations. New intervention approaches are needed to reduce sexual risk behaviors in persons traveling for leisure. PMID:17922205

  10. Structural Studies of Truncated Forms of the Prion Protein PrP

    PubMed Central

    Wan, William; Wille, Holger; Stöhr, Jan; Kendall, Amy; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Tiggelaar, Sarah; Watts, Joel C.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Prions are proteins that adopt self-propagating aberrant folds. The self-propagating properties of prions are a direct consequence of their distinct structures, making the understanding of these structures and their biophysical interactions fundamental to understanding prions and their related diseases. The insolubility and inherent disorder of prions have made their structures difficult to study, particularly in the case of the infectious form of the mammalian prion protein PrP. Many investigators have therefore preferred to work with peptide fragments of PrP, suggesting that these peptides might serve as structural and functional models for biologically active prions. We have used x-ray fiber diffraction to compare a series of different-sized fragments of PrP, to determine the structural commonalities among the fragments and the biologically active, self-propagating prions. Although all of the peptides studied adopted amyloid conformations, only the larger fragments demonstrated a degree of structural complexity approaching that of PrP. Even these larger fragments did not adopt the prion structure itself with detailed fidelity, and in some cases their structures were radically different from that of pathogenic PrPSc. PMID:25809267

  11. Cellular COPII Proteins Are Involved in Production of the Vesicles That Form the Poliovirus Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rust, René C.; Landmann, Lukas; Gosert, Rainer; Tang, Bor Luen; Hong, Wanjin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) replicates its genome in association with membranous vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To elucidate the origin and mode of formation of PV vesicles, immunofluorescence labeling with antibodies against the viral vesicle marker proteins 2B and 2BC, as well as cellular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), anterograde transport vesicles, and the Golgi complex, was performed in BT7-H cells. Optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy were subjected to a deconvolution process to enhance resolution and signal-to-noise ratio and to allow for a three-dimensional representation of labeled membrane structures. The mode of formation of the PV vesicles was, on morphological grounds, similar to the formation of anterograde membrane traffic vesicles in uninfected cells. ER-resident membrane markers were excluded from both types of vesicles, and the COPII components Sec13 and Sec31 were both found to be colocalized on the vesicular surface, indicating the presence of a functional COPII coat. PV vesicle formation during early time points of infection did not involve the Golgi complex. The expression of PV protein 2BC or the entire P2 and P3 genomic region led to the production of vesicles carrying a COPII coat and showing the same mode of formation as vesicles produced after PV infection. These results indicate that PV vesicles are formed at the ER by the cellular COPII budding mechanism and thus are homologous to the vesicles of the anterograde membrane transport pathway. PMID:11559814

  12. Bacterial collagen-like proteins that form triple-helical structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhuoxin; An, Bo; Ramshaw, John A M; Brodsky, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    A large number of collagen-like proteins have been identified in bacteria during the past 10years, principally from analysis of genome databases. These bacterial collagens share the distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating amino acid sequence of animal collagens which underlies their unique triple-helical structure. A number of the bacterial collagens have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and they all adopt a triple-helix conformation. Unlike animal collagens, these bacterial proteins do not contain the post-translationally modified amino acid, hydroxyproline, which is known to stabilize the triple-helix structure and may promote self-assembly. Despite the absence of collagen hydroxylation, the triple-helix structures of the bacterial collagens studied exhibit a high thermal stability of 35-39°C, close to that seen for mammalian collagens. These bacterial collagens are readily produced in large quantities by recombinant methods, either in the original amino acid sequence or in genetically manipulated sequences. This new family of recombinant, easy to modify collagens could provide a novel system for investigating structural and functional motifs in animal collagens and could also form the basis of new biomedical materials with designed structural properties and functions.

  13. Bacterial collagen-like proteins that form triple-helical structures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhuoxin; An, Bo; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Brodsky, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A large number of collagen-like proteins have been identified in bacteria during the past ten years, principally from analysis of genome databases. These bacterial collagens share the distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating amino acid sequence of animal collagens which underlies their unique triple-helical structure. A number of the bacterial collagens have been expressed in E. coli, and they all adopt a triple-helix conformation. Unlike animal collagens, these bacterial proteins do not contain the post-translationally modified amino acid, hydroxyproline, which is known to stabilize the triple-helix structure and may promote self-assembly. Despite the absence of collagen hydroxylation, the triple-helix structures of the bacterial collagens studied exhibit a high thermal stability of 35–39 °C, close to that seen for mammalian collagens. These bacterial collagens are readily produced in large quantities by recombinant methods, either in the original amino acid sequence or in genetically manipulated sequences. This new family of recombinant, easy to modify collagens could provide a novel system for investigating structural and functional motifs in animal collagens and could also form the basis of new biomedical materials with designed structural properties and functions. PMID:24434612

  14. Freeze-drying of proteins in glass solids formed by basic amino acids and dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Kadoya, Saori; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce and characterize glass-state amorphous solids containing amino acids and organic acids that protect co-lyophilized proteins. Thermal analysis of frozen solutions containing a basic amino acid (e.g., L-arginine, L-lysine, L-histidine) and a hydroxy di- or tricarboxylic acid (e.g., citric acid, L-tartaric acid, DL-malic acid) showed glass transition of maximally freeze-concentrated solute at temperatures (T'g) significantly higher than those of the individual solute solutions. Mixing of the amino acid with some dicarboxylic acids (e.g., oxalic acid) also suggested an upward shift of the transition temperature. Contrarily, combinations of the amino acid with monocarboxylic acids (e.g., acetic acid) had T'gs between those of the individual solute solutions. Co-lyophilization of the basic amino acids and citric acid or L-tartaric acid resulted in amorphous solids that have glass transition temperatures (Tg) higher than the individual components. Mid- and near-infrared analysis indicated altered environment around the functional groups of the consisting molecules. Some of the glass-state excipient combinations protected an enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH) from inactivation during freeze-drying. The glass-state excipient combinations formed by hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction network would be potent alternative to stabilize therapeutic proteins in freeze-dried formulations.

  15. PROTEIN KINASE Cα MEDIATES A NOVEL FORM OF PLASTICITY IN THE ACCESSORY OLFACTORY BULB

    PubMed Central

    DONG, C.; GODWIN, D. W.; BRENNAN, P. A.; HEGDE, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    Modification of synapses in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is believed to underlie pheromonal memory that enables mate recognition in mice. The memory, which is acquired with single-trial learning forms only with coincident noradrenergic and glutamatergic inputs to the AOB. The mechanisms by which glutamate and norepinephrine (NE) alter the AOB synapses are not well understood. Here we present results that not only reconcile the earlier, seemingly contradictory, observations on the role of glutamate and NE in changing the AOB synapses, but also reveal novel mechanisms of plasticity. Our studies suggest that initially, glutamate acting at Group II metabotropic receptors and NE acting at α2-adrenergic receptors inhibit N-type and R-type Ca2+ channels in mitral cells via a G-Protein. The N-type and R-type Ca2+ channel inhibition is reversed by activation of α1-adrenergic receptors and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Based on these results, we propose a hypothetical model for a new kind of synaptic plasticity in the AOB that accounts for the previous behavioral data on pheromonal memory. According to this model, initial inhibition of the Ca2+ channels suppresses the GABAergic inhibitory feedback to mitral cells, causing disinhibition and Ca2+ influx. NE also activates phospholipase C (PLC) through α1-adrenergic receptors generating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol (DAG). Calcium and DAG together activate protein kinase Cα (PKCα) which switches the disinhibition to increased inhibition of mitral cells. Thus, PKCα is likely to be a coincidence detector integrating glutamate and NE input in the AOB and bridging the short-term signaling to long-term structural changes resulting in enhanced inhibition of mitral cells that is thought to underlie memory formation. PMID:19580852

  16. Beta-catenin Forms Protein Aggregation at High Concentrations in HEK293TCells

    PubMed Central

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Najafi, Seyed Mahmoud Arab

    2017-01-01

    Background: The canonical Wnt signal transduction (or the Wnt/β-catenin pathway) plays a crucial role in the development of animals and in carcinogenesis. Beta-catenin is the central component of this signaling pathway. The activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling results in the cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with the TCF/LEF transcription factors and, therefore, participates in the upregulation or downregulation of some important genes involved in diverse cellular activities. In addition, β-catenin is a critical component of the cadherin-mediated cell adherens junction. We had previously noticed that very high cellular concentrations of β-catenin had a negative effect on the transcriptional activity of this protein and, therefore, the aim of this study was to find a mechanism for this negative interaction. Methods: Cell fractionation, western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy experiments were performed to measure β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin cellular localization in HEK293Tcells transfected with various amounts of a β-catenin-encoding plasmid. Also, total RNA was extracted from the cells and used for reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments to measure the expression of the β-catenin target genes. SPSS, version 16, was used to analyze the results statistically. Results: We demonstrated that overexpression of β-catenin led to the formation of rod-shaped protein aggregates. The aggregate structures were mainly formed in the cell nucleus and were heavy enough to be isolated by centrifugation. Beta-catenin aggregate formation was accompanied by a decrease in the expression of the β-catenin target genes used in this study. Conclusion: Since deregulation of β-catenin function occurs in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders, the results of this paper further support the possible biological and clinical significance of β-catenin aggregate formation. PMID

  17. Pore-forming Activity of the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Protein EspD*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Caballero-Franco, Celia; Bakker, Dannika; Totten, Stephanie; Jardim, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a causative agent of gastrointestinal and diarrheal diseases. Pathogenesis associated with enterohemorrhagic E. coli involves direct delivery of virulence factors from the bacteria into epithelial cell cytosol via a syringe-like organelle known as the type III secretion system. The type III secretion system protein EspD is a critical factor required for formation of a translocation pore on the host cell membrane. Here, we show that recombinant EspD spontaneously integrates into large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) lipid bilayers; however, pore formation required incorporation of anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and an acidic pH. Leakage assays performed with fluorescent dextrans confirmed that EspD formed a structure with an inner diameter of ∼2.5 nm. Protease mapping indicated that the two transmembrane helical hairpin of EspD penetrated the lipid layer positioning the N- and C-terminal domains on the extralumenal surface of LUVs. Finally, a combination of glutaraldehyde cross-linking and rate zonal centrifugation suggested that EspD in LUV membranes forms an ∼280–320-kDa oligomeric structure consisting of ∼6–7 subunits. PMID:26324713

  18. An adult form of Alexander disease: a novel mutation in glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Ohnari, K; Yamano, M; Uozumi, T; Hashimoto, T; Tsuji, S; Nakagawa, M

    2007-10-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mutation has been reported in Alexander disease. We report a patient with the adult form of Alexander disease who shows a novel mutation in GFAP. This case presented with progressive dysarthria, dysphagia and spastic gait on the right side. Brain and spinal cord MRI showed marked atrophy of the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. Abnormal high signal intensities in the ventral medulla oblongata were detected bilaterally. There were no white matter lesions or contrast enhancing lesions. Recently, there have been reports of patients with a juvenile form of Alexander disease presenting with atrophy or signal abnormalities of the medulla or spinal cord. Atrophy of the medulla and spinal cord have specifically been described as suggestive of Alexander disease [1]. Sequence analysis of the GFAP gene of this patient showed a heterozygous c.221T>C mutation, predicting a p.M74T amino acid change. In all patients suspected of Alexander disease on the basis of MRI findings, GFAP analysis is necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

  19. LRRC8 proteins form volume-regulated anion channels that sense ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Ruhma; Qiu, Zhaozhu; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Murthy, Swetha E.; Florendo, Maria N.; Mason, Daniel E.; Mathur, Jayanti; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Peters, Eric C.; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Summary The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) is activated when a cell swells, and plays a central role in maintaining cell volume in response to osmotic challenges. SWELL1 (LRRC8A) was recently identified as an essential component of VRAC. However, the identity of the pore-forming subunits of VRAC, and how the channel is gated by cell swelling are unknown. Here we show that SWELL1 with up to four other LRRC8 subunits assemble into heterogeneous complexes of ~800 kDa. When reconstituted into bilayers, LRRC8 complexes are sufficient to form anion channels activated by osmolality gradients. In bilayers as well as in cells, the single-channel conductance of the complexes depends on the LRRC8 composition. Finally, low ionic strength (Γ), in the absence of an osmotic gradient, activates the complexes in bilayers. These data demonstrate that LRRC8 proteins together constitute the VRAC pore, and that hypotonic stress can activate VRAC through a decrease in cytoplasmic Γ. PMID:26824658

  20. LRRC8 Proteins Form Volume-Regulated Anion Channels that Sense Ionic Strength.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Ruhma; Qiu, Zhaozhu; Dubin, Adrienne E; Murthy, Swetha E; Florendo, Maria N; Mason, Daniel E; Mathur, Jayanti; Cahalan, Stuart M; Peters, Eric C; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2016-01-28

    The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) is activated when a cell swells, and it plays a central role in maintaining cell volume in response to osmotic challenges. SWELL1 (LRRC8A) was recently identified as an essential component of VRAC. However, the identity of the pore-forming subunits of VRAC and how the channel is gated by cell swelling are unknown. Here, we show that SWELL1 and up to four other LRRC8 subunits assemble into heterogeneous complexes of ∼800 kDa. When reconstituted into bilayers, LRRC8 complexes are sufficient to form anion channels activated by osmolality gradients. In bilayers, as well as in cells, the single-channel conductance of the complexes depends on the LRRC8 composition. Finally, low ionic strength (Γ) in the absence of an osmotic gradient activates the complexes in bilayers. These data demonstrate that LRRC8 proteins together constitute the VRAC pore and that hypotonic stress can activate VRAC through a decrease in cytoplasmic Γ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. '2A-Like' Signal Sequences Mediating Translational Recoding: A Novel Form of Dual Protein Targeting.

    PubMed

    Roulston, Claire; Luke, Garry A; de Felipe, Pablo; Ruan, Lin; Cope, Jonathan; Nicholson, John; Sukhodub, Andriy; Tilsner, Jens; Ryan, Martin D

    2016-08-01

    We report the initial characterization of an N-terminal oligopeptide '2A-like' sequence that is able to function both as a signal sequence and as a translational recoding element. Owing to this translational recoding activity, two forms of nascent polypeptide are synthesized: (i) when 2A-mediated translational recoding has not occurred: the nascent polypeptide is fused to the 2A-like N-terminal signal sequence and the fusion translation product is targeted to the exocytic pathway, and, (ii) a translation product where 2A-mediated translational recoding has occurred: the 2A-like signal sequence is synthesized as a separate translation product and, therefore, the nascent (downstream) polypeptide lacks the 2A-like signal sequence and is localized to the cytoplasm. This type of dual-functional signal sequence results, therefore, in the partitioning of the translation products between the two sub-cellular sites and represents a newly described form of dual protein targeting.

  2. Development of a long-acting, protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel formed by a polyion complex for local protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shiro; Kaneko, Junya; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-04-01

    Although cancer immunotherapies are attracting much attention, it is difficult to develop bioactive proteins owing to the severe systemic toxicity. To overcome the issue, we designed new local protein delivery system by using a protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel (RIG), which is formed by a polyion complex (PIC) comprising three components, viz., cationic polyamine-poly(ethylene glycol)-polyamine triblock copolymer possessing ROS-scavenging moieties as side chains; anionic poly(acrylic acid); and a protein. The mixture formed the protein-loaded PIC flower micelles at room temperature, which immediately converted to a gel with high mechanical strength upon exposure to physiological conditions. Because the protein electrostatically interacts with the PIC gel network, RIG provided a sustained release of the protein without a significant initial burst, regardless of the types of proteins in vitro, and much longer retention of the protein at the local injection site in mice than that of the naked protein. Subcutaneous injections of IL-12@RIG in the vicinity of tumor tissue showed remarkable tumor growth inhibition in tumor-bearing mice, compared to that observed with injection of IL-12 alone, suppressing adverse events caused by IL-12-induced ROS. Our results indicate that RIG has potential as a platform technology for an injectable sustained-release carrier for proteins.

  3. Sperm Lysozyme-Like Protein 1 (SLLP1), an intra-acrosomal oolemmal-binding sperm protein, reveals filamentous organization in protein crystal form.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Mandal, A; Shumilin, I A; Chordia, M D; Panneerdoss, S; Herr, J C; Minor, W

    2015-07-01

    Sperm lysozyme-like protein 1 (SLLP1) is one of the lysozyme-like proteins predominantly expressed in mammalian testes that lacks bacteriolytic activity, localizes in the sperm acrosome, and exhibits high affinity for an oolemmal receptor, SAS1B. The crystal structure of mouse SLLP1 (mSLLP1) was determined at 2.15 Å resolution. mSLLP1 monomer adopts a structural fold similar to that of chicken/mouse lysozymes retaining all four canonical disulfide bonds. mSLLP1 is distinct from c-lysozyme by substituting two essential catalytic residues (E35T/D52N), exhibiting different surface charge distribution, and by forming helical filaments approximately 75 Å in diameter with a 25 Å central pore comprised of six monomers per helix turn repeating every 33 Å. Cross-species alignment of all reported SLLP1 sequences revealed a set of invariant surface regions comprising a characteristic fingerprint uniquely identifying SLLP1 from other c-lysozyme family members. The fingerprint surface regions reside around the lips of the putative glycan-binding groove including three polar residues (Y33/E46/H113). A flexible salt bridge (E46-R61) was observed covering the glycan-binding groove. The conservation of these regions may be linked to their involvement in oolemmal protein binding. Interaction between SLLP1 monomer and its oolemmal receptor SAS1B was modeled using protein-protein docking algorithms, utilizing the SLLP1 fingerprint regions along with the SAS1B conserved surface regions. This computational model revealed complementarity between the conserved SLLP1/SAS1B interacting surfaces supporting the experimentally observed SLLP1/SAS1B interaction involved in fertilization. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  4. Sperm Lysozyme-Like Protein 1 (SLLP1), an intra-acrosomal oolemmal-binding sperm protein, reveals filamentous organization in protein crystal form

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Heping; Mandal, Arabinda; Shumilin, Igor A.; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Panneerdoss, Subbarayalu; Herr, John C.; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Sperm Lysozyme-Like Protein 1 (SLLP1) is one of the lysozyme-like proteins predominantly expressed in mammalian testes that lacks bacteriolytic activity, localizes in the sperm acrosome, and exhibits high affinity for an oolemmal receptor, SAS1B. The crystal structure of mouse SLLP1 (mSLLP1) was determined at 2.15Å resolution. mSLLP1 monomer adopts a structural fold similar to that of chicken/mouse lysozymes retaining all four canonical disulfide bonds. mSLLP1 is distinct from c-lysozyme by substituting two essential catalytic residues (E35T/D52N), exhibiting different surface charge distribution, and by forming helical filaments approximately 75Å in diameter with a 25Å central pore comprised of six monomers per helix turn repeating every 33Å. Cross-species alignment of all reported SLLP1 sequences revealed a set of invariant surface regions comprising a characteristic fingerprint uniquely identifying SLLP1 from other c-lysozyme family members. The fingerprint surface regions reside around the lips of the putative glycan binding groove including three polar residues (Y33/E46/H113). A flexible salt bridge (E46-R61) was observed covering the glycan binding groove. The conservation of these regions may be linked to their involvement in oolemmal protein binding. Interaction between SLLP1 monomer and its oolemmal receptor SAS1B was modeled using protein-protein docking algorithms, utilizing the SLLP1 fingerprint regions along with the SAS1B conserved surface regions. This computational model revealed complementarity between the conserved SLLP1/SAS1B interacting surfaces supporting the experimentally-observed SLLP1/SAS1B interaction involved in fertilization. PMID:26198801

  5. The transforming proteins of PRCII virus and Rous sarcoma virus form a complex with the same two cellular phosphoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, B; Hunter, T; Sefton, B M

    1982-01-01

    P105 and P110, the presumptive transforming proteins of PRCII avian sarcoma virus, have been found to be present in transformed chicken cells in two forms: as monomers and as part of a complex which contains both a 50,000-dalton and a 90,000-dalton cellular phosphoprotein. The 90,000-dalton cellular protein was found to be identical to one of the proteins in chicken cells whose synthesis is induced by stress. The 50,000-dalton protein was found to contain phosphotyrosine when isolated from the complex and therefore may be a substrate for the tyrosine protein kinase activity which is associated with P105 and P110. These same two cellular phosphoproteins have previously been shown to be present in a complex with pp60src, the tyrosine protein kinase which is the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus. However, not all avian sarcoma virus transforming proteins with associated tyrosine protein kinase activities form a complex efficiently with these cellular proteins. Little if any of P90, the putative transforming protein of Yamaguchi 73 virus, was found in a complex with the 50,000-dalton and 90,000-dalton cellular phosphoproteins. Images PMID:6180178

  6. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle

    PubMed Central

    Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Meyer, Moritz T.; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K.; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S.; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2. Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2. We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1’s four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  7. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle.

    PubMed

    Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K; Mitchell, Madeline C; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-05-24

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2 Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2 We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1's four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency.

  8. Design of a PROTAC that antagonizes and destroys the cancer-forming X-protein of the hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Montrose, Kristopher; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • A novel proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule (PROTAC) to treat hepatitis B. • The PROTAC antagonizes and destroys the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. • The PROTAC is a fusion of the X-protein oligomerization and instability domains. • The oligomerization domain is a dominant-negative inhibitor of X-protein function. • X-protein-targeting PROTACs have potential to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. - Abstract: The X-protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is essential for virus infection and contributes to the development of HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a disease which causes more than one million deaths each year. Here we describe the design of a novel PROTAC (proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule) capable of simultaneously inducing the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizing its function. The PROTAC was constructed by fusing the N-terminal oligomerization and C-terminal instability domains of the X-protein to each other, and rendering them cell-permeable by the inclusion of a polyarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was predicted that the oligomerization domain would bind the X-protein, and that the instability domain would cause the X-protein to be targeted for proteasomal degradation. Addition of the PROTAC to HepG2 liver cancer cells, engineered to express full-length and C-terminally truncated forms of the X-protein, resulted in the degradation of both forms of the X-protein. A cell-permeable stand-alone form of the oligomerization domain was taken up by HepG2 cells, and acted as a dominant-negative inhibitor, causing inhibition of X-protein-induced apoptosis. In summary, the PROTAC described here induces the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizes its function, and warrants investigation in a preclinical study for its ability to prevent or treat HBV infection and/or the development of HCC.

  9. Structural Features of Apicomplexan Pore-Forming Proteins and Their Roles in Parasite Cell Traversal and Egress.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Alfredo J; Carruthers, Vern B

    2017-08-29

    Apicomplexan parasites cause diseases, including malaria and toxoplasmosis, in a range of hosts, including humans. These intracellular parasites utilize pore-forming proteins that disrupt host cell membranes to either traverse host cells while migrating through tissues or egress from the parasite-containing vacuole after replication. This review highlights recent insight gained from the newly available three-dimensional structures of several known or putative apicomplexan pore-forming proteins that contribute to cell traversal or egress. These new structural advances suggest that parasite pore-forming proteins use distinct mechanisms to disrupt host cell membranes at multiple steps in parasite life cycles. How proteolytic processing, secretion, environment, and the accessibility of lipid receptors regulate the membranolytic activities of such proteins is also discussed.

  10. Heterogeneity of high-mobility-group protein 2. Enrichment of a rapidly migrating form in testis.

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, L R; Brock, W A; Meistrich, M L

    1985-01-01

    A determination of the absolute amounts of high-mobility-group proteins 1 and 2 (HMG1 and HMG2) in rat tissues demonstrated that amounts of HMG2 were low in non-proliferating tissues, somewhat higher in proliferating and lymphoid tissues, but were extremely elevated in the testis. This increase was due to a germ-cell-specific form of HMG2 with increased mobility relative to somatic HMG2 on acid/urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. To determine if the findings in the rat were a general feature of spermatogenesis, testis (germinal), spleen (lymphoid), and liver (non-proliferating) tissues from various vertebrate species were examined for their relative amounts of HMG1 and HMG2, and for HMG2 heterogeneity. Bull, chimpanzee, cynomologus monkey, dog, gopher, guinea pig, hamster, mouse, opossum, rabbit, rat, rhesus monkey, squirrel and toad (Xenopus) tissues were analysed. Nearly all species showed relatively high contents of HMG2 in testis tissue, whereas HMG1 contents were similar in all species and tissues. Ten of thirteen species showed a rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype in testis tissue, separable by acid/urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Xenopus, which lacks HMG2 in somatic tissues, showed an HMG2-like protein in testis tissue. Although the rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype in species other than rat was not testis-specific, it was always enriched in the testis. This study indicates that increased amounts of HMG2 and the enrichment of a rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype are general features of spermatogenic cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:4038257

  11. DNA Recombinase Proteins, their Function and Structure in the Active Form, a Computational Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carra, Claudio; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a crucial sequence of reactions in all cells for the repair of double strand DNA (dsDNA) breaks. While it was traditionally considered as a means for generating genetic diversity, it is now known to be essential for restart of collapsed replication forks that have met a lesion on the DNA template (Cox et al., 2000). The central stage of this process requires the presence of the DNA recombinase protein, RecA in bacteria, RadA in archaea, or Rad51 in eukaryotes, which leads to an ATP-mediated DNA strand-exchange process. Despite many years of intense study, some aspects of the biochemical mechanism, and structure of the active form of recombinase proteins are not well understood. Our theoretical study is an attempt to shed light on the main structural and mechanistic issues encountered on the RecA of the e-coli, the RecA of the extremely radio resistant Deinococcus Radiodurans (promoting an inverse DNA strand-exchange repair), and the homolog human Rad51. The conformational changes are analyzed for the naked enzymes, and when they are linked to ATP and ADP. The average structures are determined over 2ns time scale of Langevian dynamics using a collision frequency of 1.0 ps(sup -1). The systems are inserted in an octahedron periodic box with a 10 Angstrom buffer of water molecules explicitly described by the TIP3P model. The corresponding binding free energies are calculated in an implicit solvent using the Poisson-Boltzmann solvent accessible surface area, MM-PBSA model. The role of the ATP is not only in stabilizing the interaction RecA-DNA, but its hydrolysis is required to allow the DNA strand-exchange to proceed. Furthermore, we extended our study, using the hybrid QM/MM method, on the mechanism of this chemical process. All the calculations were performed using the commercial code Amber 9.

