Science.gov

Sample records for gravitational microlensing events

  1. Gravitational Microlensing Events as a Target for the SETI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2016-09-01

    The detection of signals from a possible extrasolar technological civilization is one of the most challenging efforts of science. In this work, we propose using natural telescopes made of single or binary gravitational lensing systems to magnify leakage of electromagnetic signals from a remote planet that harbors Extraterrestrial Intelligent (ETI) technology. Currently, gravitational microlensing surveys are monitoring a large area of the Galactic bulge to search for microlensing events, finding more than 2000 events per year. These lenses are capable of playing the role of natural telescopes, and, in some instances, they can magnify radio band signals from planets orbiting around the source stars in gravitational microlensing systems. Assuming that the frequency of electromagnetic waves used for telecommunication in ETIs is similar to ours, we propose follow-up observation of microlensing events with radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the Low Frequency Demonstrators, and the Mileura Wide-Field Array. Amplifying signals from the leakage of broadcasting by an Earth-like civilization will allow us to detect them as far as the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Our analysis shows that in binary microlensing systems, the probability of amplification of signals from ETIs is more than that in single microlensing events. Finally, we propose the use of the target of opportunity mode for follow-up observations of binary microlensing events with SKA as a new observational program for searching ETIs. Using optimistic values for the factors of the Drake equation provides detection of about one event per year.

  2. Photometric, astrometric and polarimetric observations of gravitational microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing can be used as a unique astrophysical tool to study the atmospheres of stars thousands of parsec away from us. This capability results from the bending of light rays in the gravitational field of a lens that can magnify the light of a background source star during the lensing. Moreover, one of the consequences of this light bending is that the circular symmetry of the source is broken because distorted images are produced at either side of the lens position. This property makes it possible to observe polarization, and also the light centroid shift of images. Assigning vectors for these two parameters, they are perpendicular to each other in simple and binary microlensing events, except in fold singularities. In this work, we investigate the advantages of polarimetric and astrometric observations during microlensing events (i) for studying the surface of the source star and spots on it and (ii) for obtaining extra information to determine the trajectory of source stars with respect to the lens. Finally, we analyse the largest sample of microlensing events from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) catalogue and show that, for almost ˜4.3 per cent of events in the direction of the Galactic bulge, the polarization signals would be observable with large telescopes.

  3. Detectability of GW150914-like events by gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilbott, Daniel; Riley, Alexander; Cohn, Jonathan; Kesden, Michael H.; King, Lindsay J.

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from stellar-mass binary black holes (BBHs) provided direct evidence of the existence of these systems. These BBHs would have gravitational microlensing signatures that are, due to their large masses and small separations, distinct from single-lens signals. We apply Bayesian statistics to examine the distinguishability of BBH microlensing events from single-lens events under ideal observing conditions, using modern photometric and astrometric capabilities. Given one year of ideal observations, a source star at the Galactic center, a GW150914-like BBH lens (total mass 65 M⊙, mass ratio 0.8) at half that distance, and an impact parameter of 0.4 Einstein radii, we find that BBH separations down to 0.00634 Einstein radii are detectable, which is < 0.00716 Einstein radii, the limit at which the BBH would merge within the age of the universe. We encourage analyses of LSST data to search for similar modulation in all long-duration events, providing a new channel for the discovery of short-period BBHs in our Galaxy.

  4. Improving the prospects for detecting extrasolar planets in gravitational microlensing events in 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, I. A.; Abe, F.; Dodd, R. J.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Noda, S.; Petterson, O. K. L.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Reid, M.; Saito, To.; Saito, Y.; Sako, T.; Skuljan, J.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Wilkinson, S.; Yamada, R.; Yanagisawa, T.; Yock, P. C. M.

    2002-03-01

    Gravitational microlensing events of high magnification have been shown to be promising targets for detecting extrasolar planets. However, only a few events of high magnification have been found using conventional survey techniques. Here we demonstrate that high-magnification events can be readily found in microlensing surveys using a strategy that combines high-frequency sampling of target fields with on-line difference imaging analysis. We present 10 microlensing events with peak magnifications greater than 40 that were detected in real-time towards the Galactic bulge during 2001 by the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) project. We show that Earth-mass planets can be detected in future events such as these through intensive follow-up observations around the event peaks. We report this result with urgency as a similar number of such events are expected in 2002.

  5. Candidate gravitational microlensing events for future direct lens imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C. B.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Park, H.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N.; Udalski, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-10

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ ≳ 8 mas yr{sup –1}. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In ≲12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  6. Candidate Gravitational Microlensing Events for Future Direct Lens Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, C. B.; Park, H.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; OGLE Collaboration; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Choi, J.-Y.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Friedmann, M.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I.-G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ >~ 8 mas yr-1. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In lsim12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  7. Detecting binarity of GW150914-like lenses in gravitational microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilbott, Daniel H.; Riley, Alexander H.; Cohn, Jonathan H.; Kesden, Michael; King, Lindsay J.

    2017-05-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves (GWs) from stellar-mass binary black holes (BBHs) provided direct evidence of the existence of these systems. BBH lenses would have gravitational microlensing signatures that are distinct from single-lens signals. We apply Bayesian statistics to examine the distinguishability of BBH microlensing events from single-lens events under ideal observing conditions, using the photometric capabilities of the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network. Given one year of observations, a source star at the Galactic Centre, a GW150914-like BBH lens (total mass 65 M⊙, mass ratio 0.8) at half that distance and an impact parameter of 0.4 Einstein radii, we find that binarity is detectable for BBHs with separations down to 0.0250 Einstein radii, which is nearly 3.5 times greater than the maximum separation for which such BBHs would merge within the age of the Universe. Microlensing searches are thus sensitive to more widely separated BBHs than GW searches, perhaps allowing the discovery of BBH populations produced in different channels of binary formation.

  8. Detecting binarity of GW150914-like lenses in gravitational microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael; Eilbott, Daniel; Riley, Alexander; Cohn, Jonathan; King, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from stellar-mass binary black holes (BBHs) provided direct evidence of the existence of these systems. These BBHs would have gravitational microlensing signatures that are, due to their large masses and small separations, distinct from single-lens signals. We apply Bayesian statistics to examine the distinguishability of BBH microlensing events from single-lens events under ideal observing conditions, using modern photometric and astrometric capabilities. Given one year of ideal observations, a source star at the Galactic center, a GW150914-like BBH lens (total mass 65 solar masses, mass ratio 0.8) at half that distance, and an impact parameter of 0.4 Einstein radii, we find that BBHs with separations down to 0.00634 Einstein radii are detectable, marginally below the separation at which such systems would merge due to gravitational radiation with the age of the Universe. Supported by Alfred P Sloan Foundation Grant No. RG- 2015-65299 and NSF Grant No. PHY-1607031.

  9. REANALYSIS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENT MACHO-97-BLG-41 BASED ON COMBINED DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Youn Kil; Han, Cheongho; Gould, Andrew; Maoz, Dan

    2013-05-01

    MACHO-97-BLG-41 is a gravitational microlensing event produced by a lens composed of multiple masses detected by the first-generation lensing experiment. For the event, there exist two different interpretations of the lens from independent analyses based on two different data sets: one interpreted the event as produced by a circumbinary planetary system while the other explained the light curve with only a binary system by introducing orbital motion of the lens. According to the former interpretation, the lens would not only be the first planet detected via microlensing but also the first circumbinary planet ever detected. To resolve the issue using state-of-the-art analysis methods, we reanalyze the event based on the combined data used separately by the previous analyses. By considering various higher-order effects, we find that the orbiting binary-lens model provides a better fit than the circumbinary planet model with {Delta}{chi}{sup 2} {approx} 166. The result signifies the importance of even and dense coverage of lensing light curves in the interpretation of events.

  10. Gravitational microlensing results from MACHO

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; MACHO Collaboration

    1996-09-01

    The MACHO project is searching for dark qter inthe form of massive compact haio objects (Machos), by monitoring the brightness of millions of stars in the Magellanic Clouds to search for gravitational microlensing events. Analysis of our 1st 2.3 years of data for 8.5 million stars in the LMC yields 8 candidate microlensing events, well in excess of the {approx} 1 event expected from lensing by known low-mass stars. The event timescales range from 34 to 145 days, and the estimated optical depth is N 2x10{sup -7}, about half of that expected from a `standard` halo. Likelihood analysis indicates the typical lens mass is 0.5{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2}M{sub {circle_dot}}, suggesting they may be old white dwarfs.

  11. Data analysis of MOA for Gravitational Microlensing events with durations Less than 2 days by using brown dwarf population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Sh.

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational Microlensing is one of the most powerful methods of detecting very low mass objects like Exoplanets and Brown dwarfs. The most important parameter that we can extract from a microlensing event is the Einstein radius crossing time tE. In this work, by performing Monte-Carlo simulation, we obtain tE distribution for brown dwarf population. Then we show that this population can be a good candidate for very short microlensing events with tE<2 days. The data set used in this analysis was taken in 2006 and 2007 seasons by the MOA-II survey, using the 1.8-m MOA-II telescope located at the Mt. John University Observatory, New Zealand.

  12. Study by MOA of extrasolar planets in gravitational microlensing events of high magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, I. A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Skuljan, J.; Abe, F.; Dodd, R. J.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Honda, M.; Jugaku, J.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Marles, A.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nankivell, G.; Noda, S.; Noguchi, C.; Ohnishi, K.; Reid, M.; Saito, To.; Sato, H.; Sekiguchi, M.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Takeuti, M.; Watase, Y.; Wilkinson, S.; Yamada, R.; Yanagisawa, T.; Yock, P. C. M.

