Science.gov

Sample records for gravel mines exploitation

  1. Offshore sand and gravel mining

    SciTech Connect

    Pandan, J.W.

    1983-05-01

    This paper reviews the status of mining offshore for sand and gravel on a world-wide basis. It discusses the technology for exploration and evaluation of sea floor mineral targets, as well as mining, transportation, and processing. Large operations in Japan and Europe are described, based upon personal observations of the author. The U.S. situation is outlined and opinions offered as to the outlook for the future.

  2. 75 FR 68606 - Chetco River Gravel Mining Executive and Technical Teams; Notification of Availability of Documents.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers Chetco River Gravel Mining Executive and Technical Teams... Chetco River Gravel Mining Executive and Technical Teams. These work products consist of meeting agendas, meeting minutes, reports, and other documents related to the proposed Chetco River Gravel Mining...

  3. Injury experience in sand and gravel mining, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of sand and gravel mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, and occupation. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  4. Sand and gravel mine operations and reclamation planning using microcomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Ariffin, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to focus on the application of microcomputers, also known as personal computers, in planning for sand and gravel mine operations and reclamation at a site in Story County, Iowa. This site, called the Arrasmith Pit, is operated by Martin Marietta Aggregates, Inc. The Arrasmith site, which encompasses an area of about 25 acres, is a relatively small site for aggregate mining. However, planning for the concurrent mine operation and reclamation program at this site is just as critical as with larger sites and the planning process is the same.

  5. PROFILE: Hungry Water: Effects of Dams and Gravel Mining on River Channels

    PubMed

    Kondolf

    1997-07-01

    / Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream). Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources.KEY WORDS: Dams; Aquatic habitat; Sediment transport; Erosion; Sedimentation; Gravel mining

  6. Hungry water: Effects of dams and gravel mining on river channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kondolf, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream), Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources. 80 refs., 17 figs.

  7. Channel dynamics and geomorphic resilience in an ephemeral Mediterranean river affected by gravel mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, Mikel; Alho, Petteri; Benito, Gerardo

    2017-05-01

    Gravel mining has been a widespread activity in ephemeral rivers worldwide whose long-lasting hydrogeomorphological impacts preclude effective implementation of water and environmental policies. This paper presents a GIS-based method for temporal assessment of morphosedimentary changes in relation to in-channel gravel mining in a typical ephemeral Mediterranean stream, namely the Rambla de la Viuda (eastern Spain). The aims of this work were to identify morphosedimentary changes and responses to human activities and floods, quantify river degradations and analyze factors favoring fluvial recovery for further applications in other rivers. Aerial photographs and LiDAR topography data were studied to analyze geomorphic evolution over the past 70 years along a 7.5-km reach of an ephemeral gravel stream that has been mined intensively since the 1970s. To evaluate changes in the riverbed, we mapped comparable units applying morphological, hydraulic, and stability (based on vegetation density and elevation) criteria to 13 sets of aerial photographs taken from 1946 to 2012. A detailed spatiotemporal analysis of comparable units revealed a 50% reduction in the active section and a 20% increase in stable areas, compared to the conditions observed prior to gravel mining. Instream mining was first observed in 1976 aerial photograph covering already up to 50% of the 1956 riverbed area. River degradation since then was quantified by means of a LiDAR DTM and RTK-GPS measurements, which revealed a 3.5-m incision that had started simultaneously with gravel mining. Climate and land use changes were present but the effects were completely masked by changes produced by instream gravel mining. Therefore, river incision/degradation was triggered by scarcity of sediment and lack of longitudinal sedimentary connection, creating an unbalanced river system that is still adjusting to the present hydrosedimentary conditions.

  8. Instream sand and gravel mining: Environmental issues and regulatory process in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; Layher, A.O.

    1998-01-01

    Sand and gravel are widely used throughout the U.S. construction industry, but their extraction can significantly affect the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of mined streams. Fisheries biologists often find themselves involved in the complex environmental and regulatory issues related to instream sand and gravel mining. This paper provides an overview of information presented in a symposium held at the 1997 midyear meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society in San Antonio, Texas, to discuss environmental issues and regulatory procedures related to instream mining. Conclusions from the symposium suggest that complex physicochemical and biotic responses to disturbance such as channel incision and alteration of riparian vegetation ultimately determine the effects of instream mining. An understanding of geomorphic processes can provide insight into the effects of mining operations on stream function, and multidisciplinary empirical studies are needed to determine the relative effects of mining versus other natural and human-induced stream alterations. Mining regulations often result in a confusing regulatory process complicated, for example, by the role of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which has undergone numerous changes and remains unclear. Dialogue among scientists, miners, and regulators can provide an important first step toward developing a plan that integrates biology and politics to protect aquatic resources.

  9. Invertebrate drift during in-channel gravel mining: the Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjar, Maria; Gibbins, Chris; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.; Muñoz, Efrén; Ramos, Ester; Lobera, Gemma; Andrés López-Tarazón, Jose; Piqué, Gemma; Tena, Álvaro; Buendía, Cristina; Rennie, Colin D.

    2015-04-01

    Invertebrate drift has been widely studied as an important mechanism to structure the benthic assemblages and as a part of invertebrate behavior in fluvial systems. River channel disturbance is considered the main factor affecting the organization of riverine communities and contributes to key ecological processes. However, little is known about involuntary drift associated to bed disturbance due to the difficulties associated with sampling during floods. In-channel gravel mining offers an opportunity to study involuntary drift associated not only to local bed disturbances but also to sudden changes on suspended sediment concentrations and flow. High suspended sediment concentrations and sudden changes in flow also prompt drift due to the limiting conditions (i.e. lack of oxygen, hydric stress). Within this context, invertebrate drift was monitored in the Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees) during two gravel mining activities performed in summer 2014. The data acquisition design includes: drift, suspended sediment, bedload, bed mobility and flow. Data was acquired before, during and after mining at different sampling locations located upstream and downstream the perturbation. Drift and suspended sediment transport were sampled at 5 sections: 1 control site upstream the mining and 4 downstream. Bedload samples were collected just downstream the channel where gravels were extracted. Bed mobility and changes on topography were assessed by means of GPS-aDcp and repeat topographic surveys. Discharge was continuously recorded 2.5 km downstream the mining location. Additionally, two turbidity meters registered water turbidity at 15 minute intervals in two of the four sampling sections located downstream. This experimental design provides data on the spatial and temporal variability of drift associated to a local bed disturbance that (i) changes the distribution of flow across the section where mining was performed, (ii) increase substantially suspended sediment

  10. Distinct Urban Mines: Exploiting secondary resources in unique anthropogenic spaces.

    PubMed

    Ongondo, F O; Williams, I D; Whitlock, G

    2015-11-01

    Fear of scarcity of resources highlight the need to exploit secondary materials from urban mines in the anthroposphere. Analogous to primary mines rich in one type of material (e.g. copper, gold, etc.), some urban mines are unique/distinct. We introduce, illustrate and discuss the concept of Distinct Urban Mines (DUM). Using the example of a university DUM in the UK, analogous to a primary mine, we illustrate potential product/material yields in respect of size, concentration and spatial location of the mine. Product ownership and replacement cycles for 17 high-value electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) among students showed that 20 tonnes of valuable e-waste were in stockpile in this DUM and a further 87 tonnes would 'soon' be available for exploitation. We address the opportunities and challenges of exploiting DUMs and conclude that they are readily available reservoirs for resource recovery. Two original contributions arise from this work: (i) a novel approach to urban mining with a potential for maximising resource recovery within the anthroposphere is conceptualised; and (ii) previously unavailable data for high-value products for a typical university DUM are presented and analysed.

  11. Influence of gravel mining and other factors on detection probabilities of Coastal Plain fishes in the Mobile River Basin, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayer, C.-A.; Irwin, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    We used an information-theoretic approach to examine the variation in detection probabilities for 87 Piedmont and Coastal Plain fishes in relation to instream gravel mining in four Alabama streams of the Mobile River drainage. Biotic and abiotic variables were also included in candidate models. Detection probabilities were heterogeneous across species and varied with habitat type, stream, season, and water quality. Instream gravel mining influenced the variation in detection probabilities for 38% of the species collected, probably because it led to habitat loss and increased sedimentation. Higher detection probabilities were apparent at unmined sites than at mined sites for 78% of the species for which gravel mining was shown to influence detection probabilities, indicating potential negative impacts to these species. Physical and chemical attributes also explained the variation in detection probabilities for many species. These results indicate that anthropogenic impacts can affect detection probabilities for fishes, and such variation should be considered when developing monitoring programs or routine sampling protocols. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  12. Impact of Sand and Gravel Mining on Groundwater Resources in La Bassée Alluvial Plain, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, A.; Wang, S.; Labarthe, B.; Flipo, N.

    2016-12-01

    The alluvial plain of La Bassée, in the middle reach of the Seine River (France), is both of environmental importance as a major wetland and at the centre of strategic issues regarding inland waterways transport, flood prevention, water and granular resources. The sand and gravel mining industry has been productive for more than five decades over the area and contributes to 40% of the regional production of natural aggregates. Former and active gravel pits cover about 10% of the areal extent of the plain. Gravel pit lakes interact with groundwater from the surrounding alluvial aquifer and the underlying chalk aquifer. By exposing groundwater to the atmosphere, they can act as a sink/source for the groundwater system through atmospheric exchange. We develop a model-based approach using the EauDyssée platform for determining the impact of such lakes on groundwater resources in terms of quantity and how they affect groundwater level and flow paths. Over the alluvial plain area of La Bassée a local model is built, which takes its hydrodynamic parameters from an inverse calibration procedure and its boundary conditions from a coarser regional model run on the whole Seine basin. To efficiently simulate lake-groundwater exchange, the modelling platform was extended by a lake module. The effet of gravel excavation is investigated by quantifying the gravel pit lakes water budget and by simulating groundwater transient response over almost two decades.

  13. Using choice architecture to exploit a university Distinct Urban Mine.

    PubMed

    Pierron, Xavier; Williams, Ian D; Shaw, Peter J; Cleaver, Victoria

    2017-10-01

    There are widespread concerns regarding the potential future scarcity of ferrous and non-ferrous materials. However, there are already potentially rich reserves of secondary materials via high ownership of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (EEE) in economically-developed nations. Young people are particularly high consumers of EEE, thus university students and campuses may present an opportunity to harness this potential. University Distinct Urban Mines (DUM) may be used to exemplify how potential reserves of secondary metals may be exploited, and could contribute to the transition from a linear to a circular economy. This study aimed to evaluate small household appliances (SHA) DUM from a UK university, with the objectives to identify and quantify student households' SHA ownership, WEEE recycling, stockpiling and discarding habits amongst student households, assess and evaluate the monetary potential of SHA DUM at UK level, and propose methods to exploit DUM for universities in the UK. To this purpose, a quantitative survey was undertaken to measure students' ownership and discarding behaviour with respect to SHA. The amounts of ferrous and non-ferrous materials were then estimated and converted to monetary values from secondary materials market data to appraise the SHA DUM overall value. Thirty-five per cent of SHA are discarded in the general refuse. Broken personal care appliances (PCA) tend to be discarded due to hygiene and small size factors. When in working order, SHA tend to be equally reused, recycled or stockpiled. We conclude that a total of 189 tonnes of ferrous and non-ferrous materials were available via discarding or being stockpiled at the University of Southampton. Extrapolated to UK higher education level, discarded and stockpiled SHA represent a potential worth ∼USD 11 million. To initiate DUM exploitation within Higher Education campuses, we suggest improving users' choice architecture by providing collection methods specific to broken SHA

  14. An impact evaluation of a federal mine safety training regulation on injury rates among US stone, sand, and gravel mine workers: an interrupted time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Monforton, Celeste; Windsor, Richard

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated the impact of a safety training regulation, implemented by the US Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 1999, on injury rates at stone, sand, and gravel mining operations. We applied a time-series design and analyses with quarterly counts of nonfatal injuries and employment hours from 7998 surface aggregate mines from 1995 through 2006. Covariates included standard industrial classification codes, ownership, and injury severity. Overall crude rates of injuries declined over the 12-year period. Reductions in incident rates for medical treatment only, restricted duty, and lost-time injuries were consistent with temporal trends and provided no evidence of an intervention effect attributable to the MSHA regulation. Rates of permanently disabling injuries (PDIs) declined markedly. Regression analyses documented a statistically significant reduction in the risk rate in the postintervention time period (risk rate = 0.591; 95% confidence interval = 0.529, 0.661). Although a causal relationship between the regulatory intervention and the decline in the rate of PDIs is plausible, inconsistency in the results with the other injury-severity categories preclude attributing the observed outcome to the MSHA regulation. Further analyses of these data are needed.

  15. An Impact Evaluation of a Federal Mine Safety Training Regulation on Injury Rates Among US Stone, Sand, and Gravel Mine Workers: An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the impact of a safety training regulation, implemented by the US Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 1999, on injury rates at stone, sand, and gravel mining operations. Methods. We applied a time-series design and analyses with quarterly counts of nonfatal injuries and employment hours from 7998 surface aggregate mines from 1995 through 2006. Covariates included standard industrial classification codes, ownership, and injury severity. Results. Overall crude rates of injuries declined over the 12-year period. Reductions in incident rates for medical treatment only, restricted duty, and lost-time injuries were consistent with temporal trends and provided no evidence of an intervention effect attributable to the MSHA regulation. Rates of permanently disabling injuries (PDIs) declined markedly. Regression analyses documented a statistically significant reduction in the risk rate in the postintervention time period (risk rate = 0.591; 95% confidence interval = 0.529, 0.661). Conclusions. Although a causal relationship between the regulatory intervention and the decline in the rate of PDIs is plausible, inconsistency in the results with the other injury-severity categories preclude attributing the observed outcome to the MSHA regulation. Further analyses of these data are needed. PMID:20466960

  16. Example Building Damage Caused by Mining Exploitation in Disturbed Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowska, Lucyna

    2013-06-01

    Issues concerning protection of buildings against the impact of underground coal mining pose significant scientific and engineering challenges. In Poland, where mining is a potent and prominent industry assuring domestic energy security, regions within reach of mining influences are plenty. Moreover, due to their industrial character they are also densely built-up areas. Because minerals have been extracted on an industrial scale in majority of those areas for many years, the rock mass structure has been significantly disturbed. Hence, exploitation of successive layers of multi-seam deposits might cause considerable damage - both in terms of surface and existing infrastructure networks. In the light of those facts, the means of mining and building prevention have to be improved on a regular basis. Moreover, they have to be underpinned by reliable analyses holistically capturing the comprehensive picture of the mining, geotechnical and constructional situation of structures. Scientific research conducted based on observations and measurements of mining-induced strain in buildings is deployed to do just that. Presented in this paper examples of damage sustained by buildings armed with protection against mining influences give an account of impact the mining exploitation in disturbed rock mass can have. This paper is based on analyses of mining damage to church and Nursing Home owned by Evangelical Augsburg Parish in Bytom-Miechowice. Neighbouring buildings differ in the date they were built, construction, building technology, geometry of the building body and fitted protection against mining damage. Both the buildings, however, have sustained lately significant deformation and damage caused by repeated mining exploitation. Selected damage has been discussed hereunder. The structures have been characterised, their current situation and mining history have been outlined, which have taken their toll on character and magnitude of damage. Description has been supplemented

  17. Channel morphodynamics and habitat recovery in a river reach affected by gravel-mining (River Ésera, Ebro basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Tarazon, J. A.; Lobera, G.; Andrés-Doménech, I.; Martínez-Capel, F.; Muñoz-Mas, R.; Vallés, F.; Tena, A.; Vericat, D.; Batalla, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Physical processes in rivers are the result of the interaction between flow regime and hydraulics, morphology, sedimentology and sediment transport. The frequency and magnitude of physical disturbance (i.e. bed stability) control habitat integrity and, consequently, ecological diversity of a particular fluvial system. Most rivers experience human-induced perturbations that alter such hydrosedimentary equilibrium, thus affecting the habitat of aquatic species. A dynamic balance may take long time to be newly attained. Within this context, gravel mining is well known to affect channel characteristics mostly at the local scale, but its effect may also propagate downstream and upstream. Sedimentary forms are modified during extraction and habitat features are reduced or even eliminated. Effects tend to be most acute in contrasted climatic environments, such as the Mediterranean areas, in which climatic and hydrological variability maximises effects of impacts and precludes short regeneration periods. Present research focuses on the evolution of a river reach, which has experienced an intense gravel extraction. The selected area is located in the River Ésera (Ebro basin), where interactions between morphodynamics and habitat recovery are examined. Emphasis is put on monitoring sedimentary, morphological and hydraulic variables to later compare pre (t0) and post (t1, t2... tn) extraction situations. Methodology for all time monitoring steps (i.e. ti) includes: i) characterization of grain size distribution at all of the different hydromorphological units within the reach; ii) description of channel morphology (together with changes before and after floods) by means of close-range aerial photographs, which are taken with a digital camera attached to a 1m3 helium balloon (i.e. BLIMP); and iii) determination of flow parameters from 2D hydraulic modelling that is based on detailed topographical data obtained from Leica® GNSS/GPS and robotic total station, and River

  18. Mining and Exploitation of Rare Earth Elements in Africa as an Engagement Strategy in US Africa Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-17

    WARFIGHTING SCHOOL MINING AND EXPLOITATION OF RARE EARTH ELEMENTS IN AFRICA AS AN ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY IN US AFRICA COMMAND By Eugene...earth mining and exploitation until the late 1990s when China gained monopoly status. They now supply over 95% of rare earths to the world...government approach including United States Africa Command, can achieve several national objectives by assisting African nations in mining and

  19. Gravel packer

    SciTech Connect

    Zunkel, G.D.; Bolin, M.L.

    1987-01-27

    A retrievable gravel packer is described for placing a gravel pack in a wellbore about a gravel screen disposed therebelow across a producing formation comprising: a gravel packer assembly; a packer element disposed on the exterior of the assembly; J-slot means in the assembly for selectively maintaining the packer element in an unset mode; ratchet means in the assembly for releasably locking the packer element in a set mode; an intake passage in the assembly for receiving fluid from a tubing string in the well bore above and secured to the gravel packer; a return passage for receiving fluid from the interior of the gravel screen; a circulation passage extending from the exterior of the gravel packer below the packer element to the intake passage; closeable crossover means to receive fluid from the return passage and guide the received fluid from the return passage to the exterior of the assembly above the packer element; first check valve means for preventing back flow to the intake passage from the interior of the gravel screen; second check valve means adapted to selectively open the intake passage to the circulation passage in response to a positive pressure differential between the exterior of the gravel packer and the intake passage; and check valve release means for inactivating the second check valve means in response to a fluid pressure buildup in the intake passage thereabove.

  20. Gravel packer

    SciTech Connect

    Zunkel, G.D.

    1986-01-06

    A retrievable gravel packer is described for placing a gravel pack in a wellbore about a gravel screen disposed therebelow across a producing formation comprising: a gravel packer assembly; a packer element disposed on the exterior of the assembly; means in the assembly for selectively maintaining the packer element in an unset mode; means in the assembly for releasably locking the packer element in a set mode; an intake passage in the assembly for receiving fluid from a tubing string in the well bore above and secured to the gravel packer; a return passage in the assembly for receiving fluid from the interior of the gravel screen; a circulation passage extending from the exterior of the gravel packer assembly below the packer element to the intake passage; closeable crossover means to receive fluid from the return passage and guide the received fluid from the return passage to the exterior of the assembly above the packer element; relief ports between the intake passage and the return passage; first valve means for closing the intake passage from the circulation passage; second valve means for opening communication through the relief ports; a check ball at the lower end of the gravel packer; and check ball release means for selectively releasing the check ball from the gravel packer.

  1. A study of mining-induced seismicity in Czech mines with longwall coal exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Holub, K.

    2007-01-15

    A review is performed for the data of local and regional seismographical networks installed in mines of the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin (Czech Republic), where underground anthracite mining is carried out and dynamic events occur in the form of rockbursts. The seismological and seismoacoustic observations data obtained in panels that are in limiting state are analyzed. This aggregate information is a basic for determining hazardous zones and assigning rockburst prevention measures.

  2. Gravel packer

    SciTech Connect

    Zunkel, G.D.

    1987-01-13

    A gravel packer is described for placing a gravel pack in a wellbore about a gravel screen disposed therebelow across a producing formation comprising: a gravel packer assembly; a packer element disposed on the exterior of the assembly; ratchet means in the assembly for releasably locking the packer element in a set mode; an intake passage in the assembly for receiving fluid from a tubing string in the well bore and secured to the gravel packer; a return passage in the assembly for receiving fluid from the interior of the gravel screen; a circulation passage in assembly extending from the exterior of the gravel packer below the packer element to the intake passage; closeable crossover means associated with the assembly to receive fluid from the return passage and guide the received fluid from the return passage to the exterior of the assembly above the packer element; first check valve means in the assembly for preventing flow to the gravel screen through the return passage; second check valve means in the assembly adapted to selectively permit flow from the return passage to the intake passage in response to a positive pressure differential between the return pass and the intake passage; and J-slot means for selectively disconnecting the crossover means from the packer assembly.

  3. Analytical and numerical simulation of the steady-state hydrologic effects of mining aggregate in hypothetical sand-and-gravel and fractured crystalline-rock aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L.R.; Langer, William H.; Paschke, Suzanne Smith

    2003-01-01

    Analytical solutions and numerical models were used to predict the extent of steady-state drawdown caused by mining of aggregate below the water table in hypothetical sand-and-gravel and fractured crystalline-rock aquifers representative of hydrogeologic settings in the Front Range area of Colorado. Analytical solutions were used to predict the extent of drawdown under a wide range of hydrologic and mining conditions that assume aquifer homogeneity, isotropy, and infinite extent. Numerical ground-water flow models were used to estimate the extent of drawdown under conditions that consider heterogeneity, anisotropy, and hydrologic boundaries and to simulate complex or unusual conditions not readily simulated using analytical solutions. Analytical simulations indicated that the drawdown radius (or distance) of influence increased as horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer, mine penetration of the water table, and mine radius increased; radius of influence decreased as aquifer recharge increased. Sensitivity analysis of analytical simulations under intermediate conditions in sand-and-gravel and fractured crystalline-rock aquifers indicated that the drawdown radius of influence was most sensitive to mine penetration of the water table and least sensitive to mine radius. Radius of influence was equally sensitive to changes in horizontal hydraulic conductivity and recharge. Numerical simulations of pits in sand-and- gravel aquifers indicated that the area of influence in a vertically anisotropic sand-and-gravel aquifer of medium size was nearly identical to that in an isotropic aquifer of the same size. Simulated area of influence increased as aquifer size increased and aquifer boundaries were farther away from the pit, and simulated drawdown was greater near the pit when aquifer boundaries were close to the pit. Pits simulated as lined with slurry walls caused mounding to occur upgradient from the pits and drawdown to occur downgradient from the pits. Pits

  4. Improving structural medical process comparison by exploiting domain knowledge and mined information.

    PubMed

    Montani, Stefania; Leonardi, Giorgio; Quaglini, Silvana; Cavallini, Anna; Micieli, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Process model comparison and similar process retrieval is a key issue to be addressed in many real-world situations, and a particularly relevant one in medical applications, where similarity quantification can be exploited to accomplish goals such as conformance checking, local process adaptation analysis, and hospital ranking. In this paper, we present a framework that allows the user to: (i) mine the actual process model from a database of process execution traces available at a given hospital; and (ii) compare (mined) process models. The tool is currently being applied in stroke management. Our framework relies on process mining to extract process-related information (i.e., process models) from data. As for process comparison, we have modified a state-of-the-art structural similarity metric by exploiting: (i) domain knowledge; (ii) process mining outputs and statistical temporal information. These changes were meant to make the metric more suited to the medical domain. Experimental results showed that our metric outperforms the original one, and generated output closer than that provided by a stroke management expert. In particular, our metric correctly rated 11 out of 15 mined hospital models with respect to a given query. On the other hand, the original metric correctly rated only 7 out of 15 models. The experiments also showed that the framework can support stroke management experts in answering key research questions: in particular, average patient improvement decreased as the distance (according to our metric) from the top level hospital process model increased. The paper shows that process mining and process comparison, through a similarity metric tailored to medical applications, can be applied successfully to clinical data to gain a better understanding of different medical processes adopted by different hospitals, and of their impact on clinical outcomes. In the future, we plan to make our metric even more general and efficient, by explicitly

  5. Application of territorial GIS to study of natural environment for regions under mining exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsanov, A.

    1996-07-01

    Mineral resources exploitation becomes one of the leading factors of technogenic impact to natural environment. The processes accompanying exploitation lead to changes of geological/geomorphological, engineering/geological, hydrogeological, geochemical and landscape conditions over the large territories surrounded mining exploitation districts. The types of environmental changes and disturbances are stipulated by several reasons such as kind of exploited resources (ore, petroleum, gas, coal, peat, building materials etc.); the ways of extraction (opened by quarry or closed by mine); natural zone (tundra, taiga, steppe, desert etc.). Expressive revelation and control of these environmental changes is impossible without wide using and analysis of various types and different times materials of airborne and satellite surveys (MASS). They are the basis of system approach to environmental study because of image is the decreased spatial model of territory. For integrated estimation of natural resources and perspectives of its economical profit using, as well as examination of influence of extraction objects to natural environment necessary to involve different data. Only territorial GIS permits to solve the tasks of collection, keeping, processing and analysis of this data as well as to conduct modelling of situations and presentation of information necessary to accept the decision. The core of GIS is the Data base which consists of initial remote sensing and cartographic data allow in completely obtain various information providing of full value and objectivity of investigations.

  6. Towards an increase of flash flood geomorphic effects due to gravel mining and ground subsidence in Nogalte stream (Murcia, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Becerril, Jose Antonio; Garzón, Guillermina; Béjar-Pizarro, Marta; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, Jose

    2016-10-01

    Transition from endorheic alluvial fan environments to well-channelized fluvial systems in natural conditions may occur in response to base-level fluctuations. However, human-induced changes in semi-arid regions can also be responsible for similar unforeseen modifications. Our results confirm that in-channel gravel mining and aquifer overexploitation over the last 50 years in the case study area have changed the natural stability of the Nogalte stream and, as a result, its geomorphic parameters including channel depth and longitudinal profile have begun to adapt to the new situation. Using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data we obtain maximum values for ground subsidence in the Upper Guadalentín Basin of ˜ 10 cm yr-1 for the period 2003-2010. In this context of a lowered base level, the river is changing its natural flood model to a more powerful one. A comparison of the 1973 flood event, the most dramatic flood event ever recorded in the area, with the 2012 event, where there was a similar discharge but a sediment load deficit, reveals greater changes and a new flooding pattern and extension. In-channel gravel mining may be responsible for significant local changes in channel incision and profile. This, together with the collateral effects of aquifer overexploitation, can favour increased river velocity and stream power, which intensify the consequences of the flooding. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate an existing transition from the former alluvial pattern to a confined fluvial trend, which may become more pronounced in the future due to the time lag between the drop in aquifer level and ground subsidence, and introduce a new scenario to be taken into consideration in future natural hazard planning in this area.

  7. Value of Geological Information in Exploitation Management: the Case of Exploitation Units of the Polkowice-Sieroszowice Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzak, Mariusz; Panajew, Paweł

    2014-03-01

    The application of mathematical techniques of management is particularly significant in managing mineral deposits as well as generally in the mining industry, in which the execution of geological-mining projects is usually time-consuming and expensive. Such projects are usually undertaken in conditions of uncertainty, and the incurred expenses do not always generate satisfactory revenues. Mineral deposit management requires close cooperation between the geologist providing necessary information about the deposit and the miner conducting exploitation work. A real decision-making problem was undertaken, in which three exploitation divisions of a certain area in the Polkowice-Sieroszowice mine, differing in ore quality, could be developed in an order which would guarantee maximisation of income. First, the ore price was calculated with the NSR formula; next, the decision-making problem was presented as a kind of game between the geologist (the mine) and states of Nature. Projekty geologiczno-górnicze (surowcowe) różnią się znacznie od innych form aktywności gospodarczej człowieka, ponieważ wiedza o przedmiocie zainteresowań opiera się głównie na ocenach, zaś samo złoże kopalin jest obiektem przyrodniczym i trudno jest jednoznacznie przewidzieć rzeczywiste efekty jego odkrycia. Geologiczna niepewność związana z modelem złoża i jego zasobami znajduje odzwierciedlenie w technicznych planach kopalni i przygotowaniu rozcinki złoża odpowiednim systemem i sposobem eksploatacji. Kwantyfikacja, ocena i zarządzanie niepewnością geologiczną jest kluczowe w strategicznym planowaniu działania kopalni. Podstawowym celem, dla którego wykonuje się wyrobiska udostępniające jest przygotowanie złoża do eksploatacji górniczej. Wyrobiska udostępniające stanowią główne drogi transportu ludzi i urobku oraz spływu wód kopalnianych. Część z nich stanowi drogi jezdne i wentylacyjne, na innych zostaje ulokowany przenośnik taśmowy, a jeszcze innymi

  8. Mobility and phytoavailability of antimony in an area impacted by a former stibnite mine exploitation.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ayuso, E; Otones, V; Murciego, A; García-Sánchez, A; Regina, I Santa

    2013-04-01

    A mining area affected by the abandoned mine exploitation of a stibnite deposit was studied to establish the current and eventual environmental risks and to propose possible remediation practices. Soil and plant samples were collected at different places in this area and analyzed for their Sb content and distribution. Critical soil total concentrations of Sb were found, with values ranging from 585 to 3184 mg kg(-1) dry weight in the uppermost soil layer, and decreasing progressively with soil depth. The readily labile Sb contents represent <2% of the total concentrations, whereas the soil Sb contents more susceptible of being mobilized under changing environmental conditions attain values of about 4-9% of the total concentrations. Remediation measures should be undertaken to limit off-site migration of Sb. Within the tolerant plant community growing in this area, the shrub Daphne gnidium L. stands out for its relatively high root Sb accumulation and low Sb translocation, suggesting its feasibility to be used in Sb phytostabilization strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of arsenopyrite weathering products in mine wastes from abandoned tungsten and tin exploitations.

    PubMed

    Murciego, A; Alvarez-Ayuso, E; Pellitero, E; Rodríguez, Ma A; García-Sánchez, A; Tamayo, A; Rubio, J; Rubio, F; Rubin, J

    2011-02-15

    Arsenopyrite-rich wastes from abandoned tungsten and tin exploitations were studied to determine the composition and characteristics of the secondary phases formed under natural weathering conditions so as to assess their potential environmental risk. Representative weathered arsenopyrite-bearing rock wastes collected from the mine dumps were analysed using the following techniques: X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis, polarizing microscopy analysis, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and microRaman and Mössbauer spectroscopies. Scorodite, pharmacosiderite and amorphous ferric arsenates (AFA) with Fe/As molar ratios in the range 1.2-2.5 were identified as secondary arsenic products. The former showed to be the most abundant and present in the different studied mining areas. Its chemical composition showed to vary in function of the original surrounding rock mineralogy in such a way that phosphoscorodite was found as the mineral variety present in apatite-containing geoenvirons. Other ever-present weathering phases were goethite and hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), displaying, respectively, As retained amounts about 1 and 20% (expressed as As(2)O(5)). The low solubility of scorodite, the relatively low content of AFA and the formation of compounds of variable charge, mostly of amorphous nature, with high capacity to adsorb As attenuate importantly the dispersion of this element into the environment from these arsenopyrite-bearing wastes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery tools for exploiting big Earth-Observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza Molina, D.; Datcu, M.

    2015-04-01

    The continuous increase in the size of the archives and in the variety and complexity of Earth-Observation (EO) sensors require new methodologies and tools that allow the end-user to access a large image repository, to extract and to infer knowledge about the patterns hidden in the images, to retrieve dynamically a collection of relevant images, and to support the creation of emerging applications (e.g.: change detection, global monitoring, disaster and risk management, image time series, etc.). In this context, we are concerned with providing a platform for data mining and knowledge discovery content from EO archives. The platform's goal is to implement a communication channel between Payload Ground Segments and the end-user who receives the content of the data coded in an understandable format associated with semantics that is ready for immediate exploitation. It will provide the user with automated tools to explore and understand the content of highly complex images archives. The challenge lies in the extraction of meaningful information and understanding observations of large extended areas, over long periods of time, with a broad variety of EO imaging sensors in synergy with other related measurements and data. The platform is composed of several components such as 1.) ingestion of EO images and related data providing basic features for image analysis, 2.) query engine based on metadata, semantics and image content, 3.) data mining and knowledge discovery tools for supporting the interpretation and understanding of image content, 4.) semantic definition of the image content via machine learning methods. All these components are integrated and supported by a relational database management system, ensuring the integrity and consistency of Terabytes of Earth Observation data.

  11. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Resource Capturing, Exploration, and Exploitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system (AMOSS) has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high-energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as helium 3 (He-3) and hydrogen can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. 3He and hydrogen (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest, with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of AMOSS. These analyses included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. Additional supporting analyses were conducted to illuminate vehicle sizing and orbital transportation issues. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and helium 4 (He-4) are produced. With these two additional gases, the potential exists for fueling small and large fleets of additional exploration and exploitation vehicles. Additional aerospacecraft or other aerial vehicles (UAVs, balloons, rockets, etc.) could fly through the outer-planet atmosphere to investigate cloud formation dynamics, global weather, localized storms or other disturbances, wind speeds, the poles, and so forth. Deep-diving aircraft (built with the strength to withstand many atmospheres of pressure) powered by the excess hydrogen or 4He may be designed to probe the higher density regions of the gas giants.

  12. Groundwater intensive exploitation and mining in Gran Canaria and Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain: Hydrogeological, environmental, economic and social aspects.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Emilio; Cabrera, María Del Carmen; Poncela, Roberto; Puga, Luis-Olavo; Skupien, Elzbieta; Del Villar, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Intensive exploitation and continuous consumption of groundwater reserves (groundwater mining) have been real facts for decades in arid and semiarid areas. A summary of experience in the hydrogeological, economic, social and ethical consequences of groundwater intensive and mining exploitation in Gran Canaria and Tenerife Islands, in the Canarian Archipelago, is presented. Groundwater abstraction is less than recharge, but a significant outflow of groundwater to the sea cannot be avoided, especially in Tenerife, due to its younger volcanic coastal formations. Consequently, the intensive aquifer groundwater development by means of wells and water galleries (tunnels) has produced a groundwater reserve depletion of about 2km(3). Should current groundwater abstraction cease, the recovery time to close-to-natural conditions is from decades to one century, except in the mid and high elevations of Tenerife, where this recovery is not possible as aquifer formations will remain permanently drained by the numerous long water galleries. The socio-economic circumstances are complex due to a long standing history of water resources exploitation, successive social changes on each island, and well-established groundwater water trading, with complex relationships that affect water governance and the resulting ethical concerns. Gran Canaria and Tenerife are in an advanced groundwater exploitation stage and have a large water demand. They are good examples that allow drawing guidelines to evaluate groundwater development on other small high islands. After presenting the hydrogeological background, the socio-economic results are discussed to derive general knowledge to guide on water governance.

  13. Combined effects of dam removal and past sediment mining on a relatively large lowland sandy gravel bed river (Vienne River, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursache, Ovidiu; Rodrigues, Stephane; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Jugé, Philippe; Richard, Nina

    2014-05-01

    Dam removal is of growing interest for the management of sediment fluxes within fluvial basins, morphological evolution and ecological restoration of rivers. If dam removal experiments are now quite well documented for small streams located in the upstream parts of river networks, examples of lowland and relatively large rivers are still scarce. In this study we present a dam removal operation carried out on the Vienne River (France) to restore both sediment and biotic continuity. The Vienne River is 363 km in length. On its middle reaches the average slope is equal to 0.0003 m.m-1 and the average annual discharge is 195 m3.s-1 at the gauging station of Nouâtre. The river is characterized by a sinuous single channel of an average width of 150 m. The sediments are mainly made of a siliceous mixture of sands and gravels and were intensively mined between years 1930 and 1995's. In 1920, a 4 m height dam was built just downstream the confluence between the Vienne and Creuse Rivers triggering a total sediment deposition upstream of 900 000 m3 in 75 years. Hence, in 1998, the removal of the dam increased severely the sediment supply delivered to the Vienne River. The objective of this study is to understand and quantify the fluvial processes and morphological evolution on a reach of 50 km of the Vienne associated with the dam remova and the presence of ancient sand pits located along the riverbed. This study is based on field data collected during 7 surveys performed between 1998 and 2013. This large dataset focuses on bed geometry (detailed bathymetrical surveys), sediment grain size, and bedload fluxes measured using isokinetic samplers. It was combined with a 1D numerical model developed to assess flow dynamics and sediment transport capacity before and after dam removal. Results show that dam removal triggered both headward and progressive (near the dam) erosions and that discharges higher than 100 m3.s-1 were sufficient to erode the sandy sediments trapped by the

  14. Synthesising acid mine drainage to maintain and exploit indigenous mining micro-algae and microbial assemblies for biotreatment investigations.

    PubMed

    Orandi, Sanaz; Lewis, David M

    2013-02-01

    The stringent regulations for discharging acid mine drainage (AMD) has led to increased attention on traditional or emerging treatment technologies to establish efficient and sustainable management for mine effluents. To assess new technologies, laboratory investigations on AMD treatment are necessary requiring a consistent supply of AMD with a stable composition, thus limiting environmental variability and uncertainty during controlled experiments. Additionally, biotreatment systems using live cells, particularly micro-algae, require appropriate nutrient availability. Synthetic AMD (Syn-AMD) meets these requirements. However, to date, most of the reported Syn-AMDs are composed of only a few selected heavy metals without considering the complexity of actual AMD. In this study, AMD was synthesised based on the typical AMD characteristics from a copper mine where biotreatment is being considered using indigenous AMD algal-microbes. Major cations (Ca, Na, Cu, Zn, Mg, Mn and Ni), trace metals (Al, Fe, Ag, Na, Co, Mo, Pb and Cr), essential nutrients (N, P and C) and high SO(4) were incorporated into the Syn-AMD. This paper presents the preparation of chemically complex Syn-AMD and the challenges associated with combining metal salts of varying solubility that is not restricted to one particular mine site. The general approach reported and the particular reagents used can produce alternative Syn-AMD with varying compositions. The successful growth of indigenous AMD algal-microbes in the Syn-AMD demonstrated its applicability as appropriate generic media for cultivation and maintenance of mining microorganisms for future biotreatment studies.

  15. DEVELOPING AND EXPLOITING A UNIQUE DATASET FROM SOUTH AFRICAN GOLD MINES FOR SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND WAVE PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Gok, R; Walter, W; Linzer, L; Durrheim, R

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing and exploiting a unique seismic dataset to address the characteristics of small seismic events and the associated seismic signals observed at local (< 200 km) and regional (< 2000 km) distances. The dataset is being developed using mining-induced events from three deep gold mines in South Africa recorded on in-mine networks (< 1 km) composed of tens of high-frequency sensors, a network of four broadband stations installed as part of this project at the surface around the mines (1-10 km), and a network of existing broadband seismic stations at local/regional distances (50-1000 km) from the mines. Data acquisition has now been completed and includes: (1) {approx}2 years (2007 and 2008) of continuous recording by the surface broadband array, and (2) tens of thousands of mine tremors in the -3.4 < ML < 4.4 local magnitude range. Events with positive magnitudes are generally well recorded by the surface-mine stations, while magnitudes of 3.0 and larger are seen at regional distances (up to {approx} 600 km) in high-pass filtered recordings. We have now completed the quality control of the in-mine data gathered at the three gold mines included in this project. The quality control consisted of: (1) identification and analysis of outliers among the P- and S-wave travel-time picks reported by the in-mine network operator and (2) verification of sensor orientations. The outliers have been identified through a 'Wadati filter' that searches for the largest subset of P- and S-wave travel-time picks consistent with a medium of uniform wave-speed. They have observed that outliers are generally picked at a few select stations. They have also detected that trigger times were mistakenly reported as origin times by the in-mine network operator, and corrections have been obtained from the intercept times in the Wadati diagrams. Sensor orientations have been verified through rotations into the local ray-coordinate system and, when possible, corrected

  16. DEVELOPING AND EXPLOITING A UNIQUE SEISMIC DATA SET FROM SOUTH AFRICAN GOLD MINES FOR SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND WAVE PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A A; Gok, R; Walter, W R; Linzer, L; Durrheim, R

    2008-07-08

    In this project, we are developing and exploiting a unique seismic data set to address the characteristics of small seismic events and the associated seismic signals observed at local (< 200 km) and regional (< 2000 km) distances. The dataset is being developed using mining-induced events from 3 deep gold mines in South Africa recorded on inmine networks (< 1 km) comprised of tens of high-frequency sensors, a network of 4 broadband stations installed as part of this project at the surface around the mines (1-10 km), and a network of existing broadband seismic stations at local/regional distances (50-1000 km) from the mines. After 1 year of seismic monitoring of mine activity (2007), over 10,000 events in the range -3.4 < ML < 4.4 have been catalogued and recorded by the in-mine networks. Events with positive magnitudes are generally well recorded by the surface-mine stations, while magnitudes 3.0 and larger are seen at regional distances (up to {approx}600 km) in high-pass filtered recordings. We have analyzed in-mine recordings in detail at one of the South African mines (Savuka) to (i) improve on reported hypocentral locations, (ii) verify sensor orientations, and (iii) determine full moment tensor solutions. Hypocentral relocations on all catalogued events have been obtained from P- and S-wave travel-times reported by the mine network operator through an automated procedure that selects travel-times falling on Wadati lines with slopes in the 0.6-0.7 range; sensor orientations have been verified and, when possible, corrected by correlating P-, SV-, and SH-waveforms obtained from theoretical and empirical (polarization filter) rotation angles; full moment tensor solutions have been obtained by inverting P-, SV-, and SH- spectral amplitudes measured on the theoretically rotated waveforms with visually assigned polarities. The relocation procedure has revealed that origin times often necessitate a negative correction of a few tenths of second and that hypocentral

  17. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, domestic production of industrial sand and gravel was about 31 Mt, a 5% increase from 2004. This increase was bouyed by robust construction and petroleum sectors of the US economy. Based on estimated world production figures, the United States was the world's leading producer and consumer of industrial sand and gravel. In the short term, local shortages of industrial sand and gravel will continue to increase.

  18. Consolidatable gravel pack method

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.; Surles, B.W.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for forming a consolidated gravel pack in a washed-out cavity adjacent to a producing well penetrating a subterranean oil formation comprising the steps of: (a) forming a quantity of resin coated gravel comprising granular mineral particles including gravel, the gravel particles being coated with a resin fluid containing a polymerizable oligomer of furfuryl alcohol resin, a catalyst comprising an oil soluble, very slightly water soluble organic acid and an ester of a weak organic acid to consume water produced by the polymerization of resin, the polymer coated gravel comprising a sticky solid material; (b) preparing an aqueous saline carrier fluid comprising water which is from 70 to 100% saturated with sodium chloride; (c) suspending the resin-coated gravel in the carrier fluid, forming a fluid mixture of resin-coated gravel and carrier fluid; (d) introducing the fluid mixture comprising the resin coated gravel particles suspended in the aqueous saline carrier fluid into the washed-out cavity of the formation adjacent to the producing well and shutting in the well for sufficient period of time to allow polymerization of the resin, forming the permeable gravel pack in the washed-out cavity of the formation.

  19. Prepacking perforations improves gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.E.; Pace, J.R. )

    1990-05-21

    Productivity can be increased by prepacking perforations with gravel before a major gravel pack is pumped. The main gravel-pack treatment follows immediately after the prepack. This procedure can increase perforation permeability due to a more complete gravel fill of the perforation. The gravel pack prevents perforations from collapsing or filling with formation sand.

  20. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section 436.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the mining and the...

  1. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section 436.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the mining and the...

  2. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2010 was about 26.5 Mt (29.2 million st), a 6-percent increased from 2009. Certain end uses of industrial sand and gravel, such as sand for container glass, golf course sand, recreational sand, specialty glass and water filtration, showed increased demand in 2010.

  3. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2011 was about 30 Mt (33 million st), increasing slightly compared with 2010. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  4. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  5. Mineral resource of the month: industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    With many diverse uses, industrial sand and gravel, also known as silica sand, is one of the most important nonmetallic minerals in the world. Industrial sand and gravel is a mining industry term used for sands that have a very high percentage of silicon dioxide, or greater than 95 percent quartz. Deposits of industrial sand and gravel can be found virtually everywhere on Earth, but are less widespread than deposits of common construction sand and gravel. Industrial sand and gravel is distinctive in grain size, hardness, inertness and resistance to high temperature and chemical action. Beverage containers, fiberglass insulation, fiber-optic cables and light bulbs are just some of today’s many products produced from industrial sand and gravel.

  6. Integrated system for rehabilitation of mine wastes and exploitation of added-value compounds from Cistus ladanifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Erika S.; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Macías, Felipe

    2017-04-01

    The rehabilitation of mining areas with sulfide materials, both abandoned and active mines, is a priority because these areas are sources of acid mine drainage and multielemental contamination and, consequently, environmental and health risk. The combined use of Technosols and Phytostabilisation accelerates the area recovery, and ensures the sustainability at long-term of the physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the rehabilitation due to the functional complementarity of the components. Nowadays the rehabilitation strategy of contaminated areas must be based on circular economy, environmental improvements and economic approaches. Cistus ladanifer L. is an autochthones and spontaneous species that contributes to natural rehabilitation of contaminated soils from mining areas. Moreover, bioextracts obtained from C. ladanifer growing in São Domingos mining area (Iberian Pyrite Belt) presented several valuable compounds, which can provide an economic return by their use for fragrance and pharmaceutical approaches. This study aimed to evaluate, under controlled conditions, the efficiency of an integrated system for the rehabilitation of sulfide-rich and gossan tailings, which combines the application of Technosols and Phytostabilisation, and exploitation of added-value compounds from C. ladanifer bioextracts. The rehabilitation system comprised a surface layer of Technosol and a barrier of alkaline residues (biomass ashes and limestone wastes) that covered sulfide-rich wastes. Two Tecnosols composed of gossan wastes and different mixtures of agro-industrial wastes (from distilleries and greenhouse agriculture without any valorisation) at 150 Mg/ha were tested. In the Technosols was seeded C. ladanifer. After three years of plant growth, shoots biomass was quantified and used to obtain bioextracts (extraction with n-hexane). The organic composition of the bioextracts was determined and some compounds with added value (α-pinene, camphene, camphor

  7. Data mining tools for Sentinel 1 and Sentinel 2 data exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza Molina, Daniela; Datcu, Mihai

    2016-10-01

    With the new planned Sentinel missions, the availability of Earth Observation data is increasing everyday offering a larger number of applications that can be created using these data. Currently, three of the five missions were launched and they are delivering a wealth of data and imagery of the Earth's surface as, for example, the Sentinel-1 carries an advanced radar instrument to provide an all-weather, day-and-night supply of Earth imagery. The second mission, the Sentinel-2, carries an optical instrument payload that will sample 13 spectral bands at different resolutions. Even though, we count on tools for automated loading and visual exploration of the Sentinel data, we still face the problem of extracting relevant structures from the images, finding similar patterns in a scene, exploiting the data, and creating final user applications based on these processed data. In this paper, we present our approach for processing radar and multi-spectral Sentinel data. Our approach is mainly composed of three steps: 1) the generation of a data model that explains the information contained in a Sentinel product. The model is formed by primitive descriptors and metadata entries, 2) the storage of this model in a database system, 3) the semantic definition of the image content based on machine learning algorithms and relevance feedback methods.

  8. Reconditioning contaminated gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, H.; Bowers, J.S.; Cadwell, K.

    1995-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a portable screening system that will recondition radioactively contaminated gravel in the field. The separation technique employed by this system removes dirt, contaminated debris, and other fine particles from gravel. At LLNL, gravel is used in conjunction with the experimental testing of explosives to reduce shock wave propagation. The gravel surrounds the experimental device and buffers the energy generated from the explosion. During an explosion, some of the gravel is broken down into small particles and mixed with contaminants. Contaminants in the used gravel originate from metal sheathing and other parts comprising, the experimental device. These contaminants may consist of radionuclides and metals that are considered hazardous by the State of California when disposed. This paper describes the process that conveys contaminated material into the screener system, sprays the material with recycled water or other mild cleaning chemicals, and separates particles based on size. Particles greater than a specified size are discharged out of the screener separator and recycled back into use, thereby reducing the amount of mixed waste generated and minimizing the need for new gravel. The fines or silt are flushed out of the separator with the water and are removed from the water and consolidated into a drum with the use of a hydrocyclone separator and drum decant system. Because the water in the spray system is recycled, minimal makeup water is needed. The system monitors pH and total dissolved solids.

  9. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2010-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2009 was about 27 Mt (30 million st), declining by 10 percent compared with 2008. Certain end uses of industrial sand and gravel, such as foundry and glassmaking sand, may have declined by a factor greater than 10 percent in 2009. U.S. apparent consumption was 24.7 Mt (27.2 million st) in 2009, down by 10 percent from the previous year, and imports declined to 83 kt (91,000 st).

  10. Gravel pit lakes in Denmark: Chemical and biological state.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Martin; Lauridsen, Torben L; Johansson, Liselotte S; Jeppesen, Erik

    2017-08-25

    Mining of gravel and sand for construction purposes is big business and gravel pit lakes have become increasingly common all over the world. In Denmark, hundreds of gravel pit lakes have been created during the past decades. We investigated the chemical and biological status of 33-52 gravel pit lakes and compared the results with data from similar-sized natural Danish lakes. The area of the lakes ranged from 0.2 to 13ha and their age from 0.5 to 26years. Generally, the gravel pit lakes were clear with low nutrient concentrations, the median concentrations of total phosphorus and total nitrogen being 0.023mg/l and 0.30mg/l compared with 0.115mg/l and 1.29mg/l, respectively, in natural lakes. Correspondingly, median chlorophyll a was 5μg/l in the gravel pit lakes and 36μg/l in the natural lakes. Submerged macrophytes were found in all gravel pit lakes, with particularly high cover in the shallow ones. Most gravel pit lakes were deeper than the natural lakes, which may restrict the area potentially to be covered by submerged macrophytes, with implications also for the biological quality of the lakes. Fish were found in most of the gravel pit lakes, roach (Rutilus rutilus), perch (Perca fluviatilis) and rudd (Scardinius erythrophalmus) being the most frequently observed species. Fish stocking was common and included also non-native species such as carp (Cyprinus carpio) and rainbow trout (Oncorchynchus mykiss). Compared with the natural lakes, fish species richness and catch per gillnet were overall lower in the gravel pit lakes. Groundwater-fed gravel pit lakes add importantly to the number of high-quality lakes in Denmark and with an optimised design and by avoiding negative side effects, they can be positive for both nature and society. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The gravel sand transition in a disturbed catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knighton, A. David

    1999-03-01

    More than 40 million cubic metres of mining waste were supplied to the Ringarooma River between 1875 and 1984, leading to successive phases of aggradation and degradation. The natural bed material is gravel but, given the volume of introduced load and the fact that much of the input was less than 5 mm in diameter, the size composition of the bed changed from gravel to sand during the phase of downstream progressive aggradation. A very sharp gravel-sand transition developed in which median grain size decreased from over 30 mm to under 3 mm in less than 500 m. With upstream supplies of mining debris becoming depleted first, degradation followed the same downstream progressive pattern as aggradation, causing the transition to migrate downstream. By 1984, the river could be regarded as a series of zones, each characterized by a particular bed condition: a natural cobble-gravel bed, unaffected by mining inputs (0-32 km); pre-disturbance bed re-exposed by degradation over 35-40 years (32-53 km); sandy substrate with a gravel armour produced by differential transport during degradation (53-65 km); sand dominated but with developing surface patches of coarser material (65-75 km); sandy bed reflecting the size composition of the original mining input (75-118 km). Although the gravel-sand transition itself is sharp, the transitional zone is lengthy (53-75 km). As degradation continues, the gravel-sand transition is expected to progress downstream but it has remained in a stable position for 12 years. Indeed, two major floods during the period released large quantities of sand from the sub-armour layer and newly-formed banks of mine tailings, causing fining both above and below the transition. Surface grain size is an adjustable component in the transitional zone as the river strives to recover from a major anthropogenic disturbance.

  12. Developing and Exploiting a Unique Dataset from South African Gold Mines for Source Characterization and Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    mechanisms of mine-related seismicity, Savuka mine, South Africa, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am. 99: 2801–2814. Mayeda, K. (2003). Stable and transportable...regional magnitudes based on coda-derived moment-rate spectra, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am. 93: 224–239. Menke, W. (1989). Geophysical Data Analysis...Bull. Seism . Soc. Am. 19: 1579–1582. McGarr, A. (1992b). Moment tensors of ten Witwatersrand mine tremors, Pure Appl. Geophys. 139: 781–800

  13. Developing and Exploiting a Unique Seismic Data Set from South African Gold Mines for Source Characterization and Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    the University of the Witwatersrand . RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHED Three complimentary data sets are being assembled in this project: (1) high...frequency in-mine seismic data from three mines along the northwestern edge of the Witwatersrand basin, (2) seismograms from mine events recorded at...Seismicity The Witwatersrand basin is part of a granite-greenstone complex constituting the basement of the Kaapvaal craton. The basement evolved

  14. Rates of Gravel Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment transfers in gravel-bed rivers involve the three-dimensional dispersion of mixed size sediment. From a kinematics standpoint, few studies are available to inform on the streamwise and vertical rates of sediment dispersion in natural channels. This research uses a gravel tracing program to quantify dispersion rates over 19 flood seasons. Empirical observations come from Carnation Creek, a small gravel-bed river with large woody debris located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. Frequent floods and the relatively limited armor layer facilitate streambed activity and relatively high bedload transport rates, typically under partial sediment transport conditions. Over 2500 magnetically tagged stones, ranging in size from 16 to 180 mm, were deployed on the bed surface between 1989 and 1992 in four generations. To quantify gravel dispersion over distances up to 2.6 km, observations are taken from 11 recoveries. Over 280 floods capable of moving bedload occurred during this period, with five exceeding the estimated bankfull discharge. Streamwise dispersion is quantified by virtual velocity, while dispersion into the streambed is quantified by a vertical burial rate. The temporal trend in streamwise dispersion rates is described by a power function. Initial virtual velocities decline rapidly from around 1.4 m/hr to approach an asymptote value of about 0.2 m/hr. The rapid change corresponds to a significant increase in the proportion of buried tracers due to vertical mixing. Initial burial rates reflect the magnitude of the first flood after tracer deployment and range from 0.07 to 0.46 cm/hr depending on tracer generation. Burial rates converge to about 0.06 cm/hr after the fourth flood season and then gradually decline to about 0.01 cm/hr. Thus, the rate of streamwise dispersion exceeds that of vertical dispersion by three orders of magnitude when the movement of sediment routinely activated by floods is considered.

  15. Coal Mining and Post-Metallurgic Dumping Grounds and Their Connections with Exploitation of Raw Materials in the Region of Ruda Śląska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonczy, Iwona; Gawor, Łukasz

    2017-06-01

    Characteristics of mining and metallurgical waste dumps in Ruda Śląska was presented in this article. Special attention was paid to the relationship of waste material accumulated on the dumps with resources exploited on studied area. The possibilities of dumps management were also traced and two directions were indicated. The first one is associated with forming a biological covering on the dumps and the second one - with the dumps liquidation and with recovery areas now occupied by the dumps and thus with the secondary use of material collected on them.

  16. Exploiting Stable Mercury Isotopic Analysis to Differentiate between Mercury Sources: Gold Mining vs. Land-Use Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergquist, B. A.; Adler Miserendino, R. A.; Guimarães, J. R.; Veiga, M.; Velasquez-López, P.; Lees, P. S.; Thibodeau, A. M.; Fernandez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    In parts of the developing world, mercury (Hg) is used to extract gold by amalgamation during artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) and this can lead to contamination of downstream aquatic ecosystems. Differentiation between Hg from ASGM and from other sources of Hg, such as increased erosion from land cover and land use change (LCLUC), is challenging and has lead to heated debates over the dominant sources of elevated Hg in some ecosystems. Here, stable Hg isotopic analysis was applied in two aquatic ecosystems in South America: (1) the Amazonian aquatic ecosystem of Amapá, Brazil downstream of artisanal gold mining (AGM) and (2) the Puyango-Tumbes River ecosystem downstream of Portovelo-Zaruma, Ecuador, a large mining area where both AGM and small-scale gold mining (SGM) are in operation. The Hg isotopic analyses from Amapá, Brazil, do not support AGM as the source of elevated Hg in the downstream aquatic ecosystem. Instead, Hg isotopes are most consistent with the elevated Hg being from preferential migration of Hg from soil erosion, which is likely associated with land use change. Although soils are regarded as Hg sinks in the global Hg cycle, this work suggests that LCLUC can disrupt Hg stores with significant ecological consequences. In contrast in the Southwestern Andean region of Ecuador and Peru, analysis of Hg isotopes and other toxic metals (i.e., Pb, Zn, Cu), which are associated with the larger scale mining and cyanide used during SGM, demonstrate Hg used during gold mining is the predominant source of Hg downstream and can be traced far from the dominant mining area. Although it has been speculated that Hg from SGM in Ecuador was not that mobile or that Hg far downstream of SGM processing plants was from erosion due to LCLUC or from AGM taking place downstream, the isotopically heavy signature of Hg used during gold mining and elevated other metal concentrations were observed ~120 km downstream of Portovelo-Zaruma. Mercury isotopes appear

  17. Manganese removal in saturated gravel beds: Obtaining design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, F.J.; Brodie, G.A.; Behrends, L.L.

    1996-12-31

    Manganese is difficult to remove in passive wetland systems due to high pH requirements for rapid Mn oxidation and solubilization of MnO{sub 2} in the presence of Fe. To achieve Mn removal below the federal requirement of 2 mg/L, gravel beds placed after wetlands that remove Fe has been proposed. Although some data is available on gravel beds, not enough is available to recommend design parameters for these systems under a range of operating conditions. A study is being conducted to obtain information on the required Mn loading rates and retention times for adequate Mn removal at the TVA constructed wetland research facility. Treatments consist of two Mn loading rates of 1.4 and 3.7 g/m{sup 2}/d and two types of gravel, namely limestone and river gravel. The treatments are replicated 3 times resulting in 12 experimental units. After 3 months of operation, limestone is proving to be more effective at removing Mn than river gravel. Compilation of operating parameters for Mn removal in gravel beds will benefit power utility and surface mining industries by yielding information on a passive system that is inexpensive relative to caustic alkaline drip.

  18. Numerical simulation of gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeld, P.H.; Schroeder, D.E. Jr. )

    1992-08-01

    To obtain maximum productivity from unconsolidated formations where sand control is required, it is important to understand the mechanics of gravel packing. This paper describes a finite-element, numerical simulator that can predict gravel placement in the perforations and annulus of a wellbore. The equations for the simulator include mass and momentum conservation. Wellbore geometry, physical properties, and fluid and gravel-pack properties are simulator input. Experiments in a 100-ft full-scale wellbore model for three gravel-packing configurations have been successfully simulated. These configurations are a circulating pack with a washpipe, a squeeze pack, and a circulating/squeeze pack with a washpipe and a lower telltale screen. The low cost, speed, and extrapolation capabilities of the numerical simulator will greatly enhance our ability to predict gravel placement in a wellbore.

  19. Effects of surface mining on aquatic resources in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Starnes, L.B.; Gasper, D.C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper is the American Fisheries Society position statement on the effects of surface mining on aquatic resources in North America. The issue is defined including history and types of mining operations; and the actual impacts on aquatic environments from different types of surface mining including sand and gravel mining, phasphate-rock mining, peat mining, heavy metal mining. 4 refs.

  20. Method for gravel packing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.G.

    1990-08-07

    This patent describes a method for gravel packing a well that penetrates an unconsolidated or poorly consolidated subterranean oil or gas reservoir. It comprises: providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one set of longitudinal, perforation tunnels adjacent a substantial portion of the reservoir; locating a sand screen inside the casing and in juxtaposition with the perforation tunnels, an annulus being formed between the sand screen and the casing; positioning a conduit in juxtaposition with the sand screen extending substantially the length of the sand screen and having its upper extremity open to fluids; injecting a fluid slurry containing gravel down through the annulus and conduit whereby the fluid portion of the slurry is forced out of the annulus through the perforation tunnels into the reservoir and the gravel portion of the slurry deposited in the annulus and forced into the perforation tunnels into the formation; sizing the cross-sectional area of the conduit and the annulus so that if gravel forms a bridge in a portion of the annulus thereby blocking the flow of fluid slurry through the the annulus, fluid slurry containing gravel will continue to flow through the conduit and into the annulus around the gravel bridge; and terminating the injection of the slurry.