  12. Protein Variants Form a System of Networks: Microdiversity of IMP Metallo-Beta-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Widmann, Michael; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Genome and metagenome sequencing projects support the view that only a tiny portion of the total protein microdiversity in the biosphere has been sequenced yet, while the vast majority of existing protein variants is still unknown. By using a network approach, the microdiversity of 42 metallo-β-lactamases of the IMP family was investigated. In the networks, the nodes are formed by the variants, while the edges correspond to single mutations between pairs of variants. The 42 variants were assigned to 7 separate networks. By analyzing the networks and their relationships, the structure of sequence space was studied and existing, but still unknown, functional variants were predicted. The largest network consists of 10 variants with IMP-1 in its center and includes two ubiquitous mutations, V67F and S262G. By relating the corresponding pairs of variants, the networks were integrated into a single system of networks. The largest network also included a quartet of variants: IMP-1, two single mutants, and the respective double mutant. The existence of quartets indicates that if two mutations resulted in functional enzymes, the double mutant may also be active and stable. Therefore, quartet construction from triplets was applied to predict 15 functional variants. Further functional mutants were predicted by applying the two ubiquitous mutations in all networks. In addition, since the networks are separated from each other by 10–15 mutations on average, it is expected that a subset of the theoretical intermediates are functional, and therefore are supposed to exist in the biosphere. Finally, the network analysis helps to distinguish between epistatic and additive effects of mutations; while the presence of correlated mutations indicates a strong interdependency between the respective positions, the mutations V67F and S262G are ubiquitous and therefore background independent. PMID:25013948

  13. Polymer-Induced Heteronucleation for Protein Single Crystal Growth: Structural Elucidation of Bovine Liver Catalase and Concanavalin A Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J.

    2012-05-09

    Obtaining single crystals for X-ray diffraction remains a major bottleneck in structural biology; when existing crystal growth methods fail to yield suitable crystals, often the target rather than the crystallization approach is reconsidered. Here we demonstrate that polymer-induced heteronucleation, a powerful technique that has been used for small molecule crystallization form discovery, can be applied to protein crystallization by optimizing the heteronucleant composition and crystallization formats for crystallizing a wide range of protein targets. Applying these advances to two benchmark proteins resulted in dramatically increased crystal size, enabling structure determination, for a half century old form of bovine liver catalase (BLC) that had previously only been characterized by electron microscopy, and the discovery of two new forms of concanavalin A (conA) from the Jack bean and accompanying structural elucidation of one of these forms.

  14. A nacre protein, n16.3, self-assembles to form protein oligomers that dimensionally limit and organize mineral deposits.

    PubMed

    Perovic, Iva; Chang, Eric P; Lui, Michael; Rao, Ashit; Cölfen, Helmut; Evans, John Spencer

    2014-04-29

    The mollusk shell is a complex biological material that integrates mineral phases with organic macromolecular components such as proteins. The role of proteins in the formation of the nacre layer (aragonite mineral phase) is poorly understood, particularly with regard to the organization of mineral deposits within the protein extracellular matrix and the identification of which proteins are responsible for this task. We report new experiments that provide insight into the role of the framework nacre protein, n16.3 (Pinctada fucata), as an organizer or assembler of calcium carbonate mineral clusters. Using a combination of biophysical techniques, we find that recombinant n16.3 (r-n16.3) oligomerizes to form amorphous protein films and particles that possess regions of disorder and mobility. These supramolecular assemblies possess an intrinsically disordered C-terminal region (T64-W98) and reorganize in the presence of Ca(2+) ions to form clustered protein oligomers. This Ca(2+)-induced reorganization leads to alterations in the molecular environments of Trp residues, the majority of which reside in putative aggregation-prone cross-β strand regions. Potentiometric Ca(2+) titrations reveal that r-n16.3 does not significantly affect the formation of prenucleation clusters in solution, and this suggests a role for this protein in postnucleation mineralization events. This is verified in subsequent in vitro mineralization assays in which r-n16.3 demonstrates its ability to form gel-like protein phases that organize and cluster nanometer-sized single-crystal calcite relative to protein-deficient controls. We conclude that the n16 nacre framework proteome creates a protein gel matrix that organizes and dimensionally limits mineral deposits. This process is highly relevant to the formation of ordered, nanometer-sized nacre tablets in the mollusk shell.

  15. Glucocorticoid modulation of androgen receptor nuclear aggregation and cellular toxicity is associated with distinct forms of soluble expanded polyglutamine protein.

    PubMed

    Welch, W J; Diamond, M I

    2001-12-15

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by abnormal polyglutamine tract expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, and is part of a family of central nervous system (CNS) neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD). Each pathologic protein is widely expressed, but the cause of neuronal degeneration within the CNS remains unknown. Many reports now link abnormal polyglutamine protein aggregation to pathogenesis. A previous study reported that activation of the wild-type glucocorticoid receptor (wtGR) suppressed the aggregation of expanded polyglutamine proteins derived from AR and huntingtin, whereas a mutant receptor containing an internal deletion, GRDelta108-317, increased polyglutamine protein aggregation, in this case primarily within the nucleus. In this study, we use these two forms of GR to study expanded polyglutamine AR protein in different cell contexts. Using cell biology and biochemical approaches, we find that wtGR promotes soluble forms of the protein and prevents nuclear aggregation in NIH3T3 cells and cultured neurons. In contrast, GRDelta108-317 decreases polyglutamine protein solubility, and causes formation of nuclear aggregates in non-neuronal cells. Nuclear aggregates recruit hsp72 more rapidly than cytoplasmic aggregates, and are associated with decreased cell viability. Limited proteolysis and chemical cross-linking suggest unique soluble forms of the expanded AR protein underlie these distinct biological activities. These observations provide an experimental framework to understand why expanded polyglutamine proteins may be toxic only to certain populations of cells, and suggest that unique protein associations or conformations of expanded polyglutamine proteins may determine subsequent cellular effects such as nuclear localization and cellular toxicity.

  16. Topographic labelling of pore-forming proteins from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Page, M G; Rosenbusch, J P

    1986-01-01

    The topography of three pore-forming proteins from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been explored by using two labelling techniques. Firstly, the distribution of nucleophilic residues has been investigated by selective chemical modification using arylglyoxals (for arginine residues), isothiocyanates (for lysine residues), carbodi-imides (for carboxy residues) and diazonium salts. Secondly, the membrane-embedded domains have been investigated by labelling with photoactivatable phospholipid analogues and a reagent that partitions into the membrane. Few nucleophilic groups are found to be freely accessible to pore-impermeant probes reacting in the aqueous medium. More groups are accessible to small, pore-permeant probes, suggesting that several groups of each sort are contained within the pore. In addition, there appear to be a number of arginine, lysine, carboxyl and many tyrosine residues that are rather inaccessible and that react only with small, hydrophobic probes, if at all. Amongst these more deeply buried residues there are four arginine residues and an as-yet-undetermined number of carboxy residues that appear to be essential to the structural integrity of the oligomeric molecule. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2428354

  17. Rottlerin dissolves pre-formed protein amyloid: a study on hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Nandini; Kumar, Manjeet; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2011-09-01

    Deposition of protein fibrillar aggregates called amyloids in the tissue, is the principal cause of several degenerative diseases. Here, we have shown the disaggregation potential of rottlerin towards hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) fibrils formed under alkaline conditions (pH-12.2). Several biophysical methods like Atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and fluorescence emission spectra were used for the study. Rottlerin exhibited instantaneous disaggregation effect on HEWL fibrils as monitored by Thioflavin T assay, anisotropy study and AFM imaging. Further we have monitored the conformational changes induced by rottlerin on the fibril in terms of surface hydrophobicity and secondary structure through 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence and FTIR study respectively. We have also attempted to elucidate the type of interaction between HEWL and rottlerin at pH-12.2 employing techniques like quenching study and FTIR. Rottlerin seems to have potential application as anti-amyloid compound. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. `Phosphatido-peptide'-like complexes formed by the interaction of calcium triphosphoinositide with protein

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, R. M. C.

    1965-01-01

    1. The sodium salt of triphosphoinositide partitions in the upper polar phase in a biphasic chloroform–methanol–water system similar to that of Folch et al. (1957). 2. On the addition of 2μg.atoms of Ca2+ or Mg2+ per μmole of triphosphoinositide the phospholipid passes entirely into the lower non-polar phase as the dicalcium or dimagnesium salt. 3. When serum albumin is included in the biphasic system, some of the dicalcium (dimagnesium) triphosphoinositide becomes attached to the protein material at the interface. 4. The affinity of Ca2+ for triphosphoinositide is 2–2·5 times as great as that of Mg2+ and the salt is not dissociated appreciably by equimolar amounts of EDTA or cyclohexane-1,2-diaminetetra-acetate. 5. When dicalcium triphosphoinositide is mixed with serum albumin a complex is formed which is insoluble in chloroform–methanol (2:1, v/v) but which dissolves completely when 0·25% (v/v) of concentrated hydrochloric acid is added. 6. On homogenizing a chloroform–methanol solution of dicalcium triphosphoinositide with guinea-pig liver the phospholipid becomes quantitatively attached to the insoluble residue, but it can be completely extracted from this with acidified chloroform–methanol. 7. The relevance of these observations to the significance of the phosphatido-peptide-complexes extracted from brain is discussed. PMID:16749093

  19. 'Phosphatido-peptide'-like complexes formed by the interaction of calcium triphosphoinositide with protein.

    PubMed

    Dawson, R M

    1965-10-01

    1. The sodium salt of triphosphoinositide partitions in the upper polar phase in a biphasic chloroform-methanol-water system similar to that of Folch et al. (1957). 2. On the addition of 2mug.atoms of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) per mumole of triphosphoinositide the phospholipid passes entirely into the lower non-polar phase as the dicalcium or dimagnesium salt. 3. When serum albumin is included in the biphasic system, some of the dicalcium (dimagnesium) triphosphoinositide becomes attached to the protein material at the interface. 4. The affinity of Ca(2+) for triphosphoinositide is 2-2.5 times as great as that of Mg(2+) and the salt is not dissociated appreciably by equimolar amounts of EDTA or cyclohexane-1,2-diaminetetra-acetate. 5. When dicalcium triphosphoinositide is mixed with serum albumin a complex is formed which is insoluble in chloroform-methanol (2:1, v/v) but which dissolves completely when 0.25% (v/v) of concentrated hydrochloric acid is added. 6. On homogenizing a chloroform-methanol solution of dicalcium triphosphoinositide with guinea-pig liver the phospholipid becomes quantitatively attached to the insoluble residue, but it can be completely extracted from this with acidified chloroform-methanol. 7. The relevance of these observations to the significance of the phosphatido-peptide-complexes extracted from brain is discussed.

  20. Comparison of Replica Exchange Simulations of a Kinetically Trapped Protein Conformational State and its Native Form.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mark A; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2016-03-10

    Recently an X-ray crystallographic structure of a single-domain antibody was reported with the protein chain trapped in a rare homodimeric form. One of the conformers appears to exhibit a misfolded region, and thus presumably the configurational stability is less favorable. To investigate whether simulation methods can detect any difference between the conformers and buttress the notion that one conformation is trapped on a pathway that incurs lower activation energy to unfold, adaptive temperature-based replica exchange simulations were applied to each chain to model conformational transitions. Simulation results found that the observed crystallographic difference between the two chains in the complementarity determining region CDR2 induces a stark distinction in conformational populations on the energy landscape. An appraisal of the energetic difference between the CDR2 conformations at 300 K revealed a localized order-disorder free-energy transition of roughly equivalent to two peptide hydrogen bonds in solution. It was also found that interconversion between the conformers is slower than the rate to unfold and that near an unfolding transition temperature one conformer retained a greater fraction of native-like contacts and energy over a longer time span before fully populating the denatured state, thus verifying the coexistence of a metastable conformation in the crystallographic assembly.

  1. Ex vivo mammalian prions are formed of paired double helical prion protein fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Cassandra; Wenborn, Adam; Gros, Nathalie; Sells, Jessica; Joiner, Susan; Hosszu, Laszlo L. P.; Tattum, M. Howard; Panico, Silvia; Clare, Daniel K.; Collinge, John; Saibil, Helen R.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian prions are hypothesized to be fibrillar or amyloid forms of prion protein (PrP), but structures observed to date have not been definitively correlated with infectivity and the three-dimensional structure of infectious prions has remained obscure. Recently, we developed novel methods to obtain exceptionally pure preparations of prions from mouse brain and showed that pathogenic PrP in these high-titre preparations is assembled into rod-like assemblies. Here, we have used precise cell culture-based prion infectivity assays to define the physical relationship between the PrP rods and prion infectivity and have used electron tomography to define their architecture. We show that infectious PrP rods isolated from multiple prion strains have a common hierarchical assembly comprising twisted pairs of short fibres with repeating substructure. The architecture of the PrP rods provides a new structural basis for understanding prion infectivity and can explain the inability to systematically generate high-titre synthetic prions from recombinant PrP. PMID:27249641

  2. Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Arispe, N; Rojas, E; Pollard, H B

    1993-01-01

    Amyloid beta protein (A beta P) is the 40- to 42-residue polypeptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have incorporated this peptide into phosphatidylserine liposomes and then fused the liposomes with a planar bilayer. When incorporated into bilayers the A beta P forms channels, which generate linear current-voltage relationships in symmetrical solutions. A permeability ratio, PK/PCl, of 11 for the open A beta P channel was estimated from the reversal potential of the channel current in asymmetrical KCl solutions. The permeability sequence for different cations, estimated from the reversal potential of the A beta P-channel current for each system of asymmetrical solutions, is Pcs > PLi > PCa > or = PK > PNa. A beta P-channel current (either CS+ or Ca2+ as charge carriers) is blocked reversibly by tromethamine (millimolar range) and irreversibly by Al3+ (micromolar range). The inhibition of the A beta P-channel current by these two substances depends on transmembrane potential, suggesting that the mechanism of blockade involves direct interaction between tromethamine (or Al3+) and sites within the A beta P channel. Hitherto, A beta P has been presumed to be neurotoxic. On the basis of the present data we suggest that the channel activity of the polypeptide may be responsible for some or all of its neurotoxic effects. We further propose that a useful strategy for drug discovery for treatment of Alzheimer disease may include screening compounds for their ability to block or otherwise modify A beta P channels. PMID:8380642

  3. Functional Analysis of the Hydrophilic Loop in Intracellular Trafficking of Arabidopsis PIN-FORMED Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anindya; Park, Minho; Kesawat, Mahipal Singh; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2014-04-01

    Different PIN-FORMED proteins (PINs) contribute to intercellular and intracellular auxin transport, depending on their distinctive subcellular localizations. Arabidopsis thaliana PINs with a long hydrophilic loop (HL) (PIN1 to PIN4 and PIN7; long PINs) localize predominantly to the plasma membrane (PM), whereas short PINs (PIN5 and PIN8) localize predominantly to internal compartments. However, the subcellular localization of the short PINs has been observed mostly for PINs ectopically expressed in different cell types, and the role of the HL in PIN trafficking remains unclear. Here, we tested whether a long PIN-HL can provide its original molecular cues to a short PIN by transplanting the HL. The transplanted long PIN2-HL was sufficient for phosphorylation and PM trafficking of the chimeric PIN5:PIN2-HL but failed to provide the characteristic polarity of PIN2. Unlike previous observations, PIN5 showed clear PM localization in diverse cell types where PIN5 is natively or ectopically expressed and even polar PM localization in one cell type. Furthermore, in the root epidermis, the subcellular localization of PIN5 switched from PM to internal compartments according to the developmental stage. Our results suggest that the long PIN-HL is partially modular for the trafficking behavior of PINs and that the intracellular trafficking of PIN is plastic depending on cell type and developmental stage.

  4. Ultrastructure, pharmacologic inhibition, and transport selectivity of aquaporin channel-forming integral protein in proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Zeidel, M L; Nielsen, S; Smith, B L; Ambudkar, S V; Maunsbach, A B; Agre, P

    1994-02-15

    Reconstitution of highly purified aquaporin CHIP (channel-forming integral protein) into proteoliposomes was previously shown to confer high osmotic water permeability (Pf) to the membranes [Zeidel et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 7436-7440]. Here we report detailed ultrastructural, pharmacologic, and transport studies of human red cell CHIP in proteoliposomes. Freeze-fracture and transmission electron microscopy revealed a uniform distribution of CHIP which was incorporated into the membranes in both native and inverse orientations. Morphometric analysis of membranes reconstituted at three different concentrations of CHIP revealed that the intramembrane particles correspond to tetramers or possible higher order oligomers, and the Pf increased in direct proportion to the CHIP density. Proteolytic removal of the 4-kDa C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CHIP did not alter the Pf or oligomerization in red cell membranes. CHIP exhibited a similar conductance for water when reconstituted into membranes of varied lipid compositions. The sensitivities of CHIP-mediated Pf to specific sulfhydryl reagents were identical to known sensitivities of red cell Pf, including a delayed response to p-(chloromercuri)benzenesulfonate. CHIP did not increase the permeability of the proteoliposome membranes to H+/OH- or NH3. These studies demonstrate that CHIP proteoliposomes exhibit all known characteristics of water channels in native red cells and therefore provide a defined system for biophysical analysis of transmembrane water movements.

  5. The HhH domain of the human DNA repair protein XPF forms stable homodimers.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2008-03-01

    The human XPF-ERCC1 protein complex plays an essential role in nucleotide excision repair by catalysing positioned nicking of a DNA strand at the 5' side of the damage. We have recently solved the structure of the heterodimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1 (Tripsianes et al., Structure 2005;13:1849-1858). We found that this complex comprises a pseudo twofold symmetry axis and that the helix-hairpin-helix motif of ERCC1 is required for DNA binding, whereas the corresponding domain of XPF is functioning as a scaffold for complex formation with ERCC1. Despite the functional importance of heterodimerization, the C-terminal domain of XPF can also form homodimers in vitro. We here compare the stabilities of homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1. The higher stability of the XPF HhH complexes under various experimental conditions, determined using CD and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, is well explained by the structural differences that exist between the HhH domains of the two complexes. The XPF HhH homodimer has a larger interaction interface, aromatic stacking interactions, and additional hydrogen bond contacts as compared to the XPF/ERCC1 HhH complex, which accounts for its higher stability.

  6. Ex vivo mammalian prions are formed of paired double helical prion protein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Terry, Cassandra; Wenborn, Adam; Gros, Nathalie; Sells, Jessica; Joiner, Susan; Hosszu, Laszlo L P; Tattum, M Howard; Panico, Silvia; Clare, Daniel K; Collinge, John; Saibil, Helen R; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian prions are hypothesized to be fibrillar or amyloid forms of prion protein (PrP), but structures observed to date have not been definitively correlated with infectivity and the three-dimensional structure of infectious prions has remained obscure. Recently, we developed novel methods to obtain exceptionally pure preparations of prions from mouse brain and showed that pathogenic PrP in these high-titre preparations is assembled into rod-like assemblies. Here, we have used precise cell culture-based prion infectivity assays to define the physical relationship between the PrP rods and prion infectivity and have used electron tomography to define their architecture. We show that infectious PrP rods isolated from multiple prion strains have a common hierarchical assembly comprising twisted pairs of short fibres with repeating substructure. The architecture of the PrP rods provides a new structural basis for understanding prion infectivity and can explain the inability to systematically generate high-titre synthetic prions from recombinant PrP.

  7. The major form of hepatitis C virus alternate reading frame protein is suppressed by core protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marie; Dimitrova, Maria; Baumert, Thomas F.; Schuster, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a human RNA virus encoding 10 proteins in a single open reading frame. In the +1 frame, an ‘alternate reading frame’ (ARF) overlaps with the core protein-encoding sequence and encodes the ARF protein (ARFP). Here, we investigated the molecular regulatory mechanisms of ARFP expression in HCV target cells. Chimeric HCV-luciferase reporter constructs derived from the infectious HCV prototype isolate H77 were transfected into hepatocyte-derived cell lines. Translation initiation was most efficient at the internal AUG codon at position 86/88, resulting in the synthesis of a truncated ARFP named 86/88ARFP. Interestingly, 86/88ARFP synthesis was markedly enhanced in constructs containing an inactivated core protein reading frame. This enhancement was reversed by co-expression of core protein in trans, demonstrating suppression of ARFP synthesis by HCV core protein. In conclusion, our results indicate that translation of ARFP occurs mainly by alternative internal initiation at position 86/88 and is regulated by HCV core protein expression. The suppression of ARFP translation by HCV core protein suggests that ARFP expression is inversely linked to the level of viral replication. These findings define key mechanisms regulating ARFP expression and set the stage for further studies addressing the function of ARFP within the viral life cycle. PMID:18400784

  8. Microscopic relaxations in a protein sustained down to 160 K in a non-glass forming organic solvent

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neil, Hugh

    2016-05-03

    In this paper, we have studied microscopic dynamics of a protein in carbon disulfide, a non-glass forming solvent, down to its freezing temperature of ca. 160 K. We have utilized quasielastic neutron scattering. A comparison of lysozyme hydrated with water and dissolved in carbon disulfide reveals a stark difference in the temperature dependence of the protein's microscopic relaxation dynamics induced by the solvent. In the case of hydration water, the common protein glass-forming solvent, the protein relaxation slows down in response to a large increase in the water viscosity on cooling down, exhibiting a well-known protein dynamical transition. The dynamicalmore » transition disappears in non-glass forming carbon disulfide, whose viscosity remains a weak function of temperature all the way down to freezing at just below 160 K. The microscopic relaxation dynamics of lysozyme dissolved in carbon disulfide is sustained down to the freezing temperature of its solvent at a rate similar to that measured at ambient temperature. Finally, our results demonstrate that protein dynamical transition is not merely solvent-assisted, but rather solvent-induced, or, more precisely, is a reflection of the temperature dependence of the solvent's glass-forming dynamics.« less

  9. Microscopic relaxations in a protein sustained down to 160 K in a non-glass forming organic solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neil, Hugh

    2016-05-03

    In this paper, we have studied microscopic dynamics of a protein in carbon disulfide, a non-glass forming solvent, down to its freezing temperature of ca. 160 K. We have utilized quasielastic neutron scattering. A comparison of lysozyme hydrated with water and dissolved in carbon disulfide reveals a stark difference in the temperature dependence of the protein's microscopic relaxation dynamics induced by the solvent. In the case of hydration water, the common protein glass-forming solvent, the protein relaxation slows down in response to a large increase in the water viscosity on cooling down, exhibiting a well-known protein dynamical transition. The dynamical transition disappears in non-glass forming carbon disulfide, whose viscosity remains a weak function of temperature all the way down to freezing at just below 160 K. The microscopic relaxation dynamics of lysozyme dissolved in carbon disulfide is sustained down to the freezing temperature of its solvent at a rate similar to that measured at ambient temperature. Finally, our results demonstrate that protein dynamical transition is not merely solvent-assisted, but rather solvent-induced, or, more precisely, is a reflection of the temperature dependence of the solvent's glass-forming dynamics.

  10. Microscopic relaxations in a protein sustained down to 160 K in a non-glass forming organic solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neil, Hugh

    2016-05-03

    In this paper, we have studied microscopic dynamics of a protein in carbon disulfide, a non-glass forming solvent, down to its freezing temperature of ca. 160 K. We have utilized quasielastic neutron scattering. A comparison of lysozyme hydrated with water and dissolved in carbon disulfide reveals a stark difference in the temperature dependence of the protein's microscopic relaxation dynamics induced by the solvent. In the case of hydration water, the common protein glass-forming solvent, the protein relaxation slows down in response to a large increase in the water viscosity on cooling down, exhibiting a well-known protein dynamical transition. The dynamical transition disappears in non-glass forming carbon disulfide, whose viscosity remains a weak function of temperature all the way down to freezing at just below 160 K. The microscopic relaxation dynamics of lysozyme dissolved in carbon disulfide is sustained down to the freezing temperature of its solvent at a rate similar to that measured at ambient temperature. Finally, our results demonstrate that protein dynamical transition is not merely solvent-assisted, but rather solvent-induced, or, more precisely, is a reflection of the temperature dependence of the solvent's glass-forming dynamics.