    2002-06-01

    A search for extrasolar planets was carried out in three gravitational microlensing events of high magnification, MACHO 98-BLG-35, MACHO 99-LMC-2 and OGLE 00-BUL-12. Photometry was derived from observational images by the MOA and OGLE groups using an image subtraction technique. For MACHO 98-BLG-35, additional photometry derived from the MPS and PLANET groups was included. Planetary modelling of the three events was carried out in a supercluster computing environment. The estimated probability for explaining the data on MACHO 98-BLG-35 without a planet is <1 per cent. The best planetary model has a planet of mass ~(0.4-1.5)×MEarth at a projected radius of either ~1.5 or ~2.3au. We show how multiplanet models can be applied to the data. We calculate exclusion regions for the three events and find that Jupiter-mass planets can be excluded with projected radii from as wide as about 30au to as close as around 0.5au for MACHO 98-BLG-35 and OGLE 00-BUL-12. For MACHO 99-LMC-2, the exclusion region extends out to around 10au and constitutes the first limit placed on a planetary companion to an extragalactic star. We derive a particularly high peak magnification of ~160 for OGLE 00-BUL-12. We discuss the detectability of planets with masses as low as Mercury in this and similar events.

  13. Exoplanet searches with gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Depending on gravitational lens masses, people are speaking about different regimes of gravitational lensing or more precisely, different regimes correspond to different angular distances, assuming that lenses and sources are located at cosmological distances. If a gravitational lens has a stellar mass, the regime is called microlensing. Since a distance between images depends on a square root of a lens mass, a regime for a lens with a planet mass (10^{-6} M_{⊙}) is called nanolensing. Therefore, searches for light exoplanets with gravitational lensing may be called nanolensing. There are different techniques to find exoplanets such as Doppler shift measurements, transits, pulsar timing, astrometrical measurements. It was noted that gravitational microlensing is the most promising technique to find exoplanets near the habitable zone with a temperature at exoplanet surface in the range 1 - 100° C (or in the temperature range for temperature of liquid water).

  14. Confirmation of the Planetary Origin of the Gravitational Microlensing Event OGLE-2006-BLG-0169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Bennett, David P.; Bhattacharya, Aparna; Anderson, Jay; Bond, Ian; Anderson, Nyki; Batista, Virgini; Beaulieu, Jean-philippe; Depoy, Darren L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gould, Andrew; Gilbert, Emily; Pfeifle, Ryan; Pogge, Richard W.; Terry, Sean; Udalski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the source and lens stars for planetary microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169, which confirm the relative proper motion prediction due to the planetary light curve signal observed for this event. This (and the companion Keck result) provide the first confirmation of a planetary microlensing signal, for which the deviation was only 2%. The follow-up observations determine the flux of the planetary host star in multiple passbands and remove light curve model ambiguity caused by sparse sampling of part of the light curve. This leads to a precise determination of the properties of the OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb planetary system.

  15. Time Delay in Microlensing Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-14

    This plot shows data obtained from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, or OGLE, telescope located in Chile, during a "microlensing" event. Microlensing events occur when one star passes another, and the gravity of the foreground star causes the distant star's light to magnify and brighten. This magnification is evident in the plot, as both Spitzer and OGLE register an increase in the star's brightness. If the foreground star is circled by a planet, the planet's gravity can alter the magnification over a shorter period, seen in the plot in the form of spikes and a dip. The great distance between Spitzer, in space, and OGLE, on the ground, meant that Spitzer saw this particular microlensing event before OGLE. The offset in the timing can be used to measure the distance to the planet. In this case, the planet, called OGLE-2014-BLG-0124L, was found to be 13,000 light-years away, near the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The finding was the result of fortuitous timing because Spitzer's overall program to observe microlensing events was only just starting up in the week before the planet's effects were visible from Spitzer's vantage point. While Spitzer sees infrared light of 3.6 microns in wavelength, OGLE sees visible light of 0.8 microns. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19331

  16. Astrophysical Applications of Gravitational Micro-Lensing /

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, R.; Refsdal, S.; Stabell, R.; Grieger, B.

    Gravitational micro-lensing due to stars in the deflecting galaxy influences the brightness and the spectra of the macro-images. Furthermore changes in the spectra due to micro-lensing may give informations on the quasar structure. From high amplification events the brightness profile of the source may be obtained. The time scale of the high amplification event is proportional to the source radius and inverse proportional to the transversal velocity. Due to the large brightness gradient by a high amplification event, a "parallax-effect" occurs, from which the transversal velocity may be obtained, and thereby the source radius (R = ΔtmVT). The authors roughly estimate 0.3 high amplication events per year for all gravitationally lensed quasars.

  17. Real Time Gravitational Microlensing in OGLE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej; Szymanski, Michal

    1998-05-01

    The Early Warning System (EWS) designed for detection of microlensing events in progress has been implemented for the second phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment - OGLE-2. Information about detected events in progress is available on WWW page and Anonymous FTP. Astronomers interested in e-mail notification, are requested to send an e-mail to ogle-ews@sirius.astrouw.edu.pl.

  18. Interpretation of a short-term anomaly in the gravitational microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.-H.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Chote, P.; Harris, P.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-11-20

    A planetary microlensing signal is generally characterized by a short-term perturbation to the standard single lensing light curve. A subset of binary-source events can produce perturbations that mimic planetary signals, thereby introducing an ambiguity between the planetary and binary-source interpretations. In this paper, we present the analysis of the microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486, for which the light curve exhibits a short-lived perturbation. Routine modeling not considering data taken in different passbands yields a best-fit planetary model that is slightly preferred over the best-fit binary-source model. However, when allowed for a change in the color during the perturbation, we find that the binary-source model yields a significantly better fit and thus the degeneracy is clearly resolved. This event not only signifies the importance of considering various interpretations of short-term anomalies, but also demonstrates the importance of multi-band data for checking the possibility of false-positive planetary signals.

  19. Constraint on Additional Planets in Planetary Systems Discovered Through the Channel of High-magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y.-K.; Park, H.

    2015-04-01

    High-magnification gravitational microlensing events provide an important channel of detecting planetary systems with multiple giants located at their birth places. In order to investigate the potential existence of additional planets, we reanalyze the light curves of the eight high-magnification microlensing events, for each of which a single planet was previously detected. The analyzed events include OGLE-2005-BLG-071, OGLE-2005-BLG-169, MOA-2007-BLG-400, MOA-2008-BLG-310, MOA-2009-BLG-319, MOA-2009-BLG-387, MOA-2010-BLG-477, and MOA-2011-BLG-293. We find that including an additional planet improves fits with {Δ }{{χ }2}\\lt 80 for seven out of eight analyzed events. For MOA-2009-BLG-319, the improvement is relatively big with {Δ }{{χ }2}∼ 143. From inspection of the fits, we find that the improvement of the fits is attributed to systematics in data. Although no clear evidence of additional planets is found, it is still possible to constrain the existence of additional planets in the parameter space. For this purpose, we construct exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of an additional planet as a function of its separation and mass ratio. We also present the exclusion ranges of additional planets with 90% confidence level for Jupiter-, Saturn-, and Uranus-mass planets.

  20. Measuring polarization in microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrosso, G.; Calchi Novati, S.; De Paolis, F.; Jetzer, Ph.; Nucita, A. A.; Strafella, F.

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the polarization of the star light that may arise during microlensing events due to the high gradient of magnification across the atmosphere of the source star, by exploring the full range of microlensing and stellar physical parameters. Since it is already known that only cool evolved giant stars give rise to the highest polarization signals, we follow the model by Simmons et al. to compute the polarization as due to the photon scattering on dust grains in the stellar wind. Motivated by the possibility to perform a polarization measurement during an ongoing microlensing event, we consider the recently reported event catalogue by the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) collaboration covering the 2001-2009 campaigns (OGLE-III events), that makes available the largest and more comprehensive set of single-lens microlensing events towards the Galactic bulge. The study of these events, integrated by a Monte Carlo analysis, allows us to estimate the expected polarization profiles and to predict for which source stars and at which time is most convenient to perform a polarization measurement in an ongoing event. We find that about two dozens of OGLE-III events (about 1 per cent of the total) have maximum polarization degree in the range 0.1 < Pmax < 1 per cent, corresponding to source stars with apparent magnitude I ≲ 14.5, being very cool red giants. This signal is measurable by using the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at Very Large Telescope (VLT) telescope with about 1 h integration time.

  1. Dark Matter Detection with Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Mark Robin

    There is overwhelming evidence that the majority of the mass in ordinary galaxies like our own is undetected by its absorption or emission of light. If this mass is in the form of massive compact halo objects (Machos) it can be detected through its gravitational microlensing of background stars. The MACHO Project is searching for this Galactic dark matter by monitoring millions of stars in the Magellanic Clouds and Galactic bulge in an attempt to detect rare microlensing events caused by otherwise invisible Machos. Analysis of two years of photometry on 8.5 million stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) reveals 8 candidate microlensing events. Detailed calibrations including characterization of our confusion limited photometry allow us to calculate a mass for the entire lensing population and to compare the observed event rate with both that expected from known stars and that expected for the dark matter. We find that only ~1 event should be expected from lensing by stars in known galactic populations. From these eight events we estimate the optical depth towards the LMC from events with duration 2Event time scales yield a most probable Macho mass of 0.5-0.2+0.3Msolar, although this value is quite model dependent. The absence of short timescale microlensing events allows us to exclude Machos in the mass range ~10-4-0.03Msolar as significant contributors to the Galactic dark matter.

  2. DETERMINING THE PHYSICAL LENS PARAMETERS OF THE BINARY GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENT MOA-2009-BLG-016

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.-H.; Han, C.; Bond, I. A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Miyake, N.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A.