  1. Exploiting EST databases for the mining and characterization of short sequence repeat (SSR) markers in Catharanthus roseus L.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Raj Kumar; Kar, Basudeba; Nayak, Sanghamitra

    2011-02-07

    Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus L.) (Family: Apocyanaceae) is a ornamental plants with great medicinal properties. Although it is represented by seven species, little work has been carried out on its genetic characterization due to non-availability of reliable molecular markers. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have been widely applied as molecular markers in genetic studies. With the rapid increase in the deposition of nucleotide sequences in the public databases and advent of bioinformatics tools, it has become a cost effective and fast approach to scan for microsatellite repeats and exploit the possibility of converting it into potential genetic markers. Expressed sequence tags (EST's) from Catharanthus roseus were used for the screening of Class I (hyper variable) simple sequence repeats (SSR's). A total of 502 microsatellite repeats were detected from 21730 EST sequences of turmeric after redundancy elimination. The average density of Class I SSRs account to 1 SSR per 10.21 kb of EST. Mononucleotides was the most abundant class of microsatellite motifs. It accounted for 44.02% of the total, followed by the trinucleotide (26.09%) and dinucleotide repeats (14.34%). Among all the repeat motifs, (A/T)n accounted for the highest Proportion (36.25%) followed by (AAG)n. These detected SSRs can be used to design primers that have functional importance and should also facilitate the analysis of genetic diversity, variability, linkage mapping and evolutionary relationships in plants especially medicinal plants.

  2. Concepts in gravel beach dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, Daniel; Masselink, Gerhard

    2006-11-01

    The dominant processes in gravel beach dynamics are reviewed, highlighting some common themes which unify the various components of the gravel beach system, the repercussions of which impart on how gravel beach dynamics might be understood conceptually. In particular, gravel beach dynamics are thought to be highly dependent on the temporal and spatial variation in grain size, and the continual adjustments made by an active beach step, both of which act not only as the expression of changing morphodynamic conditions, but also as a controlling influence. Morphodynamics, the notion that the exchanges on beaches between the hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and morphological change takes the form of reciprocal relationships which are mediated through feedback mechanisms (in such a way that they cannot be thought of or studied independently) is not a new one. Yet it appears that for the gravel beach, morphodynamics must be re-defined to describe conditions where variations in sediment size are thought to deserve parity, rather than as merely a sequent entity or boundary condition. 'Morpho-sedimentary-dynamics' is a phrase coined to intuit such cause and effect, detailing the co-evolution of morphology, hydro-hydraulics and sediment properties whilst acknowledging causative pluralism, feedbacks and multiplier effects. This is the recommended conceptual framework within which to crystallise thought and organise further research for the gravel beach. Essentially, it increases the minimum number of parameters needed to describe the state of the gravel beach as a physical system. Therefore, it is advised that simplicity will be most expedient in our future modelling efforts, if complexity is to be adequately encapsulated.

  3. [Comunicable diseases, mental health and exposure to environmental pollutants in population living near Las Bambas mining project before exploitation phase, Peru 2006].

    PubMed

    Astete, Jonh; Gastañaga, María del Carmen; Fiestas, Víctor; Oblitas, Tania; Sabastizagal, Iselle; Lucero, Martha; Abadíe, Jesús del Milagro; Muñoz, María Elena; Valverde, Ada; Suarez, Magna

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of communicable diseases, mental health and environmental pollutants exposure in population living near Las Bambas mining project before exploitation phase. Cross sectional study performed in 453 subjects (children and adults) living in three Apurimac region districts: Haquira, Chalhuahuacho and Progreso. Psychomotor development, intelligence quotient, anxiety and depression levels and the presence of communicable diseases (viral hepatitis B, C and delta, syphilis and HIV) were evaluated, as well as heavy metals (lead in blood, and cadmium, arsenic and mercury in urine samples) and serum cholinesterase levels. Mean age was 29 ± 17.25 years, 59.2% were female and a range of 6 to 15 years of living in the area was found. No cases of HIV, hepatitis C and delta were found, 1.4% were positive for syphilis and in relation to hepatitis B, we found 1,7% of subjects positive to total anti HBc and 0.5% positive for HBsAg. Heavy metal testing identified people with exceeding limits of mercury in 1.8% arsenic in 4.6%, lead in 24.3% and cadmium in 43.9%. Besides, 29.1% of the population had cholinesterase levels below normal range. Among children, 12.5% were at psychomotor development levels of risk; 2.1% and 3.1% suffered from mild and borderline intellectual disability (mental retardation), respectively. 34.3% of subjects older than 12 had anxiety and 17.5% depression. Evidence of heavy metal environmental pollution and presence of communicable diseases in this population were already found. Future careless mining activity could worsen the current health situation.

  4. Method for staged placement of gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.E.

    1990-04-10

    This patent describes a process for gravel packing in a wellbore annulus including a well screen and perforations extending into a producing formation. It comprises: providing an initial gravel pack carrier fluid at below formation fracturing pressure and having a gravel loading of up to about five pounds gravel per gallon of carrier fluid within the wellbore annulus, providing additional amounts of carrier fluid at below fracturing pressure and having gravel loadings which are successively higher than a preceding and the initial gravel loading to the wellbore annulus and continually increasing the gravel loading in the carrier fluid to a range of ten to twenty pounds of gravel per gallon of carrier fluid until the gravel packing of the wellbore annulus is completed.

  5. Designing gravel pack for uranium ISL wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ber, A. A.; Minaev, K. M.; Ber, L. M.; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes the improvement of gravel packing technique applied for the production wells. The authors have suggested new design of gravel pack for gravel packing of productive formations. The issue is currently topical because gravel packing at drillhole ISL is less time- and money-consuming. The subject of the research is gravel pack design and content. The purpose defined by the authors is to design the gravel pack and to suggest the composition of gravel cement agent. As a result of the research, the authors have described different designs of the gravel pack, its optimal shape, as well as a choice and justification of cement agents, a hold cover of the gravel pack, and suggested the methods of experimental research.

  6. Gravel Roads: Maintenance and Design Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This manual was developed with a major emphasis on the maintenance of gravel roads, including some basic design elements. The purpose of the manual is to provide clear and helpful information for doing a better job of maintaining gravel roads.

  7. Methods to measure sedimentation of spawning gravels

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Rand E. Eads

    1991-01-01

    Sediment transport occurring after spawning can cause scour of incubating embryos and infiltration of fine sediment into spawning gravel, decreasing intergravel flow and preventing hatched fry from emerging from the gravel. Documentation of these effects requires measuring gravel conditions before and after high flow periods and combining methods to record scour and...

  8. Unfolding with Maxed and Gravel.

    SciTech Connect

    WIEGEL, BURKHARD

    2004-07-12

    Version: 00 UMG (Unfolding with MAXED and GRAVEL) is a package of seven programs written for the analysis of data measured with spectrometers that require the use of unfolding techniques. See the developers’ website for information on training courses http://www.ptb.de/en/org/6/utc2006/intro.htm. The program MAXED applies the maximum entropy principle to the unfolding problem, and the program GRAVEL uses a modified SAND-II algorithm to do the unfolding. There are two versions of each: MXD_FC33 and GRV_FC33 for “few-channel” unfolding (e.g., Bonner sphere spectrometers) and MXD-MC33 and GRV_MC33 for “multi-channel” unfolding (e.g., NE-213). The program IQU can be used to calculate integral quantities for both MAXED and GRAVEL solution spectra and, in the case of MAXED solutions, it can also be used to calculate the uncertainty in these values as well as the uncertainty in the solution spectrum. The uncertainty calculation is handled in the following way: given a solution spectrum generated by MAXED, the program IQU considers variations in the measured data and in the default spectrum and uses standard methods to do sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation. There are two versions: IQU_FC33 for “few channel” unfolding and IQU_MC33 for “multi-channel” unfolding. The program UMGPlot can be used to display the results from the unfolding programs MAXED and GRAVEL in graphical form in a quick and easy way.

  9. An overview of gravel-packed completions

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, H.B.

    1987-05-01

    Sarawak Shell Bhd./Sabah Shell Petroleum Co. (SSB/SSPC) experience with gravel-packed completions covers some 12 years. During that period, some 290 gravel-packed zones have been completed, and about 400X10/sup 6/ bbl (64X10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) of oil have been produced through gravel packs in 13 offshore fields. This paper presents an overview of the development of gravel-packing methods, with special reference to the new gravel-packing technique developed in early 1984 for the Bayan field gravel-packed completions. Productivity reduction resulting from gravel packing and the long-term performance of the packs are discussed briefly.

  10. Gravel resources, urbanization, and future land use, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soule, James M.; Fitch, Harold R.

    1974-01-01

    An assessment of gravel needs in Front Range Urban Corridor markets to 2000 A.D., based on forecast population increases and urbanization, indicates that adequate resources to meet anticipated needs are potentially available, if future land use does not preclude their extraction. Because of urban encroachment onto gravel-bearing lands, this basic construction material is in short supply nationally and in the Front Range Urban Corridor. Longer hauls, increased prices, and use of alternatives, especially crushed rock aggregate, have resulted. An analysis of possible sequential land uses following gravel mining indicates that a desirable use is for 'real estate' ponds and small lakes. A method for computing gravel reserves, based on planimeter measurement of area of resource-bearing lands and statistical analysis of reliability of thickness and size distribution data, was developed to compute reserves in individual markets. A discussion of the qualitative 'usability' of these reserves is then made for the individual markets.

  11. Locating subsurface gravel with thermal imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholen, Douglas E.; Clerke, William H.; Luepke, Douglas E.

    1986-01-01

    A method was discussed for using 6 band thermal imagery to locate subsurface gravel deposits in vegetated areas. Geologic history is reviewed to select potential areas of study. An overflight was made using a thermal scanner. The data were processed with a computerized system to delineate areas showing a quartz signature radiated by a gravel deposit. The method was developed during a search for gravel on National Forest land in Louisiana. Processed data from thermal imagery was compared with known gravel deposits and exploratory drill hole logs. A high correlation was noted for a wide range of deposits, from commercial pits to trace deposits only a foot thick. Overburden at these sites varied from zero to sixty feet, near the maximum annual penetration by the thermal wave. It was concluded that the method can be used to locate buried gravel deposits and that more time and effort are needed to verify the usefulness for developing gravel pits adjacent to proposed construction sites.

  12. Preliminary Assessment of Vertical Stability and Gravel Transport along the Umpqua River, Southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, Jim E.; Wallick, J. Rose; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Cannon, Charles; Anderson, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    This report addresses physical channel issues related to instream gravel mining on the Umpqua River and its two primary tributaries, the North and South Umpqua Rivers. This analysis constitutes a 'Phase I' investigation, as designated by an interagency team cochaired by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, and the Oregon Department of State Lands to address instream gravel mining issues across Oregon. Phase I analyses rely primarily on existing datasets and cursory analysis to determine the vertical stability of a channel to ascertain whether a particular river channel is aggrading, degrading, or at equilibrium. Additionally, a Phase I analysis identifies other critical issues or questions pertinent to physical channel conditions that may be related to instream gravel mining activities. This analysis can support agency permitting decisions as well as possibly indicating the need for additional studies. This specific analysis focuses on the mainstem Umpqua River from the Pacific Ocean at River Mile (RM) 0 to the confluence of the North and South Umpqua Rivers (at RM 111.8), as well as the lower 29 mi of the North Umpqua River and the lower 80 mi of the South Umpqua River (fig. 1). It is within these reaches where mining of gravel bars for aggregate has been most prevalent.

  13. Method of gravel packing a subterranean well

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-05

    This patent describes a method of gravel packing a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises blocking a first group of apertures in a liner with an immobile gel; positioning the liner within the well bore thereby defining a first annulus between the liner and the well bore; transporting a slurry comprised of gravel suspended in a fluid into the first annulus, the fluid flowing through a second group of apertures in the liner while the gravel is deposited within the first annulus to form a gravel pack; and thereafter removing substantially all of the gel from the first group of apertures.

  14. Study of geohazards in the artisanal exploitation sites and their impacts on their surrounding areas. Cases of Mufwa and Kalimbi mines in the South Kivu province (D.R. Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nshokano, Jean-Robert

    2014-05-01

    Kivu region is located in the eastern part of DR Congo. This region is in western branch of the East African Rift. In this region there is a presence of several mineral resources. It is also a sismic zone with many cases of geohazards. Very often international NGO's (Human rights, Green Peace, etc.) consider the illegal mining exploitations as the causes of conflicts and war in that region. Those illegal mining exploitations are also responsible for the insecure and inconvenient situations in the region. The DR Congo is a country with great mining vocation and remarkable geological diversity, its people has the need and the right to understand the different challenges related to geological resources. So it's up to raise the question: "What about the unsubstitutable links which put the life beings and their physical environment, what about the interest of soil and subsoil in the human subsistence and comfort?" In undertaking natural resource exploitation, extreme comfort and ultra capitalism should not blind people. They are called to preserve a nature for all and a nature for future generations. We have a common earth where we exploit all the mineral resources. It's up to everyone as human being to be aware of our responsibility regarding to the irreversible decrease of mineral resources and the constant danger of geohazards. The project'"Earth and life" essentially aims for the strengthening of efforts in geoeducation and mass geocommunication (information and sensitization) about the challenges of oil and mineral resources on one hand, and on the other hand the natural hazards in the perspective to encourage much more a sustainable development. Through fieldwork investigations (geological survey), we are going to map the artisanal exploitation sites targeted by the project. We will proceed by sensitization and mass information about different topics of geology and mineral resources issues in the region. The fieldworks will allow us to make an inventory of

  15. Tertiary gold-bearing channel gravel in northern Nevada County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.W.; Yeend, W.E.; Oliver, H.W.; Mattick, R.E.

    1968-01-01

    The remains of a huge Tertiary gravel-filled channel lie in the area between the South and Middle Yuba Rivers in northern Nevada County, Calif. The deposits in this channel were the site of some of the most productive hydraulic gold mines in California between the 1850's and 1884. The gravel occupies a major channel and parts of several tributaries that in Tertiary time cut into a surface of Paleozoic and Mesozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The gravel is partly covered by the remains of an extensive sheet of volcanic rocks, but it crops out along the broad crest of the ridge between the canyons of the South and Middle Yuba Rivers. The lower parts of the gravel deposits generally carry the highest values of placer gold. Traditionally, the richest deposits of all are found in the so-called blue gravel, which, when present, lies just above the bedrock and consists of a very coarse, poorly sorted mixture of cobbles, pebbles, sand, and clay. It is unoxidized, and, at least locally, contains appreciable quantities of secondary sulfide minerals, chiefly pyrite. Information in drill logs from private sources indicates that a 2-mile stretch of the channel near North Columbia contains over half a million ounces of gold dispersed through about 22 million cubic yards of gravel at a grade .averaging about 81 cents per cubic yard. The deposit is buried at depths ranging from 100 to 400 feet. Several geophysical methods have been tested for their feasibility in determining the configuration of the buried bedrock surface, in delineating channel gravel buried under volcanic rocks, and in identifying concentrations of heavy minerals within the gravel. Although the data have not yet been completely processed, preliminary conclusions indicate that some methods may be quite useful. A combination of seismic-refraction and gravity methods was used to determine the depth and configuration of the bottom of the channel to an accuracy within 10 percent as checked by the drill holes

  16. Program of mining research, 1998--1999

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The paper contains: Reflections on 1998; Project summaries; Noise; Injury prevention, ergonomics, and human factors; Surface, sand and gravel, and stone mines; Hazard detection and warning devices; Ground control -- metal/nonmetal mines; Ground control -- coal mines; Explosion and fire detection and suppression; Methane detection; Electrical hazards; Emerging technologies; Surveillance; Construction; Training and education; and Communication activity.

  17. Sand transport over an immobile gravel substrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory flume channel to evaluate the effects of increasing amounts of sand with an immobile gravel fraction on the sand transport rate and configuration of the sand bed. Knowledge of the movement of sand in gravel beds is important for the management of streams a...

  18. Hydrogeology of sand and gravel deposits near Nepaug Reservoir, New Hartford and Burlington, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Janet Radway; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Morrison, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Sand and gravel deposits near the Nepaug Reservoir in New Hartford and Burlington, Connecticut, were studied to provide a basis for ongoing investigations that will evaluate water-quality conditions in the watershed and the effects of sand and gravel mining on the quality of water in the reservoir. In the Nepaug area, surficial glacial materials overlie crystalline bedrock that is predominantly schist and gneiss. Along the western side of Nepaug Reservoir, glacial stratified deposits were laid down as ice-marginal deltas in a series of small glacial lakes that formed sequentially as the ice margin retreated northeastward through the area. These deposits are as much as 250 feet thick and are subdivided into coarse-grained units (gravel, sand and gravel, and sand deposits) and fine-grained units (very fine sand, silt, and clay deposits). Approximately 954 million cubic feet of sand and gravel is contained in four delineated deposits in two areas near the reservoir. The sand and gravel deposits adjacent to the Nepaug Reservoir can affect the physical and chemical responses of the watershed. Removal of the sand and gravel would likely result in increased streamflow peaks associated with storms and decreased streamflow during low-flow periods. Streamflow during floods and droughts at Burlington Brook and Clear Brook, a tributary to the Nepaug Reservoir, were compared to determine how the volume of sand and gravel in a watershed affects ground-water storage and the way water is released from storage. Removal of unsaturated deposits also may affect chemical interactions between water and sediment and cause changes in the amount of dissolved constituents in the water.

  19. Preliminary report on deposit models for sand and gravel in the Cache la Poudre River valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Lindsey, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    The stratigraphy, sedimentary features, and physical characteristics of gravel deposits in the Cache la Poudre River valley were studied to establish geologic models for these deposits. Because most of the gravel mined in the valley is beneath the low terraces and floodplain, the quality of these deposits for aggregate was studied in detail at eight sites in a 25.5-mile reach between Fort Collins and Greeley, Colorado. Aggregate quality was determined by field and laboratory measurements on samples collected under a consistent sampling plan. The Broadway terrace is underlain by Pleistocene alluvium and, at some places, by fine-grained wind-blown deposits. The Piney Creek terrace, low terraces, and floodplain are primarily underlain by Holocene alluvium. Pleistocene alluvium may underlie these terraces at isolated locations along the river. Gravels beneath the Piney Creek terrace, low terraces, and floodplain are divisible into two units that are poorly distinguishable at the upstream end of the study area, but are readily distinguishable about 7 miles downstream. Where distinguished, the two gravel units are separated by a sharp, locally erosional, contact. The upper gravel is probably of Holocene age, but the lower gravel is considered to be Holocene and Pleistocene. The primary variation in particle size of the gravels beneath the floodplain and low terraces of the Cache la Poudre River valley is the downstream decrease in the proportion of particles measuring 3/4 inch and larger. Above Fort Collins, about 60 pct of the gravel collects on the 3/4 inch sieve, whereas about 50 pct of gravel collects on the same sieve size at Greeley. For 1.5-inch sieves, the corresponding values are about 50 pct for Fort Collins and only about 30 pct for Greeley. Local differences in particle size and sorting between the upper and lower gravel units were observed in the field, but only the coarsest particle sizes appear to have been concentrated in the lower unit. Field

  20. Statistical analysis of sand and gravel aggregate deposits of late Pleistocene Lake Bonneville, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, James D.; Bolm, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    Sedimentary deposits of pluvial Lake Bonneville are an important source of sand and gravel suitable for aggregate and construction in Utah. Data on Lake Bonneville basin sand and gravel deposit thickness, volume, grain size, percent of fines, and durability were statistically analyzed to detect variations associated with geologic domains, geographic location, Lake Bonneville shorelines, and sand and gravel deposit type, and to construct quantitative deposit models. Analysis showed several trends; (1) sand and gravel in younger shorelines was slightly more durable and the deposits considerably larger in volume, (2) younger shorelines are also more likely to contain more than one genetic deposit type, (3) the volume of terrace deposits is larger than beach deposits, (4) terraces and beaches are generally thicker than spits and bars, (5) the northern part of the Bonneville Basin contains slightly more durable sand and gravel than the southern part of the basin and is more likely to contain deposits composed of more than one genetic deposit type, and (6) the Wasatch domain deposits are composed of more than one genetic deposit type more often than deposits of the Basin and Range domain. Three additional conclusions with immediate economic significance are; (1) the median sand and gravel deposit in the Wasatch domain, 360,000 m3 (275,000 yd3), is three times larger than that of the Basin and Range domain (120,000 m3 [90,000 yd3]), (2) the median deposit thickness in the Wasatch domain, 5.8 m (19.0 ft), is nearly twice that of the Basin and Range domain (3 m [10 ft]), and (3) the Wasatch domain also contains slightly larger diameter gravel. These three conclusions are significant because the trend for sand and gravel development in the Bonneville Basin is to move from the Wasatch domain to the Basin and Range domain. Smaller, thinner deposits with smaller diameter gravel will require more surface area to mine than would have been necessary in the Wasatch domain. The

  1. Diffusion coefficients in gravel under unsaturated conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.; Wright, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Diffusion coefficients were experimentally determined in unsaturated gravel to evaluate the effectiveness of gravel as a diffusion barrier to ionic transport in the vadose zone. Water contents were fixed by use of an ultracentrifuge with an ultralow constant rate flow pump supplying solution to the sample via a rotating seal. Once the gravel was at hydraulic steady state, the electrical conductivity was measured, and the diffusion coefficient calculated using the Nernst-Einstein equation. Diffusion coefficient values for potassium ion (D{sub e}) in four types of angular gravel ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s (1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}/s) for a 6.3-9.5 mm angular granitic gravel at a volumetric water content of 5.5% to 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} m{sup 2}/s (2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2}/s) in a 4.0-6.3 mm quartzite gravel at a volumetric water content of 0.47%. Variations in D{sub e} values resulted primarily from differences in water content which depends on gravel type and particle size.

  2. Optimizing materials for better gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Cocales, B. )

    1992-12-01

    This paper reports on the permeability of crystalline silica (commercial) gravel used for gravel packs. Many gravel properties are tested and monitored frequently, but an industry permeability standard has not been established. To standardize permeability numbers, experiments were conducted on crystalline silica and aluminum silicate (Carbo-Prop) using a constant-head permeameter. Equations developed from lab results show permeability as a function of porosity. These equations were developed for each material size and type, and can be used to determine permeability for any porosity.

  3. Crossfire-Bonds Gravel Pit NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is an NPDES permit and statement of basis. The Crossfire-Bonds Gravel Pit is authorized to discharge to Deer Canyon. Authorization for discharge is limited to only those outfalls specifically listed in the permit.

  4. NVESD mine lane facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersat, James D.; Marshall, Christopher; Maksymonko, George

    2003-09-01

    The NVESD Mine Lane Facility has recently undergone an extensive renovation. It now consists of an indoor, dry lane portion, a greenhouse portion with moisture-controlled lanes, a control room, and two outdoor lanes. The indoor structure contains six mine lanes, each approximately 2.5m (width) × 1.2m (depth) × 33m(length). These lanes contain six different soil types: magnetite/sand, silt, crusher run gravel (bluestone gravel), bank run gravel (tan gravel), red clay, and white sand. An automated trolley system is used for mounting the various mine detection systems and sensors under test. Data acquisition and data logging is fully automated. The greenhouse structure was added to provide moisture controlled lanes for measuring the effect of moisture on sensor effectiveness. A gantry type crane was installed to permit remotely controlled positioning of a sensor package over any portion of the greenhouse lanes at elevations from ground level up to 5m without shadowing the target area. The roof of the greenhouse is motorized, and can be rolled back to allow full solar loading. A control room overlooking the lanes is complete with recording and monitoring devices and contains controls to operate the trolleys. A facility overview is presented and typical results from recent data collection exercises are presented.

  5. Modeling surficial sand and gravel deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, J.D.; Page, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    Mineral-deposit models are an integral part of quantitative mineral-resource assessment. As the focus of mineral-deposit modeling has moved from metals to industrial minerals, procedure has been modified and may be sufficient to model surficial sand and gravel deposits. Sand and gravel models are needed to assess resource-supply analyses for planning future development and renewal of infrastructure. Successful modeling of sand and gravel deposits must address (1) deposit volumes and geometries, (2) sizes of fragments within the deposits, (3) physical characteristics of the material, and (4) chemical composition and chemical reactivity of the material. Several models of sand and gravel volumes and geometries have been prepared and suggest the following: Sand and gravel deposits in alluvial fans have a median volume of 35 million m3. Deposits in all other geologic settings have a median volume of 5.4 million m3, a median area of 120 ha, and a median thickness of 4 m. The area of a sand and gravel deposit can be predicted from volume using a regression model (log [area (ha)] =1.47+0.79 log [volume (million m3)]). In similar fashion, the volume of a sand and gravel deposit can be predicted from area using the regression (log [volume (million m3)]=-1.45+1.07 log [area (ha)]). Classifying deposits by fragment size can be done using models of the percentage of sand, gravel, and silt within deposits. A classification scheme based on fragment size is sufficiently general to be applied anywhere. ?? 1994 Oxford University Press.

  6. Modelling gravel transport and morphology for the Fraser River Gravel Reach, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. S.; Millar, R. G.; Islam, S.

    2008-03-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) numerical hydrodynamic-morphological model is developed to investigate gravel transport and channel morphology in a large wandering gravel-bed river, the Fraser River Gravel Reach, in British Columbia, Canada. The model takes into count multi-fraction bedload transport, including the effects of surface coarsening, hiding and protrusion. Model outputs together with river discharge statistics were analyzed, producing distributed sediment budget and well-defined, localised zones of aggradation and degradation along the gravel reach. Long-term channel response to gravel extraction from aggrading zones as a flood hazard mitigation measure was also investigated numerically to assess the effectiveness of such an extraction. The total computed sediment budget agrees well with results based on field measurements of gravel transport available to us. This study points to the importance of a number of factors to bedload predictions: the gravel-to-sand ratio, the adequacy of resolving the wandering planform, and the distinction between bed shear stress driving bedload transport and bed resistance on the flow. These are in addition to the physical processes governing the flow field and gravel mobilization. The methodology presented in this paper can provide a scientific basis for gravel management including monitoring and extraction in order to maintain adequate flood protection and navigation, while preserving the ecosystem.

  7. Protection of gravel pack well completions during steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, D.N.; Northrop, P.S.

    1993-08-31

    A method is described for protecting a gravel pack completion in a well through which steam is injected into a subterranean formation wherein gravel used to form said gravel pack completion contains silica; said method comprising: passing said steam through a silica-containing particulate material at the surface prior to injecting said steam through said gravel pack well completion.

  8. Noise Exposure and Hearing Loss Among Sand and Gravel Miners

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Deborah; Wilkins, Steve; Stephenson, Mark; McWilliams, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe workplace noise exposures, risk factors for hearing loss, and hearing levels among sand and gravel miners, and to determine whether full shift noise exposures resulted in changes in hearing thresholds from baseline values. Sand and gravel miners (n = 317) were interviewed regarding medical history, leisure-time and occupational noise exposure, other occupational exposures, and use of hearing protection. Audiometric tests were performed both before the work shift (following a 12-hour noise-free interval) and immediately following the work shift. Full shift noise dosimetry was conducted. Miners' noise exposures exceeded the Recommended Exposure Limit (REL) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for 69% of workers, and exceeded the Mine Safety and Health Administration's action level for enrollment in a hearing conservation program for 41% of workers. Significantly higher noise exposures occurred among employees of small companies, among workers with a job classification of truck driver, among males, and among black workers. Hearing protection usage was low, with 48% of subjects reporting that they never used hearing protection. Hearing impairment, as defined by NIOSH, was present among 37% of 275 subjects with valid audiograms. Black male workers and white male workers had higher hearing thresholds than males from a comparison North Carolina population unexposed to industrial noise. Small but statistically significant changes in hearing thresholds occurred following full shift noise exposure among subjects who had good hearing sensitivity at baseline. In a logistic regression model, age and history of a past noisy job were significant predictors of hearing impairment. Overall, sand and gravel workers have excessive noise exposures and significant hearing loss, and demonstrate inadequate use of hearing protection. Well-designed hearing conservation programs, with reduction of noise exposure

  9. Noise exposure and hearing loss among sand and gravel miners.

    PubMed

    Landen, Deborah; Wilkins, Steve; Stephenson, Mark; McWilliams, Linda

    2004-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe workplace noise exposures, risk factors for hearing loss, and hearing levels among sand and gravel miners, and to determine whether full shift noise exposures resulted in changes in hearing thresholds from baseline values. Sand and gravel miners (n = 317) were interviewed regarding medical history, leisure-time and occupational noise exposure, other occupational exposures, and use of hearing protection. Audiometric tests were performed both before the work shift (following a 12-hour noise-free interval) and immediately following the work shift. Full shift noise dosimetry was conducted. Miners' noise exposures exceeded the Recommended Exposure Limit (REL) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for 69% of workers, and exceeded the Mine Safety and Health Administration's action level for enrollment in a hearing conservation program for 41% of workers. Significantly higher noise exposures occurred among employees of small companies, among workers with a job classification of truck driver, among males, and among black workers. Hearing protection usage was low, with 48% of subjects reporting that they never used hearing protection. Hearing impairment, as defined by NIOSH, was present among 37% of 275 subjects with valid audiograms. Black male workers and white male workers had higher hearing thresholds than males from a comparison North Carolina population unexposed to industrial noise. Small but statistically significant changes in hearing thresholds occurred following full shift noise exposure among subjects who had good hearing sensitivity at baseline. In a logistic regression model, age and history of a past noisy job were significant predictors of hearing impairment. Overall, sand and gravel workers have excessive noise exposures and significant hearing loss, and demonstrate inadequate use of hearing protection. Well-designed hearing conservation programs, with reduction of noise exposure

  10. Social Web mining and exploitation for serious applications: Technosocial Predictive Analytics and related technologies for public health, environmental and national security surveillance.

    PubMed

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Sanfilippo, Antonio P; Corley, Courtney D; Wheeler, Steve

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores Technosocial Predictive Analytics (TPA) and related methods for Web "data mining" where users' posts and queries are garnered from Social Web ("Web 2.0") tools such as blogs, micro-blogging and social networking sites to form coherent representations of real-time health events. The paper includes a brief introduction to commonly used Social Web tools such as mashups and aggregators, and maps their exponential growth as an open architecture of participation for the masses and an emerging way to gain insight about people's collective health status of whole populations. Several health related tool examples are described and demonstrated as practical means through which health professionals might create clear location specific pictures of epidemiological data such as flu outbreaks.

  11. MICROTURBULENCE IN GRAVEL BED STREAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.; Kramer, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The overarching objective of this investigation was to evaluate the role of relative submergence on the formation and evolution of cluster microforms in gravel bed streams and its implications to bedload transport. Secondary objectives of this research included (1) a detailed analysis of mean flow measurements around a clast; and (2) a selected number of experimental runs where the mean flow characteristics are linked together with the bed micro-topography observations around a clast. It is hypothesized that the relative submergence is an important parameter in defining the feedback processes between the flow and clasts, which governs the flow patterns around the clasts, thus directly affecting the depositional patterns of the incoming sediments. To examine the validity of the hypothesis and meet the objectives of this research, 19 detailed experimental runs were conducted in a tilting, water recirculating laboratory flume under well-controlled conditions. A fixed array of clast-obstacles were placed atop a well-packed bed with uniform size glass beads. During the runs, multifractional spherical particles were fed upstream of the clast section at a predetermined rate. State-of-the-art techniques/instruments, such as imaging analysis software, Large Scale Particle Velocimeter (LSPIV) and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) were employed to provide unique quantitative measurements for bedload fluxes, clast/clusters geomorphic patterns, and mean flow characteristics in the vicinity of the clusters. Different flow patterns were recorded for the high relative submergence (HRS) and low relative submergence (LRS) experimental runs. The ADV measurements provided improved insight about the governing flow mechanisms for the HRS runs. These mechanisms were described with flow upwelling at the center of the flume and downwelling occurring along the flume walls. Flow downwelling corresponded to an increase in the free surface velocity. Additionally, the visual observations

  12. Roughness of stable, armored gravel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Basil

    1993-11-01

    The grain roughness of stable armored beds that formed in a laboratory flume under a range of steady flow conditions on rounded, flat and angular gravel is analyzed. Gravel roughness geometry is determined from bed surface profiles and vertical photographs. These techniques have been employed in field situations. Thus the methodology is potentially applicable to the analysis of grain roughness in natural gravel bed channels. The description of representative roughness geometry is also analogous to that used to characterize artificial roughness arrays. Armor roughness increases with increasing flow. Armored surfaces composed of angular gravel are roughest, and surfaces formed of flat gravel offer least resistance to the flow. Stable armored beds may exhibit a tendency to maximize the ratio of the shear due to drag on representative roughness elements to total shear. Roughness concentration is strongly correlated with the energy slope, and there is a linear increase in equivalent roughness height with increasing roughness concentration. The friction factor for an armored surface varies in a linear manner with representative roughness geometry. The equation defining this relation is probably similar to that used to characterize variations in the friction factor with artificial roughness geometry at low roughness concentrations. However, to reconcile the relations for artificial and natural roughness completely, it may be necessary to explicitly consider the contribution to flow resistance made by roughness shape, background roughness, and blocking in shallow flows.

  13. Land reclamation beautifies coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Coblentz, B.

    2009-07-15

    The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

  14. Laboratory studies of fines movement in gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, A.R. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Most high permeability, high deliverability, unconsolidated and loosely consolidated sandstone formations require gravel packing as part of the completion procedure. The gravel packs are designed to allow the soft formations to produce sand-free at economic production rates. Techniques and procedures used for gravel size selection are typically based on criteria which have been used by the industry for over 20 years. Simple laboratory flow tests using clean gravel columns and fines from a variety of formations, however, indicate existing gravel-size selection guidelines are too conservative. Although the gravels selected are very efficient in preventing formation fines from entering the pack, the buildup of silt and fines at the gravel/formation interface can cause quick degradation of the effective permeability through the pack. Improvements in gravel pack life can be obtained by using gravel with higher initial permeability, either by increasing the average size of the gravels used (i.e. larger sand grains) or through the use of more spherical particles (synthetic gravel). The laboratory tests reported in this paper suggest that both alternatives can be considered in gravel pack operations. It is a further premise of this paper that sufficient improvements have been made in gravel pack procedures in recent years to allow effective placement of the higher permeability gravels proposed.

  15. Laboratory studies of fines movement in gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, A.R. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Most high-permeability, high-deliverability, unconsolidated, and loosely consolidated sandstone formations require gravel packing as part of the completion procedure. The gravel packs are designed to allow the soft formations to produce sand-free at economical production rates. Techniques and procedures used for gravel-size selection are typically based on criteria that have been used by the industry for more than 20 years. Simple laboratory flow tests using clean gravel columns and fines from a variety of formations, however, indicate that existing gravel-size-selection guidelines are too conservative. Although the gravels selected are very efficient in preventing formation fines from entering the pack, the buildup of silt and fines at the gravel/formation interface can cause quick degradation of the effective permeability through the pack. Improvements in gravel-pack life can be obtained by using gravel with higher initial permeability, either by increasing the average size of the gravels used (i.e., larger sand grains) or through the use of more spherical particles (synthetic gravel). The laboratory tests reported in this paper suggest that both alternatives can be considered in gravel-pack operations. It is a further premise of this paper that sufficient improvements have been made in gravel-pack procedures in recent years to allow effective placement of the proposed higher-permeability gravels.

  16. Sand, gravel properties key to optimum designs

    SciTech Connect

    Oyeneyin, M.B.

    1998-01-26

    Successful gravel packed and screen well completions require a knowledge of sand as well as gravel textural properties. These completion methods keep sand and fines from entering the well bore, so that long-term production capacity of the well is ensured. This first of a three-part series will cover key factors that influence effective sand control. The concluding parts will present guidelines for both gravel packs and screens. Fines, more than load-bearing formation sands, pose the greater problem for the two sand exclusion techniques. Therefore, reservoir sand analysis is the main key for controlling sand. An integrated team approach to both sand control design and implementation from well planning through drilling to final completion is the best strategy for optimizing well performance in reservoirs with sand problems.

  17. Gravel Augmentation Below Dams: California Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Minear, J. T.

    2004-12-01

    Most dams block all coarse sediment traveling downstream, such that reaches downstream are commonly typically depleted of gravel, causing a variety of effects such as incision, bank erosion, coarsening of the bed material, and reduction of salmonid spawning habitiat. To compensate for this reduction in coarse sediment supply, gravel has been artificially added below dams, using techniques such as high flow stock piling, high flow direct injection, artificial riffle construction, riffle supplementation, and construction of side channel or artificial spawning channels. In the Trinity and Sacramento-San Joaquin River systems of northern California, loss of suitable salmonid spawning gravels below dams has motivated augmentation of over 320,000 m3 of gravel in 73 separate projects on 19 rivers since 1978, mostly since 1990. Of the 67 projects for which adequate data were available, 48 involved adding less than 7,500 m3 each. Costs reported for 57 of the projects totaled nearly $8,753,000, but these figures generally did not include the cost of staff time involved in planning, design, and oversight. Despite the magnitude of this experimental intervention, fewer than half of the projects were monitored, and of those few had monitored sufficient parameters pre- and post- project to evaluate project performance. Performance of these projects to date has been mixed: in many cases the imported gravels have promptly washed out, some channel forms created have been unnatural and not heavily used by salmon. In all cases, the volumes of gravel artificially added have been only a small percentage of the annual coarse sediment deficit.

  18. Where does all the gravel go? Abrasion-set limits on Himalayan gravel flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingle, Elizabeth; Attal, Mikael; Sinclair, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    Rivers sourced in the Himalaya carry some of the largest sediment loads on the planet, yet coarse gravel in these rivers vanishes within approximately 20-40 kilometres on entering the Ganga Plain. Understanding "where the gravel goes" is crucial to forecasting the response of rivers to large pulses of sediment triggered by earthquakes and storms. Through an analysis of fan geometry, sediment grain size and lithology, we demonstrate that gravel flux from rivers draining the central Himalaya with contributing areas spanning three orders of magnitude is approximately constant. Furthermore, we show that the distance to the gravel-sand transition is independent of total sediment flux and water discharge, where subsidence rates are comparable. Findings from our lithology-dependent abrasion model reveal that abrasion of gravel during fluvial transport can explain this observation; most of the gravel sourced from more than 100 km upstream is converted into sand by the time it reaches the Plain. Our results also suggest that over the length scale of large trans-Himalayan rivers, abrasion facilitates the downstream translation and dispersion of earthquake generated sediment. Increased sediment delivery to channels (e.g. following large earthquakes or storms) will only result in an additional pulse of gravel reaching the Plain if sediment delivery occurs within less than 100 km upstream of the mountain front or is sourced in highly resistant lithologies.

  19. Erosion of sand from a gravel bed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cleaning of fine sediment out of gravel stream beds has become an important method to restore impacted stream habitats. Introducing the increased flows needed to entrain fine sediments without eroding the coarser fractions of the bed and potentially destroying its usefulness as a habitat requires c...

  20. Grain Exchange Probabilities Within a Gravel Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J.

    2008-12-01

    Sediment transfers in gravel-bed rivers involve the vertical exchange of sediments during floods. These exchanges regulate the virtual velocity of sediment and bed material texture. This study describes general tendencies in the vertical exchange of gravels within the substrate that result from multiple floods. Empirical observations come from Carnation Creek, a small gravel-bed river with large woody debris located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Frequent floods and the relatively limited armor layer facilitate streambed activity and relatively high bedload transport rates, typically under partial sediment transport conditions. Over 2000 magnetically tagged stones, ranging in size from 16 to 180 mm, were deployed on the bed surface between 1991 and 1992. These tracers have been recovered 10 times over 12 flood seasons to quantify their vertical position in the streambed. For analysis, the bed is divided into layers based on armor layer thickness. Once tracers are well mixed within the streambed, grains in the surface layer are most likely to be mixed into the subsurface, while subsurface grains are most likely to persist within the subsurface. Fractional exchange probabilities approach size independence when the most active depth of the substrate is considered. Overall these results highlight vertical mixing as an important process in the dispersion of gravels.

  1. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Booth, D.B.; Burges, S.J.; Montgomery, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial patterns of bed material entrainment by floods were documented at seven gravel bars using arrays of metal washers (bed tags) placed in the streambed. The observed patterns were used to test a general stochastic model that bed material entrainment is a spatially independent, random process where the probability of entrainment is uniform over a gravel bar and a function of the peak dimensionless shear stress ??*0 of the flood. The fraction of tags missing from a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect to ??*0 with a mean value (50% of the tags entrained) of 0.085 and standard deviation of 0.022 (root-mean-square error of 0.09). Variation in partial entrainment for a given ??*0 demonstrated the effects of flow conditioning on bed strength, with lower values of partial entrainment after intermediate magnitude floods (0.065 < ??*0 < 0.08) than after higher magnitude floods. Although the probability of bed material entrainment was approximately uniform over a gravel bar during individual floods and independent from flood to flood, regions of preferential stability and instability emerged at some bars over the course of a wet season. Deviations from spatially uniform and independent bed material entrainment were most pronounced for reaches with varied flow and in consecutive floods with small to intermediate magnitudes.

  2. Methods of Erecting Supports in Mine Shafts,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    erecting permanent supports in mine shafts * which are sunk with the pre-freezing of the rock and where a concrete * casing is sunk parallel with the...carried out independent of the construction of a concrete casing * with a space left which is filled with sand or gravel. This provides for an...which is sunk a concrete casing and then tubbing is erected in an upward direction with a space left which is filled with sand or gravel. In the

  3. Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

    2003-11-12

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

  4. Fine bed material in pools of natural gravel bed channels

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Sue Hilton

    1999-01-01

    Abstract - Natural gravel bed channels commonly contain a fine mode of sand and fine gravel that fills voids of the bed framework of coarser gravel. If the supply of fine bed material exceeds the storage capacity of framework voids, excess fine material forms surficial patches, which can be voluminous in pools during low flow. Data collected in 34 natural channels in...

  5. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Arthur L.; Krawza, Kenneth I.

    1997-01-01

    In a hydraulically powered pump for excavating and transporting slurries in hich it is immersed, the improvement of a gravel and cobble eductor including an expandable mixing section, comprising: a primary flow conduit that terminates in a nozzle that creates a water jet internal to a tubular mixing section of the pump when water pressure is applied from a primary supply flow; a tubular mixing section having a center line in alignment with the nozzle that creates a water jet; a mixing section/exit diffuser column that envelopes the flexible liner; and a secondary inlet conduit that forms an opening at a bas portion of the column and adjacent to the nozzle and water jet to receive water saturated gravel as a secondary flow that mixes with the primary flow inside of the mixing section to form a combined total flow that exits the mixing section and decelerates in the exit diffuser.

  6. Mineral scale in gravel packed wells

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Soereide, F.

    1994-12-31

    Mineral scales of barium, strontium and calcium sulphate are well known to the oil industry. The most common scale is calcium carbonate. However carbonate, unlike the three other scales mentioned, is acid soluble and it is perhaps the sulphate scales which gives the greatest problems. One additional feature of the sulphate scales is that they very often coprecipitate radium sulphate which is radioactive and difficult to dispose of and troublesome to work with from a health and safety aspect. This paper presents the production history of gravel packed wells which have experienced the deposition and removal of mainly strontium sulphate (SrSO{sub 4}) scale. A scale prediction program is used to analyze the scale tendencies under both equilibrium and kinetic controlled conditions. The flow and scale characteristics of gravel packed and naturally completed wells are compared.

  7. Effect of gravel on hydraulic conductivity of compacted soil liners

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, T.L. ); Daniel, D.E. )

    1993-01-01

    How much gravel should be allowed in low-hydraulic-conductivity, compacted soil liners To address this question, two clayey soils are uniformly mixed with varying percentages of gravel that, by itself, has a hydraulic conductivity of 170 cm/s. Soil/gravel mixtures are compacted and then permeated. Hydraulic conductivity of the compacted gravel/soil mixtures is less than 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] cm/s for gravel contents as high as 50-60%. For gravel contents [le] 60%, gravel content is not important: all test specimens have a low hydraulic conductivity. For gravel contents > 50-60%, the clayey soils does not fill voids between gravel particles, and high hydraulic conductivity results. The water content of the nongravel fraction is found to be a useful indicator of proper moisture conditions during compaction. From these experiments in which molding water content and compactive energy are carefully controlled, and gravel is uniformly mixed with the soil, it is concluded that the maximum allowable gravel content is approximately 50%.

  8. Characterizing Unsaturated Diffusion in Porous Tuff Gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Kneafsey, T J; Roberts, J J; Tomutsa, L; Wang, J S

    2003-11-12

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (e.g., the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent of surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents are calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could significantly hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel.

  9. Improving the behavior of body roads by the use of gravel-slag mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadinane, Hocine; Oucief, Hocine; Merzoud, Mouloud

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of wastes industrial stemming of the iron and steel industry has influenced negatively the environment. The adopted policy had for mission to eliminate these undesirable wastes by recycling them by their utilization in adequate areas. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical behavior of a gravel-slag based on crystallized and granulated slag, activated by lime. One will be interested in the study of resistance to punching and the bearing ratio of this slag through Proctor tests, CBR and by compression, tensile tests, for use in the layers of pavement (Foundation and base layers). The obtained result on gravel-slag show considerable performances, compared with natural aggregates point of resistance and thickness of the layers. Its utilization in the road area has allowed therefore the recycling these industrial wastes, to decrease the pollution, to use a minimum noble product requiring important exploitation energy and an economy on layers of surface realized with costly materials (bituminous concrete).

  10. Method for reducing water production from a gravel packed well

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, L.E.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes a process for reducing water production from a well having a gravel containing gravel pack traversing a production zone, the gravel pack including a perforated tubing extending through the gravel pack, a screen over a perforate section of the tubing; isolating packers above and below the screen, and gravel packing between the screen and perforated casing adjacent- the production zone, the production zone including a lower water-producing interval and an upper hydrocarbon-producing interval. It comprises: placing a bridge plug within the perforate tubing at a position below the hydrocarbon-producing zone; placing a layer of coarse sand on the bridge plug, the coarse sand having an average particle sized greater than the average particle size of the gravel forming the gravel pack; placing a layer of fine sand over the layer of coarse sand, the fine sand having an average particle size smaller than the average particle size of the gravel forming the gravel pack and filling the tubing to a level at or above the top of the water-producing interval; placing a settable liquid resin through the tubing onto the top of the layer of fine sand, whereby the resin flows outwardly from the tubing to form a layer of resin extending from the tubing through the gravel; and allowing the resin to set, thereby forming a barrier to flow of water from the water-producing zone into the tubing.

  11. Riverbank erosion induced by gravel bar accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klösch, Mario; Habersack, Helmut

    2010-05-01

    Riverbank erosion is known to be strongly fluvially controlled and determination of shear stresses at the bank surface and at the bank toe is a crucial point in bank erosion modeling. In many modeling attempts hydraulics are simulated separately in a hydrodynamic-numerical model and the simulated shear stresses are further applied onto the bank surface in a bank erosion model. Hydrodynamics are usually simulated at a constant geometry. However, in some cases bed geometry may vary strongly during the event, changing the conditions for hydrodynamics along the bank. This research seeks to investigate the effect of gravel bar accretion during high discharges on final bank retreat. At a restored section of the Drava River bed widenings have been implemented to counter bed degradation. There, in an initiated side-arm, self-dynamic widening strongly affects bed development and long-term connectivity to the main channel. Understanding the riverbank erosion processes there would help to improve planning of future restoration measures. At one riverbank section in the side-arm large bank retreat was measured repeatedly after several flow events. This section is situated between two groins with a distance of 60 m, which act as lateral boundaries to the self-widening channel. In front of this bank section a gravel bar developed. During low flow condition most discharge of the side-arm flows beside the gravel bar along the bank, but shear stresses are too low for triggering bank erosion. For higher discharges results from a two-dimensional hydrodynamic-numerical model suggested shear stresses there to be generally low during the entire events. At some discharges the modeled flow velocities even showed to be recirculating along the bank. These results didn't explain the observed bank retreat. Based on the modeled shear stresses, bank erosion models would have greatly underestimated the bank retreat induced by the investigated events. Repeated surveys after events applying

  12. Subsurface Flow in Gravel River Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, E. N.; Dunne, T.

    2014-12-01

    The geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics of gravel bars control the direction, magnitude and spatial patterns of infiltration and exfiltration between rivers and their immediate subsurface environments. Bed undulation, water-surface gradient, alluvial depth, and the spatial variation of hydraulic conductivity (both deterministic trends and stochastic variability) affect the hydrologically-driven groundwater-surface water exchange. In this paper, we use a set of field measurements of morphological and hydrological characteristics along two reaches of the San Joaquin River, California to motivate a systematic analysis of the factors that affect paths and residence times of flow through gravel bars under an observed range of streamflow values. In the field investigation, it is shown that asymmetry of bar morphology is a first-order control on the extent and magnitude of infiltration, which is often represented to produce approximately equal areas of infiltration and seepage under the assumption of sinusoidal bedforms. Infiltration over the length of a bar is shown to be greater at low flow than at high flow because of the effect of water-surface gradient. Hydraulic conductivity (ksat) varies by orders of magnitude and systematic downstream coarsening arises related to the process of bar evolution. The lowest values of ksat were observed where the difference between the topographic gradient and the water-surface gradient is at a maximum and thus where the infiltration would be greatest into a uniform bar of homogeneous gravel. Morphology and fine sediment accumulation in recharge zones exert an important control over the mechanisms driving subsurface fluid exchange. Simulations from a numerical groundwater flow model that isolate the signatures of morphology and streambed sediment patterns on subsurface flow corroborate our interpretation that the infiltration patterns and rates are primarily controlled by bed morphology, with ksat playing a secondary role.

  13. Dual openhole gravel pack in shaly fine sands

    SciTech Connect

    Moricca, G.; Ripa, G.; Rucci, D.; Pitoni, E.

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and execution of dual-zone gravel packs in very shaly and silty formations of median sand grain size less than 30 {micro}m. An oversized gravel was selected for sand control and, as a consequence, the openhole gravel-pack technique was adopted to reduce the effect of intermixing between formation and gravel-pack sand. During the completions in the first five wells, the authors encountered and solved several operational problems, including those involving (1) borehole stability, (2) setting of inflatable packer for zone isolation, (3) hole preparation, and (4) gravel placement. From the lessons they learned, another 11 wells were completed with dual openhole gravel packs without significant problems. After 1 year of production, the flow performance from the wells met or exceeded the initial objectives.

  14. Erosion depth of sand from an immobile gravel bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnle, R.; Wren, D.; Langendoen, E.

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to improve prediction of the depth of erosion of sand (D50 = 0.3-0.9 mm) from immobile gravel (D50 = 36.1 mm) under steady uniform flows with bed shear stresses from 0.1 to 0.9 of that required to entrain the gravel. This situation, often encountered downstream of dams, has important implications for habitat restoration. Steady uniform flows were imposed on a flume channel containing a mixture of sand and gravel until sediment concentrations in the flow exiting the channel became small. The elevation of sand relative to gravel was measured after each experiment and compared poorly to calculated depths from published relationships whose predictions were based in part on the equivalent grain roughness of the bed. An improved predictive relationship was developed by using the cumulative distribution function of the surface gravel elevations to scale the shear velocity available for transporting sand from the gravel substrate.

  15. Effects of acids on gravels and proppants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, S.K.

    1988-05-01

    The effects of acids on the integrity of gravels and proppants should be considered in acid treatments. This paper reports on the influence of acid type, acid concentration, and contact duration on the acid solubility of five sands and bauxitic materials. The effects of the acids on the mechanical strength and the size distribution of the solids are determined. The authors found that intermediate-density and low-density bauxites (IDB and LDB) are very soluble in HF acid and that sintered bauxite is weakened by HF acid.

  16. Two-step method for horizontal gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, J.K.

    1991-10-22

    This patent describes a method for placing gravel within an annulus formed in a non-vertical borehole by the placement of a screen within the borehole. It comprises: injecting into the annulus a slurry of gravel and a medium viscosity carrier fluid to pack from 50% to 75% of the screen-borehole annulus; and injecting into the annulus a slurry of gravel and a low viscosity carrier fluid until the annulus is completely packed.

  17. Problems with Approximate Bearing Capacity of Gravel Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachý, Jan; Weiss, Viktorie; Bartuška, Ladislav

    2016-10-01

    The publication aims to bring undoubted importance approximate table bearing capacity of gravel soils, which are used in the new constructions. Tabulated values enable to determine the estimated bearing capacity of foundation soil for a simple and inexpensive construction to a depth of 1 meter. In the publication there are compares particular class of gravel soils in depending on the width of the base and ingredients of fine-grained soil. Gravelly soils are the best foundation soil in terms of bearing capacity, but the amount of fine-grained soils or poorly grained gravel, or gravel with a low value of relative density can greatly reduce this value.

  18. Quantifying the factors influencing gravel placement and productivity of an internally gravel packed completion based on field data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, R.W.F.; Jonathan, P.; Reijnen, P.H.F.; Samuel, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    A detailed analysis of 341 internally gravel-packed zones in wells from three oil fields was carried out to determine which parameters significantly influence the placement of the gravel in such a completion and the well`s resulting productivity. The database analysis demonstrates that, in addition to the well-known impairing factors, such as dirty completion fluids and viscous fluid-loss control pills, the performance of gravel packs can be improved by increasing the number of perforations--especially in 7 inch completions. This suggests that the perforation tunnel is the most critical area in an internally gravel-packed completion.

  19. Overwash threshold experiment for gravel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, Ana; Williams, Jon; Bradbury, Andrew; Masselink, Gerhard; Ferreira, Óscar

    2010-05-01

    Field measurements of overwash effects, associated physical forcing, and determination of threshold conditions, are much less common for gravel than for sandy barriers (e.g., field measurements by Lorang, 2002; Bradbury et al., 2005; and laboratory studies by Obhrai et al., 2008). In order to define overwash thresholds for gravel there is a need for measurements under a variety of forcing conditions that include waves, tides and surges. Flume experiments allow the manipulation of physical forcing and can make a valuable contribution to improve the understanding and prediction of overwash. To study gravel barrier overwash processes, BARDEX proto-type scale laboratory experiment was undertaken in the Delta flume (Williams et al., 2009). A 4 m high, 50 m wide gravel barrier composed of sediments with D50 = 10 mm was emplaced in the flume and subjected to a range of water levels, wave heights and wave periods. Barrier morphology was surveyed before and after each run. Two situations were simulated: overwashing and overtopping. Following Orford and Carter (1982) terminology, the distinction between overtopping and overwash was based on the type of morphological change over the barrier crest. Overtopping causes vertical accretion at the crest, whereas overwashing promotes the formation of washover deposits landwards from the crest. Ten overwash experiments were conducted (divided in 63 runs), and overtopping was recorded in 22 runs and overwash in 20 runs. In other runs, only the beach face was reworked by waves. In a systematic series of tests water levels were varied between 3.00 m and 3.75 m (in steps of 0.125 m); wave height was varied between 0.8 m and 1.3 m (in steps of 0.05 or 0.1 m); and wave periods of 4.5, 6, 7 and 8 seconds were used. These hydrodynamic conditions were used to compute wave run-up using several well-known formulae (cf., Powell, 1990; Stockdon et al., 2007). Comparison between run-up estimations and the barrier crest elevation prior to wave

  20. Experience in gravel packing long, perforated intervals in deviated holes

    SciTech Connect

    van Ballegooyen, J.; Giap, T.K.; Seng, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    This paper presents the philosophy, criteria, and technique used in arriving at the gravel-packing method for Sabah Shell Petroleum Co. Ltd.'s (SSPC's) operations. It also analyzes and discusses problems and efforts to resolve them with the aid of an evaluation tool. Intervals of up to 600 ft have been successfully gravel-packed by use of a highly viscous slurry technique with minor modifications. The CNL gives a qualitative indication of the gravel placement behind the liner. A reduction in either the gravel concentration or the volume of viscous pad ahead had no effect on reducing the incidence of bridging in the casing/WWS annulus. Large volumes of formation sand removed during perforation washing could not always be replaced with gravel. To ensure proper packoff, the wash volumes should be reduced. Stable gravel bridges will form against sand stringers of higher permeability in a 6 5/8-in./9 5/8-in. screen/casing annulus. Various parameters were changed to prevent this, but the only long-term solution appears to be the use of a smaller WWS. Gravel slumping does occur in hole angles up to 51/sup 0/ to fill voids created during placement. The importance of an adequate reservoir of gravel above the top perforation cannot be over emphasized.

  1. Erosion depth of sand from an immobile gravel bed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract This study was conducted to provide information on the depth of erosion of sand (D50 = 0.3, 0.9 mm) from immobile gravel (D50 = 36.1 mm) under steady uniform flows with bed shear stresses from 0.1 to 0.9 of that required to entrain the gravel. This situation, often encountered downstream o...

  2. Use of succinoglycan biopolymer for gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, G.P.; Gunningham, M.C.; Samuel, A.J. . E P Lab.); Lau, H.C.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory experiments and field trials on a polysaccharide biopolymer, succinoglycan, for use in gravel packing. This biopolymer causes minimal formation damage and has unique rheological properties that combine high shear-thinning behavior with temperature-induced viscosity breakback; thus, it can be used without breakers. A scouting study has been carried out at KSEPL to identify new viscosifiers with better rheological properties that cause minimal formation damage. Ideally, breakers should not be required and on-site polymer preparation procedures should be simple enough to give reliable, repeatable performances. For slurry-pack-type operations, the polysaccharide biopolymer succinoglycan was identified as the best candidate. The biopolymer was developed for EOR during 1980--83 at the Sittingbourne Research Centre, Shell Research Ltd., U.K., and is marketed by Shell Intl. Chemical Co. Ltd. as Shellflo-S.''

  3. Mapping sand and gravel pits in the Patuxent River watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, T. J.; Witt, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT data from July 1973 and June 1978 for the Patuxent River Watershed of Maryland were processed in an effort to devise an economical method of monitoring the reclamation of sand and gravel pits. ASTEP-II and IDIMS software were utilized to derive signatures for sand and gravel pits and other land use/land cover types. Both unsupervised and supervised classifications of the two data sets were produced. Resultant statistics and color output products were compared in order to determine the extent of reclamation and expansion of sand and gravel pits over the five-year time span and to check the locations of more recent sand and gravel pits. Preliminary results indicate that, for a selected northern sub-acre, signatures derived for sand and gravel pits were nearly 90 percent accurate.

  4. Mapping sand and gravel pits in the Patuxent River watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, T. J.; Witt, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT data from July 1973 and June 1978 for the Patuxent River Watershed of Maryland were processed in an effort to devise an economical method of monitoring the reclamation of sand and gravel pits. ASTEP-II and IDIMS software were utilized to derive signatures for sand and gravel pits and other land use/land cover types. Both unsupervised and supervised classifications of the two data sets were produced. Resultant statistics and color output products were compared in order to determine the extent of reclamation and expansion of sand and gravel pits over the five-year time span and to check the locations of more recent sand and gravel pits. Preliminary results indicate that, for a selected northern sub-acre, signatures derived for sand and gravel pits were nearly 90 percent accurate.

  5. Mapping gravel bed river bathymetry from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Overstreet, B. T.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding river form and behavior requires an efficient means of measuring channel morphology. This study evaluated the potential to map the bathymetry of two clear-flowing, shallow (<3 m deep) gravel bed rivers <60 m wide from 2 m-pixel WorldView2 satellite images. Direct measurements of water column optical properties were used to quantify constraints on depth retrieval. The smallest detectable change in depth was 0.01-0.04 m and the maximum detectable depth was 5 m in green bands but <2 m in the near-infrared; lower sensor radiometric resolution yields less precise estimates over a smaller range. An algorithm for calibrating a band ratioX to field measurements of depth d proved effective when applied to spectra extracted from images (R2 = 0.822 and 0.594 for the larger and smaller stream, respectively) or measured in the field (R2 = 0.769 and 0.452). This procedure also identified optimal wavelength combinations, but different bands were selected for each site. Accuracy assessment of bathymetric maps produced using various calibration approaches and image types indicated that: 1) a linear d vs. Xrelation provided depth estimates nearly as accurate as a quadratic formulation; 2) panchromatic and pan-sharpened multispectral images with smaller 0.5 m pixels did not yield more reliable depth estimates than the original images; and 3) depth retrieval was less reliable in pools due to saturation of the radiance signal. This investigation thus demonstrated the feasibility, as well as the limitations, of measuring the bathymetry of clear, shallow gravel bed rivers from space.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Wauconda Sand and Gravel, Wauconda, Illinois, September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-30

    The Wauconda Sand and Gravel Landfill site is located in Lake County, Illinois, approximately two miles north of the Village of Wauconda. The 74-acre site is comprised of a 43-acre unpermitted landfill, a nine-acre permitted landfill, nine acres excavated but unfilled, and 13 acres of perimeter site area. Before 1950, the site property was used as a sand and gravel pit. From 1950 until 1977, Wauconda Sand and Gravel Company operated the northern portion (43 acres unpermitted fill) of the site as a landfill. Landfill operations during this period consisted of dumping refuse into the mined-out gravel pit. The refuse deposited at the landfill consisted of residential garbage, construction debris, some industrial sludges and drums with undetermined contents. In 1980, a private well adjacent to the eastern boundary of the landfill was sampled by Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and inorganic, organic and PCB contamination was detected. Additional investigations concluded that PCBs, metals, and organics were contaminating the ground water and surface water (Mutton Creek).