  11. Lipid dependencies, biogenesis and cytoplasmic micellar forms of integral membrane sugar transport proteins of the bacterial phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    Aboulwafa, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Permeases of the prokaryotic phosphoenolpyruvate–sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) catalyse sugar transport coupled to sugar phosphorylation. The lipid composition of a membrane determines the activities of these enzyme/transporters as well as the degree of coupling of phosphorylation to transport. We have investigated mechanisms of PTS permease biogenesis and identified cytoplasmic (soluble) forms of these integral membrane proteins. We found that the catalytic activities of the soluble forms differ from those of the membrane-embedded forms. Transport via the latter is much more sensitive to lipid composition than to phosphorylation, and some of these enzymes are much more sensitive to the lipid environment than others. While the membrane-embedded PTS permeases are always dimeric, the cytoplasmic forms are micellar, either monomeric or dimeric. Scattered published evidence suggests that other integral membrane proteins also exist in cytoplasmic micellar forms. The possible functions of cytoplasmic PTS permeases in biogenesis, intracellular sugar phosphorylation and permease storage are discussed. PMID:23985145

  12. Comparison of four different crystal forms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESX-1 secreted protein regulator EspR.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Shanti P; Meena, Sita R; Saxena, Ajay K

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESX-1 secreted protein regulator (EspR, Rv3849) is the key protein that delivers bacterial proteins into the host cell during mycobacterial infection. EspR binds directly to the espACD operon and is involved in transcriptional activation. In the current study, M. tuberculosis EspR has been crystallized and its X-ray structure has been determined at 3.3 Å resolution in a P3221 crystal form. EspR forms a physiological dimer in the crystal. Each EspR monomer contains an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The EspR structure in the P3221 crystal form was compared with previously determined EspR structures in P32, P21 and P212121 crystal forms. Structural comparison analysis indicated that the N-terminal helix-turn-helix domain of EspR acquires a rigid structure in the four crystal forms. However, significant structural differences were observed in the C-terminal domain of EspR in the P21 crystal form when compared with the P3221 and P32 crystal forms. The interaction, stabilization energy and buried surface area analysis of EspR in the four different crystal forms have provided information about the physiological dimer interface of EspR.

  13. Microscopic relaxations in a protein sustained down to 160K in a non-glass forming organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Mamontov, E; O'Neill, H

    2017-01-01

    We have studied microscopic dynamics of a protein in carbon disulfide, a non-glass forming solvent, down to its freezing temperature of ca. 160K. We have utilized quasielastic neutron scattering. A comparison of lysozyme hydrated with water and dissolved in carbon disulfide reveals a stark difference in the temperature dependence of the protein's microscopic relaxation dynamics induced by the solvent. In the case of hydration water, the common protein glass-forming solvent, the protein relaxation slows down in response to a large increase in the water viscosity on cooling down, exhibiting a well-known protein dynamical transition. The dynamical transition disappears in non-glass forming carbon disulfide, whose viscosity remains a weak function of temperature all the way down to freezing at just below 160K. The microscopic relaxation dynamics of lysozyme dissolved in carbon disulfide is sustained down to the freezing temperature of its solvent at a rate similar to that measured at ambient temperature. Our results demonstrate that protein dynamical transition is not merely solvent-assisted, but rather solvent-induced, or, more precisely, is a reflection of the temperature dependence of the solvent's glass-forming dynamics. We hypothesize that, if the long debated idea regarding the direct link between the microscopic relaxations and the biological activity in proteins is correct, then not only the microscopic relaxations, but also the activity, could be sustained in proteins all the way down to the freezing temperature of a non-glass forming solvent with a weak temperature dependence of its viscosity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunological and Chemical Identification of Intracellular Forms of Adenovirus Type 2 Terminal Protein

    PubMed Central

    Green, Maurice; Symington, Janey; Brackmann, Karl H.; Cartas, Maria A.; Thornton, Helen; Young, Leann

    1981-01-01

    Highly purified adenovirus type 2 terminal protein (TP) with an apparent Mr of 55,000 (55K) was prepared in quantities of 10 to 30 μg from guanidine hydrochloride- or sodium dodecyl sulfate-disrupted virions (60 to 120 mg). Guinea pigs were immunized with 14 to 20 injections of TP in amounts of 1 to 2 μg. Antiserum to TP was used to study the intracellular polypeptides related to adenovirus type 2 TP. By immunoprecipitation with anti-TP serum, we identified 80K and 76K polypeptides in the nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic S100 fractions of [35S]methionine-labeled cells early and late after infection with Ad2. By immunoautoradiographic analysis which eliminates coprecipitation of unrelated proteins, we identified an 80K polypeptide (probably an 80K-76K doublet) in unlabeled, late infected cells, using anti-TP serum and 125I-labeled staphylococcal protein A. About two- to threefold-higher levels of the 80K and 76K polypeptides were present in the nucleoplasm than in the S100 fraction, and two- to threefold-higher levels were found in late infected cells than in early infected cells (cycloheximide enhanced, arabinofuranosylcytosine treated). We did not detect the 80K or 76K polypeptide in uninfected cells, indicating that these polypeptides are virus coded. Tryptic peptide map analysis showed that the 80K and 76K polypeptides are very closely related and that they share peptides with the DNA-bound 55K TP. Our data provide the first direct demonstration of intracellular 80K and 76K forms of TP. The intracellular 80K and 76K polypeptides are closely related or identical to the 80K polypeptide that Challberg and co-workers (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:5105-5109, 1980) detected at the termini of adenovirus DNA synthesized in vitro and to the 87K polypeptide that Stillman and co-workers (Cell 23:497-508, 1981) translated in vitro. We did not detect the 55K TP in early or late infected cells, consistent with the proposal by Challberg and co-workers that the 80K

  15. Lipids as cofactors in protein folding: Stereo-specific lipid–protein interactions are required to form HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells)

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Malin; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Linse, Sara; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-01-01

    Proteins can adjust their structure and function in response to shifting environments. Functional diversity is created not only by the sequence but by changes in tertiary structure. Here we present evidence that lipid cofactors may enable otherwise unstable protein folding variants to maintain their conformation and to form novel, biologically active complexes. We have identified unsaturated C18 fatty acids in the cis conformation as the cofactors that bind apo α-lactalbumin and form HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells). The complexes were formed on an ion exchange column, were stable in a molten globule-like conformation, and had attained the novel biological activity. The protein–fatty acid interaction was specific, as saturated C18 fatty acids, or unsaturated C18:1trans conformers were unable to form complexes with apo α-lactalbumin, as were fatty acids with shorter or longer carbon chains. Unsaturated cis fatty acids other than C18:1:9cis were able to form stable complexes, but these were not active in the apoptosis assay. The results demonstrate that stereo-specific lipid–protein interactions can stabilize partially unfolded conformations and form molecular complexes with novel biological activity. The results offer a new mechanism for the functional diversity of proteins, by exploiting lipids as essential, tissue-specific cofactors in this process. PMID:14627740

  16. Screening and Characterization of Hydrate Forms of T-3256336, a Novel Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) Protein Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shoko; Kojima, Takashi; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Saito, Bunnai; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Different crystal packing of hydrates from anhydrate crystals leads to different physical properties, such as solubility and stability. Investigation of the potential of varied hydrate formation, and understanding the stability in an anhydrous/hydrate system, are crucial to prevent an undesired transition during the manufacturing process and storage. Only one anhydrous form of T-3256336, a novel inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein antagonist, was discovered during synthesis, and no hydrate form has been identified. In this study, we conducted hydrate screening such as dynamic water vapor sorption/desorption (DVS), and the slurry experiment, and characterized the solid-state properties of anhydrous/hydrate forms to determine the most desirable crystalline form for development. New hydrate forms, both mono-hydrate and hemi-hydrate forms, were discovered as a result of this hydrate screening. The characterization of two new hydrate forms was conducted, and the anhydrous form was determined to be the most desirable development form of T-3256336 in terms of solid-state stability. In addition, the stability of the anhydrous form was investigated using the water content and temperature controlled slurry experiment to obtain the desirable crystal form in the crystallization process. The water content regions of the stable phase of the desired form, the anhydrous form, were identified for the cooling crystallization process.

  17. Mirror image forms of snow flea antifreeze protein prepared by total chemical synthesis have identical antifreeze activities.

    PubMed

    Pentelute, Brad L; Gates, Zachary P; Dashnau, Jennifer L; Vanderkooi, Jane M; Kent, Stephen B H

    2008-07-30

    The recently discovered glycine-rich snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP) has no sequence homology with any known proteins. No experimental structure has been reported for this interesting protein molecule. Here we report the total chemical synthesis of the mirror image forms of sfAFP (i.e., L-sfAFP, the native protein, and D-sfAFP, the native protein's enantiomer). The predicted 81 amino acid residue polypeptide chain of sfAFP contains Cys residues at positions 1, 13, 28, and 43 and was prepared from four synthetic peptide segments by sequential native chemical ligation. After purification, the full-length synthetic polypeptide was folded at 4 degrees C to form the sfAFP protein containing two disulfides. Chemically synthesized sfAFP had the expected antifreeze activity in an ice recrystallization inhibition assay. Mirror image D-sfAFP protein was prepared by the same synthetic strategy, using peptide segments made from d-amino acids, and had an identical but opposite-sign CD spectrum. As expected, D-sfAFP displays the same antifreeze properties as L-sfAFP, because ice presents an achiral surface for sfAFP binding. Facile synthetic access to sfAFP will enable determination of its molecular structure and systematic elucidation of the molecular basis of the antifreeze properties of this unique protein.

  18. The GraS Sensor in Staphylococcus aureus Mediates Resistance to Host Defense Peptides Differing in Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Chaili, Siyang; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Waring, Alan J.; Memmi, Guido; Donegan, Niles; Yang, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the two-component regulatory system GraRS to sense and respond to host defense peptides (HDPs). However, the mechanistic impact of GraS or its extracellular sensing loop (EL) on HDP resistance is essentially unexplored. Strains with null mutations in the GraS holoprotein (ΔgraS) or its EL (ΔEL) were compared for mechanisms of resistance to HDPs of relevant immune sources: neutrophil α-defensin (human neutrophil peptide 1 [hNP-1]), cutaneous β-defensin (human β-defensin 2 [hBD-2]), or the platelet kinocidin congener RP-1. Actions studied by flow cytometry included energetics (ENR); membrane permeabilization (PRM); annexin V binding (ANX), and cell death protease activation (CDP). Assay conditions simulated bloodstream (pH 7.5) or phagolysosomal (pH 5.5) pH contexts. S. aureus strains were more susceptible to HDPs at pH 7.5 than at pH 5.5, and each HDP exerted a distinct effect signature. The impacts of ΔgraS and ΔΕL on HDP resistance were peptide and pH dependent. Both mutants exhibited defects in ANX response to hNP-1 or hBD-2 at pH 7.5, but only hNP-1 did so at pH 5.5. Both mutants exhibited hyper-PRM, -ANX, and -CDP responses to RP-1 at both pHs and hypo-ENR at pH 5.5. The actions correlated with ΔgraS or ΔΕL hypersusceptibility to hNP-1 or RP-1 (but not hBD-2) at pH 7.5 and to all study HDPs at pH 5.5. An exogenous EL mimic protected mutant strains from hNP-1 and hBD-2 but not RP-1, indicating that GraS and its EL play nonredundant roles in S. aureus survival responses to specific HDPs. These findings suggest that GraS mediates specific resistance countermeasures to HDPs in immune contexts that are highly relevant to S. aureus pathogenesis in humans. PMID:26597988

  19. Diversity of amyloid beta protein fragment [1-40]-formed channels.

    PubMed

    Kourie, J I; Henry, C L; Farrelly, P

    2001-06-01

    1. The lipid bilayer technique was used to characterize the biophysical and pharmacological properties of several ion channels formed by incorporating amyloid beta protein fragment (AbetaP) 1-40 into lipid membranes. Based on the conductance, kinetics, selectivity, and pharmacological properties, the following AbetaP[1-40]-formed ion channels have been identified: (i) The AbetaP[1-40]-formed "bursting" fast cation channel was characterized by (a) a single channel conductance of 63 pS (250/50 mM KCl cis/trans) at +140 mV. 17 pS (250/50 mM KCl cis/trans) at -160 mV, and the nonlinear current-voltage relationship drawn to a third-order polynomial, (b) selectivity sequence PK > PNa > PLi = 1.0:0.60:0.47, (c) Po of 0.22 at 0 mV and 0.55 at +120 mV, and (d) Zn2+-induced reduction in current amplitude, a typical property of a slow block mechanism. (ii) The AbetaP[1-40]-formed "spiky" fast cation channel was characterized by (a) a similar kinetics to the "bursting" fast channel with exception for the absence of the long intraburst closures, (b) single channel conductance of 63 pS (250/50 KCl) at +140 mV 17 pS (250/50 KCl) at -160 mV, the current-voltage relationship nonlinear drawn to a third-order polynomial fit, and (c) selectivity sequence PRb > (iii) The AbetaP[1-40]-formed medium conductance channel was charcterized by (a) 275 pS (250/50 mM KCl cis/trans) at +140 mV and 19 pS (250/50 mM KCl cis/trans) at -160 mV and (b) inactivation at Vms more negative than -120 and more positive than +120 mV. (iv) The AbetaP[1-40]-formed inactivating large conductance channel was characterized by (a) fast and slow modes of opening to seven multilevel conductances ranging between 0-589 pS (in 250/50 mM KCI) at +140 mV and 0-704 pS (in 250/50 mM KCl) at -160 mV. (b) The fast mode which had a conductance of <250 pS was voltage dependent. The inactivation was described by a bell-shaped curve with a peak lag time of 7.2 s at +36 mV. The slow mode which had a conductance of >250 pS was

  20. Structure and dynamics of the membrane-bound form of the filamentous bacteriophage coat proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogusky, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the Pf1 and fd bacteriophage coat proteins in detergent micelles are characterized in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The coat proteins are found to exist within the bacterial inner cell membrane during viral infection and assembly. The coat proteins serve as a model system to investigate integral membrane proteins as well as the viral infection and assembly processes. The coat protein is insoluble in aqueous or organic solvents and can only be effectively solubilized in the presence of detergents that form micelles or phospholipids that form vesicles. The effective molecular weight of the detergent-micelle complex is ca. 30K daltons. Sequential assignment strategies were ineffective due to short T/sub 2s/ and severe resonance degeneracy. The backbone resonance assignments were completed by the combination of several homo- and heteronuclear correlation techniques with biosynthetic /sup 15/N labelling. 2D NOE experiments were used to locate and characterize the secondary structure of the membrane bound form of the proteins showing them to be largely helical with the hydrophobic core existing in a very stable helix.

  1. The fungal cerato-platanin protein EPL1 forms highly ordered layers at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bonazza, K; Gaderer, R; Neudl, S; Przylucka, A; Allmaier, G; Druzhinina, I S; Grothe, H; Friedbacher, G; Seidl-Seiboth, V

    2015-03-07

    Cerato-platanin proteins (CPPs) and hydrophobins are two classes of small, secreted proteins that are exclusively found in fungi. CPPs are known as chitin-binding proteins, and were recently also shown to form protein layers at air/water interfaces, but the features of these layers were not investigated on the molecular level yet. In this study, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), EPL1, a member of the CPP family was shown to form highly ordered monolayers at a hydrophobic surface/liquid-interface. Furthermore, two new hydrophobins were analysed, and the influence of EPL1 on hydrophobin layers was studied in situ. Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins that are able to self-assemble at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces, thereby inverting the polarity of the surface. This renders fungal growth structures such as spores water repellent. The combination of AFM data and wettability experiments led to the conclusion that in presence of both, hydrophobins and EPL1, a previously unknown hybrid layer is formed. This mixed protein layer is on one hand not inverting but enhancing the hydrophobicity of HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), typical for EPL1, and on the other hand, it is stable and water insoluble, which is reminiscent of hydrophobin layers.

  2. Platelet factor 4 binds to glycanated forms of thrombomodulin and to protein C. A potential mechanism for enhancing generation of activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Dudek, A Z; Pennell, C A; Decker, T D; Young, T A; Key, N S; Slungaard, A

    1997-12-12

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule heparin-binding protein. We have previously shown that PF4 accelerates up to 25-fold the proteolytic conversion of protein C to activated protein C by the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex by increasing its affinity for protein C 30-fold. This stimulatory effect requires presence of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain in protein C and is enhanced by the presence of a chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) domain on thrombomodulin. We hypothesized that cationic PF4 binds to both protein C and thrombomodulin through these anionic domains. Qualitative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of avidin extracts of solutions containing biotinylated PF4 and candidate ligands shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ but not GAG- forms of thrombomodulin and native but not Gla-domainless protein C. Quantitative analysis using the surface plasmon resonance-based BIAcoreTM biosensor system confirms the extremely high affinity of PF4 for heparin (KD = 4 nM) and shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ thrombomodulin with a KD of 31 nM and to protein C with a KD of 0.37 microM. In contrast, PF4 had no measurable interaction with GAG- thrombomodulin or Gla-domainless protein C. Western blot analysis of normal human plasma extracted with biotinylated PF4 demonstrates PF4 binding to protein C in a physiologic context. Thus, PF4 binds with relative specificity and high affinity to the GAG- domain of thrombomodulin and the Gla domain of protein C. These interactions may enhance the affinity of the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex for protein C and thereby promote the generation of activated protein C.

  3. Kinetoplast DNA-binding protein profile in the epimastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Castro, Jorge E; Acosta-Viana, Karla; Baylon-Pacheco, Lydia; González-Robles, Arturo; Guzmán-Marín, Eugenia; Rosales-Encina, José L

    2002-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family possesses one of the most unusual DNAs found in nature: the kinetoplast genome. It consists of a few dozen maxicircles that encode for some subunits of mitochondrial enzymes and rRNAs in a cryptic pattern and thousands of minicircles that encode for the guide RNAs (gRNAs), all catenated and constituting a dense network. The complexity of kinetoplast genome based on its intricate DNA structure is well known; however, only a small number of proteins associated with kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) have been described, and the majority are related with the replication process. We describe the protein profile obtained using formaldehyde as a cross-linking agent to obtain the kinetoplast DNA-protein complex, and Southwestern assay to identify the kDNA binding proteins present in the complex. We identified seven proteins eluted from the kDNA complex fixed by formaldehyde. Polyclonal antiserum developed against the kDNA-protein complex recognized only four proteins in crude extracts of epimastigote stage, suggesting immunogenic differences among these proteins and/or their availability in the kinetoplast genome. Southwestern assay using minicircle fragments showed nine kDNA binding proteins in crude extracts of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote. We describe several proteins associated with the kDNA. Some could be involved in the essential process for parasite life and also could be a good target for drug or vaccine development. The results contribute to understanding the organization of the kinetoplast genome.

  4. The protein folds as platonic forms: new support for the pre-Darwinian conception of evolution by natural law.

    PubMed

    Denton, Michael J; Marshall, Craig J; Legge, Michael

    2002-12-07

    Before the Darwinian revolution many biologists considered organic forms to be determined by natural law like atoms or crystals and therefore necessary, intrinsic and immutable features of the world order, which will occur throughout the cosmos wherever there is life. The search for the natural determinants of organic form-the celebrated "Laws of Form"-was seen as one of the major tasks of biology. After Darwin, this Platonic conception of form was abandoned and natural selection, not natural law, was increasingly seen to be the main, if not the exclusive, determinant of organic form. However, in the case of one class of very important organic forms-the basic protein folds-advances in protein chemistry since the early 1970s have revealed that they represent a finite set of natural forms, determined by a number of generative constructional rules, like those which govern the formation of atoms or crystals, in which functional adaptations are clearly secondary modifications of primary "givens of physics." The folds are evidently determined by natural law, not natural selection, and are "lawful forms" in the Platonic and pre-Darwinian sense of the word, which are bound to occur everywhere in the universe where the same 20 amino acids are used for their construction. We argue that this is a major discovery which has many important implications regarding the origin of proteins, the origin of life and the fundamental nature of organic form. We speculate that it is unlikely that the folds will prove to be the only case in nature where a set of complex organic forms is determined by natural law, and suggest that natural law may have played a far greater role in the origin and evolution of life than is currently assumed.

  5. TRP1 interacting PDZ-domain protein GIPC forms oligomers and is localized to intracellular vesicles in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Kedlaya, Rajendra H; Bhat, Kumar M R; Mitchell, Julie; Darnell, Steven J; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2006-10-15

    PDZ proteins coordinate assembly of protein complexes that participate in diverse biological processes. GIPC is a multifunctional PDZ protein that interacts with several soluble and membrane proteins. Unlike most PDZ proteins, GIPC contains single PDZ domain and the mechanisms by which GIPC mediates its actions remain unclear. We investigated the possibility that in lieu of multiple PDZ domains, GIPC forms multimers. Here, we demonstrate that GIPC can bind to itself and that the PDZ domain is involved in GIPC-GIPC interaction. Gel filtration, sucrose gradient centrifugation and chemical cross-linking showed that whereas bulk of cytosolic GIPC was present as monomer, oligomers with an estimated molecular mass corresponding to GIPC homotrimer were readily detectable in the membrane fraction. Modeling of GIPC PDZ domain showed feasibility of trimerization. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that GIPC is present in clusters near vesicles. Our data suggest that oligomers of GIPC mediate its functions in melanocytes.

  6. TRP1 interacting PDZ-domain protein GIPC forms oligomers and is localized to intracellular vesicles in human melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kedlaya, Rajendra H.; Bhat, Kumar M.R.; Mitchell, Julie; Darnell, Steven J.; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2010-01-01

    PDZ proteins coordinate assembly of protein complexes that participate in diverse biological processes. GIPC is a multifunctional PDZ protein that interacts with several soluble and membrane proteins. Unlike most PDZ proteins, GIPC contains single PDZ domain and the mechanisms by which GIPC mediates its actions remain unclear. We investigated the possibility that in lieu of multiple PDZ domains, GIPC forms multimers. Here, we demonstrate that GIPC can bind to itself and that the PDZ domain is involved in GIPC–GIPC interaction. Gel filtration, sucrose gradient centrifugation and chemical cross-linking showed that whereas bulk of cytosolic GIPC was present as monomer, oligomers with an estimated molecular mass corresponding to GIPC homotrimer were readily detectable in the membrane fraction. Modeling of GIPC PDZ domain showed feasibility of trimerization. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that GIPC is present in clusters near vesicles. Our data suggest that oligomers of GIPC mediate its functions in melanocytes. PMID:16962991

  7. Free mRNA in excess upon polysome dissociation is a scaffold for protein multimerization to form stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Bounedjah, Ouissame; Desforges, Bénédicte; Wu, Ting-Di; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Marco, Sergio; Hamon, Loic; Curmi, Patrick A.; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Piétrement, Olivier; Pastré, David

    2014-01-01

    The sequence of events leading to stress granule assembly in stressed cells remains elusive. We show here, using isotope labeling and ion microprobe, that proportionally more RNA than proteins are present in stress granules than in surrounding cytoplasm. We further demonstrate that the delivery of single strand polynucleotides, mRNA and ssDNA, to the cytoplasm can trigger stress granule assembly. On the other hand, increasing the cytoplasmic level of mRNA-binding proteins like YB-1 can directly prevent the aggregation of mRNA by forming isolated mRNPs, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, we also discovered that enucleated cells do form stress granules, demonstrating that the translocation to the cytoplasm of nuclear prion-like RNA-binding proteins like TIA-1 is dispensable for stress granule assembly. The results lead to an alternative view on stress granule formation based on the following sequence of events: after the massive dissociation of polysomes during stress, mRNA-stabilizing proteins like YB-1 are outnumbered by the burst of nonpolysomal mRNA. mRNA freed of ribosomes thus becomes accessible to mRNA-binding aggregation-prone proteins or misfolded proteins, which induces stress granule formation. Within the frame of this model, the shuttling of nuclear mRNA-stabilizing proteins to the cytoplasm could dissociate stress granules or prevent their assembly. PMID:25013173

  8. The EICP22 Protein of Equine Herpesvirus 1 Physically Interacts with the Immediate-Early Protein and with Itself To Form Dimers and Higher-Order Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Derbigny, Wilbert A.; Kim, Seong K.; Caughman, Gretchen B.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    The EICP22 protein (EICP22P) of Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is an early protein that functions synergistically with other EHV-1 regulatory proteins to transactivate the expression of early and late viral genes. We have previously identified EICP22P as an accessory regulatory protein that has the ability to enhance the transactivating properties and the sequence-specific DNA-binding activity of the EHV-1 immediate-early protein (IEP). In the present study, we identify EICP22P as a self-associating protein able to form dimers and higher-order complexes during infection. Studies with the yeast two-hybrid system also indicate that physical interactions occur between EICP22P and IEP and that EICP22P self-aggregates. Results from in vitro and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation experiments and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down studies confirmed a direct protein-protein interaction between EICP22P and IEP as well as self-interactions of EICP22P. Analyses of infected cells by laser-scanning confocal microscopy with antibodies specific for IEP and EICP22P revealed that these viral regulatory proteins colocalize in the nucleus at early times postinfection and form aggregates of dense nuclear structures within the nucleoplasm. Mutational analyses with a battery of EICP22P deletion mutants in both yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down experiments implicated amino acids between positions 124 and 143 as the critical domain mediating the EICP22P self-interactions. Additional in vitro protein-binding assays with a library of GST-EICP22P deletion mutants identified amino acids mapping within region 2 (amino acids [aa] 65 to 196) and region 3 (aa 197 to 268) of EICP22P as residues that mediate its interaction with IEP. PMID:10627553

  9. Identification of goose (Anser anser) and mule duck (Anasplatyrhynchos x Cairina moschata) foie gras by multiplex polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 5S RDNA gene.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A; García, T; González, I; Asensio, L; Fernández, A; Lobo, E; Hernández, P E; Martín, R

    2001-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the nuclear 5S rDNA gene has been used for the identification of goose and mule duck foie gras. Two species-specific reverse primers were designed and used in a multiplex reaction, together with a forward universal primer, to amplify specific fragments of the 5S rDNA in each species. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed clear identification of goose and mule duck foie gras samples. This genetic marker can be useful for detecting fraudulent substitution of the duck liver for the more expensive goose liver.

  10. Cytochrome c peroxidase. Interconversion of chemically and enzymatically reactive and unreactive forms of the ferric protein.