    2010-07-01

    We report the result of the analysis of the light curve of the microlensing event MOA-2009-BLG-016. The light curve is characterized by a short-duration anomaly near the peak and an overall asymmetry. We find that the peak anomaly is due to a binary companion to the primary lens and the asymmetry of the light curve is explained by the parallax effect caused by the acceleration of the observer over the course of the event due to the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we detect evidence for the effect of the finite size of the source near the peak of the event, which allows us to measure the angular Einstein radius of the lens system. The Einstein radius combined with the microlens parallax allows us to determine the total mass of the lens and the distance to the lens. We identify three distinct classes of degenerate solutions for the binary lens parameters, where two are manifestations of the previously identified degeneracies of close/wide binaries and positive/negative impact parameters, while the third class is caused by the symmetric cycloid shape of the caustic. We find that, for the best-fit solution, the estimated mass of the lower-mass component of the binary is (0.04 {+-} 0.01) M{sub sun}, implying a brown-dwarf companion. However, there exists a solution that is worse only by {Delta}{chi}{sup 2} {approx} 3 for which the mass of the secondary is above the hydrogen-burning limit. Unfortunately, resolving these two degenerate solutions will be difficult as the relative lens-source proper motions for both are similar and small ({approx}1 mas yr{sup -1}) and thus the lens will remain blended with the source for the next several decades.

  3. Microlensing Event Caustic Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MACHO/GMAN Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    The MACHO/GMAN Collaboration (cf. IAUC 6845) plus affiliate S.Rhie report that further observations of microlensing event MACHO-98-SMC-1 (R.A. = 0h45m35s.2, Decl. = -72o52'34" J2000) confirm the binary lens interpretation and yield a prediction for the time of the 2nd caustic crossing: June 19.2 +/- 1.5 UT. The confirming observations were obtained with the MSO 1.3m MACHO survey telescope and the CTIO 0.9-m telescope.

  4. REANALYSES OF ANOMALOUS GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS IN THE OGLE-III EARLY WARNING SYSTEM DATABASE WITH COMBINED DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J.; Park, H.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Poleski, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Koshimoto, N.; Collaboration:; and others

    2015-05-01

    We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) lensing survey conducted during the 2004–2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of eight events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of five events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for six events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of three events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effects induced by the changes of the observer’s position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.

  5. Reanalyses of Anomalous Gravitational Microlensing Events in the OGLE-III Early Warning System Database with Combined Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.; Park, H.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hoffman, M.; Huber, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Martin, R.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Pitrou, C.; Pollard, K.; Sahu, K. C.; Vinter, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; PLANET Collaboration; Allen, W.; Bolt, G.; Choi, J.-Y.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Lee, C.-U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ofek, E. O.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; Santallo, R.; Shin, I.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) lensing survey conducted during the 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of eight events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of five events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for six events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of three events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effects induced by the changes of the observer’s position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.

  6. Sharpening the tools of gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Shawn D.

    We attempt to identify all microlensing parallax events for which the parallax fit improves Deltachi2 > 100 relative to a standard microlensing model. We outline a procedure to identify three types of discrete degeneracies (including a new one that we dub the "ecliptic degeneracy") and find many new degenerate solutions in 16 previously published and 6 unpublished events. Only four events have one unique solution and the other 18 events have a total of 44 solutions. Our sample includes three previously identified black-hole (BH) candidates. We consider the newly discovered degenerate solutions and determine the relative likelihood that each of these is a BH. We find the lens of event MACHO-99-BLG-22 is a strong BH candidate (78%), event MACHO-96-BLG-5 is a marginal BH candidate (37%), and MACHO-98-BLG-6 is a weak BH candidate (2.2%). The lens of event OGLE-2003-BLG-84 may be a Jupiter-mass free-floating planet candidate based on a weak 3sigma detection of finite-source effects. We find that event MACHO-179-A is a brown dwarf candidate within ˜100 pc of the Sun, mostly due to its very small projected Einstein radius, r˜E = 0.23 +/- 0.05 AU. As expected, these microlensing parallax events are biased toward lenses that are heavier and closer than average. These events were examined for xallarap (or binary-source motion), which can mimic parallax. We find that 23% of these events are strongly affected by xallarap. The mid-IR flux ratios FA/F B = 2.84 +/- 0.06 of the two images of the gravitationally lensed quasar HE 1104--1805 show no wavelength dependence to within 3% across 3.6--8.0 mum, no time dependence over 6 months and agree with the broad emission line flux ratios. This indicates that the mid-IR emission likely comes from scales large enough to be little affected by microlensing and that there is little differential extinction between the images. We measure a revised time-delay between these two images of 152.2+2.8-3.0 (1sigma) days from R and V-band data

  7. Possibly high amplification microlensing event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, Michal; Udalski, Andrzej

    1998-06-01

    The OGLE team informs about a microlensing event in progress - OGLE-1998-BUL-18 (17:54:21.79, -29:53:24.0, J2000) which is presently about 2 days before maximum. It is relatively bright star (I0=15.5), rising rapidly. Preliminary microlensing fit to the light curve predicts large maximum magnification to be reached on JD=2450971.831 (1998-06-07.33 UT) Follow-up observations, both photometric and spectroscopic, are strongly encouraged.

  8. Gravitational microlensing searches and results

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.

    1997-05-08

    Baryonic matter, in the form of Machos (MAssive Compact Halo Objects), might be a significant constituent of the dark matter that dominates the Milky Way. This article describes how surveys for Machos exploit the gravitational microlens magnification of extragalactic stars. The experimental searches for this effect monitor millions of stars, in some cases every night, looking for magnification events. The early results of these surveys indicate that Machos make up a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Milky Way, and that these objects have stellar masses. Truly substellar objects do not contribute much to the total. Additionally, the relatively high event rate towards the Galactic bulge seems to require that the bulge be elongated, and massive.

  9. GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-10

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 10{sup 11} km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 10{sup 7} km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  10. Possible high magnification microlensing event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej; Szymanski, Michal

    1998-05-01

    The OGLE team informs about a microlensing event in progress - OGLE-1998-BUL-15 (18:07:20.83, -27:34:10.8, J2000) which is presently about 4 days before maximum and is rising rapidly (already more than 2 mag above the normal level). Preliminary fit to the light curve predicts possible maximum magnification as large as 10 mag and maximum on JD=2450945.2. Follow up observations, both photometric and spectroscopic, are strongly encouraged.

  11. Short duration microlensing events: Searching for rogue planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Laurent, Kathryn E.; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Primini, Francis A.; Lew, Wei Peng; Gau, Lai Su; Benson, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Einstein described gravitational microlensing in 1936, at the same time suggesting it to be an unobservable phenomenon. He did not foresee technological advancements that would lead to microlensing becoming a productive tool for astronomy. Of particular interest may be the role it has begun to play in the discovery of rogue planets - exoplanets that are not bound to a star or stars. Rogue planets may be formed independently, or they may be formed in the confines of a stellar system and then ejected by gravitational interactions. Currently fewer than a dozen rogue planets are known but estimates of their abundance conservatively start at double the number of stars in our galaxy.The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) and Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) teams have collectively detected approximately 2500 events this year alone. A significant portion of these events are of short duration, with an Einstein crossing time of less than 10 days. Microlensing events generally occur on a timescale of weeks to months, so short duration events are an interesting class for study, particularly with regard to searches for rogue planets. We have undertaken a systematic study and categorization of the short duration microlensing events from recent OGLE and MOA alerts, with a special eye to identifying exoplanet candidates.

  12. PERIODIC SIGNALS IN BINARY MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Stefano, Rosanne Di; Esin, Ann; Taylor, Jeffrey

    2015-08-20

    Gravitational microlensing events are powerful tools for the study of stellar populations. In particular, they can be used to discover and study a variety of binary systems. A large number of binary lenses have already been found through microlensing surveys and a few of these systems show strong evidence of orbital motion on the timescale of the lensing event. We expect that more binary lenses of this kind will be detected in the future. For binaries whose orbital period is comparable to the event duration, the orbital motion can cause the lensing signal to deviate drastically from that of a static binary lens. The most striking property of such light curves is the presence of quasi-periodic features, which are produced as the source traverses the same regions in the rotating lens plane. These repeating features contain information about the orbital period of the lens. If this period can be extracted, then much can be learned about the lensing system even without performing time-consuming, detailed light-curve modeling. However, the relative transverse motion between the source and the lens significantly complicates the problem of period extraction. To resolve this difficulty, we present a modification of the standard Lomb–Scargle periodogram analysis. We test our method for four representative binary lens systems and demonstrate its efficiency in correctly extracting binary orbital periods.

  13. A POSSIBLE BINARY SYSTEM OF A STELLAR REMNANT IN THE HIGH-MAGNIFICATION GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2007-BLG-514

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, N.; Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Dong, S.; Gould, A.; Street, R. A.; Greenhill, J.; Bond, I. A.; Fukui, A.; Holderness, S.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2012-06-20

    We report the extremely high-magnification (A > 1000) binary microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514. We obtained good coverage around the double peak structure in the light curve via follow-up observations from different observatories. The binary lens model that includes the effects of parallax (known orbital motion of the Earth) and orbital motion of the lens yields a binary lens mass ratio of q = 0.321 {+-} 0.007 and a projected separation of s = 0.072 {+-} 0.001 in units of the Einstein radius. The parallax parameters allow us to determine the lens distance D{sub L} = 3.11 {+-} 0.39 kpc and total mass M{sub L} = 1.40 {+-} 0.18 M{sub Sun }; this leads to the primary and secondary components having masses of M{sub 1} = 1.06 {+-} 0.13 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.34 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }, respectively. The parallax model indicates that the binary lens system is likely constructed by the main-sequence stars. On the other hand, we used a Bayesian analysis to estimate probability distributions by the model that includes the effects of xallarap (possible orbital motion of the source around a companion) and parallax (q = 0.270 {+-} 0.005, s = 0.083 {+-} 0.001). The primary component of the binary lens is relatively massive, with M{sub 1} = 0.9{sup +4.6}{sub -0.3} M{sub Sun} and it is at a distance of D{sub L} = 2.6{sup +3.8}{sub -0.9} kpc. Given the secure mass ratio measurement, the companion mass is therefore M{sub 2} = 0.2{sup +1.2}{sub -0.1} M{sub Sun }. The xallarap model implies that the primary lens is likely a stellar remnant, such as a white dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole.