  7. Gravel extraction and planform change in a wandering gravel-bed river: The River Wear, Northern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, Duncan; Warburton, Jeff; Bracken, Louise

    2008-02-01

    Within-channel alluvial gravel extraction is one of the most important forms of anthropogenically induced morphological change in river channels. In British rivers commercial gravel extraction was widespread between the 1930s and 1960s, and limited gravel extraction operations to reduce flood risk or maintain navigation continue to the present day. Despite this, gravel extraction has received little attention in UK river studies. This paper examines the significance of within-channel gravel extraction, during the period 1945-1960, on the planform of the River Wear in northern England. The study focuses on two 3 km piedmont reaches at Wolsingham and Harperley Park, located at the margin of the upland zone. Examination of detailed archival accounts of the gravel extraction operations, supplemented by the analysis of aerial photographs has enabled the impact of gravel extraction on the channel of the River Wear to be determined. Sediment budget calculations suggest large sediment deficits in both study reaches, however, assessing potential impacts simply in terms of a sediment deficit may be misleading as channel adjustments depend on local factors and a detailed consideration of the reach-scale sediment budget. Differences in the nature of channel adjustments of both reaches were found to be primarily a function of the method of gravel extraction employed. Overall patterns of channel change along the extraction reaches, over the past 150 years, were similar to reaches where gravel extraction was not practiced. This highlights the difficulty of trying to establish the significance of different processes where both local (gravel extraction) and catchment-scale factors (climate and land use) are operating.

  8. Wellbore pressure differential control for gravel pack screen

    SciTech Connect

    Cornette, H.M.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described for minimizing cross-flow of fluid in a wellbore in an earth formation and fitted with a gravel packing and an auger-type gravel pack screen, comprising the steps of: providing an auger-type gravel pack screen having a generally tubular liner member defining a space therewithin; providing a quantity of wellbore fluid loss control material comprising a graded particulate salt disposed in said space which will provide a substantially impermeable barrier to the flow of fluid out of said space through said liner into said gravel packing and said earth formation; filling at least a portion of said space with said material; installing said screen in said gravel packing; removing said material from said space after installation of said screen in said gravel packing by entraining said material in a carrier fluid while allowing at least some of said material to flow out of said space through said screen to form a filter cake on at least one of said gravel packing and said earth formation to minimize said cross-flow of fluid into said earth formation.

  9. New tool designs for high rate gravel pack operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Fracturing of the wellbore to improve hydrocarbon recovery has been a universally accepted practice in the oilfield. The fracturing procedures reduce skin by breaking through or bypassing near wellbore damage that inhibits production. In loosely consolidated formations, a propped fracture can reduce fluid velocity in the near wellbore region, which subsequently reduces fines migration that can plug the wellbore. Fracturing also provides highly conductive paths for gas and oil production. Gravel packing is another operation that is often needed during a well`s productive cycle. When a highly conductive fracture is created before a gravel packing operation is run, it has been found that well productivity increases. Performing the operations separately, however, diminishes the productivity gains because of formation damage that can occur between completion operations. A method of gravel packing that includes a tip-screenout-design fracturing procedure, performed with the gravel pack packer, screen, and blank in the hole, was proposed to allow the procedures to be performed simultaneously. This paper will describe the various types of gravel packing tools that are currently in use, their specific application, and a new series of gravel packing tools that was developed to resolve the difficulties that arose when the operations of fracturing and gravel packing were combined. Also discussed is the need that arose for tools that could sustain high flow rates in small casing diameters. Test results will be used to provide acceptable flow rates for different bore sizes.

  10. New tool designs for high rate gravel pack operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.M.

    1995-10-01

    A universally accepted practice in the oilfield has been fracturing of the wellbore to improve hydrocarbon recovery. Fracturing procedures reduce skin by breaking through or bypassing near wellbore damage that inhibits production. In loosely consolidated formations, a propped fracture can reduce fluid velocity in the near wellbore region, which subsequently reduces fines migration that can plug the wellbore. Fracturing also provides highly conductive paths for gas and oil production. Gravel packing is another operation that is often needed during a well`s productive cycle. When a highly-conductive fracture is created before a gravel packing operation is run, it has been found that well productivity increases. Performing the operations separately however, diminishes the productivity gains because of formation damage that can occur between completion operations. A method of gravel packing that includes a tip-screen-out-design fracturing procedure, performed with the gravel pack packer, screen, and blank in the hole, was proposed to allow the procedures to be performed simultaneously. This paper will describe the various types of gravel packing tools that are currently in use, their specific application, and a new series of gravel packing tools that was developed to resolve the difficulties that arose when the operations of fracturing and gravel packing were combined. Also discussed is the need that arose for tools that could sustain high flow rates in small casing diameters. Test results will be used to provide acceptable flow rates for different bore sizes.

  11. The Dispersion and Burial of Well-Mixed Gravels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last two decades, results from numerous tracing experiments have shed light on grain kinematics in gravel-bed channels, including the distance of grain displacement and the depth of vertical mixing. However, most of these studies report results for relatively short temporal and spatial scales, when the behavior of tagged gravels may not reflect the overall streambed dynamics. The purpose of this talk is to highlight the grain kinematics of well-mixed gravels. Field observations come from a tracing experiment operated for nearly 20 years in Carnation Creek, which is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. The small gravel-bed river with pool-riffle-bar morphology and large woody debris experiences an average of 15 ± 5 floods per year, which facilitates frequent streambed activity and relatively high bed material transport rates typically under partial sediment transport conditions. The magnetically tagged gravels, which range in size from 16 to 180 mm, have been recovered more than 10 times over the study period. Evaluation of the spatial distribution of tagged gravels over time documents the complex evolution of streamwise dispersion. Once tracers are well mixed vertically, the displacement of mobile gravels is only partly influenced by the tracer starting position in the bed morphology and its depth of burial before a given flooding period.

  12. Stream-power model of meander cutoff in gravel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannone, M.; De Vincenzo, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study we propose a one-dimensional model for the prediction of the large-time evolution of river meanders (pre-cutoff conditions) characterized by gravel bed and negligible suspended load. Due to its relatively simple structure, it may be a fast and easy tool to forecast the time evolution of a bend when the symptoms of an incipient instability suggest quantifying the time left for river exploitation as a naturalistic or a commercial resource and timely planning, if needed, the site management and restoration. Most of the previous research on meandering rivers focused on linearized theories that apply to very small bend amplitudes and very large radii of curvature. The dynamics of meander growth and cutoff was typically afforded by case-sensitive numerical simulations or by descriptive methods aimed at deriving purely empirical laws relating the hydraulics to some geomorphological parameters. The present approach combines the immediacy of a general analytical model with the accuracy of a fluid-mechanical background. The model focuses on energetic principles and interprets the mechanism of meander cutoff as the achievement of limit conditions in terms of river stream power. The corresponding analytical solution, which consists in a 1-D deterministic integro-differential equation governing the meander pre-cutoff phase, accounts for the influence of the morphological and sedimentological parameters by the downstream migration rate and the radius of the meander osculating circle. The results, expressed in terms of instable meander lifetime, are in good agreement with the data obtained from a number of field surveys documented in literature. Additionally, the proposed fluid-mechanical model allows identifying the physical mechanisms responsible for some peculiarities of large-time meander evolution like the decreasing skewness and asymmetry.

  13. Denitrification in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard L.; Duff, John H.

    1988-01-01

    Denitrification was assayed by the acetylene blockage technique in slurried core material obtained from a freshwater sand and gravel aquifer. The aquifer, which has been contaminated with treated sewage for more than 50 years, had a contaminant plume greater than 3.5-km long. Near the contaminant source, groundwater nitrate concentrations were greater than 1 mM, whereas 0.25 km downgradient the central portion of the contaminant plume was anoxic and contained no detectable nitrate. Samples were obtained along the longitudinal axis of the plume (0 to 0.25 km) at several depths from four sites. Denitrification was evident at in situ nitrate concentrations at all sites tested; rates ranged from 2.3 to 260 pmol of N2O produced (g of wet sediment)−1 h−1. Rates were highest nearest the contaminant source and decreased with increasing distance downgradient. Denitrification was the predominant nitrate-reducing activity; no evidence was found for nitrate reduction to ammonium at any site. Denitrifying activity was carbon limited and not nitrate limited, except when the ambient nitrate level was less than the detection limit, in which case, even when amended with high concentrations of glucose and nitrate, the capacity to denitrify on a short-term basis was lacking. These results demonstrate that denitrification can occur in groundwater systems and, thereby, serve as a mechanism for nitrate removal from groundwater. PMID:16347621

  14. Mercury and other metal(oid)s from mining activities in sediments from the Almadén district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ordiales, Efrén; Esbrí, José M.; Higueras, Pablo; Loredo, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    Almadén (South Central Spain) is worldwide famous because of mercury mining. But besides, the area has also been the site of other types of mining, in particular exploitation of Pb-Zn sulphides, with variable contents of other economic metals such as Ag, as well as others with high pollution potential such as As, Cd, Sb, etc. These exploitations were in activity in different historic periods, since Romans times to the 20th Century, and most of them were abandoned with no reclamation measures at all, acting as important sources of contamination in surrounding soils. In this work, we present a preliminary assessment of the affection of sediments for the streams of Almadén mine district, considering other potential pollutants in addition to mercury. Sampling was carried out during the period 2010-2013, and involved the collection of 65 samples of stream sediments in the main river of the district (Valdeazogues River) and main subsidiaries. Samples were air-dried, sieved to <2mm to discard gravel fraction, milled to <63μm and analysed in certified laboratory (ACME Labs Canada) by ICP-AES and ICP-MS after hot acid digestion. Results showed that sediments suffer a significant metal accumulation within the district, being specially concern at the areas close to mines. Most studied samples exceed the heavy metals and metalloids reference values for uncontaminated sites as well as those fitted to protect the aquatic life. Element by element, mercury contents are widely disperse in the district because of mining activities and it can be considered as the main pollutant of the district. Concentrations of other potentially harmful elements such as Pb, Zn and As show also important concentrations, which may be attributed to anthropogenic sources, specially to decommissioned mines. Comparing concentrations from the different surveyed areas, two different zones were identified: One located in the upper part of the district, where the intense mining activities related with four

  15. 15. VIEW OF GRAVEL PLANT, WEST SIDE OF RIVER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF GRAVEL PLANT, WEST SIDE OF RIVER AND DOWNSTREAM OF DAM SITE WITH EMPLOYEE HOUSING AT RIGHT. TRAMWAY BUCKETS ARE CLEARLY VISIBLE, November 1, 1927 - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  16. 29. photographer unknown 27 August 1935 GRAVEL AND SAND HOPPERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. photographer unknown 27 August 1935 GRAVEL AND SAND HOPPERS IN CONCRETE PLANT. - Bonneville Project, Columbia River, 1 mile Northeast of Exit 40, off Interstate 84, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  17. Advective-diffusive contaminant migration in unsaturated sand and gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, R.K.; Badv, K.

    1996-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating the diffusion coefficients for chloride and sodium in unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel based on parameters obtained from saturated diffusion tests conducted for similar material. The method is tested by comparing the observed and predicted diffusion profiles through unsaturated soil. The method is shown to work well for predicting the advective-diffusive migration of chloride and sodium through a two-layer soil system consisting of a compacted clayey silt underlain by an unsaturated fine gravel. Over the range of conditions examined, it is concluded that existing solute transport theory along with the proposed procedure for estimating the unsaturated diffusion coefficients can adequately predict chloride and sodium diffusion through both unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel as well as predict advective-diffusive transport through a compacted clayey layer and underlying unsaturated fine gravel.

  18. 6. VIEW OF BAMBOO GATE LEADING INTO WHITE GRAVEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BAMBOO GATE LEADING INTO WHITE GRAVEL AND ROCK CLUSTER GARDEN REMINISCENT OF RYOAN-JI TEMPLE GARDEN IN KYOTO - Kykuit, Japanese Gardens, 200 Lake Road, Pocantico Hills, Westchester County, NY

  19. Gravel addition as a habitat restoration technique for tailwaters

    Treesearch

    Ryan McManamay; D. Orth; Charles Dolloff; Mark Cantrell

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of passive gravel addition at forming catostomid spawning habitat under various flow regimes in the Cheoah River, a high-gradient tailwater river in North Carolina. The purpose was to provide a case study that included recommendations for future applications. A total of 76.3 m3 (162 tons) of washed gravel (10-50 mm) was passively dumped down...

  20. The resuscitation of the term Bryn Mawr gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bascom, Florence

    1925-01-01

    In the course of geologic and physiographic work in eastern Pennsylvania, it has seemed to the writer that the time was ripe for the restriction of the term Brandywine formation, now including presumably both Pliocene and Pleistocene gravels, and the reinstatement of the old term Bryn Mawr gravel for a portion of the divided Brandywine. A brief history of the nomenclature and usage involved will show the grounds for the choice of terms.

  1. Map showing potential sources of gravel and crushed-rock aggregate in the greater Denver area, Front Range urban corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, D.E.; Fitch, H.R.

    1974-01-01

    Gravel and (or) crushed-rock aggregates are essential commodities for urban development, but supplies in many places are exhausted or otherwise eliminated by urban growth. Gravel resources may be exhausted by exploitation, covered by urban spread, or eliminated from production by zoning. this conflict between a growing need and a progressively reduced supply can be forestalled by informed land-use planning. Fundamental to intelligent decisions on land use is knowledge of the physical character, distribution, and quantity of the gravel resources of an area, and of the alternative resource of rock suitable for crushing. This map has been prepared to supply data basic to land-use planning in the Front Range Urban Corridor.

  2. Techniques for assessing sand and gravel resources in glaciofluvial deposits; an example using the surficial geologic map of the Loudon Quadrangle, Merrimack and Belknap counties, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, David M.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Fowler, Brian K.; Goldsmith, Richard

    2002-01-01

    A method for estimating the sand and gravel resources in glaciofluvial systems has been developed based on surficial mapping techniques that use the morphosequence concept and geographic information systems (GIS). Two different strategies are used to estimate gravel resources. One strategy estimates the sand and gravel resources contained in esker deposits; the other, which is more dependent on GIS, estimates resources in non-esker deposits. An attempt has been made to determine which deposits are sterilized; that is, those beneath the water table, adjacent to streams or roads, or encroached on by urbanization. Preliminary estimates using these methods indicate that about 158,000,000 m3 (206,000,000 yd3) of sand and gravel are present in the Soucook River valley part of the Loudon, N.H., 7.5-minute quadrangle. About 64,500,000 m3 (84,400,000 yd3) of these materials are in deposits above the water table. About 26 percent of the sand and gravel resources above the water table are unlikely to be mined because they have been sterilized. Of the remaining resources, 479,000 m3 (627,000 yd3) of gravel and 1,120,000 m3 (1,460,000 yd3) of sand are in esker deposits, and 9,400,000 m3 (12,300,000 yd3) of gravel and 38,300,000 m3 (50,100,000 yd3) of sand are in stratified non-esker deposits. With the addition of new well data, newer and more accurate estimates are possible.

  3. Field experience in gravel packing the Dourado field, offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, F.C.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the completion operations in the Dourado field, with emphasis on four major gravel packing problems: (1) formation taking excessive gravel; (2) failure of the gravel pack screens; (3) severe well productivity decline and (4) an unusual production casing buckling. The problem occurred in a new area of the field where the main reservoir, the Calumbi sandstone, is largely intercalated with plastic, water sensitive shale streaks. Presumably, stresses developed during gravel packing set off the creepage tendency of these streaks, which might be intensified by hydration upon rock imbibition with water-based completion and gravel carrier fluids. The result was a continuous migration of shale into adjacent permeable layers, leaving behind progressive void space, which allows for the excessive pumping of gravel. As the well was flowed, check-valve effect naturally ensued as lumps of dispersed shales concentrates around the wellbore; hence the decline on well productivity. Another consequence of the shale behavior was a detrimental effect in the wellbore stability, which reflected in buckling of the casing in front of the perforated interval. Finally, the screen failure, a less conjectural problem, was attributed only to poor manufacturing quality.

  4. Effects of gravel mulch on emergency of galleta grass seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Medrano, J.C.; Stanley, C.; Walo, M.D.

    1993-02-01

    Gravel mulches show promise as effective material on the US Dept. of Energy Nevada Test Site for stabilizing erosive soils and aiding plant establishment by conserving soil water. A greenhouse study was implemented to determine the effects of gravel mulch on seedling emergence and soil water, and optimal depths of gravel for various native plant species. Greenhouse flats were sown with seeds of nine species of native grasses, forbs, and shrubs. The flats were then treated with a variety of mulch treatments including, no mulch, a 1-cm layer of soil over seeds, and 2 to 3-cm and 4 to 5-cm layers of 3 to 25-mm mixed gravel. Superimposed over these treatments were 3 irrigation treatments. Seedling density data was collected daily, and soil water was monitored daily with the gravimetric method. This study showed that under a variety of soil water conditions, a 2--3 cm gravel layer may aid emergence of galleta grass. Results from this study also demonstrated that a deeper layer of gravel (4--5 cm) prohibits emergence, probably because it acts as a physical barrier to the seedlings. Galleta grass emergence can be used as a model for how other species might respond to these seedbed and irrigation treatments, provided they have adequate germination and are exposed to similar environmental conditions.

  5. Modification of fluvial gravel size by spawning salmonids

    SciTech Connect

    Kondolf, G.M. ); Sale, M.J. ); Wolman, M.G. )

    1993-07-01

    Salmonids (salmon and trout) winnow fine sediment from streambed gravels during construction of the nest or [open quotes]redd[close quotes] used for spawning and incubation of fertilized eggs. The gravels and interstitial fine sediments excavated during this process are exposed to currents and differently transported: Gravels move a short distance, while the fine sediments are swept further downstream from the redd. To quantify the resultant modification of particle size distributions in redds, the authors sampled redds and adjacent undisturbed gravels to document changes in size distributions. These data were compiled with previously published observations to analyze the general nature of size modification during spawning. The final percentage finer than 1 mm in the gravels, P1[sub f], is related to the initial percentage finer than 1 mm, P1[sub i], by the equation P1[sub f] = 0.63 P1[sub i]. Hydraulic variables (water surface slope, mean column velocity, depth, shear stress, unit stream power) explained little of the variance and did not appear in the optimal models. Because fisheries biologists are called upon to evaluate gravels as potential spawning sites, these findings should prove useful in such evaluations. 44 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Laboratory measurements of gravel thermal properties. A methodology proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, Matteo; Peron, Fabio; Bison, Paolo; Dalla Santa, Giorgia; Bertermann, David; Muller, Johannes; Bernardi, Adriana; Galgaro, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Gravel thermal properties measurements at laboratory level is quite challenging due to several technical and logistic issues, mainly connected to the sediment sizes and the variability of their mineralogical composition. The direct measurement of gravel thermal properties usually are not able to involve a representative volume of geological material, consequently the thermal measurements performed produce much dispersed results and not consistent due to the large interstitial voids and the poor physical contact with the measuring sensors. With the aim of directly provide the measurement of the gravel thermal properties, a new methodology has been developed and some results are already available on several gravel deposits samples around Europe. Indeed, a single guarded hot plate Taurus Instruments TLP 800 measured the gravel thermal properties. Some instrumental adjustments were necessary to adapt the measuring devices and to finalize the thermal measurements on gravels at the IUAV FISTEC laboratory (Environmental Technical Physics Laboratory of Venice University). This device usually provides thermal measurements according to ISO 8302, ASTM C177, EN 1946-2, EN 12664, EN 12667 and EN 12939 for building materials. A preliminary calibration has been performed comparing the outcomes obtained with the single guarded hot plate with a needle probe of a portable thermal conductivity meter (ISOMET). Standard sand (ISO 67:2009) is used as reference material. This study is provided under the Cheap-GSHPs project that has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement no. 657982

  7. Changes to channel sediments resulting from complex human impacts in a gravel-bed river, Polish Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiejska, Joanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Mikuś, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    During the second half of the twentieth century, many sections of the Czarny Dunajec River, Polish Carpathians, were considerably modified by channelization as well as gravel-mining and the resultant channel incision (up to 3.5 m). This paper examines changes to the longitudinal pattern of grain size and sorting of bed material in an 18-km-long river reach. Surface bed-material grain size was established on 47 gravel bars and compared with a reference downstream fining trend of bar sediments derived from the sites with average river width and a vertically stable channel. Contrary to expectations, the extraction of cobbles from the channel bed in the upper part of the study reach, conducted in the past decades, has resulted in the marked coarsening of bed material in this river section. The extraction facilitated entrainment of exposed finer grains and has led to rapid bed degradation, whereas the concentration of flood flows in the increasingly deep and narrow channel has increased their competence and enabled a delivery of the coarse particles previously typical of the upstream reach. The middle section of the study reach, channelized to prevent sediment delivery to a downstream reservoir, now transfers the bed material flushed out from the incising upstream section. With considerably increased transport capacity of the river and with sediment delivery from bank erosion eliminated by bank reinforcements, bar sediments in the channelized section are typified by increased size of the finer fraction and better-than-average sorting. In the wide, multi-thread channel in the lower part of the reach, low unit stream power and high channel-form roughness facilitate sediment deposition and are reflected in relatively fine grades of bar gravels. The study showed that selective extraction of larger particles from the channel bed leads to channel incision at and upstream of the mining site. However, unlike bulk gravel mining, selective extraction does not result in sediment

  8. The sand-deposition impact of artificial gravel beds on the protection of the Mogao Grottoes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo Shuai; Qu, Jian Jun; Li, Xu Zhi; Wang, Wan Fu

    2014-03-11

    Gravel beds can prevent sand-dust emission and weaken sand-dust flux. We used wind-tunnel experiments and field observations on artificial gravel beds above the Mogao Grottoes to quantify their impact. In the report, we identified a significant correlation between gravel roughness and its ability to trap wind-transported sand. The optimal combinations of gravel diameter and coverage were determined. The greatest roughness is achieved when small gravel coverage is 75%, medium 40% and large 45%. We found that initial wind speed and gravel coverage are the key factors controlling the amount of sand trapped by the gravel beds.

  9. The sand-deposition impact of artificial gravel beds on the protection of the Mogao Grottoes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo Shuai; Qu, Jian Jun; Li, Xu Zhi; Wang, Wan Fu

    2014-01-01

    Gravel beds can prevent sand-dust emission and weaken sand-dust flux. We used wind-tunnel experiments and field observations on artificial gravel beds above the Mogao Grottoes to quantify their impact. In the report, we identified a significant correlation between gravel roughness and its ability to trap wind-transported sand. The optimal combinations of gravel diameter and coverage were determined. The greatest roughness is achieved when small gravel coverage is 75%, medium 40% and large 45%. We found that initial wind speed and gravel coverage are the key factors controlling the amount of sand trapped by the gravel beds. PMID:24614183

  10. Gravel pit lake ecosystems reduce nitrate and phosphate concentrations in the outflowing groundwater.

    PubMed

    Weilhartner, Andreas; Muellegger, Christian; Kainz, Martin; Mathieu, Francine; Hofmann, Thilo; Battin, Tom J

    2012-03-15

    Gravel excavation often bears conflicts with the use of drinking water as under-water-table mining can directly impact groundwater quality downstream of the open gravel pit lake due to exposure of the groundwater aquifer to the atmosphere and to human activities. To assess this potential impact of GPLs on groundwater, we assessed the mass balance for nitrate (NO(3)) and phosphate (PO(4)) and whole-ecosystem metabolism of five post-excavation GPLs in Austria. GPLs differed in both age and residence time of lake water. We found that GPLs significantly reduced the concentration of NO(3) and PO(4) as groundwater passes through the lake ecosystem, which in most cases acted as a net sink for these nutrients. Groundwater-derived nutrients enhanced both epilithic and pelagic net primary production in the GPLs, which ultimately leads to biomass accrual. Our data also suggest that this biomass accrual may induce, at least in part, clogging of the GPLs and their successive hydrodynamic isolation from the adjacent groundwater. Despite continuous biomass build-up and elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the lake water compared to the inflowing groundwater, DOC export into the outflowing groundwater remained low. Our data suggest that GPLs could contribute to groundwater amelioration where agricultural land use increases nutrient concentrations in the groundwater given a proper management of these man-made ecosystems.

  11. Can high resolution 3D topographic surveys provide reliable grain size estimates in gravel bed rivers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, E.; Smith, M. W.; Klaar, M. J.; Brown, L. E.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution topographic surveys such as those provided by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) contain a wealth of information that is not always exploited in the generation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In particular, several authors have related sub-metre scale topographic variability (or 'surface roughness') to sediment grain size by deriving empirical relationships between the two. In fluvial applications, such relationships permit rapid analysis of the spatial distribution of grain size over entire river reaches, providing improved data to drive three-dimensional hydraulic models, allowing rapid geomorphic monitoring of sub-reach river restoration projects, and enabling more robust characterisation of riverbed habitats. However, comparison of previously published roughness-grain-size relationships shows substantial variability between field sites. Using a combination of over 300 laboratory and field-based SfM surveys, we demonstrate the influence of inherent survey error, irregularity of natural gravels, particle shape, grain packing structure, sorting, and form roughness on roughness-grain-size relationships. Roughness analysis from SfM datasets can accurately predict the diameter of smooth hemispheres, though natural, irregular gravels result in a higher roughness value for a given diameter and different grain shapes yield different relationships. A suite of empirical relationships is presented as a decision tree which improves predictions of grain size. By accounting for differences in patch facies, large improvements in D50 prediction are possible. SfM is capable of providing accurate grain size estimates, although further refinement is needed for poorly sorted gravel patches, for which c-axis percentiles are better predicted than b-axis percentiles.

  12. Beaver Dam Effects on Gravel Transport Patterns - a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Swingle, K. W.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Beaver dams are numerous in mountain streams, but little is known about gravel transport in those streams. The dams may be fully functioning and retain all incoming sediment or partially permeable to sediment or be almost completely removed. Beaver dams in their various states of preservation can have a profound influence on stream morphology and bedload transport. During the spring of 2011, the authors made a time series study of bedload transport in a mountain stream dominated by beavers dams. Dams occurred with a frequency of one every 50 feet and showed a range of decay and fluvial influence. Gravel transport was sampled with bedload traps over a 2-month long snowmelt highflow season. The reach-average gradient was 0.03 and stream widths ranged from 3 to 8 m. The stream bed was incised 0.5 to 1.5 m deep into a floodplain and typically trapezoidal in its cross-sectional shape. Much of the floodplain consisted of filled-in beaver dams. Partially breached dams that were permeable to gravel transport acted as an obstacle, forcing the flow around sharp bends. Complex hydraulic conditions developed in the vicinity of the bends with backwater eddies upstream and downstream of the remnant dam. Wake eddies at the downstream side of dam remnants caused gravel deposits. The tortuous channel course around the bends caused strong secondary currents that forced gravel transport into a narrow pathway along one of the banks causing a strong lateral concentration of transport. The pathway had a bed of fine and medium gravel, while the remainder of the bed consisted mostly of coarse gravel and cobbles that became immobile shortly after peak flows. Tracer experiments indicated that most of the mobile gravel traveled along that bankward path, even though flow velocities and depths were considerably smaller than in the stream center. Over the highflow season, flows increased to about 160% of the 1.5 year recurrence interval (Q1.5) within about a week and then remained within the

  13. A balefill facility in a sand/gravel quarry and a question of wetland jurisdiction

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.

    1998-12-31

    The Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County (SWANCC), a municipal corporation of 26 city members, proposed to construct and operate a baled waste landfill facility as part of a comprehensive solid waste management and disposal program which included recycling. After a lengthy site selection process, SWANCC informed the US Army Corps of Engineers Chicago District of its intentions to convert a 298-acre sand/gravel pit to construct a state-of-the-art sanitary balefill facility. After twice determining it did not have jurisdiction, the Corps informed SWANCC that Waters of the United States, as defined in 33 CFR part 328.3(a), were present on the property. The Corps in its 404 permit review denied the permit because the mined landscape represented significant natural character and supported valuable wetland aquatic ecosystem. This paper presents the details of this project, the mined landscape`s environmental conditions based upon a multidisciplinary team site investigations of soils, hydrology, vegetation, wildlife, and wetland functions, and the extraordinary Corps decision that has sent this case to the federal district courts. This court case outcome may profoundly affect future mining and rehabilitation activities.

  14. Innovative approach to modeling accident response of Gravel Gerties

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M.; McClure, P.; Sullivan, H.

    1997-08-01

    Recent safety analyses at nuclear explosive facilities have renewed interest in the accident phenomenology associated with explosions in nuclear explosive cells, which are commonly referred to as {open_quotes}Gravel Gerties.{close_quotes} The cells are used for the assembly and disassembly of nuclear explosives and are located in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at the Pantex facility. The cells are designed to mitigate the release of special nuclear material to the environment in the event of a detonation of high explosive within the Gravel Gertie. Although there are some subtle differences between the cells of DAF and Pantex, their general design, geometry, and configuration are similar. The cells consist of a round room approximately 10.4 m in diameter and 5.2 m high enclosed by 0.3-m-thick concrete. Each cell has a wire-rope cantenary roof overlain with gravel. The gravel is approximately 6.9 m deep at the center of the roof and decreases toward the outer edge of the cell. The cell is connected to a corridor and subsequent rooms through an interlocking blast door. In the event of a accidental explosion involving significant amounts of high explosive, the roof structure is lifted by the force of the explosion, the supporting cables break, the gravel is lifted by the blast (resulting in rapid venting of the cell), and the gravel roof collapses, filling the cell. The lifting and subsequent collapse of the gravel, which acts much like a piston, is very challenging to model.

  15. Gravel Particles Entrainment and Deposition under Unsteady Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franca, M. J.; Altinakar, M. S.; Hassan, M. A.; Qu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial patterns of particle entrainment and deposition under unsteady flow regime were examined using coloured particles. The impact of three different basic hydrograph shapes (triangular, rising and falling) on the bedload rate of a gravel-bedded channel is experimentally analysed. The experiments were performed in a 16.8 m long glassed-walls tilting flume, with a 60 cm wide and 80 cm deep rectangular section, at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. A mobile 10 cm deep layer reach was made in the bed channel from x = 4.9 m to x = 14.1 m with a relatively uniform gravel of size 3 to 8 mm. A sediment trap is located immediately downstream the movable bed reach and no sediment feeding were imposed upstream. Eight 0.70 m long stripes of coloured sediments were laid over the natural gravel starting immediately upstream of the sediment trap. The thickness of the coloured gravel layer was about 3 to 4 cm (approximately 5 to 7 times D50). The total length of the reach covered with the coloured sediments was 5.6 m. After the experiments, approximately the top 2 cm of the gravel bed was sampled by strips of 0.175 m in the longitudinal direction, over the entire reach covered with sediments. These samples were then separated into gravels of different colours, and the dry weight of the sediments of each sample was measured. In addition, the gravel accumulated in the sediment trap was also separated into different colour groups, weighed separately. From the combined evaluation of the sediments trapped downstream and the sediments sampled throughout the channel, spatial patterns of entrainment and deposition rates are inferred. With this, back calculation of the depth of the active layer is performed and Wilcok's formulations on tracer dispersion and estimation of sediment transport is tested and discussed.

  16. Dispersion Rates of Gravel Sizes in a Natural Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Sediment transfers in gravel-bed rivers involve the three-dimensional dispersion of mixed size sediment. Few studies are available to inform on the streamwise rate of gravel dispersion in natural channels, especially over a longer time scale. This research uses a gravel tracing program to quantify both the mean and maximum rates of different size fractions over 17 flood seasons. Empirical observations were collected in Carnation Creek, a small gravel-bed river with large woody debris located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. An average of 15 ± 5 floods per year facilitates frequent streambed activity and relatively high bed material transport rates, typically under partial sediment transport conditions. About 2000 magnetically tagged stones, ranging in size from 16 to 180 mm, were deployed on the bed surface between 1991 and 1992. Streamwise dispersion rates were quantified for the eight size fractions as virtual velocities based on 11 tracer recoveries completed between 1991 and 2008. Maximum velocities were calculated using the 10 largest values for each fraction. During the study period 258 floods capable of moving bedload occurred, with two exceeding the estimated bankfull discharge. The hydrological forcing driving the dispersion process was quantified by expended flow energy. Fractional virtual velocities as a function of flow energy are fairly well described by power functions. In absolute terms, finer gravels have higher rates of dispersion than coarser gravels as expected. A slowdown in mean velocities over time occurs more quickly with finer gravels; function exponents range from -0.2 to -0.5. Maximum velocities adjusted more quickly than mean values, with function exponents spanning from -0.4 to -0.8. These grain size differences contribute to the streamwise sorting of bed material.

  17. Recolonization of gravel habitats on Georges Bank (northwest Atlantic)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collie, J.S.; Hermsen, J.M.; Valentine, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    Gravel habitats on continental shelves around the world support productive fisheries but are also vulnerable to disturbance from bottom fishing. We conducted a 2-year in situ experiment to measure the rate of colonization of a gravel habitat on northern Georges Bank in an area closed to fishing (Closed Area II) since December 1994. Three large (0.25 m2) sediment trays containing defaunated pebble gravel were deployed at a study site (47 m water depth) in July 1997 and recovered in June 1999. The undersides of the tray lids positioned 56 cm above the trays served as settlement panels over the same time period. We observed rapid colonization of the gravel substrate (56 species) and the settlement panels (35 species), indicating that colonization of gravel in this region is not limited by the supply of colonists. The species composition of the taxa found in the trays was broadly similar to that we collected over a 10-year period (1994-2004) in dredge samples from gravel sediments at the same site. The increase in abundance of animals in the gravel colonization trays was rapid and reached a level in 2 years that took 4.5 years to achieve in the surrounding gravel sediments once fishing had stopped, based on data from dredge sampling at this site. The increase in biomass of animals found in the sediment trays paralleled the trend of biomass increase observed in dredge samples over the same period (1997-1999) but was lower in value. These data suggest that after rapid initial increase in abundance of organisms, succession proceeded by increasing individual body size. A comparison of settlement panel and tray faunas revealed that the mean biomass of structure-forming epifauna (sponges, bryozoans, anemones, hydroids, colonial tube worms) on the panels was 8 times that found on the trays. Structure-forming taxa constituted 29% of the mean biomass of the panel fauna but only 5.5% of the tray fauna. By contrast, the mean biomass of scavengers (crabs, echinoderms, nudibranchs

  18. Quantifying Upper Particle-size Limits of Salmonid Spawning Gravel: Analysis of Fall-run Chinook Salmon of the Sacramento River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, J. K.; Riebe, C. S.; Ligon, F. K.

    2008-12-01

    Reversing the decline of historically prolific runs of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) remains a high priority of river restoration along the US Pacific Coast. One routinely implemented strategy is gravel injection, to supplement spawning habitat which has been depleted by gravel mining and bed coarsening below dams. Gravel augmentation is generally designed around a qualitatively assessed "preferred" median particle size. Implementation sites are not always ecologically ideal, because there often is little quantitative basis for determining where added gravel would be most suitable. Although gravel augmentation may increase spawning habitat, a more mechanistic design basis could reduce costs, improve efficiency, and make results more predictable. One key to developing better designs is a better method for characterizing existing spawning gravel deposits. Here we propose a series of mechanistically oriented hypotheses about the spawning suitability of natural gravels. One hypothesis is that there is an upper size limit on particles that can be moved by salmon. We expect that this limit depends on salmon size, water velocity and the size (and embeddedness) of surrounding rocks. Another hypothesis is that spawning success is related to percent coverage by immovable particles. A corollary hypothesis is that redds become irregular (and less productive) as percent coverage by immovable particles increases. Another related hypothesis is that redd-building success should approach zero at an upper threshold of coverage by immovable particles. We explored our hypotheses for fall-run Chinook in the Sacramento River. We collected grain size data, constructed facies maps of the bed, and delineated boundaries of spawning use at the peak of spawning, prior to the run's recent population decline. Our observations suggest that particles with intermediate axes diameters bigger than about 130 mm are not generally movable by fall run Chinook. Moreover we observed no

  19. Flow Characteristics over a Gravel Bedform: Kaj River Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddahi, Mohammad Reza; Afzalimehr, Hossein; Rowinski, Paweł M.

    2016-10-01

    The present study deals with the turbulence structure in order to better understand the interaction of bedform and flow characteristics in a gravel-bed river. Data measured above a bedform is used to analyze the importance of coherent structures in turbulent transfer. The Reynolds stress and turbulence intensity in stream-wise direction illustrate significant difference along the bedform, showing a three-layer distribution at the crest and a convex one at the downstream of bedform. Quadrant analysis technique is used to picture momentum exchange above the considered bedform and to find the dominant event in bursting process of the gravel bedform. Quadrant analysis demonstrates that the mechanisms of bedforms generation in sand and gravel-bed rivers are similar and sweep is the dominant event in both rivers.

  20. Liquid filtration properties in gravel foundation of railroad tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelkov, A.; Teplykh, S.; Bukhman, N.

    2016-08-01

    Railway bed gravel foundation has a constant permanent impact on urban ecology and ground surface. It is only natural that larger objects, such as railway stations, make broader impact. Surface run-off waters polluted by harmful substances existing in railroad track body (ballast section) flow along railroad tracks and within macadam, go down into subterranean ground flow and then enter neighbouring rivers and water basins. This paper presents analytic calculations and characteristics of surface run-off liquid filtration which flows through gravel multiple layers (railroad track ballast section). The authors analyse liquids with various density and viscosity flowing in multi-layer porous medium. The paper also describes liquid stationary and non-stationary weepage into gravel foundation of railroad tracks.

  1. Exploitability Assessment with TEASER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    executable xor writable, or that executable images cannot have write permissions over the course of the program’s execution. DWARF Debugging With...feature a Proof of Concept (POC), or input to a program demonstrating the ability to use a bug to exploit the application. For example, a recent write -up...TEASER Exploit Development Workflow Tainted Malloc Reads, Tainted Function Arguments, Tainted Pointer Reads/ Writes , Tainted Data Reads Tainted

  2. Remote identification of a gravel laden Pleistocene river bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholen, Douglas E.

    1993-01-01

    The abundance of gravel deposits is well known in certain areas across the Gulf of Mexico coastal plain, including lands within several National Forests. These Pleistocene gravels were deposited following periods of glacial buildup when ocean levels were down and the main river channels had cut deep gorges, leaving the subsidiary streams with increased gradients to reach the main channels. During the warm interglacial periods that followed each glaciation, melting ice brought heavy rainfall and torrents of runoff carrying huge sediment loads that separated into gravel banks below these steeper reaches where abraiding streams, developed. As the oceans rose again, filling in the main channels, these abraiding areas were gradually flattened and covered over by progressively finer material. Older terraces were uplifted by tectonic movements associated with the Gulf Coastal Plain, and the subsequent erosional processes gradually brought the gravels closer to the surface. The study area is located on the Kisatchie National Forest, in central Louisiana, near Alexandria. Details of the full study have been discussed elsewhere. The nearest source of chert is in the Ouachita Mountains located to the northeast. The Ouachita River flows south, out of these mountains, and in Pleistocene times probably carried these chert gravels into the vicinity of the present day Little River Basin which lies along the eastern boundary of the National Forest. Current day drainages cross the National Forest from west to east, emptying into the Little River on the east side. However, a north-south oriented ridge of hills along the west side of the Forest appears to be a recent uplift associated with the hinge line of the Mississippi River depositional basin further to the east, and 800,000 years ago, when these gravels were first deposited during the Williana interglacial period, the streams probably flowed east to west, from the Little River basin to the Red River basin on the west side of the

  3. On the dynamics of shallow gravel bed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajeri, Seyed Hossein; Righetti, Maurizio; Wharton, Geraldene; Gurnell, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Flow dynamics on a gravel bed is a popular research subject because of environmental implications and especially in the presence of sediment transport. However, some features of flow dynamics on gravel beds are not completely understood and many questions remain open, especially in the context of the turbulence structure of the flow field and sediment transport. Due to the low submergence characteristics of the flow, the dynamics of the turbulent flow field, especially at the bed region, cannot be regarded as a classical boundary roughness problem, sensu Nikuradse (Nezu and Nakagawa, 1993) due to the strong spatial and temporal variation of the flow field. Over the past decade, in order to properly take into account the spatial heterogeneity, spatial averaging of time averaged values have become common. Besides,recently a trend to understand the role of gravel bed statistical properties, such as structure function of the bed elevation, on the statistics of the near-bed flow has been proposed. Although much research considers gravel beds by spatial averaging and research has been conducted on the effects of bed characteristics on near bed flow and sediment transport, only a few studies consider both together. In the present study, the results of 2D PIV measurement coupled with high accurate measurement of the gravel bed characteristics and the turbulence properties of the low submergence gravel bed flow as related to the bed properties are presented. The double averaging method was used in the analysis. Furthermore, in order to have a better insight into the dynamics of transport processes at the bed, a simple quadrant analysis, based on the Lu and Willmarth method, was implemented (Lu and Willmarth, 1973). Finally, the turbulent integral length scale was calculated both near and far from the gravel bed. The time and double averaged results show an agreement with the previous studies. Moreover, the result of quadrant analysis shows the sweep is dominant between

  4. Energy for lunar resource exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1992-02-01

    Humanity stands at the threshold of exploiting the known lunar resources that have opened up with the access to space. America's role in the future exploitation of space, and specifically of lunar resources, may well determine the level of achievement in technology development and global economic competition. Space activities during the coming decades will significantly influence the events on Earth. The 'shifting of history's tectonic plates' is a process that will be hastened by the increasingly insistent demands for higher living standards of the exponentially growing global population. Key to the achievement of a peaceful world in the 21st century, will be the development of a mix of energy resources at a societally acceptable and affordable cost within a realistic planning horizon. This must be the theme for the globally applicable energy sources that are compatible with the Earth's ecology. It is in this context that lunar resources development should be a primary goal for science missions to the Moon, and for establishing an expanding human presence. The economic viability and commercial business potential of mining, extracting, manufacturing, and transporting lunar resource based materials to Earth, Earth orbits, and to undertake macroengineering projects on the Moon remains to be demonstrated. These extensive activities will be supportive of the realization of the potential of space energy sources for use on Earth. These may include generating electricity for use on Earth based on beaming power from Earth orbits and from the Moon to the Earth, and for the production of helium 3 as a fuel for advanced fusion reactors.

  5. Energy for lunar resource exploitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Humanity stands at the threshold of exploiting the known lunar resources that have opened up with the access to space. America's role in the future exploitation of space, and specifically of lunar resources, may well determine the level of achievement in technology development and global economic competition. Space activities during the coming decades will significantly influence the events on Earth. The 'shifting of history's tectonic plates' is a process that will be hastened by the increasingly insistent demands for higher living standards of the exponentially growing global population. Key to the achievement of a peaceful world in the 21st century, will be the development of a mix of energy resources at a societally acceptable and affordable cost within a realistic planning horizon. This must be the theme for the globally applicable energy sources that are compatible with the Earth's ecology. It is in this context that lunar resources development should be a primary goal for science missions to the Moon, and for establishing an expanding human presence. The economic viability and commercial business potential of mining, extracting, manufacturing, and transporting lunar resource based materials to Earth, Earth orbits, and to undertake macroengineering projects on the Moon remains to be demonstrated. These extensive activities will be supportive of the realization of the potential of space energy sources for use on Earth. These may include generating electricity for use on Earth based on beaming power from Earth orbits and from the Moon to the Earth, and for the production of helium 3 as a fuel for advanced fusion reactors.

  6. The Exploitation of Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Shirley; Montagne, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drug users have been exploited in research studies and clinical practice. We explore ways in which exploitation has occurred and strategies to help patients, research subjects and communities to prevent or avoid exploitation.

  7. Fine sediment erosion rate in immobile gravel bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarekegn, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of fine sediment transport in immobile gravel bed is a complex process and is a common phenomenon downstream of dams during dam removal and flushing operations. Despite many developments in the field, the direct measurement of fine sediment erosion (entrainment) rates in immobile coarse beds remains challenging. We developed a new approach for measurement of fine sediment erosion rate in coarse immobile bed in laboratory experiment. The method uses single laser line, a video camera and a reflective mirror. It allows a non-intrusive, fast and accurate measurement of fine sediment erosion rate in running water and non-equilibrium transport conditions. The measurement method was conducted for flow depth that ranges from 3.0 cm to 8.0 cm. We present procedures developed to extract laser lines from series of images captured at high temporal resolution and to estimate rapid evolution of fine sediment erosion depth within the roughness layer of the immobile gravel bed. With the use of a reflective mirror the depth of erosion can be measured with sub-millimeter (350μm) resolution. The results of the measurements are used to describe vertical profile of fine sediment erosion rate in the gravel roughness layer and its spatial heterogeneity. The spatial pattern of erosion rates shows good agreement with gravel bed turbulent flow structures.

  8. An improved tri-tube cryogenic gravel sampler.

    Treesearch

    Fred H. Everest; Carl E. McLemore; John F. Ward

    1980-01-01

    The tri-tube cryogenic gravel sampler has been improved, and accessories have been developed that increase its reliability and safety of operation, reduce core extraction time, and allow accurate partitioning of cores into subsamples. The improved tri-tube sampler is one of the most versatile and efficient substrate sampling tools yet developed.

  9. New method for measuring water seepage through salmon spawning gravel.

    Treesearch

    Richard D. Orchard

    1988-01-01

    A new method, with heat as a tracer, was developed for measuring rate and direction of intragravel waterflow through salmon spawning gravel. A commercial flowmeter was calibrated in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. Flow measurements comparing the flowmeter with a dye-tracer method were made in an artificial stream channel at Young Bay and in...

  10. Gravel pit ponds as habitat enhancement for juvenile coho salmon.

    Treesearch

    M.D. Bryant

    1988-01-01

    Gravel pits built during road construction in the early 1970's near Yakutat, Alaska, filled with water and were connected to nearby rivers to allow juvenile salmonids to enter. Seasonal changes in population size, length and weight, and length frequencies of the coho salmon population were evaluated over a 2-year period. Numbers of coho salmon fluctuated, but two...

  11. Steam injection well gravel pack material of sintered bauxite

    SciTech Connect

    Elson, T. D.; Millhone, R. S.

    1985-08-27

    A packing material useful in a gravel pack for open or cased wells or in a prepack for use in steam or hot fluid injection and production wells. The packing material is a material which is insoluble in high temperature caustic fluids and subsurface formation fluids. Sintered bauxite is a claimed material.

  12. Steam injection well gravel prepack material of sintered bauxite

    SciTech Connect

    Elson, T. D.; Millhone, R. S.

    1985-10-22

    A packing material useful in a gravel pack for open or cased wells or in a prepack for use in steam or hot fluid injection and production wells. The packing material is a material which is insoluble in high temperature caustic fluids and subsurface formation fluids. Sintered bauxite is a claimed material.

  13. Evaluation of steam resistance of gravel-packing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.D.; Knox, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper compares the steam stability of common gravel-packing materials. The scope was limited to one set of downhole conditions. Results indicated that none of the commonly used materials were entirely satisfactory, but another material not normally used in the petroleum industry was found to give excellent results.

  14. Bed load transport in gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey J. Barry

    2007-01-01

    Bed load transport is a fundamental physical process in alluvial rivers, building and maintaining a channel geometry that reflects both the quantity and timing of water and the volume and caliber of sediment delivered from the watershed. A variety of formulae have been developed to predict bed load transport in gravel-bed rivers, but testing of the equations in natural...

  15. Lunar vertical-shaft mining system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Introne, Steven D. (Editor); Krause, Roy; Williams, Erik; Baskette, Keith; Martich, Frederick; Weaver, Brad; Meve, Jeff; Alexander, Kyle; Dailey, Ron; White, Matt

    1994-01-01

    This report proposes a method that will allow lunar vertical-shaft mining. Lunar mining allows the exploitation of mineral resources imbedded within the surface. The proposed lunar vertical-shaft mining system is comprised of five subsystems: structure, materials handling, drilling, mining, and planning. The structure provides support for the exploration and mining equipment in the lunar environment. The materials handling subsystem moves mined material outside the structure and mining and drilling equipment inside the structure. The drilling process bores into the surface for the purpose of collecting soil samples, inserting transducer probes, or locating ore deposits. Once the ore deposits are discovered and pinpointed, mining operations bring the ore to the surface. The final subsystem is planning, which involves the construction of the mining structure.

  16. Vortex model of open channel flows with gravel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Brian James

    Turbulent structures are known to be important physical processes in gravel-bed rivers. A number of limitations exist that prohibit the advancement and prediction of turbulence structures for optimization of civil infrastructure, biological habitats and sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers. This includes measurement limitations that prohibit characterization of size and strength of turbulent structures in the riverine environment for different case studies as well as traditional numerical modeling limitations that prohibit modeling and prediction of turbulent structure for heterogeneous beds under high Reynolds number flows using the Navier-Stokes equations. While these limitations exist, researchers have developed various theories for the structure of turbulence in boundary layer flows including large eddies in gravel-bed rivers. While these theories have varied in details and applicable conditions, a common hypothesis has been a structural organization in the fluid which links eddies formed at the wall to coherent turbulent structures such as large eddies which may be observed vertically across the entire flow depth in an open channel. Recently physics has also seen the advancement of topological fluid mechanical ideas concerned with the study of vortex structures, braids, links and knots in velocity vector fields. In the present study the structural organization hypothesis is investigated with topological fluid mechanics and experimental results which are used to derive a vortex model for gravel-bed flows. Velocity field measurements in gravel-bed flow conditions in the laboratory were used to characterize temporal and spatial structures which may be attributed to vortex motions and reconnection phenomena. Turbulent velocity time series data were measured with ADV and decomposed using statistical decompositions to measure turbulent length scales. PIV was used to measure spatial velocity vector fields which were decomposed with filtering techniques for flow

  17. Fisher Sand & Gravel New Mexico, Inc. General Air Quality Permit: Related Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Documents related to the Fisher Sand & Gravel – New Mexico, Inc., Grey Mesa Gravel Pit General Air Quality Permit for New or Modified Minor Source Stone Quarrying, Crushing, and Screening Facilities in Indian Country.

  18. Sediment transport and resulting deposition in spawning gravels, north coastal California

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle

    1989-01-01

    Incubating salmonid eggs in streambeds are often threatened by deposition of fine sediment within the gravel. To relate sedimentation of spawning gravel beds to sediment transport, infiltration of fine sediment (

  19. Disturbance of fluvial gravel substrates by signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Rice, Stephen; Reid, Ian

    2010-05-01

    The reworking of substrates by organisms, termed bioturbation, is considered a fundamental processes in marine and terrestrial environments but has remained relatively unstudied in fluvial environments. This studies looks at the bioturbation of fluvial gravel substrates by signal crayfish, an internationally important invasive species. We investigated the impact of signal crayfish activity in a laboratory flume. Bioturbation by crayfish on both loose arrangements of gravel and water-worked surfaces were studied and two sizes of narrowly-graded gravel were used; 11 - 16 mm and 16 - 22 mm. A laser scanner was used to obtain high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of gravel surfaces before and after crayfish activity. These DEMs were used to quantify topographic and structural changes to the surfaces due to the activity of crayfish. It was found that crayfish moved substantial quantities of material from all surfaces within six hours of introduction. The majority of the disturbance was associated with small scale (≤ 1 median grain diameter) movements of surface grains due to walking and foraging by crayfish. This textural change resulted in a structural alteration to the substrate surface. After six hours of crayfish activity, there was a 14% reduction in the imbrication of the grains from water-worked surfaces. Crayfish also constructed shallow pits and heaped excavated material into a series of mounds around its edge. Crayfish would always posture in pits in the same way. They would fold their vulnerable tails under their body and place their claws in front of their heads. When in pits crayfish predominately orientated themselves so they were facing an upstream direction. This implies that crayfish dig pits in order to streamline their bodies in the flow and lower their protrusion. Although pits and mounds contributed a relatively small proportion to the overall disturbance of substrates, they significantly increased the roughness of substrates. Pit and

  20. Chiquicamata Mine, Chile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-24

    Chuquicamata, in Chile's Atacama Desert, is the largest open pit copper mine in the world, by excavated volume. The copper deposits were first exploited in pre-Hispanic times. Open pit mining began in the early 20th century when a method was developed to work low grade oxidized copper ores. The image was acquired September 2, 2007, covers an area of 19.5 by 29.3 km, and is located at 22.1 degrees south, 68.9 degrees west. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20973

  1. Sediment supply controls equilibrium channel geometry in gravel rivers

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Noah J.; Willenbring, Jane K.

    2017-01-01

    In many gravel-bedded rivers, floods that fill the channel banks create just enough shear stress to move the median-sized gravel particles on the bed surface (D50). Because this observation is common and is supported by theory, the coincidence of bankfull flow and the incipient motion of D50 has become a commonly used assumption. However, not all natural gravel channels actually conform to this simple relationship; some channels maintain bankfull stresses far in excess of the critical stress required to initiate sediment transport. We use a database of >300 gravel-bedded rivers and >600 10Be-derived erosion rates from across North America to explore the hypothesis that sediment supply drives the magnitude of bankfull shear stress relative to the critical stress required to mobilize the median bed surface grain size (τbf*/τc*). We find that τbf*/τc* is significantly higher in West Coast river reaches (2.35, n = 96) than in river reaches elsewhere on the continent (1.03, n = 245). This pattern parallels patterns in erosion rates (and hence sediment supplies). Supporting our hypothesis, we find a significant correlation between upstream erosion rate and local τbf*/τc* at sites where this comparison is possible. Our analysis reveals a decrease in bed surface armoring with increasing τbf*/τc*, suggesting channels accommodate changes in sediment supply through adjustments in bed surface grain size, as also shown through numerical modeling. Our findings demonstrate that sediment supply is encoded in the bankfull hydraulic geometry of gravel bedded channels through its control on bed surface grain size. PMID:28289212

  2. Sediment supply controls equilibrium channel geometry in gravel rivers.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Allison M; Finnegan, Noah J; Willenbring, Jane K

    2017-03-28

    In many gravel-bedded rivers, floods that fill the channel banks create just enough shear stress to move the median-sized gravel particles on the bed surface (D50). Because this observation is common and is supported by theory, the coincidence of bankfull flow and the incipient motion of D50 has become a commonly used assumption. However, not all natural gravel channels actually conform to this simple relationship; some channels maintain bankfull stresses far in excess of the critical stress required to initiate sediment transport. We use a database of >300 gravel-bedded rivers and >600 (10)Be-derived erosion rates from across North America to explore the hypothesis that sediment supply drives the magnitude of bankfull shear stress relative to the critical stress required to mobilize the median bed surface grain size ([Formula: see text]). We find that [Formula: see text] is significantly higher in West Coast river reaches (2.35, n = 96) than in river reaches elsewhere on the continent (1.03, n = 245). This pattern parallels patterns in erosion rates (and hence sediment supplies). Supporting our hypothesis, we find a significant correlation between upstream erosion rate and local [Formula: see text] at sites where this comparison is possible. Our analysis reveals a decrease in bed surface armoring with increasing [Formula: see text], suggesting channels accommodate changes in sediment supply through adjustments in bed surface grain size, as also shown through numerical modeling. Our findings demonstrate that sediment supply is encoded in the bankfull hydraulic geometry of gravel bedded channels through its control on bed surface grain size.

  3. Sediment supply controls equilibrium channel geometry in gravel rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Allison M.; Finnegan, Noah J.; Willenbring, Jane K.

    2017-03-01

    In many gravel-bedded rivers, floods that fill the channel banks create just enough shear stress to move the median-sized gravel particles on the bed surface (D50). Because this observation is common and is supported by theory, the coincidence of bankfull flow and the incipient motion of D50 has become a commonly used assumption. However, not all natural gravel channels actually conform to this simple relationship; some channels maintain bankfull stresses far in excess of the critical stress required to initiate sediment transport. We use a database of >300 gravel-bedded rivers and >600 10Be-derived erosion rates from across North America to explore the hypothesis that sediment supply drives the magnitude of bankfull shear stress relative to the critical stress required to mobilize the median bed surface grain size (τbf*/τc*). We find that τbf*/τc* is significantly higher in West Coast river reaches (2.35, n = 96) than in river reaches elsewhere on the continent (1.03, n = 245). This pattern parallels patterns in erosion rates (and hence sediment supplies). Supporting our hypothesis, we find a significant correlation between upstream erosion rate and local τbf*/τc* at sites where this comparison is possible. Our analysis reveals a decrease in bed surface armoring with increasing τbf*/τc*, suggesting channels accommodate changes in sediment supply through adjustments in bed surface grain size, as also shown through numerical modeling. Our findings demonstrate that sediment supply is encoded in the bankfull hydraulic geometry of gravel bedded channels through its control on bed surface grain size.

  4. Quality Aspects of a Marine Aggregate Deposit off the SE Euboea Island, Greece, for its Exploitation - Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasatou, Marianthi; Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Stamatakis, Michael; Tsoutsia, Antonia; Poulos, Serafeim; Rousakis, Grigoris; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Petrakis, Stelios; Aspiotis, Konstantinos; Papavlasopoulou, Nafsika; Stamatakis, Giorgos

    2015-04-01

    Aggregates are inert materials, such as terrestrial or marine sand and gravel, composed mainly of limestone, igneous rocks and sandstone. There is an international trend of increasing demand for aggregates during the last 30 years. Thus, marine aggregate (MA) demand has been displayed a remarkably increased due to limited terrestrial deposits and strict environmental issues related to their exploitation, induced by mining legislation. Regarding offshore MA extraction, important physical and biological seabed impacts that may persist long after the completion of the MA dredging, should be addressed, according to European directives, that deal with aspects such as restoration of the influenced subaqueous mining area. The present contribution focuses on the qualitative determination of the marine sediments on inner continental shelf of SE Euboea (central Aegean Sea), concerning primarily its silica content and secondarily the various environmental issues, in order to evaluate whether or not this subaqueous deposit fulfils the requirements for its exploitation. This MA deposit was found during the implementation of the research project THALES-MARE (MIS 375655) and after taking into consideration the presence of highly siliceous coastal lithology of the South Euboea Island. The area belongs to the Attico-Cycladic geotectonic zone, and especially in the Blueschist Unit, Styra and Ochi nappes. It consists mainly of metamorphosed clastic siliceous sedimentary and calcareous, mafic and felsic volcanic rocks and serpentinites. Sixteen representative samples were analysed out of 48 were collected in June 2014, during the scientific cruise of the M/V Aegaio (Hellenic Centre for Marine Research). The grain size analysis shows that seabed sediments are granulometrically classified mostly as sand, with contaminants of finer fractions and with the sand content often to be >90%. X-Ray Diffraction analysis revealed that the predominant crystalline phase is quartz (often >70

  5. Improving sand and gravel utilization and land-use planning. - 3D-modelling gravel resources with geospatial data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolstad Libach, Lars; Wolden, Knut; Dagestad, Atle; Eskil Larsen, Bjørn

    2017-04-01

    The Norwegian aggregate industry produces approximately 14 million tons of sand and gravel aggregates annually to a value of approximately 100 million Euros. Utilization of aggregates are often linked to land-use conflicts and complex environmental impacts at the extraction site. These topics are managed on a local municipal level in Norway. The Geological Survey of Norway has a database and a web map service with information about sand and gravel deposits with considerable volumes and an importance evaluation. Some of the deposits covers large areas where the land-use conflicts are high. To ease and improve land-use planning, safeguard other important resources like groundwater and sustainable utilization of sand and gravel resources - there is a need for more detailed information of already mapped important resources. Detailed 3D-models of gravel deposits is a tool for a better land-use- and resource management. By combining seismic, GPR and resistivity geophysical profile data, borehole data, quaternary maps and lidar surface data, it has been possible to make 3D-models of deposits and to further research the possibilities for distinguishing different qualities and volumes. Good datasets and a detailed resource map is a prerequisite to assess geological resources for planners, extractors and neighbours. Future challenges lies in use of, often old, geophysical data, and combining these. What kind of information is it possible to grasp from depth-data that actually argues for a more detailed delineation of resources?