    PubMed

    Mathews, R A; Wittenberg, J B

    1979-07-10

    Ferric yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in the presence of different anions may assume a number of forms which differ in optical spectra and chemical properties. In solutions whose only anion is acetate, two spectral forms are present together in an equilibrium. Each of these spectral species is believed to bear bound acetate anion. A form characterized by an intense absorption maximum at 620 nm is unreactive enzymatically and does not react with hydrogen peroxide or with dithionite. A form characterized by a less intense absorption near 645 nm is enzymatically and chemically reactive. Increasing temperature and increasing pH displace the equilibrium toward the 645 nm form. Increasing cytochrome c peroxidase concentration favors the 620 nm form. In kinetic experiments in which the 645 nm form is removed by rapid reaction with H2O2 or dithionite, the 620 nm form is converted in a first order reaction (k = 0.36 s-1, 15 degrees C) to the 645 nm form. In solutions whose sole anion is phosphate a 645 nm form is the only demonstrable spectral species. The enzymatic activity and rates of chemical reaction of 645 nm spectral forms occurring in acetate and in phosphate buffers are the same.

  11. LexA repressor forms stable dimers in solution. The role of specific dna in tightening protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohana-Borges, R; Pacheco, A B; Sousa, F J; Foguel, D; Almeida, D F; Silva, J L

    2000-02-18

    Cooperativity in the interactions among proteins subunits and DNA is crucial for DNA recognition. LexA repressor was originally thought to bind DNA as a monomer, with cooperativity leading to tighter binding of the second monomer. The main support for this model was a high value of the dissociation constant for the LexA dimer (micromolar range). Here we show that the protein is a dimer at nanomolar concentrations under different conditions. The reversible dissociation of LexA dimer was investigated by the effects of hydrostatic pressure or urea, using fluorescence emission and polarization to monitor the dissociation process. The dissociation constant lies in the picomolar range (lower than 20 pM). LexA monomers associate with an unusual large volume change (340 ml/mol), indicating the burial of a large surface area upon dimerization. Whereas nonspecific DNA has no stabilizing effect, specific DNA induces tightening of the dimer and a 750-fold decrease in the K(d). In contrast to the previous model, a tight dimer rather than a monomer is the functional repressor. Accordingly, the LexA dimer only loses its ability to recognize a specific DNA sequence by RecA-induced autoproteolysis. Our work provides insights into the linkage between protein-protein interactions, DNA recognition, and DNA repair.

  12. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-bin; Ye, Jin-zhou; Yang, Man-jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication. PMID:28210241

  13. BHMP39 PROTEINS OF B. HYODYSENTERIAE FORM HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT COMPLEXES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the aetiological agent of swine dysentery, a severe mucohaemorrhagic diarrhoeal disease of pigs, with economic significance for the global pork industry. The most abundant outer membrane proteins of B. hyodysenteriae are from the Bhmp39 family of proteins. Eight bhmp39 ...

  14. [Physical-chemical properties of the mutant (protein) form of D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein GGBP/H152C with an attached fluorescent dye BADAN].

    PubMed

    Fonin, A V; Stepanenko, O V; Povarova, O I; Volova, E A; Filippova, E M; Bublikov, G S; Kuznetsova, I M; Demchenko, A P; Turoverov, K K

    2013-01-01

    The influence of various factors on the physico-chemical characteristics and complexation of glucose with a mutant form of D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein which can be regarded as a sensor of the glucometer, namely the protein GGBP/H152C with solvatochromic dye BADAN attached to the cysteine residue Cys 152, has been investigated. The point mutation His 152Cys and attaching BADAN reduced the affinity of the mutant form GGBP/H152C to glucose more than 8-fold compared to the wild type protein. This allows using this mutant for the determination of sugar content in biological fluids extracted by transdermal technologies. Sufficiently rapid complexation of GGBP/H152C with glucose (the time of protein-glucose complex formation is not more than three seconds even in solutions with a viscosity of 4 cP) provides timely monitoring changes in the concentration of sugar. The changes of ionic strength and pH within the physiological range of values of these variables do not have significant influence on fluorescent characteristics of GGBP/H152C-BADAN. At acidic pH, (see symbol) some of the molecules GGBP/H152C is in the unfolded state. It has been shown that mutant form GGBP/H152C has relatively low resistance to guanidine hydrochloride denaturing effects. This result indicates the need for more stable proteins to create a sensor for glucose biosensor system.

  15. Mitochondria: a kinase anchoring protein 1, a signaling platform for mitochondrial form and function.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ronald A; Strack, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are best known for their role as cellular power plants, but they also serve as signaling hubs, regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A kinase anchoring protein 1 (AKAP1) is a scaffold protein that recruits protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins, as well as RNA, to the outer mitochondrial membrane. AKAP1 thereby integrates several second messenger cascades to modulate mitochondrial function and associated physiological and pathophysiological outcomes. Here, we review what is currently known about AKAP1's macromolecular interactions in health and disease states, including obesity. We also discuss dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), the enzyme that catalyzes mitochondrial fission, as one of the key substrates of the PKA/AKAP1 signaling complex in neurons. Recent evidence suggests that AKAP1 has critical roles in neuronal development and survival, which are mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of Drp1 and maintenance of mitochondrial integrity.

  16. The evolution of calcite-bearing kimberlites by melt-rock reaction: evidence from polymineralic inclusions within clinopyroxene and garnet megacrysts from Lac de Gras kimberlites, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussweiler, Y.; Stone, R. S.; Pearson, D. G.; Luth, R. W.; Stachel, T.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; Menzies, A.

    2016-07-01

    Megacrystic (>1 cm) clinopyroxene (Cr-diopside) and garnet (Cr-pyrope) xenocrysts within kimberlites from Lac de Gras (Northwest Territories, Canada) contain fully crystallized melt inclusions. These `polymineralic inclusions' have previously been interpreted to form by necking down of melts at mantle depths. We present a detailed petrographical and geochemical investigation of polymineralic inclusions and their host crystals to better understand how they form and what they reveal about the evolution of kimberlite melt. Genetically, the megacrysts are mantle xenocrysts with peridotitic chemical signatures indicating an origin within the lithospheric mantle (for the Cr-diopsides studied here ~4.6 GPa, 1015 °C). Textural evidence for disequilibrium between the host crystals and their polymineralic inclusions (spongy rims in Cr-diopside, kelyphite in Cr-pyrope) is consistent with measured Sr isotopic disequilibrium. The preservation of disequilibrium establishes a temporal link to kimberlite eruption. In Cr-diopsides, polymineralic inclusions contain phlogopite, olivine, chromite, serpentine, and calcite. Abundant fluid inclusion trails surround the inclusions. In Cr-pyropes, the inclusions additionally contain Al-spinel, clinopyroxene, and dolomite. The major and trace element compositions of the inclusion phases are generally consistent with the early stages of kimberlite differentiation trends. Extensive chemical exchange between the host phases and the inclusions is indicated by enrichment of the inclusions in major components of the host crystals, such as Cr2O3 and Al2O3. This chemical evidence, along with phase equilibria constraints, supports the proposal that the inclusions within Cr-diopside record the decarbonation reaction: dolomitic melt + diopside → forsterite + calcite + CO2, yielding the observed inclusion mineralogy and producing associated (CO2-rich) fluid inclusions. Our study of polymineralic inclusions in megacrysts provides clear mineralogical

  17. The human immunodeficiency virus antigen Nef forms protein bodies in leaves of transgenic tobacco when fused to zeolin.

    PubMed

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Mainieri, Davide; Rossi, Marika; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Arcioni, Sergio; Vitale, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Protein bodies (PB) are stable polymers naturally formed by certain seed storage proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The human immunodeficiency virus negative factor (Nef) protein, a potential antigen for the development of an anti-viral vaccine, is highly unstable when introduced into the plant secretory pathway, probably because of folding defects in the ER environment. The aim of this study was to promote the formation of Nef-containing PB in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves by fusing the Nef sequence to the N-terminal domains of the maize storage protein gamma-zein or to the chimeric protein zeolin (which efficiently forms PB and is composed of the vacuolar storage protein phaseolin fused to the N-terminal domains of gamma-zein). Protein blots and pulse-chase indicate that fusions between Nef and the same gamma-zein domains present in zeolin are degraded by ER quality control. Consistently, a mutated zeolin, in which wild-type phaseolin was substituted with a defective version known to be degraded by ER quality control, is unstable in plant cells. Fusion of Nef to the entire zeolin sequence instead allows the formation of PB detectable by electron microscopy and subcellular fractionation, leading to zeolin-Nef accumulation higher than 1% of total soluble protein, consistently reproduced in independent transgenic plants. It is concluded that zeolin, but not its gamma-zein portion, has a positive dominant effect over ER quality control degradation. These results provide insights into the requirements for PB formation and avoidance of quality-control degradation, and indicate a strategy for enhancing foreign protein accumulation in plants.

  18. The human immunodeficiency virus antigen Nef forms protein bodies in leaves of transgenic tobacco when fused to zeolin

    PubMed Central

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Bellucci, Michele; Mainieri, Davide; Rossi, Marika; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Arcioni, Sergio; Vitale, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Protein bodies (PB) are stable polymers naturally formed by certain seed storage proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The human immunodeficiency virus negative factor (Nef) protein, a potential antigen for the development of an anti-viral vaccine, is highly unstable when introduced into the plant secretory pathway, probably because of folding defects in the ER environment. The aim of this study was to promote the formation of Nef-containing PB in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves by fusing the Nef sequence to the N-terminal domains of the maize storage protein γ-zein or to the chimeric protein zeolin (which efficiently forms PB and is composed of the vacuolar storage protein phaseolin fused to the N-terminal domains of γ-zein). Protein blots and pulse–chase indicate that fusions between Nef and the same γ-zein domains present in zeolin are degraded by ER quality control. Consistently, a mutated zeolin, in which wild-type phaseolin was substituted with a defective version known to be degraded by ER quality control, is unstable in plant cells. Fusion of Nef to the entire zeolin sequence instead allows the formation of PB detectable by electron microscopy and subcellular fractionation, leading to zeolin–Nef accumulation higher than 1% of total soluble protein, consistently reproduced in independent transgenic plants. It is concluded that zeolin, but not its γ-zein portion, has a positive dominant effect over ER quality control degradation. These results provide insights into the requirements for PB formation and avoidance of quality-control degradation, and indicate a strategy for enhancing foreign protein accumulation in plants. PMID:18540021

  19. Bowl-shaped oligomeric structures on membranes as DegP's new functional forms in protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qing-Tao; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Chang, Lei-Fu; Wu, Yi; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sui, Sen-Fang

    2009-01-01

    In the periplasm of Escherichia coli, DegP (also known as HtrA), which has both chaperone-like and proteolytic activities, prevents the accumulation of toxic misfolded and unfolded polypeptides. In solution, upon binding to denatured proteins, DegP forms large cage-like structures. Here, we show that DegP forms a range of bowl-shaped structures, independent of substrate proteins, each with a 4-, 5-, or 6-fold symmetry and all with a DegP trimer as the structural unit, on lipid membranes. These membrane-bound DegP assemblies have the capacity to recruit and process substrates in the bowl chamber, and they exhibit higher proteolytic and lower chaperone-like activities than DegP in solution. Our findings imply that DegP might regulate its dual roles during protein quality control, depending on its assembly state in the narrow bacterial envelope. PMID:19255437

  20. Comparative protein expression in different strains of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Alexova, Ralitza; Haynes, Paul A; Ferrari, Belinda C; Neilan, Brett A

    2011-09-01

    Toxin production in algal blooms presents a significant problem for the water industry. Of particular concern is microcystin, a potent hepatotoxin produced by the unicellular freshwater species Microcystis aeruginosa. In this study, the proteomes of six toxic and nontoxic strains of M. aeruginosa were analyzed to gain further knowledge in elucidating the role of microcystin production in this microorganism. This represents the first comparative proteomic study in a cyanobacterial species. A large diversity in the protein expression profiles of each strain was observed, with a significant proportion of the identified proteins appearing to be strain-specific. In total, 475 proteins were identified reproducibly and of these, 82 comprised the core proteome of M. aeruginosa. The expression of several hypothetical and unknown proteins, including four possible operons was confirmed. Surprisingly, no proteins were found to be produced only by toxic or nontoxic strains. Quantitative proteome analysis using the label-free normalized spectrum abundance factor approach revealed nine proteins that were differentially expressed between toxic and nontoxic strains. These proteins participate in carbon-nitrogen metabolism and redox balance maintenance and point to an involvement of the global nitrogen regulator NtcA in toxicity. In addition, the switching of a previously inactive toxin-producing strain to microcystin synthesis is reported.

  1. Iron-regulatory proteins DmdR1 and DmdR2 of Streptomyces coelicolor form two different DNA-protein complexes with iron boxes.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Francisco J; Martín, Juan F

    2004-01-01

    In high G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the control of expression of genes involved in iron metabolism is exerted by a DmdR [divalent (bivalent) metal-dependent regulatory protein] in the presence of Fe2+ or other bivalent ions. The dmdR1 and dmdR2 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the DmdR1 and DmdR2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed that both DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the 19-nt tox and desA iron boxes forming two different complexes in each case. Increasing the concentrations of DmdR1 or DmdR2 protein shifted these complexes from their low-molecular-mass form to the high-molecular-mass complexes. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was prevented by the bivalent metal chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and by antibodies specific against the DmdR proteins. Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde of pure DmdR1 or DmdR2 proteins showed that DmdR1 forms dimers, whereas DmdR2 is capable of forming dimers and probably tetramers. Ten different iron boxes were found in a search for iron boxes in the genome of S. coelicolor. Most of them correspond to putative genes involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Since the nucleotide sequence of these ten boxes is identical (or slightly different) with the synthetic DNA fragment containing the desA box used in the present study, it is proposed that DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the iron boxes upstream of at least ten different genes in S. coelicolor. PMID:14960152

  2. The Proline Rich Homeodomain Protein PRH/Hhex Forms Stable Oligomers That Are Highly Resistant to Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anshuman; Burton, Nicholas M.; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Gaston, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Background Many transcription factors control gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences at or near the genes that they regulate. However, some transcription factors play more global roles in the control of gene expression by altering the architecture of sections of chromatin or even the whole genome. The ability to form oligomeric protein assemblies allows many of these proteins to manipulate extensive segments of DNA or chromatin via the formation of structures such as DNA loops or protein-DNA fibres. Principal Findings Here we show that the proline rich homeodomain protein PRH/Hhex forms predominantly octameric and/or hexadecameric species in solution as well as larger assemblies. We show that these assemblies are highly stable resisting denaturation by temperature and chemical denaturants. Conclusion These data indicate that PRH is functionally and structurally related to the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, a group of proteins that are known to act globally to control gene expression in bacteria and archaea. PMID:22540015

  3. Novel Protein Substrates of the Phospho-Form Modification System in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Their Connection to O-Linked Protein Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Anonsen, Jan Haug; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Aas, Finn Erik; Børud, Bente; Koomey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The zwitterionic phospho-form moieties phosphoethanolamine (PE) and phosphocholine (PC) are important components of bacterial membranes and cell surfaces. The major type IV pilus subunit protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, PilE, undergoes posttranslational modifications with these moieties via the activity of the pilin phospho-form transferase PptA. A number of observations relating to colocalization of phospho-form and O-linked glycan attachment sites in PilE suggested that these modifications might be either functionally or mechanistically linked or interact directly or indirectly. Moreover, it was unknown whether the phenomenon of phospho-form modification was solely dedicated to PilE or if other neisserial protein targets might exist. In light of these concerns, we screened for evidence of phospho-form modification on other membrane glycoproteins targeted by the broad-spectrum O-linked glycosylation system. In this way, two periplasmic lipoproteins, NGO1043 and NGO1237, were identified as substrates for PE addition. As seen previously for PilE, sites of PE modifications were clustered with those of glycan attachment. In the case of NGO1043, evidence for at least six serine phospho-form attachment sites was found, and further analyses revealed that at least two of these serines were also attachment sites for glycan. Finally, mutations altering glycosylation status led to the presence of pptA-dependent PC modifications on both proteins. Together, these results reinforce the associations established in PilE and provide evidence for dynamic interplay between phospho-form modification and O-linked glycosylation. The observations also suggest that phospho-form modifications likely contribute biologically at both intracellular and extracellular levels. PMID:22083701

  4. Myelin basic protein interaction with zinc and phosphate: fluorescence studies on the water-soluble form of the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Cavatorta, P; Giovanelli, S; Bobba, A; Riccio, P; Szabo, A G; Quagliariello, E

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of myelin basic protein (MBP) with zinc and phosphate ions has been studied by using the emission properties of the single tryptophan residue of the protein (Trp-115). The studies have been carried out by means of both static and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The addition of either zinc to MBP in the presence of phosphate or phosphate to MBP in the presence of zinc resulted in an increase of fluorescence intensity and a blue shift of the emission maximum wavelength. Furthermore, a concomitant increase in the scattering was also detected. Anisotropy decay experiments demonstrated that these effects are due to the formation of MBP molecules into large aggregates. A possible physiological role for such interaction is discussed. PMID:7518704

  5. A novel tubulin-dependent protein kinase forming a paired helical filament epitope on tau.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, K; Ihara, Y; Uchida, T; Imahori, K

    1988-09-01

    From rat brain microtubule proteins, we purified a protein kinase that phosphorylated tau, one of microtubule-associated proteins. The electrophoretic mobility of the phosphorylated tau on SDS-polyacrylamide gel decreased. The enzyme was not activated by cyclic nucleotides, calmodulin, or phospholipids, and was inhibited by the calcium ions. The kinase bound to tau. The phosphorylation of tau was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation. From these results we propose an idea that the phosphorylation could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Human tau phosphorylated by the kinase carried an epitope of the paired helical filaments that accumulate in the brain in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Drosophila Torsin Protein Regulates Motor Control and Stress Sensitivity and Forms a Complex with Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Min; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    We investigated unknown in vivo functions of Torsin by using Drosophila as a model. Downregulation of Drosophila Torsin (DTor) by DTor-specific inhibitory double-stranded RNA (RNAi) induced abnormal locomotor behavior and increased susceptibility to H2O2. In addition, altered expression of DTor significantly increased the numbers of synaptic boutons. One important biochemical consequence of DTor-RNAi expression in fly brains was upregulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Altered expression of ADH has also been reported in Drosophila Fragile-X mental retardation protein (DFMRP) mutant flies. Interestingly, expression of DFMRP was altered in DTor mutant flies, and DTor and DFMRP were present in the same protein complexes. In addition, DTor and DFMRP immunoreactivities were partially colocalized in several cellular organelles in larval muscles. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between synaptic morphologies of dfmrp null mutants and dfmrp mutants expressing DTor-RNAi. Taken together, our evidences suggested that DTor and DFMRP might be present in the same signaling pathway regulating synaptic plasticity. In addition, we also found that human Torsin1A and human FMRP were present in the same protein complexes, suggesting that this phenomenon is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:27313903

  7. Folding forms of Escherichia coli DmsD, a twin-arginine leader binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sarfo, Kwabena J; Winstone, Tara L; Papish, Andriyka L; Howell, Jenika M; Kadir, Hakan; Vogel, Hans J; Turner, Raymond J

    2004-03-05

    Escherichia coli DmsD interacts with the twin-arginine leader sequence of the catalytic sub-unit (DmsA) of DMSO reductase. DmsD was purified as a mixture of a number of different folding forms including: dimer (A); monomer (B); a minor thiol oxidized form; a heterogeneously folded or multi-conformational monomer form which displayed a ladder of bands on native-PAGE (D); and proteolytically degraded and aggregated forms. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), under denaturing and non-denaturing conditions, was used to examine the folding and stability of DmsD. Additionally, the biophysical methods of dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and mass spectroscopy were also used. Form D could be converted to form B by treatment with 4M urea, which is the concentration at which form B begins to denature. Forms A/B could be converted to D by incubation at pH 5.0. Forms A/B and D all had twin-arginine leader binding activity.

  8. Protein turnover forms one of the highest maintenance costs in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Seiman, Andrus; Arike, Liisa; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-07-01

    Protein turnover plays an important role in cell metabolism by regulating metabolic fluxes. Furthermore, the energy costs for protein turnover have been estimated to account for up to a third of the total energy production during cell replication and hence may represent a major limiting factor in achieving either higher biomass or production yields. This work aimed to measure the specific growth rate (μ)-dependent abundance and turnover rate of individual proteins, estimate the ATP cost for protein production and turnover, and compare this with the total energy balance and other maintenance costs. The lactic acid bacteria model organism Lactococcus lactis was used to measure protein turnover rates at μ = 0.1 and 0.5 h(-1) in chemostat experiments. Individual turnover rates were measured for ~75% of the total proteome. On average, protein turnover increased by sevenfold with a fivefold increase in growth rate, whilst biomass yield increased by 35%. The median turnover rates found were higher than the specific growth rate of the bacterium, which suggests relatively high energy consumption for protein turnover. We found that protein turnover costs alone account for 38 and 47% of the total energy produced at μ = 0.1 and 0.5 h(-1), respectively, and gene ontology groups Energy metabolism and Translation dominated synthesis costs at both growth rates studied. These results reflect the complexity of metabolic changes that occur in response to changes in environmental conditions, and signify the trade-off between biomass yield and the need to produce ATP for maintenance processes.

  9. The Tobacco etch virus P3 protein forms mobile inclusions via the early secretory pathway and traffics along actin microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Wei, Taiyun; Chowda-Reddy, R V; Sun, Guangyu; Wang, Aiming

    2010-02-05

    Plant potyviruses encode two membrane proteins, 6K and P3. The 6K protein has been shown to induce virus replication vesicles. However, the function of P3 remains unclear. In this study, subcellular localization of the Tobacco etch virus (TEV) P3 protein was investigated in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells. The TEV P3 protein localized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and formed punctate inclusions in association with the Golgi apparatus. The trafficking of P3 to the Golgi was mediated by the early secretory pathway. The Golgi-associated punctate structures originated from the ER exit site (ERES). Deletion analyses identified P3 domains required for the retention of P3 at the Golgi. Moreover, the P3 punctate structure was found to traffic along the actin filaments and colocalize with the 6K-containing replication vesicles. Taken together, these data support previous suggestions that P3 may play dual roles in virus movement and replication.

  10. Silverfish silk is formed by entanglement of randomly coiled protein chains.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andrew A; Church, Jeffrey S; Woodhead, Andrea L; Sutherland, Tara D

    2013-07-01

    Silks are semi-crystalline solids in which protein chains are associated by intermolecular hydrogen bonding within ordered crystallites, and by entanglement within unordered regions. By varying the type of protein secondary structure within crystallites and the overall degree of molecular order within fibers, arthropods produce fibers with a variety of physical properties suited to many purposes. We characterized silk produced as a tactile stimulus during mating by the grey silverfish (Ctenolepisma longicaudata) using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, polarized Raman spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and amino acid analysis. Fibers were proteinaceous-the main component being a 220 kDa protein-and were rich in Gln/Glu, Leu, and Lys. The protein structure present was predominantly random coil, with a lesser amount of beta-structure. Silk fibers could readily be solubilized in aqueous solutions of a mild chaotrope, sodium dodecyl sulfate, indicating protein chains were not cross-linked by disulfide or other covalent bonds. We conclude that entanglement is the major mechanism by which these silk proteins cohere into a solid material. We propose silks used as short-term tactile cues are subject to less stringent requirements for molecular order relative to other silks, allowing the random coil structure to be favored as an adaptation promoting maximal entanglement and adhesion. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  12. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. VAT-1 from Torpedo electric organ forms a high-molecular-mass protein complex within the synaptic vesicle membrane.

    PubMed

    Linial, M

    1993-08-15

    VAT-1 is an abundant 41-kDa protein from Torpedo cholinergic synaptic vesicles. Most of VAT-1 immunoreactivity (70%) is localized to the synaptic vesicle membrane while the rest (30%) copurifies with larger membranous fragments. VAT-1 forms a high-molecular-mass complex within the synaptic vesicle membrane. The Stokes radius of the VAT-1 complex is 4.85 nm and the sedimentation coefficient is 8.0 x 10(-13) S. Using these values, the calculated apparent mass of the VAT-1 complex is 176 kDa and the friction coefficient is consistent with that for a globular protein. Electrophoresis of solubilized synaptic vesicle proteins following cross-linking resulted in a 40-kDa ladder which was detected by VAT-1 antibodies. This is in accord with VAT-1 protein complex being composed primarily of VAT-1 subunits. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the VAT-1 protein complex suggest that it is composed of three or four VAT-1 subunits. Synaptophysin, an abundant component of Torpedo synaptic vesicle membranes, which has a similar apparent size as VAT-1, is not part of the VAT-1 protein complex. Interactions between the subunits within the protein complex do not depend on disulfide bonds or on lowering the ionic strength. However, partial dissociation of VAT-1 subunits from the complex occurs by chelating calcium ions.