  14. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  15. Characterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events with Lenses Passing over Source Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, S.-Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hung, L.-W.; Jablonski, F.; Janczak, J.; Lee, C.-U.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; "TG" Tan, T.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Abe, F.; Barnard, E.; Baudry, J.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; OGLE Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Menzies, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; PLANET Collaboration; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Mottram, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; RoboNet Collaboration; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Calchi Novati, S.; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.; MiNDSTEp Consortium

    2012-05-01

    We present the analysis of the light curves of nine high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all of the events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For seven events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, five events are found to have Einstein radii of less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses very low mass star or brown dwarf candidates. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of θE ~ 0.08 mas combined with the short timescale of t E ~ 2.7 days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of ~0.84 M ⊙ is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we did not find planetary signals for any of the events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.

  16. CHARACTERIZING LENSES AND LENSED STARS OF HIGH-MAGNIFICATION SINGLE-LENS GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS WITH LENSES PASSING OVER SOURCE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, S.-Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-05-20

    We present the analysis of the light curves of nine high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all of the events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For seven events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, five events are found to have Einstein radii of less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses very low mass star or brown dwarf candidates. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of {theta}{sub E} {approx} 0.08 mas combined with the short timescale of t{sub E} {approx} 2.7 days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of {approx}0.84 M{sub Sun} is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we did not find planetary signals for any of the events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.

  17. Exoplanets and brown dwarfs detections through gravitational microlensing. Study of interferometric observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranc, Clément

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing effect has become a unique tool to detect and characterise exoplanets. A microlensing effect occurs when a foreground star (the microlens) and a background star (the source) are aligned with the Earth on the same line of sight. The light from the furthest star, usually in the Galactic bulge, is deflected by the microlens located on the disk. During this phenomenon, multiple images of the source are created by the lens, bigger than the source that consequently seems amplified. When one of these images are located in the vicinity of an exoplanet, a short amplification jump occurs revealing its presence. After a quick overview of the exoplanets field of research, I highlight the specificities of microlensing comparing to the other planets detection techniques. Then, I describe in details the modelling of microlensing effects, from a theoretical to a numerical point of view. In a third part, I describe the detection of the first brown dwarf orbiting a solar-type star using microlensing, strengthening the recent idea that microlensing will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the brown dwarfs formation, still not fully understood. Finally, I investigate the potential of interferometric observations of microlensing events that will give, in the future, new original constraints on the microlens physical properties. First, we introduce a new formalism that closely combines interferometric and microlensing observable quantities. Secondly, we determine an average number of events that are at reach of long baseline interferometers every year.

  18. Gravitational microlensing in Verlinde's emergent gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei-Hua; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2017-06-01

    We propose gravitational microlensing as a way of testing the emergent gravity theory recently proposed by Eric Verlinde [1]. We consider two limiting cases: the dark mass of maximally anisotropic pressures (Case I) and of isotropic pressures (Case II). Our analysis of perihelion advancement of a planet shows that only Case I yields a viable theory. In this case the metric outside a star of mass M* can be modeled by that of a point-like global monopole whose mass is M* and a deficit angle Δ =√{ (2 GH0M*) / (3c3) }, where H0 is the Hubble rate and G the Newton constant. This deficit angle can be used to test the theory since light exhibits additional bending around stars given by, αD ≈ - πΔ / 2. This angle is independent on the distance from the star and it affects equally light and massive particles. The effect is too small to be measurable today, but should be within reach of the next generation of high resolution telescopes. Finally we note that the advancement of periastron of a planet orbiting around a star or black hole, which equals πΔ per period, can be also used to test the theory.

  19. Random scattering approach to gravitational microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, N.; Balbus, S.; Paczynski, B.

    1986-01-01

    Small random deflections of a narrow beam of radiation due to gravitational scattering by stars randomly distributed within the deflector plane are considered. Using a Fouriere transform method, the probability of scattering is obtained as a function of scattering angle for an arbitrary number of stars with an arbitrary distribution of masses. The probability density, expressed in proper units, depends on one parameter only: the effective number of stars. At small scattering angles the density is a Gaussian, and at large angles it falls off as the scattering angle to the minus fourth power. The probability distribution for scatterings is simply related to the angular distribution of the surface brightness of a macroimage, averaged over many microimages. The isophotes are ellipses, with the ratio of the major axis to the minor axis, determined by the dimensionless surface mass density and the shear of the lensing system. The number of stars that has to be included in the modeling of microlensing is proportional to the amplification due to the macrolens, and to the square of the dimensionless surface mass density.

  20. Application of Compressive Sensing to Gravitational Microlensing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korde-Patel, Asmita; Barry, Richard K.; Mohsenin, Tinoosh

    2016-01-01

    Compressive Sensing is an emerging technology for data compression and simultaneous data acquisition. This is an enabling technique for significant reduction in data bandwidth, and transmission power and hence, can greatly benefit spaceflight instruments. We apply this process to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. We experiment with various impact parameters that describe microlensing curves to determine the effectiveness and uncertainty caused by Compressive Sensing. Finally, we describe implications for spaceflight missions.

  1. Gravitational microlensing by a single star plus external shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shude

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing by a single star plus external shear is considered. It is shown that for a general cusp the magnification probability distribution follows pc(A)dA of about (A exp -7/2)dA for sufficiently large magnifications. An adaptive grid technique is developed to calculate the magnification probability distributions. The results could be useful for cases of microlensing where the surface-mass density is low.

  2. Application of Compressive Sensing to Gravitational Microlensing Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korde-Patel, Asmita; Barry, Richard K.; Mohsenin, Tinoosh

    2017-06-01

    Compressive Sensing is an emerging technology for data compression and simultaneous data acquisition. This is an enabling technique for significant reduction in data bandwidth, and transmission power and hence, can greatly benefit space-flight instruments. We apply this process to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. We experiment with various impact parameters that describe microlensing curves to determine the effectiveness and uncertainty caused by Compressive Sensing. Finally, we describe implications for space-flight missions.

  3. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission. PMID:26574051

  4. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin

    2015-11-17

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission.

  5. Extrasolar planets detections and statistics through gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, A.

    2014-10-01

    Gravitational microlensing was proposed thirty years ago as a promising method to probe the existence and properties of compact objects in the Galaxy and its surroundings. The particularity and strength of the technique is based on the fact that the detection does not rely on the detection of the photon emission of the object itself, but on the way its mass affects the path of light of a background, almost aligned source. Detections thus include not only bright, but also dark objects. Today, the many successes of gravitational microlensing have largely exceeded the original promises. Microlensing contributed important results and breakthroughs in several astrophysical fields as it was used as a powerful tool to probe the Galactic structure (proper motions, extinction maps), to search for dark and compact massive objects in the halo and disk of the Milky Way, to probe the atmospheres of bulge red giant stars, to search for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and to hunt for extrasolar planets. As an extrasolar planet detection method, microlensing nowadays stands in the top five of the successful observational techniques. Compared to other (complementary) detection methods, microlensing provides unique information on the population of exoplanets, because it allows the detection of very low-mass planets (down to the mass of the Earth) at large orbital distances from their star (0.5 to 10 AU). It is also the only technique that allows the discovery of planets at distances from Earth greater than a few kiloparsecs, up to the bulge of the Galaxy. Microlensing discoveries include the first ever detection of a cool super-Earth around an M-dwarf star, the detection of several cool Neptunes, Jupiters and super-Jupiters, as well as multi-planetary systems and brown dwarfs. So far, the least massive planet detected by microlensing has only three times the mass of the Earth and orbits a very low mass star at the edge of the brown dwarf regime. Several free-floating planetary

  6. Determining the parameters of high amplification microlensing events by means of statistical machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, Elena

    2017-06-01

    Strong gravitational microlensing (GM) events provide us a possibility to determine both the parameters of microlensed source and microlens. GM can be an important clue to understand the nature of dark matter on comparably small spatial and mass scales (i.e. substructure), especially when speaking about the combination of astrometrical and photometrical data about high amplification microlensing events (HAME). In the same time, fitting of HAME lightcurves of microlensed sources is quite time-consuming process. That is why we test here the possibility to apply the statistical machine learning techniques to determine the source and microlens parameters for the set of HAME lightcurves, using the simulated set of amplification curves of sources microlensed by point masses and clumps of DM with various density profiles.

  7. Accelerating gravitational microlensing simulations using the Xeon Phi coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.; Baron, E.; Van der Mark, P.

    2017-04-01

    Recently Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have been used to speed up very CPU-intensive gravitational microlensing simulations. In this work, we use the Xeon Phi coprocessor to accelerate such simulations and compare its performance on a microlensing code with that of NVIDIA's GPUs. For the selected set of parameters evaluated in our experiment, we find that the speedup by Intel's Knights Corner coprocessor is comparable to that by NVIDIA's Fermi family of GPUs with compute capability 2.0, but less significant than GPUs with higher compute capabilities such as the Kepler. However, the very recently released second generation Xeon Phi, Knights Landing, is about 5.8 times faster than the Knights Corner, and about 2.9 times faster than the Kepler GPU used in our simulations. We conclude that the Xeon Phi is a very promising alternative to GPUs for modern high performance microlensing simulations.

  8. Searching for intermediate-mass black holes with gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kains, Noé; Bramich, Dan; Sahu, Kailash C.; Calamida, Annalisa

    2016-06-01

    Despite a lot of indirect observational evidence, no intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) has been detected unambiguously so far. A clear detection would shed light on the possible role of IMBHs in the formation of supermassive black holes, and on the evolution of Galaxies. This could be achieved with gravitational microlensing. We present the results of simulations to estimate the expected astrometric microlensing rates by IMBHs in globular clusters, and show that microlensing has the potential to detect signals that can be unambiguously attributed to an IMBH in several Galactic globular clusters. We also discuss the implication of our simulations for archival studies with available Hubble Space Telescope data, and the impact of JWST and WFIRST on possible future detections.