  6. Hope and exploitation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adrienne M

    2008-01-01

    How do we encourage patients to be hopeful without exploiting their hope? A medical researcher or a pharmaceutical company can take unfair advantage of someone's hope by much subtler means than simply giving misinformation. Hope shapes deliberation, and therefore can make deliberation better or worse, by the deliberator's own standards of deliberation.

  7. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644.505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering sand...

  8. 75 FR 3915 - Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Sand and Gravel Activities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Minerals Management Service Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Sand and Gravel Activities on... for three sand and gravel activities proposed on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and described in... noncompetitive basis, the rights to OCS sand, gravel, or shell resources for shore protection, beach or wetlands...

  9. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  10. Prediction of sand transport over immobile gravel from supply limited to capacity conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prediction of the transport of sand in armored gravel reaches downstream of dams is complicated by variable bed conditions ranging from sand transported through gravel to sand in transport over buried gravel. Knowledge of the rate of sand transport in these conditions, however, is necessary for...

  11. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section 436.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the...

  12. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section 436.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the...

  13. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644.505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering sand...

  14. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section 436.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the...

  15. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644.505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering sand...

  16. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644.505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering sand...

  17. Macroinvertebrate Community responses to gravel addition in a Southeastern regulated river

    Treesearch

    Ryan A. McManamay; Donald J. Orth; A. Charles. Dolloff

    2013-01-01

    Sediment transport, one of the key processes of river systems, is altered or stopped by dams, leaving lower river reaches barren of sand and gravel, both of which are essential habitat for fish and macroinvertebrates. One way to compensate for losses in sediment is to supplement gravel to river reaches below impoundments. Because gravel addition has become a widespread...

  18. The physics of mining in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raafat, Kian; Burnett, J. A.; Chapman, Thomas; Cockell, Charles S.

    2013-10-01

    Asteroids and planets are potentially valuable mineral resources, but finding and exploiting them will be a challenge. Kian Raafat, Jordan Burnett, Thomas Chapman and Charles S Cockell ask: what's different about mining off Earth?

  19. The Unified Gravel-Sand (TUGS) Model: Simulating the Transport of Gravel-Sand Mixtures in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.

    2006-12-01

    TUGS Model was developed by employing the surface-based bedload equation of Wilcock and Crowe (2003) and linking grain size distributions in the bedload, surface layer, and subsurface sediment deposit with the gravel transfer function of Hoey and Ferguson (1994) and Toro-Escobar et al. (1996), and a hypothetical sand transfer function. The unmodified model was applied to simulate the sedimentation process in Marmot Reservoir, Sandy River, Oregon and produced similar stratified sediment deposit as observed through coring exercises. The model was also examined with three runs of large-scale flume experiments conducted at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) by Seal et al. (1995). With a very minor modification to Wilcock and Crowe (2003) equation, the model excellently reproduced the longitudinal profiles, gravel grain size distributions and sand fractions in the deposits for all the three SAFL runs. Following its examination, TUGS model was applied to simulate the sediment transport dynamics in the Sandy River, Oregon under a few hypothetical scenarios, focusing on the dynamics of sand fractions in gravel-bedded channel deposits. Results of the exploratory runs on the Sandy River indicate that (a) surface and subsurface sand fractions generally increase in the downstream direction, similar to observed in the field; (b) sand fraction in the deposit is positively correlated with sand supply as expected; (c) extremely high sand supply under similar gravel supply and hydrologic conditions can transform the river into predominantly sand-bedded; (d) increased discharge under the same sand and gravel supply conditions results in decreased sand fraction in the deposit as expected; and (e) there can be significant increase in surface and subsurface sand fractions in the backwater zones near the mouth of the river as expected.

  20. Alluvial fan facies in Death Valley: Contrasts with fluvial gravels and implications for the interpretation of ancient fan'' gravels

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Sedimentary environments in Death Valley belong to three major groups: fans, washes, and playas. Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits of the playa, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River, which drains into the south end of Death Valley. The most remarkable features of the fan and wash deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper regime flows. Most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). Within a fan, facies vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from facies seen in adjacent fans.

  1. Mining law and regulations of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, F.C.

    1992-01-01

    The mining law and regulations of Mexico have been of considerable interest to mining lawyers in the united States. Recent wide-ranging changes in Mexican mining regulations have come at a time when the mining industry hopes to broaden its scope to contend with worldwide competition. Article 27 of the Federal Constitution of Mexico governs the mining of metallic, nonmetallic, and coal materials. New regulation implementing this law became effective on December 10, 1990. These regulations, generally regarded as providing far greater flexibility in the acquisition and maintenance of mineral rights, also provide substantial additional flexibility in the ability of non-Mexican companies to own concessions. The Laws section of this book includes: General Provision, ministry of National Patrimony, mining concession, beneficiating plant concessions, execution and proof of exploitation work oppositions, national mineral reserves, special concessions on National Mineral Reserves, Public/Registry of mining, mining promotion and of the assistance to small miners, Industrial Mining Reserves and violations and penalties. The regulations section includes: general dispositions, mineral reserves, mining assignments and concessions, right of mining concession holders, obligations of the holders of mining concessions, mining companies, mining public registry, mining experts, inspections, sanctions and remedies.

  2. Tribal children are most exploited - UNICEF.

    PubMed

    A workshop sponsored by the UN Children's Fund in the Philippines examined the status of the children of indigenous people and found that exploitation of the assets of indigenous people in the name of development has resulted in social inequalities that have damaged the indigenous children. As examples of the disregard for the human rights of the children, participants cited projects in Davao, Boracay, and Benguet that have displaced native children. These include mining schemes that have "raped" ancestral lands, large-scale agricultural enterprises, promotion of tourism, and creation of hydroelectric dams. The children rarely benefit at all from any of these projects as their families are moved from a position of isolated independence to one of exploited dependence. Social changes accompanying development ruin traditional culture without providing a better or even similar basis of existence.

  3. Transient Responses of Gravel Bars to Increases in Sediment Supply - Field & Flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, C.

    2010-12-01

    Bedforms in a gravel-bed river respond to a combination of water discharge, the rate and size of sediment supply, and valley-scale geometry. This study investigates bar response to an increase in sediment supply. In a large flume (2.75 m wide) with a plane bed of mixed sand and gravel (gravel D50 = 10 mm; 15% sand), alternate bars were formed by inducing a slight perturbation in the flow at the upstream end. After the bars and sediment flux reached a steady state, sediment supply was increased (from 45 kg/min to 70 kg/min). After the bed and sediment flux reached steady state, sediment supply was again increased (from 70 kg/min to 140 kg/min). Throughout the experiment high-frequency (1 Hz) measurements of the sediment flux, as well as moderate frequency (every 90 minutes) measurements of the bed topography were made. As the channel increased transport capacity to match the increased sediment supply, the initial bed adjustment was an increase in slope with near uniform deposition in the cross-stream direction. The bed then evolved to a steady-state configuration in which the locations and dimensions of the bars and pools were very similar to the pre-augmentation condition. During the adjustment process, the cross-stream relief initially decreased, the bar wavelengths decreased, and the bar celerity increased. The evolution from the lower-relief interim state to the post-augmentation steady state was reminiscent of initial bar development from a plane bed. A similar sequence of bed adjustment was observed on the Sandy River, Oregon, following a large increase in sediment flux due to the 2007 Marmot Dam removal. Measurements of bedform evolution immediately downstream of the dam show a transition from a long high-relief lateral bar along the right bank, to a lower-relief multiple short wavelength mid-channel bars, finally back to a long high-relief lateral bar along the right bank, albeit 4-5 meters higher than the original. Previous work on bedform response to

  4. Longwall mining

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-14

    As part of EIA`s program to provide information on coal, this report, Longwall-Mining, describes longwall mining and compares it with other underground mining methods. Using data from EIA and private sector surveys, the report describes major changes in the geologic, technological, and operating characteristics of longwall mining over the past decade. Most important, the report shows how these changes led to dramatic improvements in longwall mining productivity. For readers interested in the history of longwall mining and greater detail on recent developments affecting longwall mining, the report includes a bibliography.

  5. Position estimator for underground mine equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, G.K.; Stentz, A.; Whittaker, W.L.; Fitzpatrick, K.W. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes a 2-D perception system that exploits the accuracy and resolution of a laser range sensor to determine the position and orientation of a mobile robot in a mine environment. The perception system detects features from range sensor data and matches the features to a map of the mine to compute the sensor position. The features used are line segments and corners, which represent the typical geometry of the mine walls and intersections found in room-0and-pillar type mining. The position estimate is refined by minimizing the error between the map and sensed features. This position information can be used for autonomous navigation when a map of the mine is available or to survey the mine to build such a map. The technique is applied to robot navigation in a mine mockup. A refinement of this system could guide machines to yield productive, safe mining operations.

  6. Experimental investigation of the influence of perforating on gravel-pack impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Blok, R.H.J.; Welling, R.W.F.; Venkitaraman, A.

    1996-12-31

    Analysis of the performance of perforated, gravel-packed wells compared with openhole gravel-packed wells has indicated that the perforation could be responsible for the low productivity of internally gravel-packed wells. A series of laboratory experiments on weak rock (UCS = 1200 psi) was conducted to quantify this. Castlegate sandstone rock samples, 7 in. in diameter and 18 in. long, were perforated with shaped charges under downhole conditions. The perforations were gravel packed by circulating a gravel slurry past the tunnel entrance while applying a differential pressure. The preperforation, post-perforation and post-gravel-pack productivities of the core samples were monitored at different flow rates (5 to 20 b/d/perf). Sectional photographs of the core samples were taken at post-gravel-pack conditions for qualitative analysis. Performance evaluation of gravel-packed {open_quotes}realistic perforations{close_quotes} (debris and loose sand in the tunnel removed by drawdown-induced flow) versus {open_quotes}ideal perforations{close_quotes} (debris and loose sand removed by external means) showed the post-gravel-pack productivities of realistic perforations to be much lower than ideal perforations in oil-phase as well as water-phase experiments. Injection of fluid after gravel packing only temporarily unplugged the perforation tunnel. The study shows the importance of fines-and debris-free perforation tunnels in maintaining the productivities; of gravel-packed completions.

  7. Channel erosion in steep gradient, gravel-paved streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, L.R.; Koger, C.J.; Wheeler, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    Discharges were measured in steep gradient (> 5 percent) gravel-paved streams from 1988 to 1991 in order to empirically determine erosional thresholds based on sediment size, related to critical velocity, tractive force, and unit stream power. Results suggest that the empirical relationship between sediment size and unit stream power provides an accurate and simple methodology for determining the minimum erosion threshold discharge for steep gradient streams common in western Washington and other similar mountain terrains.

  8. Infiltration of Sand Into Gravel Riverbeds With Alternate Bar Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardson, R.; Wydzga, M. A.; Venditti, J. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Stacey, M. T.; Dracup, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The hyporheic zone, which is comprised of the interconnected pore spaces in the bed of gravel rivers, plays a variety of roles in river health. It serves as a nutrient reservoir and refuge for aquatic organisms; supports surface water-groundwater exchange, which can mitigate flooding and improve water supply reliability; and stores organic matter, heavy metals, and other pollutants. When fine sediment (sand and silt) fills the pore spaces of the hyporheic zone, these functions are compromised. A number of one-dimensional laboratory studies have explored infiltration of sand into stable, flat (plane-bed), gravel riverbeds. The depth and volumetric content of sand infiltrated under such conditions are functions of sediment supply and the grain size distributions of the bed (gravel) and the sand in bedload. This study examines whether the relationships established in plane-bed experiments suffice to explain infiltration into a bed with alternate-bar topography. We present results from an infiltration experiment performed on a 2.7m x 55m laboratory flume at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory in Minneapolis. In this experiment, sand (D50 = 0.4mm) was infiltrated into a gravel (D50 = 9.2mm) bed with alternate bars, under low flow (35 lps). After infiltration, the bed was excavated at 3-6 sites in each of 5 cross-sections, chosen to represent a variety of topographic and flow conditions (e.g. head of bar, top of bar and deep channel, cross-channel). Bed samples are analyzed for depth of infiltration, sand content, and grain size distribution. We present the spatial patterns of depth and content of sand infiltrated, in relation to bed surface topography and surface water flow path. Ongoing research will couple the characteristics of this spatial pattern with sediment routing.

  9. Completion and production results from alternate-path gravel-packed wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, D.W.; Jones, L.G.

    1995-09-01

    A successful gravel pack requires two things: perforations packed with gravel-pack sand and a completely packed annulus. Failure to obtain either one can result in low productivity and/or a sand-producing gravel pack. Alternate-path gravel packing ensures that the annulus will be completely packed and that all perforations taking fluid will be packed with gravel-pack sand. Altercate-path gravel packing has provided long and highly productive completions without any sand production. This paper presents completion data and production results from 39 wells completed with the alternate-path gravel-pack technique. The completion data include completion length, net perforations, carrier fluid, sand placement outside casing, workover fluid, and return rate during packaging. Production results include qualitative discussion of all completions with quantitative results, including permeability-thickness product and skin on select completions.

  10. Coupling channel evolution monitoring and RFID tracking in a large, wandering, gravel-bed river: Insights into sediment routing on geomorphic continuity through a riffle-pool sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, Margot; Dufour, Simon; Provansal, Mireille; Couvert, Bernard; de Linares, Matthieu

    2015-02-01

    Bedload transport and bedform mobility in large gravel-bed rivers are not easily monitored, especially during floods. Large reaches present difficulties in bed access during flows for flow measurements. Because of these logistical issues, the current knowledge about bedload transport processes and bedform mobility lacks field-based information, while this missing information would precisely match river management needs. The lack of information linking channel evolution and particle displacements is even more striking in wandering reaches. The Durance River is a large, wandering, gravel-bed river (catchment area: 14,280 km2; mean width: 240 m), located in the southern French Alps and highly impacted by flow diversion and gravel mining. In order to improve current understanding of the link between sediment transport processes and river bed morphodynamics, we set up a sediment particle survey in the channel using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and topographic surveys (GPS RTK and scour chains) for a 4-year recurrence interval flood. By combining topographic changes before and after a flood, intraflood erosion/deposition patterns from scour chains, differential routing of tracer particles, and spatial distribution of bed shear stress through a complex reach, this paper aims to define the critical shear stress for significant sediment mobility in this setting. Gravel tracking highlights displacement patterns in agreement with bar downstream migration and transport of particles across the riffle within this single flood event. Because no velocity measurements were possible during flood, a TELEMAC three-dimensional model helped interpret particle displacements by estimating spatial distribution of shear stresses and flow directions at peak flow. Although RFID tracking in a large, wandering, gravel-bed river does have some technical limitations (burial, recovery process time-consuming), it provides useful information on sediment routing through a riffle

  11. The design method of a dam on gravel stream

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, W.B.; Wu, S.J.; Huang, C.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Due to the intense requirements of electricity and water supply in the past decades, large number of dams, reservoirs and mobile barrages have been completed in Taiwan. These hydraulic structures almost occupied all the sound rock foundations with little overburdens. This indicates that the future ones have to face the situation of high overburdens. Special considerations should be taken to overcome the difficulties of water tight requirement and stability of structures. A case study is presented in this paper. It is a dam built for the purpose of hydropower generation and water supply, and is constructed on a gravel stream with 40 m of overburdens. Design method of this dam is discussed in this paper. Curtain grouting is performed in this dam to reduce the high permeability of gravel to an acceptable level. Caissons are chosen to be the structural foundations in this case study to support heavy loads of the dam and to reduce the difficulty of curtain grouting. Another problem for a dam built on gravel stream is the damage of abrasion and erosion to the stilling basin slabs, the sluice way aprons and the spillway aprons. Discussions on the abrasion-erosion resistant materials are also given in this paper.

  12. Bed Mobility on the Deschutes River, Oregon: Tracer Gravel Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Williams, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Deschutes River, drainage area 20,250 km2 near Madras, Oregon, is a gravel-bedded river, impounded since 1957 by three dams in the Pelton-Round Butte hydroelectric project, operated by Portland General Electric (PGE). Salmon spawning has declined in the reach below the dams since their construction, so possible project effects on spawning habitat are an issue of concern in relicensing of the project. Consultants to PGE applied the Parker bedload transport function to several sites below the hydroelectric dams; they concluded that the entrainment threshold flow was 340 m3s-1, and that the bed had been mobile only 25 days in the 72-year period of record from 1925-1996. However, their model was not calibrated with any actual field data of bed mobility or bedload transport, and the calculations were for full bed mobility, ignoring potentially significant bedload transport that might occur at a condition of partial mobility. To redress that lack of field data, we placed tracer gravels in the bed at three sites below the dams. In 2002 tracer gravels moved at one of the three sites after a flow of 150 m3s-1 (128-mm stones moved up to 1 m). The minor movement suggests that the bed is just beginning to move at 150 m3s-1, but indicates that the previously assumed entrainment threshold of 340 m3s-1 is too high.

  13. Gravel packing a 2,400-ft openhole horizontal interval

    SciTech Connect

    Duhon, P.; Holley, A.; Gardiner, N.; Grigsby, T.

    1998-09-01

    A typical economic requirement of most high-cost deepwater development projects is high-initial-rate (> 15,000-B/D oil wells or > 70-MMcf/D gas wells) completions. To achieve these rates from pay sands in this field, 2,000--2,500-ft horizontal completions are used. Conventional openhole horizontal completions have been used in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) since the early 1990`s. However, the number of failures experienced by some operators has raised questions about the reliability of this type of completion. In deepwater projects, high-rate production and completion reliability present major challenges to operators, and traditional methods of sand control often have not been able to satisfy the changing conditions. The full-length paper presents a solution that combines gravel packing, enhanced downhole-tool capability, and advanced fluid technology to solve sand-control problems. The successful application of the first extended, horizontal openhole gravel packs in the northern GOM proved that gravel packing can be applied successfully to extended horizontal boreholes.

  14. Deschutes River Spawning Gravel Study, Volume I, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, Charles W.

    1985-09-01

    Spawning habitat in the Deschutes River was inventoried, gravel permeability and composition were sampled at selected gravel bars, historical flow records for the Deschutes were analyzed, salmon and trout utilization of spawning habitat was examined, and potential methods of enhancing spawning habitat in the river were explored. Some changes in river conditions since the mid-1960's were identified, including a reduction in spawning habitat immediately downstream from the hydroelectric complex. The 1964 flood was identified as a factor which profoundly affected spawning habitat in the river, and which greatly complicated efforts to identify recent changes which could be attributed to the hydrocomplex. A baseline on present gravel quality at both chinook and steelhead spawning areas in the river was established using a freeze-core methodology. Recommendations are made for enhancing spawning habitat in the Deschutes River, if it is independently determined that spawning habitat is presently limiting populations of summer steelhead or fall chinook in the river. 53 refs., 40 figs., 21 tabs.

  15. Introduction to Space Resource Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    There are vast amounts of resources in the solar system that will be useful to humans in space and possibly on Earth. None of these resources can be exploited without the first necessary step of extra-terrestrial mining. The necessary technologies for tele-robotic and autonomous mining have not matured sufficiently yet. The current state of technology was assessed for terrestrial and extraterrestrial mining and a taxonomy of robotic space mining mechanisms was presented which was based on current existing prototypes. Terrestrial and extra-terrestrial mining methods and technologies are on the cusp of massive changes towards automation and autonomy for economic and safety reasons. It is highly likely that these industries will benefit from mutual cooperation and technology transfer.

  16. Multisensor staring exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Michael L.

    2008-04-01

    The focus of this paper is on the exploitation of new staring sensors to address the urban surveillance challenge and help combat the war on terror. A staring sensor visualization environment, known as the Data Table, will be presented which integrates staring sensors with close-in sensors, such as small UAVs, building mounted sensors, and unattended ground sensors (UGS). There are several staring sensors in development, but two in particular will be highlighted in this paper - NightStare and the Gotcha Radar, both under development by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL).

  17. Mechanical resistance properties of gravel used in subsurface flow constructed wetlands: implications for clogging.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, Anna; Passos, Fabiana; Alba, Elisenda; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    Gravel constitutes the filter medium in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF CWs) and its porosity and hydraulic conductivity decrease over time (clogging), limiting the lifespan of the systems. Using gravel of poor quality accelerates clogging in wetlands. In this study, gravel samples from six different wetland systems were compared with regards to their mineral composition and mechanical resistance properties. Results showed that both mineralogy and texture are related to mechanical resistance. Accordingly, gravel with high content of quartz (> 80%) showed a lower percentage of broken particles (0.18-1.03%) than those with lower content of quartz (2.42-4.56% media broken). Although granite is formed by high durability minerals, its non-uniform texture results in a lower resistance to abrasion (ca. 10% less resistance than calcareous gravel). Therefore, it is recommended to use gravels composed mainly of quartz or, when it is not available, limestone gravels (rounded and uniform) are recommended instead. The resistance to abrasion (LAA test) seems to be a good indicator to determine the mechanical properties of gravels used in CWs. It is recommended to use gravels with LAA below 30% in order to avoid a rapid clogging due to gravel crumbling and subsequent mineral solids accumulation.

  18. The effect of coarse gravel on cohesive sediment entrapment in an annular flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasbergen, K.; Stone, M.; Krishnappan, B.; Dixon, J.; Silins, U.

    2015-03-01

    While cohesive sediment generally represents a small fraction (<0.5%) of the total sediment mass stored in gravel-bed rivers, it can strongly influence physical and biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone and alter aquatic habitat. This research was conducted to examine mechanisms governing the interaction of cohesive sediments with gravel beds in the Elbow River, Alberta, Canada. A series of erosion and deposition experiments with and without a gravel bed were conducted in a 5-m diameter annular flume. The critical shear stress for deposition and erosion of cohesive sediment without gravel was 0.115 Pa and 0.212 Pa, respectively. In experiments with a gravel bed, cohesive sediment moved from the water column into the gravel bed via the coupling of surface and pore water flow. Once in the gravel bed, cohesive sediments were not mobilized under the maximum applied shear stresses (1.11 Pa) used in the experiment. The gravel bed had an entrapment coefficient (ratio between the entrapment flux and the settling flux) of 0.2. Accordingly, when flow conditions are sufficient to produce a shear stress that will mobilize the armour layer of the gravel bed (>16 Pa), cohesive materials trapped within the gravel bed will be entrained and transported into the Glenmore Reservoir, where sediment-associated nutrients may pose treatment challenges to the drinking water supply.

  19. The effect of gravel size fraction on the distribution coefficients of selected radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R Jeffrey; Last, George V; Clayton, Ray E; Glossbrenner, Ellwood T

    2009-06-26

    This manuscript addresses the consequences of the common practice of assuming that the gravel fraction of sediments does not participate in sorption reactions and thus sorption quantified by the distribution coefficient (K(d)) construct can be estimated from laboratory tests on sediments less than 2 mm size fraction. However, this common assumption can lead to inaccurate estimates of the mobility and sorption affinity of many radionuclides (e.g., Tc, U, and Np) on gravel dominated sediments at the Hanford Site and other locations. Laboratory batch sorption experiments showed that the distribution coefficients measured using only sediment less than 2 mm size fraction and correcting for inert gravel fraction were not in agreement with those obtained from the bulk sediments including gravel (larger than 2 mm size fraction), depending on the radionuclide. The least reactive radionuclide, Tc had K(d) values for bulk sediment with negligible deviations from the inert gravel corrected K(d) values measured on less than 2 mm size fraction. However, differences between measured K(d) values using sediment less than 2 mm size fraction and the K(d) values on the bulk sediment were significant for intermediately and strongly reactive radionuclides such as U and Np, especially on the sediment with gravel fractions that contained highly reactive sites. Highly reactive sites in the gravel fraction were attributed to the presence of Fe oxide coatings and/or reactive fracture faces on the gravel surfaces. Gravel correction factors that use the sum of the K(d)(,<2 mm) and K(d)(,>2 mm) values to estimate the K(d) for the bulk sediment were found to best describe K(d) values for radionuclides on the bulk sediment. Gravel correction factors should not be neglected to predict precisely the sorption capacity of the bulk sediments that contain more than 30% gravel. In addition, more detailed characterization of gravel surfaces should be conducted to identify whether higher reactive sorbents

  20. The effect of gravel size fraction on the distribution coefficients of selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Clayton, Ray E.; Glossbrenner, Ellwood T.

    2009-06-26

    This manuscript addresses the consequences of the common practice of assuming that the gravel fraction of sediments does not participate in sorption reactions and thus sorption quantified by the distribution coefficient (Kd) construct can be estimated from laboratory tests on sediments less than 2 mm size fraction. However, this common assumption can lead to inaccurate estimates of the mobility and sorption affinity of many radionuclides (e.g., Tc, U, and Np) on gravel dominated sediments at the Hanford Site and other locations. Laboratory batch sorption experiments showed that the distribution coefficients measured using only sediment less than 2 mm size fraction and correcting for inert gravel fraction were not in agreement with those obtained from the bulk sediments including gravel (larger than 2 mm size fraction), depending on the radionuclide. The least reactive radionuclide, Tc had Kd values for bulk sediment with negligible deviations from the inert gravel corrected Kd values measured on less than 2 mm size fraction. However, differences between measured Kd values using sediment less than 2 mm size fraction and the Kd values on the bulk sediment were significant for intermediately and strongly reactive radionuclides such as U and Np, especially on the sediment with gravel fractions that contained highly reactive sites. Highly reactive sites in the gravel fraction were attributed to the presence of Fe oxide coatings and/or reactive fracture faces on the gravel surfaces. Gravel correction factors that use the sum of the Kd,<2 mm and Kd,>2 mm values to estimate the Kd for the bulk sediment were found to best describe Kd values for radionuclides on the bulk sediment. Gravel correction factors should not be neglected to predict precisely the sorption capacity of the bulk sediments that contain more than 30% gravel. In addition, more detailed characterization of gravel surfaces should be conducted to identify whether higher reactive sorbents are present in the

  1. Gravel sediment routing from widespread, low-intensity landscape disturbance, Current River basin, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.B.; Gran, K.B.

    1999-01-01

    During the last 160 years, land-use changes in the Ozarks have had the potential to cause widespread, low-intensity delivery of excess amounts of gravel-sized sediment to stream channels. Previous studies have indicated that this excess gravel bedload is moving in wave-like forms through Ozarks drainage basins. The longitudinal, areal distribution of gravel bars along 160 km of the Current River, Missouri, was evaluated to determine the relative effects of valley-scale controls, tributary basin characteristics, and lagged sediment transport in creating areas of gravel accumulations. The longitudinal distribution of gravel-bar area shows a broad scale wave-like form with increases in gravel-bar area weakly associated with tributary junctions. Secondary peaks of gravel area with 1.8-4.1 km spacing (disturbance reaches) are superimposed on the broad form. Variations in valley width explain some, but not all, of the short-spacing variation in gravel-bar area. Among variables describing tributary drainage basin morphometry, present-day land use and geologic characteristics, only drainage area and road density relate even weakly to gravel-bar areal inventories. A simple, channel network-based sediment routing model shows that many of the features of the observed longitudinal gravel distribution can be replicated by uniform transport of sediment from widespread disturbances through a channel network. These results indicate that lagged sediment transport may have a dominant effect on the synoptic spatial distribution of gravel in Ozarks streams; present-day land uses are only weakly associated with present-day gravel inventories; and valley-scale characteristics have secondary controls on gravel accumulations in disturbance reaches.

  2. Relationships between woody vegetation and geomorphological patterns in three gravel-bed rivers with different intensities of anthropogenic disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitzia, T.; Picco, L.; Ravazzolo, D.; Comiti, F.; Mao, L.; Lenzi, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We compared three gravel-bed rivers in north-eastern Italy (Brenta, Piave, Tagliamento) having similar bioclimate, geology and fluvial morphology, but affected by different intensities of anthropogenic disturbance related particularly to hydropower dams, training works and instream gravel mining. Our aim was to test whether a corresponding difference in the interactions between vegetation and geomorphological patterns existed among the three rivers. In equally spaced and sized plots (n = 710) we collected descriptors of geomorphic conditions, and presence-absence of woody species. In the less disturbed river (Tagliamento), spatial succession of woody communities from the floodplain to the channel followed a profile where higher elevation floodplains featured more developed tree communities, and lower elevation islands and bars were covered by pioneer communities. In the intermediate-disturbed river (Piave), islands and floodplains lay at similar elevation and both showed species indicators of mature developed communities. In the most disturbed river (Brenta), all these patterns were simplified, all geomorphic units lay at similar elevations, were not well characterized by species composition, and presented similar persistence age. This indicates that in human-disturbed rivers, channel and vegetation adjustments are closely linked in the long term, and suggests that intermediate levels of anthropogenic disturbance, such as those encountered in the Piave River, could counteract the natural, more dynamic conditions that may periodically fragment vegetated landscapes in natural rivers.

  3. The Geohazards Exploitation Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laur, Henri; Casu, Francesco; Bally, Philippe; Caumont, Hervé; Pinto, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    The Geohazards Exploitation Platform, or Geohazards TEP (GEP), is an ESA originated R&D activity of the EO ground segment to demonstrate the benefit of new technologies for large scale processing of EO data. This encompasses on-demand processing for specific user needs, systematic processing to address common information needs of the geohazards community, and integration of newly developed processors for scientists and other expert users. The platform supports the geohazards community's objectives as defined in the context of the International Forum on Satellite EO and Geohazards organised by ESA and GEO in Santorini in 2012. The GEP is a follow on to the Supersites Exploitation Platform (SSEP) an ESA initiative to support the Geohazards Supersites & Natural Laboratories initiative (GSNL). Today the GEP allows to exploit 70+ Terabyte of ERS and ENVISAT archive and the Copernicus Sentinel-1 data available on line. The platform has already engaged 22 European early adopters in a validation activity initiated in March 2015. Since September, this validation has reached 29 single user projects. Each project is concerned with either integrating an application, running on demand processing or systematically generating a product collection using an application available in the platform. The users primarily include 15 geoscience centres and universities based in Europe: British Geological Survey (UK), University of Leeds (UK), University College London (UK), ETH University of Zurich (CH), INGV (IT), CNR-IREA and CNR-IRPI (IT), University of L'Aquila (IT), NOA (GR), Univ. Blaise Pascal & CNRS (FR), Ecole Normale Supérieure (FR), ISTERRE / University of Grenoble-Alpes (FR). In addition, there are users from Africa and North America with the University of Rabat (MA) and the University of Miami (US). Furthermore two space agencies and four private companies are involved: the German Space Research Centre DLR (DE), the European Space Agency (ESA), Altamira Information (ES

  4. Image exploitation for MISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, N.; Edrich, M.; Saur, G.; Krüger, W.

    2007-04-01

    The miniature SAR-system MiSAR has been developed by EADS Germany for lightweight UAVs like the LUNASystem. MiSAR adds to these tactical UAV-systems the all-weather reconnaissance capability, which is missing until now. Unlike other SAR sensors, that produce large strip maps at update rates of several seconds, MiSAR generates sequences of SAR images with approximately 1 Hz frame rate. photo interpreters (PI) of tactical drones, now mainly experienced with visual interpretation, are not used to SARimages, especially not with SAR-image sequence characteristics. So they should be supported to improve their ability to carry out their task with a new, demanding sensor system. We have therefore analyzed and discussed with military PIs in which task MiSAR can be used and how the PIs can be supported by special algorithms. We developed image processing- and exploitation-algorithms for such SAR-image sequences. A main component is the generation of image sequence mosaics to get more oversight. This mosaicing has the advantage that also non straight /linear flight-paths and varying squint angles can be processed. Another component is a screening-component for manmade objects to mark regions of interest in the image sequences. We use a classification based approach, which can be easily adapted to new sensors and scenes. These algorithms are integrated into an image exploitation system to improve the image interpreters ability to get a better oversight, better orientation and helping them to detect relevant objects, especially considering long endurance reconnaissance missions.

  5. Web Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürnkranz, Johannes

    The World-Wide Web provides every internet citizen with access to an abundance of information, but it becomes increasingly difficult to identify the relevant pieces of information. Research in web mining tries to address this problem by applying techniques from data mining and machine learning to Web data and documents. This chapter provides a brief overview of web mining techniques and research areas, most notably hypertext classification, wrapper induction, recommender systems and web usage mining.

  6. Human Influences on Geomorphic Dynamics in Western Montana Gravel-Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Management of river ecosystems, river restoration, climate-change vulnerability assessments, and other applications require understanding of how current channel conditions and processes compare to historical ranges of variability. This is particularly true with respect to evaluation of sediment balances, including of whether and how current sediment supply compares to background conditions. In western Montana, management and restoration efforts are in some cases driven by the perception that anthropogenic activities have elevated sediment yields above background levels; human-induced erosional increases have been documented in certain environments, but empirical supporting evidence is lacking for western Montana rivers. Here, human-induced changes in channel form and in sediment balances, including flow, sediment supply, and erosion rates, are evaluated for rivers in western Montana, with a particular focus on the Clark Fork and Bitterroot Rivers. These rivers are characteristic of systems in the northern Rocky Mountains with gravel beds, historically wandering channel patterns, modest bed-material loads, and land uses including logging, mining, and agriculture. The Clark Fork is influenced by legacy mining-related sediments and associated contaminants, remediation efforts, and the 2008 removal of Milltown Dam. These influences have caused temporary shifts in sediment balances, but overall, sediment fluxes are modest (e.g., suspended sediment fluxes of 6 tonnes km-2 yr-1 at the USGS Turah gage). The Bitterroot River is influenced by a mix of glaciated and unglaciated landscapes with fire-dominated erosional regimes and larger sand supply than the Clark Fork, reflecting lithologic differences; erosion rates, and the imprint of anthropogenic activities on sediment dynamics, are being investigated. This work has implications for river restoration, including whether measures are needed to impose channel stability, and for evaluating how climate-change-induced changes

  7. An Introduction to Using Surface Geophysics to Characterize Sand and Gravel Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Langer, William H.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2007-01-01

    This report is an introduction to surface geophysical techniques that aggregate producers can use to characterize known deposits of sand and gravel. Five well-established and well-tested geophysical methods are presented: seismic refraction and reflection, resistivity, ground penetrating radar, time-domain electromagnetism, and frequency-domain electromagnetism. Depending on site conditions and the selected method(s), geophysical surveys can provide information concerning areal extent and thickness of the deposit, thickness of overburden, depth to the water table, critical geologic contacts, and location and correlation of geologic features. In addition, geophysical surveys can be conducted prior to intensive drilling to help locate auger or drill holes, reduce the number of drill holes required, calculate stripping ratios to help manage mining costs, and provide continuity between sampling sites to upgrade the confidence of reserve calculations from probable reserves to proved reserves. Perhaps the greatest value of geophysics to aggregate producers may be the speed of data acquisition, reduced overall costs, and improved subsurface characterization.

  8. An Introduction to Using Surface Geophysics to Characterize Sand and Gravel Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Langer, William H.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2006-01-01

    This report is an introduction to surface geophysical techniques that aggregate producers can use to characterize known deposits of sand and gravel. Five well-established and well-tested geophysical methods are presented: seismic refraction and reflection, resistivity, ground penetrating radar, time-domain electromagnetism, and frequency-domain electromagnetism. Depending on site conditions and the selected method(s), geophysical surveys can provide information concerning aerial extent and thickness of the deposit, thickness of overburden, depth to the water table, critical geologic contacts, and location and correlation of geologic features. In addition, geophysical surveys can be conducted prior to intensive drilling to help locate auger or drill holes, reduce the number of drill holes required, calculate stripping ratios to help manage mining costs, and provide continuity between sampling sites to upgrade the confidence of reserve calculations from probable reserves to proved reserves. Perhaps the greatest value of geophysics to aggregate producers may be the speed of data acquisition, reduced overall costs, and improved subsurface characterization.

  9. Geologie study off gravels of the Agua Fria River, Phoenix, AZ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Dewitt, E.; Adams, D.T.; O'Briens, T.

    2010-01-01

    The annual consumption of sand and gravel aggregate in 2006 in the Phoenix, AZ metropolitan area was about 76 Mt (84 million st) (USGS, 2009), or about 18 t (20 st) per capita. Quaternary alluvial deposits in the modern stream channel of the Agua Fria River west of Phoenix are mined and processed to provide some of this aggregate to the greater Phoenix area. The Agua Fria drainage basin (Fig. 1) is characterized by rugged mountains with high elevations and steep stream gradients in the north, and by broad alluvial filled basins separated by elongated faultblock mountain ranges in the south. The Agua Fria River, the basin’s main drainage, flows south from Prescott, AZ and west of Phoenix to the Gila River. The Waddel Dam impounds Lake Pleasant and greatly limits the flow of the Agua Fria River south of the lake. The southern portion of the watershed, south of Lake Pleasant, opens out into a broad valley where the river flows through urban and agricultural lands to its confluence with the Gila River, a tributary of the Colorado River.

  10. Text Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trybula, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the state of research in text mining, focusing on newer developments. The intent is to describe the disparate investigations currently included under the term text mining and provide a cohesive structure for these efforts. A summary of research identifies key organizations responsible for pushing the development of text mining. A section…

  11. Data Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoit, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Discusses data mining (DM) and knowledge discovery in databases (KDD), taking the view that KDD is the larger view of the entire process, with DM emphasizing the cleaning, warehousing, mining, and visualization of knowledge discovery in databases. Highlights include algorithms; users; the Internet; text mining; and information extraction.…

  12. Surface mining

    Treesearch

    Robert Leopold; Bruce Rowland; Reed Stalder

    1979-01-01

    The surface mining process consists of four phases: (1) exploration; (2) development; (3) production; and (4) reclamation. A variety of surface mining methods has been developed, including strip mining, auger, area strip, open pit, dredging, and hydraulic. Sound planning and design techniques are essential to implement alternatives to meet the myriad of laws,...

  13. Data Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoit, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Discusses data mining (DM) and knowledge discovery in databases (KDD), taking the view that KDD is the larger view of the entire process, with DM emphasizing the cleaning, warehousing, mining, and visualization of knowledge discovery in databases. Highlights include algorithms; users; the Internet; text mining; and information extraction.…

  14. Salmon as biogeomorphic agents in gravel-bed rivers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Spawning salmon have been known to affect streambed texture, influence sediment transport, and play an important geomorphological role in streams by digging nests or redds. We examined the impact of salmon and floods on channel morphology, bed material dispersion and yield, bed surface texture and stability, fine sediment dynamics and nutrient retention of small gravel bed streams in British Columbia, Canada. Channel morphology and dynamics of a large number of streams in British Columbia are partially or wholly affected by fish bioturbation. The scale of the impact is controlled by the salmon species, population density, and channel size and characteristics. Sediment transport measurements show that salmon play a significant role in erosion and deposition within the channel by promoting vertical and longitudinal mixing of the substrate, as well as by changing the relative mobility of the gravel on the bed. The action of salmon bioturbation promotes distinctive bedforms and packing of sediment grains. In streams with dense populations of sockeye or chum salmon the whole surface of spawning reaches may be modified, as bars are excavated and pools are filled. For chinook salmon the organization of spawning bedforms ranges from scattered mounds or ‘gravel pile-ups’ to well-ordered dunes. Such dunes extend for hundreds of meters to kilometres along the river bed. They exhibit amplitudes of more than one metre and wavelengths of 10 to 15 m. Our conclusion that mass-spawning fish can dominate sediment transport in mountain drainage basins has fundamental implications for understanding channel morphology, aquatic ecosystem dynamics, stream responses to environmental change, and river restoration programs.

  15. Deposition of uranium precipitaties in dolomitic gravel fill

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Debra H.; Watson, David B; Kelly, Shelly D; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2008-06-01

    Uranium-containing precipitates have been observed in a dolomitic gravel fill near the Department of Energy (DOE) S-3 Ponds former waste disposal site as a result of exposure to acidic (pH 3.4) groundwater contaminated with U (33 mg L{sup -1}), Al{sup 3+} (900 mg L{sup -1}), and NO{sub 3}{sup -} (14000 mg L{sup -1}). The U containing precipitates fluoresce a bright green under ultraviolet (UV) short-wave light which identify U-rich coatings on the gravel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microprobe analysis show U concentration ranges from 1.6-19.8% (average of 7%) within the coatings with higher concentrations at the interface of the dolomite fragments. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) indicate that the U is hexavalent and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) shows that the uranyl is coordinated by carbonate. The exact nature of the uranyl carbonates are difficult to determine, but some are best described by a split K{sup +}-like shell similar to grimselite [K{sub 4}Na(UO{sub 2})(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O] and other regions are better described by a single Ca{sup 2+}-like shell similar to liebigite [Ca{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 11(H{sub 2}O)] or andersonite [Na{sub 2}CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O]. The U precipitates are found in the form of white to light yellow cracked-formations as coatings on the dolomite gravel and as detached individual precipitates, and are associated with amorphous basalumnite [Al{sub 4}(SO{sub 4})(OH){sub 10} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O].

  16. Deposition of uranium precipitates in dolomitic gravel fill.

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D. H.; Watson, D. B.; Kelly, S. D.; Ravel, B.; Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division; Queens Univ.; ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Uranium-containing precipitates have been observed in a dolomitic gravel fill near the Department of Energy (DOE) S-3 Ponds former waste disposal site as a result of exposure to acidic (pH 3.4) groundwater contaminated with U (33 mg L{sup -1}), Al{sup 3+} (900 mg L{sup -1}), and NO{sub 3}{sup -} (14000 mg L{sup -1}). The U containing precipitates fluoresce a bright green under ultraviolet (UV) short-wave light which identify U-rich coatings on the gravel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microprobe analysis show U concentration ranges from 1.6?19.8% (average of 7%) within the coatings with higher concentrations at the interface of the dolomite fragments. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) indicate that the U is hexavalent and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) shows that the uranyl is coordinated by carbonate. The exact nature of the uranyl carbonates are difficult to determine, but some are best described by a split K{sup +}-like shell similar to grimselite [K{sub 4}Na(UO{sub 2})(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O] and other regions are better described by a single Ca{sup 2+}-like shell similar to liebigite [Ca{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 11(H{sub 2}O)] or andersonite [Na{sub 2}CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O]. The U precipitates are found in the form of white to light yellow cracked-formations as coatings on the dolomite gravel and as detached individual precipitates, and are associated with amorphous basalumnite [Al{sub 4}(SO{sub 4})(OH){sub 10} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O].

  17. Pilot-scale tests of tuff gravel flow diversion barriers for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.; Apted, M.; Kessler, J.; Kessler, J.

    1995-12-31

    This project conducts pilot-scale tests on potential sand/tuff gravel barrier designs and materials by measuring their hydraulic and barrier properties for use in modeling and final designs of possible diversion barriers at Yucca Mountain. The use of rubble composed of crushed paintbrush tuff (referred to as tuff gravel) in an engineered barrier around the waste packages can provide superior performance capabilities in a geologic repository located in the vadose zone. The effectiveness of unsaturated gravel as an hydraulic barrier to inflow of water from the surrounding environment is referred to by various names, e.g., diversion barrier, capillary barrier, or Richard`s barrier. A gravel barrier can also function as a diffusion barrier to the transport of ionic contaminants away from waste packages. Preliminary studies on tuff gravel and other gravel barriers have demonstrated their performance under a wide range of conditions anticipated in disposal scenarios.

  18. Particulate removal processes and hydraulics of porous gravel media filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, J. M.; Phoenix, V. R.; Dorea, C. C.; Haynes, H.; Sloan, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainable urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) are rapidly gaining acceptance as a low-cost tool for treating urban runoff pollutants close to source. Road runoff water in particular requires treatment due to the presence of high levels of suspended particles and heavy metals adsorbed to these particles. The aim of this research is to elucidate the particle removal processes that occur within gravel filters that have so far been considered as 'black-box' systems. Based on these findings, a better understanding will be attained on what influences gravel filter removal efficiency and how this changes throughout their design life; leading to a more rational design of this useful technology. This has been achieved by tying together three disparate research elements: tracer residence time distribution curves of filters during clogging; 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of clogging filters and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of complex filter pore networks. This research relates column average changes in particle removal efficiency and tracer residence time distributions (RTDs) due to clogging with non-invasive measurement of the spatial variability in particle deposition. The CFD modelling provides a link between observed deposition patterns, flow velocities and wall shear stresses as well as the explanations for the change in RTD with clogging and the effect on particle transport. Results show that, as a filter clogs, particles take a longer, more tortuous path through the filter. This is offset by a reduction in filter volume resulting in higher flow velocities and more rapid particle transport. Higher velocities result in higher shear stresses and the development of preferential pathways in which the velocity exceeds the deposition threshold and the overall efficiency of the filter decreases. Initial pore geometry is linked to the pattern of deposition and subsequent formation of preferential pathways. These results shed light on the 'black-box' internal

  19. An improved method for size distribution of stream bed gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1970-01-01

    Random sampling of surface rocks on a gravel bar is biased toward larger sizes which, because of their area, are more likely to be picked up. Weighting can eliminate this bias. Data on average weight of a single rock are used to change numbers of rocks to weights, thus yielding size frequency data in general agreement with a sieved and weighed sample. The question of what to sample depends on the use to which the data are to be put, and is not treated in detail in this paper.

  20. Influences on Bed Sorting and Armoring in an Upland Gravel-Cobble Bed River, Middle Fork John Day River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Fork is an unconfined to partly confined upland river with channel length of 34 km, drainage area of 250-850 km2, and channel gradients of 0.004 to 0.006 in the study area. Geology is dominated by Tertiary volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks that yield abundant coarse clasts. Surface and subsurface bed material was sampled volumetrically at twenty-five sites. The textural types range from gravelly cobbles to sandy cobbly gravels, sand content is low (2 to 13%), mud content is very low, and sorting is poor to very poor. Generally the surface layer is an open framework gravel or cobble, while the subsurface layer is a filled or partially filled framework gravel or cobble. Despite an armored appearance, only 20% of the sites are armored using the standard armor ratio (surface D50/subsurface D50). While surface layers are not coarser than their subsurface layers in terms of the median or coarse end of the distribution, they are coarser in terms of fines (ratios based on D25, D16, % sand), suggesting that alternatives to the D50armor ratio might be useful. Multivariate analysis of size fraction data reveals four distinct groups of samples, distinguished mainly by differences in proportions of coarse to fine gravels, and in abundance of sand. While one group comprises only surface samples and another subsurface samples, two of the groups are mixed. One goal of the project is to evaluate the effects of land use history on bed material characteristics and mobility. Sediment characteristics were examined in relation to distance downstream, geology, relation to debris-flow sources, land use history, and other potential influences. There are no geologic associations or downstream trends in fining or other grain size parameters. Differences in land use history, such as former dredged-mined reaches and reaches with recent restoration projects also do not explain patterns of armoring or other sediment characteristics. High variability within each reach suggests that

  1. Chemical fate and transport of atrazine in soil gravel materials at agrichemical distribution facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Chou, S.-F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The gravel commonly used to cover parking lots and roadways at retail agrichemical facilities may contain relatively large concentrations of pesticides that resulted from past management problems. These pesticides may threaten groundwater quality. Previous studies, however, suggested that the pesticides had not moved from the gravel in several sample profiles. Excavations at a closed facility revealed tremendous variability in pesticide distribution within the site. Pesticides were present below the gravel in two profiles, but the mechanism(s) for their movement were not clear. The objectives of this study were to investigate how the physical and chemical properties of the gravel influence the environmental fate of atrazine. All of the gravel samples collected and characterized contained atrazine and sufficient organic C to adsorb significant amounts of atrazine, thus retarding its movement through the gravel. Laboratory column leaching experiments, however, suggested that much of the atrazine should leach from the gravel within a year or two. A field-scale test plot was constructed to study how atrazine moves through the gravel under controlled conditions. Atrazine was "spilled" in the test plot. Atrazine moved from the gravel both vertically and horizontally. It appears that formulated product spilled on gravel will leach. A single discrete spill can give rise to phantom spills whose occurrence and distribution is not related to any specific pesticide-management practice. The apparent lack of atrazine leaching from gravel appeared to be a transient phenomenon and/or the result of sampling limitations in previous studies. The contaminated gravel clearly poses a risk to groundwater quality.

  2. Gravel packing dual zones in one trip reduces offshore completion time

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, D.H.; Harrison, D.T. ); van Sickle, E.W. )

    1991-09-01

    A single trip, dual-zone gravel pack system was used to successfully gravel pack two wells on Green Canyon platform 52 A in the Gulf of Mexico. An average 56 hours was saved on each well, representing reductions of about 25% in completion time and 26% in completion cost per well. Time-sensitive costs had the largest impact on Green Canyon 52 A final well completion cost; therefore, new technology or more efficient operations were required to minimize completion time. One way to enhance project economics was to gravel pack two separate zones in one trip. In this paper, four objectives are addressed during development of a single trip tool to gravel pack the stacked zones of the Marquette project. These were time and cost reduction, removal of loss circulation material (LCM) prior to gravel packing, zone isolation during gravel packing and use of conventional gravel placement techniques. The design requirement that all LCM (salt and/or viscous polymer pills), perforation debris and formation sand be removed from the wellbore prior to gravel packing was accomplished by incorporating a washdown feature that allows circulation at the bottom of the gravel pack assembly prior to landing in the sump packer.

  3. Gravel-pack field examples of a new pulsed-neutron-activation logging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Caroll, J.F.; Smith, B.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Gravel packs traditionally have been evaluated with gamma/gamma density and neutron logging tools. These logging tools, particularly the density tools, do an acceptable job in most logging environments but have some limitations that affect their measurement resolution in attempts to define gravel-pack quality. The presence of high-density completion fluids significantly reduces the dynamic range of the conventional measurements. Low-contrast logging resolution is also encountered with the new matched-density gravel-pack systems that use matrix materials with densities near those of the completion fluids. This paper presents an alternative measurement of gravel-pack quality that is unaffected by the type of completion fluid present. The authors also present six field examples that demonstrate this new technique. Each example presents a different logging condition, e.g., heavy borehole fluid in a conventional gravel pack, gravel pack with sintered bauxite, two completions with Isopac gravel of different screen sizes, and multiple gravel-pack logs recorded before and after wireline repair work. Several of these examples show that neutron activation can be a useful method of gravel-pack analysis in some logging environments.

  4. Flow resistance under conditions of intense gravel transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitlick, John

    1992-01-01

    A study of flow resistance was undertaken in a channelized reach of the North Fork Toutle River, downstream of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Hydraulic and sediment transport data were collected in flows with velocities up to 3 m/s and shear stresses up to 7 times the critical value needed for bed load transport. Details of the flow structure as revealed in vertical velocity profiles indicate that weak bed load transport over a plane gravel bed has little effect on flow resistance. The plane gravel bed persists up to stresses ∼3 times critical, at which point, irregular bed forms appear. Bed forms greatly increase flow resistance and cause velocity profiles to become distorted. The latter arises as an effect of flows becoming depth-limited as bed form amplitude increases. At very high rates of bed load transport, an upper stage plane bed appeared. Velocity profiles measured in these flows match the law of the wall closely, with the equivalent roughness being well represented by ks = 3D84 of the bed load. The effects noted here will be important in very large floods or in rivers that are not free to widen, such as those cut into bedrock.

  5. The Persistence of Potential Refugia Mapped from Gravel Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    Floods disturb aquatic habitats. On an event basis, flood characteristics control the spatial extent and depth of streambed disturbance for a given river and set limits to the amount of channel refugia for biota. The aim of this research is to quantify the area of potential refugia that persists over a long flood series and therefore affects many generations of aquatic populations. Field observations were collected in Carnation Creek, a small gravel-bed river located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. Streambed disturbance was documented by monitoring the three-dimensional positions of about 2500 magnetically tagged gravels over 277 floods. Tracer movement and burial observations were used to produce cellular maps of the frequency of bed disturbance within a GIS. The streambed exhibits different frequencies of disturbance as expected. The most active areas make up about 1% of the streambed and tend to be located near the channel thalweg. Undisturbed areas constitute more than 25% of the bed, and provide distinct areas of longer-term refugia that persist over the range of flood magnitudes observed. In addition to validating a key aspect of partial sediment transport, the results suggest that the natural variability of floods facilitates diverse aquatic communities by ensuring the availability of channel refugia over time.

  6. Sand infiltration into a gravel bed: A mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, A.; Berni, C.

    2016-11-01

    Fine sediment infiltration into a river bed is a physical process affected by different human actions and has several environmental, socioeconomic, and river morphology consequences. A theoretical model is proposed herein aiming to reproduce the fine sediment content depth profile resulting from the infiltration of fine sediment into an initially clean gravel bed. The model is based on the probability of infiltrating particles to be trapped in a pore throat formed by three bed particles. The model is tested against previous experimental results and is found to reproduce adequately the occurrence of the two infiltration mechanisms reported by previous studies: bridging and unimpeded static percolation. Theoretical depth profiles are found to underestimate fine sediment content at the bed subsurface (below 2-3 gravel diameter depth) compared to the laboratory results. This may be due to hyporheic flow that is not taken into account in our model. In flow experiments, the particles previously infiltrated and deposited might be destabilized by pore water flow and their fall down to the bed might be magnified.

  7. Mining Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Trends in other sectors of the domestic economy were similar to those in mineral production and consumption rates (Table 1). After continued decline following the 2008-2009 recession, the construction industry began to show signs of improvement late in 2011 and throughout 2012, with increased production and consumption of cement, construction sand and gravel, crushed stone and gypsum, mineral commodities that are used almost exclusively in construction.

  8. AMU NEXRAD Exploitation Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Applied Meteorology Unit's NEXRAD Exploitation Task. The objectives of this task are to determine what radar signatures are present prior to and at the time of convection initiation, and to determine radar signatures which will help distinguish whether the ensuing convection will become severe. Radar data from the WSR-88D radar located at NWS Melbourne (WSR-88D/KMLB) were collected between June and September 1995, and 16 convective case studies were analyzed for which the radar was operating during the entire period of interest. All WSR-88D/KMLB products were scrutinized for their utility in detecting convection initiation and severe storm signatures. Through process of elimination, it was found that the 0.5 deg reflectivity product with the lowest reflectivity values displayed is the best product to monitor for convection initiation signatures. Seven meteorological features associated with the initiation of deep convection were identified: the Merritt Island and Indian River convergence zones, interlake convergence, horizontal convective rolls, the sea breeze, storm outflow boundaries, and fires. Their reflectivity values ranged from -5 to 20 dBZ. Of the three severe weather phenomena (winds greater than or equal to 50 kts, tornado, 3/4 inch hail), high wind events due to microbursts were most common in the data set. It was found that the values and trends of composite reflectivity, vertically integrated liquid, and core aspect ratio were key indicators of the potential of a cell to produce a microburst. The data were not analyzed for the other two severe weather phenomena because they rarely occurred during the data collection period. This report also includes suggestions for new WSR-88D products, summaries of ongoing research aimed at creating new products, and explicit recommended procedures for detecting convection initiation and severe storm signatures in the radar data using the currently available technology.

  9. Iron and Zinc Exploitation during Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Terwilliger, Austen; Maresso, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient bacteria originated from metal-rich environments. Billions of years of evolution directed these tiny single cell creatures to exploit the versatile properties of metals in catalyzing chemical reactions and biological responses. The result is an entire metallome of proteins that use metal co-factors to facilitate key cellular process that range from the production of energy to the replication of DNA. Two key metals in this regard are iron and zinc, both abundant on Earth but not readily accessible in a human host. Instead, pathogenic bacteria must employ clever ways to acquire these metals. In this review we describe the many elegant ways these bacteria mine, regulate, and craft the use of two key metals (iron and zinc) to build a virulence arsenal that challenges even the most sophisticated immune response. PMID:26497057

  10. Plant cover and water balance in gravel admixtures at an arid waste-burial site

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Thiede, M.E.; Bates, D.J.

    1994-07-01

    Isolation of radioactive waste buried in unsaturated zones will require long-term control of recharge and erosion. Soil covers control recharge at and sites by storing rainwater close enough to the surface to be removed by evapotranspiration. Surface layers of rock or gravel control erosion at sites with sparse vegetation, but can also alter plant habitat and cause recharge through interred waste. As an alternative, gravel mixed into the uppermost soil law may control erosion ever the king-term better than surface gravel layers. Gravel admixtures may also not influence plant establishment or sod water balance in waste-site covers. The interactive effects of gravel admixture concentration, vegetation, and precipitation on soil water content and plant cover were measured at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Results support use of a combination of vegetation and gravel admixtures for erosion control. Vegetation seasonally depleted root zone water storage to about 6.5 volume % regardless of precipitation amount or the presence of gravel admixture amendments. In contrast, yearly increases in soil water storage as deep as 225 cm in plots without vegetation may be a leading indicator of recharge. The composition and abundance of vegetation changed over time and with precipitation amount, but was not influenced by gravel amendments. Seeded wheatgrasses [Agropyron sibericum Wilde and Agropyron dasystachyum (Hook.) Scribn.] established only when irrigated with twice average precipitation, but persisted after the irrigation ceased. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) and Russian thistle (Salsola kali L.) colonized areas receiving both irrigation and ambient precipitation. Stands with wheatgrasses extracted water more rapidly and depleted soil water to lower levels than cheatgrass-dominated stands. Increases in gravel cover and near-surface gravel concentrations after 5 yr were evidence of the formation of a protective gravel veneer. 44 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The effect of gravel size fraction on the distribution coefficients of selected radionuclides radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Glossbrenner, Ellwood T.

    2009-06-26

    This manuscript addresses the consequences of the common practice of assuming that the gravel fraction of sediments does not participate in sorption reactions and thus sorption quantified by the distribution coefficient (Kd) construct can be estimated from laboratory tests on < 2mm fraction of sediments. As shown within the use of this common assumption can lead to inaccurate estimates of the mobility and sorption capacity of key radionuclides (Tc, U, and Np) at the Hanford Site where gravel dominates the lower Hanford formation and upper Ringold Formation. Batch sorption and column experiments showed that the distribution coefficient measured using only < 2mm fraction were not in agreement with those obtained from the bulk sediments depending on the radionuclide. The least reactive radionuclide, Tc showed the lowest effects from the presence of gravel. However, differences between measured Kds using < 2mm fractions of the sediment and the Kds measured on the bulk sediment were significant for strongly reactive radionuclides such as Np, especially on the sediment with gravel fractions that contained highly reactive sites. Highly reactive sites in the gravel fraction were attributed to the presence of Fe oxides coatings and/or reactive fracture faces on the gravel surfaces. Gravel correction factors that use the sum of the Kd,<2 mm and Kd,>2 mm values to estimate the Kd for the bulk sediment were found to best describe Kds for radionuclides on the bulk sediment. However, more detailed characterization of gravel surfaces should be also conducted to identify those gravels with higher reactive sorbents, if present. Gravel correction factors should be considered to predict precisely the sorption capacity of bulk sediments that contain more than 10% gravel and to estimate the mobility of contaminants in subsurface environments.

  12. Reconnaissance of alluvial fans as potential sources of gravel aggregate, Santa Cruz River valley, Southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Melick, Roger

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to provide information on the aggregate potential of alluvial fan sediments in the Santa Cruz River valley. Pebble lithology, roundness, and particle size were determined in the field, and structures and textures of alluvial fan sediments were photographed and described. Additional measurements of particle size on digital photographs were made on a computer screen. Digital elevation models were acquired and compiled for viewing the areal extent of selected fans. Alluvial fan gravel in the Santa Cruz River valley reflects the lithology of its source. Gravel derived from granitic and gneissic terrane of the Tortolita, Santa Catalina, and Rincon Mountains weathers to grus and is generally inferior for use as aggregate. Gravel derived from the Tucson, Sierrita, and Tumacacori Mountains is composed mostly of angular particles of volcanic rock, much of it felsic in composition. This angular volcanic gravel should be suitable for use in asphalt but may require treatment for alkali-silica reaction prior to use in concrete. Gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains is of mixed plutonic (mostly granitic rocks), volcanic (mostly felsic rocks), and sedimentary (sandstone and carbonate rock) composition. The sedimentary component tends to make gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains slightly more rounded than other fan gravel. The coarsest (pebble, cobble, and boulder) gravel is found near the heads (proximal part) of alluvial fans. At the foot (distal part) of alluvial fans, most gravel is pebble-sized and interbedded with sand and silt. Some of the coarsest gravel was observed near the head of the Madera Canyon, Montosa Canyon, and Esperanza Wash fans. The large Cienega Creek fan, located immediately south and southeast of Tucson, consists entirely of distal-fan pebble gravel, sand, and silt.