  14. Characterisation of different forms of the accessory gp3 canine coronavirus type I protein identified in cats.

    PubMed

    d'Orengiani, Anne-Laure Pham-Hung d'Alexandry; Duarte, Lidia; Pavio, Nicole; Le Poder, Sophie

    2015-04-16

    ORF3 is a supplemental open reading frame coding for an accessory glycoprotein gp3 of unknown function, only present in genotype I canine strain (CCoV-I) and some atypical feline FCoV strains. In these latter hosts, the ORF3 gene systematically displays one or two identical deletions leading to the synthesis of truncated proteins gp3-Δ1 and gp3-Δ2. As deletions in CoV accessory proteins have already been involved in tissue or host switch, studies of these different gp3 proteins were conducted in canine and feline cell. All proteins oligomerise through covalent bonds, are N-glycosylated and are maintained in the ER in non-infected but also in CCoV-II infected cells, without any specific retention signal. However, deletions influence their level of expression. In canine cells, all proteins are expressed with similar level whereas in feline cells, the expression of gp3-Δ1 is higher than the two other forms of gp3. None of the gp3 proteins modulate the viral replication cycle of heterologous genotype II CCoV in canine cell line, leading to the conclusion that the gp3 proteins are probably advantageous only for CCoV-I and atypical FCoV strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A protein fold classifier formed by fusing different modes of pseudo amino acid composition via PSSM.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Kaveh; Moshiri, Behzad; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Araabi, Babak N; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2011-02-01

    Protein function is related to its chemical reaction to the surrounding environment including other proteins. On the other hand, this depends on the spatial shape and tertiary structure of protein and folding of its constituent components in space. The correct identification of protein domain fold solely using extracted information from protein sequence is a complicated and controversial task in the current computational biology. In this article a combined classifier based on the information content of extracted features from the primary structure of protein has been introduced to face this challenging problem. In the first stage of our proposed two-tier architecture, there are several classifiers each of which is trained with a different sequence based feature vector. Apart from the application of the predicted secondary structure, hydrophobicity, van der Waals volume, polarity, polarizability, and different dimensions of pseudo-amino acid composition vectors in similar studies, the position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) has also been used to improve the correct classification rate (CCR) in this study. Using K-fold cross validation on training dataset related to 27 famous folds of SCOP, the 28 dimensional probability output vector from each evidence theoretic K-NN classifier is used to determine the information content or expertness of corresponding feature for discrimination in each fold class. In the second stage, the outputs of classifiers for test dataset are fused using Sugeno fuzzy integral operator to make better decision for target fold class. The expertness factor of each classifier in each fold class has been used to calculate the fuzzy integral operator weights. Results make it possible to provide deeper interpretation about the effectiveness of each feature for discrimination in target classes for query proteins.

  16. Trafficking protein particle complex 6A delta (TRAPPC6AΔ) is an extracellular plaque-forming protein in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jean-Yun; Lee, Ming-Hui; Lin, Sing-Ru; Yang, Li-Yi; Sun, H. Sunny; Sze, Chun-I; Hong, Qunying; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chou, Ying-Tsen; Hsu, Li-Jin; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor WWOX is involved in the progression of cancer and neurodegeneration. Here, we examined whether protein aggregation occurs in the brain of nondemented, middle-aged humans and whether this is associated with WWOX downregulation. We isolated an N-terminal internal deletion isoform, TPC6AΔ, derived from alternative splicing of the TRAPPC6A (TPC6A) gene transcript. TPC6AΔ proteins are present as aggregates or plaques in the extracellular matrix of the brain such as in the cortex. Filter retardation assays revealed that aggregate formation of TPC6AΔ occurs preceding Aβ generation in the hippocampi of middle-aged postmortem normal humans. In a Wwox gene knockout mouse model, we showed the plaques of pT181-Tau and TPC6AΔ in the cortex and hippocampus in 3-week-old mice, suggesting a role of WWOX in limiting TPC6AΔ aggregation. To support this hypothesis, in vitro analysis revealed that TGF-β1 induces dissociation of the ectopic complex of TPC6AΔ and WWOX in cells, and then TPC6AΔ undergoes Ser35 phosphorylation-dependent polymerization and induces caspase 3 activation and Aβ production. Similarly, knockdown of WWOX by siRNA resulted in dramatic aggregation of TPC6AΔ. Together, when WWOX is downregulated, TPC6AΔ is phosphorylated at Ser35 and becomes aggregated for causing caspase activation that leads to Tau aggregation and Aβ formation. PMID:25650666

  17. Heat-induced destabilization of oil-in-water emulsions formed from hydrolyzed whey protein.

    PubMed

    Euston, S R; Finnigan, S R; Hirst, R L

    2001-11-01

    The emulsifying ability, heat stability, and coalescence stability of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with whey protein of varied degrees of hydrolysis (DH), and at varied protein contents, was studied. Whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) with a DH of 4% and 10% had poorer emulsifying ability than non-hydrolyzed whey protein concentrate (WPC), but were more heat stable. Increasing DH between 10 and 27% improved emulsifying ability and further improved the heat stability of the emulsion droplets. Increasing DH from 27 to 35% led to a big decrease in both emulsifying ability and heat stability. The quiescent coalescence stability of WPH emulsions was relatively good up to a DH of 27%. Above DH 27% emulsions become highly unstable. It appears that two mechanisms of instability are at work here. At low DH heat-induced denaturation and aggregation occur. In the DH range of 4-20% heat stability increases as protein globular structure is disrupted. At a DH greater than 27% we see a change from a hydrolysis-induced increase in heat-stability to coalescence instability, with a resultant large increase in emulsion breakdown during heating.

  18. Active site inhibitors protect protein kinase C from dephosphorylation and stabilize its mature form.

    PubMed

    Gould, Christine M; Antal, Corina E; Reyes, Gloria; Kunkel, Maya T; Adams, Ryan A; Ziyar, Ahdad; Riveros, Tania; Newton, Alexandra C

    2011-08-19

    Conformational changes acutely control protein kinase C (PKC). We have previously shown that the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate must be removed from the active site in order for 1) PKC to be phosphorylated by its upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1), 2) the mature enzyme to bind and phosphorylate substrates, and 3) the mature enzyme to be dephosphorylated by phosphatases. Here we show an additional level of conformational control; binding of active site inhibitors locks PKC in a conformation in which the priming phosphorylation sites are resistant to dephosphorylation. Using homogeneously pure PKC, we show that the active site inhibitor Gö 6983 prevents the dephosphorylation by pure protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) or the hydrophobic motif phosphatase, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP). Consistent with results using pure proteins, treatment of cells with the competitive inhibitors Gö 6983 or bisindolylmaleimide I, but not the uncompetitive inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide IV, prevents the dephosphorylation and down-regulation of PKC induced by phorbol esters. Pulse-chase analyses reveal that active site inhibitors do not affect the net rate of priming phosphorylations of PKC; rather, they inhibit the dephosphorylation triggered by phorbol esters. These data provide a molecular explanation for the recent studies showing that active site inhibitors stabilize the phosphorylation state of protein kinases B/Akt and C.

  19. Herpes simplex virus VP16 forms a complex with the virion host shutoff protein vhs.

    PubMed Central

    Smibert, C A; Popova, B; Xiao, P; Capone, J P; Smiley, J R

    1994-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) virions contain at least two regulatory proteins that modulate gene expression in infected cells: the transcriptional activator VP16 and the virion host shutoff protein vhs. VP16 stimulates transcription of the HSV immediate-early genes, and vhs suppresses host protein synthesis and induces accelerated turnover of cellular and viral mRNAs. We report here that vhs binds directly to VP16: vhs and VP16 were coprecipitated from infected cells by an anti-vhs antiserum, and vhs and VP16 protein A fusions each bound intact versions of the other protein in a solid-phase capture assay. In addition, vhs and VP16 interacted in the two-hybrid activator system when coexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. vhs residues 238 to 344 were sufficient for the interaction, and the VP16 acidic transcriptional activation domain was not required. vhs blocked the ability of VP16 to enter a multiprotein complex on an immediate-early TAATGARATTC consensus sequence, indicating that vhs interacts with one or more regions of VP16 required for promoter recognition. We suggest that this interaction may play a structural role in the assembly of HSV virions and modulate the activity of vhs during infection. Images PMID:8139019

  20. Properties and Phylogeny of 76 Families of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Organellar Outer Membrane Pore-Forming Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bhaskara L.; Saier, Milton H.

    2016-01-01

    We here report statistical analyses of 76 families of integral outer membrane pore-forming proteins (OMPPs) found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. 47 of these families fall into one superfamily (SFI) which segregate into fifteen phylogenetic clusters. Families with members of the same protein size, topology and substrate specificities often cluster together. Virtually all OMPP families include only proteins that form transmembrane pores. Nine such families, all of which cluster together in the SFI phylogenetic tree, contain both α- and β-structures, are multi domain, multi subunit systems, and transport macromolecules. Most other SFI OMPPs transport small molecules. SFII and SFV homologues derive from Actinobacteria while SFIII and SFIV proteins derive from chloroplasts. Three families of actinobacterial OMPPs and two families of eukaryotic OMPPs apparently consist primarily of α-helices (α-TMSs). Of the 71 families of (putative) β-barrel OMPPs, only twenty could not be assigned to a superfamily, and these derived primarily from Actinobacteria (1), chloroplasts (1), spirochaetes (8), and proteobacteria (10). Proteins were identified in which two or three full length OMPPs are fused together. Family characteristic are described and evidence agrees with a previous proposal suggesting that many arose by adjacent β-hairpin structural unit duplications. PMID:27064789

  1. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Forms Plasmalemmal Clusters via Its Pathogenic Amyloid-β Domain

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Arne; Fischer, Sebastian; Lang, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a large, ubiquitous integral membrane protein with a small amyloid-β (Aβ) domain. In the human brain, endosomal processing of APP produces neurotoxic Aβ-peptides, which are involved in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that the Aβ sequence exerts a physiological function when still present in the unprocessed APP molecule. From the extracellular site, Aβ concentrates APP molecules into plasmalemmal membrane protein clusters. Moreover, Aβ stabilization of clusters is a prerequisite for their targeting to endocytic clathrin structures. Therefore, we conclude that the Aβ domain directly mediates a central step in APP trafficking, driving its own conversion into neurotoxic peptides. PMID:22455924

  2. An ultrastable conjugate of silver nanoparticles and protein formed through weak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmkhatri, Varsha P.; Chandra, Kousik; Dubey, Abhinav; Atreya, Hanudatta S.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted significant attention owing to their unique physicochemical, optical, conductive and antimicrobial properties. One of the properties of AgNPs which is crucial for all applications is their stability. In the present study we unravel a mechanism through which silver nanoparticles are rendered ultrastable in an aqueous solution in complex with the protein ubiquitin (Ubq). This involves a dynamic and reversible association and dissociation of ubiquitin from the surface of AgNP. The exchange occurs at a rate much greater than 25 s-1 implying a residence time of <40 ms for the protein. The AgNP-Ubq complex remains stable for months due to steric stabilization over a wide pH range compared to unconjugated AgNPs. NMR studies reveal that the protein molecules bind reversibly to AgNP with an approximate dissociation constant of 55 μM and undergo fast exchange. At pH > 4 the positively charged surface of the protein comes in contact with the citrate capped AgNP surface. Further, NMR relaxation-based experiments suggest that in addition to the dynamic exchange, a conformational rearrangement of the protein takes place upon binding to AgNP. The ultrastability of the AgNP-Ubq complex was found to be useful for its anti-microbial activity, which allowed the recycling of this complex multiple times without the loss of stability. Altogether, the study provides new insights into the mechanism of protein-silver nanoparticle interactions and opens up new avenues for its application in a wide range of systems.In recent years, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted significant attention owing to their unique physicochemical, optical, conductive and antimicrobial properties. One of the properties of AgNPs which is crucial for all applications is their stability. In the present study we unravel a mechanism through which silver nanoparticles are rendered ultrastable in an aqueous solution in complex with the protein

  3. Comparison of the effect of homocysteine in the reduced form, its thiolactone and protein homocysteinylation on hemostatic properties of plasma.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Joanna; Nowak, Paweł; Olas, Beata

    2011-03-01

    Mechanisms involved in the relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and hemostatic process are still unclear. In the literature there are few papers describing studies on the effects of homocysteine (Hcys) on proteins that participate in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in human. The aim of our study was to establish and compare the influence of a reduced form of Hcys (at final doses of 0.01 - 1 mM) and the most reactive form of Hcys - its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (HTL, 0.1 - 1 μM) on the clot formation (using whole human plasma and purified fibrinogen) and the fibrin lysis. Moreover, the aim of our study was to explain the effect of plasma protein modifications (S- and N-homocysteinylation) on selected parameters of hemostasis. We observed that HTL, like its precursor, a reduced form of Hcys stimulated polymerization of fibrinogen, but this process was not dose-dependent. In the presence of HTL (at the lowest tested concentration - 0.1μM) the increase was about 55%. Our present results also demonstrated that Hcys in the reduced form (0.01 - 1 mM) and HTL at lower doses than Hcys (0.1 - 1 μM) reduced the fibrin lysis in whole human plasma. Our results reported that HTL, like the reduced form of Hcys (at concentrations corresponding to concentrations in plasma during hyperhomocysteinemia) induced modifications of hemostatic plasma proteins, and the consequence of these modifications may be alteration in protein structure associated with changes of hemostatic functions.

  4. Bovine serum albumin oligomers in the E- and B-forms at low protein concentration and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Jeremiah J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The manuscript describes the study of the oligomerization process of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in two different structural monomeric forms: the extended-form (E) at pH 2.0 and the basic-form (B) at pH 9.0. The study was conducted at low protein concentration (1 mg/ml) and relatively short incubation time (maximum 56 days) in order to investigate early oligomerization events rather than the formation of mature fibrils. The comparison between the two isoforms show that oligomers form much faster (∼6 days) in the E-form than in the B-form where formation of oligomers requires ∼4 weeks. The oligomers appear to be limited to a maximum of tetramers with size <30nm. Hydrophobic interactions from exposed neutral amino acid residues in the elongated E-form are the likely cause for the quick formation of aggregates at acidic pH. We used an array of biophysical techniques for the study and determined that oligomerization occurs without further large changes in the secondary structure of the monomers. Under the conditions adopted in this study, aggregation does not seem to exceed the formation of tetramers, even though a very small amount of much larger aggregates seem to form. PMID:23148944

  5. An ultrastable conjugate of silver nanoparticles and protein formed through weak interactions.

    PubMed

    Brahmkhatri, Varsha P; Chandra, Kousik; Dubey, Abhinav; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted significant attention owing to their unique physicochemical, optical, conductive and antimicrobial properties. One of the properties of AgNPs which is crucial for all applications is their stability. In the present study we unravel a mechanism through which silver nanoparticles are rendered ultrastable in an aqueous solution in complex with the protein ubiquitin (Ubq). This involves a dynamic and reversible association and dissociation of ubiquitin from the surface of AgNP. The exchange occurs at a rate much greater than 25 s(-1) implying a residence time of <40 ms for the protein. The AgNP-Ubq complex remains stable for months due to steric stabilization over a wide pH range compared to unconjugated AgNPs. NMR studies reveal that the protein molecules bind reversibly to AgNP with an approximate dissociation constant of 55 μM and undergo fast exchange. At pH > 4 the positively charged surface of the protein comes in contact with the citrate capped AgNP surface. Further, NMR relaxation-based experiments suggest that in addition to the dynamic exchange, a conformational rearrangement of the protein takes place upon binding to AgNP. The ultrastability of the AgNP-Ubq complex was found to be useful for its anti-microbial activity, which allowed the recycling of this complex multiple times without the loss of stability. Altogether, the study provides new insights into the mechanism of protein-silver nanoparticle interactions and opens up new avenues for its application in a wide range of systems.

  6. Entropic potential field formed for a linear-motor protein near a filament: Statistical-mechanical analyses using simple models.

    PubMed

    Amano, Ken-Ichi; Yoshidome, Takashi; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2010-07-28

    We report a new progress in elucidating the mechanism of the unidirectional movement of a linear-motor protein (e.g., myosin) along a filament (e.g., F-actin). The basic concept emphasized here is that a potential field is entropically formed for the protein on the filament immersed in solvent due to the effect of the translational displacement of solvent molecules. The entropic potential field is strongly dependent on geometric features of the protein and the filament, their overall shapes as well as details of the polyatomic structures. The features and the corresponding field are judiciously adjusted by the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the protein, hydrolysis of ATP into adenosine diphosphate (ADP)+Pi, and release of Pi and ADP. As the first step, we propose the following physical picture: The potential field formed along the filament for the protein without the binding of ATP or ADP+Pi to it is largely different from that for the protein with the binding, and the directed movement is realized by repeated switches from one of the fields to the other. To illustrate the picture, we analyze the spatial distribution of the entropic potential between a large solute and a large body using the three-dimensional integral equation theory. The solute is modeled as a large hard sphere. Two model filaments are considered as the body: model 1 is a set of one-dimensionally connected large hard spheres and model 2 is a double helical structure formed by two sets of connected large hard spheres. The solute and the filament are immersed in small hard spheres forming the solvent. The major findings are as follows. The solute is strongly confined within a narrow space in contact with the filament. Within the space there are locations with sharply deep local potential minima along the filament, and the distance between two adjacent locations is equal to the diameter of the large spheres constituting the filament. The potential minima form a ringlike domain in model 1

  7. The PBX-regulating protein PREP1 is present in different PBX-complexed forms in mouse.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, E; Schulz, H; Talarico, D; Blasi, F; Berthelsen, J

    1999-05-01

    Human PREP1, a novel homeodomain protein of the TALE super-family, forms a stable DNA-binding complex with PBX proteins in solution, a ternary complex with PBX and HOXB1 on DNA, and is able to act as a co-activator in the transcription of PBX-HOXB1 activated promoters (Berthelsen, J., Zappavigna, V., Ferretti, E., Mavilio, F., Blasi, F. , 1998b. The novel homeoprotein Prep1 modulates Pbx-Hox protein cooperatity. EMBO J. 17, 1434-1445; Berthelsen, J., Zappavigna, V., Mavilio, F., Blasi, F., 1998c. Prep1, a novel functional partner of Pbx proteins. EMBO J. 17, 1423-1433). Here we demonstrate the presence of DNA-binding PREP1-PBX complexes also in murine cells. In vivo, PREP1 is a predominant partner of PBX proteins in various murine tissues. However, the choice of PBX family member associated with PREP1 is largely tissue-type specific. We report the cloning and expression domain of murine Prep1 gene. Murine PREP1 shares 100% identity with human PREP1 in the homeodomain and 95% similarity throughout the whole protein. In the adult mouse, PREP1 is expressed ubiquitously, with peaks in testis and thymus. We further demonstrate the presence of murine Prep1 mRNA and protein, and of different DNA-binding PREP1-PBX complexes, in mouse embryos from at least 9.5 days p.c. Moreover, we show that PREP1 is present in all embryonic tissues from at least 7.5-17.5 days p.c with a predominantly nuclear staining. PREP1 is able to super-activate the PBX-HOXB-1 autoregulated Hoxb-1 promoter, and we show that all three proteins, PREP1, PBX and HOXB-1, are present together in the mouse rhombomere 4 domain in vivo, compatible with a role of PREP1 as a regulator of PBX and HOXB-1 proteins activity during development.

  8. A severe form of abetalipoproteinemia caused by new splicing mutations of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP).

    PubMed

    Pons, Véronique; Rolland, Corinne; Nauze, Michel; Danjoux, Marie; Gaibelet, Gérald; Durandy, Anne; Sassolas, Agnès; Lévy, Emile; Tercé, François; Collet, Xavier; Mas, Emmanuel

    2011-07-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by low lipid levels and by the absence of apoB-containing lipoproteins. It is the consequence of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) deficiency. We report two patients with new MTTP mutations. We studied their functional consequences on the triglyceride transfer function using duodenal biopsies. We transfected MTTP mutants in HepG2 and HeLa cells to investigate their association with protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and their localization at the endoplasmic reticulum. These children have a severe abetalipoproteinemia. Both of them had also a mild hypogammaglobulinemia. They are compound heterozygotes with c.619G>T and c.1237-28A>G mutations within the MTTP gene. mRNA analysis revealed abnormal splicing with deletion of exon 6 and 10, respectively. Deletion of exon 6 (Δ6-MTTP) introduced a frame shift in the reading frame and a premature stop codon at position 234. Despite the fact that Δ6-MTTP and Δ10-MTTP mutants were not capable of binding PDI, both MTTP mutant proteins normally localize at the endoplasmic reticulum. However, these two mutations induce a loss of MTTP triglyceride transfer activity. These two mutations lead to abnormal truncated MTTP proteins, incapable of binding PDI and responsible for the loss of function of MTTP, thereby explaining the severe abetalipoproteinemia phenotype of these children.

  9. Primate TRIM5 proteins form hexagonal nets on HIV-1 capsids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yen-Li; Chandrasekaran, Viswanathan; Carter, Stephen D; Woodward, Cora L; Christensen, Devin E; Dryden, Kelly A; Pornillos, Owen; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Jensen, Grant J; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2016-01-01

    TRIM5 proteins are restriction factors that block retroviral infections by binding viral capsids and preventing reverse transcription. Capsid recognition is mediated by C-terminal domains on TRIM5α (SPRY) or TRIMCyp (cyclophilin A), which interact weakly with capsids. Efficient capsid recognition also requires the conserved N-terminal tripartite motifs (TRIM), which mediate oligomerization and create avidity effects. To characterize how TRIM5 proteins recognize viral capsids, we developed methods for isolating native recombinant TRIM5 proteins and purifying stable HIV-1 capsids. Biochemical and EM analyses revealed that TRIM5 proteins assembled into hexagonal nets, both alone and on capsid surfaces. These nets comprised open hexameric rings, with the SPRY domains centered on the edges and the B-box and RING domains at the vertices. Thus, the principles of hexagonal TRIM5 assembly and capsid pattern recognition are conserved across primates, allowing TRIM5 assemblies to maintain the conformational plasticity necessary to recognize divergent and pleomorphic retroviral capsids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16269.001 PMID:27253068

  10. Expression of a truncated form of ribosomal protein L3 confers resistance to pokeweed antiviral protein and the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Di, Rong; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2005-08-01

    The contamination of important agricultural products such as wheat, barley, or maize with the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) due to infection with Fusarium species is a worldwide problem. Trichothecenes inhibit protein synthesis by targeting ribosomal protein L3. Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome-inactivating protein binds to L3 to depurinate the alpha-sarcin/loop of the large rRNA. Plants transformed with the wild-type PAP show lesions and express very low levels of PAP because PAP autoregulates its expression by destabilizing its own mRNA. We show here that transgenic tobacco plants expressing both the wild-type PAP and a truncated form of yeast L3 (L3delta) are phenotypically normal. PAP mRNA and protein levels are very high in these plants, indicating that L3delta suppresses the autoregulation of PAP mRNA expression. Ribosomes are not depurinated in the transgenic plants expressing PAP and L3delta, even though PAP is associated with ribosomes. The expression of the endogenous tobacco ribosomal protein L3 is up-regulated in these plants and they are resistant to the Fusarium mycotoxin DON. These results demonstrate that expression of an N-terminal fragment of yeast L3 leads to trans-dominant resistance to PAP and the trichothecene mycotoxin DON, providing evidence that both toxins target L3 by a common mechanism.

  11. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  12. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature.

  13. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  14. Quinone-reactive proteins devoid of haem b form widespread membrane-bound electron transport modules in bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Kern, Melanie

    2008-10-01

    Many quinone-reactive enzyme complexes that are part of membrane-integral eukaryotic or prokaryotic respiratory electron transport chains contain one or more haem b molecules embedded in the membrane. In recent years, various novel proteins have emerged that are devoid of haem b but are thought to fulfil a similar function in bacterial anaerobic respiratory systems. These proteins are encoded by genes organized in various genomic arrangements and are thought to form widespread membrane-bound quinone-reactive electron transport modules that exchange electrons with redox partner proteins located at the outer side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Prototypic representatives are the multihaem c-type cytochromes NapC, NrfH and TorC (NapC/NrfH family), the putative iron-sulfur protein NapH and representatives of the NrfD/PsrC family. Members of these protein families vary in the number of their predicted transmembrane segments and, consequently, diverse quinone-binding sites are expected. Only a few of these enzymes have been isolated and characterized biochemically and high-resolution structures are limited. This mini-review briefly summarizes predicted and experimentally demonstrated properties of the proteins in question and discusses their role in electron transport and bioenergetics of anaerobic respiration.

  15. The propensity of the bacterial rodlin protein RdlB to form amyloid fibrils determines its function in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen; Willemse, Joost; Sawyer, Elizabeth B.; Lou, Fei; Gong, Weibin; Zhang, Hong; Gras, Sally L.; Claessen, Dennis; Perrett, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces bacteria form reproductive aerial hyphae that are covered with a pattern of pairwise aligned fibrils called rodlets. The presence of the rodlet layer requires two homologous rodlin proteins, RdlA and RdlB, and the functional amyloid chaplin proteins, ChpA-H. In contrast to the redundancy shared among the eight chaplins, both RdlA and RdlB are indispensable for the establishment of this rodlet structure. By using a comprehensive biophysical approach combined with in vivo characterization we found that RdlB, but not RdlA, readily assembles into amyloid fibrils. The marked difference in amyloid propensity between these highly similar proteins could be largely attributed to a difference in amino acid sequence at just three sites. Further, an engineered RdlA protein in which these three key amino acids were replaced with the corresponding residues from RdlB could compensate for loss of RdlB and restore formation of the surface-exposed amyloid layer in bacteria. Our data reveal that RdlB is a new functional amyloid and provide a biophysical basis for the functional differences between the two rodlin proteins. This study enhances our understanding of how rodlin proteins contribute to formation of an outer fibrillar layer during spore morphogenesis in streptomycetes. PMID:28211492

  16. The Outer Membrane Protein OmpW Forms an Eight-Stranded beta-Barrel with a Hydrophobic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Hong,H.; Patel, D.; Tamm, L.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli OmpW belongs to a family of small outer membrane (OM) proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Their functions are unknown, but recent data suggest that they may be involved in the protection of bacteria against various forms of environmental stress. In order to gain insight into the function of these proteins we have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli OmpW to 2.7 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that OmpW forms an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a long and narrow hydrophobic channel that contains a bound LDAO detergent molecule. Single channel conductance experiments show that OmpW functions as an ion channel in planar lipid bilayers. The channel activity can be blocked by the addition of LDAO. Taken together, the data suggest that members of the OmpW family could be involved in the transport of small hydrophobic molecules across the bacterial OM.