  9. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudi, B; Bennett, D; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M; Tristram, P; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; DePoy, D; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R; Park, B; Abe, F; Bond, I; Botzler, C; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A; Kilmartin, P; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Sako, T; Saito, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Yock, P; Albrow, M; Beaulieu, J; Burgdorf, M; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2007-11-08

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the first detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of {approx} 0.71 and {approx} 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary of mass {approx} 0.50 solar masses. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only 6 confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  10. Fitting Photometry of Blended Microlensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christian L.; Griest, Kim

    2006-03-01

    We reexamine the usefulness of fitting blended light-curve models to microlensing photometric data. We find agreement with previous workers (e.g., Woźniak & Paczyński) that this is a difficult proposition because of the degeneracy of blend fraction with other fit parameters. We show that follow-up observations at specific point along the light curve (peak region and wings) of high-magnification events are the most helpful in removing degeneracies. We also show that very small errors in the baseline magnitude can result in problems in measuring the blend fraction and study the importance of non-Gaussian errors in the fit results. The biases and skewness in the distribution of the recovered blend fraction is discussed. We also find a new approximation formula relating the blend fraction and the unblended fit parameters to the underlying event duration needed to estimate microlensing optical depth.

  11. Resolving Microlensing Events with Triggered VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Mansour; Broderick, Avery E.; Rahvar, Sohrab; Reid, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Microlensing events provide a unique capacity to study the stellar remnant population of the Galaxy. Optical microlensing suffers from a near-complete degeneracy between mass, velocity, and distance. However, a subpopulation of lensed stars, Mira variable stars, are also radio-bright, exhibiting strong SiO masers. These are sufficiently bright and compact to permit direct imaging using existing very long baseline interferometers such as the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We show that these events are relatively common, occurring at a rate of ≈ 2 {{yr}}-1 of which 0.1 {{yr}}-1 are associated with Galactic black holes. Features in the associated images, e.g., the Einstein ring, are sufficiently well resolved to fully reconstruct the lens properties, enabling the measurement of mass, distance, and tangential velocity of the lensing object to a precision better than 15%. Future radio microlensing surveys conducted with upcoming radio telescopes combined with modest improvements in the VLBA could increase the rate of Galactic black hole events to roughly 10 {{yr}}-1, sufficient to double the number of known stellar mass black holes in a couple of years, and permitting the construction of distribution functions of stellar mass black hole properties.

  12. Unbound or distant planetary mass population detected by gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    2011-05-19

    Since 1995, more than 500 exoplanets have been detected using different techniques, of which 12 were detected with gravitational microlensing. Most of these are gravitationally bound to their host stars. There is some evidence of free-floating planetary-mass objects in young star-forming regions, but these objects are limited to massive objects of 3 to 15 Jupiter masses with large uncertainties in photometric mass estimates and their abundance. Here, we report the discovery of a population of unbound or distant Jupiter-mass objects, which are almost twice (1.8(+1.7)(-0.8)) as common as main-sequence stars, based on two years of gravitational microlensing survey observations towards the Galactic Bulge. These planetary-mass objects have no host stars that can be detected within about ten astronomical units by gravitational microlensing. However, a comparison with constraints from direct imaging suggests that most of these planetary-mass objects are not bound to any host star. An abrupt change in the mass function at about one Jupiter mass favours the idea that their formation process is different from that of stars and brown dwarfs. They may have formed in proto-planetary disks and subsequently scattered into unbound or very distant orbits.

  13. Gravitational Microlensing in Modified Gravity Theories - Inverse-Square Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.

    2011-02-01

    Microlensing studies are usually based on the lens equation that is valid only to the first order in the gravitational constant G and lens mass M. We consider corrections to the conventional lens equation in terms of differentiable functions, so that they can express not only the second-order effects of GM in general relativity but also modified gravity theories. As a generalization of Ebina et al. (Prog. Theor. Phys. 104 (2000), 1317), we show that, provided that the spacetime is static, spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat, the total amplification by microlensing remains unchanged at the linear order of the correction to the deflection angle, if and only if the correction takes a particular form as the inverse square of the impact parameter, whereas the magnification factor for each image is corrected. It is concluded that the light curve shape by microlensing is inevitably changed and will thus allow us to probe modified gravity, unless a modificati on to the deflection angle takes the particular form. No systematic deviation in microlensing observations has been reported. For instance, therefore, the Yukawa-type correction is constrained as the characteristic length > 10^{14} m.

  14. Microlensing Events in Gaia and other Astrometric Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Claire; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Lepine, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    The region within a kiloparsec of the Sun is a vast and mysterious place filled with uncharted planets, stars and compact objects, whose masses and properties are unknown. The Gaia space mission provides a unique opportunity to study of this region by measuring parallax distances and proper motions to millions of nearby stars, significantly advancing data available from previous astrometric surveys.We are putting this new astrometric information from the first Gaia data release to a novel use, by searching for matches between the positions of known microlensing events and the positions of stars observed by both the Gaia and the Tycho-2 missions, as listed in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) Catalogue.The existence of a gravitational microlensing event near a TGAS-listed star may provide information about the nature of either the source star lensed in the event, or the lens itself. For example, the source star lensed in the ‘TAGO’ event lies nearby, and is listed in the TGAS Catalogue. Other events may also have been caused by nearby TGAS-listed stars, or by their dim companions. In such cases, we can determine the lens mass and acquire information about any compact objects or planets which may exist around the lens.We report on the process of matching the positions of over 20,000 candidate microlensing events discovered by either OGLE and/or MOA, with the positions of 2 million stars from the TGAS Catalogue and stars from a range of other surveys, including Lepine's SUPERBLINK survey, and discuss the implications of the matches obtained.

  15. Gravitational microlensing variability caused by small masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsdal, S.; Stabell, R.

    1993-10-01

    The microlensing variability predicted for QSO 2237+0305 some time ago (Kayser et al. 1986; Kayser & Refsdal 1989), has now definitely been observed in the lightcurves of its images (Irwin et al. 1989; Pettersen 1990; Corrigan et al. 1991; Yee & DeRobertis 1992 and Racine 1992). It has been shown by Wambsganss et al. (1990) that the observed lightcurves can be explained with lens masses from 0.1 solar mass to 1 solar mass assuming a Salpeter mass function and with source radii less than about three percent of the corresponding typical Einstein ring radius projected into the source plane, R0 proportional to the square root of M. We have found that the sources with radii up to 5 R0 can give as large variabilities as those observed (Delta m approximately equal to 0.5 mag) and at timescales consistent with the observations (Delta t approximately equal to 0.5 years), if the lens masses are about 10-5 solar mass. We also find that masses down to about 10-7 solar mass may cause an observable flickering superimposed on the variability caused by larger (stellar) masses. More accurate lightcurves over longer time spans are therefore asked for.

  16. Searching for the QCD Axion with Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Marsh, David J. E.; Quevillon, Jérémie

    2017-07-01

    The phase transition responsible for axion dark matter (DM) production can create large amplitude isocurvature perturbations, which collapse into dense objects known as axion miniclusters. We use microlensing data from the EROS survey and from recent observations with the Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam to place constraints on the minicluster scenario. We compute the microlensing event rate for miniclusters, treating them as spatially extended objects. Using the published bounds on the number of microlensing events, we bound the fraction of DM collapsed into miniclusters fMC. For an axion with temperature-dependent mass consistent with the QCD axion, we find fMC<0.083 (ma/100 μ eV )0.12 , which represents the first observational constraint on the minicluster fraction. We forecast that a high-efficiency observation of around ten nights with Subaru would be sufficient to constrain fMC≲0.004 over the entire QCD axion mass range. We make various approximations to derive these constraints, and dedicated analyses by the observing teams of EROS and Subaru are necessary to confirm our results. If accurate theoretical predictions for fMC can be made in the future, then microlensing can be used to exclude or discover the QCD axion. Further details of our computations are presented in a companion paper [M. Fairbairn, D. J. E. Marsh, J. Quevillon, and S. Rozier (to be published)].

  17. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn analog with gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G W; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M K; Tristram, P J; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Depoy, D L; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R W; Park, B-G; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Saito, To; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Allan, A; Beaulieu, J-P; Burgdorf, M J; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2008-02-15

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of approximately 0.71 and approximately 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of approximately 2.3 and approximately 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass approximately 0.50 solar mass at a distance of approximately 1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  18. Gravitational microlensing by double stars and planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shunde; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    Almost all stars are in binary systems. When the separation between the two components is comparable to the Einstein ring radius corresponding to the combined mass of the binary acting as a gravitational lens, then an extra pair of images can be created, and the light curve of a lensed source becomes complicated. It is estimated that about 10 percent of all lensing episodes of the Galactic bulge stars will strongly display the binary nature of the lens. The effect is strong even if the companion is a planet. A massive search for microlensing of the Galactic bulge stars may lead to a discovery of the first extrasolar planetary systems.

  19. Resolving the Nature of the LMC Microlensing Event LMC-5

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A J; Cook, K H; Keller, S C

    2004-04-22

    The authors present the results from an analysis of Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Camera data for the Large Magellanic Cloud microlensing event MACHO-LMC-5. By determining the parallax and proper motion of this object they find that the lens is an M dwarf star at a distance of 578{sub -53}{sup +65}pc with a proper motion of 21.39 {+-} 0.04 mas/yr. Based on the kinematics and location of this star is it more likely to be part of the Galactic thick disk than thin disk population. They confirm that the microlensing event LMC-5 is a jerk-parallax microlensing event.