  13. Reconnaissance of alluvial fans as potential sources of gravel aggregate, Santa Cruz River valley, Southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Melick, Roger

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to provide information on the aggregate potential of alluvial fan sediments in the Santa Cruz River valley. Pebble lithology, roundness, and particle size were determined in the field, and structures and textures of alluvial fan sediments were photographed and described. Additional measurements of particle size on digital photographs were made on a computer screen. Digital elevation models were acquired and compiled for viewing the areal extent of selected fans. Alluvial fan gravel in the Santa Cruz River valley reflects the lithology of its source. Gravel derived from granitic and gneissic terrane of the Tortolita, Santa Catalina, and Rincon Mountains weathers to grus and is generally inferior for use as aggregate. Gravel derived from the Tucson, Sierrita, and Tumacacori Mountains is composed mostly of angular particles of volcanic rock, much of it felsic in composition. This angular volcanic gravel should be suitable for use in asphalt but may require treatment for alkali-silica reaction prior to use in concrete. Gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains is of mixed plutonic (mostly granitic rocks), volcanic (mostly felsic rocks), and sedimentary (sandstone and carbonate rock) composition. The sedimentary component tends to make gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains slightly more rounded than other fan gravel. The coarsest (pebble, cobble, and boulder) gravel is found near the heads (proximal part) of alluvial fans. At the foot (distal part) of alluvial fans, most gravel is pebble-sized and interbedded with sand and silt. Some of the coarsest gravel was observed near the head of the Madera Canyon, Montosa Canyon, and Esperanza Wash fans. The large Cienega Creek fan, located immediately south and southeast of Tucson, consists entirely of distal-fan pebble gravel, sand, and silt.

  14. Application of Structure from Motion (SfM) Photogrammetry to Quantify Gravel Storage Following Gravel Augmentation, Oak Grove Fork of the Clackamas River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, M. L.; Hales, G.; Michalak, M.

    2016-12-01

    Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) generated in Agisoft Photoscan from photogrammetry provide a basis for a high resolution, quantitative analysis of geomorphic features that are difficult to describe using conventional, commonly used techniques. Photogrammetric analysis can be particularly useful in investigating the spatial and temporal dispersal of gravel in high gradient mountainous streams. The Oak Grove Fork (OGF), located in northwestern Oregon, is one of the largest tributaries to the Clackamas River. Lake Harriet Dam and diversion was built on the OGF in 1924 as part of a hydroelectric development by Portland General Electric. Decreased flow and sediment supply downstream of Lake Harriet Dam has resulted in geomorphic and biological changes, including reduced salmonid habitat. As part of a program to help restore a portion of the natural sediment supply and improve salmonid habitat, gravel augmentation is scheduled to begin September 2016. Tracking the downstream movement of augmented gravels is crucial to establishing program success. The OGF provides a unique setting for this study; flow is regulated at the dam, except for spillover during high flow events, and a streamflow gaging station downstream of the study area reports discharge. As such, the controlled environment of the OGF provides a natural laboratory to study how a sediment-depleted channel responds geomorphically to a known volume of added gravel. This study uses SfM to evaluate deposition of the augmented gravel following its introduction. The existing channel is characterized by coarse, angular gravel, cobble, and boulder; the augmented gravel is finer, rounded, and 5% of the volume is an exotic lithology to provide a visual tracer. Baseline, pre-gravel introduction DTMs are constructed and will be differenced with post-gravel introduction DTMs to calculate change at four study sites. Our preliminary pilot testing on another river shows that centimeter-scale accretion and aggradation within the

  15. Quantifying Stream Bed Gravel Mobility from Friction Angle Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, M. A.; Dunne, T.

    2012-12-01

    A method to measure friction angles using force gauges was field tested to determine its utility at quantifying critical shear stress in a gravel bedded reach of the San Joaquin River in California. Predictions of mobility from friction angles were compared with observations of the movement of tagged particles from locations for which local shear stress was quantified with a validated 2-D flow model. The observations of movement, distance of travel, and location of the end of travel were made after extended flow releases from Friant dam. Determining the critical shear stress for gravel bed material transport currently depends upon bedload sampling or tracer studies. Often, such measurements can only be made during occasional and untimely flow events, and at limited, suboptimal locations. Yet, theoretical studies conclude that the friction angle is an important control on the critical shear stress for mobility of any grain size, and therefore of the excess shear stress which strongly influences bedload transport rate. The ability to predict bed mobility at ungauged and unmonitored locations is also an important requirement for planning of flow regimes and channel design. Therefore, a method to measure friction angles that can be performed quickly in low flow conditions would prove useful for river management and research. To investigate this promising method friction angle surveys were performed at two riffle sites where differences in bed material size and distribution, and channel slope were observed. The friction angle surveys are sensitive enough to detect differences between the sites as well as spatially and temporally within a single riffle. Low friction angles were observed along the inside of a long bend where sand content was greater (by ~20%) than other surveyed locations. Friction angles decreased slightly after a depositional event associated with transient large woody debris and bank erosion, and increased again after a 5 year return interval flow

  16. Manual for computing bed load transport using BAGS (Bedload Assessment for Gravel-bed Streams) Software

    Treesearch

    John Pitlick; Yantao Cui; Peter Wilcock

    2009-01-01

    This manual provides background information and instructions on the use of a spreadsheet-based program for Bedload Assessment in Gravel-bed Streams (BAGS). The program implements six bed load transport equations developed specifically for gravel-bed rivers. Transport capacities are calculated on the basis of field measurements of channel geometry, reach-average slope,...

  17. Simulating the role of gravel in freeze-thaw process on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongjie; Lyu, Shihua; Li, Suosuo; Gao, Yanhong; Meng, Xianhong; Ao, Yinhuan; Wang, Shujin

    2017-02-01

    Soils containing gravel (particle size ≥2 mm) are widely distributed over the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP). Soil mixed with gravel has different thermal and hydrological properties compared with fine soil (particle size <2 mm) and thus has marked impacts on soil water and heat transfer. However, the most commonly used land models do not consider the effects of gravel. This paper reports the development of a new scheme that simulates the thermal and hydrological processes in soil containing gravel and its application in the QTP. The new scheme was implemented in version 4 of the Community Land Model, and experiments were conducted for two typical sites in the QTP. The results showed that (1) soil with gravel tends to reduce the water holding capacity and enhance the hydraulic conductivity and drainage; (2) the thermal conductivity increases with soil gravel content, and the response of the temperature of soil mixed with gravel to air temperature change is rapid; (3) the new scheme performs well in simulating the soil temperature and moisture—the mean biases of soil moisture between the simulation and observation reduced by 25-48 %, and the mean biases of soil temperature reduced by 9-25 %. Therefore, this scheme can successfully simulate the thermal and hydrological processes in soil with different levels of gravel content and is potentially applicable in land surface models.

  18. Evaluation of an ion adsorption method to estimate intragravel flow velocity in salmonid spawning gravels

    Treesearch

    James L. Clayton; John G. King; Russell F. Thurow

    1996-01-01

    Intragravel water exchange provides oxygenated water, removes metabolic waste, and is an essential factor in salmonid embryo survival. Measurements of intragravel flow velocity have been suggested as an index of gravel quality and also as a useful predictor of fry emergence; however, proposed methods for measuring velocity in gravel are problematic. We evaluate an ion...

  19. Prediction of sand transport over immobile gravel from supply limited to capacity conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prediction of the transport of sand in channels armored with gravel downstream of dams is difficult but necessary for the range of bed conditions from supply limited to capacity transport. Previous work has shown that information on the mean elevation of the sand relative to the gravel and on the s...

  20. A general power equation for predicting bed load transport rates in gravel bed rivers

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey J. Barry; John M. Buffington; John G. King

    2004-01-01

    A variety of formulae has been developed to predict bed load transport in gravel bed rivers, ranging from simple regressions to complex multiparameter formulations. The ability to test these formulae across numerous field sites has, until recently, been hampered by a paucity of bed load transport data for gravel bed rivers. We use 2104 bed load transport observations...

  1. Partial transport in a natural gravel bed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, Judith K.; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2003-01-01

    Partial transport is documented in the gravel bed channel of Carnation Creek using magnetically tagged stones. For four flood peaks the active proportion of surface grains was used to map streambed areas into distinct units of three different levels of grain entrainment. In partially mobile regions of the bed, the active proportion of surface grains declines with grain size. As flow increases, areas of partial transport grow at the expense of inactive areas and fully active areas replace areas with partial mobility. Approximately 25-50% of the bed remained in a state of partial mobility during a flood with a 2-year return period, indicating that inactive regions of the bed surface typically persist from year to year. During a flood with a 7-year return period, surface grain entrainment was nearly complete, indicating that full mobilization of surface grains is not a frequent event.

  2. Large size space construction for space exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Space exploitation is impossible without large space structures. We need to make sufficient large volume of pressurized protecting frames for crew, passengers, space processing equipment, & etc. We have to be unlimited in space. Now the size and mass of space constructions are limited by possibility of a launch vehicle. It limits our future in exploitation of space by humans and in development of space industry. Large-size space construction can be made with using of the curing technology of the fibers-filled composites and a reactionable matrix applied directly in free space. For curing the fabric impregnated with a liquid matrix (prepreg) is prepared in terrestrial conditions and shipped in a container to orbit. In due time the prepreg is unfolded by inflating. After polymerization reaction, the durable construction can be fitted out with air, apparatus and life support systems. Our experimental studies of the curing processes in the simulated free space environment showed that the curing of composite in free space is possible. The large-size space construction can be developed. A project of space station, Moon base, Mars base, mining station, interplanet space ship, telecommunication station, space observatory, space factory, antenna dish, radiation shield, solar sail is proposed and overviewed. The study was supported by Humboldt Foundation, ESA (contract 17083/03/NL/SFe), NASA program of the stratospheric balloons and RFBR grants (05-08-18277, 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011).

  3. Monitoring and analysis of gravel-packing procedures to explain well performance

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, H.O. Jr. ); Minarovic, M.J. )

    1994-10-01

    Gravel-packed gas wells completed in the Gulf of Mexico since 1980 were reviewed to build a selective database for a completion-effectiveness study. Gas wells with clean, uniform sands were selected for analysis. Significant monitoring data identified were injectivity tests at different points during the completion and fluid loss rates (barrels per hour). Injectivity before gravel packing and productivity after gravel packing were classified according to sidewall-core permeabilities. Different gravel-pack preparation and execution techniques were reviewed. Fluid-loss-control pills were identified as the greatest source of damage restricting gravel-packed well productivity. Injectivity tests and sidewall-core permeabilities provide valuable information for monitoring well completion procedures.

  4. The model test of restoration project of the gravel beach of Chen Village fishing port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. X.; Gui, J. S.; Sun, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    Gravel beach is a case in coastal landform by wave action. It is more and more crucial for the environment of coastal engineering in recent years. However, it is poorly studied for it in China. And this paper which is based on the model test of Restoration Project of the Gravel Beach of Chen Village Fishing Port, uses two dimensional normal physical models, aiming at exploring the movement of gravel beach under wave action and verifying the stability of the gravel beach section. The test depends on different water levels (designed high water level, designed low water level, and extreme high water level) and return periods (2, 5, 10, 25, 50 years once). Finally, two distinct experimental sections are got under the changed conditions and the movement law of gravels is obtained.

  5. Diffusion And Flow In Gravel, Soil, And Whole Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conca, James L.; Wright, Judith

    1992-01-01

    Transport parameters (diffusion coefficients, D(θ), hydraulic conductivities, K(θ), and retardation factors, Rf were experimentally determined in unsaturated soil, gravel, bentonite, and whole rock over a wide range of water contents, fixed at desired levels using the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFATM). Effective diffusion coefficients in all media were found primarily to be a function of volumeric water cintent (θ) and not material characteristics, except where the characteristics affect or determine water content. At high water contents, D(θ) gradually declines as water content decreases, from 10-5cm2/s at a θ of about 50% to 10-7cm2/s at a θ of about 5%, followed by a sharp decline as surface films become thin and discontinuous, and pendular water elements become very small, from 10-7cm2/s at a θ of about 5% to 10-10cm2/s at a θ of about 0,5%. The several whole rock cores studied behaved similary. In aggregate material such as gravel and soil where the particles themselves have significant porosity, only the surface water content, not the internal water of the particles, contributes to the diffusion coefficient and hydraulic conductivity under unsaturated conditions, although the internal water is very important in retardation and other chemical effects. Experimentally determined K(θ) compares favorably to van Genuchten/Mualem relationships calculated from laboratory-determined water retention versus matric potential data obtained on the same soils. Experimentally determined K(θ) for whole rock appears to validate capillary bundle theory.

  6. Sedimentology of Martian Gravels from Mardi Twilight Imaging: Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Malin, Michael C.; Minitti, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative sedimentologic analysis of gravel surfaces dominated by pebble-sized clasts has been employed in an effort to untangle aspects of the provenance of surface sediments on Mars using Curiosity's MARDI nadir-viewing camera operated at twilight Images have been systematically acquired since sol 310 providing a representative sample of gravel-covered surfaces since the rover departed the Shaler region. The MARDI Twilight imaging dataset offers approximately 1 millimeter spatial resolution (slightly out of focus) for patches beneath the rover that cover just under 1 m2 in area, under illumination that makes clast size and inter-clast spacing analysis relatively straightforward using semi- automated codes developed for use with nadir images. Twilight images are utilized for these analyses in order to reduce light scattering off dust deposited on the front MARDI lens element during the terminal stages of Curiosity's entry, descent and landing. Such scattering is worse when imaging bright, directly-illuminated surfaces; twilight imaging times yield diffusely-illuminated surfaces that improve the clarity of the resulting MARDI product. Twilight images are obtained between 10-30 minutes after local sunset, governed by the timing of the end of the no-heat window for the camera. Techniques were also utilized to examine data terrestrial locations (the Kau Desert in Hawaii and near Askja Caldera in Iceland). Methods employed include log hyperbolic size distribution (LHD) analysis and Delauney Triangulation (DT) inter-clast spacing analysis. This work extends the initial results reported in Yingst et al., that covered the initial landing zone, to the Rapid-Transit Route (RTR) towards Mount Sharp.

  7. Bulk Friction Angles in Dry, Drained, and Saturated Gravel Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holo, S.; Palucis, M. C.; Lamb, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    We examined the effect of capillary action and lubrication of grains on bulk friction angles through tilting chute experiments. In each experiment, we screed a bed of 5mm gravels in 65cm long x 18cm wide tilting chute with fixed roughness and slowly tilted the chute until a granular avalanche occurred. We performed these experiments under three conditions: with dry grains, with a bed that had been submerged and subsequently drained such that no water occupied the pore space, and with the entire apparatus submerged under water such that the bed is saturated. In addition, for each of these cases, we performed experiments with 5, 10, and 15cm bed thicknesses. In the dry case, the bed failed at ~ 41º, and bed thickness did not have a significant effect on failure angle. In the drained case, friction angles increased from 46.5º to 50.9º with increasing bed thickness. In the submerged case, the bed failed at angles not significantly different than those from the dry case, and they did not vary with bed thickness. The increase in friction angles between the dry and drained cases suggests that addition of the water induces a cohesive effect on the grains. Because the pore pressure from the saturated bed removes capillary effects but retains lubrication effects, the submerged case data suggest that capillary action is primarily responsible for the observed increases in friction angle and effects from grain lubrication are negligible. Further study is ongoing to fully understand the effect of capillary action on bulk friction angles in unsaturated gravel and why it appears to increase with bed thickness.

  8. Bedload pulses in a hydropower affected alpine gravel bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigner, Johann; Kreisler, Andrea; Rindler, Rolf; Hauer, Christoph; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the sediment resupply and transport dynamics at the Upper Drau River upstream of Lienz (Eastern Tyrol, Austria). Due to a hydropower plant, a 24 km long river reach of this alpine gravel bed river is under residual flow conditions, although sediment is still resupplied into the reach through many active torrents and tributaries. As a result, sediment deposition in the residual flow reach intensified, hence increasing maintenance efforts to stabilize this river section and ensure flood protection. In combination with a new sediment management program, a continuous bedload monitoring system was installed 2 km downstream of the residual reach in 2001 to support the development of adapted sediment management strategies. The surrogate bedload monitoring system consists of 16 impact plate geophones, installed over a 17 m wide cross section. The unprecedented 15-year dataset of high-resolution bedload intensity revealed a complex process of gravel storage and intermittent resupply from the residual reach, allowing the authors a detailed analysis of frequently occurring bedload pulses. These transport features are triggered by increased discharges during floods in the residual reach and created pronounced anticlockwise bedload hysteresis or, with a temporal shift to the event peak, caused distinct shifts in the bedload activity downstream. Bedload pulses produce very high bedload fluxes while in transit, tend to increase bedload flux in the post-event phase, and can alter and reduce the upstream sediment storage leading to a lowering of bedload availability for future pulses. The observed time lags between main discharge events and the arrival of the macro-pulses are correlated with mean water discharge during pulse propagation, thus enabling a prediction of the pulse arrival at the monitoring station solely based on the hydrograph. In combination with the hydrological setup of the reach, the observed bedload pulse time lags allowed an estimation of

  9. Wind-formed gravel bed forms, Wright Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John A.; Nickling, William G.; Tilson, Michael; Furtak-Cole, Eden

    2012-12-01

    Bed forms composed of gravel size particles (≈50% of particles >4 mm) are observed in the Wright Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valley system in Antarctica. These bed forms are characterized by a very asymmetrical shape with a mean aspect ratio of 0.025 (standard deviation 0.005), mean wavelength of 2.7 m (±0.49 m), and a mean height of 0.06 m (±0.01 m). Particle size analysis of the bed form sediments shows bimodality with a peak near 9 mm and another between 0.5 mm and 0.25 mm. Time-integrated sediment trap samples of horizontal saltation and creep flux indicate the flux of particles ≥4 mm during the two-year monitoring period was extremely low. Measurements of the horizontal displacement of tracer particles (14 mm, 12 mm, 10 mm, 8 mm, and 6 mm diameter) placed onto the bed forms corroborate the low particle flux measurements and limited movement of particles. The bed forms share form and grain size characteristics with both ripples and mega-ripples, showing poor sorting of particles across a single wavelength except for a slight coarsening at the crest similar to ripples, but their sinuosity suggest that transverse instabilities affect their formation similar to mega-ripples. Based on the data for the prevailing environmental conditions it can be argued that the Wright Valley form is an expression of gravel particles moved solely by highly intermittent creep processes. This also argues for the need for a very long period of time for their evolution, on the order of centuries.

  10. Mercury contamination from historical gold mining in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, Charles N.; Hunerlach, Michael P.; May, Jason T.; Hothem, Roger L.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury contamination from historical gold mines represents a potential risk to human health and the environment. This fact sheet provides background information on the use of mercury in historical gold mining and processing operations in California, with emphasis on historical hydraulic mining areas. It also describes results of recent USGS projects that address the potential risks associated with mercury contamination. Miners used mercury (quicksilver) to recover gold throughout the western United States. Gold deposits were either hardrock (lode, gold-quartz veins) or placer (alluvial, unconsolidated gravels). Underground methods (adits and shafts) were used to mine hardrock gold deposits. Hydraulic, drift, or dredging methods were used to mine the placer gold deposits. Mercury was used to enhance gold recovery in all the various types of mining operations; historical records indicate that more mercury was used and lost at hydraulic mines than at other types of mines. On the basis of USGS studies and other recent work, a better understanding is emerging of mercury distribution, ongoing transport, transformation processes, and the extent of biological uptake in areas affected by historical gold mining. This information has been used extensively by federal, state, and local agencies responsible for resource management and public health in California.

  11. African mining

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference addressing the development of the minerals industry in Africa. Topics covered include: A review - past, present and future - of Zimbabwe's mining industry; Geomorphological processes and related mineralization in Tanzania; and Rock mechanics investigations at Mufulira mine, Zambia.

  12. Modeling the soil water retention curves of soil-gravel mixtures with regression method on the Loess Plateau of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifang; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Shao, Ming'an

    2013-01-01

    Soil water retention parameters are critical to quantify flow and solute transport in vadose zone, while the presence of rock fragments remarkably increases their variability. Therefore a novel method for determining water retention parameters of soil-gravel mixtures is required. The procedure to generate such a model is based firstly on the determination of the quantitative relationship between the content of rock fragments and the effective saturation of soil-gravel mixtures, and then on the integration of this relationship with former analytical equations of water retention curves (WRCs). In order to find such relationships, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine WRCs of soil-gravel mixtures obtained with a clay loam soil mixed with shale clasts or pebbles in three size groups with various gravel contents. Data showed that the effective saturation of the soil-gravel mixtures with the same kind of gravels within one size group had a linear relation with gravel contents, and had a power relation with the bulk density of samples at any pressure head. Revised formulas for water retention properties of the soil-gravel mixtures are proposed to establish the water retention curved surface models of the power-linear functions and power functions. The analysis of the parameters obtained by regression and validation of the empirical models showed that they were acceptable by using either the measured data of separate gravel size group or those of all the three gravel size groups having a large size range. Furthermore, the regression parameters of the curved surfaces for the soil-gravel mixtures with a large range of gravel content could be determined from the water retention data of the soil-gravel mixtures with two representative gravel contents or bulk densities. Such revised water retention models are potentially applicable in regional or large scale field investigations of significantly heterogeneous media, where various gravel sizes and different gravel

  13. Modeling the Soil Water Retention Curves of Soil-Gravel Mixtures with Regression Method on the Loess Plateau of China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huifang; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Shao, Ming'an

    2013-01-01

    Soil water retention parameters are critical to quantify flow and solute transport in vadose zone, while the presence of rock fragments remarkably increases their variability. Therefore a novel method for determining water retention parameters of soil-gravel mixtures is required. The procedure to generate such a model is based firstly on the determination of the quantitative relationship between the content of rock fragments and the effective saturation of soil-gravel mixtures, and then on the integration of this relationship with former analytical equations of water retention curves (WRCs). In order to find such relationships, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine WRCs of soil-gravel mixtures obtained with a clay loam soil mixed with shale clasts or pebbles in three size groups with various gravel contents. Data showed that the effective saturation of the soil-gravel mixtures with the same kind of gravels within one size group had a linear relation with gravel contents, and had a power relation with the bulk density of samples at any pressure head. Revised formulas for water retention properties of the soil-gravel mixtures are proposed to establish the water retention curved surface models of the power-linear functions and power functions. The analysis of the parameters obtained by regression and validation of the empirical models showed that they were acceptable by using either the measured data of separate gravel size group or those of all the three gravel size groups having a large size range. Furthermore, the regression parameters of the curved surfaces for the soil-gravel mixtures with a large range of gravel content could be determined from the water retention data of the soil-gravel mixtures with two representative gravel contents or bulk densities. Such revised water retention models are potentially applicable in regional or large scale field investigations of significantly heterogeneous media, where various gravel sizes and different gravel

  14. Establishment of woody riparian species from natural seedfall at a former gravel pit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roelle, J.E.; Gladwin, D.N.

    1999-01-01

    Establishment of native riparian communities through natural seedfall may be a viable reclamation alternative at some alluvial sand and gravel mines where water level can be controlled in the abandoned pit. We experimented with this approach at a pit in Fort Collins, Colorado, where a drain culvert equipped with a screw gate allows water levels to be manipulated. From 1994 to 1996 we conducted a series of annual drawdowns during the period of natural seedfall of Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera (plains cottonwood), Salix amygdaloides (peachleaf willow), and S. exigua (sand-bar willow), thus providing the bare, moist substrate conducive to establishment of these species. Establishment was highly variable from year to year; in the fall following establishment, frequency of occurrence on 0.5-m2 sample plots ranged from 8.6% to 50.6% for cottonwood, 15.9% to 22.0% for peachleaf willow, and 21.7% to 50.0% for sandbar willow. Mean densities, however, were comparable to those reported for other locations. Concurrent establishment of the undesirable exotic Tamarix ramosissima (saltcedar) was a problem, but we were able to eradicate most saltcedar seedlings by reflooding the lower elevations of the annual drawdown zones each fall. At the end of the 3-year period, at least one of the three native woody species survived on 41.1% of the plots, while saltcedar was present on only 6.1%. In addition to the potential for establishing valuable native habitats, adaptations of the techniques described may require less earth moving than other reclamation approaches.

  15. Analysis Of The Impact Of The Coal Bed Inclination And The Direction Of Exploitation On Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Andrzej; Polanin, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The article presents deformation indexes for three examples, for which the quantitative relations of extreme values were described, including the influence of a coal bed dip and a direction of exploitation. The conclusion regards the mining prevention on minimizing longwall deformation. New experience allows improving methods of theoretical description of deformation, which is the aim of the research continuing at the Central Mining Institute.

  16. Defining hazard from the mine worker's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Eiter, B.M.; Kosmoski, C.L.; Connor, B.P.

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the mining industry has witnessed a substantial increase in the numbers of fatalities occurring at metal and nonmetal mine sites, but it is unclear why this is occurring. One possible explanation is that workers struggle with identifying worksite hazards and accurately assessing the associated risk. The purpose of this research was to explore this possibility within the mining industry and to more fully understand stone, sand and gravel (SSG) mine workers' thoughts, understandings and perceptions of worksite hazards and risks. Eight mine workers were interviewed and asked to identify common hazards they come across when doing their jobs and to then discuss their perceptions of the risks associated with those identified hazards. The results of this exploratory study indicate the importance of workers' job-related experience as it applies to hazard identification and risk perception, particularly their knowledge of or familiarity with a task, whether or not they had personal control over that task, and the frequency with which they perform that task. PMID:28042176

  17. Active mines in Arizona - 1993. Directory 40

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K.A.; Niemuth, N.J.; Bain, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A directory of the active mines in Arizona is presented. The directory was compiled in November, 1992 from field visits and information received by the Department's technical staff. For the purpose of this directory, an active mine is defined as a mine in continuous operation, either in production or under full-time development for production. Custom milling operations that are active or available on a full-time basis are also included in the directory. It is acknowledged that there are additional mines not listed that are in an exploration, evaluation, or part-time development phase. There are others where production is on an intermittent basis that are not listed. The report is dependent on the cooperation of government agencies, private industry, and individuals who voluntarily provide information on their projects and activities. The directory is arranged alphabetically by company name. Each listing includes corporate addresses, mine name and location, operation description, and key personnel. The listing for the sand and gravel operations include name, address, and phone number.

  18. Evolution of coarse gravel bed forms; field measurements at flood stage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, Randy L.

    1992-01-01

    Field measurements to investigate the origin and growth of mesoscale gravel bed forms in deep flows were made in the North Fork Toutle River, Washington. Sonar observations of the gravel streambed at a stationary point were recorded during two storm flows in December 1989 and January 1990 with concurrent bed load sampling and continuous velocity measurements. Mean diameter of bed load was about 3 cm, flow depths were 1.4–2.4 m, and bed shear stresses were 2–5 times the critical stress of mean bed load diameter, as computed from the depth-slope product. These records document the hydrodynamic conditions under which dunelike coarse gravel bed forms were observed. Coarse gravel dunes (height, 20 cm; length, 6–15 m) evolved more than 24 hours after peak stage, primarily by accretion, as inferred from bed form changes revealed in dual sonar records. Dune heights increased to 40 cm as mean trough elevation rose about 50 cm over several hours. Smaller dunes (wavelength, 1–3 m), transitional from bed load sheets, migrated on the backs of the large dunes. The superposed dunes finally became indistinguishable from the large dunes, which diminished in height by increasing the mean level of troughs. Gravel deposition occurred at the observation point in conjunction with migration of gravel dunes. The direct comparison of known bed form regimes and gravel bar facies provides alternative interpretations of gravelly deposits.

  19. Mine detection using backscattered X-ray imaging of antitank and antipersonnel mines

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.; Shope, S.; Bishop, L.; Selph, M.; Jojola, J.

    1997-04-01

    The use of backscattered X rays to image buried land mines and distinguish between surface and buried features has been well documented. Laboratory imaging experiments, being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM), have been used to develop preliminary data acquisition hardware and software for an upcoming Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD). In addition image processing techniques, developed by the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Florida (UF), are utilized. Previous buried land mine imaging studies focused on antitank mines buried in screened sand and have included well defined surface features such as a broad or a small diameter rock. In the present study the authors have examined imaging under a variety of practical environmental conditions. They have successfully imaged antitank mines (ATM) buried in sand and rocky New Mexico (NM) soil. Images have been obtained for bare surfaces as well s for surfaces covered with limestone road coarse base (gravel), snow, water, and native grass. In addition, they have imaged buried ATM and surface antipersonnel (AP) mines covered with debris consisting of various size rocks, a log, and leaves such that no mine was visible to the eye.

  20. On the structure of turbulent gravel bed flow: Implications for sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajeri, Seyed Hossein; Righetti, Maurizio; Wharton, Geraldene; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the turbulent flow field over gravel particles as a first step towards understanding sediment transport in a gravel bed river. Specifically, the vertical momentum flux in gravel bed turbulent flow was investigated with particular attention to the near-bed region. Spatial organization of vertical momentum flux was studied with stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in a horizontal layer 1mm above the gravel crests. The vertical momentum flux through the water column was described with digital PIV measurements in three vertical planes. The data showed that near the gravel bed, net turbulent momentum flux spatially varies with respect to bed topography. Analysis of the vertical velocity data revealed that near the gravel particle crests, there is a significant net vertical form-induced momentum flux approximately with the same order of magnitude as the net vertical turbulent momentum flux. Above the crests, total net vertical momentum flux is positive. However, below the crests, despite noticeable positive form-induced momentum flux, total net vertical momentum flux is negative. Results of quadrant analysis show that variation of turbulent net vertical momentum flux through water column is in agreement with prevalence of upward movement of low velocity flow (known as ejection) above gravel crests and downward movement of high velocity flow (known as sweep) below gravel crests. Below gravel crests (- 0.1 < z / H < 0.0), there is a region where the contribution of second quadrant to Reynolds shear stress is lower than fourth quadrant, while the contribution of second quadrant to vertical momentum flux is higher than fourth quadrant. This can be interpreted that ejection events in this region are strong enough to lift up fine particles but their contribution is not sufficient to move fine particles in the longitudinal direction.

  1. Distribution of uranium and thorium in dolomitic gravel fill and shale saprolite.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D H; Watson, D B

    2015-03-21

    The objectives of this study were to examine (1) the distribution of U and Th in dolomitic gravel fill and shale saprolite, and (2) the removal of uranium from acidic groundwater by dolomitic gravel through precipitation with amorphous basaluminite at the U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) field site west of the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex in East Tennessee. Media reactivity and sustainability are a technical concern with the deployment of any subsurface reactive media. Because the gravel was placed in the subsurface and exposed to contaminated groundwater for over 20 years, it provided a unique opportunity to study the solid and water phase geochemical conditions within the media after this length of exposure. This study illustrates that dolomite gravel can remove U from acidic contaminated groundwater with high levels of Al(3+), Ca(2+), NO(3-), and SO4(2-) over the long term. As the groundwater flows through high pH carbonate gravel, U containing amorphous basaluminite precipitates as the pH increases. This is due to an increase in groundwater pH from 3.2 to ∼6.5 as it comes in contact with the gravel. Therefore, carbonate gravel could be considered as a possible treatment medium for removal and sequestration of U and other pH sensitive metals from acidic contaminated groundwater. Thorium concentrations are also high in the carbonate gravel. Thorium generally shows an inverse relationship with U from the surface down into the deeper saprolite. Barite precipitated in the shallow saprolite directly below the dolomitic gravel from barium present in the acidic contaminated groundwater.

  2. Use of GPR technique in surveying gravel road wearing course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarenketo, Timo; Vesa, Heikki

    2000-04-01

    During summer 1998 a series of tests were conducted in Finland in order to find out how Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technology can be utilized at both the project and network level, when surveying the wearing course thickness of gravel roads. The second objective was to investigate the possibilities of applying dielectricity information obtained using the GPR surface reflection method when determining the quality of the gravel road wearing course. In this study GPR was tested at the project level on highway 9241 Simo in Northern Finland, where the information provided by the GPR and laboratory research was used in designing and proportioning a new wearing course. In the network level studies, performed in the maintenance areas of Kemi and Karstula in Northern and Central Finland the goal for using GPR was to inspect the condition and thickness of the wearing course and evaluate the need for additional wearing course material. The total length of the roads under survey was approximately 200 km and both a 1.5 GHz ground-coupled antenna and a 1.0 GHz horn antenna were tested in this study. The research results show that GPR can be used to measure the thickness of the wearing course, the average measuring error against reference drilling measurements being 25 mm, which is considerably larger than the error of radar measurements in paved roads. To a great extent this is due to the fact that the thickness of the wearing course varies greatly even in the road's cross-section and thus a single reference thickness does not represent the actual thickness of the area measured with the GPR. The wearing course can often get mixed up with lower layers, which makes it difficult to determine the exact layer interfaces. For this reason reference information must always be used along with the GPR measurement results. Of the two GPR antennae tested, the horn antenna proved to be the more effective in measurements. The dielectric value of the wearing course, measured using the horn

  3. Streamwise decrease of the 'unsteady' virtual velocity of gravel tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klösch, Mario; Gmeiner, Philipp; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Gravel tracers are usually inserted and transported on top of the riverbed, before they disperse vertically and laterally due to periods of intense bedload, the passage of bed forms, lateral channel migration and storage on bars. Buried grains have a lower probability of entrainment, resulting in a reduction of overall mobility, and, on average, in a deceleration of the particles with distance downstream. As a consequence, the results derived from tracer experiments and their significance for gravel transport may depend on the time scale of the investigation period, complicating the comparison of results from different experiments. We developed a regression method, which establishes a direct link between the transport velocity and the unsteady flow variables to yield an 'unsteady' virtual velocity, while considering the tracer slowdown with distance downstream in the regression. For that purpose, the two parameters of a linear excess shear velocity formula (the critical shear velocity u*c and coefficient a) were defined as functions of the travelled distance since the tracer's insertion. Application to published RFID tracer data from the Mameyes River, Puerto Rico, showed that during the investigation period the critical shear velocity u*c of tracers representing the median bed particle diameter (0.11 m) increased from 0.36 m s-1 to 0.44 m s-1, while the coefficient a decreased from the dimensionless value of 4.22 to 3.53, suggesting a reduction of the unsteady virtual velocity at the highest shear velocity in the investigation period from 0.40 m s-1 to 0.08 m s-1. Consideration of the tracer slowdown improved the root mean square error of the calculated mean displacements of the median bed particle diameter from 8.82 m to 0.34 m. As in previous work these results suggest the need of considering the history of transport when deriving travel distances and travel velocities, depending on the aim of the tracer study. The introduced method now allows estimating the

  4. Paleohydrology of the eocene ballena gravels, San Diego County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Bradley L.; Abbott, Patrick L.

    1984-03-01

    The Ballena Gravels are remnants of a river system that flowed westward across the ancestral Peninsular Ranges during medial and late Eocene time. The Gravels (actually conglomerate) are channelized fluvial deposits that built westward as alluvial fan (Poway Group), submarine canyon (Scripps Formation) and submarine fan (Jolla Vieja Formation) depositional systems. Because the integrated sedimentary system contains distinctive Poway rhyolite clasts of limited geographic and temporal extent the now separated component formations are recognizable on the San Diego coastal plain and on the Channel Islands. Paleogeographic reconstructions suggest a transport distance of about 315 km. Multiple techniques analysis suggests the channel gradient in the San Diego area was 12-18 m km -1. Stream velocity, based on a competent particle size of 52 cm, ranges from 2.5 to 4 m s -1. Eight equations based on slope and velocity generated estimates of channel depth at food stage that vary from 2.5 to 4.5 m. Paleodischarge can be estimated from regime-type engineering equations that are based on gradient, depth, and grain size. Paleodischarge also is calculated using a technique based on stream length and drainage area. Values generated by multiple techniques suggest 2.33-yr flood discharges of about 275 m 3 s -1. Extrapolation based on a logarithmic curve indicates 100-yr flood discharges around 27,500 m 3 s -1. Channel-width estimates for 1 to 2.33 yr floods range from 25 to 75 m. Calculations of seasonally dominant rainfall, based on runoff and temperature, vary between 50-75 cm annually. Runoff is estimated from discharge values and paleotemperatures are based on caliche type, salt-fractured clasts, and the immature clay mineral suite. The Nueces River of Texas shares some of the same characteristics of the Eocene Ballena river. The Nueces has a highly varied discharge due to seasonally intense rainfall similar to that interpreted for the Ballena river. Several rivers flowing to

  5. Assessment of the sand and gravel resources of the Lower Boise River Valley area, Idaho: part one: geological framework of the sand and gravel deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, James D.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    2001-01-01

    The USGS has undertaken a first order evaluation of sand & gravel resources in the Lower Boise River Valley in response to rapid urban expansion in the Boise-Nampa-Caldwell corridor in southwest Idaho. The study is intended to provide land-use planners and managers, particularly in the Bureau of Land Management, with a foundation of knowledge that will allow them to anticipate and plan for demand for and development of sand and gravel resources on public lands in response to the urban growth. Attributes under study include: regional geology of both alluvial source areas as well as deposits; fluvial processes that led to deposition of the sand and gravel deposits; spatial distribution of the deposits; quantity and quality of materials in the deposits; and the suitability of the deposits for a range of applications. The study will also examine and attempt to model the association between fluvial processes, deposit characteristics, and physical specifications for various applications of sand and gravel. The results will be presented in a series of sand and gravel assessment reports of which this is the first.

  6. Can we enhance amphibians' habitat restoration in the post-mining areas?

    PubMed

    Klimaszewski, Krzysztof; Pacholik, Ewa; Snopek, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the selected improvements of nature restoration in a depleted gravel pit. The study site consisted of four water reservoirs of different shapes and sizes, flooded after the gravel extraction ended. Ecological succession monitoring, conducted by the Warsaw University of Life Sciences students associated in the Student Scientific Association of Animal Sciences Faculty since the completion of mining, have focused on amphibians. A twofold approach upheld amphibian species population dynamics, as well as selected habitat elements. The restoration practices dedicated to habitat conditions enhancing have been proved to be definitely effective and useful for similar sites.

  7. Prescription data mining and the protection of patients' interests.

    PubMed

    Orentlicher, David

    2010-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies have exploited health information technology to "mine" data from drug prescriptions and use the data to better target their sales pitches to physicians. This article considers the policy arguments and first amendment implications regarding state regulation of data mining. It concludes that the legislative provisions are desirable and should withstand constitutional challenge.

  8. The effect of lateral confinement on gravel bed river morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Lugo, G. A.; Bertoldi, W.; Henshaw, A. J.; Gurnell, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we use a physical modeling approach to explore the effect of lateral confinement on gravel bed river planform style, bed morphology, and sediment transport processes. A set of 27 runs was performed in a large flume (25 m long, 2.9 m wide), with constant longitudinal slope (0.01) and uniform grain size (1 mm), changing the water discharge (1.5-2.5 L/s) and the channel width (0.15-1.5 m) to model a wide range of channel configurations, from narrow, straight, embanked channels to wide braided networks. The outcomes of each run were characterized by a detailed digital elevation model describing channel morphology, a map of dry areas and areas actively transporting sediment within the channel, and continuous monitoring of the amount of sediment transported through the flume outlet. Analysis reveals strong relationships between unit stream power and parameters describing the channel morphology. In particular, a smooth transition is observed between narrow channels with an almost rectangular cross-section profile (with sediment transport occurring across the entire channel width) and complex braided networks where only a limited proportion (30%) of the bed is active. This transition is captured by descriptors of the bed elevation frequency distribution, e.g., standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis. These summary statistics represent potentially useful indicators of bed morphology that are compared with other commonly used summary indicators such as the braiding index and the type and number of bars.

  9. Integrated automatic and continuous bedload monitoring in gravel bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersack, Helmut; Kreisler, Andrea; Rindler, Rolf; Aigner, Johann; Seitz, Hugo; Liedermann, Marcel; Laronne, Jonathan B.

    2017-08-01

    Bedload monitoring techniques have been developed and applied for many years in rivers ranging from steep mountain torrents to the large gravel-bed Danube River in Austria. Most monitoring stations use a combination of direct (mobile bag samplers, slot samplers) and indirect (geophones, hydrophones) measurement methods. Each individual technique is adequate, yet features particular boundary conditions and limitations related to hydraulic and sampling efficiency, functionality during floods, sampling duration or grain size. We show the capabilities and limitations of the different monitoring devices with respect to technical, operational and economic criteria, evaluating their suitability for determining bedload transport parameters. Bedload monitoring results of a measuring site at the Drau River in Carinthia/Austria are used to illustrate the specific range of the device application. We present an integrated automatic and continuous bedload monitoring system. It complements the specific limitations of single monitoring methods by additional measurement devices, enabling comprehensive monitoring of the bedload transport process. We then derive the Bedload Discharge Integrated Calculation Approach and the Bedload Rating Curve Approach and discuss their application for determining bedload discharge Qb and total bedload mass Vb. Whereas the integrated approach combines data from direct monitoring methods with indirect techniques, the rating curve approach uses only data from direct bedload monitoring devices. We demonstrate that applying an integrated automatic and continuous bedload monitoring system and combining the Bedload Discharge Integrated Calculation Approach and Bedload Rating Curve Approach yields accurate bedload discharge results.

  10. Eagle Mine

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page contains Eagle Mine Superfund site information, site description, site risk, cleanup progress, community involvement, reuse, land use controls, five-year reviews, site documents, contacts and links.

  11. SEASAT economic assessment. Volume 4: Ocean mining case study and generalization. [economic benefits of SEASAT satellites for mineral exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study of the weather sensitive features of near shore and deep water ocean mining industries are described. Problems with the evaluation of economic benefits for the deep water ocean mining industry are attributed to the relative immaturity and highly proprietary nature of the industry. Case studies on the gold industry, diamond industry, tin industry and sand and gravel industry are cited.

  12. Multiple mining impacts induce widespread changes in ecosystem dynamics in a boreal lake.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Jaakko Johannes; Weckström, Jan; Korhola, Atte

    2017-09-05

    In order to satisfy the needs of constant economic growth, the pressure to exploit natural resources has increased. Since accessible mineral resources are becoming scarce, the mining industry is constantly looking for novel techniques to allow commercial exploitation of lower-grade deposits. However, mining can have considerable impacts on freshwater ecosystems. Here, we present the ecological damage inflicted by mine water originating from the massive Terrafame Talvivaara polymetal mine (central Finland), where bioheap leaching is being applied to high-sulphur low-grade ore. We found that saline mine water has turned the lake meromictic, and sediment is heavily contaminated. As a result, important zooplankton and phytoplankton groups have been significantly altered. As the exploitation of poor-grade deposits is the future of the mining industry globally, water management should be taken to a higher level in order to proceed towards a sustainable mining sector.

  13. [Effects of gravel mulch technology on soil erosion resistance and plant growth of river flinty slope].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xie, San-Tao; Ruan, Ai-Dong; Bian, Xun-Wen

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at the technical difficulties such as the stability and water balance in the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope, a gravel mulch technology was proposed, with the effects of different gravel mulch treatments on the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property, and plant growth investigated by anti-erosion and pot experiments. The results showed that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size could obviously enhance the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property and plant biomass, but no obvious differences were observed between the mulch thickness of 5 cm and 8 cm. It was indicated that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size and 5 cm in thickness was an effective and economical technology for the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope.

  14. Minor NSR Permit: Crossfire Aggregate Services, LLC - Crossfire Bonds Gravel Pit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the response to public comments and final minor NSR permit for the Crossfire Bonds Gravel Pit, operated by Crossfire Aggregate Services, LLC, and located on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in La Plata County, Colorado.

  15. TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SAND AND GRAVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods for determining small-scale variations in aquifer properties were investigated for a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. easurements of aquifer properties, in particular hydraulic conductivity, are needed for further investigations into the effects of aqui...

  16. TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SAND AND GRAVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods for determining small-scale variations in aquifer properties were investigated for a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. easurements of aquifer properties, in particular hydraulic conductivity, are needed for further investigations into the effects of aqui...

  17. A new method for reporting and interpreting textural composition of spawning gravel.

    Treesearch

    Fredrick B. Lotspeich; Fred H. Everest

    1981-01-01

    A new method has been developed for collecting, sorting, and interpreting gravel quality. Samples are collected with a tri-tube freeze-core device and dry-sorted by using sieves based on the Wentworth scale. An index to the quality of gravel is obtained by dividing geometric mean particle size by the sorting coefficient (a measure of the distribution of grain sizes) of...

  18. Macroinvertebrate community responses to gravel augmentation in a high-gradient, Southeastern regulated river

    SciTech Connect

    McManamay, Ryan A; Orth, Dr. Donald J; Dolloff, Dr. Charles A

    2013-01-01

    Sediment transport, one of the key processes of river systems, is altered or stopped by dams, leaving lower river reaches barren of sand and gravel, both of which are essential habitat for fish and macroinvertebrates. One way to compensate for losses in sediment is to supplement gravel to river reaches below impoundments. Because gravel addition has become a widespread practice, it is essential to evaluate the biotic response to restoration projects in order to improve the efficacy of future applications. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the response of the macroinvertebrate community to gravel addition in a high-gradient, regulated river in western North Carolina. We collected benthic macroinvertebrate samples from gravel-enhanced areas and unenhanced areas for 1 season before gravel addition, and for 4 seasons afterwards. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated that the responses of macroinvertebrates to gravel addition were generally specific to individual taxa or particular functional feeding groups and did not lead to consistent patterns in overall family richness, diversity, density, or evenness. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling showed that shifts in macroinvertebrate community composition were temporary and dependent upon site conditions and season. Correlations between macroinvertebrate response variables and substrate microhabitat variables existed with or without the inclusion of data from enhanced areas, which suggests that substrate-biotic relationships were present before gravel addition. A review of the current literature suggests that the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates to substrate restoration are inconsistent and dependent upon site conditions and the degree habitat improvement of pre-restoration site conditions.

  19. Measurement of coarse gravel and cobble transport using portable bedload traps

    Treesearch

    Kristin Bunte; Steven R. Abt; John P. Potyondy; Sandra E. Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Portable bedload traps (0.3 by 0.2 m opening) were developed for sampling coarse bedload transport in mountain gravel-bed rivers during wadable high flows. The 0.9 m long trailing net can capture about 20 kg of gravel and cobbles. Traps are positioned on ground plates anchored in the streambed to minimize disturbance of the streambed during sampling. This design...

  20. The dynamic monitoring of coal resources exploitation in the ecological function regionalization of Hulun Buir City based on remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Huawei; Xia, Wei; Li, Jing; Wang, Changzuo

    2014-11-01

    The over-exploitation of coal resources has a serious negative influence upon the ecological environment. It causes ecological destruction and environmental pollution problems. This paper presents the current status of coal resources exploitation and dynamic monitoring in Hulun Buir. Analysis of them is based on the data of coal mines, which are obtained by RS data, including Thematic Mapper (TM) and HJ-1 satellite data. Through the research on the dynamic monitoring methods of multi-temporal RS images and GIS technology, the quantity of coal mines and the size of coal mines, are extracted based on the features of mines. Finally, it analyzes the character of coal resources exploitation status, and put forward proposals for sustainable development Hulun Buir or other areas.

  1. Sensory exploitation and sexual conflict

    PubMed Central

    Arnqvist, Göran

    2006-01-01

    Much of the literature on male–female coevolution concerns the processes by which male traits and female preferences for these can coevolve and be maintained by selection. There has been less explicit focus on the origin of male traits and female preferences. Here, I argue that it is important to distinguish origin from subsequent coevolution and that insights into the origin can help us appreciate the relative roles of various coevolutionary processes for the evolution of diversity in sexual dimorphism. I delineate four distinct scenarios for the origin of male traits and female preferences that build on past contributions, two of which are based on pre-existing variation in quality indicators among males and two on exploitation of pre-existing sensory biases among females. Recent empirical research, and theoretical models, suggest that origin by sensory exploitation has been widespread. I argue that this points to a key, but perhaps transient, role for sexually antagonistic coevolution (SAC) in the subsequent evolutionary elaboration of sexual traits, because (i) sensory exploitation is often likely to be initially costly for individuals of the exploited sex and (ii) the subsequent evolution of resistance to sensory exploitation should often be associated with costs due to selective constraints. A review of a few case studies is used to illustrate these points. Empirical data directly relevant to the costs of being sensory exploited and the costs of evolving resistance is largely lacking, and I stress that such data would help determining the general importance of sexual conflict and SAC for the evolution of sexual dimorphism. PMID:16612895

  2. Gravel-bed river floodplains are the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, F. Richard; Locke, Harvey; Dreitz, Victoria J.; Hebblewhite, Mark; Lowe, Winsor H.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Nelson, Cara R.; Proctor, Michael F.; Rood, Stewart B.

    2016-01-01

    Gravel-bed river floodplains in mountain landscapes disproportionately concentrate diverse habitats, nutrient cycling, productivity of biota, and species interactions. Although stream ecologists know that river channel and floodplain habitats used by aquatic organisms are maintained by hydrologic regimes that mobilize gravel-bed sediments, terrestrial ecologists have largely been unaware of the importance of floodplain structures and processes to the life requirements of a wide variety of species. We provide insight into gravel-bed rivers as the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes. We show why gravel-bed river floodplains are the primary arena where interactions take place among aquatic, avian, and terrestrial species from microbes to grizzly bears and provide essential connectivity as corridors for movement for both aquatic and terrestrial species. Paradoxically, gravel-bed river floodplains are also disproportionately unprotected where human developments are concentrated. Structural modifications to floodplains such as roads, railways, and housing and hydrologic-altering hydroelectric or water storage dams have severe impacts to floodplain habitat diversity and productivity, restrict local and regional connectivity, and reduce the resilience of both aquatic and terrestrial species, including adaptation to climate change. To be effective, conservation efforts in glaciated mountain landscapes intended to benefit the widest variety of organisms need a paradigm shift that has gravel-bed rivers and their floodplains as the central focus and that prioritizes the maintenance or restoration of the intact structure and processes of these critically important systems throughout their length and breadth. PMID:27386570

  3. Domestic well capture zone and influence of the gravel pack length.

    PubMed

    Horn, Judith E; Harter, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Domestic wells in North America and elsewhere are typically constructed at relatively shallow depths and with the sand or gravel pack extending far above the intake screen of the well (shallow well seal). The source areas of these domestic wells and the effect of an extended gravel pack on the source area are typically unknown, and few resources exist for estimating these. In this article, we use detailed, high-resolution ground water modeling to estimate the capture zone (source area) of a typical domestic well located in an alluvial aquifer. Results for a wide range of aquifer and gravel pack hydraulic conductivities are compared to a simple analytical model. Correction factors for the analytical model are computed based on statistical regression of the numerical results against the analytical model. This tool can be applied to estimate the source area of a domestic well for a wide range of conditions. We show that an extended gravel pack above the well screen may contribute significantly to the overall inflow to a domestic well, especially in less permeable aquifers, where that contribution may range from 20% to 50% and that an extended gravel pack may lead to a significantly elongated capture zone, in some instances, nearly doubling the length of the capture zone. Extending the gravel pack much above the intake screen therefore significantly increases the vulnerability of the water source.

  4. Time-averaged Turbulent Flow Characteristics over a Highly Spatially Heterogeneous Gravel-Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sankar

    2016-10-01

    The present study focuses on the time-averaged turbulence characteristics over a highly spatially-heterogeneous gravel-bed. The timeaveraged streamwise velocity, Reynolds shear and normal stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, higher-order moments of velocity fluctuations, length scales, and the turbulent bursting were measured over a gravel-bed with an array of larger gravels. It was observed that the turbulence characteristics do not vary significantly above the crest level of the array as compared to those below the array. The nondimensional streamwise velocity decreases considerably with a decrease in depth below the array. Below the array, the Reynolds shear stress (RSS) deviates from the gravity- law of RSS distributions. Turbulence intensities reduce below the crest level of the gravel-bed. The third-order moments of velocity fluctuations increase below the crest level of the gravel-bed and give a clear indication of sweeps as the predominating event which were further verified with the quadrant analysis plots. The turbulent length scales values change significantly below the crest level of the gravel-bed.

  5. Gravel-bed river floodplains are the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauer, F. Richard; Locke, Harvey; Dreitz, Victoria; Hebblewhite, Mark; Lowe, Winsor; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Nelson, Cara; Proctor, Michael F; Rood, Stewart B.

    2016-01-01

    Gravel-bed river floodplains in mountain landscapes disproportionately concentrate diverse habitats, nutrient cycling, productivity of biota, and species interactions. Although stream ecologists know that river channel and floodplain habitats used by aquatic organisms are maintained by hydrologic regimes that mobilize gravel-bed sediments, terrestrial ecologists have largely been unaware of the importance of floodplain structures and processes to the life requirements of a wide variety of species. We provide insight into gravel-bed rivers as the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes. We show why gravel-bed river floodplains are the primary arena where interactions take place among aquatic, avian, and terrestrial species from microbes to grizzly bears and provide essential connectivity as corridors for movement for both aquatic and terrestrial species. Paradoxically, gravel-bed river floodplains are also disproportionately unprotected where human developments are concentrated. Structural modifications to floodplains such as roads, railways, and housing and hydrologicaltering hydroelectric or water storage dams have severe impacts to floodplain habitat diversity and productivity, restrict local and regional connectivity, and reduce the resilience of both aquatic and terrestrial species, including adaptation to climate change. To be effective, conservation efforts in glaciated mountain landscapes intended to benefit the widest variety of organisms need a paradigm shift that has gravel-bed rivers and their floodplains as the central focus and that prioritizes the maintenance or restoration of the intact structure and processes of these critically important systems throughout their length and breadth.

  6. Gravel-bed river floodplains are the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes.

    PubMed

    Hauer, F Richard; Locke, Harvey; Dreitz, Victoria J; Hebblewhite, Mark; Lowe, Winsor H; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Nelson, Cara R; Proctor, Michael F; Rood, Stewart B

    2016-06-01

    Gravel-bed river floodplains in mountain landscapes disproportionately concentrate diverse habitats, nutrient cycling, productivity of biota, and species interactions. Although stream ecologists know that river channel and floodplain habitats used by aquatic organisms are maintained by hydrologic regimes that mobilize gravel-bed sediments, terrestrial ecologists have largely been unaware of the importance of floodplain structures and processes to the life requirements of a wide variety of species. We provide insight into gravel-bed rivers as the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes. We show why gravel-bed river floodplains are the primary arena where interactions take place among aquatic, avian, and terrestrial species from microbes to grizzly bears and provide essential connectivity as corridors for movement for both aquatic and terrestrial species. Paradoxically, gravel-bed river floodplains are also disproportionately unprotected where human developments are concentrated. Structural modifications to floodplains such as roads, railways, and housing and hydrologic-altering hydroelectric or water storage dams have severe impacts to floodplain habitat diversity and productivity, restrict local and regional connectivity, and reduce the resilience of both aquatic and terrestrial species, including adaptation to climate change. To be effective, conservation efforts in glaciated mountain landscapes intended to benefit the widest variety of organisms need a paradigm shift that has gravel-bed rivers and their floodplains as the central focus and that prioritizes the maintenance or restoration of the intact structure and processes of these critically important systems throughout their length and breadth.

  7. Mapping Gravel-Bed River Bathymetry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Overstreet, B. T.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the form and behavior of rivers requires efficient means of measuring their morphology and dynamics. Conventional field methods are inadequate for this task, but remote sensing techniques have emerged as a viable alternative. This study evaluated the potential to map the bathymetry of clear-flowing gravel-bed rivers from satellite images. Direct measurements of water column optical properties also were used to quantify constraints associated with depth retrieval. The smallest detectable change in depth was 0.01 - 0.04 m and the maximum detectable depth was 5 m in green bands but < 2 m in the near-infrared; sensors with lower radiometric resolution would yield less precise estimates over a smaller range. A band ratio-based algorithm for identifying optimal wavelength combinations and calibrating the image-derived quantity X to depth d proved effective when applied to spectra extracted from images (R2 = 0.822 and 0.594 for the larger and smaller stream, respectively) or, to a lesser degree, measured in the field (R2 = 0.769 and 0.452). Accuracy assessment of bathymetric maps produced using various calibration approaches and image types indicated that: 1) a linear relationship between d and X provided depth estimates nearly as reliable as a quadratic formulation; 2) panchromatic and pan-sharpened multispectral images with smaller pixels did not yield more reliable depth estimates than the original, coarser-resolution images; and 3) depth retrieval was less reliable in pools due to saturation of the radiance signal. This investigation thus demonstrated the feasibility, as well as the limitations, of measuring river bathymetry from space. Image-derived depth maps for Rusty Bend of the Snake River produced using various calibration approaches and image data types. All maps have a common color scale shown at the bottom. Flow is from right to left.

  8. Mining with backfill

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, S.

    1983-01-01

    This book reviews the fill mining practice in Sweden and other countries. Research results and technological innovations are presented on mining methods, mining operations, mining machinery and geomechanics. Other topics discussed are fill properties, technology, geomechanics, and new development.

  9. Interaction of mining activities and aquatic environment: A review from Greek mine sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Kallioras, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Greece a significant amount of mineral and ore deposits have been recorded accompanied by large industrial interest and a long mining history. Today many active and/or abandoned mine sites are scattered within the country; while mining activities take place in different sites for exploiting various deposits (clay, limestone, slate, gypsum, kaolin, mixed sulphide ores (lead, zinc, olivine, pozzolan, quartz lignite, nickel, magnesite, aluminum, bauxite, gold, marbles etc). The most prominent recent ones are: (i) the lignite exploitation that is extended in the area of Ptolemais (Western Macedonia) and Megalopolis (Central Peloponnese); and (ii) the major bauxite deposits located in central Greece within the Parnassos-Ghiona geotectonic zone and on Euboea Island. In the latter area, significant ores of magnesite were exploited and mixed sulphide ores. Centuries of intensive mining exploitation and metallurgical treatment of lead-silver deposits in Greece, have also resulted in significant abandoned sites, such as the one in Lavrion. Mining activities in Lavrio, were initiated in ancient times and continued until the 1980s, resulting in the production of significant waste stockpiles deposited in the area, crucial for the local water resources. Ιn many mining sites, environmental pressures are also recorded after the mine closure to the aquatic environment, as the surface waters flow through waste dump areas and contaminated soils. This paper aims to the geospatial visualization of the mining activities in Greece, in connection to their negative (surface- and/or ground-water pollution; overpumping due to extensive dewatering practices) or positive (enhanced groundwater recharge; pit lakes, improvement of water budget in the catchment scale) impacts on local water resources.

  10. Coastal mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) declared by President Reagan in March 1983 has met with a mixed response from those who would benefit from a guaranteed, 200-nautical-mile (370-km) protected underwater mining zone off the coasts of the United States and its possessions. On the one hand, the U.S. Department of the Interior is looking ahead and has been very successful in safeguarding important natural resources that will be needed in the coming decades. On the other hand, the mining industry is faced with a depressed metals and mining market.A report of the Exclusive Economic Zone Symposium held in November 1983 by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Mineral Management Service, and the Bureau of Mines described the mixed response as: “ … The Department of Interior … raring to go into promotion of deep-seal mining but industrial consortia being very pessimistic about the program, at least for the next 30 or so years.” (Chemical & Engineering News, February 5, 1983).

  11. Microbes from mined sites: Harnessing their potential for reclamation of derelict mine sites.

    PubMed

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Samkumar, R Amos; Satheesh, Viswanathan; Subashchandrabose, Suresh R; Ramadass, Kavitha; Naidu, Ravi; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-07-06

    Derelict mines pose potential risks to environmental health. Several factors such as soil structure, organic matter, and nutrient content are the greatly affected qualities in mined soils. Soil microbial communities are an important element for successful reclamation because of their major role in nutrient cycling, plant establishment, geochemical transformations, and soil formation. Yet, microorganisms generally remain an undervalued asset in mined sites. The microbial diversity in derelict mine sites consists of diverse species belonging to four key phyla: Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The activity of plant symbiotic microorganisms including root-colonizing rhizobacteria and ectomycorrhizal fungi of existing vegetation in the mined sites is very high since most of these microbes are extremophiles. This review outlines the importance of microorganisms to soil health and the rehabilitation of derelict mines and how microbial activity and diversity can be exploited to better plan the soil rehabilitation. Besides highlighting the major breakthroughs in the application of microorganisms for mined site reclamation, we provide a critical view on plant-microbiome interactions to improve revegetation at the mined sites. Also, the need has been emphasized for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of adaptation and resistance of rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere microbes in abandoned mine sites, understanding their role in remediation, and subsequent harnessing of their potential to pave the way in future rehabilitation strategies for mined sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mine Planning for Asteroid Orebodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertsch, L. S.; Gertsch, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Given that an asteroid (or comet) has been determined to contain sufficient material of value to be potentially economic to exploit, a mining method must be selected and implemented. This paper discusses the engineering necessary to bring a mine online, and the opportunities and challenges inherent in asteroid mineral prospects. The very important step of orebody characterization is discussed elsewhere. The mining methods discussed here are based on enclosing the asteroid within a bag in some fashion, whether completely or partially. In general, asteroid mining methods based on bags will consist of the following steps. Not all will be required in every case, nor necessarily in this particular sequence. Some steps will be performed simultaneously. Their purpose is to extract the valuable material from the body of the asteroid in the most efficient, cost-effective manner possible. In approximate order of initiation, if not of conclusion, the steps are: 1. Tether anchoring to the asteroid. 2. Asteroid motion control. 3. Body/fragment restraint system placement. 4. Operations platform construction. 5. Bag construction. 6. Auxiliary and support equipment placement. 7. Mining operations. 8. Processing operations. 9. Product transport to markets.