  17. Biochemical characteristics of cytosolic and particulate forms of protein tyrosine kinases from methyl nitrosourea (MNU)-induced rat mammary carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.K.; Chiasson, J.C.; Chiasson, J.L.; Lacroix, A.; Windisch, L. )

    1991-03-11

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activities in MNU-induced rat mammary carcinoma has been investigated by using poly (glu: tyr; 4:1) as an exogenous substrate. The PTK activity of the mammary carcinoma was about equally distributed between the particulate and cytosolic fractions at 110 000 x g. Both particulate and cytosolic PTKs catalyzed the phosphorylation of several tyrosine containing synthetic substrates to various degrees, however, poly (glu: tyr; 4:1) was the best substrate. Both the forms utilized ATP as the phosphoryl group donor. Among various divalent cations tested, Co{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} were able to fulfill the divalent cation requirement. Poly-lysine exerted a stimulatory effect on the particulate, but not on the cytosolic form. On the other hand, though heparin and quercetin inhibited both the forms in a concentration dependent manner, the particulate form was more sensitive to inhibition. These data indicate that MNU-induced rat mammary carcinoma expresses both particulate and cytosolic forms of PTKs and that there are significant differences in the properties of the two forms. Differential differences in the properties of the two forms. Differential effects of some agents on mammary carcinoma PTKs suggest that these enzymes may be acutely regulated in vivo and could play important role in mammary carcinogenesis.

  18. Host-derived, pore-forming toxin–like protein and trefoil factor complex protects the host against microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Yan, Chao; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Kaifeng; Li, Sheng’an; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the bacterial β-pore–forming toxin superfamily. Surprisingly, numerous aerolysin-like proteins exist in vertebrates, but their biological functions are unknown. βγ-CAT, a complex of an aerolysin-like protein subunit (two βγ-crystallin domains followed by an aerolysin pore-forming domain) and two trefoil factor subunits, has been identified in frogs (Bombina maxima) skin secretions. Here, we report the rich expression of this protein, in the frog blood and immune-related tissues, and the induction of its presence in peritoneal lavage by bacterial challenge. This phenomena raises the possibility of its involvement in antimicrobial infection. When βγ-CAT was administrated in a peritoneal infection model, it greatly accelerated bacterial clearance and increased the survival rate of both frogs and mice. Meanwhile, accelerated Interleukin-1β release and enhanced local leukocyte recruitments were determined, which may partially explain the robust and effective antimicrobial responses observed. The release of interleukin-1β was potently triggered by βγ-CAT from the frog peritoneal cells and murine macrophages in vitro. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed and translocated to lysosomes, where it formed high molecular mass SDS-stable oligomers (>170 kDa). Lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin B release were detected, which may explain the activation of caspase-1 inflammasome and subsequent interleukin-1β maturation and release. To our knowledge, these results provide the first functional evidence of the ability of a host-derived aerolysin-like protein to counter microbial infection by eliciting rapid and effective host innate immune responses. The findings will also largely help to elucidate the possible involvement and action mechanisms of aerolysin-like proteins and/or trefoil factors widely existing in vertebrates in the host defense against pathogens. PMID:24733922

  19. Host-derived, pore-forming toxin-like protein and trefoil factor complex protects the host against microbial infection.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Yan, Chao; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Kaifeng; Li, Sheng'an; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-05-06

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the bacterial β-pore-forming toxin superfamily. Surprisingly, numerous aerolysin-like proteins exist in vertebrates, but their biological functions are unknown. βγ-CAT, a complex of an aerolysin-like protein subunit (two βγ-crystallin domains followed by an aerolysin pore-forming domain) and two trefoil factor subunits, has been identified in frogs (Bombina maxima) skin secretions. Here, we report the rich expression of this protein, in the frog blood and immune-related tissues, and the induction of its presence in peritoneal lavage by bacterial challenge. This phenomena raises the possibility of its involvement in antimicrobial infection. When βγ-CAT was administrated in a peritoneal infection model, it greatly accelerated bacterial clearance and increased the survival rate of both frogs and mice. Meanwhile, accelerated Interleukin-1β release and enhanced local leukocyte recruitments were determined, which may partially explain the robust and effective antimicrobial responses observed. The release of interleukin-1β was potently triggered by βγ-CAT from the frog peritoneal cells and murine macrophages in vitro. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed and translocated to lysosomes, where it formed high molecular mass SDS-stable oligomers (>170 kDa). Lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin B release were detected, which may explain the activation of caspase-1 inflammasome and subsequent interleukin-1β maturation and release. To our knowledge, these results provide the first functional evidence of the ability of a host-derived aerolysin-like protein to counter microbial infection by eliciting rapid and effective host innate immune responses. The findings will also largely help to elucidate the possible involvement and action mechanisms of aerolysin-like proteins and/or trefoil factors widely existing in vertebrates in the host defense against pathogens.

  20. Identification of Novel Potentially Toxic Oligomers Formed in Vitro from Mammalian-derived Expanded huntingtin Exon-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nucifora, Leslie G.; Burke, Kathleen A.; Feng, Xia; Arbez, Nicolas; Zhu, Shanshan; Miller, Jason; Yang, Guocheng; Ratovitski, Tamara; Delannoy, Michael; Muchowski, Paul J.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Legleiter, Justin; Ross, Christopher A.; Poirier, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that arises from an expanded polyglutamine region in the N terminus of the HD gene product, huntingtin. Protein inclusions comprised of N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin are a characteristic feature of disease, though are likely to play a protective role rather than a causative one in neurodegeneration. Soluble oligomeric assemblies of huntingtin formed early in the aggregation process are candidate toxic species in HD. In the present study, we established an in vitro system to generate recombinant huntingtin in mammalian cells. Using both denaturing and native gel analysis, we have identified novel oligomeric forms of mammalian-derived expanded huntingtin exon-1 N-terminal fragment. These species are transient and were not previously detected using bacterially expressed exon-1 protein. Importantly, these species are recognized by 3B5H10, an antibody that recognizes a two-stranded hairpin conformation of expanded polyglutamine believed to be associated with a toxic form of huntingtin. Interestingly, comparable oligomeric species were not observed for expanded huntingtin shortstop, a 117-amino acid fragment of huntingtin shown previously in mammalian cell lines and transgenic mice, and here in primary cortical neurons, to be non-toxic. Further, we demonstrate that expanded huntingtin shortstop has a reduced ability to form amyloid-like fibrils characteristic of the aggregation pathway for toxic expanded polyglutamine proteins. Taken together, these data provide a possible candidate toxic species in HD. In addition, these studies demonstrate the fundamental differences in early aggregation events between mutant huntingtin exon-1 and shortstop proteins that may underlie the differences in toxicity. PMID:22433867

  1. [Isolation and purification of human blood plasma proteins able to form potassium channels in artificial bilayer lipid membrane].

    PubMed

    Venediktova, N I; Kuznetsov, K V; Gritsenko, E N; Gulidova, G P; Mironova, G D

    2012-01-01

    Protein fraction able to induce K(+)-selective transport across bilayer lipid membrane was isolated from human blood plasma with the use of the detergent and proteolytic enzyme-free method developed at our laboratory. After addition of the studied sample to the artificial membrane in the presence of 100 mM KCl, a discrete current change was observed. No channel activity was recorded in the presence of calcium and sodium ions. Channel forming activity of fraction was observed only in the presence of K+. Using a threefold gradient of KCl in the presence of studied proteins the potassium-selective potential balanced by voltage of -29 mV was registered. This value is very close to the theoretical Nernst potential in this case. This means that the examined ion channel is cation-selective. According to data obtained with MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF and database NCBI three protein components were identified in isolated researched sample.

  2. Whirlin and PDZ Domain-containing 7 (PDZD7) Proteins Are Both Required to Form the Quaternary Protein Complex Associated with Usher Syndrome Type 2*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Zou, Junhuang; Shen, Zuolian; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the leading genetic cause of combined hearing and vision loss. Among the three USH clinical types, type 2 (USH2) occurs most commonly. USH2A, GPR98, and WHRN are three known causative genes of USH2, whereas PDZD7 is a modifier gene found in USH2 patients. The proteins encoded by these four USH genes have been proposed to form a multiprotein complex, the USH2 complex, due to interactions found among some of these proteins in vitro, their colocalization in vivo, and mutual dependence of some of these proteins for their normal in vivo localizations. However, evidence showing the formation of the USH2 complex is missing, and details on how this complex is formed remain elusive. Here, we systematically investigated interactions among the intracellular regions of the four USH proteins using colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and pull-down assays. We show that multiple domains of the four USH proteins interact among one another. Importantly, both WHRN and PDZD7 are required for the complex formation with USH2A and GPR98. In this USH2 quaternary complex, WHRN prefers to bind to USH2A, whereas PDZD7 prefers to bind to GPR98. Interaction between WHRN and PDZD7 is the bridge between USH2A and GPR98. Additionally, the USH2 quaternary complex has a variable stoichiometry. These findings suggest that a non-obligate, short term, and dynamic USH2 quaternary protein complex may exist in vivo. Our work provides valuable insight into the physiological role of the USH2 complex in vivo and informs possible reconstruction of the USH2 complex for future therapy. PMID:25406310

  3. [Comparative study of the protein makeup in diploid and haploid forms of Saccharomyces and Pichia].

    PubMed

    Temina, A V; Tolstorukov, I I; Korogodin, V I; Gololobov, A D

    1979-01-01

    The rates of growth, biomass accumulation, and electrophoretic spectra of mobile cytoplasmic proteins were studied with nonisogenous haploid and diploid cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia guilliermondii as well as with isogenous haploid-diploid pairs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pinus. On a mineral medium with glucose, differences in these parameters in various yeast strains were found to be due to the genotype of a strain rather than to ploidy: nonisogenous haploid and diploid cultures displayed considerable and random variability of these properties while no differences were found in isogenous haploid-diploid pairs. Studies on solubility of protein fractions in various solvents made it possible to reveal differences connected with ploidy, namely: both in nonisogenous and isogenous haploid-diploid systems, the content of the water-soluble fraction decreased in diploid cultures.

  4. Structural characterization of yeast acidic ribosomal P proteins forming the P1A-P2B heterocomplex.

    PubMed

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Liljas, Anders; Grankowski, Nikodem

    2003-04-01

    Acidic ribosomal P proteins form a distinct lateral protuberance on the 60S ribosomal subunit. In yeast, this structure is composed of two heterocomplexes (P1A-P2B and P1B-P2A) attached to the ribosome with the aid of the P0 protein. In solution, the isolated P proteins P1A and P2B have a flexible structure with some characteristics of a molten globule [Zurdo, J., et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 8935-8943]. In this report, the structure of P1A-P2B heterocomplex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is investigated by means of size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, circular dichroism, light scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The circular dichroism experiment shows that the complex could be ranked in the tertiary class of all-alpha proteins, with an average alpha-helical content of approximately 65%. Heat and urea denaturation experiments reveal that the P1A-P2B complex, unlike the isolated proteins, has a full cooperative transition which can be fitted into a two-state folding-unfolding model. The behavior of the complex in the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol also resembles a two-state folding-unfolding transition, further supporting the idea that the heterocomplex contains well-packed side chains. In conclusion, the P1A-P2B heterocomplex, unlike the isolated proteins, has a well-defined hydrophobic core. Consequently, the complex can put up its structure without additional ribosomal components, so the heterodimeric complex reflects the intrinsic properties of the two analyzed proteins, indicating thus that this is the only possible configuration of the P1A and P2B proteins on the ribosomal stalk structure.

  5. Secretion of sulfated and nonsulfated forms of parathyroid chromogranin A (secretory protein-I)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorr, S.U.; Cohn, D.V. )

    1990-02-25

    Chromogranin A (secretory protein-I) is an acidic, sulfated glycoprotein found in secretory granules of most endocrine cells but not in exocrine or epithelial cells. Parathyroid chromogranin A is sulfated on tyrosine residues, whereas adrenal chromogranin A appears to be sulfated mainly on oligosaccharide residues. Chromogranin B, on the other hand, is tyrosine-sulfated in the bovine adrenal whereas this protein is absent from the parathyroid. The role of this tissue- or species-specific sulfation of chromogranin is not known. Tyrosine sulfation is a common post-translational modification of proteins in the exocytotic pathway and has been suggested to play a role in the sorting or intracellular transport of secretory proteins. To test this, porcine parathyroid tissue slices were metabolically labeled with 35SO4 and (3H)Lys, and the tissue and incubation medium analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and immunoprecipitation with chromogranin A-specific antiserum or by radioimmunoassay for parathormone. Secretion of total and 3H-labeled chromogranin A was about 3- and 7-fold higher, respectively, at 0.5 mM than at 3.0 mM Ca2+, and secretion of 35SO4-labeled chromogranin A was 67-fold higher. This indicates that either sulfated chromogranin A is directed primarily to the Ca2+-regulated pathway or that sulfation occurs following sorting to this pathway. Sodium chlorate (1-10 mM) inhibited sulfation in a dose-dependent manner by up to 95% but it had no effect on the onset or rate of chromogranin A secretion. These data indicate that regulated secretion of parathyroid chromogranin A does not require sulfation of tyrosine residues.

  6. The Role of a Novel Topological Form of the Prion Protein in Prion Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    CtmPrP [designated Tg(L9R-3AV)], and these mice develop a spontaneous neurological illness similar to scrapie [Stewart et al. 2005]. We are...that CtmPrP is not produced at appreciable levels in scrapie -infected animals. Task 2: Characterization of the CtmPrP-induced neurotoxic pathway in...Caughey, E. Masliah, and M.Oldstone (2005). Anchorless Prion Protein Results in Infectious Amyloid Disease Without Clinical Scrapie . Science 308:1435

  7. Study of the protein complex, pore diameter, and pore-forming activity of the Borrelia burgdorferi P13 porin.

    PubMed

    Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Thein, Marcus; Barbot, Mariam; Sans-Serramitjana, Eulalia; Bonde, Mari; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Bergström, Sven; Benz, Roland

    2014-07-04

    P13 is one of the major outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi. Previous studies described P13 as a porin. In the present study some structure and function aspects of P13 were studied. P13 showed according to lipid bilayer studies a channel-forming activity of 0.6 nanosiemens in 1 m KCl. Single channel and selectivity measurements demonstrated that P13 had no preference for either cations or anions and showed no voltage-gating up to ±100 mV. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to isolate and characterize the P13 protein complex in its native state. The complex had a high molecular mass of about 300 kDa and was only composed of P13 monomers. The channel size was investigated using non-electrolytes revealing an apparent diameter of about 1.4 nm with a 400-Da molecular mass cut-off. Multichannel titrations with different substrates reinforced the idea that P13 forms a general diffusion channel. The identity of P13 within the complex was confirmed by second dimension SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and the use of a p13 deletion mutant strain. The results suggested that P13 is the protein responsible for the 0.6-nanosiemens pore-forming activity in the outer membrane of B. burgdorferi. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Study of the Protein Complex, Pore Diameter, and Pore-forming Activity of the Borrelia burgdorferi P13 Porin*

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Thein, Marcus; Barbot, Mariam; Sans-Serramitjana, Eulalia; Bonde, Mari; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Bergström, Sven; Benz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    P13 is one of the major outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi. Previous studies described P13 as a porin. In the present study some structure and function aspects of P13 were studied. P13 showed according to lipid bilayer studies a channel-forming activity of 0.6 nanosiemens in 1 m KCl. Single channel and selectivity measurements demonstrated that P13 had no preference for either cations or anions and showed no voltage-gating up to ±100 mV. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to isolate and characterize the P13 protein complex in its native state. The complex had a high molecular mass of about 300 kDa and was only composed of P13 monomers. The channel size was investigated using non-electrolytes revealing an apparent diameter of about 1.4 nm with a 400-Da molecular mass cut-off. Multichannel titrations with different substrates reinforced the idea that P13 forms a general diffusion channel. The identity of P13 within the complex was confirmed by second dimension SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and the use of a p13 deletion mutant strain. The results suggested that P13 is the protein responsible for the 0.6-nanosiemens pore-forming activity in the outer membrane of B. burgdorferi. PMID:24825899

  9. The Reticulon and Dp1/Yop1p Proteins Form Immobile Oligomers in the Tubular Endoplasmic Reticulum*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yoko; Voss, Christiane; Rist, Julia M.; Hu, Junjie; Rapoport, Tom A.; Prinz, William A.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2008-01-01

    We recently identified a class of membrane proteins, the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p, which shape the tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast and mammalian cells. These proteins are highly enriched in the tubular portions of the ER and virtually excluded from other regions. To understand how they promote tubule formation, we characterized their behavior in cellular membranes and addressed how their localization in the ER is determined. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that yeast Rtn1p and Yop1p are less mobile in the membrane than normal ER proteins. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and cross-linking analyses show that they form oligomers. Mutants of yeast Rtn1p, which no longer localize exclusively to the tubular ER or are even totally inactive in inducing ER tubules, are more mobile and oligomerize less extensively. The mammalian reticulons and DP1 are also relatively immobile and can form oligomers. The conserved reticulon homology domain that includes the two membrane-embedded segments is sufficient for the localization of the reticulons to the tubular ER, as well as for their diffusional immobility and oligomerization. Finally, ATP depletion in both yeast and mammalian cells further decreases the mobilities of the reticulons and DP1. We propose that oligomerization of the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p is important for both their localization to the tubular domains of the ER and for their ability to form tubules. PMID:18442980

  10. Stand-Alone EAL Domain Proteins Form a Distinct Subclass of EAL Proteins Involved in Regulation of Cell Motility and Biofilm Formation in Enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    El Mouali, Youssef; Kim, Hyunhee; Ahmad, Irfan; Brauner, Annelie; Liu, Ying; Skurnik, Mikael; Galperin, Michael Y; Römling, Ute

    2017-09-15

    that in FlhDC-harboring beta- and gammaproteobacteria, some EAL-only proteins evolved to become catalytically inactive and regulate motility and biofilm formation by interacting with FlhDC.IMPORTANCE The EAL domain superfamily consists mainly of proteins with cyclic dimeric GMP-specific phosphodiesterase activity, but individual domains have been classified in three classes according to their functions and conserved amino acid signatures. Proteins that consist solely of stand-alone EAL domains cannot rely on other domains to form catalytically active dimers, and most of them fall into one of two distinct classes: catalytically active phosphodiesterases with well-conserved residues of the active site and the dimerization loop, and catalytically inactive YdiV/CdgR-like proteins that regulate bacterial motility by binding to the flagellar master regulator, FlhDC, and are found primarily in enterobacteria. The presence of apparently inactive EAL-only proteins in the bacteria that do not express FlhD suggests the existence of additional EAL interaction partners. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Planes formed with four intron-positions in tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Michiko; Hirata, Katsuki; Tsuji, Ryotarou; Sunaba, Syunya

    2014-01-07

    Eukaryotic genes have intervening sequences, introns, in their coding regions. Since introns are spliced out from m-RNA before translation, they are considered to have no effect on the protein structure. Here, we report a novel relationship between introns and the tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI. We identified "intron-positions" as amino acid residues on which or just after which introns are found in their corresponding nucleotide sequences, and then found that four intron-positions form a plane. We also found that the four intron-positions of retinol-binding protein encloses its ligand retinol. The tertiary structure of calpain domain VI changes after Ca(2+) binding, and the four intron-positions form a plane that includes its ligand calpastatin. To evaluate the statistical significance of the planarity, we calculated the mean distance of each intron-position from the plane defined by the other three intron-positions, and showed that it is significantly smaller than the one calculated for randomly generated locations based on exon size distribution. On the basis of this finding, we discuss the evolution of retinol binding protein and the origin of introns.

  12. EsxB, a secreted protein from Bacillus anthracis forms two distinct helical bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yao; Tan, Kemin; Chhor, Gekleng; Butler, Emily K.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Missiakas, Dominique; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-07-03

    The EsxB protein from Bacillus anthracis belongs to the WXG100 family, a group of proteins secreted by a specialized secretion system. We have determined the crystal structures of recombinant EsxB and discovered that the small protein (~10 kDa), comprised of a helix-loop-helix (HLH) hairpin, is capable of associating into two different helical bundles. The two basic quaternary assemblies of EsxB are an antiparallel (AP) dimer and a rarely observed bisecting U (BU) dimer. This structural duality of EsxB is believed to originate from the heptad repeat sequence diversity of the first helix of its HLH hairpin, which allows for two alternative helix packing. The flexibility of EsxB and the ability to form alternative helical bundles underscore the possibility that this protein can serve as an adaptor in secretion and can form hetero-oligomeric helix bundle(s) with other secreted members of the WXG100 family, such as EsxW. The highly conserved WXG motif is located within the loop of the HLH hairpin and is mostly buried within the helix bundle suggesting that its role is mainly structural. The exact functions of the motif, including a proposed role as a secretion signal, remain unknown.

  13. The metastasis-associated extracellular matrix protein osteopontin forms transient structure in ligand interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Gerald; Schedlbauer, Andreas; Chemelli, Angela; Ozdowy, Przemyslaw; Coudevylle, Nicolas; Auer, Renate; Kontaxis, Georg; Hartl, Markus; Miles, Andrew J; Wallace, B A; Glatter, Otto; Bister, Klaus; Konrat, Robert

    2011-07-12

    Osteopontin (OPN) is an acidic hydrophilic glycophosphoprotein that was first identified as a major sialoprotein in bones. It functions as a cell attachment protein displaying a RGD cell adhesion sequence and as a cytokine that signals through integrin and CD44 cell adhesion molecules. OPN is also implicated in human tumor progression and cell invasion. OPN has intrinsic transforming activity, and elevated OPN levels promote metastasis. OPN gene expression is also strongly activated in avian fibroblasts simultaneously transformed by the v-myc and v-mil(raf) oncogenes. Here we have investigated the solution structure of a 220-amino acid recombinant OPN protein by an integrated structural biology approach employing bioinformatic sequence analysis, multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. These studies suggest that OPN is an intrinsically unstructured protein in solution. Although OPN does not fold into a single defined structure, its conformational flexibility significantly deviates from random coil-like behavior. OPN comprises distinct local secondary structure elements with reduced conformational flexibility and substantially populates a compact subspace displaying distinct tertiary contacts. These compacted regions of OPN encompass the binding sites for α(V)β(III) integrin and heparin. The conformational flexibility combined with the modular architecture of OPN may represent an important structural prerequisite for its functional diversity.

  14. Expression and characterization of an N-truncated form of the NifA protein of Azospirillum brasilense

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, C.Y.; Araújo, L.M.; Kadowaki, M.A.S.; Monteiro, R.A.; Steffens, M.B.R.; Pedrosa, F.O.; Souza, E.M.; Chubatsu, L.S.

    2012-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium associated with important agricultural crops such as rice, wheat and maize. The expression of genes responsible for nitrogen fixation (nif genes) in this bacterium is dependent on the transcriptional activator NifA. This protein contains three structural domains: the N-terminal domain is responsible for the negative control by fixed nitrogen; the central domain interacts with the RNA polymerase σ54 factor and the C-terminal domain is involved in DNA binding. The central and C-terminal domains are linked by the interdomain linker (IDL). A conserved four-cysteine motif encompassing the end of the central domain and the IDL is probably involved in the oxygen-sensitivity of NifA. In the present study, we have expressed, purified and characterized an N-truncated form of A. brasilense NifA. The protein expression was carried out in Escherichia coli and the N-truncated NifA protein was purified by chromatography using an affinity metal-chelating resin followed by a heparin-bound resin. Protein homogeneity was determined by densitometric analysis. The N-truncated protein activated in vivo nifH::lacZ transcription regardless of fixed nitrogen concentration (absence or presence of 20 mM NH4Cl) but only under low oxygen levels. On the other hand, the aerobically purified N-truncated NifA protein bound to the nifB promoter, as demonstrated by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, implying that DNA-binding activity is not strictly controlled by oxygen levels. Our data show that, while the N-truncated NifA is inactive in vivo under aerobic conditions, it still retains DNA-binding activity, suggesting that the oxidized form of NifA bound to DNA is not competent to activate transcription. PMID:22267004

  15. Expression and characterization of an N-truncated form of the NifA protein of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, C Y; Araújo, L M; Kadowaki, M A S; Monteiro, R A; Steffens, M B R; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Chubatsu, L S

    2012-02-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium associated with important agricultural crops such as rice, wheat and maize. The expression of genes responsible for nitrogen fixation (nif genes) in this bacterium is dependent on the transcriptional activator NifA. This protein contains three structural domains: the N-terminal domain is responsible for the negative control by fixed nitrogen; the central domain interacts with the RNA polymerase σ(54) co-factor and the C-terminal domain is involved in DNA binding. The central and C-terminal domains are linked by the interdomain linker (IDL). A conserved four-cysteine motif encompassing the end of the central domain and the IDL is probably involved in the oxygen-sensitivity of NifA. In the present study, we have expressed, purified and characterized an N-truncated form of A. brasilense NifA. The protein expression was carried out in Escherichia coli and the N-truncated NifA protein was purified by chromatography using an affinity metal-chelating resin followed by a heparin-bound resin. Protein homogeneity was determined by densitometric analysis. The N-truncated protein activated in vivo nifH::lacZ transcription regardless of fixed nitrogen concentration (absence or presence of 20 mM NH(4)Cl) but only under low oxygen levels. On the other hand, the aerobically purified N-truncated NifA protein bound to the nifB promoter, as demonstrated by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, implying that DNA-binding activity is not strictly controlled by oxygen levels. Our data show that, while the N-truncated NifA is inactive in vivo under aerobic conditions, it still retains DNA-binding activity, suggesting that the oxidized form of NifA bound to DNA is not competent to activate transcription.