  20. Exoplanets mass measurement using gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranc, Clement; Cassan, Arnaud

    2015-07-01

    Thousands of extrasolar planets have been discovered so far, and after the pioneer era, when the discovery of a single planet was a notable event, the interest is moving to the more complex work of planet and planetary system taxonomy, trying to put some order and eventually understand why they are so different from each others. The characterization of planets is tied to the knowledge of their host stars. Nearly all planets known so far however belong to isolated field stars, and their mass and radius are affected by large errors that transfer directly onto the precision of the planet parameters. On the contrary, distances, ages, mass and overall characteristics of stars in Open Clusters are much better measured than for field stars. OC stars are chemically homogeneous, so we can effectively investigate the effect of the presence of a planetary systems on the host star chemistry, e.g. if the observed trend of chemical elements with respect to their condensation temperature is effectively related to the presence planets. Curiously, at the present time, only less than ten planets have been confirmed or validated around Main Sequence stars in OCs. In this proposed talk I will give a short historical review on previous searches for exoplanets in OCs, then I will introduce our on-going survey aimed at detecting Neptune-mass planets around close, intermediate-age OC stars with HARPS (8 night/year) and HARPS-N (5 nights/semester, within the GAPS program). I will discuss our observational strategy and how we are dealing with activity, the main limiting factor in this kind of research, and the impact of the forth-coming K2 observations on our search. I will finally present our latest discoveries, including the first planetary multiple system around a OC star.

  1. Gravitational microlensing by low-mass objects in the globular cluster M22.

    PubMed

    Sahu, K C; Casertano, S; Livio, M; Gilliland, R L; Panagia, N; Albrow, M D; Potter, M

    2001-06-28

    Gravitational microlensing offers a means of determining directly the masses of objects ranging from planets to stars, provided that the distances and motions of the lenses and sources can be determined. A globular cluster observed against the dense stellar field of the Galactic bulge presents ideal conditions for such observations because the probability of lensing is high and the distances and kinematics of the lenses and sources are well constrained. The abundance of low-mass objects in a globular cluster is of particular interest, because it may be representative of the very early stages of star formation in the Universe, and therefore indicative of the amount of dark baryonic matter in such clusters. Here we report a microlensing event associated with the globular cluster M22. We determine the mass of the lens to be 0.13(+0.03)(-0.02) solar masses. We have also detected six events that are unresolved in time. If these are also microlensing events, they imply that a non-negligible fraction of the cluster mass resides in the form of free-floating planetary-mass objects.

  2. Gravitational microlensing by low-mass objects in the globular cluster M22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Casertano, Stefano; Livio, Mario; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Panagia, Nino; Albrow, Michael D.; Potter, Mike

    2001-06-01

    Gravitational microlensing offers a means of determining directly the masses of objects ranging from planets to stars, provided that the distances and motions of the lenses and sources can be determined. A globular cluster observed against the dense stellar field of the Galactic bulge presents ideal conditions for such observations because the probability of lensing is high and the distances and kinematics of the lenses and sources are well constrained. The abundance of low-mass objects in a globular cluster is of particular interest, because it may be representative of the very early stages of star formation in the Universe, and therefore indicative of the amount of dark baryonic matter in such clusters. Here we report a microlensing event associated with the globular cluster M22. We determine the mass of the lens to be 0.13+0.03-0.02 solar masses. We have also detected six events that are unresolved in time. If these are also microlensing events, they imply that a non-negligible fraction of the cluster mass resides in the form of free-floating planetary-mass objects.

  3. Gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310: microlensing factory and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    We spectroscopically re-observed the gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310 using OSIRIS on the GTC. We also monitored the r-band variability of the two quasar images (A and B) with the LT over 143 epochs in the period 2009-2016. These new data in both the wavelength and time domains have confirmed that the system is an unusual microlensing factory. The C iv emission line is remarkably microlensed, since the microlensing magnification of B relative to that for A, μBA, reaches a value of 1.4 ( 0.4 mag) for its core. Moreover, the B image shows a red wing enhancement of C iv flux (relative to A), and μBA = 2 (0.75 mag) for the C iv broad-line emission. Regarding the nuclear continuum, we find a chromatic behaviour of μBA, which roughly varies from 5 (1.75 mag) at 7000 Å to 6 (1.95 mag) at 4000 Å. We also detect significant microlensing variability in the r band, and this includes a number of microlensing events on timescales of 50-100 d. Fortunately, the presence of an intrinsic 0.7 mag dip in the light curves of A and B, permitted us to measure the time delay between both quasar images. This delay is ΔtAB = 47 d (1σ confidence interval; A is leading), in good agreement with predictions of lens models. Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A77

  4. Interpretation of microlensing events in Q2237 + 0305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Hans J.; Mao, Shude

    1994-01-01

    We point out the uncertainties in the potential models of the foreground galaxy in the gravitational lens Q2237 + 0305. The surface densities and external shears are uncertain by a factor of appproximately less than 2. Very long light curves are calculated for different models using the method developed by Witt (1993) and Lewis et al. (1993). We find that the probability of images being in a quiescent state depends strongly on the potential models and the direction of the source motion relative to the alignment of the (gravitational lens) shear term of the macroimages. For example, the probabilities of finding variations smaller than 0.1 mag and for a period of longer than 0.5 Einstein radii (approximately equals 3-5 yr) in image C and D are approximately 30%. This offers an explanation of why image C and D showed relatively small variations. The quiescent images are more likely to be demagnified, consistent with the observations. Further, the higher the magnification of the macroimages, the weaker are the microlensing events. In addition, we conclude that a simple Gaussian profile has some difficulties in explaining the asymmetric shape and the small amplitude of the observed high-magnification events if they are typical. Source models in which the emission is produced by a brightt compact core and a more extended halo can occur better explain the observed double peak events. More data are needed to clearly distinguish different galaxy potential models.

  5. High Probabilities of Planet Detection during Microlensing Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2000-10-01

    The averaged probability of detecting a planetary companion of a lensing star during a gravitational microlensing event toward the Galactic center when the planet-lens mass ratio is 0.001 is shown to have a maximum exceeding 20% for a distribution of source-lens impact parameters that is determined by the efficiency of event detection, and a maximum exceeding 10% for a uniform distribution of impact parameters. The probability varies as the square root of the planet-lens mass ratio. A planet is assumed detectable if the perturbation of the light curve exceeds 2/(S/N) for a significant number of data points, where S/N is the signal-to noise ratio for the photometry of the source. The probability peaks at a planetary semimajor axis a that is close to the mean Einstein ring radius of the lenses of about 2 AU along the line of sight, and remains significant for 0.6<= a<= 10 AU. The low value of the mean Einstein ring radius results from the dominance of M stars in the mass function of the lenses. The probability is averaged over the distribution of the projected position of the planet onto the lens plane, over the lens mass function, over the distribution of impact parameters, over the distribution of lens along the line of sight to the source star, over the I band luminosity function of the sources adjusted for the source distance, and over the source distribution along the line of sight. If two or more parameters of the lensing event are known, such as the I magnitude of the source and the impact parameter, the averages over these parameters can be omitted and the probability of detection determined for a particular event. The calculated probabilities behave as expected with variations in the line of sight, the mass function of the lenses, the extinction and distance to and magnitude of the source, and with a more demanding detection criterion. The relatively high values of the probabilities are robust to plausible variations in the assumptions. The high

  6. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  7. Quasar structure from microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher Warren

    2008-02-01

    I analyze microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars to yield measurements of the structure of their continuum emission regions. I first describe our lensed quasar monitoring program and RETROCAM, the auxiliary port camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I describe the application of our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to SDSS 0924+0219, a system with a highly anomalous optical flux ratio. For an inclination angle i, I find an optical scale radius log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] . I extrapolate the best-fitting light curves into the future to find a roughly 45% probability that the anomalous image (D) will brighten by at least an order of magnitude during the next decade. I expand our method to make simultaneous estimates of the time delays and structure of HE1104-1805 and QJ0158-4325, two doubly-imaged quasars with microlensing and intrinsic variability on comparable time scales. For HE1104- 1805 I find a time delay of D t AB = t A - t B = [Special characters omitted.] days and estimate a scale radius of log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] at 0.2mm in the rest frame. I am unable to measure a time delay for QJ0158-4325, but the scale radius is log[( r s /cm) [Special characters omitted.] ] = 14.9 ±1 0.3 at 0.3mm in the rest frame. I then apply our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to the optical light curves of 11 lensed quasar systems to show that quasar accretion disk sizes at 2500Å are related to black hole mass ( M BH ) by log( R 2500 /cm) = (15.7 ± 0.16) + (0.64± 0.18) log( M BH /10 9 [Special characters omitted.] ). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R 0( [Special characters omitted.] ), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(e) = -1.54 ± 0.36 + log( L/L E ) where e=3D L / ( M c 2 ). These sizes are also larger, by a factor of ~ 3, than

  8. A PUZZLE INVOLVING GALACTIC BULGE MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Feltzing, Sofia; Bensby, Thomas; Huang Wenjin; Melendez, Jorge; Lucatello, Sara; Asplund, Martin E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: tbensby@eso.org E-mail: jorge@astro.up.pt E-mail: asplund@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE

    2010-03-01

    We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff region stars for which high-dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all, and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars, it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.

  9. Ground-based Parallax Confirmed by Spitzer: Binary Microlensing Event MOA-2015-BLG-020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianshu; Zhu, Wei; Mao, Shude; Bond, I. A.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bozza, V.; Ranc, C.; Cassan, A.; Yee, J. C.; Han, C.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Evans, P.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Kawasaki, K.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyazaki, S.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Shibai, H.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yamada, T.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; KozŁowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Collaboration; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Calchi Novati, S.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Spitzer Team; Albrow, M. D.; Chung, S.-J.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Shin, I.-G.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Kim, H.-W.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; KMTNet Collaboration; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Hundertmark, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Wambsganss, J.; Bramich, D. M.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Menzies, J.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    We present the analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event MOA-2015-BLG-020. The event has a fairly long timescale (˜63 days) and thus the light curve deviates significantly from the lensing model that is based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion. This enables us to measure the microlensing parallax through the annual parallax effect. The microlensing parallax parameters constrained by the ground-based data are confirmed by the Spitzer observations through the satellite parallax method. By additionally measuring the angular Einstein radius from the analysis of the resolved caustic crossing, the physical parameters of the lens are determined. It is found that the binary lens is composed of two dwarf stars with masses {M}1=0.606+/- 0.028 {M}⊙ and {M}2=0.125 +/- 0.006 {M}⊙ in the Galactic disk. Assuming that the source star is at the same distance as the bulge red clump stars, we find the lens is at a distance {D}L=2.44+/- 0.10 {kpc}. We also provide a summary and short discussion of all of the published microlensing events in which the annual parallax effect is confirmed by other independent observations.