  13. Mechanisms of vegetation removal by floods on bars of a heavily managed gravel bed river (The Isere River, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, Camille; Belleudy, Philippe; Tal, Michal; Malavoi, Jean-René

    2016-04-01

    In natural alpine gravel bed rivers, floods and their associated bedload transport maintain channels active and free of mature woody vegetation. In managed rivers, where flood regime and sediment supply have been modified by hydroelectric infrastructures and sediment mining, river beds tend to stabilize. As a result, in the recent past, mature vegetation has established on gravel bars of many gravel bed rivers worldwide. This established vegetation increases the risk of flooding by decreasing flow velocity and increasing water levels. In addition, the associated reduction in availability of pioneer habitats characteristic of these environments typically degrades biodiversity. Managing hydrology in a way that would limit vegetation establishment on bars presents an interesting management option. In this context, our study aims at understanding the impacts of floods of varying magnitude on vegetation removal, and identifying and quantifying the underlying mechanisms. Our study site is the Isère River, a heavily managed gravel bed river flowing in the western part of the French Alps. We studied the impact of floods on sediment transport and vegetation survival at the bar scale through field monitoring from 2014 to 2015, focusing on young salicaceous vegetation (<2 yr old). Measurements were made before and after floods. Vegetation was monitored on 16m² plots through repeat photographs. Sediment transport was assessed using painted plots, scour chains, and topographic surveys. Hourly water discharge was obtained from the national gauging network. The hydraulics of monitored floods was characterized using a combination of field measurements and 2D hydraulic modeling: water levels were measured with pressure sensors and Large Scale Particle Velocimetry was used to measure flow velocities. These data were used to calibrate 2D hydrodynamic model using TELEMAC2D. At the reach scale, removal of mature vegetation was assed using a series of historical aerial photographs

  14. The Exploitation of Black Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry

    1983-01-01

    Colleges and universities have not up held their end of the bargain with athletes, exploiting a disproportionate number of talented Black athletes by not providing the kind of education the students sought or needed and by applying rigid academic standards for eligibility. (MSE)

  15. Asteroid mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsch, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    The earliest studies of asteroid mining proposed retrieving a main belt asteroid. Because of the very long travel times to the main asteroid belt, attention has shifted to the asteroids whose orbits bring them fairly close to the Earth. In these schemes, the asteroids would be bagged and then processed during the return trip, with the asteroid itself providing the reaction mass to propel the mission homeward. A mission to one of these near-Earth asteroids would be shorter, involve less weight, and require a somewhat lower change in velocity. Since these asteroids apparently contain a wide range of potentially useful materials, our study group considered only them. The topics covered include asteroid materials and properties, asteroid mission selection, manned versus automated missions, mining in zero gravity, and a conceptual mining method.

  16. Strong effect of coarse surface layer on moisture within gravel bars: Results from an outdoor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Claudio I.; Hauer, F. Richard

    2010-05-01

    We propose that the coarse surface layer found on most gravel bars acts as mulch, decreasing evaporation from the soil surface and maintaining higher moisture levels in the underlying fine matrix, as compared with the case of sand bed streams. Because of the importance that such process would have for vegetation establishment, we conducted an outdoor evaporation experiment on soil columns containing diverse mixtures of fines and gravel, covered with 0, 4, and 8 cm thick gravel layers, as well as columns with homogeneous sand. The columns were saturated, drained, and then exposed to the atmosphere for 58 days. They were weighed and their soil moisture was computed on eight different dates. Both the coarse layer thickness and the texture of the underlying fine matrix, as well as their interaction, had significant effects on soil moisture. The presence of 4 and 8 cm thick gravel layers on the surface increased moisture up to 3.7 and 5.3 times, respectively, as compared with homogeneous sand. Effects of the fine matrix texture were significant only when the fines were exposed to the atmosphere at the top of the columns, but not when a coarse layer was present. Our results show that the presence of a clean gravel layer maintains high moisture levels within the underlying fines, for periods of weeks without water input. We suggest that this rock mulching effect could be fundamental for successful plant colonization of bare gravel bars, so that it should be incorporated into any vegetation establishment model developed for gravel bed rivers.

  17. Sorption, mineralization and mobility of N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosate) in five different types of gravel.

    PubMed

    Strange-Hansen, Rikke; Holm, Peter E; Jacobsen, Ole S; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2004-06-01

    Sorption, mineralization and mobility of glyphosate were studied in six substrates: the five types of gravel most frequently used as surfacing in Denmark and a sandy agricultural soil from Simmelkaer that served as a reference soil. Cumulative mineralization of [methyl-14C]glyphosate in batch studies was highest in coarse gravel, amounting to 14% after 4 days at 30 degrees C and 32% after 31 days. Mineralization was slowest in the sandy reference soil, amounting to only 2% after 31 days. The adsorption coefficient (Kd) of glyphosate in gravel ranged from 62 to 164 litre kg(-1), while that in the sandy reference soil was 410 litre kg(-1). The results indicate that the relatively low Kd in gravel allows a relatively high rate of glyphosate mineralization by the biomass. When Kd is high, in contrast, mineralization is slow. Lowering the temperature to 10 degrees C decreased mineralization by 50% in one of two gravels. The leaching of glyphosate was screened in simple columns of gravel or soil in which precipitation events (20 mm over a 2-h period) were simulated on three occasions, starting either immediately after or 2 days after application of glyphosate. [14C]Glyphosate was applied as a tracer mixed with the commercial product Roundup Garden at the recommended rate of 2.4 kg glyphosate ha(-1), equivalent to 1 microg g(-1) soil. The highest concentration of [14C] compounds (expressed in terms of glyphosate concentration) in leachate from the columns exceeded 1300 microg litre(-1), and was detected in rounded gravel after the first rain event. No glyphosate was detected in leachate from the sandy reference soil.

  18. Timing of early Quaternary gravel accumulation in the Swiss Alpine Foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anne, Claude; Naki, Akçar; Susan, Ivy-Ochs; Fritz, Schlunegger; Peter, Kubik W.; Andreas, Dehnert; Joachim, Kuhlemann; Meinert, Rahn; Christian, Schlüchter

    2017-01-01

    Deckenschotter ('Cover Gravels') are proximal glaciofluvial gravels located in the northern Alpine Foreland mainly beyond the extent of the Last Glacial Maximum. They cover Tertiary Molasse or Mesozoic bedrock with an erosional unconformity. In Switzerland, Deckenschotter are referred to as Höhere (Higher) and Tiefere (Lower) Deckenschotter based on their topographical positions with a significant phase of incision that separates these two units. For this study, we performed sedimentological analyses to identify the provenance, transport mechanisms and depositional environment of these gravels. In addition, we established the chronology of the Höhere Deckenschotter gravels at Stadlerberg using cosmogenic 10Be depth-profile dating technique. The inherited 10Be concentration then allowed estimation of a catchment-wide palaeo-denudation rate. The results from clast fabric investigations indicate that braided rivers within a glaciofluvial environment transported these sediments to the study site mainly as bedload. In addition, the petrographic composition of the deposits shows that a large portion of the gravels was derived through erosional recycling of Miocene Molasse conglomerates. Some material was additionally sourced in the northern Central Alps. We then conclude that gravel accumulation in the Swiss Alpine Foreland was completed at 1.9 ± 0.2 Ma. This age, however, represents a minimum age and the oldest 10Be depth-profile age ever obtained for a geological unit. Furthermore, a palaeo-denudation rate of c. 0.3-0.4 mm/a was estimated for the catchment of Stadlerberg gravels. Finally, elevation differences between the bedrock underlying the Höhere Deckenschotter and the modern base level imply a long-term regional incision rate of c. 0.12 mm/a.

  19. Manipulating riparian vegetation, large wood, and discharge in a gravel-cobble bed stream: channel response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Middle Fork John Day River at Oxbow Conservation Area, northeastern Oregon, experienced heavy cattle grazing for a number of decades and was dredge mined for gold in the 1930s-50s. As a result of dredging, flow was divided between the original meandering channel on the southern part of the floodplain and a straight dredged channel on the northern part of the floodplain. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs acquired this property and began planning floodplain and instream restoration focused primarily on anadromous and resident salmonids. In 2000, cattle grazing in the riparian zone was eliminated, resulting in expansion of sedges and other plants on banks, bars and the channel bed. In 2003, riparian planting of woody vegetation began. In 2011, log structures were constructed in the south channel. The overarching goals of the log structure project were: 1) to add bank protection and roughness to accommodate the planned increase in discharge, and 2) to provide fish cover, pools, and channel complexity. In 2013, the north channel was closed and all flow was put in the south channel. This paper examines channel morphological response to these multiple actions. Channel adjustment was monitored through repeated channel cross-section surveys, longitudinal profile surveys, and analysis of planform change using high-resolution aerial imagery. I hypothesized that channel adjustment would be greatest where banks were less protected, and where bed materials were more mobile due to smaller size or local hydraulic factors such as bend curvature. The results indicate that there has been significant reorganization of riffle-pool structure in the longitudinal profile, but less change in cross-sections and planform. Cross-sections, both at log structures and not at structures, show limited bar aggradation and bank erosion. Some modest erosion occurred on banks protected by log structures. There is no increase in pool depth. The hypothesized relationship between channel

  20. Measurement of the bed material of gravel-bed rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, R.T.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of the physical properties of a gravel-bed river is important in the calculation of sediment transport and physical habitat values for aquatic animals. These properties are not always easy to measure. One recent report on flushing of fines from the Klamath River did not contain information on one location because the grain size distribution of the armour could not be measured on a dry river bar. The grain size distribution could have been measured using a barrel sampler and converting the measurements to the same as would have been measured if a dry bar existed at the site. In another recent paper the porosity was calculated from an average value relation from the literature. The results of that paper may be sensitive to the actual value of porosity. Using the bulk density sampling technique based on a water displacement process presented in this paper the porosity could have been calculated from the measured bulk density. The principle topics of this paper are the measurement of the size distribution of the armour, and measurement of the porosity of the substrate. The 'standard' method of sampling of the armour is to do a Wolman-type count of the armour on a dry section of the river bed. When a dry bar does not exist the armour in an area of the wet streambed is to sample and the measurements transformed analytically to the same type of results that would have been obtained from the standard Wolman procedure. A comparison of the results for the San Miguel River in Colorado shows significant differences in the median size of the armour. The method use to determine the porosity is not 'high-tech' and there is a need improve knowledge of the porosity because of the importance of porosity in the aquatic ecosystem. The technique is to measure the in-situ volume of a substrate sample by measuring the volume of a frame over the substrate and then repeated the volume measurement after the sample is obtained from within the frame. The difference in the

  1. Streambed Deformation and Adjustments in a Gravel-Bed Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2005-12-01

    The streambed is the major source of bedload sediment in gravel-bed channels and is necessarily deformed during competent flows. At the local scale, net adjustments to streambeds are well documented through repeated survey of channel cross sections in a wide range of rivers. However, evaluating the end result of sediment transfers provides little insight into how changes occur through scour and fill processes. This research connects the contributions of scour and fill to net adjustments in streambed elevation over a series of flood events. Field observations come from Carnation Creek, British Columbia, where over 100 scour indicators were installed in a 900 m study reach and recovered 15 times during two flood seasons. Peak discharges (Q) ranged from 3.6 to 36.3 m3s-1, the largest representing a return period of about 7 years. The relatively limited coarse surface layer facilitates an active streambed and relatively high sediment transport rates typically under partial transport conditions. The mean bed elevation was relatively stable over the field program, showing only minor degradation in response to the two largest floods. The likelihood of both scour and fill occurring at a given location increases from 0.2 to 0.8 as flow increases. The dominance of only scour when Q<11 m3s-1 gives way to both processes at the higher flows observed. The bed undergoes more numerous and larger net adjustments as flow increases. At flows near incipient motion, the largest net adjustments were 0.5 times the thickness of the coarse surface layer (D90), and at large flows, they reached 5D90 for both net scour and fill. During the largest flood, depths of scour and fill reached 8D90 with 30% of the active locations experiencing depths >2D90. As the likelihood of neither scour nor fill occurring declines with flow, the explanation of stable bed elevations shifts from inactivity toward compensating depths of scour and fill. These results indicate that conditions favorable to both

  2. The Traversella mining site as Piedmont geosite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Emanuele; Benna, Piera; Antonella Dino, Giovanna; Rossetti, Piergiorgio

    2017-04-01

    The multidisciplinary research project PROGEOPiemonte, started in 2012, selected nine strategic geothematic areas that have been and are still investigated as representative of the geodiversity of Piedmont region. The dissemination of the knowledge connected to geological history, climate and environmental changes, natural hazards, soil processes, and georesources, not only of the geosites but also of the museum collections, has been and will be spread, evidencing the mining and quarrying activities, and by means of science exhibits and Nature trails. Among the nine selected geosites, there is the Traversella mining area, object of the present research. Traversella mine is located nearly 50 km north of Torino, and it was (together with the neighbor site of Brosso) one of the most important mining location for iron exploitation. The Traversella orebody was exploited from late medieval age up to the middle XX century. It is a representative contact-metasomatic deposit at the border between granodiorite and preexisting host rocks (micaschists, gneisses and marbles of the Sesia-Lanzo Zone), and the mining district represents the only exploited skarn-type mineralization in the Alps. The iron mineral, exploited from different veins and mass (pertaining to the contact aureola) was primarily magnetite, an iron oxide easy to treat in cast iron even employing the technology locally available before 1900. After the beginning of XX century the extraction involved also pyrite and chalcopyrite (iron and copper-iron sulfide), used mainly for the production of sulfuric acid. The mine, after some interruptions and re-openings, was officially closed in the second half of the XX century, due to the high exploitation costs and the competition of the foreign mine deposits interested by iron extraction. The area still presents several signs of mining and dressing activities (underground pits, explorable under severe restrictions, traces of dressing plant, offices, and miners changing

  3. An End-To-End Near-Earth Asteroid Resource Exploitation Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, K. L.

    2000-01-01

    The possible end result of the utilization of raw materials garnered from near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) has been well documented if often a bit fanciful. Very few have put forward an end-to-end plan from prospecting to mine closure for any specific asteroid or for any particular asteroid resource. There are many aspects to planning for the mining of raw materials from asteroids that have never been encountered in terrestrial resource exploitation due to the dispersed nature of the asteroids. As an example from petroleum exploration, if a dry hole is drilled in a large geologic setting indicative of petroleum deposits, one only need pack the drill rig up and move it to a new spot. In asteroid exploitation, the problem of "moving to a new spot" is complicated, as the "new spot" is moving constantly and may be many millions of kilometers distant at great cost in time and rocket fuel. This paper will outline a relatively low-risk, probable high-return, end-to-end plan for the exploitation and utilization of asteroid raw materials. All aspects of exploration and mining will attempt to be addressed, from prospecting, exploration, and evaluation of possible resources to initialization, industrialization, and closure of the mine. It will attempt to plan for the acquisition of not just the needed scientific knowledge, but also to plan for acquisition of the engineering and geotechnical knowledge needed for effective mining of a small planetary object.

  4. Dark matters: exploitation as cooperation.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Partha

    2012-04-21

    The empirical literature on human cooperation contains studies of communitarian institutions that govern the provision of public goods and management of common property resources in poor countries. Scholars studying those institutions have frequently used the Prisoners' Dilemma game as their theoretical tool-kit. But neither the provision of local public goods nor the management of local common property resources involves the Prisoners' Dilemma. That has implications for our reading of communitarian institutions. By applying a fundamental result in the theory of repeated games to a model of local common property resources, it is shown that communitarian institutions can harbour exploitation of fellow members, something that would not be possible in societies where cooperation amounts to overcoming the Prisoners' Dilemma. The conclusion we should draw is that exploitation can masquerade as cooperation.

  5. Teotihuacan, tepeapulco, and obsidian exploitation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, T H

    1978-06-16

    Current cultural ecological models of the development of civilization in central Mexico emphasize the role of subsistence production techniques and organization. The recent use of established and productive archeological surface survey techniques along natural corridors of communication between favorable niches for cultural development within the Central Mexican symbiotic region resulted in the location of sites that indicate an early development of a decentralized resource exploitation, manufacturing, and exchange network. The association of the development of this system with Teotihuacán indicates the importance such nonsubsistence production and exchange had in the evolution of this first central Mexican civilization. The later expansion of Teotihuacán into more distant areas of Mesoamerica was based on this resource exploitation model. Later civilizations centered at Tula and Tenochtitlán also used such a model in their expansion.

  6. Mine land reclamation and eco-reconstruction in Shanxi province I: mine land reclamation model.

    PubMed

    Bing-yuan, Hao; Li-xun, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Coal resource is the main primary energy in our country, while Shanxi Province is the most important province in resource. Therefore Shanxi is an energy base for our country and has a great significance in energy strategy. However because of the heavy development of the coal resource, the ecological environment is worsening and the farmland is reducing continuously in Shanxi Province. How to resolve the contradiction between coal resource exploitation and environmental protection has become the imperative. Thus the concept of "green mining industry" is arousing more and more attention. In this assay, we will talk about the basic mode of land reclamation in mine area, the engineering study of mine land reclamation, the comprehensive model study of mine land reclamation, and the design and model of ecological agricultural reclamation in mining subsidence.

  7. Hematite mining in the ancient Americas: Mina Primavera, A 2,000 year old Peruvian mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Kevin J.; Grados, Moises Linares; Eerkens, Jelmer W.; Edwards, Matthew J.

    2007-12-01

    Mina Primavera, a hematite (Fe2O3) mine located in southern Peru, was exploited beginning approximately 2,000 years ago by two Andean civilizations, the Nasca and Wari. Despite the importance of hematite in the material culture of the ancient Americas, few hematite mines have been reported in the New World literature and none have been reported for the Central Andes. An estimated 3,710 tonnes of hematite were extracted from the mine for over 1,400 years at an average rate of 2.65 tonnes per year, suggesting regular and extensive mining prior to Spanish conquest. The hematite was likely used as a pigment for painting pottery, and the mine demonstrates that iron ores were extracted extensively at an early date in the Americas.

  8. Mine Land Reclamation and Eco-Reconstruction in Shanxi Province I: Mine Land Reclamation Model

    PubMed Central

    Bing-yuan, Hao; Li-xun, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Coal resource is the main primary energy in our country, while Shanxi Province is the most important province in resource. Therefore Shanxi is an energy base for our country and has a great significance in energy strategy. However because of the heavy development of the coal resource, the ecological environment is worsening and the farmland is reducing continuously in Shanxi Province. How to resolve the contradiction between coal resource exploitation and environmental protection has become the imperative. Thus the concept of “green mining industry” is arousing more and more attention. In this assay, we will talk about the basic mode of land reclamation in mine area, the engineering study of mine land reclamation, the comprehensive model study of mine land reclamation, and the design and model of ecological agricultural reclamation in mining subsidence. PMID:25050398

  9. Unique Microbial Phylotypes in Namib Desert Dune and Gravel Plain Fairy Circle Soils

    PubMed Central

    van der Walt,, Andries J.; Johnson, Riegardt M.; Cowan, Don A.; Seely, Mary

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fairy circles (FCs) are barren circular patches of soil surrounded by grass species. Their origin is poorly understood. FCs feature in both the gravel plains and the dune fields of the Namib Desert. While a substantial number of hypotheses to explain the origin and/or maintenance of fairy circles have been presented, none are completely consistent with either their properties or their distribution. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that FC formation in dunes and gravel plains is due to microbial phytopathogenesis. Surface soils from five gravel plain and five dune FCs, together with control soil samples, were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing of bacterial/archaeal (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (internal transcribed spacer [ITS] region) phylogenetic markers. Our analyses showed that gravel plain and dune FC microbial communities are phylogenetically distinct and that FC communities differ from those of adjacent vegetated soils. Furthermore, various soil physicochemical properties, particularly the pH, the Ca, P, Na, and SO4 contents, the soil particle size, and the percentage of carbon, significantly influenced the compositions of dune and gravel plain FC microbial communities, but none were found to segregate FC and vegetated soil communities. Nevertheless, 9 bacterial, 1 archaeal, and 57 fungal phylotypes were identified as FC specific, since they were present within the gravel plain and dune FC soils only, not in the vegetated soils. Some of these FC-specific phylotypes were assigned to taxa known to harbor phytopathogenic microorganisms. This suggests that these FC-specific microbial taxa may be involved in the formation and/or maintenance of Namib Desert FCs. IMPORTANCE Fairy circles (FCs) are mysterious barren circular patches of soil found within a grass matrix in the dune fields and gravel plains of the Namib Desert. Various hypotheses attempting to explain this phenomenon have been proposed. To date, however, none have been

  10. Unique Microbial Phylotypes in Namib Desert Dune and Gravel Plain Fairy Circle Soils.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, Andries J; Johnson, Riegardt M; Cowan, Don A; Seely, Mary; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-08-01

    Fairy circles (FCs) are barren circular patches of soil surrounded by grass species. Their origin is poorly understood. FCs feature in both the gravel plains and the dune fields of the Namib Desert. While a substantial number of hypotheses to explain the origin and/or maintenance of fairy circles have been presented, none are completely consistent with either their properties or their distribution. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that FC formation in dunes and gravel plains is due to microbial phytopathogenesis. Surface soils from five gravel plain and five dune FCs, together with control soil samples, were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing of bacterial/archaeal (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (internal transcribed spacer [ITS] region) phylogenetic markers. Our analyses showed that gravel plain and dune FC microbial communities are phylogenetically distinct and that FC communities differ from those of adjacent vegetated soils. Furthermore, various soil physicochemical properties, particularly the pH, the Ca, P, Na, and SO4 contents, the soil particle size, and the percentage of carbon, significantly influenced the compositions of dune and gravel plain FC microbial communities, but none were found to segregate FC and vegetated soil communities. Nevertheless, 9 bacterial, 1 archaeal, and 57 fungal phylotypes were identified as FC specific, since they were present within the gravel plain and dune FC soils only, not in the vegetated soils. Some of these FC-specific phylotypes were assigned to taxa known to harbor phytopathogenic microorganisms. This suggests that these FC-specific microbial taxa may be involved in the formation and/or maintenance of Namib Desert FCs. Fairy circles (FCs) are mysterious barren circular patches of soil found within a grass matrix in the dune fields and gravel plains of the Namib Desert. Various hypotheses attempting to explain this phenomenon have been proposed. To date, however, none have been successful in fully

  11. Planning the Mine and Mining the Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, D. S.; Chen, N.

    2016-11-01

    Overview of best practices used in the terrestrial mining industry when developing a mine site towards production. The intent is to guide planners towards an effective and well constructed roadmap for the development of ISRU mining activities. A strawman scenario is presented as an illustration for lunar mining of water ice.

  12. Tertiary fluvial gravels and evolution of the Western Canadian Prairie Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckie, Dale A.

    2006-08-01

    The early Tertiary of Western Canada and northern United States was marked by a change from compressional to extensional tectonics. The result was regional uplift and magmatic events. The uplift resulted in a major unconformity and deposition of extensive regional sheets of gravel and sand, of which only isolated remnants remain. These units are the Eocene to Miocene Cypress Hills Formation, the Miocene Wood Mountain Formation, Miocene Flaxville Formation and preglacial Souris River gravels, All four stratigraphic units consist of gravel and sand with lesser amounts of clay. The formations were largely deposited as laterally continuous sheets of braided river gravels, with some occurrences of meandering-river sedimentation. The sediment was deposited several hundred kilometres downstream of their source areas. Paleocurrent data for the Cypress Hills and Wood Mountain formations indicate that regional paleoslope dipped towards the north-northeast. The modern prairie landscape of western Canada began to evolve with the deposition of these gravels during the Eocene with creation of a basin-wide unconformity followed by deposition of an extensive braidplain system that was subsequently uplifted, incised, and molded into its present form.

  13. Treatment of domestic wastewater by subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with gravel and tire chip media.

    PubMed

    Richter, A Y; Weaver, R W

    2003-12-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and less expensive. This study determines the treatment efficiency of SFCWs filled with gravel or tire chip media to treat domestic wastewater. The influent and effluent of six SFCWs filled with tire chip medium and six SFCWs filled with gravel were monitored for 5 to 16 consecutive months. Parameters measured included pH, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total and volatile suspended solids, NH4, P, and fecal and total coliforms. The only clear difference between medium types in wetland performance was for P. Soluble P in the effluent averaged 1.6 +/- 1.0 mg l(-1) in the tire chip-filled wetlands and 4.8 +/- 3.2 mg l(-1) in the gravel-filled wetlands. Most likely, Fe from exposed wires in shredded steel-belted tires complexed with P to create an insoluble compound. Tire chips may be a better fill medium for SFCWs than gravel because of higher porosity, lower cost, and greater reduction of P in effluent.

  14. Pretreatment of turkey fat-containing wastewater in coarse sand and gravel/coarse sand bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi Singh; Cai, Ling; Tuovinen, Olli H; Mancl, Karen M

    2010-02-01

    Fat, oil and grease in wastewater can be difficult to treat because of their slow decomposition. Traditional pretreatment facilities to remove fat, oil and grease from wastewater are increasingly costly. The hypothesis in this study was that pretreatment of animal fat-containing wastewater in sand and sand/gravel filters facilitates the conversion of slowly degradable organic matter measured as the difference between chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) for subsequent biological treatment. The pretreatment was evaluated using simulated turkey-processing wastewater and coarse sand and sand/gravel filters at a constant hydraulic loading rate of 132L/m(2)/day. Two types of fixed media reactors were employed: (i) one set with a varying depth of coarse sand, and (ii) the second was similar but with an additional pea gravel cap. The results indicated that the relative removal of COD was slightly improved in the sand bioreactors with a pea gravel cap irrespective of the depth of coarse sand, but partial conversion to BOD(5) was not consistently demonstrated. Pea gravel may act as a sieve to entrap organic matter including fat globules from the wastewater. Multiple dosing at the same daily loading rate slightly improved the treatment efficiency of the sand bioreactors. The ratios of influent-COD/effluent-COD were always greater than 1.0 following a change in the dosing frequency after a rest period, suggesting that organic matter, specifically fat globules in this case, was retained by the column matrix.

  15. TI-59 helps predict IPRs for gravel-packed gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevielle, W.C.

    1983-12-01

    The inflow performance relationship (IPR) is an important tool for reservoir and production engineers. It helps optimize completion, tubing, gas lift, and storm choke design. It facilitates accurate rate predictions that can be used to evaluate field development decisions. The IPR is the first step of the systems analysis that translates reservoir rock and fluid parameters into predictable flow rates. Use of gravel packing for sand control complicates the calculation that predicts a well's IPR curve, particularly in gas wells where high velocities in the formation and through gravel-filled perforation tunnels can cause turbulent flow. The program presented in this article calculates the pressure drop and the flowing bottomhole pressures at varying flow rates for gravel-packed gas wells. The program was written for a Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator with a PC-100 printer. Program features include: Calculations for in-casing gravel packs, open-hole gravel packs, or ungravel packed wells. Program prompts for the required data variables. Easy change of data values to run new cases. Calculates pressures for an unlimited number of flow rates. Results show the total pressure drop and the relative magnitude of its components.

  16. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Open-source tools for data mining.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Blaz; Demsar, Janez

    2008-03-01

    With a growing volume of biomedical databases and repositories, the need to develop a set of tools to address their analysis and support knowledge discovery is becoming acute. The data mining community has developed a substantial set of techniques for computational treatment of these data. In this article, we discuss the evolution of open-source toolboxes that data mining researchers and enthusiasts have developed over the span of a few decades and review several currently available open-source data mining suites. The approaches we review are diverse in data mining methods and user interfaces and also demonstrate that the field and its tools are ready to be fully exploited in biomedical research.

  18. Native plant restoration of biosolids-amended copper mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.A.; Zabowski, D.; Everett, R.L.; Scherer, G.

    1998-12-31

    Copper mine tailings are difficult to revegetate due to nutrient deficiencies, high levels of acidity, and potential metal toxicities. An amendment of biosolids could ameliorate these harsh growing conditions through the addition of available nutrients, improvement of physical soil properties (e.g., increased water holding capacity), and possible lowering of toxic metal availability through complexation with organic matter. A study was conducted on mine tailings at Holden, WA to evaluate the effect of an amendment of biosolids on the survival and growth of five native plant species (Sitka alder, big leaf maple, fireweed, w. yarrow, and pearly everlasting). Plots were established in tailings, gravel over tailings (G/T), and biosolids plus gravel over tailings. Each of the native plant species, except maple, had their highest survival in the biosolids-amended plot with 3 species at 100% survival. The biosolids amendment was shown to improve the growth of all species except maple. Fireweed produced 62 times more biomass in the biosolids-amended plot compared to the unamended plot (G/T). Plant analysis revealed a dramatic increase in nutrient content with the amendment of biosolids. Biosolids improved the survival, growth, and nutritional status of native plant species on the copper mine tailings.

  19. Characteristics and origin of coarse gold in Late Pleistocene sediments of the Cariboo placer mining district, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, N.

    1995-02-01

    The Cariboo placer mining district (1000 km 2) sited in the Interior Plateau of central British Columbia, Canada, is the premier placer gold mining district of the Province. Gold is recovered from three Late Pleistocene sedimentary facies: postglacial fluvial gravels (< 10 Ka), Late Wisconsin till (ca. 25-10 Ka), and "older" fluvial gravels (>25 Ka). This study reports the morphology (size, roundness, sphericity) of 1636 gold grains, ranging in size from 0.25 to 17 mm, recovered from 19 placer mines. Older gravels contain the smallest gold grains (mean grani size 1.53 mm), grains of intermediate size occur in till (2.23 mm) and the coarsest gold occurs in postglacial gravels (2.34 mm) with a mean of 1.93 mm for the mining district as a whole. The most common grain shapes are sub-rounded, discoidal (14.73% of the grain population), sub-angular, discoidal (10.88%), and sub-rounded, sub-discoidal (9.59%); the most angular grains occur in postglacial gravels. In-situ growth of coarse, angular grains is indicated by a "composite" grain structure, consisting of aggregates of gold particles welded together by high-grade (Ag = < 2%) filamentous gold; in-situ coarsening may be reliant on organic complexing agents produced below a dense forest cover. An evolutionary sequence of grain form, from angular aggregates to rounded "pumpkin seed" grains, is suggested. Rounded grains commonly show a crystalline structure which may result from the cold hammering of gold during transport; fracturing along crystal boundaries is common. Gold grains may undergo cycles of coarsening, rounding, diagenesis and breakup in response to repeated recycling through Pleistocene sedimentary environments.

  20. Valveless ash removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion systems by gravel bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.K.; Hauserman, W.B.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this project is to apply the gravel bucket pressure letdown concept to a stream of hot, gas-borne ash, under conditions similar to those found in a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor, where the system pressure is dissipated across a packed or partially fluidized bed of coarsely crushed rock. A second objective is to use the data collected during testing to develop a mathematical model which can be used to predict pressure drop in a gravel bucket device. The final objective of the project is to develop an economic analysis comparing the cost of constructing and operating a gravel bucket with that of a lockhopper system. The results of this analysis will be submitted as a separate report. 9 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Method of inhibiting gravel pack and formation sandstone dissolution during steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, P.G.

    1982-04-06

    A method is claimed of inhibiting dissolution of the gravel pack and/or erosion of the formation standstone in a well bore subject to water or steam injection. The method includes the addition of a material to the surface of the gravel or formation which is capable of adhering to such surfaces and forming a tenacious water-repellent film. The film is monomolecular and hydrophobic. The active ingredient in the chemical treatment is commercial soybean lecithin. The material is added to the surfaces by injecting a liquid solution of the chemical down the annulus of the well during steaming and/or physically precoating the gravel pack by soaking it in a liquid solution of the chemical.

  2. Hydrogeologic evaluation of a sand and gravel aquifer contaminated by wood-preserving compounds, Pensacola, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The sand and gravel aquifer in southern Escambia County, Florida, is a typical surficial aquifer composed of quartz sands and gravels interbedded locally with silts and clays. Because creosote is the most extensively used industrial preservative in the US, an abandoned wood-treatment plant near Pensacola was chosen for investigation. This report describes the hydrogeology and groundwater flow system of the sand and gravel aquifer near the plant. A three-dimensional simulation of groundwater flow in the aquifer was evaluated under steady-state conditions. The model was calibrated on the basis of observed water levels from January 1986. Calibration criteria included reproducing all water levels within the accuracy of the data. Applications of the results of the calibrated flow model in evaluation of solute transport may require further discretization of the contaminated area, including more sublayers, than were needed for calibration of the groundwater flow system itself. 32 refs., 44 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Data mining

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Kargupta, H.; Stafford, B.G.; Buescher, K.L.; Ravindran, B.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop and implement data mining technology suited to the analysis of large collections of unstructured data. This has taken the form of a software tool, PADMA (Parallel Data Mining Agents), which incorporates parallel data accessing, parallel scalable hierarchical clustering algorithms, and a web-based user interface for submitting Structured Query Language (SQL) queries and interactive data visualization. The authors have demonstrated the viability and scalability of PADMA by applying it to an unstructured text database of 25,000 documents running on an IBM SP2 at Argonne National Laboratory. The utility of PADMA for discovering patterns in data has also been demonstrated by applying it to laboratory test data for Hepatitis C patients and autopsy reports in collaboration with the University of New Mexico School of Medicine.

  4. The origin, distribution, and depositional history of gravel deposits on the Beaufort Sea Continental Shelf, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodeick, Craig A.

    1979-01-01

    Two distinct gravel populations are present on the Beaufort Sea continental shelf. First, a geographically arcuate deposit that is convex seaward has been designated as the Chert Facies. This deposit is restricted to landward of the 10 meter bathymetric contour and west of Heald Point. The Chert Facies, originally a fluvial gravel deposit and probably part of the basal transgressive, represents reworked Gubik Formation. The Chert Facies is derived from the Brooks Range. The second population is the Dolomite Facies. This facies is a blanket deposit covering much of the shelf and occurs in most water depths greater than 10 meters. The Dolomite Facies extends on land into the Quaternary Gubik Formation east of Prudhoe Bay and probably to Point Barrow. Rocks of the Dolomite Facies are exotic to Alaska and represent ice rafted clasts. The distribution of the Dolomite Facies shelf gravel indicates an easterly source compatible with a proposed provenance surrounding the Amundsen Gulf of the Canadian Archipelago. Radiocarbon dates from undisturbed sediment underlying the gravel on the upper slope indicate that low Holocene sedimentation rates are the reason for gravel exposure in this region and on the outer shelf. Considerations of sea level fluctuations, possible times available for the transportation of gravel from the proposed source area to the study area, and radiocarbon dates indicate influxes of ice rafted debris during the mid-Wisconsin transgression and probably between 15, 000-10,000 years B. P. Correlation of the Gubik Formation at Heald Point with the Barrow unit of the Gubik Formation at Point Barrow on the basis of incorporated dolomite and orthoquartzite clasts is suggested.

  5. Large-scale restoration of salmon spawning habitat in a regulated, gravel-bedded river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L.; Bray, E. N.; Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.; Dunne, T.

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale river restoration programs have recently emerged as a tool for improving salmon habitat in highly altered river ecosystems. Few studies have quantified the extent to which the restored habitat is utilized by salmonids, which physical processes contribute to improved biological functionality, or how the restored habitat changes over time. We investigated Pacific salmon spawning site utilization in two restored reaches of a gravel-bedded river: a site of gravel augmentation and habitat enhancement completed three years ago and a re-engineered, meandering channel and floodplain reach constructed over a decade ago. Spawning was observed at both sites in areas predicted to have high quality habitat, based on channel morphology and hydraulics. At the more recently restored gravel augmentation site, peak redd densities occurred in areas of high sediment mobility as determined by measurements of gravel pivot angles and a grain entrainment model. Redds were built in areas with high values of hydraulic conductivity and streambed hyporheic fluxes, which were located near the transition between pool-riffle bedforms in the re-engineered reach but spanned the entire length of the gravel-augmented reach. In situ measurements of streambed hydraulic conductivity indicated lower hyporheic fluxes at the re-engineered, meandering site due to the infiltration of fine sediment into the subsurface. Highly mobile and permeable gravels were heavily utilized for spawning in restored reaches amid an otherwise predominantly armored bed. However the potential long-term, ecological benefits provided by large-scale restoration projects will vary depending on the patterns of post-restoration flow, sediment supply and channel evolution.

  6. Assessing potential abiotic and biotic complications of crayfish-induced gravel transport in experimental streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statzner, Bernhard; Peltret, Odile

    2006-03-01

    Biogeomorphology adds the element "biological dynamics" (of populations or communities) to chemical and physical geomorphic factors and thus complicates the framework of geomorphic processes. Such biological complications of the animal-induced transport of solids in streams should be particularly important in crayfish, as crayfish affect this transport through their overall activity and intraspecific aggression levels, which could be modified by shelter availability or the establishment of dominance hierarchies among individuals not knowing each other. Using experimental streams, we tested these hypotheses by measuring how shelter availability or residential crayfish group invasion by unknown individuals affected the impact of the crayfish Orconectes limosus on the (i) transport of gravel at baseflow (during 12 experimental days); (ii) sediment surface characteristics (after 12 days); and (iii) critical shear stress causing incipient gravel motion during simulated floods (after 12 days). The two potentially important factors shelter availability or residential group invasion negligibly affected the crayfish impact on gravel sediments, suggesting that habitat unfamiliarity (a third potentially important factor affecting crayfish activity) should increase the crayfish-induced sediment transport. Because habitat unfamiliarity is associated with sporadic long-distance migrations of a few crayfish individuals, this third factor should play a minor role in real streams, where crayfish biomass should be a key factor in relations with crayfish effects on sediments. Therefore, we combined the results of this study with those of previous crayfish experiments to assess how crayfish biomass could serve in modelling the gravel transport. Crayfish biomass explained 47% of the variability in the baseflow gravel transport and, in combination with the coefficient of variation of the bed elevation and algal cover, 72% of the variability in the critical gravel shear stress. These

  7. Analyzing and mining image databases.

    PubMed

    Berlage, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Image mining is the application of computer-based techniques that extract and exploit information from large image sets to support human users in generating knowledge from these sources. This review focuses on biomedical applications, in particular automated imaging at the cellular level. An image database is an interactive software application that combines data management, image analysis and visual data mining. The main characteristic of such a system is a layer that represents objects within an image, and that represents a large spectrum of quantitative and semantic object features. The image analysis needs to be adapted to each particular experiment, so 'end-user programming' will be desirable to make the technology more widely applicable.

  8. Routing Algorithm Exploits Spatial Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Jennings, Esther

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed routing algorithm for broadcasting in an ad hoc wireless communication network takes account of, and exploits, the spatial relationships among the locations of nodes, in addition to transmission power levels and distances between the nodes. In contrast, most prior algorithms for discovering routes through ad hoc networks rely heavily on transmission power levels and utilize limited graph-topology techniques that do not involve consideration of the aforesaid spatial relationships. The present algorithm extracts the relevant spatial-relationship information by use of a construct denoted the relative-neighborhood graph (RNG).

  9. Text mining.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Andrew B; Shepherd, Adrian J

    2008-01-01

    One of the fastest-growing fields in bioinformatics is text mining: the application of natural language processing techniques to problems of knowledge management and discovery, using large collections of biological or biomedical text such as MEDLINE. The techniques used in text mining range from the very simple (e.g., the inference of relationships between genes from frequent proximity in documents) to the complex and computationally intensive (e.g., the analysis of sentence structures with parsers in order to extract facts about protein-protein interactions from statements in the text). This chapter presents a general introduction to some of the key principles and challenges of natural language processing, and introduces some of the tools available to end-users and developers. A case study describes the construction and testing of a simple tool designed to tackle a task that is crucial to almost any application of text mining in bioinformatics--identifying gene/protein names in text and mapping them onto records in an external database.

  10. The Mechanization of Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marovelli, Robert L.; Karhnak, John M.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanization of mining is explained in terms of its effect on the mining of coal, focusing on, among others, types of mining, productivity, machinery, benefits to retired miners, fatality rate in underground coal mines, and output of U.S. mining industry. (Author/JN)

  11. The Mechanization of Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marovelli, Robert L.; Karhnak, John M.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanization of mining is explained in terms of its effect on the mining of coal, focusing on, among others, types of mining, productivity, machinery, benefits to retired miners, fatality rate in underground coal mines, and output of U.S. mining industry. (Author/JN)

  12. Effects of Surface and Subsurface Bed Material Composition on Gravel Transport and Flow Competence Relations—Possibilities for Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.; Cenderelli, D. A.; Gaeuman, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bedload transport and flow competence relations are difficult to predict in coarse-bedded steep streams where widely differing sediment supply, bed stability, and complex flow hydraulics greatly affect amounts and sizes of transported gravel particles. This study explains how properties of bed material surface and subsurface size distributions are directly related to gravel transport and may be used for prediction of gravel transport and flow competence relations. Gravel transport, flow competence, and bed material size were measured in step-pool and plane-bed streams. Power functions were fitted to gravel transport QB=aQb and flow competence Dmax=cQd relations; Q is water discharge. Frequency distributions of surface FDsurf and subsurface FDsub bed material were likewise described by power functions FDsurf=hD j and FDsub=kDm fitted over six 0.5-phi size classes within 4 to 22.4 mm. Those gravel sizes are typically mobile even in moderate floods. Study results show that steeper subsurface bed material size distributions lead to steeper gravel transport and flow competence relations, whereas larger amounts of sediment contained in those 6 size bedmaterial classes (larger h and k) flatten the relations. Similarly, steeper surface size distributions decrease the coefficients of the gravel transport and flow competence relations, whereas larger amounts of sediment within the six bed material classes increase the intercepts of gravel transport and flow competence relations. Those relations are likely causative in streams where bedload stems almost entirely from the channel bed as opposed to direct (unworked) contributions from hillslopes and tributaries. The exponent of the subsurface bed material distribution m predicted the gravel transport exponent b with r2 near 0.7 and flow competence exponent d with r2 near 0.5. The intercept of bed surface distributions h increased the intercept a of gravel transport and c of the flow competence relations with r2 near 0.6.

  13. Several 1992 astronaut candidates brush the sand and gravel off one another following one of several

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    1992 ASCAN TRAINING --- Several 1992 astronaut candidates brush the sand and gravel off one another following one of several phases of parachute familiarization and survival training at Vance Air Force Base in Oklahoma. Recognizable in the picture are Wendy B. Lawrence, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Chris A. Hadfield, Winston E. Scott and Koichi Wakata. The trainees had just completed an exercise which required their jumping off a box into a gravel pit, in order to familiarize them the proper way to meet the ground following an emergency parachute drop.

  14. Hydrology of the sand-and-gravel aquifer, southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, L.R.; Barr, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The sand-and-gravel aquifer in southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida, extends from land surface to depth of 50 to 150 feet. Intervening layers of clay generally separate the aquifer into an unconfined surficial zone, composed principally of fine to medium sand, and a lower confined zone, consisting of variable amounts of medium to coarse sand and gravel. Well yields of 50 to 500 gallons per minute are possible in most of the area, and yields of 500 to 1,000 gallons per minute can be developed in parts of southwestern Okaloosa County. (USGS)

  15. Kinetic analysis of strontium and potassium sorption onto sands and gravels in a natural channel.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, K.E.; Jackman, A.P.; Kennedy, V.C.; Avanzino, R.J.; Zellweger, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    A kinetic, first-order mass transfer model was used to describe the sorption of strontium onto sand-and gravel-sized streambed sediments. Rate parameters, empirically determined for strontium, allowed for the prediction of potassium sorption with moderate success. The model parameters varied significantly with particle size. The sorption data were collected during an experimental injection of several elements into a small mountain pool-and- riffle stream. The sorption process onto sand- and gravel-sized sediment was relatively slow compared to changes in the dissolved concentrations. -Authors

  16. Map showing gravel-bearing surficial deposits and basaltic rocks near Trinidad, Las Animas County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Glenn R.

    1985-01-01

    This map of the Trinidad area is considered to be a special purpose map, as it shows only gravel-bearing alluvial deposits laid down by streams and a series of stacked lava flows erupted from local volcanoes.  Nongravelly surficial deposits and Cretaceous bedrock, which would be on a standard geologic map, are not shown.  The map has two purposes: a scientific one to show the distribution, character, and age of the alluvial deposits and a practical one, to map the distribution of deposits of gravel and crushable rock for use as construction materials.

  17. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  18. Propagation of sediment pulses in flume experiments simulating gravel augmentation in armored channels downstream of dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadde, J.; Venditti, J. G.; Sklar, L. S.; Wydzga, A.; Nelson, P. A.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2005-12-01

    Gravel augmentation is an increasingly common river restoration strategy for armored channels downstream of dams, however, few analytical tools are available to assist river managers in selecting the appropriate sediment volumes, grain sizes, and frequency of additions to achieve desired geomorphic and ecological outcomes. Coarse sediment additions are often intended to improve habitat for spawning salmonids by altering stream bed grain size distributions, and increasing the frequency of bed mobilization and the diversity of channel morphology. Here we report preliminary results of an ongoing laboratory investigation in which we simulate the gravel augmentation process and document the spatial and temporal evolution of the bed in response to pulses of elevated fine gravel supply. The experiments are conducted in a 30-m long, 0.86-m wide flume, with a calibrated sediment feed and a tipping bucket type sediment trap that provides a continuous record of sediment flux at the downstream end of the flume. We created an initial armored bed by first achieving an active transport equilibrium slope and then shutting off the sediment feed and allowing the bed to coarsen and degrade until the transport rate became negligible. We then introduced gravel pulses of various volumes and grain sizes, and mapped the propagation of the wave of added sediment as it moved through the flume. The sediments comprising each pulse are painted distinct colors to aid in mapping and to quantify the extent of exchange with the armored bed. Mapping techniques include planform maps of zones of active transport and temporal contours of width-averaged concentrations of added gravel. We also documented the changes in bed grain size distribution using manual pebble counts before and after each run and analysis of high resolution photographs of the bed taken during the run. We also collected frequent bedload samples at regular locations along the flume length to document the movement of the gravel pulse

  19. Groundwater and surface water interaction in flow-through gravel pit lakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nella Mollema, Pauline; Antonellini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Gravel pits are excavated in aquifers to fulfill the need for construction materials. Flow-through lakes form when the gravel pits are below the water table and fill with groundwater. In certain areas there are more than 60 of these lakes close together and their presence changes the drainage patterns and water- and hydrochemical budgets of a watershed. In flow-through gravel pit lakes, groundwater mixes with surface water and interacts with the atmosphere; outflow occurs only via groundwater. The lifespan of gravel pit lakes may be up to thousands of years as their depth to surface ratio is typically large and sedimentation rates are low. We have studied two gravel pit lake systems, a fluvial freshwater system in the Netherlands and a coastal brackish lake system in Italy. One Dutch gravel pit lake studied in detail is in part artificially replenished with Meuse River water for drinking water production that occurs downstream of the lake by water pumps. The Italian gravel pit lakes are fed by brackish groundwater that is a mix of freshwater from precipitation, Apennine Rivers and brackish (Holocene) Adriatic Sea water. Here, the drainage system of the low lying land enhances groundwater flow into the lake. Surface water evaporation is larger in temperate and Mediterranean climates than the actual evapotranspiration of pre-existing grassland and forests. The lakes, therefore, cause a loss of freshwater. The creation of water surfaces allows algae and other flora and fauna to develop. In general, water becomes gradually enriched in certain chemical constituents on its way through the hydrological cycle, especially as groundwater due to water-rock interactions. When groundwater ex-filtrates into gravel pit lakes, the natural flow of solutes towards the sea is interrupted. Hydrochemical analysis of ground- and surface waters, as well as chemical analysis of lake bottom sediments and stable H and O isotope data, show that gravel pit lake water is characterized (among

  20. Effects of coal strip mining on stream water quality and biology, southwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuste, L.A.; Meyer, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    Strip mining for coal in southwestern Washington may be affecting the water quality of streams. To investigate these possible effects, five streams were selected for study of water quality in each of the two coal bearing areas: the Centralia-Chehalis coal district, and Kelso-Castle Rock coal area. In the Centralia-Chehalis coal district, three of the streams have drainage basins in which mines are active. Water in streams that drain unmined basins is typical of western Washington streams and is characterized as a mixed water because calcium, magnesium, sodium, and bicarbonate ions predominate. A change in anionic composition from bicarbonate to sulfate in streams draining mined areas was not sufficient to change the general water composition and thus make the streams acidic. The largest downstream changes in water quality in both mined and unmined drainage basins were observed during summer low-flow conditions, when minimal dilution, increased water temperatures, and low dissolved oxygen concentrations occurred. High dissolved solids were found in the mined drainage basins during this period. High concentrations of iron, manganese, and zinc were present in the bottom sediments of the mined basins. Moderate concentrations of chromium, cobalt, copper, and zinc were also found in the bottom sediments of a few unmined basins. Streams with substrates of gravel-cobble or gravel-coarse sand had the most diverse benthic fauna and a higher number of ubiquitous taxa than streams with sand-silt substrates, which had the most dissimilar fauna. Mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies were rare at the site most affected by mining. The erosion potential of a basin appears to be related to the average basin slope and the amount of forested areas. Strip mining for coal in steep basins may lead to massive movements of unconsolidated spoils after vegetal cover is removed if the land disturbed is graded to pre-mining slopes. (Lantz-PTT)

  1. Northern Trust Mines

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The United States and the Navajo Nation entered into settlement agreements that provide funds to conduct investigations and any needed cleanup at 16 of the 46 priority mines, including six mines in the Northern Abandoned Uranium Mine Region.

  2. Exploration and Mining Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-09-01

    This Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap represents the third roadmap for the Mining Industry of the Future. It is based upon the results of the Exploration and Mining Roadmap Workshop held May 10 ñ 11, 2001.

  3. 32 CFR 644.551 - Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand... § 644.551 Equal opportunity—sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures...) Sale of standing timber. (b) Sale of embedded sand, gravel, and stone in their natural state. (c) Sale...

  4. 32 CFR 644.551 - Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand... § 644.551 Equal opportunity—sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures...) Sale of standing timber. (b) Sale of embedded sand, gravel, and stone in their natural state. (c)...

  5. Resistivity Profiling for Mapping Gravel Layers That May Control Contaminant Migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Abraham, Jared D.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous contaminants, including CFC 113, chloroform, and tritiated compounds, move preferentially in unsaturated subsurface gravel layers away from disposal trenches at a closed low-level radioactive waste-disposal facility in the Amargosa Desert about 17 kilometers south of Beatty, Nevada. Two distinct gravel layers are involved in contaminant transport: a thin, shallow layer between about 0.5 and 2.2 meters below the surface and a layer of variable thickness between about 15 and 30 meters below land surface. From 2003 to 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey used multielectrode DC and AC resistivity surveys to map these gravel layers. Previous core sampling indicates the fine-grained sediments generally have higher water content than the gravel layers or the sediments near the surface. The relatively higher electrical resistivity of the dry gravel layers, compared to that of the surrounding finer sediments, makes the gravel readily mappable using electrical resistivity profiling. The upper gravel layer is not easily distinguished from the very dry, fine-grained deposits at the surface. Two-dimensional resistivity models, however, clearly identify the resistive lower gravel layer, which is continuous near the facility except to the southeast. Multielectrode resistivity surveys provide a practical noninvasive method to image hydrogeologic features in the arid environment of the Amargosa Desert.

  6. 32 CFR 644.551 - Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., gravel, stone, and surplus structures. 644.551 Section 644.551 National Defense Department of Defense... § 644.551 Equal opportunity—sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures... of surplus structures where an appreciable amount of dismantling and site restoration is involved. ...

  7. 32 CFR 644.551 - Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., gravel, stone, and surplus structures. 644.551 Section 644.551 National Defense Department of Defense... § 644.551 Equal opportunity—sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures... of surplus structures where an appreciable amount of dismantling and site restoration is involved. ...

  8. 32 CFR 644.551 - Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Equal opportunity-sales of timber, embedded sand... § 644.551 Equal opportunity—sales of timber, embedded sand, gravel, stone, and surplus structures...) Sale of standing timber. (b) Sale of embedded sand, gravel, and stone in their natural state. (c) Sale...

  9. The volume of fine sediment in pools: An index of sediment supply in gravel-bed streams

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Sue Hilton

    1992-01-01

    Abstract - During waning flood flows in gravel-bed streams, fine-grained bedload sediment (sand and fine gravel) is commonly winnowed from zones of high shear stress, such as riffles, and deposited in pools, where it mantles an underlying coarse layer. As sediment load increases, more fine sediment becomes availabe to fill pools. The volume of fine sediment in pools...

  10. Basin-scale availability of salmonid spawning gravel as influenced by channel type and hydraulic roughness in mountain catchments.

    Treesearch

    John M. Buffington; David R. Montgomery; Harvey M. Greenberg

    2004-01-01

    A general framework is presented for examining the effects of channel type and associated hydraulic roughness on salmonid spawning-gravel availability in mountain catchments. Digital elevation models are coupled with grain-size predictions to provide basin-scale assessments of the potential extent and spatial pattern of spawning gravels. To demonstrate both the model...

  11. Response of bed mobility to sediment supply in natural gravel bed channels: A detailed examination and evaluation of mobility parameters

    Treesearch

    T. E. Lisle; J. M. Nelson; B. L. Barkett; J. Pitlick; M. A. Madej

    1998-01-01

    Recent laboratory experiments have shown that bed mobility in gravel bed channels responds to changes in sediment supply, but detailed examinations of this adjustment in natural channels have been lacking, and practical methodologies to measure bed mobility have not been tested. We examined six gravel-bed, alternate-bar channels which have a wide range in annual...

  12. Undersea safety mining of the large gold deposit in Xinli District of Sanshandao Gold Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-xiang; Dang, Wen-gang; He, Xian-qun

    2012-07-01

    The exploration of undersea resources becomes popular as land resources decrease. Researches were conducted with emphasis on the safety and efficiency of undersea mining of the large gold deposit in Xinli District of Sanshandao Gold Mine. A series of tests for the physical and mechanical characteristics of rock mass were carried out, and the three-dimensional geo-stress distribution was tested in the mining area. Further, a similar experimental simulation platform, which revealed the mechanism of water inrush and ascertained the reasonable thickness of the safety isolate layer, was established for the undersea mining. Meanwhile, the feasibility of cancelling the ore pillars and the safety conditions was checked by numerical simulation. The simulation results show that it is safe to exploit the ore body below the -85 m level (presently, the exploitation level is below -160 m in Xinli District), and the ore pillars can be cancelled below the -560 m level. Furthermore, a novel backfill method was designed to reduce the rock strata disturbance and settlement, and the settlement of roof strata was monitored during the mining process. Engineering practice shows that the settlement of roof strata was small and that no disaster happened. This indicates that the undersea safety mining technology of the large gold deposit is achieved in Xinli District.

  13. Exploiting social evolution in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kerry E; Heilmann, Silja; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Xavier, Joao B

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria are highly social organisms that communicate via signaling molecules, move collectively over surfaces and make biofilm communities. Nonetheless, our main line of defense against pathogenic bacteria consists of antibiotics-drugs that target individual-level traits of bacterial cells and thus, regrettably, select for resistance against their own action. A possible solution lies in targeting the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other within biofilms. The emerging field of microbial social evolution combines molecular microbiology with evolutionary theory to dissect the molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary pressures underpinning bacterial sociality. This exciting new research can ultimately lead to new therapies against biofilm infections that exploit evolutionary cheating or the trade-off between biofilm formation and dispersal.

  14. Mining review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCartan, L.; Morse, D.E.; Plunkert, P.A.; Sibley, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    The average annual growth rate of real gross domestic product (GDP) from the third quarter of 2001 through the second quarter of 2003 in the United States was about 2.6 percent. GDP growth rates in the third and fourth quarters of 2003 were about 8 percent and 4 percent, respectively. The upward trends in many sectors of the U.S. economy in 2003, however, were shared by few of the mineral materials industries. Annual output declined in most nonfuel mining and mineral processing industries, although there was an upward turn toward yearend as prices began to increase.

  15. Surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports on a GAO study of attorney and expert witness fees awarded as a result of litigation brought under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. As of March 24, 1989, a total of about $1.4 million had been awarded in attorney fees and expenses - about $1.3 subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a comparison of its features with provisions of ERISA showed that the plan differed from ERISA provisions in areas such as eligibility, funding, and contribution limits.

  16. Predicting bed load transport of sand and gravel on Goodwin Creek

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bed load transport rates are difficult to predict in channels with bed material composed of sand and gravel mixtures. The transport of bed load was measured on Goodwin Creek, and in a laboratory flume channel with a similar bed material size distribution. The range of bed load transport rates meas...

  17. Alba Field cased hole horizontal gravel pack -- A team approach to design

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, K.; Winton, S.; Price-Smith, C.

    1995-12-31

    A 700 ft. cased hole horizontal well was gravel packed and completed in the Alba Field, Central North Sea. The completion incorporated a number of new technologies adopted for a horizontal cased hole completion including both equipment and fluids. The zone was completed in 2 stages using a horizontal stack pack approach. Perforation packing was optimized by performing a staged acid prepack with the guns in the hole utilizing a low density synthetic gravel substitute in a shear thinning carrier fluid. This was a world first achievement at a cased hole gravel pack using the stack pack approach in a horizontal well. A solids free fluid loss control material was evaluated and chosen for the high permeability Alba sands (3 Darcy). Extensive lab testing was performed to ensure minimal damage from various fluids. A 30 ft. physical model was used to optimize annular pack efficiency. A gravel placement computer simulation was used to design pump rate, sand concentration and gel loading in order to optimize annular and perforation pack efficiency.

  18. Alba Field cased-hole horizontal gravel pack: A team approach to design

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, K.; Winton, S.; Price-Smith, C.

    1996-03-01

    A 700-ft cased-hole horizontal well was gravel packed and completed in the Alba Field, central North Sea. The completion incorporated a number of new technologies adopted for a horizontal cased-hole completion, including both equipment and fluids. The zone was completed in two stages using a horizontal stack-pack approach. Perforation packing was optimized by performing a staged acid prepack with the guns in the hole using a low-density synthetic gravel substitute in a shear thinning carrier fluid. This was a world-first achievement at a cased-hole gravel pack using the stack-pack approach in a horizontal well. A solids-free fluid-loss control material was evaluated and chosen for the high-permeability Alba sands (3 darcies). Extensive lab testing was performed to ensure minimal damage from various fluids. A 30-ft physical model was used to optimize annular pack efficiency. A gravel placement computer simulation was used to design pump rate, sand concentration, and gel loading to optimize annular and perforation-pack efficiency.

  19. Alba field cased hole horizontal gravel pack -- a team approach to design

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, K.; Winton, S.; Price-Smith, C.

    1995-12-31

    A 700 ft cased hole horizontal well was gravel packed and completed in the Alba Field, Central North Sea. The completion incorporated a number of new technologies adopted for a horizontal cased hole completion including both equipment and fluids. The zone was completed in 2 stages using a horizontal stack pack approach. Perforation packing was optimized by performing a staged acid prepack with the guns in the hole utilizing a low density synthetic gravel substitute in a shear thinning carrier fluid. This was a world first achievement at a cased hole gravel pack using the stack pack approach in a horizontal well. A solids free fluid loss control material was evaluated and chosen for the high permeability Alba Sands (3 Darcy). Extensive lab testing was performed to ensure minimal damage from various fluids. A 30 ft physical model was used to optimize annular pack efficiency. A gravel placement computer simulation was used to design pump rate, sand concentration and gel loading in order to optimize annular and perforation pack efficiency.

  20. Correction to "A general power equation for predicting bed load transport rates in gravel bed rivers"

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey J. Barry; John M. Buffington; John G. King

    2007-01-01

    In the paper "A general power equation for predicting bed load transport rates in gravel bed rivers" by Jeffrey J. Barry et al. (Water Resources Research, 40, W10401, doi:10.1029/2004WR003190, 2004), the y axis for Figures 5 and 10 was incorrectly labeled and should have read "log10 (predicted transport) - log10 (observed transport)." In addition,...

  1. Sediment transport primer: estimating bed-material transport in gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    Peter Wilcock; John Pitlick; Yantao Cui

    2009-01-01

    This primer accompanies the release of BAGS, software developed to calculate sediment transport rate in gravel-bed rivers. BAGS and other programs facilitate calculation and can reduce some errors, but cannot ensure that calculations are accurate or relevant. This primer was written to help the software user define relevant and tractable problems, select appropriate...