  16. Water in the Cratonic Mantle: Insights from FTIR Data on Lac De Gras Xenoliths (Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Brandon, Alan D.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; O'Reilly, Suzanne Yvette; Griffin, William L.; Morris, Richard V.; Graff, Trevor G.; Agresti, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The mantle lithosphere beneath the cratonic part of continents is the deepest (> 200 km) and oldest (>2-3 Ga) on Earth, remaining a conundrum as to how these cratonic roots could have resisted delamination by asthenospheric convection over time. Water, or trace H incorporated in mineral defects, could be a key player in the evolution of continental lithosphere because it influences melting and rheology of the mantle. Mantle xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlite in the Slave craton were analyzed by FTIR. The cratonic mantle beneath Lac de Gras is stratified with shallow (<145 km) oxidized ultradepleted peridotites and pyroxenites with evidence for carbonatitic metasomatism, underlain by reduced and less depleted peridotites metasomatized by kimberlite melts. Peridotites analyzed so far have H O contents in ppm weight of 7-100 in their olivines, 58 to 255 in their orthopyroxenes (opx), 11 to 84 in their garnet, and 139 in one clinopyroxene. A pyroxenite contains 58 ppm H2O in opx and 5 ppm H2O in its olivine and garnet. Olivine and garnet from the deep peridotites have a range of water contents extending to higher values than those from the shallow ones. The FTIR spectra of olivines from the shallow samples have more prominent Group II OH bands compared to the olivines from the deep samples, consistent with a more oxidized mantle environment. The range of olivine water content is similar to that observed in Kaapvaal craton peridotites at the same depths (129-184 km) but does not extend to as high values as those from Udachnaya (Siberian craton). The Slave, Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons will be compared in terms of water content distribution, controls and role in cratonic root longevity.

  17. The FEMA GRAS assessment of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and related substances used as flavor ingredients.

    PubMed

    Adams, T B; Gavin, C Lucas; Taylor, S V; Waddell, W J; Cohen, S M; Feron, V J; Goodman, J; Rietjens, I M C M; Marnett, L J; Portoghese, P S; Smith, R L

    2008-09-01

    This publication is the 12th in a series of safety evaluations performed by the Expert Panel of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA). In 1993, the Panel initiated a comprehensive program to re-evaluate the safety of more than 1700 GRAS flavoring substances under conditions of intended use. Since then, the number of flavoring substances has grown to more than 2200 chemically-defined substances. Elements that are fundamental to the safety evaluation of flavor ingredients include exposure, structural analogy, metabolism, toxicodynamics and toxicology. Scientific data relevant to the safety evaluation for the use of aliphatic, linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and structurally related substances as flavoring ingredients are evaluated. The group of substances was reaffirmed as GRAS (GRASr) based, in part, on their self-limiting properties as flavoring substances in food; their low level of flavor use; the rapid absorption and metabolism of low in vivo concentrations by well-recognized biochemical pathways; adequate metabolic detoxication at much higher levels of exposure in humans and animals; the wide margins of safety between the conservative estimates of intake and the no-observed-adverse effect levels determined from subchronic and chronic studies. While some of the compounds described here have exhibited positive in vitro genotoxicity results, evidence of in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity occurs only under conditions in which animals are repeatedly and directly exposed to high irritating concentrations of the aldehyde. These conditions are not relevant to humans who consume alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes as flavor ingredients at low concentrations distributed in a food or beverage matrix.

  18. Geriatric rescue after surgery (GRAS) score to predict failure-to-rescue in geriatric emergency general surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad; Azim, Asad; O'Keeffe, Terence; Jehan, Faisal; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Santino, Chelsey; Tang, Andrew; Vercruysse, Gary; Gries, Lynn; Joseph, Bellal

    2017-08-15

    Geriatric-patients(GP) undergoing emergency-general-surgery(EGS) are vulnerable to develop adverse-outcomes. Impact of patient-level-factors on Failure-to-Rescue(FTR) in EGS-GP remains unclear. Aim of our study was to determine factors associated with FTR(death from major-complication) and devise simple-bedside-score that predicts FTR in EGS-GP. 3-year(2013-15) analysis of patients, age≥65y on acute-care-surgery-service and underwent EGS. Regression analysis used to analyze factors associated with FTR and natural-logarithm of significant odds-ratio used to calculate estimated-weights for each factor. Geriatric-Rescue-After-Surgery(GRAS)-score calculated for each-patient. AUROC used to assess model discrimination. 725 EGS-patients analyzed. 44.6%(n = 324) had major-complications. The FTR-rate was 11.5%. Overall-mortality rate was 15.3%. On regression, significant-factors with their estimated-weights were:Age≥80y(2), Chronic-Obstructive-Pulmonary-Disease(COPD)(1), Chronic-renal-failure(CRF)(2), Congestive-heart-failure(CHF)(1), Albumin<3.5(1) and ASA score>3(2). AUROC of score was 0.787. GRAS-score is first score based on preoperative assessment that can reliably predict FTR in EGS-GP. Preoperative identification of patients at increased-risk of FTR can help in risk-stratification and timely-mobilization of resources for successful rescue of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The origins of life -- the 'protein interaction world' hypothesis: protein interactions were the first form of self-reproducing life and nucleic acids evolved later as memory molecules.

    PubMed

    Andras, Peter; Andras, Csaba

    2005-01-01

    The 'protein interaction world' (PIW) hypothesis of the origins of life assumes that life emerged as a self-reproducing and expanding system of protein interactions. In mainstream molecular biology, 'replication' refers to the material copying of molecules such as nucleic acids. However, PIW is conceptualized as an abstract communication system constituted by the interactions between proteins, in which 'replication' happens at the level of self-reproduction of these interactions between proteins. Densely concentrated peptide interaction systems may have reproduced and expanded as 'protocell' vesicles surrounded by lipid bi-layer membranes. Protocells led to the emergence of proto-RNA molecules of greater chemical stability which served as chemically differentiated 'memories' of peptide interaction states, thereby facilitating the reproduction and expansion of protocells. Simplification-driven expansion led to the selection of biotic amino acids and the reduction of the typical RNA alphabet to the four usual bases (A, C, G and U). Dense interactions between RNA molecules led to the emergence of the RNA interaction subsystem of the cell, and to the emergence of 'memories' of RNA interactions in the form of DNA molecules with greater chemical stability. The expansion of DNA molecule interactions led to the dense clustering and encapsulation of DNA molecules within the cell nucleus. RNA molecules therefore serve as memories of protein interactions and DNA molecules are memories of RNA interactions. We believe that the PIW hypothesis is more evolutionarily plausible than the mainstream RNA world hypothesis, and has greater explanatory power.

  20. The Role of a Novel Topological Form of the Prion Protein in Prion Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    experimental scrapie infection, which suggests that CtmPrP may be the ultimate toxic trigger. We have identified mutations in the prion protein sequence...which express CtmPrP [designated Tg(L9R-3AV)], and these mice develop a spontaneous neurological illness similar to scrapie . We are characterizing the...for the presence of CtmPrP in terminally ill scrapie -infected mice, and did not detect any CtmPrP [Stewart and Harris 2003]. We have proposed

  1. A Long-Distance Translocatable Phloem Protein from Cucumber Forms a Ribonucleoprotein Complex In Vivo with Hop Stunt Viroid RNA†

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Gustavo; Pallás, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    Viroids are highly structured plant pathogenic RNAs that do not code for any protein, and thus, their long-distance movement within the plant must be mediated by direct interaction with cellular factors, the nature of which is presently unknown. In addition to this type of RNAs, recent evidence indicates that endogenous RNAs move through the phloem acting as macromolecular signals involved in plant defense and development. The form in which these RNA molecules are transported to distal parts of the plant is unclear. Viroids can be a good model system to try to identify translocatable proteins that could assist the vascular movement of RNA molecules. Here, we demonstrate by use of immunoprecipitation experiments, that the phloem protein 2 from cucumber (CsPP2) is able to interact in vivo with a viroid RNA. Intergeneric graft assays revealed that both the CsPP2 and the Hop stunt viroid RNA were translocated to the scion. The translocated viroid is symptomatic in the nonhost scion, indicating that the translocated RNA is functional. The CsPP2 gene was cloned and sequenced. The analysis of its primary structure revealed the existence of a potential double-spaced-RNA-binding motif, previously identified in a set of proteins that bind to highly structured RNAs, which could explain its RNA-binding properties. The possible involvement of this phloem protein in assisting the long-distance movement of the viroid RNA within the plant is discussed. PMID:15331743

  2. Integration of protein extraction with a stream of byproducts from marine macroalgae: A model forms the basis for marine bioeconomy.

    PubMed

    Gajaria, Tejal K; Suthar, Poornima; Baghel, Ravi S; Balar, Nikunj B; Sharnagat, Preeti; Mantri, Vaibhav A; Reddy, C R K

    2017-07-05

    The present study describes an advanced biorefinery model for marine macroalgae that assumes significant importance in the context of marine bio-economy. The method investigated in this study integrates the extraction of crude proteins with recovery of minerals rich sap, lipids, ulvan and cellulose from fresh biomass of Ulva lactuca. The protein content extracted was 11±2.12% on dry weight basis with recovery efficiency of 68.75±4.01%. The amino acid composition of crude protein fraction showed iso-leucine as the most abundant amino acid with 16.51±0.03% followed by histidine, arginine, tyrosine, serine, aspartic acid, threonine, phenyl alanine, leucine, alanine, lysine, glycine and glutamic acid (0.22±0.24%). The digestibility of protein was as high as 85.86±5.92% indicating its suitability for use in food supplements. The protein production with co-recovery of other products would not only result in effective utilisation marine macroalgal resources but also forms the basis for marine bio-economy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pericentrin forms a complex with intraflagellar transport proteins and polycystin-2 and is required for primary cilia assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; Gromley, Adam; Redick, Sambra; Agustin, Jovenal San; Witman, George; Pazour, Gregory J.; Peters, Dorien J.M.; Doxsey, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile microtubule structures that assemble from basal bodies by a process called intraflagellar transport (IFT) and are associated with several human diseases. Here, we show that the centrosome protein pericentrin (Pcnt) colocalizes with IFT proteins to the base of primary and motile cilia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrates that Pcnt is on or near basal bodies at the base of cilia. Pcnt depletion by RNA interference disrupts basal body localization of IFT proteins and the cation channel polycystin-2 (PC2), and inhibits primary cilia assembly in human epithelial cells. Conversely, silencing of IFT20 mislocalizes Pcnt from basal bodies and inhibits primary cilia assembly. Pcnt is found in spermatocyte IFT fractions, and IFT proteins are found in isolated centrosome fractions. Pcnt antibodies coimmunoprecipitate IFT proteins and PC2 from several cell lines and tissues. We conclude that Pcnt, IFTs, and PC2 form a complex in vertebrate cells that is required for assembly of primary cilia and possibly motile cilia and flagella. PMID:15337773

  4. HorC, a hop-resistance related protein, presumably functions in homodimer form.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kazumaru; Suzuki, Koji; Asano, Shizuka; Ogata, Tomoo; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2009-08-01

    To determine whether two HorC molecules coordinately form a single unit, the functional properties of covalently linked dimers of HorC encoded by tandemly fused horC genes were studied. Lactobacillus brevis introduced with the fused horC genes and a single horC gene exhibited same degree of resistance to hop compounds and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. This suggests that HorC functions as a homodimer.

  5. Printing cell-laden gelatin constructs by free-form fabrication and enzymatic protein crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Scott A; Agrawal, Animesh; Lee, Bae Hoon; Chua, Hui Yee; Low, Kok Yao; Lau, Boon Chong; Machluf, Marcelle; Venkatraman, Subbu

    2015-02-01

    Considerable interest has arisen in precision fabrication of cell bearing scaffolds and structures by free form fabrication. Gelatin is an ideal material for creating cell entrapping constructs, yet its application in free form fabrication remains challenging. We demonstrate the use of gelatin, crosslinked with microbial transglutaminase (mTgase), as a material to print cell bearing hydrogels for both 2-dimensional (2-D) precision patterns and 3-dimensional (3-D) constructs. The precision patterning was attained with 3 % gelatin and 2 % high molecular weight poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) whereas 3-D constructs were obtained using a 5 % gelatin solution. These hydrogels, referred to as "bioinks" supported entrapped cell growth, allowing cell spreading and proliferation for both HEK293 cells and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs). These bioinks were shown to be dispensable by robotic precision, forming patterns and constructs that were insoluble and of suitable stiffness to endure post gelation handling. The two bioinks were further characterized for fabrication parameters and mechanical properties.

  6. The membrane protein Pannexin1 forms two open channel conformations depending on the mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Qiu, Feng; Jackson, David G.; Sosinsky, Gina; Dahl, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) participates in several signaling events that involve ATP release, including the innate immune response, ciliary beat in airway epithelia and oxygen supply in the vasculature. The view that Panx1 forms a large ATP-release channel has been challenged by the association of a low conductance, small anion-selective channel with the presence of Panx1. We showed that Panx1 membrane channels can function in two distinct modes with different conductances and permeabilities when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. When stimulated by potassium ions (K+), Panx1 formed a high conductance channel of ~500 pS that was permeable to ATP. Various physiological stimuli can induce this ATP-permeable conformation of the channel in several cell types. In contrast, the channel had a low conductance (~50 pS) with no detectable ATP permeability when activated by voltage in the absence of K+. The two channel states were associated with different reactivities of the terminal cysteine of Panx1 to thiol reagents, suggesting different conformations. Single particle electron microscopic analysis revealed that K+ stimulated the formation of channels with a larger pore diameter than those formed in the absence of K+. These data suggest that different stimuli lead to distinct channel structures with distinct biophysical properties. PMID:25056878

  7. Distinct forms of the. beta. subunit of GTP-binding regulatory proteins identified by molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, H.K.W.; Amatruda, T.T. III; Birren, B.W.; Simon, M.I.

    1987-06-01

    Two distinct ..beta.. subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins have been identified by cDNA cloning and are referred to as ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 1/ subunits. The bovine transducin ..beta.. subunit (..beta../sub 1/) has been cloned previously. The author now isolated and analyzed cDNA clones that encode the ..beta../sub 2/ subunit from bovine adrenal, bovine brain, and a human myeloid leukemia cell line, HL-60. The 340-residue M/sub r/ 37,329 BETA/sub 2/ protein is 90% identical with ..beta../sub 1/ in predicted amino acid sequence, and it is also organized as a series of repetitive homologous segments. The major mRNA that encodes the bovine ..beta../sub 2/ subunit is 1.7 kilobases in length. It is expressed at lower levels than ..beta../sub 1/ subunit mRNA in all tissues examined. The ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ messages are expressed in cloned human cell lines. Hybridization of cDNA probes to bovine DNA showed that ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ are encoded by separate genes. The amino acid sequences for the bovine and human ..beta../sub 2/ subunit are identical, as are the amino acid sequences for the bovine and human ..beta../sub 1/ subunit. This evolutionary conservation suggests that the two ..beta.. subunits have different roles in the signal transduction process.

  8. Electrophoretic and spectroscopic characterization of the protein patterns formed in different surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elena; Ruso, Juan M; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2008-01-01

    The complexations between catalase and the sodium perfluorooctanoate/sodium octanoate and sodium perfluorooctanoate/sodium dodecanoate systems have been studied by a combination of electrophoresis and spectroscopy measurements. The numbers of adsorption sites on the protein were determined from the observed increases of the zeta-potential as a function of surfactant concentration in the regions where the adsorption was a consequence of the hydrophobic effect. The Gibbs energies of adsorption of the surfactants onto the protein were evaluated and the results show that for all systems, Gibbs energies are negative and larger, in absolute values, at low values of surfactant concentration where binding to the high energy sites takes place, and become less negative as more surfactant molecules bind, suggesting a saturation process. The role of hydrophobic interactions in these systems has been demonstrated to be the predominant. Spectroscopy measurements suggest conformational changes on catalase depending on the surfactant mixture as well as the mixed ratio. No isosbestic point or shifts have been found showing that catalase has spectrophotometrically one kind of binding site for these surfactant mixtures.

  9. tRNA acceptor stem and anticodon bases form independent codes related to protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases recognize tRNA anticodon and 3′ acceptor stem bases. Synthetase Urzymes acylate cognate tRNAs even without anticodon-binding domains, in keeping with the possibility that acceptor stem recognition preceded anticodon recognition. Representing tRNA identity elements with two bits per base, we show that the anticodon encodes the hydrophobicity of each amino acid side-chain as represented by its water-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient, and this relationship holds true over the entire temperature range of liquid water. The acceptor stem codes preferentially for the surface area or size of each side-chain, as represented by its vapor-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient. These orthogonal experimental properties are both necessary to account satisfactorily for the exposed surface area of amino acids in folded proteins. Moreover, the acceptor stem codes correctly for β-branched and carboxylic acid side-chains, whereas the anticodon codes for a wider range of such properties, but not for size or β-branching. These and other results suggest that genetic coding of 3D protein structures evolved in distinct stages, based initially on the size of the amino acid and later on its compatibility with globular folding in water. PMID:26034281

  10. Deposition of bacteriorhodopsin protein in a purple membrane form on nitrocellulose membranes for enhanced photoelectric response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Neuzil, Pavel; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Engelhard, Martin

    2012-12-27

    Bacteriorhodopsin protein (bR)-based systems are one of the simplest known biological energy converters. The robust chemical, thermal and electrochemical properties of bR have made it an attractive material for photoelectric devices. This study demonstrates the photoelectric response of a dry bR layer deposited on a nitrocellulose membrane with indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. Light-induced electrical current as well as potential and impedance changes of dried bR film were recorded as the function of illumination. We have also tested bR in solution and found that the electrical properties are strongly dependent on light intensity changing locally proton concentration and thus pH of the solution. Experimental data support the assumption that bR protein on a positively charged nitrocellulose membrane (PNM) can be used as highly sensitive photo- and pH detector. Here the bR layer facilitates proton translocation and acts as an ultrafast optoelectric signal transducer. It is therefore useful in applications related to bioelectronics, biosensors, bio-optics devices and current carrying junction devices.

  11. Deposition of Bacteriorhodopsin Protein in a Purple Membrane Form on Nitrocellulose Membranes for Enhanced Photoelectric Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Jun; Neuzil, Pavel; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Engelhard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin protein (bR)-based systems are one of the simplest known biological energy converters. The robust chemical, thermal and electrochemical properties of bR have made it an attractive material for photoelectric devices. This study demonstrates the photoelectric response of a dry bR layer deposited on a nitrocellulose membrane with indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. Light-induced electrical current as well as potential and impedance changes of dried bR film were recorded as the function of illumination. We have also tested bR in solution and found that the electrical properties are strongly dependent on light intensity changing locally proton concentration and thus pH of the solution. Experimental data support the assumption that bR protein on a positively charged nitrocellulose membrane (PNM) can be used as highly sensitive photo- and pH detector. Here the bR layer facilitates proton translocation and acts as an ultrafast optoelectric signal transducer. It is therefore useful in applications related to bioelectronics, biosensors, bio-optics devices and current carrying junction devices. PMID:23271605

  12. Solute carriers involved in energy transfer of mitochondria form a homologous protein family.

    PubMed

    Aquila, H; Link, T A; Klingenberg, M

    1987-02-09

    The sequences of three mitochondrial carriers involved in energy transfer, the ADP/ATP carrier, phosphate carrier and uncoupling carrier, are analyzed. Similarly to what has been previously reported for the ADP/ATP carrier and the uncoupling protein, now also the phosphate carrier is found to have a tripartite structure comprising three similar repeats of approx. 100 residues each. The three sequences show a fair overall homology with each other. More significant homologies are found by comparing the repeats within and between the carriers in a scheme where the sequences are spliced into repeats, which are arranged for maximum homology by allowing possible insertions or deletions. A striking conservation of critical residues, glycine, proline, of charged and of aromatic residues is found throughout all nine repeats. This is indicative of a similar structural principle in the repeats. Hydropathy profiles of the three proteins and a search for amphipathic alpha-spans reveal six membrane-spanning segments for each carrier, providing further support for the basic structural identity of the repeats. The proposed folding pattern of the carriers in the membrane is exemplified with the phosphate carrier. A possible tertiary arrangement of the repeats and the membrane-spanning helices is shown. The emergence of a mitochondrial carrier family by triplication and by divergent evolution from a common gene of about 100 residues is discussed.

  13. Yeast-expressed recombinant protein of the receptor-binding domain in SARS-CoV spike protein with deglycosylated forms as a SARS vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Du, Lanying; Chag, Shivali M; Ma, Cuiqing; Tricoche, Nancy; Tao, Xinrong; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Jiang, Shibo

    2014-01-01

    Development of vaccines for preventing a future pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and for biodefense preparedness is urgently needed. Our previous studies have shown that a candidate SARS vaccine antigen consisting of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV spike protein can induce potent neutralizing antibody responses and protection against SARS-CoV challenge in vaccinated animals. To optimize expression conditions for scale-up production of the RBD vaccine candidate, we hypothesized that this could be potentially achieved by removing glycosylation sites in the RBD protein. In this study, we constructed two RBD protein variants: 1) RBD193-WT (193-aa, residues 318-510) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD193-N1, RBD193-N2, RBD193-N3); 2) RBD219-WT (219-aa, residues 318-536) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD219-N1, RBD219-N2, and RBD219-N3). All constructs were expressed as recombinant proteins in yeast. The purified recombinant proteins of these constructs were compared for their antigenicity, functionality and immunogenicity in mice using alum as the adjuvant. We found that RBD219-N1 exhibited high expression yield, and maintained its antigenicity and functionality. More importantly, RBD219-N1 induced significantly stronger RBD-specific antibody responses and a higher level of neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice than RBD193-WT, RBD193-N1, RBD193-N3, or RBD219-WT. These results suggest that RBD219-N1 could be selected as an optimal SARS vaccine candidate for further development.

  14. Yeast-expressed recombinant protein of the receptor-binding domain in SARS-CoV spike protein with deglycosylated forms as a SARS vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Du, Lanying; Chag, Shivali M; Ma, Cuiqing; Tricoche, Nancy; Tao, Xinrong; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Jiang, Shibo

    2014-01-01

    Development of vaccines for preventing a future pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and for biodefense preparedness is urgently needed. Our previous studies have shown that a candidate SARS vaccine antigen consisting of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV spike protein can induce potent neutralizing antibody responses and protection against SARS-CoV challenge in vaccinated animals. To optimize expression conditions for scale-up production of the RBD vaccine candidate, we hypothesized that this could be potentially achieved by removing glycosylation sites in the RBD protein. In this study, we constructed two RBD protein variants: 1) RBD193-WT (193-aa, residues 318–510) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD193-N1, RBD193-N2, RBD193-N3); 2) RBD219-WT (219-aa, residues 318–536) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD219-N1, RBD219-N2, and RBD219-N3). All constructs were expressed as recombinant proteins in yeast. The purified recombinant proteins of these constructs were compared for their antigenicity, functionality and immunogenicity in mice using alum as the adjuvant. We found that RBD219-N1 exhibited high expression yield, and maintained its antigenicity and functionality. More importantly, RBD219-N1 induced significantly stronger RBD-specific antibody responses and a higher level of neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice than RBD193-WT, RBD193-N1, RBD193-N3, or RBD219-WT. These results suggest that RBD219-N1 could be selected as an optimal SARS vaccine candidate for further development. PMID:24355931

  15. Adenovirus DNA-binding protein forms a multimeric protein complex with double-stranded DNA and enhances binding of nuclear factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Stuiver, M H; van der Vliet, P C

    1990-01-01

    The 72-kilodalton adenovirus DNA-binding protein (DBP) binds to single-stranded DNA as well as to RNA and double-stranded DNA and is essential for the replication of viral DNA. We investigated the binding of DBP to double-stranded DNA by gel retardation analysis. By using a 114-base-pair DNA fragment, five or six different complexes were observed by gel retardation. The mobility of these complexes is dependent on the DBP concentration, suggesting that the complexes arise by sequential binding of DBP molecules to the DNA. In contrast to binding to single-stranded DNA, the binding of DBP to double-stranded DNA appears to be noncooperative. DBP binds to linear DNA as well as to circular DNA, while linear DNA containing the adenovirus terminal protein was also recognized. No specificity for adenovirus origin sequences was observed. To study whether the binding of DBP could influence initiation of DNA replication, we analyzed the effect of DBP on the binding of nuclear factor I (NFI) and NFIII, two sequence-specific origin-recognizing proteins that enhance initiation. At subsaturating levels of NFI, DBP increases the rate of binding of NFI considerably, while no effect was seen on NFIII. This stimulation of NFI binding is specific for DBP and was not observed with another protein (NFIV), which forms a similar DNA-multimeric protein complex. In agreement with enhanced NFI binding, DBP stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro especially strongly at subsaturating NFI concentrations. We explain our results by assuming that DBP forms a complex with origin DNA that promotes formation of an alternative DNA structure, thereby facilitating the binding of NFI as well as the initiation of DNA replication via NFI. Images PMID:2293667

  16. The copper transport-associated protein Ctr4 can form prion-like epigenetic determinants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Sideri, Theodora; Yashiroda, Yoko; Ellis, David A.; Rodríguez-López, María; Yoshida, Minoru; Tuite, Mick F.; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Prions are protein-based infectious entities associated with fatal brain diseases in animals, but also modify a range of host-cell phenotypes in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many questions remain about the evolution and biology of prions. Although several functionally distinct prion-forming proteins exist in S. cerevisiae, [HET-s] of Podospora anserina is the only other known fungal prion. Here we investigated prion-like, protein-based epigenetic transmission in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that S. pombe cells can support the formation and maintenance of the prion form of the S. cerevisiae Sup35 translation factor [PSI+], and that the formation and propagation of these Sup35 aggregates is inhibited by guanidine hydrochloride, indicating commonalities in prion propagation machineries in these evolutionary diverged yeasts. A proteome-wide screen identified the Ctr4 copper transporter subunit as a putative prion with a predicted prion-like domain. Overexpression of the ctr4 gene resulted in large Ctr4 protein aggregates that were both detergent and proteinase-K resistant. Cells carrying such [CTR+] aggregates showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, and this phenotype could be transmitted to aggregate-free [ctr-] cells by transformation with [CTR+] cell extracts. Moreover, this [CTR+] phenotype was inherited in a non-Mendelian manner following mating with naïve [ctr-] cells, but intriguingly the [CTR+] phenotype was not eliminated by guanidine-hydrochloride treatment. Thus, Ctr4 exhibits multiple features diagnostic of other fungal prions and is the first example of a prion in fission yeast. These findings suggest that transmissible protein-based determinants of traits may be more widespread among fungi. PMID:28191457

  17. Structural and biochemical characterization of the essential DsbA-like disulfide bond forming protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial Disulfide bond forming (Dsb) proteins facilitate proper folding and disulfide bond formation of periplasmic and secreted proteins. Previously, we have shown that Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF aid in vitro oxidative folding of proteins. The M. tuberculosis proteome contains another predicted membrane-tethered Dsb protein, Mt-DsbA, which is encoded by an essential gene. Results Herein, we present structural and biochemical analyses of Mt-DsbA. The X-ray crystal structure of Mt-DsbA reveals a two-domain structure, comprising a canonical thioredoxin domain with the conserved CXXC active site cysteines in their reduced form, and an inserted α-helical domain containing a structural disulfide bond. The overall fold of Mt-DsbA resembles that of other DsbA-like proteins and not Mt-DsbE or Mt-DsbF. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that, unlike Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF, Mt-DsbA is unable to oxidatively fold reduced, denatured hirudin. Moreover, on the substrates tested in this study, Mt-DsbA has disulfide bond isomerase activity contrary to Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF. Conclusion These results suggest that Mt-DsbA acts upon a distinct subset of substrates as compared to Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF. One could speculate that Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF are functionally redundant whereas Mt-DsbA is not, offering an explanation for the essentiality of Mt-DsbA in M. tuberculosis. PMID:24134223

  18. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Leona; Toivola, Jouni; Välilehto, Outi; Saloniemi, Taija; Cunningham, Claire; White, Daniel; Mäkelä, Anna R; Korhonen, Eila; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids) were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs). The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles. PMID:17156442

  19. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Leona; Toivola, Jouni; Välilehto, Outi; Saloniemi, Taija; Cunningham, Claire; White, Daniel; Mäkelä, Anna R; Korhonen, Eila; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2006-12-08

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids) were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs). The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles.