  10. Exotic gravitational microlensing effects as a probe of stellar and galactic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Andrew Cameron

    The nature of the "dark matter" which comprises the majority of the mass of our Universe is one of the most elusive, yet fundamental, cosmological properties. Its presence has been inferred on a variety of scales by indirect observational measurements. It remains to be seen whether or not this dark matter is composed of discrete units (Machos---Massive Compact Halo Objects) or is a sea of fundamental particles (WIMPS---Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). The MACHO project was founded to test for Machos orbiting in the halo of our Milky Way Galaxy. The experiment makes use of the one property we know about dark matter---it exerts a gravitational force on its surroundings. Einstein's theory of general relativity implies the region of influence sensitive to dark matter includes the fundamental fabric of space-time itself. A bizarre consequence of this is that matter may warp space, splitting the light from a background source into multiple images on the sky, hence acting as a gravitational lens. Millions of source stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been observed for signatures of intervening, lensing dark matter. Approximately 20 events have been discovered. Several hundred additional events have been seen towards our Galactic bulge. Given the dearth of lensing events, the focus of the gravitational microlensing field has evolved from passive surveys to an aggressive pursuit of lightcurve fine structure. Embedded in each microlensing lightcurve are clues to the nature of the lensing system. Recognizing these features in real-time requires frequent sampling and high precision measurements. This dissertation includes the development and maintenance of the MACHO Alert System, which recognized these rare events in real-time. This Alert System required daily vigilance between its inception in 1995 and the completion of the MACHO Survey in 1999. However, the focus of this dissertation was the Global Microlensing Alert Network (GMAN). This system

  11. ASAS-SN Discovery of a Candidate High-Magnification Microlensing Event Located Close to the Galactic Anticenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, T.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Dong, Subo; Shields, J. V.; Thompson, T. A.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.

    2017-08-01

    As part of an ongoing effort by ASAS-SN project (Shappee et al. 2014; Kochanek et al. 2017) to characterize and catalog all bright variable stars (e.g., Jayasinghe et al. 2017, ATel #10634), we report the discovery of an apparent high-magnification gravitational microlensing event, located close to the Galactic anticenter.

  12. ASAS-SN Archival Discoveries of a 2016 Galactic Nova and a Bright Microlensing Event Toward the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, T.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Dong, Subo; Prieto, J. L.; Shields, J. V.; Thompson, T. A.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shappee, B. J.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.

    2017-09-01

    As part of an ongoing effort by ASAS-SN project (Shappee et al. 2014; Kochanek et al. 2017) to characterize and catalog all bright variable stars (e.g., Jayasinghe et al. 2017, ATel #10677, #10710), we report the discovery of a previously unrecognized Galactic Nova candidate ASASSN-16ra and a very bright gravitational microlensing event toward the Galactic bulge.

  13. Simulations of the Fe Kα Energy Spectra from Gravitationally Microlensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, H.; Chartas, G.

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of the Chandra X-ray observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar RX J1131-1231 revealed the detection of multiple and energy-variable spectral peaks. The spectral variability is thought to result from the microlensing of the Fe Kα emission, selectively amplifying the emission from certain regions of the accretion disk with certain effective frequency shifts of the Fe Kα line emission. In this paper, we combine detailed simulations of the emission of Fe Kα photons from the accretion disk of a Kerr black hole with calculations of the effect of gravitational microlensing on the observed energy spectra. The simulations show that microlensing can indeed produce multiply peaked energy spectra. We explore the dependence of the spectral characteristics on black hole spin, accretion disk inclination, corona height, and microlensing amplification factor and show that the measurements can be used to constrain these parameters. We find that the range of observed spectral peak energies of QSO RX J1131-1231 can only be reproduced for black hole inclinations exceeding 70° and for lamppost corona heights of less than 30 gravitational radii above the black hole. We conclude by emphasizing the scientific potential of studies of the microlensed Fe Kα quasar emission and the need for more detailed modeling that explores how the results change for more realistic accretion disk and corona geometries and microlensing magnification patterns. A full analysis should furthermore model the signal-to-noise ratio of the observations and the resulting detection biases.

  14. OGLE-III MICROLENSING EVENTS AND THE STRUCTURE OF THE GALACTIC BULGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Rynkiewicz, Alicja E.; Skowron, Jan; Kozłowski, Szymon; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymański, Michał K.; Kubiak, Marcin; Soszyński, Igor; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radosław; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Pawlak, Michał

    2015-01-01

    We present and study the largest and most comprehensive catalog of microlensing events ever constructed. The sample of standard microlensing events comprises 3718 unique events from 2001-2009 with 1409 events that had not been detected before in real-time by the Early Warning System of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The search pipeline uses machine learning algorithms to help find rare phenomena among 150 million objects and to derive the detection efficiency. Applications of the catalog can be numerous, from analyzing individual events to large statistical studies of the Galactic mass, kinematics distributions, and planetary abundances. We derive maps of the mean Einstein ring crossing time of events spanning 31 deg{sup 2} toward the Galactic center and compare the observed distributions with the most recent models. We find good agreement within the observed region and we see the signature of the tilt of the bar in the microlensing data. However, the asymmetry of the mean timescales seems to rise more steeply than predicted, indicating either a somewhat different orientation of the bar or a larger bar width. The map of events with sources in the Galactic bulge shows a dependence of the mean timescale on the Galactic latitude, signaling an increasing contribution from disk lenses closer to the plane relative to the height of the disk. Our data present a perfect set for comparing and enhancing new models of the central parts of the Milky Way and creating a three-dimensional picture of the Galaxy.

  15. Gravitational Microlensing in the Milky Way with the Hubble Space Telescope and Ogle-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2007-10-01

    Gravitational lensing is a powerful tool for astronomers to study the Universe. It occurs on both cosmological and local (Galactic) scales. This thesis focuses on observational studies of Galactic microlensing, which, as I will show, have significant impact on studies of the Galactic structure and the mass function of lenses in the MilkyWay. The first chapter provides a basic treatment of gravitational lensing and of the data analysis procedures used throughout this thesis. The next chapter is devoted to the investigation of blending issues. The ground-based microlensed stars (blends) are resolved into separate components using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). With Difference Image Analysis, seven microlensed stars are recognised. Blending fractions are calculated from the HST images and compared with the fractions derived from light curve fitting. Chapters 3 and 4 present my studies of HST two-epoch images of 37 Galactic bulge fields; this work has been published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and the Astrophysical Journal. The superb resolution of the HST allows the measurement of stellar positions with milli-arcsecond accuracy. Using the two-epoch images, I build a catalogue of stellar proper motions for ˜26,000 stars. For each field I calculate dispersions from the relative proper motions. Small gradients in these proper motion dispersions and in the anisotropy are clearly detected. For the first time, a covariance in the longitudinal and latitudinal motions is discovered. These results will provide strong constraints on theoretical Galactic models. In the fourth chapter I present the first ever direct detection of a lens toward the Galactic bulge. Using the HST, the luminous lens and source responsible for the microlensing event MACHO-95-BLG-37 were resolved. Having the colours of the stars, relative proper motion and parameters from the light curve fitting, I derive the distances to both the source and lens, as well as the lens mass

  16. Search for low-mass exoplanets by gravitational microlensing at high magnification.

    PubMed

    Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Eguchi, S; Furuta, Y; Hearnshaw, J B; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Kurata, Y; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Noda, S; Okajima, K; Rakich, A; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Sekiguchi, T; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Tristram, P J; Yanagisawa, T; Yock, P C M; Gal-Yam, A; Lipkin, Y; Maoz, D; Ofek, E O; Udalski, A; Szewczyk, O; Zebrun, K; Soszynski, I; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L

    2004-08-27

    Observations of the gravitational microlensing event MOA 2003-BLG-32/OGLE 2003-BLG-219 are presented, for which the peak magnification was over 500, the highest yet reported. Continuous observations around the peak enabled a sensitive search for planets orbiting the lens star. No planets were detected. Planets 1.3 times heavier than Earth were excluded from more than 50% of the projected annular region from approximately 2.3 to 3.6 astronomical units surrounding the lens star, Uranus-mass planets were excluded from 0.9 to 8.7 astronomical units, and planets 1.3 times heavier than Saturn were excluded from 0.2 to 60 astronomical units. These are the largest regions of sensitivity yet achieved in searches for extrasolar planets orbiting any star.

  17. Limits on Planetary Companions in Microlensing Event OGLE-BUL-98-14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. S.; Albrow, M. D.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Depoy, D. L.; Dominik, M.; Gould, A.; Greenhill, J.; Hill, K.; Kane, S.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Naber, R. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Pollard, K.; Sackett, P. D.; Sahu, K. C.; Vermaak, P.; Watson, R.; Williams, A.

    1998-12-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to detect second order effects in gravitational microlensing events, the Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork (PLANET) collaboration has obtained nearly continuous photometry of the microlensing event OGLE-BUL-98-14 with four telescopes located in Tasmania, Perth, South Africa and Chile. The complete data set consists of over 500 points in I and 200 in V taken over a period of ~ 120 days, making this one of the most well sampled microlensing events to date. The scatter in I is ~ 2% (1 sigma). OGLE-BUL-98-14 was a high magnification event (maximum magnification > 10) with a timescale of ~ 40 days. These facts, combined with the high sampling rate and good photometry, make this an extremely promising event for detection of second order effects. We find that the observed lightcurve is completely consistent with a point-source point-lens model. We can rule out the presence of a companion with mass ratio >10(-3) over a substantial range of projected separations. Furthermore, the lack of detected finite-source or parallax effects allows us to put a lower limit on the mass of the lens, Mlens > 0.1 Msun.