  2. An Experimental Study of Sand Transport over an Immobile Gravel Substrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of a stepwise addition of sand to an immobile gravel bed on the sand transport rate and configuration of the sand bed was investigated in a laboratory flume channel. Detailed measurements of sand transport rate, bed texture, and bed topography were collected for four different discharge...

  3. Effects of hydraulic roughness on surface textures of gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    John M. Buffington; David R. Montgomery

    1999-01-01

    Field studies of forest gravel-bed rivers in northwestern Washington and southeastern Alaska demonstrate that bed-surface grain size is responsive to hydraulic roughness caused by bank irregularities, bars, and wood debris. We evaluate textural response by comparing reach-average median grain size (D50) to that predicted from the total bank-full boundary shear stress (...

  4. A procedure for classifying textural facies in gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    John M. Buffington; David R. Montgomery

    1999-01-01

    Textural patches (i.e., grain-size facies) are commonly observed in gravel-bed channels and are of significance for both physical and biological processes at subreach scales. We present a general framework for classifying textural patches that allows modification for particular study goals, while maintaining a basic degree of standardization. Textures are classified...

  5. Experiments on the effect of hydrograph characteristics on vertical grain sorting in gravel bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Marwan A.; Egozi, Roey; Parker, Gary

    2006-09-01

    Desert ephemeral gravel bed streams typically have bed surfaces that are relatively unarmored compared to the substrate below, while gravel bed streams in humid and snowmelt areas typically have well-armored surfaces. The degree of armoring can be characterized in terms of an armor ratio defined as the ratio of the surface median size to the substrate median size. A set of field data shows desert ephemeral gravel bed streams with armor ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2.4 and with an average value of 1.2. The armor ratio of snowmelt-fed gravel bed streams in the same set ranges from 2 to 7, with an average value of 3.4. The reason for this difference is sought in terms of differing hydrological characteristics and sediment supply regimes. Thirteen experiments were conducted to study the formation of armoring under a range of hydrological conditions. The experiments have two limiting cases: a relatively flat hydrograph that represents conditions produced by continuous snowmelt and a sharply peaked hydrograph that represents conditions associated with flash floods. All constant hydrograph experiments developed a well-armored structured surface, while short asymmetrical hydrographs did not result in substantial vertical sorting. All symmetrical hydrographs show some degree of sorting, and the sorting tended to become more pronounced with longer duration. Sediment supply appears to be a first-order control on bed surface armoring, while the shape of the hydrograph plays a secondary role.

  6. The dominance of dispersion in the evolution of bed material waves in gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Yantao Cui; Gary Parker; James E. Pizzuto; Annjanette M. Dodd

    2001-01-01

    Abstract - Bed material waves are temporary zones of sediment accumulation created by large sediment inputs. Recent theoretical, experimental and field studies examine factors in fluencing dispersion and translation of bed material waves in quasi-uniform, gravel-bed channels. Exchanges of sediment between a channel and its floodplain are...

  7. Treatment performance of gravel filter media: implications for design and application of stormwater infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Belinda E; Fletcher, Tim D; Deletic, Ana

    2007-06-01

    Stormwater infiltration systems are widely used to address the flow and water quality impacts of urbanization. However, their pollutant removal performance is uncertain, with respect to varying filter depth, and over time. Seven simulation experiments were conducted on a laboratory-scale gravel infiltration system to test the pollutant removal under a range of water level regimes, including both constant and variable water levels. Gravel filters were found to be very effective for removal of sediment and heavy metals under all water level regimes, even as the system clogged over time. Despite the sediment particle size distribution being much smaller than the filter media pore size, sediment and its associated pollutants were effectively trapped in the top of the gravel filter, even when the water level was allowed to vary. A media depth of 0.5 m was found to achieve adequate pollutant removal. Breakthrough of pollutants may not be of concern, since physical clogging occurred first (thus determining the lifespan of the filter media). However, gravel filters were less effective at nutrient removal, particularly for dissolved nutrients.

  8. Coupling fine particle and bedload transport in gravel-bedded streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsu; Hunt, James R.

    2017-09-01

    Fine particles in the silt- and clay-size range are important determinants of surface water quality. Since fine particle loading rates are not unique functions of stream discharge this limits the utility of the available models for water quality assessment. Data from 38 minimally developed watersheds within the United States Geological Survey stream gauging network in California, USA reveal three lines of evidence that fine particle release is coupled with bedload transport. First, there is a transition in fine particle loading rate as a function of discharge for gravel-bedded sediments that does not appear when the sediment bed is composed of sand, cobbles, boulders, or bedrock. Second, the discharge at the transition in the loading rate is correlated with the initiation of gravel mobilization. Third, high frequency particle concentration and discharge data are dominated by clockwise hysteresis where rising limb discharges generally have higher concentrations than falling limb discharges. These three observations across multiple watersheds lead to a conceptual model that fine particles accumulate within the sediment bed at discharges less than the transition and then the gravel bed fluidizes with fine particle release at discharges above the transition discharge. While these observations were individually recognized in the literature, this analysis provides a consistent conceptual model based on the coupling of fine particle dynamics with filtration at low discharges and gravel bed fluidization at higher discharges.

  9. The geomorphic response of gravel-bed rivers to dams: perspectives and prospects

    Treesearch

    Gordon E. Grant

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarizes over 40 years of research on the downstream geomorphic responses of rivers to dams, with a particular emphasis on gravel-bed rivers, and evaluates the state if the science with respect to predicting channel adjustments: channel incision, lateral adjustments, and bed textural changes. Effects of vegetation and implications for management are also...

  10. Settlement with Stone Crushing and Gravel Company will Help Reduce Emissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A company running a stone-crushing and gravel processing facility in Westerly, R.I. has taken steps to help minimize emissions of hazardous air pollutants and visually test for dust under an agreement signed recently with the U.S. EPA.

  11. Particle size variations between bed load and bed material in natural gravel bed channels

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle

    1995-01-01

    Abstract - Particle sizes of bed load and bed material that represent materials transported and stored over a period of years are used to investigate selective transport in 13 previously sampled, natural gravel bed channels. The ratio (D*) of median particle size of bed material to the transport- and frequency-weighted mean of median bed load size decreases to unity...

  12. Measuring pebble abrasion on a mixed sand and gravel beach using abrasion baskets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Stephenson, Wayne

    2015-11-01

    The abrasion of sediments on mixed sand and gravel beaches has important consequences for local sediment budgets as abrasion often accounts for the major loss of beach volume. Here we report an innovative method using abrasion baskets to measure abrasion in the swash zone of mixed sand and gravel beaches. This method offers significant advantages over laboratory-based tumbler experiments traditionally used to determine abrasion rates. The very high recovery rate from our method is also a significant advantage over previous field methods using radio frequency identification technology to measure abrasion where tagged particles are often lost. Either three or five abrasion baskets were placed across the swash zone on a mixed sand and gravel beach at Timaru, South Island, New Zealand, to measure the abrasion occurring on labeled sediments placed in the baskets. Over two experiments, results showed measurable abrasion across the swash zone with higher abrasion rates occurring in the middle of the swash zone and lower rates towards the swash limit and at the breaker zone. Results also illustrate the role of changing wave energy on abrasion loss. A relationship between particle size and abrasion rate was also found, similar to previous laboratory results reported in the literature. Our preliminary experiments lead us to define an abrasion zone and this idea may help shape future research on abrasion processes on mixed sand and gravel beaches.

  13. Effects of sediment supply on surface textures of gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    John M. Buffington; David R. Montgomery

    1999-01-01

    Using previously published data from flume studies, we test a new approach for quantifying the effects of sediment supply (i.e., bed material supply) on surface grain size of equilibrium gravel channels. Textural response to sediment supply is evaluated relative to a theoretical prediction of competent median grain size (D’50). We find that surface median grain size (...

  14. TRANSPORT OF CHROMIUM AND SELENIUM IN A PRISTINE SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER: ROLE OF ADSORPTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field transport experiments were conducted in an oxic sand and gravel aquifer using Br (bromide ion), Cr (chromium, injected as Cr(VI)), Se (selenium, injected as Se(VI)), and other tracers. The aquifer has mildly acidic pH values and low concentrations of dissolved salts. Within...

  15. TRANSPORT OF CHROMIUM AND SELENIUM IN A PRISTINE SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER: ROLE OF ADSORPTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field transport experiments were conducted in an oxic sand and gravel aquifer using Br (bromide ion), Cr (chromium, injected as Cr(VI)), Se (selenium, injected as Se(VI)), and other tracers. The aquifer has mildly acidic pH values and low concentrations of dissolved salts. Within...

  16. Turbulence measurements over immobile gravel with additions of sand from supply limited to capacity transport conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurement of the turbulence that drives sand transport over and through immobile gravels is relevant to efforts to model sediment movement downstream of dams, where fine sediments are eroded from coarse substrates and are not replaced due to the presence of the upstream dam. The relative elevatio...

  17. Performance of bed load transport equations in mountain gravel-bed rivers: A re-analysis

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey J. Barry; John M. Buffington; John G. King; Peter Goodwin

    2006-01-01

    Our recent examination of bed load transport data from mountain gravel-bed rivers in the western United States shows that the data can be fit by a simple power function of discharge, with the coefficient being a function of drainage area (a surrogate for basin sediment supply) and the exponent being a function of supply-related channel armoring (transport capacity in...

  18. Flume experiment based analysis of fine sediment infiltration into gravel-beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamparter, Gabriele; Nicolas, Andrew; Collins, Adrian; Michaelides, Katerina

    2010-05-01

    Gravel bed rivers provide valuable habitat for a multitude of organisms, many of which are dependent on the porous nature of the river substrate (eg. insect larvae and salmonids eggs). Agricultural land use and other anthropogenic activities can lead to increased fine sediment delivery to water courses and associated fine sediment infiltration into the gravel bed, promoting clogging of pore space and habitat degradation. This problem is well established. However, current quantitative understanding of the processes involved remains poor. Here we report the results from a series of laboratory flume experiments designed to illuminate the mechanisms controlling the infiltration, deposition and remobilisation of fine sediments within gravel bed rivers. Experiments were carried out in a 10 m long, 0.6 m wide flume with a 0.2 m thick gravel bed. Data were collected to quantify variations in mean velocity, turbulence characteristics, fine sediment concentration and composition, bed roughness and bed substrate. Rates and patterns of fine sediment storage were quantified using sediment traps placed within the bed substrate, and by continuous monitoring of suspended sediment concentration within the water column. Fine sediment was analysed to determine the size distribution of both the suspended particles (including flocs and aggregates) and the primary particles of which they are composed. Turbulent velocity profiles were obtained above each of the sediment traps using an array of ADVs (Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters). Flume data are used to test a multiple size class suspended sediment transport model suitable for future application in natural rivers.

  19. Unifying criterion for the velocity reversal hypothesis in gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    Diego Caamano; Peter Goodwin; John M. Buffington; Jim C. P. Liou; Stanley Daley-Laursen

    2009-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that velocity reversals provide a mechanism for maintaining pool-riffle morphology in gravel-bed rivers-an important habitat for salmonids, which are at risk in many places worldwide and that are the focus of extensive environmental legislation in Europe and North America. However, the occurrence of velocity reversals has been controversial for...

  20. Stabilization of a gravel channel by large streamside obstructions and bedrock bends, Jacoby Creek, northwestern California

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle

    1996-01-01

    Abstract - Jacoby Creek (bed width =12 m; bankfull discharge = 32.6 m 3 /s) contains stationary gravel bars that have forms and positions controlled by numerous large streamside obstructions (bedrock outcrops, large woody debris, and rooted bank projections) and bedrock bends. Bank-projection width and bar volume measured in 104 channel segments 1 bed-width long are...

  1. An Investigation into the Processes and Quantity of Dust Emissions over Gravel and Sand Deserts in North-Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqian; Wu, Guoxi; Cui, Xujia

    2017-01-01

    Year-long field observations have shown that there are spatial and temporal variations in the quantity of dust emissions for particulate matter {<} 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter {<} 63 μm (PM63) and vertical dust flux over different gravel surfaces (with loose sand, without loose sand, with a crust, and without a crust), with the greatest emissions occurring in the spring. The largest quantity of PM10 and PM63 emissions occurred over gravel with a loose sand surface (1.1 × 10^{-3} and 10.2 × 10^{-3} kg m^{-1} day^{-1} , respectively). The gravel surface without loose sand and without a crust presents the lowest values of PM63 (1.6 × 10^{-3} kg m^{-1} day^{-1} ) and PM10 (3.3 × 10^{-4}{ kg m^{-1} day^{-1} ). However, the vertical dust flux was largest at over sandy surface (373 × 10^{-3} kg m^{-2} day^{-1} ). Multivariate correlation analysis indicates that the quantity of PM10 is strongly negatively correlated to gravel coverage (R^{2 }= 0.55 ). The quantity of PM10 dust emissions over a gravel surface with loose sand is approximately three times greater than that of a gravel surface with a crust. The mean quantity of PM10, PM63 and vertical dust flux over a gravel surface decreased with increasing gravel coverage. By comparing the quantity of PM10 dust emissions over gravel and sandy deserts, we found that gravel deserts and sandy deserts are both major sources of dust for dust storms in this region.

  2. An Investigation into the Processes and Quantity of Dust Emissions over Gravel and Sand Deserts in North-Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqian; Wu, Guoxi; Cui, Xujia

    2017-06-01

    Year-long field observations have shown that there are spatial and temporal variations in the quantity of dust emissions for particulate matter {<}10 μm (PM10), particulate matter {<}63 μm (PM63) and vertical dust flux over different gravel surfaces (with loose sand, without loose sand, with a crust, and without a crust), with the greatest emissions occurring in the spring. The largest quantity of PM10 and PM63 emissions occurred over gravel with a loose sand surface (1.1 × 10^{-3} and 10.2 × 10^{-3} kg m^{-1} day^{-1}, respectively). The gravel surface without loose sand and without a crust presents the lowest values of PM63 (1.6 × 10^{-3} kg m^{-1} day^{-1}) and PM10 (3.3 × 10^{-4} kg m^{-1} day^{-1}). However, the vertical dust flux was largest at over sandy surface (373 × 10^{-3 } kg m^{-2} day^{-1}). Multivariate correlation analysis indicates that the quantity of PM10 is strongly negatively correlated to gravel coverage (R^{2 }= 0.55). The quantity of PM10 dust emissions over a gravel surface with loose sand is approximately three times greater than that of a gravel surface with a crust. The mean quantity of PM10, PM63 and vertical dust flux over a gravel surface decreased with increasing gravel coverage. By comparing the quantity of PM10 dust emissions over gravel and sandy deserts, we found that gravel deserts and sandy deserts are both major sources of dust for dust storms in this region.

  3. Modeling flows over gravel beds by a drag force method and a modified S-A turbulence closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C.; Li, C. W.

    2012-09-01

    A double-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (DANS) model has been developed for depth-limited open channel flows over gravels. Three test cases are used to validate the model: an open-channel flow over a densely packed gravel bed with small-scale uniform roughness (D/d50 ˜ 13, d50 = median diameter of roughness elements, D = water depth), open-channel flows over large-scale sparsely distributed roughness elements (D/Δ ˜ 2.3-8.7, Δ = roughness height) and steep slope gravel-bed river flows with D/d50 ˜ 7-25. Various methods of treatment of the gravel-induced resistance effect have been investigated. The results show that the wall function approach (WFA) is successful in simulating flows over small gravels but is not appropriate for large gravels since the vertical profile of the longitudinal velocity does not follow the logarithmic-linear relationship. The drag force method (DFM) performs better but the non-logarithmic velocity distribution generated by sparsely distributed gravels cannot be simulated accurately. Noting that the turbulence length scale within the gravel layer is governed by the gravel size, the DANS model incorporating the DFM and a modified Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence closure is proposed. The turbulence length scale parameter in the S-A model is modified to address the change in the turbulence structure within the gravel layer. The computed velocity profiles agree well with the corresponding measured profiles in all cases. Particularly, the model reproduces the S-shape velocity profile for sparsely distributed large size roughness elements. The modeling methodology is robust and can be easily integrated into the existing numerical models.

  4. Estimated sand and gravel resources of the South Merrimack, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, 7.5-minute quadrangle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, D.M.; Drew, L.J.; Fowler, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    A computer methodology is presented that allows natural aggregate producers, local governmental, and nongovernmental planners to define specific locations that may have sand and gravel deposits meeting user-specified minimum size, thickness, and geographic and geologic criteria, in areas where the surficial geology has been mapped. As an example, the surficial geologic map of the South Merrimack quadrangle was digitized and several digital geographic information system databases were downloaded from the internet and used to estimate the sand and gravel resources in the quadrangle. More than 41 percent of the South Merrimack quadrangle has been mapped as having sand and (or) gravel deposited by glacial meltwaters. These glaciofluvial areas are estimated to contain a total of 10 million m3 of material mapped as gravel, 60 million m3 of material mapped as mixed sand and gravel, and another 50 million m3 of material mapped as sand with minor silt. The mean thickness of these areas is about 1.95 meters. Twenty tracts were selected, each having individual areas of more than about 14 acres4 (5.67 hectares) of stratified glacial-meltwater sand and gravel deposits, at least 10-feet (3.0 m) of material above the watertable, and not sterilized by the proximity of buildings, roads, streams and other bodies of water, or railroads. The 20 tracts are estimated to contain between about 4 and 10 million short tons (st) of gravel and 20 and 30 million st of sand. The five most gravel-rich tracts contain about 71 to 82 percent of the gravel resources in all 20 tracts and about 54-56 percent of the sand. Using this methodology, and the above criteria, a group of four tracts, divided by narrow areas sterilized by a small stream and secondary roads, may have the highest potential in the quadrangle for sand and gravel resources. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006.

  5. Transient and steady State Patterns in Gravel Bars Following Sediment Supply Increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, C.; Wilcock, P.

    2011-12-01

    Bedforms in a gravel-bed river respond to a combination of water discharge, sediment supply, and valley-scale geometry. The bed configuration can also vary between transient and steady-state conditions. Field and flume observations of gravel bedform responses to changes in sediment supply have focused primarily on decreased sediment supply, and those that have dealt with increased sediment supply have found cases of both increasing relief and decreasing relief. We present gravel bedform configurations under conditions of increased sediment supply in both field and laboratory conditions. The field study tracked the response of the Sandy River, Oregon after an increase in sediment flux due to the 2007 Marmot Dam removal in which nearly 750,000 m3 of impounded sediment which was made available for transport and resulted in a several-fold increase in annual sediment flux. The flume experiments introduced perturbation in a planar gravel bed (gravel D50 = 10mm, 15% sand) prompting alternate bar formation. Sediment was then manually added to the recirculating flume (in essence operating it as a feed flume) increasing flux rates by 50%. Upon reaching a steady state, the upstream flux was then augmented again to double the steady state rate. In response to the increased sediment supply the bed topography steepened to transport the imposed sediment flux. In both flume and field, the final bed response to increased sediment supply was deposition of a sediment wedge, steeping the channel slope with little change in bar morphology. Although the location and morphology of the bedforms were similar as the bed configuration stabilized, the transient response showed different patterns of deposition across the stream. A pattern of decreasing relief both from bar tops eroding and pools filling was observed as well as the migration of smaller wavelength high-celerity gravel bars as the bed decreased in relief. To explore the transient response we modeled both cases with a 2-D depth

  6. Bed-material, channel stability, and regional gravel production dynamics in Oregon coastal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. L.; O'Connor, J. E.; Wallick, R.; Anderson, S.; Keith, M. K.; Mangano, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Along the Oregon coast, gravel-bed rivers of various basin sizes and network topologies carve their way to the Pacific Ocean through a suite of geologic formations and land-use activities. To date, we have initiated assessments of bed-material condition and channel stability for seven coastal Oregon rivers (from north to south: Nehalem, Tillamook, Umpqua, Coquille, Rogue, Hunter, and Chetco). These river channels are of interest, in part, due to historic and on-going removal of gravels for commercial aggregate. Gravel extraction alone or in conjunction with the effects of other land uses may initiate a variety of channel changes, leading to channel instability. For each river, we synthesize multiple lines of evidence (including field observations, particle measurements, GIS analyses, specific gage analyses, and previous studies) to determine if the river channels are in equilibrium, degrading, or aggrading and if bed-material transport is likely limited by transport capacity or sediment supply. Initial field observations include the presence of reaches with some channel instability (mainly aggradation and channel widening) in the Hunter, Rogue, and Coquille basins. Our preliminary specific gage analyses indicate changes in the stage-discharge relationships at several gages, including a long-term gage on Rogue River near Grants Pass, where the channel has either incised or widened, resulting in a lowering of stage over time and different discharges. Building on our preliminary findings and review of the literature, we postulate that gravel production in coastal Oregon rivers is a function of the surrounding geology, basin slope, annual precipitation rates, channel bed elevation patterns (e.g., the length of the channel bed at sea level), and network structure. Bed-material supply tends to be greatest for rivers draining the Klamath terrane. Preliminary statistical analyses also show that the product of basin slope and mean annual precipitation describes 57% of the

  7. Effects of Gravel Bars on Nutrient Spiraling in Bedrock-Alluvium Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iobst, B. R.; Carroll, E. P.; Furbish, D. J.

    2007-05-01

    The importance of the connection between nutrient transport and local stream geomorphology is becoming increasingly important. Studies have shown that the interconnectivity of nutrient cycles in the downstream direction is in part controlled by the distribution and size of gravel bars in low order streams, as hyporheic flow occurs dominantly through alternate and mid-channel gravel bars. For this investigation multiple gravel bars in a 3rd order bedrock-alluvium stream were studied to determine general relationships between nutrient spiraling and hyporheic flow. The first goal was to understand (1) the extent to which water moves through hyporheic zones and (2) the basic chemistry of the hyporheic water. The second part of the study was to understand how nutrients, notably nitrogen, are affected in their cycling by the relatively long residence times encountered in gravel bars during hyporheic flow. Wells were installed along a 600 m reach of Panther Creek, KY in selected bars, as well as in a secondary location involving a grid installation pattern in one large bar. Results have shown that hyporheic flow through gravel bars is an important factor in influencing stream chemistry. Background water chemistry surveys have shown that certain parameters, specifically ammonium and nitrogen concentrations vary downstream, and that the dominant control over these changes is gravel bar location. Rhodamine WT was used in field tracer tests to track the travel times of water through bars as well as partitioning of water between the open channel and hyporheic flows. Further tests will be conducted utilizing a stable isotope study to determine how nitrogen is affected by hyporheic flow, and what implications this has for nutrient transport. We expect results to show that the spacing and size of gravel bars is a dominant control in key nutrient spiraling parameters, namely uptake lengths and overall nitrogen cycling rates. This has implications for how natural systems will

  8. Runoff and Sediment Delivery from Bare and Graveled Forest Road Approaches to Stream Crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. R.; McGuire, K. J.; Aust, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    Forested watersheds are typically associated with high quality water yield, yet forest roads and trails can adversely impact water quality draining forested watersheds. Increased stream sedimentation from forest road stream crossings often represents the most significant water quality threat associated with forestry operations. Quantification of sediment delivery rates is essential for the prescription of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that adequately address forest road stormwater runoff. Two different field experiments were implemented in the Virginia Piedmont to achieve the objectives of quantifying sediment delivery from forest roads where the road meets the stream (the road approach) and evaluating the sediment reduction efficacy of partially graveling road approaches. A forest operational experiment that included sediment traps and differential leveling was used to measure sediment delivery from five bare and four fully graveled road approaches for one year (August 2011 through July 2012). Rainfall simulation experiments were performed on six additional approaches to measure stormwater runoff volume, infiltration, and sediment delivery for 10 to 50-minute rain events with rainfall recurrence intervals of < 1 to 5-year return periods. Rainfall simulations were performed on newly-reopened bare approaches, with subsequent simulations on partially graveled approaches. The sediment trap study provides annual sediment delivery rates for bare and fully graveled road approaches. The rainfall simulation experiments characterize sediment delivery during storm events and provide an evaluation of different levels of Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation (i.e. ¼ to full gravel coverage) to minimize sediment inputs from road approaches. Sediment delivery from both experiments was related to rainfall amount, timing, and intensity, as well as road approach characteristics such as length, slope, and percentage of bare soil through stepwise multiple regression

  9. Ecological significance of riverine gravel bars in regulated river reaches below dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ock, G.; Takemon, Y.; Sumi, T.; Kondolf, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    A gravel bar has been recognized as ecologically significant in that they provide simplified habitat with topographical, hydrological and thermo-chemical diversity, while enhancing material exchanges as interfaces laterally between aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and vertically between surface and subsurface waters. During past several decades, regulated rivers below dams have been loss of a number of the geomorphological features due to sediment starvation by upstream dams, accompanied by a subsequent degradation of their ecological functions. Despite a growing concern for gravel bar management recognizing its importance in recovering riverine ecosystem services, the ecological roles of gravel bars have not been assessed enough from the empirical perspectives of habitat diversity and organic matter interactions. In this study, we investigate the 'natural filtering effects' for reducing lentic plankton and contaminants associated with self-purification, and 'physicochemical habitat complexity' of gravel bars, focusing on reach-scaled gravel bars in rivers located in three different countries; First is the Uji River in central Japan, where there has been a loss of gravel bars in the downstream reaches since an upstream dam was constructed in 1965; second is the Tagliamento River in northeast Italy, which shows morphologically intact braided bar channels by natural flooding events and sediment supply; third is the Trinity River in the United States (located in northern California), the site of ongoing restoration efforts for creating new gravel bars through gravel augmentation and channel rehabilitation activities. We traced the downstream changes in particulate organic matter (POM) trophic sources (composed of allochthonous terrestrial inputs, autochthonous instream production and lentic plankton from dam outflows) in order to evaluate the roles of the geomorphological features in tailwater ecosystem food-resources shifting. We calculated suspended POM

  10. Wikipedia Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Kotaro; Ito, Masahiro; Erdmann, Maike; Shirakawa, Masumi; Michishita, Tomoyuki; Hara, Takahiro; Nishio, Shojiro

    Wikipedia, a collaborative Wiki-based encyclopedia, has become a huge phenomenon among Internet users. It covers a huge number of concepts of various fields such as arts, geography, history, science, sports and games. As a corpus for knowledge extraction, Wikipedia's impressive characteristics are not limited to the scale, but also include the dense link structure, URL based word sense disambiguation, and brief anchor texts. Because of these characteristics, Wikipedia has become a promising corpus and a new frontier for research. In the past few years, a considerable number of researches have been conducted in various areas such as semantic relatedness measurement, bilingual dictionary construction, and ontology construction. Extracting machine understandable knowledge from Wikipedia to enhance the intelligence on computational systems is the main goal of "Wikipedia Mining," a project on CREP (Challenge for Realizing Early Profits) in JSAI. In this paper, we take a comprehensive, panoramic view of Wikipedia Mining research and the current status of our challenge. After that, we will discuss about the future vision of this challenge.

  11. Opportunistic exploitation: an overlooked pathway to extinction.

    PubMed

    Branch, Trevor A; Lobo, Aaron S; Purcell, Steven W

    2013-07-01

    How can species be exploited economically to extinction? Past single-species hypotheses examining the economic plausibility of exploiting rare species have argued that the escalating value of rarity allows extinction to be profitable. We describe an alternative pathway toward extinction in multispecies exploitation systems, termed 'opportunistic exploitation'. In this mode, highly valued species that are targeted first by fishing, hunting, and logging become rare, but their populations can decline further through opportunistic exploitation while more common but less desirable species are targeted. Effectively, expanding exploitation to more species subsidizes the eventual extinction of valuable species at low densities. Managers need to recognize conditions that permit opportunistic depletion and pass regulations to protect highly desirable species when exploitation can expand to other species.

  12. Effects of gravel mulch on emergence of galleta grass seedlings. Oral summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Medrano, J.C.; Stanley, C.; Walo, M.D.

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office, Technology Development and Program Management Division, has identified the need to clean up several sites on the Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range contaminated with surface plutonium. An important objective of the project identified as the Plutonium In Soils Integrated Demonstration is to develop technologies to stabilize and restore the disturbed sites after decontamination. Revegetation of these contaminated sites will be difficult due to their location in the arid Mojave and Great Basin Deserts. The major factors which will affect successful plant establishment and growth at these sites are limited and sporadic precipitation, limited soil water, extreme air and soil temperatures, limited topsoil, and herbivory . Research has shown that providing microsites for seed via mulching can aid in plant emergence and establishment. Since many of the soils at the sites slated for plutonium decontamination have a large percentage of gravel in the upper 10 cm of soil, the use of gravel as mulch could provide microsites for seed and stabilize soils during subsequent revegetation of the sites. In July 1992, EG&G/EM Environmental Sciences Department initiated a greenhouse study to examine the possible benefits of gravel mulch. The specific objectives of this greenhouse study were to: (1) determine the effects seedling emergence and soil water, and (2) determine effects of irrigation rates on seedling emergence for gravel mulches and other conventional seedbed preparation techniques. A secondary objective was to determine the depth of gravel mulch that was optimal for seedling emergence. Results from this greenhouse study will assist in formulating specific reclamation plans for sites chosen for cleanup.

  13. Nearshore shore-oblique bars, gravel outcrops, and their correlation to shoreline change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schupp, C.A.; McNinch, J.E.; List, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This study demonstrates the physical concurrence of shore-oblique bars and gravel outcrops in the surf zone along the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina. These subaqueous features are spatially correlated with shoreline change at a range of temporal and spatial scales. Previous studies have noted the existence of beach-surf zone interactions, but in general, relationships between nearshore geological features and coastal change are poorly understood. These new findings should be considered when exploring coastal zone dynamics and developing predictive engineering models. The surf zone and nearshore region of the Outer Banks is predominantly planar and sandy, but there are several discrete regions with shore-oblique bars and interspersed gravel outcrops. These bar fields have relief up to 3??m, are several kilometers wide, and were relatively stationary over a 1.5??year survey period; however, the shoreward component of the bar field does exhibit change during this time frame. All gravel outcrops observed in the study region, a 40??km longshore length, were located adjacent to a shore-oblique bar, in a trough that had width and length similar to that of the associated bar. Seismic surveys show that the outcrops are part of a gravel stratum underlying the active surface sand layer. Cross-correlation analyses demonstrate high correlation of monthly and multi-decadal shoreline change rates with the adjacent surf-zone bathymetry and sediment distribution. Regionally, areas with shore-oblique bars and gravel outcrops are correlated with on-shore areas of high short-term shoreline variability and high long-term shoreline change rates. The major peaks in long-term shoreline erosion are onshore of shore-oblique bars, but not all areas with high rates of long-term shoreline change are associated with shore-oblique bars and troughs. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Run-of-River Impoundments Can Remain Unfilled While Transporting Gravel Bedload: Numerical Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Previous work at run-of-river (ROR) dams in northern Delaware has shown that bedload supplied to ROR impoundments can be transported over the dam when impoundments remain unfilled. Transport is facilitated by high levels of sand in the impoundment that lowers the critical shear stresses for particle entrainment, and an inversely sloping sediment ramp connecting the impoundment bed (where the water depth is typically equal to the dam height) with the top of the dam (Pearson and Pizzuto, in press). We demonstrate with one-dimensional bed material transport modeling that bed material can move through impoundments and that equilibrium transport (i.e., a balance between supply to and export from the impoundment, with a constant bed elevation) is possible even when the bed elevation is below the top of the dam. Based on our field work and previous HEC-RAS modeling, we assess bed material transport capacity at the base of the sediment ramp (and ignore detailed processes carrying sediment up and ramp and over the dam). The hydraulics at the base of the ramp are computed using a weir equation, providing estimates of water depth, velocity, and friction, based on the discharge and sediment grain size distribution of the impoundment. Bedload transport rates are computed using the Wilcock-Crowe equation, and changes in the impoundment's bed elevation are determined by sediment continuity. Our results indicate that impoundments pass the gravel supplied from upstream with deep pools when gravel supply rate is low, gravel grain sizes are relatively small, sand supply is high, and discharge is high. Conversely, impoundments will tend to fill their pools when gravel supply rate is high, gravel grain sizes are relatively large, sand supply is low, and discharge is low. The rate of bedload supplied to an impoundment is the primary control on how fast equilibrium transport is reached, with discharge having almost no influence on the timing of equilibrium.

  15. Outer region scaling using the freestream velocity for nonuniform open channel flow over gravel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert L.; Fox, James F.

    2017-06-01

    The theoretical basis for outer region scaling using the freestream velocity for nonuniform open channel flows over gravel is derived and tested for the first time. Owing to the gradual expansion of the flow within the nonuniform case presented, it is hypothesized that the flow can be defined as an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer using the asymptotic invariance principle. The hypothesis is supported using similarity analysis to derive a solution, followed by further testing with experimental datasets. For the latter, 38 newly collected experimental velocity profiles across three nonuniform flows over gravel in a hydraulic flume are tested as are 43 velocity profiles previously published in seven peer-reviewed journal papers that focused on fluid mechanics of nonuniform open channel over gravel. The findings support the nonuniform flows as equilibrium defined by the asymptotic invariance principle, which is reflective of the consistency of the turbulent structure's form and function within the expanding flow. However, roughness impacts the flow structure when comparing across the published experimental datasets. As a secondary objective, we show how previously published mixed scales can be used to assist with freestream velocity scaling of the velocity deficit and thus empirically account for the roughness effects that extend into the outer region of the flow. One broader finding of this study is providing the theoretical context to relax the use of the elusive friction velocity when scaling nonuniform flows in gravel bed rivers; and instead to apply the freestream velocity. A second broader finding highlighted by our results is that scaling of nonuniform flow in gravel bed rivers is still not fully resolved theoretically since mixed scaling relies to some degree on empiricism. As researchers resolve the form and function of macroturbulence in the outer region, we hope to see the closing of this research gap.

  16. The influence of three methods of gravel cleaning on brown trout, Salmo trutta, egg survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackle, Victoria J.; Hughes, Simon; Lewis, Vaughan T.

    1999-02-01

    Siltation of spawning gravels in upland rivers appears to be an increasing hindrance to salmonids' spawning success. River managers seek an effective and non-labour intensive means of loosening gravel and reducing fine material, so improving spawning success; this study compared three practical gravel cleaning techniques, applied at realistic (rather than intensive) levels, by assessing survival to hatching of buried brown trout, Salmo trutta L., ova at five sites on four rivers with gravel substrate in southern England. Each site consisted of six reaches, of which three were cleaned by tractor rotovating, high pressure jet washing and pump washing; these were compared with adjacent, untreated reaches. Brown trout ova were buried in both fine mesh and coarse mesh boxes in each reach.Significant improvements (at P<0·05) in survival (number of live alevins) were found in three of the five pump washed reaches, two of the five tractor rotovated reaches and one pressure washed reach when the data were analysed by site. When data from all five sites were analysed together, all treated reaches showed a significant improvement (at P<0·05) in egg survival to hatching compared with control reaches for fine mesh egg boxes; for coarse mesh boxes only pump washed reaches showed such an improvement.We feel that pump-washing provides the most effective, inexpensive and suitably non labour-intensive means of improving gravel, although ultimately it may be better to reduce the silt load of rivers. Freeze core bed samples taken before and immediately after cleaning were analysed for silt content; pump washing and high pressure washing may have reduced the amount of fine material.

  17. Mining Hazards Analysis with Simultaneous Mining Copper Ores and Salt Deposits in LGOM (Legnica-Głogów Copper Belt) Mines with Regard to Dynamic Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłeczek, Zdzisław; Niedojadło, Zygmunt; Popiołek, Edward; Skobliński, Wojciech; Sopata, Paweł; Stoch, Tomasz; Wójcik, Artur; Zeljaś, Dagmara

    2016-09-01

    In the case of locating two bedded deposits of different mineral resources in a small vertical distance, additional or increased mining hazards can occur (deformations of the rock mass, crumps and mining shocks, hazards to the land surface). This paper has thoroughly examined the impact of exploitation of the lower-located deposit of copper ore on the higher-located deposit of salt as well as the reverse situation as regards the dynamic phenomena, being the greatest lithospheric hazard in LGOM. At the same time theoretical models of processes were applied, verified by previous observations in situ in mines of Legnica-Głogów Copper Belt.

  18. Mine seepage problems in drift mine operations

    SciTech Connect

    DeRossett, C.; Johnson, D.E.; Bradshaw, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Extensive mining in the Eastern Kentucky Coal Region has occurred in coal deposits located above valley floors. Underground mines present unique stability problems resulting from the creation of mine pools in abandoned works. {open_quotes}Blowouts{close_quotes} occur when hydrostatic pressures result in the cataclysmic failure of an outcrop-barrier. Additionally, seepage from flooded works results in saturation of colluvium, which may ultimately mobilize as landslides. Several case studies of both landslides and blowouts illustrate that considerations should be taken into account to control or prevent these problems. Underground mine maps and seepage conditions at the individual sites were examined to determine the mine layouts, outcrop-barrier widths, and structure of the mine floors. Discharge monitoring points were established in and near the landslides. These studies depict how mine layout, operation, and geology influence drainage conditions. The authors suggest that mine designs should incorporate drainage control to insure long-term stability and limit liability. The goal of the post-mining drainage plan is control of the mine drainage, which will reduce the size of mine pools and lower the hydrostatic pressure. Recommendations are made as to several methods that may be useful in controlling mine drainage.

  19. Remote sensing monitoring land use change in Donglutian coal mine, Shuozhou City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Baoying; Liu, Ling

    2017-01-01

    This paper monitored the coal mine exploitation in Donglutian coal mine, Shuozhou city, Shanxi Province. Landsat satellite images from 2008 to 2016 were selected, and then 15m color composite images were obtained through data processing and image fusion. On this basis, the land use map from 2008 to 2016 was obtained using visual interpretation method. Results showed that the main land use type in this area was cropland, unused land and coalmine. Area of cropland and unused land kept decreasing year by year, while coal mine expanded rapidly. The expansion of coal mine concentrated on two time periods: from 2009 to 2010 and from 2012 to 2013. During these two time periods, topsoil stripping was the main exploitation type, while deep mining was the main type for other times. Results also presented that the exploitation number of small coals kept increasing year by year, from the initial number of 26 at 2008 to 42 at 2016.

  20. GPU-Accelerated Text Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Mueller, Frank; Zhang, Yongpeng; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    Accelerating hardware devices represent a novel promise for improving the performance for many problem domains but it is not clear for which domains what accelerators are suitable. While there is no room in general-purpose processor design to significantly increase the processor frequency, developers are instead resorting to multi-core chips duplicating conventional computing capabilities on a single die. Yet, accelerators offer more radical designs with a much higher level of parallelism and novel programming environments. This present work assesses the viability of text mining on CUDA. Text mining is one of the key concepts that has become prominent as an effective means to index the Internet, but its applications range beyond this scope and extend to providing document similarity metrics, the subject of this work. We have developed and optimized text search algorithms for GPUs to exploit their potential for massive data processing. We discuss the algorithmic challenges of parallelization for text search problems on GPUs and demonstrate the potential of these devices in experiments by reporting significant speedups. Our study may be one of the first to assess more complex text search problems for suitability for GPU devices, and it may also be one of the first to exploit and report on atomic instruction usage that have recently become available in NVIDIA devices.

  1. The Gaia scientific exploitation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, F.; Jordi, C.

    2015-05-01

    On July 2014 the Gaia satellite, placed at L2 since January 2014, finished their commissioning phase and started collecting high accurate scientific data. New and more realistic estimations of the astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic accuracy expected after five years mission operation (2014-2019) have been recently published in the Gaia Science Performance Web page. Here we present the coordination efforts and the activities being conducted through the two GREAT (Gaia Research for European Astronomy Training) European Networks, the GREAT-ESF, a programme supported by the European Science Foundation (2010-2015), and the GREAT-ITN network, from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (2011-2015). The main research theme of these networks is to unravel the origin and history of our home galaxy. Emphasis is placed on the research projects being conducted by the Spanish Researchers through these networks, well coordinated by the Red Española de Explotación Científica de Gaia (REG network, with more than 140 participants). Members of the REG play an important role on the collection of complementary spectroscopic data from ground based telescopes, on the development of new tools for an optimal scientific exploitation of Gaia data and on the preparation task to create the Gaia archive.

  2. Exploiting dual otoacoustic emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina; Kalluri, Radha

    2015-12-01

    Two distinct processes generate otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Reflection-source emissions, here recorded as stimulus frequency OAEs, are optimally informative at low sound levels and are more sensitive to slight hearing loss; they have been linked to cochlear amplifier gain and tuning. Distortion-source emissions are strongest at moderate-high sound levels and persist despite mild hearing loss; they likely originate in the nonlinear process of hair cell transduction. In this preliminary study, we exploit the unique features of each by generating a combined reflection-distortion OAE profile in normal hearing and hearing-impaired ears. Distortion-product (DP) and stimulus-frequency (SF) OAEs were recorded over a broad range of stimulus levels and frequencies. Individual I/O and transfer functions were generated for both emission types in each ear, and OAE peak strength, compression threshold, and rate of compression were calculated. These combined SFOAE and DPOAE features in normal and hearing-impaired ears may provide a potentially informative and novel index of hearing loss. This is an initial step toward utilizing OAE source in characterizing cochlear function and dysfunction.

  3. Design study for asteroidal exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Carl; Blissit, Jim; Jarrett, Dave; Sanner, Rob; Yanagawa, Koji

    1985-08-01

    A systematic approach to asteroidal exploitation for the 1990 to 2010 time frame is presented as an initial step toward expanding the use of space beyond the space station by providing a source of lower cost materials. With only a limited amount of information known about the asteroids, reconnaissance and exploration phases to determine the exact locations and compositions of several earth-approaching asteroids are required. Earth-based telescopes are used to locate and study the asteroids, while unmanned probes will return samples of asteroidal material to earth for analysis. After these phases are completed, the retrieval of a 35,000 metric ton piece of the asteroid Anteros is undertaken. A cargo transporter uses magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjets outbound and a mass-driver using asteroidal material inbound. A crew ship uses ion engines. Low thrust trajectories are used for both spacecraft. A materials processing facility will manufacture propellant pellets and retrieve non-propellant materials for spacecraft use. The cost is 1/10th that to transport the same materials from earth to high earth orbit. The project will cost 25 percent less if done in conjunction with a lunar and Martian base.

  4. Evaluation of environment benefits based on new-type mining of coal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Futong; Ren, Zaixiang

    2017-08-01

    According to the energy structure characteristics in China, this paper analyzed the current situation of liquefaction and gasification exploitation of coal as an emerging mining method. Simultaneously, setting the UCG (UCG) as an example, this paper analyzed the factors impacting the new-type mining method of coal resources and the mining damages, obtaining that the main damages of UCG include surface subsidence, groundwater pollution and other pollution. This paper, which proposed to evaluate the environmental benefits of the new-type mining method, established a evaluation system of environmental benefits of UCG and adopted fuzzy comprehensive evaluation, obtaining four-class comprehensive evaluation indexes of the new-type mining method.

  5. Mining machine

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, H.R.

    1984-12-04

    A mining machine is disclosed comprising a mobile base and a cutting head assembly at a forward end of the mobile base having a cutter drum rotatable about an output shaft disposed along the longitudinal axis of the cutter drum. A drive system for the cutting head assembly comprises at least one motor for driving at least one toothed motor pinion and a generally cylindrical combination gear having generally circular end surfaces. A bevel or face gear is formed in at least one of the end surfaces, having teeth adapted to mate with and be driven by the toothed motor pinion. The combination gear has a worm gear formed in the outside cylindrical surface, which is disposed in driving engagement with the teeth of an output gear integrally and coaxially connected to the output shaft of the cutter drum.

  6. Paleocurrent and fabric analyses of the imbricated fluvial gravel deposits in Huangshui Valley, the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miao, X.; Lu, H.; Li, Z.; Cao, G.

    2008-01-01

    Gravel deposits on fluvial terraces contain a wealth of information about the paleofluvial system. In this study, flow direction and provenance were determined by systematic counts of more than 2000 clasts of imbricated gravel deposits in the Xining Region, northeastern Tibetan Plateau, China. These gravel deposits range in age from the modern Huangshui riverbed to Miocene-aged deposits overlain by eolian sediments. Our major objectives were not only to collect first-hand field data on the fluvial gravel sediments of the Xining Region, but also to the reconstruct the evolution of the fluvial system. These data may offer valuable information about uplift of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau during the late Cenozoic era. Reconstructed flow directions of the higher and lower gravel deposits imply that the river underwent a flow reversal of approximately 130-180??. In addition, the lithological compositions in the higher gravel deposits differ significantly from the lower terraces, suggesting that the source areas changed at the same time. Eolian stratigraphy overlying the gravel deposits and paleomagnetic age determination indicate that this change occurred sometime between 1.55??Ma and 1.2??Ma. We suggest that tectonic activity could explain the dramatic changes in flow direction and lithological composition during this time period. Therefore, this study provides a new scenario of fluvial response to tectonic uplift: a reversal of flow direction. In addition, field observation and statistical analyses reveal a strong relationship between rock type, size and roundness of clasts. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pliocene Cosmogenic Nuclide Burial Ages of the Nenana Gravel: Progress in Dating and Implications for Alaska Range Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, B. M.; Bemis, S. P.; Ward, D.; Caffee, M. W.; Sortor, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Nenana Gravel is an up to 1.2 km thick foreland basin deposit that spans the north flank of the Alaska Range. It is uplifted relative to the active foreland basin to the north. It is also deformed to various degree dependent on its location within the northern Alaska Range thrust system. Because this foreland basin sequence records the unroofing and northward propagation of the Alaska Range, direct dating of the Nenana Gravel, especially over wide spatial distribution along the Alaska Range, will substantially advance our understanding of the style and timing of deformation of the Alaska Range. At present though, age estimates for the Nenana Gravel are limited to a single maximum limiting age and uncertain minimum limiting age with no little or no insight as to the spatial variation in Nenana Gravel deposition timing. We present the first direct dates of deposition ages of the Nenana Gravel using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating. Results indicate that deposition of the Nenana Gravel began ca. 6.5 Ma, in stratigraphic agreement with a maximum limiting tephra age from the underlying Usibelli Group. Additional samples from the Nenana Gravel basal contact and higher in the section are presently underway. The resultant burial ages are amongst the oldest 26Al-10Be burial ages ever produced and highlight the potential of the method to directly date sediments in the Pliocene, particularly given recent advancements in the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 26Al/27Al isotope ratios.

  8. Gravel bars can be critical for biodiversity conservation: a case study on scaly-sided Merganser in South china.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing; Shi, Linlu; Wen, Li; Chen, Junzhu; Duo, Hairui; Lei, Guangchun

    2015-01-01

    Gravel bars are characteristic components of river landscapes and are increasingly recognized as key sites for many waterbirds, though detailed studies on the ecological function of gravel bars for waterbirds are rare. In this study, we surveyed the endangered Scaly-sided Merganser Mergus squamatus along a 40 km river section of Yuan River, in Central China, for three consecutive winters. We derived the landscape metrics of river gravel bars from geo-rectified fine resolution (0.6 m) aerial image data. We then built habitat suitability models (Generalized Linear Models-GLMs) to study the effects of landscape metrics and human disturbance on Scaly-sided Merganser presence probability. We found that 1) the Scaly-sided Merganser tended to congregate at river segments with more gravel patches; 2) the Scaly-sided Merganser preferred areas with larger and more contiguous gravel patches; and 3) the number of houses along the river bank (a proxy for anthropogenic disturbance) had significantly negative impacts on the occurrence of the Scaly-sided Merganser. Our results suggest that gravel bars are vital to the Scaly-sided Merganser as shelters from disturbance, as well as sites for feeding and roosting. Therefore, maintaining the exposure of gravel bars in regulated rivers during the low water period in winter might be the key for the conservation of the endangered species. These findings have important implications for understanding behavioral evolution and distribution of the species and for delineating between habitats of different quality for conservation and management.

  9. A geomorphologist's criticism of the engineering approach to channelization of gravel-bed rivers: case study of the Raba River, Polish Carpathians.

    PubMed

    Wyzga, B

    2001-09-01

    River engineers use sediment transport formulas to design regulated channels in which the river's ability to transport bedload would remain in equilibrium with the delivery of materials from upstream. In gravel-bed rivers, a number of factors distort the simple relationship between particle size and hydraulic parameters at the threshold of sediment motion, inherent in the formulas. This may lead to significant errors in predicting the bedload transport rates in such streams and hence to instability of their regulated channels. The failure to recognize a nonstationary river regime may also result in unsuccessful channelization. Rapid channel incision has followed channelization of the main rivers of the Polish Carpathians in the 20th century. A case study of the Raba River shows that incision has resulted from the increase in stream power caused by channelization and the simultaneous reduction in sediment supply due to variations in basin management and a change in flood hydrographs. Calculations of bedload transport in the river by the Meyer-Peter and Müller formula are shown to have resulted in unrealistic estimates, perhaps because the different degree of bed armoring in particular cross-sections was neglected. It would have been possible to avoid improper channelization if the decreasing trend in sediment load of the Carpathian rivers had been recognized on the basis of geomorphological and sedimentological studies. Allowing the rivers to increase their sinuosity, wherever possible without an erosional threat to property and infrastructure, and preventing further instream gravel mining are postulated in order to arrest channel incision and reestablish the conditions for water and sediment storage on the floodplains.

  10. Gravel deposits of the Caddo Gap and De Queen quadrangles, Arkansas: Chapter B in Contributions to economic geology, 1918, Part I, Metals and nonmetals except fuels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miser, Hugh D.; Purdue, Albert Homer

    1919-01-01

    Several thick deposits of gravel are widely distributed along the north edge of the Gulf Coastal Plain, of which a narrow belt is embraced in the southern parts of the Caddo Gap and De Queen quadrangles, Ark. This belt is shown on Plate I, and its location is shown on figure 5, a key map of this region. It comprises parts of Pike, Howard, and Sevier counties and a narrow strip of Hemp- stead County, in southwestern Arkansas, and a strip along the east edge of McCurtain County, in southeastern Oklahoma. The gravels are of Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous, and Quaternary age, and are composed mainly of pebbles of novaculite (a variety of chert) derived from the Arkansas novaculite exposed in the Ouachita Mountain region, which is north of the Gulf Coastal Plain. They are used in making concrete, in ballasting railroads, and in the construction of wagon roads. Very small quantities of pebbles are also used in the washing plant of the Kimberlite Diamond Mining & Washing Co., at Murfreesboro, to assist in the disintegration of the altered peridotite which carries the diamonds.Interest in possible American sources of flint pebbles or substitutes therefor to be used in tube mills, in which minerals, ores, cement materials, and clinker are extensively ground in this country, has been aroused since the beginning of the present world war. This interest is due to the partial interruption of imports of flint pebbles from Denmark and France, which have supplied most of the pebbles used in this country. The main reasons for the preparation of this report are to present a description of the gravels under discussion and to indicate the possibility of their use in tube mills.The information for this report is the result of detailed field studies in the Caddo Gap and De Queen quadrangles by the authors in 1908 and 1911 and by the senior author in 1912 and 1916. Mr. E, D. Mesler rendered valuable assistance in 1912. Much of the information is abstracted from the De Queen-Caddo Gap

  11. [Runoff and sediment yielding processes on red soil engineering accumulation containing gravels by a simulated rainfall experiment].

    PubMed

    Shi, Qian-hua; Wang, Wen-long; Guo, Ming-ming; Bai, Yun; Deng, Li-qiang; Li, Jian-ming; Li, Yao-lin

    2015-09-01

    Engineering accumulation formed in production and construction projects is characterized by unique structure and complex material composition. Characteristics of soil erosion on the engineering accumulation significantly differ from those on farmland. An artificially simulated rainfall experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of rainfall intensity on the processes of runoff and sediment yielding on the engineering accumulation of different gravel contents (0%, 10%, 20% and 30%) in red soil regions. Results showed that the initial time of runoff generation decreased with increases in rainfall intensity and gravel content, the decreased amplitudes being about 48.5%-77.9% and 4.2%-34.2%, respectively. The initial time was found to be a power function of rainfall intensity. Both runoff velocity and runoff rate manifested a trend of first rising and then in a steady state with runoff duration. Rainfall intensity was found to be the main factor influencing runoff velocity and runoff rate, whereas the influence of gravel content was not significant. About 10% of gravel content was determined to be a critical value in the influence of gravel content on runoff volume. For the underlying surface of 10% gravel content, the runoff volume was least at rainfall intensity of 1.0 mm · min(-1) and maximum at rainfall intensity of greater than 1.0 mm · min(-1). The runoff volume in- creased 10%-60% with increase in rainfall intensity. Sediment concentration showed a sharp decline in first 6 min and then in a stable state in rest of time. Influence of rainfall intensity on sediment concentration decreased as gravel content increased. Gravels could reduce sediment yield significantly at rainfall intensity of greater than 1.0 mm · min(-1). Sediment yield was found to be a linear function of rainfall intensity and gravel content.

  12. Effects of gravel on infiltration, runoff, and sediment yield in landslide deposit slope in Wenchuan earthquake area, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyang; He, Binghui; Chen, Zhanpeng; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Chuan; Wang, Renxin

    2016-06-01

    Amounts of landslide deposits were triggered by the Wenchuan earthquake with magnitude 8.0 on May 12, 2008. The landslide deposits were composed of soil and rock fragments, which play important roles in hydrological and erosion processes in the steep slope of landslide deposits. The mixtures of soil and gravels are common in the top layers of landslide deposits, and its processes are obviously different with the soil without gravels. Based on the data of field investigation, a series of simulated scouring flow experiments with four proportion of gravel (0, 25, 33.3, and 50 %) and three scouring flow rates (4, 8, 12 L/min) under two steep slopes (67.5, 72.7 %) were conducted sequentially to know the effects of proportion of gravel on infiltration capacity, runoff generation, and sediment production in the steep slope of landslide deposit. Results indicated that gravel had promoted or reduced effects on infiltration capacity which could affect further the cumulative runoff volume and cumulative sediment mass increase or decrease. The cumulative infiltration volume in 25 % proportion of gravel was less than those in 0, 33.3, and 50 % proportion of gravel. The cumulative runoff volume was in an order of 25 > 0 > 33.3 > 50 % while cumulative sediment mass ranked as 25 > 33.3 > 0 > 50 % with different proportions of gravel. A significant power relationship was found between scouring time and cumulative runoff volume as well as cumulative sediment mass. The relationship between average soil and water loss rate and proportion of gravel was able to express by quadratic function, with a high degree of reliability. The results have important implications for soil and water conservation and modeling in landslide deposit but also provide useful information for the similar conditions.

  13. Different bed surface and flow resistance characteristics for gravel and sand bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, N.; Yang, K.; Nie, R.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    Bed forms affect both bed load transport and flow resistance strongly and change their shapes and sizes depending on underlying grain size distribution and shear stress. A series of flume experiments were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory to study the effect of bed form dynamics on flow turbulence and sediment transport with both gravel and sand as bed material and different flow conditions. From the experimental data, the spectrum of bed elevation time series, the PDFs of bed elevation increments and the flow resistance characteristics are all analyzed. The wavelet-based spectral analysis shows that the slopes of the elevation spectrums are -2 and -3 for gravel and sand bed surfaces, respectively. The slope -3 indicates that the surface is self-similar, in another words, the ratios of bed form heights and lengths for different bed forms are the same; however, the slope of -2 indicates that the surface is self-affine, and in such case (-2) the ratios of bed form heights and lengths for different bed forms are not correlated at all. We interpret that the relative size of grain and boundary layer affects the bed form characteristics significantly, e.g., grain size of sand is of the same scale as the thickness of boundary layer, but both are much smaller than the grain size of gravel. Our results suggest that the PDFs of bed elevation increments for both gravel and sand beds can be fitted well with two-sided asymmetric exponential function. Furthermore, we show that the flow resistance (Darcy-Weisbach coefficients f) are much higher for sand bed than gravel bed, and the former is contributed by form drags, which is much larger than grain drags. For gravel bed, f and the skewness of bed elevation increments increases with flow discharge whereas for the sand bed, both f and the skewness of bed elevation increments decreases which corresponds to the transition in hydraulic conditions for dune to dynamic flat surface in our experiments. The analysis

  14. The Effect of Fines in Mixed Size Sediment Transport in a Gravel Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Baumgardner, S.; Gaffney, J.; Wilcock, P.; Paola, C.

    2011-12-01

    Washload is a widely recognized concept that remains difficult to define. In a gravel-bed river, washload has been defined as those sizes present in the bed only in small proportions. It has also been defined as the portion of transported sediment that has little effect on bed material transport. We experimentally investigate the impact of fine sediment on the mobility and composition of a gravel bed. We conducted flume experiments using a constant water discharge and feed rate of gravel. After reaching steady state, we doubled the feed rate by feeding sediment of finer size, using size ratios from 1:1 to 1:16. As we decrease the size of the fine particles relative to the size of the gravel particles, the system transitions between three regimes. (1) For particle size ratios close to one, the bed slope increases to supply the additional shear stress needed to transport the additional load of similar-sized particles. (2) For intermediate particle size ratios the increased fines content increases the mobility of the sediment mix, resulting in a decreased bed slope. The bed composition is a mix of fine and coarse grains. (3) For the largest particle size ratios (the smallest fines), the additional fines travel primarily in suspension and cause essentially no change in bed slope, though the subsurface becomes clogged with fine sediment. The behavior for near-unity and intermediate particle size ratios can be predicted using a mixed-size bed-material transport formula. For the mixtures with the smallest fine particles, the presence of fines has little effect on the mobility of the gravel and thus the total transport can no longer be predicted with a bed material transport formula. These results provide useful insights concerning the nature of wash load. The effect of sediment feed on gravel mobility and bed slope is not controlled solely by the amount of fines in the bed (the first definition of wash load), but also depends strongly on the relative grain size of the

  15. Experiments on seismic behavior of back-fill gravel layer as liquefaction countermeasure of buried gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuo; Shimizu, Kenji; Ueno, Junichi

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on seismic behavior of back-fill gravel layer as a back-fill material for buried pipelines was experimented with to investigate the effectiveness against liquefaction with a scaled model using a shaking table. A non-liquefied sandy surface layer was made with a steel mold divided into several pieces for a model. The back-fill gravel was found to be efficient for drainage but didn`t prevent liquefaction from occurring in the below layer. It was also found that the pipe doesn`t move up by buoyancy but subsides following the settlement of the back-fill gravel.

  16. Hydrology and erosion impacts of mining derived coastal sand dunes, Chanaral Bay, Chile

    Treesearch

    Daniel G. Neary; Pablo Garcia-Chevesich

    2008-01-01

    Chile has an economy strongly based on the exploitation of its natural resources. Copper mining represents the main export monetary income, employing thousands of people all along the country. The Chilean Copper Corporation (CODELCO), El Salvador branch, has been the primary mining company, but it will be ending most of its activities by 2011 unless copper prices stay...

  17. Safety Improvement Solutions In Coal Mines Using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Cristian; Lupu, Lucian; Edelhauser, Eduard

    2015-07-01

    Exploitation of coal from the Jiu Valley presents its own specific, in terms of coal mining deposit conditions, fact that required a continuous preoccupation for the monitoring of the work conditions, in order to ensure work-places safety. This paper intends to indicate a method of increasing the work environment safety using GIS technology, the analysis being completed at Lupeni Coal Mine, the largest Coal Mine in Jiu Valley, characterised by a low level of accidents that has taken place in there so far. It consists of an extension of accomplished studies in order to implement an intelligent dispatching system.

  18. Using passive, thermal remote sensing techniques for detecting subsurface gravel accumulations in vegetated, unconsolidated sedimentary terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Gregory S.; Scholen, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Multiband radiometric data from an airborne imaging thermal scanner are being studied for use in finding buried gravel deposits. The techniques are based on measuring relative differences in the thermal properties between gravel-laden targets and the surrounding gravelless background. These properties are determined from modeling the spectral radiant emittance recorded over both types of surfaces in conjunction with ground measurements of the most significant heat flows above and below the surface. Thermodynamic properties of sampled materials from control sites are determined, and diurnal and annual subsurface heat waves are recorded. Thermal models that account for heat exchange at the surface, as well as varying levels of soil moisture, humidity, and vegetation, are needed for adaptation and modification to simulate the physical and radiative environments of this region.

  19. Crumb rubber impact to the mechanical performance of concrete based at round gravel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaka, Wafa; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2017-02-01

    Today the concrete is used more than any other construction material, with almost four (4) billion cubic meters used worldwide [1]. Throughout history, mankind has used concrete in construction. Concrete has not only been used in the construction of buildings such as dwelling areas but also in bridges, roads, tunnels, airports and water dams. It is a heterogeneous composite resulting from cement, aggregates, water and a limited quantity of adjuvant. The round gravel is an existing traditional material within the formulation of concrete. It is high in resistance to fragmentation and widely spread out in grand quantity in the Saharian regions. However, its utilization remains rare in different types of construction. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the use of local materials (Round gravel) with polymer industrial products (Crumb Rubber). This one is used to enhance the density, homogeneity, malleability and strength of the construction material.