  20. Upregulation of regulator of G-protein signaling 2 in the sclera of a form deprivation myopic animal model.

    PubMed

    Zou, Leilei; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaohui; Chu, Renyuan; Dai, Jinhui; Zhou, Hao; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Scleral remodeling is an important mechanism underlying the development of myopia. Atropine, an antagonist of G protein-coupled muscarinic receptors, is currently used as an off-label treatment for myopia. Regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) functions as an intracellular selective inhibitor of muscarinic receptors. In this study we measured scleral RGS2 expression and scleral remodeling in an animal model of myopia in the presence or absence of atropine treatment. GUINEA PIGS WERE ASSIGNED TO FOUR GROUPS: normal (free of form deprivation), form deprivation myopia (FDM) for 4 weeks, FDM treated with saline, and FDM treated with atropine. Biometric measurements were then performed. RGS2 expression levels and scleral remodeling, including scleral thickness and collagen type I expression, were compared among the four groups. Compared with normal eyes and contralateral control eyes, the FDM eyes had the most prominent changes in refraction, axial length, and scleral remodeling, indicating myopia. There was no significant difference between control and normal eyes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the scleral thickness was significantly thinner in the posterior pole region of FDM eyes compared to normal eyes. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis showed a significant decrease in posterior scleral collagen type I mRNA and protein expression in the FDM eyes compared to the normal eyes. The FDM eyes also had increased levels of RGS2 mRNA and protein expression in the sclera. Atropine treatment attenuated the FDM-induced changes in refraction, axial length, and scleral remodeling. Interestingly, atropine treatment significantly increased collagen type I mRNA expression but decreased RGS2 mRNA and protein expression in the sclera of the FDM eyes. We identified a significant RGS2 upregulation and collagen type I downregulation in the sclera of FDM eyes, which could be partially attenuated by atropine treatment. Our data suggest that targeting dysregulated RGS

  1. Pore-forming proteins with built-in triggers and switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Hagan

    1996-02-01

    Genetic engineering and targeted chemical modification are being used to produce polypeptides with pore-forming activity that can be triggered or switched on-and-off by biochemical, chemical or physical stimuli. The principal target of our studies has been the (alpha) -hemolysin ((alpha) HL) from the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. The remodeled hemolysins include protease-activated pores, metal-regulated pores, pores that are activated by chemical alkylation and pores that are turned on with light. These polypeptides have several potential applications. For example, they might serve as components of sensors or they might be useful for mediating the controlled release of encapsulated drugs.

  2. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  3. Assembly principles of a unique cage formed by hexameric and decameric E. coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Malet, Hélène; Liu, Kaiyin; El Bakkouri, Majida; Chan, Sze Wah Samuel; Effantin, Gregory; Bacia, Maria; Houry, Walid A; Gutsche, Irina

    2014-08-05

    A 3.3 MDa macromolecular cage between two Escherichia coli proteins with seemingly incompatible symmetries-the hexameric AAA+ ATPase RavA and the decameric inducible lysine decarboxylase LdcI-is reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy to 11 Å resolution. Combined with a 7.5 Å resolution reconstruction of the minimal complex between LdcI and the LdcI-binding domain of RavA, and the previously solved crystal structures of the individual components, this work enables to build a reliable pseudoatomic model of this unusual architecture and to identify conformational rearrangements and specific elements essential for complex formation. The design of the cage created via lateral interactions between five RavA rings is unique for the diverse AAA+ ATPase superfamily.

  4. Truncated Form of the Epstein-Barr Virus Protein EBNA-LP Protects against Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis by Inhibiting Protein Phosphatase 2A▿

    PubMed Central

    Garibal, Julie; Hollville, Émilie; Bell, Andrew I.; Kelly, Gemma L.; Renouf, Benjamin; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Rickinson, Alan B.; Wiels, Joëlle

    2007-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded leader protein, EBNA-LP, strongly activates the EBNA2-mediated transcriptional activation of cellular and viral genes and is therefore important for EBV-induced B-cell transformation. However, a truncated form of EBNA-LP is produced in cells infected with variant EBV strains lacking EBNA2 due to a genetic deletion. The function of this truncated form is unknown. We show here that some Burkitt's lymphoma cells harboring defective EBV strains are specifically resistant to the caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by verotoxin 1 (VT-1) or staurosporine. These cells produced low-molecular-weight Y1Y2-truncated isoforms of EBNA-LP, which were partly localized in the cytoplasm. The transfection of sensitive cells with constructs encoding truncated EBNA-LP isoforms, but not full-length EBNA-LP, induced resistance to caspase-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, VT-1 induced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activation in sensitive cells but not in resistant cells, in which the truncated EBNA-LP interacted with this protein. Thus, the resistance to apoptosis observed in cells harboring defective EBV strains most probably results from the inactivation of PP2A via interactions with low-molecular-weight Y1Y2-truncated EBNA-LP isoforms. PMID:17494066

  5. High-resolution autoradiography of new formed proteins in the epididymis after incorporation of tritiated amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Fain-Maurel, M.A.; Dadoune, J.P.; Alfonsi, M.F.

    1981-05-01

    The synthesis and excretion of newly formed proteins in the principal cells of the head, body, and tail of the epididymis were studied by quantitative autoradiography in light and electron microscopy. Adult mice were killed from 5 min to 6 hr after intravenous injection of tritiated leucine, lysine, and arginine. The labels were taken up early and in greater amounts in the principal cells of the head. Radioactivity decreased in the cells of all three segments throughout the first hour following administration of the tracers. Thereafter, it increased in the lumen. High-resolution analysis showed successive peaks of relative concentration of the labels over the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and apical plasma membrane, thus confirming that protein synthesis and excretion follow the usual pathway in the principal cells all along the epididymis. However, since a radioactivity peak occurred as early as 15 min over the apical membrane of cells in the head, it is likely that part of the endoplasmic reticulum-canalicular and poor in polysomes-is involved independently in the synthesis and rapid transport of newly formed proteins.

  6. Arf1 and Arf6 Promote Ventral Actin Structures formed by acute Activation of Protein Kinase C and Src

    PubMed Central

    Caviston, Juliane P.; Cohen, Lee Ann; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2016-01-01

    Arf proteins regulate membrane traffic and organelle structure. Although Arf6 is known to initiate actin-based changes in cell surface architecture, Arf1 may also function at the plasma membrane. Here we show that acute activation of protein kinase C (PKC) induced by the phorbol ester PMA led to the formation of motile actin structures on the ventral surface of Beas-2b cells, a lung bronchial epithelial cell line. Ventral actin structures also formed in PMA-treated HeLa cells that had elevated levels of Arf activation. For both cell types, formation of the ventral actin structures was enhanced by expression of active forms of either Arf1 or Arf6, and by the expression of guanine nucleotide exchange factors that activate these Arfs. By contrast, formation of these structures was blocked by inhibitors of PKC and Src, and required phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate, Rac, Arf6 and Arf1. Furthermore, expression of ASAP1, an Arf1 GTPase activating protein (GAP) was more effective at inhibiting the ventral actin structures than was ACAP1, an Arf6 GAP. This study adds to the expanding role for Arf1 in the periphery and identifies a requirement for Arf1, a “Golgi Arf”, in the reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton on ventral surfaces, against the substratum. PMID:24916416

  7. Two single-headed myosin V motors bound to a tetrameric adapter protein form a processive complex

    PubMed Central

    Krementsova, Elena B.; Hodges, Alex R.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Sladewski, Thomas E.; Travaglia, Mirko; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Myo4p, one of two class V myosins in budding yeast, continuously transports messenger RNA (mRNA) cargo in the cell but is nonprocessive when characterized in vitro. The adapter protein She3p tightly binds to the Myo4p rod, forming a single-headed motor complex. In this paper, we show that two Myo4p–She3p motors are recruited by the tetrameric mRNA-binding protein She2p to form a processive double-headed complex. The binding site for She3p was mapped to a single α helix that protrudes at right angles from She2p. Processive runs of several micrometers on yeast actin–tropomyosin filaments were observed only in the presence of She2p, and, thus, motor activity is regulated by cargo binding. While moving processively, each head steps ∼72 nm in a hand-over-hand motion. Coupling two high-duty cycle monomeric motors via a common cargo-binding adapter protein creates a complex with transport properties comparable with a single dimeric processive motor such as vertebrate myosin Va. PMID:22084309

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction data for the aconitase form of human iron-regulatory protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, J.; Darnault, C.; Moulis, J. M.

    2005-05-01

    Two crystal forms of the aconitase version of recombinant human IRP1 are reported. Iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are closely related molecules involved in animal iron metabolism. Both proteins can bind to specific mRNA regions called iron-responsive elements and thereby control the expression of proteins involved in the uptake, storage and utilization of iron. In iron-replete cells, IRP1, but not IRP2, binds a [4Fe–4S] cluster and functions as a cytoplasmic aconitase, with simultaneous loss of its RNA-binding ability. Whereas IRP2 is known to be involved in Fe homeostasis, the role of IRP1 is less clear; it may provide a link between citrate and iron metabolisms and be involved in oxidative stress response. Here, two crystal forms of the aconitase version of recombinant human IRP1 are reported. An X-ray fluorescence measurement performed on a gold-derivative crystal showed the unexpected presence of zinc, in addition to gold and iron. Both native and MAD X-ray data at the Au, Fe and Zn absorption edges have been collected from these crystals.

  9. A Novel and Conserved Plasmodium Sporozoite Membrane Protein SPELD is Required for Maturation of Exo-erythrocytic Forms

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nihmi, Faisal Mohammed Abdul; Kolli, Surendra Kumar; Reddy, Segireddy Rameswara; Mastan, Babu S.; Togiri, Jyothi; Maruthi, Mulaka; Gupta, Roshni; Sijwali, Puran Singh; Mishra, Satish; Kumar, Kota Arun

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites are the infective forms of malaria parasite to vertebrate host and undergo dramatic changes in their transcriptional repertoire during maturation in mosquito salivary glands. We report here the role of a novel and conserved Plasmodium berghei protein encoded by PBANKA_091090 in maturation of Exo-erythrocytic Forms (EEFs) and designate it as Sporozoite surface Protein Essential for Liver stage Development (PbSPELD). PBANKA_091090 was previously annotated as PB402615.00.0 and its transcript was recovered at maximal frequency in the Serial Analysis of the Gene Expression (SAGE) of Plasmodium berghei salivary gland sporozoites. An orthologue of this transcript was independently identified in Plasmodium vivax sporozoite microarrays and was designated as Sporozoite Conserved Orthologous Transcript-2 (scot-2). Functional characterization through reverse genetics revealed that PbSPELD is essential for Plasmodium liver stage maturation. mCherry transgenic of PbSPELD localized the protein to plasma membrane of sporozoites and early EEFs. Global microarray analysis of pbspeld ko revealed EEF attenuation being associated with down regulation of genes central to general transcription, cell cycle, proteosome and cadherin signaling. pbspeld mutant EEFs induced pre-erythrocytic immunity with 50% protective efficacy. Our studies have implications for attenuating the human Plasmodium liver stages by targeting SPELD locus. PMID:28067322

  10. FRAXE-associated mental retardation protein (FMR2) is an RNA-binding protein with high affinity for G-quartet RNA forming structure

    PubMed Central

    Bensaid, Mounia; Melko, Mireille; Bechara, Elias G.; Davidovic, Laetitia; Berretta, Antonio; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Gecz, Jozef; Lalli, Enzo; Bardoni, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    FRAXE is a form of mild to moderate mental retardation due to the silencing of the FMR2 gene. The cellular function of FMR2 protein is presently unknown. By analogy with its homologue AF4, FMR2 was supposed to have a role in transcriptional regulation, but robust evidences supporting this hypothesis are lacking. We observed that FMR2 co-localizes with the splicing factor SC35 in nuclear speckles, the nuclear regions where splicing factors are concentrated, assembled and modified. Similarly to what was reported for splicing factors, blocking splicing or transcription leads to the accumulation of FMR2 in enlarged, rounded speckles. FMR2 is also localized in the nucleolus when splicing is blocked. We show here that FMR2 is able to specifically bind the G-quartet-forming RNA structure with high affinity. Remarkably, in vivo, in the presence of FMR2, the ESE action of the G-quartet situated in mRNA of an alternatively spliced exon of a minigene or of the putative target FMR1 appears reduced. Interestingly, FMR1 is silenced in the fragile X syndrome, another form of mental retardation. All together, our findings strongly suggest that FMR2 is an RNA-binding protein, which might be involved in alternative splicing regulation through an interaction with G-quartet RNA structure. PMID:19136466

  11. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, Michele; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva B; Raimondi, Ivan; Inga, Alberto

    2017-01-29

    The TP53 gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer and p53 protein plays a crucial role in gene expression and cancer protection. Its role is manifested by interactions with other proteins and DNA. p53 is a transcription factor that binds to DNA response elements (REs). Due to the palindromic nature of the consensus binding site, several p53-REs have the potential to form cruciform structures. However, the influence of cruciform formation on the activity of p53-REs has not been evaluated. Therefore, we prepared sets of p53-REs with identical theoretical binding affinity in their linear state, but different probabilities to form extra helical structures, for in vitro and in vivo analyses. Then we evaluated the presence of cruciform structures when inserted into plasmid DNA and employed a yeast-based assay to measure transactivation potential of these p53-REs cloned at a chromosomal locus in isogenic strains. We show that transactivation in vivo correlated more with relative propensity of an RE to form cruciforms than to its predicted in vitro DNA binding affinity for wild type p53. Structural features of p53-REs could therefore be an important determinant of p53 transactivation function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Visualization by atomic force microscopy of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein-RNA complexes formed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kiselyova, O I; Yaminsky, I V; Karger, E M; Frolova, O Y; Dorokhov, Y L; Atabekov, J G

    2001-06-01

    The structure of complexes formed in vitro by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-coded movement protein (MP) with TMV RNA and short (890 nt) synthetic RNA transcripts was visualized by atomic force microscopy on a mica surface. MP molecules were found to be distributed along the chain of RNA and the structure of MP-RNA complexes depended on the molar MP:RNA ratios at which the complexes were formed. A rise in the molar MP:TMV RNA ratio from 20:1 to 60-100:1 resulted in an increase in the density of the MP packaging on TMV RNA and structural conversion of complexes from RNase-sensitive 'beads-on-a-string' into a 'thick string' form that was partly resistant to RNAse. The 'thick string'-type RNase-resistant complexes were also produced by short synthetic RNA transcripts at different MP:RNA ratios. The 'thick string' complexes are suggested to represent clusters of MP molecules cooperatively bound to discrete regions of TMV RNA and separated by protein-free RNA segments.

  13. Solid-state NMR resonance assignments of the filament-forming CARD domain of the innate immunity signaling protein MAVS.

    PubMed

    He, Lichun; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in the innate immune response against viral infections. Viral RNA present in the cytoplasm is detected by retinoic acid inducible gene I like receptors, which then activate MAVS via heterotypic interactions between their respective caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARD). This leads to the formation of active, high molecular weight MAVS complexes formed by homotypic interactions between the single N-terminal CARDs of MAVS. Filaments formed by the N-terminal MAVS(CARD) alone are sufficient to induce the autocatalytic conversion from a monomeric to an aggregated state in a prion-like manner. Here, we present the nearly complete spectroscopic (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of human MAVS(CARD) filaments obtained from a single sample by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding secondary chemical shifts suggest that the filamentous form of MAVS(CARD) retains an exclusively alpha-helical fold that is very similar to the X-ray structure determined previously from monomeric MAVS(CARD)-maltose binding protein fusion constructs.

  14. Maltose binding protein-fusion enhances the bioactivity of truncated forms of pig myostatin propeptide produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Beum; Park, Sung Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. MSTN propeptide (MSTNpro) inhibits MSTN binding to its receptor through complex formation with MSTN, implying that MSTNpro can be a useful agent to improve skeletal muscle growth in meat-producing animals. Four different truncated forms of pig MSTNpro containing N-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP) as a fusion partner were expressed in E. coli, and purified by the combination of affinity chromatography and gel filtration. The MSTN-inhibitory capacities of these proteins were examined in an in vitro gene reporter assay. A MBP-fused, truncated MSTNpro containing residues 42–175 (MBP-Pro42-175) exhibited the same MSTN-inhibitory potency as the full sequence MSTNpro. Truncated MSTNpro proteins containing either residues 42–115 (MBP-Pro42-115) or 42–98 (MBP-Pro42-98) also exhibited MSTN-inhibitory capacity even though the potencies were significantly lower than that of full sequence MSTNpro. In pull-down assays, MBP-Pro42-175, MBP-Pro42-115, and MBP-Pro42-98 demonstrated their binding to MSTN. MBP was removed from the truncated MSTNpro proteins by incubation with factor Xa to examine the potential role of MBP on MSTN-inhibitory capacity of those proteins. Removal of MBP from MBP-Pro42-175 and MBP-Pro42-98 resulted in 20-fold decrease in MSTN-inhibitory capacity of Pro42-175 and abolition of MSTN-inhibitory capacity of Pro42-98, indicating that MBP as fusion partner enhanced the MSTN-inhibitory capacity of those truncated MSTNpro proteins. In summary, this study shows that MBP is a very useful fusion partner in enhancing MSTN-inhibitory potency of truncated forms of MSTNpro proteins, and MBP-fused pig MSTNpro consisting of amino acid residues 42–175 is sufficient to maintain the full MSTN-inhibitory capacity. PMID:28369115

  15. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-induced Protein 1 and 4 Form a Complex but Act Independently in Regulation of Interleukin-6 mRNA Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shengping; Liu, Shufeng; Fu, Jia J.; Tony Wang, T.; Yao, Xiaolan; Kumar, Anil; Liu, Gang; Fu, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that MCPIP1 is a critical factor that controls inflammation and immune homeostasis; however, the relationship between MCPIP1 and other members of this protein family is largely unknown. Here, we report that MCPIP1 interacts with MCPIP4 to form a protein complex, but acts independently in the regulation of IL-6 mRNA degradation. In an effort to identify MCPIP1-interacting proteins by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and mass-spec analysis, MCPIP4 was identified as a MCPIP1-interacting protein, which was further confirmed by Co-IP and mammalian two-hybrid assay. Immunofluorescence staining showed that MCPIP4 was co-localized with MCPIP1 in the GW-body, which features GW182 and Argonaute 2. Further studies showed that MCPIP1 and MCPIP4 act independently in regulation of IL-6 mRNA degradation. These results suggest that MCPIP1 and MCPIP4 may additively contribute to control IL-6 production in vivo. PMID:26134560

  16. Electron microscopy visualization of DNA-protein complexes formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Grob, Patricia; Zhang, Teri T; Hannah, Ryan; Yang, Hui; Hefferin, Melissa L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-02

    The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell viability and genome stability. Aberrant repair of DSBs has been linked with cancer predisposition and aging. During the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), DNA ends are brought together, processed and then joined. In eukaryotes, this repair pathway is initiated by the binding of the ring-shaped Ku heterodimer and completed by DNA ligase IV. The DNA ligase IV complex, DNA ligase IV/XRRC4 in humans and Dnl4/Lif1 in yeast, is recruited to DNA ends in vitro and in vivo by an interaction with Ku and, in yeast, Dnl4/Lif1 stabilizes the binding of yKu to in vivo DSBs. Here we have analyzed the interactions of these functionally conserved eukaryotic NHEJ factors with DNA by electron microscopy. As expected, the ring-shaped Ku complex bound stably and specifically to DNA ends at physiological salt concentrations. At a ratio of 1 Ku molecule per DNA end, the majority of DNA ends were occupied by a single Ku complex with no significant formation of linear DNA multimers or circular loops. Both Dnl4/Lif1 and DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 formed complexes with Ku-bound DNA ends, resulting in intra- and intermolecular DNA end bridging, even with non-ligatable DNA ends. Together, these studies, which provide the first visualization of the conserved complex formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV at juxtaposed DNA ends by electron microscopy, suggest that the DNA ligase IV complex mediates end-bridging by engaging two Ku-bound DNA ends.

  17. The DNA cleavage reaction of DNA gyrase. Comparison of stable ternary complexes formed with enoxacin and CcdB protein.

    PubMed

    Scheirer, K E; Higgins, N P

    1997-10-24

    The potent synthetic fluoroquinolones and the natural CcdB protein encoded by the F plasmid both inhibit bacterial growth by attacking DNA gyrase and by stimulating enzyme-induced breaks in bacterial DNA. The cleavage mechanisms of these structurally diverse compounds were analyzed by purifying and characterizing stable ternary complexes of enoxacin and CcdB protein with gyrase bound to a strong gyrase binding site from bacteriophage Mu. Three differences between enoxacin- and CcdB-derived complexes were discovered. 1) Enoxacin binds to the DNA active site and alters the breakage/reunion activity of the enzyme. CcdB binds gyrase-DNA complexes but does not influence enzymatic activity directly. 2) Complexes that produce DNA cleavage with enoxacin are reversible, whereas similar complexes made with CcdB protein are not. 3) Enoxacin stimulates cleavage of both relaxed and supercoiled forms of DNA in the absence of ATP, whereas CcdB induces cleavage only after many cycles of ATP-dependent breakage and reunion. These differences in mechanisms can be explained by a model in which enoxacin induces formation of a novel "cleavable" complex, whereas CcdB protein traps a very rare "cleaved" conformation of the enzyme.

  18. Low molecular mass phosphoproteins from the frog rod outer segments form a complex with 48 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Krapivinsky, G B; Malenyov, A L; Zaikina, I V; Fesenko, E E

    1992-09-01

    Upon separation of cAMP-dependent low molecular mass phosphoproteins [Components I and II; Polans et al. (1979) J. gen. Physiol. 74, 595-613] from the frog rod outer segments by gel-chromatography, isoelectric focusing, non-denaturating electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography, they behave like subunits of the oligomeric complex. Apparent molecular mass of the complex determined by gel-chromatography is 52-57 kDa and by non-denaturating gradient electrophoresis is 62-66 kDa. The isoelectric point of the complex is 5.5. The elution profile of Components I and II upon gel-chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography coincides with that of major rod outer segment 48 kDa protein. The isoelectric point for them also coincides with the isoelectric point of 48 kDa protein. The amount of low molecular mass phosphoproteins is sealed rods is equal to one molecule per 60 rhodopsin molecules and coincides with that of a 48 kDa protein. It is suggested that in solution Components I and II form an oligomeric complex with 48 kDa protein.

  19. Bcl-2 proteins bid and bax form a network to permeabilize the mitochondria at the onset of apoptosis