  20. Penetration and survival of riparian tree roots in compacted coarse gravel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muellner, Michael; Weissteiner, Clemens; Konzel, Christoph; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    Root growth and penetration of riparian trees along paved cycling paths and service roads of rivers causes often traffic safety problems. Damages occur mostly on street surfaces with thin asphalt layers and especially in the upper part of the pavement structure. The maintainers of these roads are faced with frequent and high annual repair costs in order to guarantee traffic safety and pleasant cycling conditions. Analyses of the dominating process mechanisms demonstrated that mainly the naturally growing pioneer vegetation along rivers is responsible for the asphalt damages caused by their constant and rapid growth. The investigations of the root growth characteristics showed that tree roots mostly penetrate the road structure between the gravel sublayer and the asphalt because of the high compaction of the layer itself. In a second step of the research project the influence of different gravel size mixtures on the root penetration and survival are analysed. Coarse gravel size mixtures with the lowest possible fine granular fraction are suposed to inhibit root growth due to the mechanical impedance and air pruning of roots. Furthermore coarse gravel size mixtures could influence the presence of condensate formed at the underside of the asphalt layer. Therefore seven different compositions of matrix stone gravel size mixtures (0/32, 4/32, 8/32, 16/32, 0/64, 8/64 hydraulic bound mixture and 16/64) as sublayer material were tested in a small scale experimental set-up. Wooden boxes with a dimension of 1x1.5x0.5 m and 0.5x0.5x0.5 m were used as frames for the different matrix stone mixtures. On one side the boxes were delimited to the surrounding soil with a steel mesh followed by a wire mesh and a geotextile. Boxes were located in an 80 cm deep hole on a 30 cm thick drainage layer. Willow and poplar cuttings were planted laterally to the root penetrable side of the boxes. Large boxes were filled and compacted with 6 different gravel size mixtures (all but 4/32) and

  1. Kali Gandaki gravel deposits of central West Nepal — their neotectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Toran; Upreti, B. N.; Vashi, N. M.

    1980-02-01

    The terraced gravel deposits of the Baglung-Behadi region in the Kali Gandaki valley, central West Nepal, reveal geomorphic features related to neotectonism. The accumulation of thick fluvioglacial gravel deposits in lake-like basins along the then existing river course took place due to the uplift of the southern Mahabharat Range and the relative subsidence of the Midland. The deposits consist of unsorted fragments of variable size, showing considerable uniformity laterally over large areas from north to south, and with abundant angular to sub-rounded boulders of Dhaulagiri limestone and gneisses of the Main Central Crystallines. Terrace flats arranged in three successive levels on either side of Kali Gandaki show that the region has undergone at least three periods of uplift.

  2. Sediment transport and siltation of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels in chalk streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acornley, R. M.; Sear, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    Deposition rates of fine sediment into brown trout spawning gravels were measured at monthly intervals for a period of one year in a small channel of the River Test, Hampshire. Data were also collected on stream discharge, water depth, flow velocity and suspended sediment concentrations. Deposition rates followed a seasonal pattern and were maximal during periods of high discharge in the late winter/early spring when suspended sediment concentrations were high. The material deposited in the spawning gravels included silts and fine sands (<250 m) that were transported in suspension and coarser fragments of low density tufa-like material that were transported as bed load. The ecological implications of fine sediment deposition for salmonid egg survival in chalk streams are considered.

  3. Unfolding the fast neutron spectra of a BC501A liquid scintillation detector using GRAVEL method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, YongHao; Chen, XiMeng; Lei, JiaRong; An, Li; Zhang, XiaoDong; Shao, JianXiong; Zheng, Pu; Wang, XinHua

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectra is useful in basic research and applications. The overall procedure of measuring and unfolding the fast neutron energy spectra with BC501A liquid scintillation detector is described. The recoil proton spectrum of 241Am-Be neutrons was obtained experimentally. With the NRESP7 code, the response matrix of detector was simulated. Combining the recoil proton spectrum and response matrix, the unfolding of neutron spectra was performed by GRAVEL iterative algorithm. A MatLab program based on the GRAVEL method was developed. The continuous neutron spectrum of 241Am-Be source and monoenergetic neutron spectrum of D-T source have been unfolded successfully and are in good agreement with their standard reference spectra. The unfolded 241Am-Be spectrum are more accurate than the spectra unfolded by artificial neural networks in recent years.

  4. Vegetation control of gravel-bed channel morphology and adjustment: the case of Carex nudata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.

    2010-12-01

    In the high energy, gravel- to cobble-bed Middle Fork John Day River of eastern Oregon, C. nudata (torrent sedge) germinates on gravel bars and forms tussocks 0.5 m across by 0.3m high or larger, with dense, tough root masses that are very resistant to erosion. Tussocks may be uprooted during floods (probably >Q-5yr), travel as boulder-sized masses, and may re-root where deposited. Individual tussocks, however, commonly persist for more than a decade in one position. When established, these tussocks behave more like channel obstructions than typical stream side sedges. Lines of C. nudata tussocks form on the stream side margin of former bare gravel bars, creating a secondary flow path and an eroding bank on their landward side. C. nudata also forms small mid-channel islets with bed scour at their base and occasional lee depositional zones. Chains of mid-channel islets can anchor pool boundaries. Observations in the field and from aerial photo time sequences suggest the following evolutionary model for channels with C. nudata. C. nudata establishes on a bare gravel bar, and can stabilize the bar surface or create erosional forms as described above. C. nudata fosters weaker sedges and other species that help extend stabilization of the bar surface. Mid-channel islets form through selective uprooting of tussocks. Observations of a reach where cattle grazing was eliminated in 2000 show that C. nudata has expanded. It has stabilized some formerly active bar surfaces but is now causing bank erosion and channel widening in some locations. In this case, C. nudata mediated the potentially stabilizing effects of management change by increasing channel instability in some respects.

  5. Rehabilitating gravel areas with short-hair sedge sod plugs and fertilizer

    Treesearch

    Raymond D. Ratliff

    1985-01-01

    Tests to rehabilitate gravel areas in high value recreation sites were carried out by transplanting short-hair sedge (Carex exserta) plugs. The plugs were 1.9 cm (0.75 inch) and 5.1 cm (2.0 inches) in diameter, 10 cm (4.0 inches) deep, and were transplanted in September 1981, with and without papier-mache pots. The test site was Siberian Outpost, in...

  6. Identification of hydraulic conductivity structure in sand and gravel aquifers: Cape Cod data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleston, J.R.; Rojstaczer, S.A.; Peirce, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluates commonly used geostatistical methods to assess reproduction of hydraulic conductivity (K) structure and sensitivity under limiting amounts of data. Extensive conductivity measurements from the Cape Cod sand and gravel aquifer are used to evaluate two geostatistical estimation methods, conditional mean as an estimate and ordinary kriging, and two stochastic simulation methods, simulated annealing and sequential Gaussian simulation. Our results indicate that for relatively homogeneousand and gravel aquifers such as the Cape Cod aquifer, neither estimation methods nor stochastic simulation methods give highly accurate point predictions of hydraulic conductivity despite the high density of collected data. Although the stochastic simulation methods yielded higher errors than the estimation methods, the stochastic simulation methods yielded better reproduction of the measured In (K) distribution and better reproduction of local contrasts in In (K). The inability of kriging to reproduce high In (K) values, as reaffirmed by this study, provides a strong instigation for choosing stochastic simulation methods to generate conductivity fields when performing fine-scale contaminant transport modeling. Results also indicate that estimation error is relatively insensitive to the number of hydraulic conductivity measurementso long as more than a threshold number of data are used to condition the realizations. This threshold occurs for the Cape Cod site when there are approximately three conductivity measurements per integral volume. The lack of improvement with additional data suggests that although fine-scale hydraulic conductivity structure is evident in the variogram, it is not accurately reproduced by geostatistical estimation methods. If the Cape Cod aquifer spatial conductivity characteristics are indicative of other sand and gravel deposits, then the results on predictive error versus data collection obtained here have significant practical consequences

  7. Sabah Shell Petroleum Company's (SSPC) experience in gravel-packing long perforated intervals in deviated holes

    SciTech Connect

    van Ballegooyen, J.; Seng, T.K.; Giap, T.K.

    1982-01-01

    This work presents the experience gained by Sabah Shell Petroleum Co. in gravel packing long, high angle intervals in a multilayered sand/shale sequence in the South Furious Field offshore N. Sabah, Malaysia. The selection of mechanical equipment, fluid properties, and a suitable tool for logging the quality of the pack are discussed. The placement procedure was modified, mostly by trial and error, until an acceptable technique was achieved. The evolution of this technique is discussed.

  8. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. )

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Experimental evidence for the effect of hydrographs on sediment pulse dynamics in gravel-bedded rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Robert; Venditti, Jeremy G.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Wooster, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Gravel augmentation is a river restoration technique applied to channels downstream of dams where size-selective transport and lack of gravel resupply have created armored, relatively immobile channel beds. Augmentation sediment pulses rely on flow releases to move the material downstream and create conditions conducive to salmon spawning and rearing. Yet how sediment pulses respond to flow releases is often unknown. Here we explore how three types of dam releases (constant flow, small hydrograph, and large hydrograph) impact sediment transport and pulse behavior (translation and dispersion) in a channel with forced bar-pool morphology. We use the term sediment "pulse" generically to refer to the sediment introduced to the channel, the zone of pronounced bed material transport that it causes, and the sediment wave that may form in the channel from the additional sediment supply, which can include input sediment and bed material. In our experiments, we held the volume of water released constant, which is equivalent to holding the cost of purchasing a water volume constant in a stream restoration project. The sediment pulses had the same grain size as the bed material in the channel. We found that a constant flow 60% greater than the discharge required to initiate sediment motion caused a mixture of translation and dispersion of the sediment pulse. A broad crested hydrograph with a peak flow 2.5 times the discharge required for entrainment caused pulse dispersion, while a more peaked hydrograph >3 times the entrainment threshold discharge caused pulse dispersion with some translation. The hydrographs produced a well-defined clockwise hysteresis effecting sediment transport, as is often observed for fine-sediment transport and transport-limited gravel bed rivers. The results imply a rational basis for design of water releases associated with gravel augmentation that is directly linked to the desired sediment behavior.

  10. An equation for bed-load transport capacities in gravel-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng

    2011-05-01

    SummaryDetailed hydraulic and sedimentary information is needed to accurately predict bed-load transport rates in natural gravel-bed rivers. Yet, being able to estimate maximum transport rates from simple measurements would greatly benefit various sediment-related river management practices. To this end, a new concept of bed-load transport capacity for heterogeneous grains in gravel-bed rivers was introduced as the maximum possible transport rate a gravel-bed river can have for a given value of dimensionless shear stress, calculated using the median size of bed-load grains. Flows that can transport bed load at capacity may be identified by the criterion that the median size of bed-load grains must be greater than or equal to that of the bed substrate. Then, a single coefficient, power equation was developed to predict such capacities using bed-load capacity data covering both low flows with an armor layer and high flows without it. The good performance of this empirical equation was confirmed by comparing its predictability with that of Mayer Peter and Muller's and Bagnold's bed-load equations. Using an independent data compiled from six gravel-bed rivers in Idaho, not only was the empirical equation validated but also the criterion for identifying the condition under which bed load is transported at capacity was tested. In practice, the empirical equation can be used to estimate the maximum possible bed-load transport rates during high flow events, which is useful for various sediment-related river managements.

  11. A Literature Review of Processes for Gravel Deposit Identification in the Lower Mississippi River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    25 Figure 18. Interpretation of GPR data collected near an active sand and gravel quarry (Lucius et al...resistivity, ground penetrat- ing radar ( GPR ), time domain electromagnetism (TDEM), and frequency domain electromagnetism (FDEM). A brief summary of...exploration. GPR is an electromagnetic method that depends on the propagation of high-frequency (10-MHz to 3-GHz) electro- magnetic energy in the ground

  12. 133. ARAII SL1 burial ground. Shows gravel path from ARAII ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    133. ARA-II SL-1 burial ground. Shows gravel path from ARA-II compound to the burial ground, detail of security fence and entry gate, and sign "Danger radiation hazard." F. C. Torkelson Company 842-area-101-1. Date: October 1961. Ineel index code no. 059-0101-00-851-150723. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Stentless pediatric ureteroscopic holmium: YAG laser stone disintegration: is gravels retrieval an issue?

    PubMed

    Gamal, W; Aldahshoury, M; Hammady, A; Hussein, Mohamed; Osman, M; Mmdouh, Ahmed; Abouzeid, A

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stentless pediatric ureteroscopic holmium laser stone disintegration without gravels retrieval. From Feb 2007 to Feb 2010, 21 children (12 boys and 9 girls) with unilateral single stone ureter, with an average age of 8.5 years (range 4-12 years), were treated with 6.9 Fr semirigid ureteroscope for a stone size ranged from 5 to 10 mm (mean 6.5 mm). All the stones were radioopaque, located in the upper ureter in 2 cases (9.5%), in the middle ureter in 5 cases (24%), and in the lower ureter in 14 cases (66.5%). Complete holmium laser stone disintegration was applied in all cases without gravels removal. No postoperative ureteral stent was inserted in any case. The stones were successfully approached and completely disintegrated in a single session in 20 cases (95.2%). All the procedures were done without ureteral orifice dilatation apart from 3 cases where another working guide wire was applied. No intraoperative complications were recorded in the form of mucosal injury, ureteral perforation, or urinary extravasation. There is no early postoperative complication in the form of urinary tract infection or colic apart from single case of hematuria which was successfully treated conservatively. Two weeks postoperatively, KUB (kidney, ureter, and bladder) films were completely free from any significant gravel (>3 mm) and US showed no hydronephrosis. Stentless ureteroscopic holmium laser disintegration without gravels removal is a safe and effective method for pediatric ureteral stone less than 10 mm in diameter.

  14. Variation in Sediment Mobility and the Active Width in Gravel-bed Braided Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, S.; Leduc, P.; Ashmore, P.

    2016-12-01

    The complex and dynamic morphology of gravel-bed braided rivers is fundamentally a consequence of spatially and temporally variable sediment transport. For example, while braided rivers have multiple channels conveying water, few ( 1-2) channels convey sediment and only a narrow area (morphological active width) of those active channels transport bedload. To investigate the relationship between the morphological active width and bedload transport, a 1:30 physical-scale model of a gravel-bed river (D50 = 1.3mm) with adjustable discharge (0.7-2.1l/s) was used to simulate three experimental hydrographs. The physical model represents a braided river with 1.5% slope, medium gravel, and discharges between 4-13 m3s-1. High-resolution (± 1.15 mm) DEMs of the dry-bed surface were generated at 15 minute intervals using digital photogrammetry and the software program Agisoft PhotoScan. The morphological active width was quantified by subtracting successive DEMs to highlight areas and volumes of erosion and deposition. Bedload transport and grain size distribution were independently measured by accumulating bedload in baskets at the downstream outlet. Results show that while bedload transport and the active width are spatially and temporally variable, they both increase with increasing discharge above a lower threshold of 1.1l/s. Exceptions from this trend suggest that antecedent morphological conditions, such as migrating bars and bedload sheets, contribute to the inherent spatio-temporal variability. Grain size analysis shows that bedload transport moves from partial mobility towards equal mobility with increasing discharge, even in these dynamic multi-channel river systems. Understanding the relationships between channel morphology, bedload transport and mobility, and the active width will improve predictions of bedload transport rate in complex rivers and provide a more complete understanding of morph-dynamic processes in gravel-bed rivers.

  15. Surface particle sizes on armoured gravel streambeds: Effects of supply and hydraulics

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Whiting; John G. King

    2003-01-01

    Most gravel-bed streams exhibit a surface armour in which the median grain size of the surface particles is coarser than that of the subsurface particles. This armour has been interpreted to result when the supply of sediment is less than the ability of the stream to move sediment. While there may be certain sizes in the bed for which the supply is less than the...

  16. Reconstructing late Cenozoic stream gradients from high-level chert gravels in central Eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, J.W.; Merriam, D.F.; Howard, H.H.

    2007-01-01

    Interpreting the evolution of Kansas' landscape east of the Flint Hills provides major challenges. In the Neogene (late Tertiary) and perhaps part of the Pleistocene, streams transported a variety of sedimentary materials, including chert gravels derived from the Flint Hills. Gentle intermittent uplift stimulated the system system to cut down, locally removing and reworking the gravels to create stream-terrace deposits that consist mostly of chert pebbles, which now lie well above the floodplains of modern streams. By correlating the elevations of these gravels, the gradients of the trunk streams that deposited them can be reconstructed. Interestingly, these ancient streams flowed southeast at a little more than a foot per mile (0.2 m/km), roughly the same as the gradient of the trunk streams in the region today. The evolving landscape in eastern Kansas also has been strongly influenced by an extensive network of fractures that is widespread in the midcontinent region and may be worldwide in extent. In northeastern Kansas, glaciation during the Pleistocene disrupted the southeasterly drainage and established the present location of the Kansas River. South of the Kansas River and its immediate tributaries, however, the general southeasterly drainage has been preserved. We have made use of the wealth of topographic-elevation data now available in digital form known as DEMs or digital elevation models. Coupled with GIS procedures, the DEMs helped link the mapped distribution of chert gravels with hypothetical fitted surfaces that represent ancient stream gradients. Furthermore, DEM data placed in shaded-relief map form emphasize the influence of fractures in evolution of the drainage system.

  17. Friction angle measurements on a naturally formed gravel streambed: Implications for critical boundary shear stress

    Treesearch

    John M. Buffington; William E. Dietrich; James W. Kirchner

    1992-01-01

    We report the first measurements of friction angles for a naturally formed gravel streambed. For a given test grain size placed on a bed surface, friction angles varied from 10º to over 100º; friction angle distributions can be expressed as a function of test grain size, median bed grain size, and bed sorting parameter. Friction angles decrease with increasing grain...

  18. Topographic disturbance of subaqueous gravel substrates by signal crayfish ( Pacifastacus leniusculus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew F.; Rice, Stephen P.; Reid, Ian

    2010-11-01

    The impact of signal crayfish ( Pacifastacus leniusculus) on the topography and fabric of six narrowly graded, gravel substrates was investigated using repeat laser scanning of sediment surfaces in still-water aquaria. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of the gravel surfaces were obtained before and after exposure to crayfish for five predetermined periods. The impact on the substrate was quantified by establishing topographic and volumetric changes using DEMs of difference (DoD). The presence of an individual, medium sized crayfish for 24 h resulted in an average volume change in surface topography of 450 cm 3 over an area of 2400 cm 2, giving a sediment displacement of 1.7 kg m -2 d - 1 . The majority (78%) of this volume change was associated with small scale (≤ 1 median grain diameter) movements of surface grains. This fabric adjustment altered grain orientations and friction angles. Crayfish also constructed pits and mounds that increased significantly the roughness of the gravel substrates and altered the protrusion of individual grains. Crayfish were able to move material up to 38 mm in diameter that had a submerged weight six times that of the individuals used in this study. By modifying the arrangement of grains on the surface of fluvial substrates, signal crayfish may counteract the low flow physical consolidation of gravel beds and reduce the entrainment stresses required to move river bed material. The results of this study suggest that signal crayfish, an internationally widespread invasive species, may have substantial impacts on the physical environment of streams and rivers, as well as on local benthic ecological communities.

  19. German mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The German mining equipment industry developed to supply machines and services to the local mining industry, i.e., coal, lignite, salt, potash, ore mining, industrial minerals, and quarrying. The sophistication and reliability of its technology also won it worldwide export markets -- which is just as well since former major domestic mining sectors such as coal and potash have declined precipitously, and others such as ore mining have all but disappeared. Today, German mining equipment suppliers focus strongly on export sales, and formerly unique German mining technologies such as continuous mining with bucket wheel excavators and conveyors for open pits, or plowing of underground coal longwalls are widely used abroad. The status of the German mining equipment industry is reviewed.

  20. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE FROM KEETLEY MINE ROAD, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE FROM KEETLEY MINE ROAD, SHOWING TAILING DUMP. VIEW TO WEST. - Park Utah Mining Company: Keetley Mine Complex, 1 mile East of U.S. 40 at Keetley, Heber City, Wasatch County, UT

  1. 4. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE, SHOWING MINE CAR TRACKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE, SHOWING MINE CAR TRACKS, SNOWSHEDS AND TIPPLE (LEFT BACKGROUND). VIEW TO EAST. - Park Utah Mining Company: Keetley Mine Complex, 1 mile East of U.S. 40 at Keetley, Heber City, Wasatch County, UT

  2. Tracing river gravels: Insights into dispersion from a long-term field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2013-10-01

    Sediment dispersion is a fundamental component of the sediment transfer process in gravel-bed rivers. Modeling this process requires an understanding of the collective movement of mixed-size clasts. This study explores the temporal evolution of gravel dispersion to underscore the importance of field observation in informing modeling efforts. Magnetically tagged gravels deployed in Carnation Creek have been monitored repeatedly over 17 years. Four metrics used to describe the extent of dispersion document that the overall shape in the spatial distribution of grain location changes over time. The general trends mask the complexity of the dispersion process, expressed by channel sections where tracers are concentrated regardless of grain size. The distribution of total grain displacement responsible for dispersion evolves as tracers become well mixed. Results demonstrate that observations from the field are crucial to the understanding and modeling of sediment dispersion because they provide key insights into the dispersion process that must be known a priori for mathematical modeling and similar observations cannot be collected using laboratory flumes.

  3. The grain size gap and abrupt gravel-sand transitions in rivers due to suspension fallout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Michael P.; Venditti, Jeremy G.

    2016-04-01

    Median grain sizes on riverbeds range from boulders in uplands to silt in lowlands; however, rivers with ~1-5 mm diameter bed sediment are rare. This grain size gap also marks an abrupt transition between gravel- and sand-bedded reaches that is unlike any other part of the fluvial network. Abrupt gravel-sand transitions have been attributed to rapid breakdown or rapid transport of fine gravel, or a bimodal sediment supply, but supporting evidence is lacking. Here we demonstrate that rivers dramatically lose the ability to transport sand as wash load where bed shear velocity drops below ~0.1 m/s, forcing an abrupt transition in bed-material grain size. Using thresholds for wash load and initial motion, we show that the gap emerges only for median bed-material grain sizes of ~1-5 mm due to Reynolds number dependencies in suspension transport. The grain size gap, therefore, is sensitive to material properties and gravity, with coarser gaps predicted on Mars and Titan.

  4. Deschutes River Spawning Gravel Study, Volume II, Appendices I-XIV, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, Charles W.

    1985-09-01

    Spawning habitat in the Deschutes River was inventoried, gravel permeability and composition were sampled at selected gravel bars, historical flow records for the Deschutes were analyzed, salmon and trout utilization of spawning habitat was examined, and potential methods of enhancing spawning habitat in the river were explored. Some changes in river conditions since the mid-1960's were identified, including a reduction in spawning habitat immediately downstream from the hydroelectric complex. The 1964 flood was identified as a factor which profoundly affected spawning habitat in the river, and which greatly complicated efforts to identify recent changes which could be attributed to the hydrocomplex. A baseline on present gravel quality at both chinook and steelhead spawning areas in the river was established using a freeze-core methodology. Recommendations are made for enhancing spawning habitat in the Deschutes River, if it is independently determined that spawning habitat is presently limiting populations of summer steelhead or fall chinook in the river. Volume II contains appendices to the study.

  5. Gravel and sand resources of the New England-New York region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currier, Louis W.

    1955-01-01

    Deposits of sand and gravel are widespread in the New England-New York regions and constitute one of its principal mineral resources. Most of the pits are operated intermittently to supply local needs. Because of the great number and variety of known deposits, and because they have been worked at countless points it is impracticable to describe in detail either the deposits or the individual pits. On the other hand, a broad description of the geologic modes of occurrence with relation to the regional geology will serve adequately to indicate the importance of the resource in the regional economy and development. Except for some special sands, such as "glass sand", certain molding and foundry sands, et. al., for which restrictive textural, compositional and physical properties are required, sand and gravel are used chiefly for local construction and are not commonly transported for long distances. Sand and gravel deposits of the region fall into four principal genetic categories - e.g., glacial, alluvial, marine, and aeolian. Of these, deposits of glacial origin are by far the most widespread and important.

  6. Greywater treatment by granular filtration system using volcanic tuff and gravel media.

    PubMed

    Albalawneh, Abeer; Chang, Tsun-Kuo; Alshawabkeh, Heba

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a granular filtration system (GFS) in greywater treatment under arid and semi-arid conditions. Six GFSs were designed, constructed, and monitored for approximately 13 months. Each GFS served a single rural Jordanian home by treating their greywater. Volcanic tuff media were used as the filtration media in three of the GFSs while the remaining three GFSs used gravel media. Results show that the biological oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, and total suspended solids of the effluent were significantly lower as compared to the influent and demonstrated a removal efficiency of 73%, 65%, and 85%, respectively, when using volcanic tuff media. The removal efficiency was 49%, 51%, and 76%, respectively, when using gravel media. There was a significant increase in the electrical conductivity, pH, potassium (K(+)), magnesium (Mg(2+)), chloride (Cl(-)), sodium (Na(+)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), bicarbonates (HCO3(-)), sodium adsorption ratio, and exchangeable sodium percentage in the effluents of the GFS that used volcanic tuff media. The study suggests that GFSs can adequately treat greywater under arid conditions. However, gravel media produce less concentrated effluent compared to the volcanic tuff media.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations of sediment size on a mixed sand and gravel beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Diane P.; Walton, Susan M.

    2007-12-01

    Mixed sand and gravel beaches have been the subject of comparatively few studies in the UK. This paper describes the sediment distribution before, during and after a programme of beach nourishment along a section of mixed sand and gravel beach forming part of the Pevensey Bay Coastal Defences, in East Sussex, UK. The beach was recharged in September 2002, and beach profiles were measured along three cross-shore transects from August 2002 to February 2003. Sediment samples were taken along the transects between August and November 2002, and a total of 147 sediment samples were analysed, 40 before nourishment and 107 after nourishment. The majority of the sediment samples were strongly bimodal, with mean sizes varying between a minimum of 0.18 mm (2.48 ϕ) for the sand fraction and a maximum of 27 mm (- 4.74 ϕ) for the gravel. The recharge material was also bimodal but contained more fine sediment than the natural beach material, particularly on the upper beach. The recharge sediment had grain sizes and sorting similar to some of the natural material but lower bimodality parameters than any of the natural sediment. The sediment distributions after recharge contained significantly more fine sediment, particularly on the upper beach. Over time, the beach profile lowered and fine sediment appeared to be selectively transported seawards from the beachface.

  8. Evaluation of long-term bedload virtual velocity in gravel-bed rivers (Ardenne, Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houbrechts, Geoffrey; Levecq, Yannick; Peeters, Alexandre; Hallot, Eric; Van Campenhout, Jean; Denis, Anne-Cécile; Petit, François

    2015-12-01

    In many gravel-bed rivers, bed material transfer has been interrupted or perturbed by anthropogenic activities. Currently, restoration projects are being conducted in many countries in order to re-establish bedload continuity. However, until now, few studies have provided indications of the velocity of bed material over the long-term (at least decade to century time-scale). In the context of river restoration projects (e.g. weir removal, addition of spawning gravel), these data are nevertheless crucial to predict the downstream propagation of the geomorphological and biological benefits (e.g. supply-transport equilibrium, morphological and substratum diversity). In our study, PIT-tag tracers were used in eight medium-sized gravel-bed rivers (Ardenne Region, Belgium) to propose a flow competence relationship based on specific stream power, on the one hand, and to determine the long-term virtual velocity of the bed material corresponding to the median diameter (D50) of the surface layer of riffles, on the other hand. After each flow event that exceeded the threshold for sediment entrainment, tagged particles were sought and located, even when they were buried in the subsurface layer. Afterwards, all of the data were used to estimate the virtual velocity of the bed material over the long-term using three approaches. Finally, the results were compared with long-term transport estimations based on iron slag dispersed by the rivers since the end of the middle ages.

  9. Laboratory evidence for short and long-term damage to pink salmon incubating in oiled gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, R.; Rice, S.; Wiedmer, M.

    1995-12-31

    Pink salmon, incubating in gravel contaminated with crude oil, demonstrated immediate and delayed responses in the laboratory at doses consistent with the concentrations observed in oiled streams in Prince William Sound. The authors incubated pink salmon embryos in a simulated intertidal environment with gravel contaminated by oil from the Exxon Valdez. During the incubation and emergence periods the authors quantified dose-response curves for characters affected directly by the oil. After emergence, fish were coded wire tagged and released, or cultured in netpens. Delayed responses have been observed among the cultured fish, and further observations will be made when coded wire tagged fish return in September 1995. The experiments have demonstrated that eggs need not contact oiled gravel to experience increased mortality, and doses as low as 17 ppb tPAH in water can have delayed effects on growth. A comparison of sediment tPAH concentrations from streams in Prince William Sound with these laboratory data suggests that many 1989 brood pink salmon were exposed to deleterious quantities of oil.

  10. Utilization of LANDSAT multispectral data in geobotanical investigations: The location of ironstone gravel in the Sam Houston National Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cibula, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    Practical techniques were developed and evaluated for deriving geobotanical information from LANDSAT MSS data acquired for a test site in the Sam Houston National Forest near Cleveland, Texas where gravel deposits exist in sufficient quantity that economical extraction would be feasible. A correlation was shown between a single spectral class and the presence of ironstone gravel. Field data indicates that this class relates to upland pine which was probably under stress as the result of a prolonged drought which was in progress at the time of data acquisition. It is suggested that the subsurface gravel produces a soil which has less field capacity for water retention, causing early appearance of water stress in the surface vegetation over these soils. In all areas within the QMC formation where this class occurred, gravel was located when borings were made.

  11. Spatial Dynamics of Gravel Bedload Transport Between a Pool-Exit Slope and the Head of a Point-Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial dynamics of gravel transport in mountain streams are not well known. Results compiled from different streams suggest that the path of gravel transport in coarse-bedded streams with a meandering thalweg follows the path described for the coarsest bedload in sand-bedded meandering streams. From the thalweg in the pool exit slope, gravel moves laterally over the downstream riffle to reach the head of the next point bar. Gravel then proceeds across the bar towards the thalweg and into the pool. If proven correct, this finding has important implications for bedload sampling in partially wadable streams. Sampling could be limited to the bar head where equipment requiring wadable flows can be used, while still collecting the majority of gravel transported. To confirm the travel path between the pool exit and the head of the next bar, gravel transport was measured in a Colorado mountain stream in two cross-sections less than 10 m apart: one at a pool exit with the thalweg near the stream center and one at the bar head with the thalweg hugging the left bank. Six bedload traps were installed in each cross-section. The lateral location of maximum gravel transport differed greatly between the two cross-sections. In the pool exit, most of the transport occurred just to the right of the thalweg. In the bar cross-section, transport was absent in the left bank thalweg where flow was deepest and fastest but focused on the bankward side of the bar where flow was much shallower and slower, and with increasing flows the location of maximum gravel transport moved progressively further up the bar. Movement of tracer particles placed at several locations across the pool exit confirmed that most of the particles take a curved path and move onto the bar head and towards the bankward side of the bar. The bedload rating curve on the bar head was found to be better defined and steeper than the curve measured in the pool exit and the curves crossed at about half the measured maximum

  12. The exploitation of Gestalt principles by magicians.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Anthony S

    2010-01-01

    Magicians exploit a host of psychological principles in deceiving their audiences. Psychologists have recently attempted to pinpoint the most common psychological tendencies exploited by magicians. This paper highlights two co-occurring principles that appear to be the basis for many popular magic tricks: accidental alignment and good continuation.

  13. Transitioning from AOP to IATA - Exploiting mechanistic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. . Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. .

  14. Exposures from mining and mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Cassaday, Valerie J.; Lowe, Leo M.

    The mining, milling and tailings management of uranium ores results in environmental radiation exposures. This paper describes the sources of radioactive emissions to the environment associated with these activities, reviews the basic approach used to estimate the resultant radiation exposures and presents examples of typical uranium mind and mill facilities. Similar concepts apply to radiation exposures associated with the mining of non-radioactive ores although the magnitudes of the exposures would normally be smaller than those associated with uranium mining.

  15. Exploiting Recurring Structure in a Semantic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Shawn R.; Keller, Richard M.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing popularity of the Semantic Web, an increasing amount of information is becoming available in machine interpretable, semantically structured networks. Within these semantic networks are recurring structures that could be mined by existing or novel knowledge discovery methods. The mining of these semantic structures represents an interesting area that focuses on mining both for and from the Semantic Web, with surprising applicability to problems confronting the developers of Semantic Web applications. In this paper, we present representative examples of recurring structures and show how these structures could be used to increase the utility of a semantic repository deployed at NASA.

  16. Exploiting Recurring Structure in a Semantic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Shawn R.; Keller, Richard M.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing popularity of the Semantic Web, an increasing amount of information is becoming available in machine interpretable, semantically structured networks. Within these semantic networks are recurring structures that could be mined by existing or novel knowledge discovery methods. The mining of these semantic structures represents an interesting area that focuses on mining both for and from the Semantic Web, with surprising applicability to problems confronting the developers of Semantic Web applications. In this paper, we present representative examples of recurring structures and show how these structures could be used to increase the utility of a semantic repository deployed at NASA.

  17. Mining lease handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Mining leases and similar agreements are some of the most common documents encountered by mining attorneys. The mining Lease Handbook contains a collection of mining lease clauses which have been organized and assembled for over 25 years. The clauses in this book have been coordinated and cross-referenced to enable the Handbook user to create a mining lease having a logical structure with consistent terminology throughout. In many cases, alternative clauses are included. The accompanying commentary provides insight into the use of the various clauses while pointing our pitfalls to be avoided. This Handbook is devoted primarily to mining leases, several chapters cover the subjects of options, subleases, and ancillary documents.

  18. A New Measure of Interpersonal Exploitativeness

    PubMed Central

    Brunell, Amy B.; Davis, Mark S.; Schley, Dan R.; Eng, Abbey L.; van Dulmen, Manfred H.M.; Wester, Kelly L.; Flannery, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Measures of exploitativeness evidence problems with validity and reliability. The present set of studies assessed a new measure [the Interpersonal Exploitativeness Scale (IES)] that defines exploitativeness in terms of reciprocity. In Studies 1 and 2, 33 items were administered to participants. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that a single factor consisting of six items adequately assess interpersonal exploitativeness. Study 3 results revealed that the IES was positively associated with “normal” narcissism, pathological narcissism, psychological entitlement, and negative reciprocity and negatively correlated with positive reciprocity. In Study 4, participants competed in a commons dilemma. Those who scored higher on the IES were more likely to harvest a greater share of resources over time, even while controlling for other relevant variables, such as entitlement. Together, these studies show the IES to be a valid and reliable measure of interpersonal exploitativeness. The authors discuss the implications of these studies. PMID:23755031

  19. Adaptive radiation of gobies in the interstitial habitats of gravel beaches accompanied by body elongation and excessive vertebral segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tomohiko; Sugiyama, Tomoshige; Tamaki, Nana; Kawakita, Atsushi; Kato, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Background The seacoasts of the Japanese Arc are fringed by many gravel beaches owing to active tectonic uplift and intense denudation caused by heavy rainfall. These gravel beaches are inhabited by gobies of the genus Luciogobius that burrow into the gravel sediment and live interstitially. Although their habitat and morphology (e. g., reduced fins, elongated, scale-less body, and highly segmented vertebral column) are highly unusual among fishes, little is known on how their morphological evolution has facilitated the colonization of interstitial habitats and promoted extensive diversification. We conducted thorough sampling of Luciogobius and related species throughout Japan, and performed molecular phylogenetic analysis to explore the patterns of morphological evolution associated with gravel beach colonization. Results An analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene suggested a remarkable diversity of previously unrecognized species. The species-level phylogeny based on six protein-coding nuclear genes clearly indicated that interstitial species cluster into two distinct clades, and that transitions from benthic or demersal habits to interstitial habits are strongly correlated with an increase in vertebral number. Colonization of gravel beach habitats is estimated to have occurred ca. 10 Ma, which coincides with the period of active orogenesis of the Japanese landmass. Different species of interstitial Luciogobius inhabit sediments with different granulometric properties, suggesting that microhabitat partitioning has been an important mechanism facilitating speciation in these fishes. Conclusion This is the first study to document the adaptation to interstitial habitats by a vertebrate. Body elongation and excessive vertebral segmentation had been the key aspects enhancing body flexibility and fishes' ability to burrow into the gravel sediment. The rich diversity of coastal gravel habitats of the Japanese Arc has likely promoted the adaptive radiation of

  20. Sheet-gravel evidence for a late Holocene tsunami run-up on beach dunes, Great Barrier Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Scott L.; Lian, Olav B.; Carter, Charles H.

    2003-01-01

    A semi-continuous sheet of granule to cobble-size clasts forms a distinctive deposit on sand dunes located on a coastal barrier in Whangapoua Bay, Great Barrier Island, New Zealand. The gravel sheet extends from the toe of the foredune to 14.3 m above mean sea level and 200 m landward from the beach. Clasts are rounded to sub-rounded and comprise lithologies consistent with local bedrock. Terrestrial sources for the gravel are considered highly unlikely due to the isolation of the dunes from hillslopes and streams. The only source for the clasts is the nearshore to inner shelf of Whangapoua Bay, where gravel sediments have been previously documented. The mechanism for transport of the gravel is unlikely to be storm surge due to the elevation of the deposit; maximum-recorded storm surge on this coast is 0.8 m above mean high water spring tide. Aeolian processes are also discounted due to the size of clasts and the elevation at which they occur. Tsunami is therefore considered the most probable mechanism for gravel transport. Minimum run-up height of the tsunami was 14.3 m, based on maximum elevation of gravel deposits. Optical ages on dune sands beneath and covering the gravel allow age bracketing to 0-4.7 ka. Within this time frame, numerous documented regional seismic and volcanic events could have generated the tsunami, notably submarine volcanism along the southern Kermadec arc to the east-southeast of Great Barrier Island where large magnitude events are documented for the late Holocene. Radiocarbon ages on shell from Maori middens that appear to have been reworked by tsunami run-up constrain the age of this event to post ca. 1400 AD. Regardless of the precise age of this event, the well-preserved nature of the Whangapoua gravel deposit provides for an improved understanding of the high degree of spatial variability in tsunami run-up.

  1. Impact of uranium mines closure and abandonment on groundwater quality.

    PubMed

    Rapantova, Nada; Licbinska, Monika; Babka, Ondrej; Grmela, Arnost; Pospisil, Pavel

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the evolving mine water quality of closed uranium mines (abandoned between 1958 and 1992) in the Czech Republic. This paper focuses on the changes in mine water quality over time and spatial variability. In 2010, systematic monitoring of mine water quality was performed at all available locations of previous uranium exploitation. Gravity flow discharges (mine adits, uncontrolled discharges) or shafts (in dynamic state or stagnating) were sampled. Since the quality of mine water results from multiple conditions-geology, type of sample, sampling depth, time since mine flooding, an assessment of mine water quality evolution was done taking into account all these conditions. Multivariate analyses were applied in order to identify the groups of samples based on their similarity. Evaluation of hydrogeochemical equilibrium and evolution of mine waters was done using the Geochemist's Workbench and PHREEQC software. The sampling proved that uranium concentrations in mine waters did not predominantly exceed 0.45 mg/L. In case of discharges from old adits abandoned more than 40 years ago, uranium concentrations were below the MCL of US Environmental Protection Agency for uranium in drinking water (0.03 mg/L). Higher concentrations, up to 1.23 mg/L of U, were found only at active dewatered mines. Activity concentration of 226Ra varied from 0.03 up to 1.85 Bq/L except for two sites with increased background values due to rock formation (granites). Radium has a typically increasing trend after mine abandonment with a large variability. Concerning metals in mine water, Al, Co and Ni exceeded legislative limits on two sites with low pH waters. The mine water quality changes with a focus on uranium mobility were described from recently dewatered mines to shafts with water level maintained in order to prevent outflows to surface water and finally to stagnating shafts and discharges of mine water from old adits. The results were in good agreement

  2. Measuring Gravel Transport in an Active Natural System: An Analytical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfilippo, J. D.; Lancaster, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    In order to measure sediment flux in Porter Creek, a small tributary to the North Fork of the Siuslaw River near Florence Oregon, we have deployed ~600 pieces of tracer gravel embedded with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, 8 fixed antennas, and 9 logging pressure transducers spaced along 130 m of channel comprising 3 wood jams and substrates of sand, gravel, cobble, and bedrock. Tracer deployment is uniform along the instrumented reach, analogous to constant-source solute or dye injection, so that sediment flux [L3/T] for the ith grain size class is Qi = niVpiFi/fTi, where ni is count rate, [T-1], Vpi is particle volume, and Fi and fTi are fractional coverage of the ith size class of grains and tracers, respectively. Tracer concentrations, fTi, must be large enough for accurate estimation of ni = 1/TAi where TAi is the mean inter-arrival time of tracers at an antenna, during a period of nearly constant discharge. A square wave or constant sediment injection is undertaken by placing a concentration of tracers dispersed upstream of the study reach, such that it will add to the concentration within the study reach as gravels migrate downstream, replacing the gravels within the antenna network. Preliminary results show dispersion values ranging from ~7 m2/month for 8-16mm size fraction, to ~0.2 m2/month for 32-64mm size fraction, with travel distances of 60 meters for the 8-16mm, 16 meters for the 16-32mm, 8 meters for the 32-64mm, and 4 meters for the >64mm for 1 water year. Since there is a high level of variability in dispersion within the antennae array given the heterogeneity of substrates and wood placed within the system, it is likely that some tracers will need to be added within the regions between antennae after high water events. The tracer concentration within the regions occupied between antennae must remain at such a level as to provide viable statistical relationships between tracer and non-tracer gravels, and percent mobile versus percent

  3. Wall-Friction Support of Vertical Loads in Submerged Sand and Gravel Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O. R.; Vollmer, H. J.; Hepa, V. S.

    2015-08-25

    Laboratory studies of the ‘floor-loads’ under submerged vertical columns of sand and/or gravel indicate that such loads can be approximated by a buoyancy-corrected Janssen-silo-theory-like relationship. Similar to conditions in storage silos filled with dry granular solids, most of the weight of the sand or gravel is supported by wall friction forces. Laboratory measurements of the loads on the floor at the base of the water-filled columns (up to 25-diameters tall) indicate that the extra floor-load from the addition of the granular solid never exceeded the load that would exist under an unsupported (wide) bed of submerged sand or gravel that has a total depth corresponding to only two column-diameters. The measured floorloads reached an asymptotic maximum value when the depth of granular material in the columns was only three or four pipe-diameters, and never increased further as the columns were filled to the top (e.g. up to heights of 10 to 25 diameters). The floor-loads were stable and remained the same for days after filling. Aggressive tapping (e.g. hitting the containing pipe on the outside, manually with a wrench up and down the height and around the circumference) could increase (and occasionally decrease) the floor load substantially, but there was no sudden collapse or slumping to a state without significant wall friction effects. Considerable effort was required, repeatedly tapping over almost the entire column wall periphery, in order to produce floor-loads that corresponded to the total buoyancy-corrected weight of granular material added to the columns. Projecting the observed laboratory behavior to field conditions would imply that a stable floor-load condition, with only a slightly higher total floor pressure than the preexisting hydrostatic-head, would exist after a water-filled bore-hole is filled with sand or gravel. Significant seismic vibration (either a large nearby event or many micro-seismic events over an extended period) would likely

  4. Gravel-Sand-Clay Mixture Model for Predictions of Permeability and Velocity of Unconsolidated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Gravel-sand-clay mixture model is proposed particularly for unconsolidated sediments to predict permeability and velocity from volume fractions of the three components (i.e. gravel, sand, and clay). A well-known sand-clay mixture model or bimodal mixture model treats clay contents as volume fraction of the small particle and the rest of the volume is considered as that of the large particle. This simple approach has been commonly accepted and has validated by many studies before. However, a collection of laboratory measurements of permeability and grain size distribution for unconsolidated samples show an impact of presence of another large particle; i.e. only a few percent of gravel particles increases the permeability of the sample significantly. This observation cannot be explained by the bimodal mixture model and it suggests the necessity of considering the gravel-sand-clay mixture model. In the proposed model, I consider the three volume fractions of each component instead of using only the clay contents. Sand becomes either larger or smaller particles in the three component mixture model, whereas it is always the large particle in the bimodal mixture model. The total porosity of the two cases, one is the case that the sand is smaller particle and the other is the case that the sand is larger particle, can be modeled independently from sand volume fraction by the same fashion in the bimodal model. However, the two cases can co-exist in one sample; thus, the total porosity of the mixed sample is calculated by weighted average of the two cases by the volume fractions of gravel and clay. The effective porosity is distinguished from the total porosity assuming that the porosity associated with clay is zero effective porosity. In addition, effective grain size can be computed from the volume fractions and representative grain sizes for each component. Using the effective porosity and the effective grain size, the permeability is predicted by Kozeny-Carman equation

  5. Comparison of the catabolic activity and catabolic profiles of rhizospheric, gravel-associated and interstitial microbial communities in treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kela P; Legge, Raymond L

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a critical role in degrading organic contaminants in treatment wetlands; however, an understanding of the different roles played by rhizospheric, gravel-associated and interstitial microbial communities is deficient due to a lack of data directly comparing these microbial communities. Community level physiological profiling (CLPP) was used to compare the catabolic capabilities of rhizospheric, gravel-associated and interstitial microbial communities in vertical-flow planted and unplanted wetland mesocosms. Wetland mesocosms were decommissioned to gather microbial community samples associated with the roots and gravel bed media taken from the top (10 cm depth), middle (30 cm depth) and bottom (60 cm depth). The catabolic capabilities of the rhizospheric microbial communities were seen to be much greater than those of the gravel-associated communities. A decrease in catabolic capability was seen with increasing depth, suggesting that communities near the surface play a larger role in the degradation of carbon-based compounds. A general difference in catabolic profiles based on plant presence/absence was observed for the interstitial water and all gravel-associated samples at all depths, suggesting that the presence of roots within part of the mesocosm not only has a localized effect on the attached microbial population, but also on gravel-associated microbial communities throughout the mesocosms.

  6. Formation of gravel pavements during fluvial erosion as an explanation for persistence of ancient cratered terrain on Titan and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Alan D.; Breton, Sylvain; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-05-01

    In many terrestrial channels the gravel bed is only transported during rare floods (threshold channels), and rates of erosion are very slow. In this paper we explore how coarse debris delivered to channels on Mars and Titan from erosion may inhibit further erosion once a coarse gravel channel bed develops. Portions of the equatorial region of Titan are fluvially eroded into banded (crenulated) terrain, some of which contains numerous circular structures that are likely highly degraded large impact craters surviving from the late heavy bombardment. No mechanism that can chemically or physically break down ice (likely the most important component of Titans crust) has been unambiguously identified. This paper examines a scenario in which fluvial erosion on Titan has largely involved erosion into an impact-generated megaregolith that contains a modest component of gravel-sized debris. As the megaregolith is eroded, coarse gravel gradually accumulates as a lag pavement on channel beds, limiting further erosion and creating a dissected, but largely inactive, or senescent, landscape. Similar development of gravel pavements occur in ancient mountain belts on Earth, and partially explain the persistence of appreciable relief after hundreds of millions of years. Likewise, coarse gravel beds may have limited the degree to which erosion could modify the heavily cratered terrains on Mars, particularly if weathering were largely due to physical, rather than chemical weathering processes in a relatively cold and/or arid environment.

  7. Ethics position towards the exploitation of manganese material in Oenbit Village, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fios, Frederikus

    2017-04-01

    Oenbit village is an area that is located in the district of Timor Tengah Utara (TTU), Timor Island, East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia. In Oenbit ongoing a conflict between the economic interests of some parties namely the government, corporation and the local indigenous community. Government of Timor Tengah Utara give legal permission to the Elgari Resources Indonesia (ERI) Company to exploit the mining of Manganese in Oenbit Village which informally is the ancestral land of indigenous peoples Oenbit hereditary called pusuf kelef and Kot-tau niap-tau (king land). Oenbit society has an ethical belief that the ancestral land Oenbit should not be produced by outside parties besides the local community on the orders of the king. Manganese exploitation in Oenbit Village cause problems contradictorily interesting to reflect on the ethical-philosophical. This paper aims to reflect the ethical position against cases of exploitation of manganese in the Oenbit Village with focuses on the local government’s decision to issue a permit exploitation and ERI Company exploit Mangan assumed unethical traditional indigenous tribe Oenbit. The study found that the district government and ERI Company has violated the public ethics and society traditional law, especially the rights of local indigenous communities by exploiting manganese material. The method used is the reflection of philosophy with ethical approaches and relevant ethical theories.

  8. Ventilation planning at Energy West's Deer Creek mine

    SciTech Connect

    Tonc, L.; Prosser, B.; Gamble, G.

    2009-08-15

    In 2004 ventilation planning was initiated to exploit a remote area of Deer Creek mine's reserve (near Huntington, Utah), the Mill Fork Area, located under a mountain. A push-pull ventilation system was selected. This article details the design process of the ventilation system upgrade, the procurement process for the new fans, and the new fan startup testing. 5 figs., 1 photo.

  9. Exploiting Early Intent Recognition for Competitive Advantage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    basketball [Bhan- dari et al., 1997; Jug et al., 2003], and Robocup soccer sim- ulations [Riley and Veloso, 2000; 2002; Kuhlmann et al., 2006] and non...actions (e.g. before, after, around). Jug et al. [2003] used a similar framework for offline basketball game analysis. More recently, Hess et al...and K. Ramanujam. Advanced Scout: Data mining and knowledge discovery in NBA data. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, 1(1):121–125, 1997. [Chang

  10. Abandoned Mine Lands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abandoned Mine Lands are those lands, waters, and surrounding watersheds where extraction, beneficiation, or processing of ores and minerals (excluding coal) has occurred. These lands also include areas where mining or processing activity is inactive.

  11. Mine drainage and surface mine reclamation. Volume II. Mine reclamation, abandoned mine lands and policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Mine waste and mine reclamation are topics of major interest to the mining industry, the government and the general public. This publication and its companion volume are the proceedings of a conference held in Pittsburgh, April 19-21, 1988. There were nine sessions (50 papers) that dealt with the geochemistry, hydrology and problems of mine waste and mine water, especially acid mine drainage. These comprise Volume 1. The nine sessions (43 papers) that dealt with reclamation and restoration of disturbed lands, as well as related policy issues, are included in volume 2. Volume 2 also contains the ten papers that pertained to control of subsidence and mine fires at abandoned mines. Poster session presentations are, in general, represented by abstracts; these have been placed in the back of both volumes.

  12. Mine drainage and surface mine reclamation. Volume I. Mine water and mine waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Mine waste and mine reclamation are topics of major interest to the mining industry, the government and the general public. This publication and its companion volume are the proceedings of a conference held in Pittsburgh, April 19-21, 1988. There were nine sessions (50 papers) that dealt with the geochemistry, hydrology and problems of mine waste and mine water, especially acid mine drainage. These comprise Volume 1. The nine sessions (43 papers) that dealt with reclamation and restoration of disturbed lands, as well as related policy issues, are included in volume 2. Volume 2 also contains the ten papers that pertained to control of subsidence and mine fires at abandoned mines. Poster session presentations are, in general, represented by abstracts; these have been placed in the back of both volumes.

  13. Herbivory eliminates fitness costs of mutualism exploiters.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Anna K; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-04-01

    A common empirical observation in mutualistic interactions is the persistence of variation in partner quality and, in particular, the persistence of exploitative phenotypes. For mutualisms between hosts and symbionts, most mutualism theory assumes that exploiters always impose fitness costs on their host. We exposed legume hosts to mutualistic (nitrogen-fixing) and exploitative (non-nitrogen-fixing) symbiotic rhizobia in field conditions, and manipulated the presence or absence of insect herbivory to determine if the costly fitness effects of exploitative rhizobia are context-dependent. Exploitative rhizobia predictably reduced host fitness when herbivores were excluded. However, insects caused greater damage on hosts associating with mutualistic rhizobia, as a consequence of feeding preferences related to leaf nitrogen content, resulting in the elimination of fitness costs imposed on hosts by exploitative rhizobia. Our experiment shows that herbivory is potentially an important factor in influencing the evolutionary dynamic between legumes and rhizobia. Partner choice and host sanctioning are theoretically predicted to stabilize mutualisms by reducing the frequency of exploitative symbionts. We argue that herbivore pressure may actually weaken selection on choice and sanction mechanisms, thus providing one explanation of why host-based discrimination mechanisms may not be completely effective in eliminating nonbeneficial partners.

  14. Global Climate Responses to Anthropogenic Groundwater Exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.; Xie, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a groundwater exploitation scheme is incorporated into the earth system model, Community Earth System Model 1.2.0 (CESM1.2.0), which is called CESM1.2_GW, and the climatic responses to anthropogenic groundwater withdrawal are then investigated on global scale. The scheme models anthropogenic groundwater exploitation and consumption, which are then divided into agricultural irrigation, industrial use and domestic use. A group of 41-year ensemble groundwater exploitation simulations with six different initial conditions, and a group of ensemble control simulations without exploitation are conducted using the developed model CESM1.2_GW with water supplies and demands estimated. The results reveal that the groundwater exploitation and water consumption cause drying effects on soil moisture in deep layers and wetting effects in upper layers, along with a rapidly declining groundwater table in Central US, Haihe River Basin in China and Northern India and Pakistan where groundwater extraction are most severe in the world. The atmosphere also responds to anthropogenic groundwater exploitation. Cooling effects on lower troposphere appear in large areas of North China Plain and of Northern India and Pakistan. Increased precipitation occurs in Haihe River Basin due to increased evapotranspiration from irrigation. Decreased precipitation occurs in Northern India because water vapor here is taken away by monsoon anomalies induced by anthropogenic alteration of groundwater. The local reducing effects of anthropogenic groundwater exploitation on total terrestrial water storage evinces that water resource is unsustainable with the current high exploitation rate. Therefore, a balance between slow groundwater withdrawal and rapid human economic development must be achieved to maintain a sustainable water resource, especially in over-exploitation regions such as Central US, Northern China, India and Pakistan.

  15. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  16. Geomorphic Effects of Boulder Placement on Gravel Capture and Retention in a Regulated Reach of the North Umpqua River, OR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallman, J.; Braudrick, C.; Pedersen, D.; Cui, Y.; Sklar, L.; Dietrich, B.; Real de Asua, R.

    2004-12-01

    Hydroelectric projects in the mountainous western Cascades often occur in steep, confined channels where salmonid spawning habitat is limited to gravel deposits forced by planform curvature, channel width changes, and flow separation associated with large bedrock and boulder obstructions. The paucity of gravel deposition in steepland channels may be exacerbated in regulated rivers where sediment trapping by impoundments reduces coarse sediment supply to downstream reaches. Placing boulders to capture and retain gravel may be an effective approach to enhancing spawning habitat in these settings. To better understand the potential use of boulders as a tool for enhancing spawning habitat, three experimental designs were tested in a 0.6-mile bypass reach of the North Umpqua River, OR. The bedrock-confined study reach has an average slope of 0.013 and plane-bed morphology with coarse cobble substrate, abundant marginal boulders, and small associated patches of sand and gravel. Experiments involved (1) placement of boulder clusters, (2) gravel augmentation and placement of boulder clusters, and (3) gravel augmentation alone. Boulder clusters were designed to promote scour and deposition during floods with a 5-10 year recurrence interval. Boulders were typically placed obliquely upstream at locations where existing hydraulics favored gravel deposition. Monitoring from 2002 to 2004 occurred prior to implementation, immediately following implementation, and following winter high flows. Sites were monitored using high-density topographic surveys, low-altitude aerial photography, facies mapping, pebble counts, scour cores and chains, and marked rocks. Stage heights were monitored using pressure transducers at the upstream and downstream ends of the study reach, and flood recurrence interval was assessed using a nearby USGS gauge. The arrangement of boulder clusters was modified after the first year of monitoring to improve gravel capture and retention. Peak flow during the

  17. Stress monitoring versus microseismic ruptures in an active deep mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnellier, Alice; Bouffier, Christian; Bigarré, Pascal; Nyström, Anders; Österberg, Anders; Fjellström, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, underground mining industry has developed high-technology mass mining methods to optimise the productivity at deep levels. Such massive extraction induces high-level stress redistribution generating seismic events around the mining works, threatening safety and economics. For this reason mining irregular deep ore bodies calls for steadily enhanced scientific practises and technologies to guarantee the mine environment to be safer and stable for the miners and the infrastructures. INERIS, within the framework of the FP7 European project I2Mine and in partnership with the Swedish mining company Boliden, has developed new methodologies in order to monitor both quasi-static stress changes and ruptures in a seismic prone area. To this purpose, a unique local permanent microseismic and stress monitoring network has been installed into the deep-working Garpenberg mine situated to the north of Uppsala (Sweden). In this mine, ore is extracted using sublevel stoping with paste fill production/distribution system and long-hole drilling method. This monitoring network has been deployed between about 1100 and 1250 meter depth. It consists in six 1-component and five 3-component microseismic probes (14-Hz geophones) deployed in the Lappberget area, in addition to three 3D stress monitoring cells that focus on a very local exploited area. Objective is three-fold: to quantify accurately quasi-static stress changes and freshly-induced stress gradients with drift development in the orebody, to study quantitatively those stress changes versus induced detected and located microseismic ruptures, and possibly to identify quasi-static stress transfer from those seismic ruptures. Geophysical and geotechnical data are acquired continuously and automatically transferred to INERIS datacenter through the web. They are made available on a secured web cloud monitoring infrastructure called e.cenaris and completed with mine data. Such interface enables the visualisation of the

  18. An evaluation of sand and gravel resources in and near the Prescott National Forest in the Verde Valley, Arizona; with a section on evaluation of sand and gravel resources using selected engineering variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Leslie J.; Bliss, James D.; Miller, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    This study was based on available published literature. Although no field investigation was conducted in the Prescott National Forest to the west of the Verde River, a field investigation was conducted in the summer of 1994 by this author on the Coconino National Forest, to the east of the Verde River, where units of surficial materials of the same age and similar character are found (Cox, 1995). The intent of this evaluation of sand and gravel resources in the Prescott National Forest and adjacent areas in the Verde Valley, is to provide the land managers of the U.S. Forest Service with a map that delineates sand- and gravel-bearing geologic units. The map distinguishes (1) sand-and gravel-bearing units that are limited to channels from those that are not, (2) sand-and gravel-bearing units that are thin (generally less than 40 feet thick which is one contour interval on the topographic maps) from those that are locally thick (generally 40 feet or more), (3) sand- and gravel-bearing units that are poorly sorted from those that are well-sorted4, (4) sand- and gravel-bearing units that have little or no soil development from those that have greater degrees of soil development and lithification, (5) and sand- and gravel-bearing units that support riparian vegetation from those that do not. These distinctive characteristics are related to the geologic age or depositional setting of the rock materials and can be distinguished where areas are mapped in detail.

  19. Mountaintop mining consequences

    Treesearch

    M.A. Palmer; E.S. Bernhardt; W.H. Schlesinger; K.N. Eshleman; E. Foufoula-Georgiou; M.S. Hendryx; A.D. Lemly; G.E. Likens; O.L. Loucks; M.E. Power; P.S. White; P.R. Wilcock

    2010-01-01

    There has been a global, 30-year increase in surface mining (1), which is now the dominant driver of land-use change in the central Appalachian ecoregion of the United States (2). One major form of such mining, mountaintop mining with valley fills (MTM/VF) (3), is widespread throughout eastern Kentucky, West Virginia (WV), and southwestern Virginia. Upper elevation...

  20. Orapa Diamond Mine, Botswana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-16

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the Orapa diamond mine, the world largest diamond mine by area. The mine is located in Botswana. It is the oldest of four mines operated by the same company, having begun operations in 1971. Orapa is an open pit style of mine, located on two kimberlite pipes. Currently, the Orapa mine annually produces approximately 11 million carats (2200 kg) of diamonds. The Letlhakane diamond mine is also an open pit construction. In 2003, the Letlhakane mine produced 1.06 million carats of diamonds. The Damtshaa diamond mine is the newest of four mines, located on top of four distinct kimberlite pipes of varying ore grade. The mine is forecast to produce about 5 million carats of diamond over the projected 31 year life of the mine. The image was acquired October 5, 2014, covers an area of 28 by 45 km, and is located at 21.3 degrees south, 25.4 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20104