  18. The first radial velocity measurements of a microlensing event: no evidence for the predicted binary⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Fakhardji, W.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Ranc, C.

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational microlensing technique allows the discovery of exoplanets around stars distributed in the disk of the galaxy towards the bulge. The alignment of two stars that led to the discovery is unique over the timescale of a human life, however, and cannot be re-observed. Moreover, the target host is often very faint and located in a crowded region. These difficulties hamper and often make impossible the follow up of the target and study of its possible companions. A radial-velocity curve was predicted for the binary system, OGLE-2011-BLG-0417, discovered and characterised from a microlensing event. We used the UVES spectrograph mounted at the VLT, ESO to derive precise radial-velocity measurements of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. To gather high-precision radial velocities on faint targets of microlensing events, we proposed to use the source star as a reference to measure the lens radial velocities. We obtained ten radial velocities on the putative V = 18 lens with a dispersion of ~100 m s-1, spread over one year. Our measurements do not confirm the microlensing prediction for this binary system. The most likely scenario is that the putative V = 18 mag lens is actually a blend and not the primary lens which is 2 mag fainter. Further observations and analyses are needed to understand the microlensing observation and infer on the nature and characteristics of the lens itself. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 092.C-0763(A) and 093.C-0532(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Predictions for microlensing planetary events from core accretion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Mao, Shude; Penny, Matthew; Gould, Andrew; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-06-10

    We conduct the first microlensing simulation in the context of a planet formation model. The planet population is taken from the Ida and Lin core accretion model for 0.3 M {sub ☉} stars. With 6690 microlensing events, we find that for a simplified Korea Microlensing Telescopes Network (KMTNet), the fraction of planetary events is 2.9%, out of which 5.5% show multiple-planet signatures. The numbers of super-Earths, super-Neptunes, and super-Jupiters detected are expected to be almost equal. Our simulation shows that high-magnification events and massive planets are favored by planet detections, which is consistent with previous expectation. However, we notice that extremely high-magnification events are less sensitive to planets, which is possibly because the 10 minute sampling of KMTNet is not intensive enough to capture the subtle anomalies that occur near the peak. This suggests that while KMTNet observations can be systematically analyzed without reference to any follow-up data, follow-up observations will be essential in extracting the full science potential of very high magnification events. The uniformly high-cadence observations expected for KMTNet also result in ∼55% of all detected planets not being caustic crossing, and more low-mass planets even down to Mars mass being detected via planetary caustics. We also find that the distributions of orbital inclinations and planet mass ratios in multiple-planet events agree with the intrinsic distributions.

  20. Predictions for Microlensing Planetary Events from Core Accretion Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Penny, Matthew; Mao, Shude; Gould, Andrew; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-06-01

    We conduct the first microlensing simulation in the context of a planet formation model. The planet population is taken from the Ida & Lin core accretion model for 0.3 M ⊙ stars. With 6690 microlensing events, we find that for a simplified Korea Microlensing Telescopes Network (KMTNet), the fraction of planetary events is 2.9%, out of which 5.5% show multiple-planet signatures. The numbers of super-Earths, super-Neptunes, and super-Jupiters detected are expected to be almost equal. Our simulation shows that high-magnification events and massive planets are favored by planet detections, which is consistent with previous expectation. However, we notice that extremely high-magnification events are less sensitive to planets, which is possibly because the 10 minute sampling of KMTNet is not intensive enough to capture the subtle anomalies that occur near the peak. This suggests that while KMTNet observations can be systematically analyzed without reference to any follow-up data, follow-up observations will be essential in extracting the full science potential of very high magnification events. The uniformly high-cadence observations expected for KMTNet also result in ~55% of all detected planets not being caustic crossing, and more low-mass planets even down to Mars mass being detected via planetary caustics. We also find that the distributions of orbital inclinations and planet mass ratios in multiple-planet events agree with the intrinsic distributions.

  1. Limits on the Mass and Abundance of Primordial Black Holes from Quasar Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, E.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.; Vives-Arias, H.; Calderón-Infante, J.

    2017-02-01

    The idea that dark matter can be made of intermediate-mass primordial black holes (PBHs) in the 10 M ⊙ ≲ M ≲ 200 M ⊙ range has recently been reconsidered, particularly in the light of the detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO experiment. The existence of even a small fraction of dark matter in black holes should nevertheless result in noticeable quasar gravitational microlensing. Quasar microlensing is sensitive to any type of compact objects in the lens galaxy, to their abundance, and to their mass. We have analyzed optical and X-ray microlensing data from 24 gravitationally lensed quasars to estimate the abundance of compact objects in a very wide range of masses. We conclude that the fraction of mass in black holes or any type of compact objects is negligible outside of the 0.05 M ⊙ ≲ M ≲ 0.45 M ⊙ mass range and that it amounts to 20% ± 5% of the total matter, in agreement with the expected masses and abundances of the stellar component. Consequently, the existence of a significant population of intermediate-mass PBHs appears to be inconsistent with current microlensing observations. Therefore, primordial massive black holes are a very unlikely source of the gravitational radiation detected by LIGO.

  2. Can gravitational microlensing be used to probe geometry of a massive black-hole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Luka Č.; Jovanović, Predrag

    2007-04-01

    Astronomical Observatory, Belgrade, Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) Here we discuss the possibility to use gravitational microlensing in order to probe the geometry around a massive black hole. Taking into account that lensed quasars are emitting X-rays which come from the heart of these objects (around a massive black hole), we investigated the influence of microlensing on the shape of the X-ray continuum/Fe K-alpha line variability due to microlensing by stars from a foreground galaxy [1,2]. We considered an X-ray accretion disk in Schwarzschild and Kerr metrics that is microlensed by a straight-fold caustic and a magnification pattern [2]. We found that the changes in the shape of the X-ray continuum as well as Fe K-alpha line due to microlensing depend on assumed metrics. This shows that microlensing can be used to investigate an unresolved X-ray emitting region geometry around massive black holes. [1] Popović, L.Č., Mediavilla, E.G.; Jovanović, P., Muñoz, J.A. 2003 A& A...398..975P [2] Popović, L. Č., Jovanović, P., Mediavilla, E.; Zakharov, A. F.; Abajas, C.; Muñoz, J. A.; Chartas, G. 2005, ApJ (to be published in February 2006; astro-ph /0510271).

  3. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events from the MACHO Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. L.; Griest, K.; Popowski, P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Minniti, D.; Myer, D. G.; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Freeman, K. C.; Geha, M.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Nelson, C. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Quinn, P. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D. L.; MACHO Collaboration

    2005-10-01

    We present a catalog of 450 relatively high signal-to-noise ratio microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout our fields, and as expected, they show a clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample, since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed and we find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper we give optical depths for the subsample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is a less significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects, are identified. We also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars. Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093; clt@ucsd.edu, kgriest@ucsd.edu, dmyer@ucsd.edu, vandehei@astrophys.ucsd.edu.

  4. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events from the MACHO Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C L; Griest, K; Popowski, P; Cook, K H; Drake, A J; Minniti, D; Myer, D G; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Alves, D R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A C; Bennett, D P; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L

    2005-06-16

    The authors present a catalog of 450 relatively high signal-to-noise microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout the fields and, as expected, they show clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed, and they find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper they give optical depths for the sub-sample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is a less significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects are identified. They also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars.

  5. Long-term monitoring, time delay, and microlensing in the gravitational lens system Q0142-100

    SciTech Connect

    Oscoz, A.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Mediavilla, E.

    2013-12-20

    We present 12 yr of monitoring of the gravitational lens Q0142-100 from the Teide Observatory. The data, taken from 1999 to 2010, comprise 105 observing nights with the IAC80 Telescope. The application of the δ{sup 2} method to the dataset leads to a value for the time delay between both components of the system of 72 ± 22 days (68% confidence level), consistent within uncertainties with the most recent results. With this value in mind a possible microlensing event is detected in Q0142-100.

  6. Microlensing in the Q0957 + 561 gravitational mirage

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, R.E.; Smith, R.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Analysis of the 10 yr record from monitoring the continuum brightness of Q0957 + 561 A, B shows a systematic increase of the B relative to the A component. The B brightness has leveled off in the last 2 yr at a value 32 percent higher than would be predicted from the ratio of Mg II 2798 A emission line strengths. This is taken to be the signature of microlensing by a star or stars in the lens galaxy. 11 refs.

  7. Detecting Earth-Mass Planets with Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.; Rhie, Sun Hong

    1996-11-01

    We show that Earth-mass planets orbiting stars in the Galactic disk and bulge can be detected by monitoring microlensed stars in the Galactic bulge. The star and its planet act as a binary lens which generates a light curve that can differ substantially from the light curve due only to the star itself. We show that the planetary signal remains detectable for planetary masses as small as an Earth mass when realistic source star sizes are included in the light curve calculation. These planets are detectable if they reside in the "lensing zone," which is centered between 1 and 4 AU from the lensing star and spans about a factor of 2 in distance. If we require a minimum deviation of 4% from the standard point-lens microlensing light curve, then we find that more than 2% of all M⊕ planets and 10% of all 10 M⊕ in the lensing zone can be detected. If a third of all lenses have no planets, a third have 1 M⊕ planets, and the remaining third have 10 M⊕ planets then we estimate that an aggressive ground-based microlensing planet search program could find one Earth-mass planet and half a dozen 10 M⊕ planets per year.

  8. "Rare" Microlensing Events: how frequent are they? what can they teach us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Bryk, William; Ginsburg, Idan; Greiner, Jochen; Lepine, Sebastien; Oprescu, Antonia; Primini, Francis A.; Tunbridge, Ben

    2014-06-01

    Today's microlensing teams discover roughly 2000 candidate microlensing events per year. Many of these exhibit the standard point-source/point-lens form, and are caused by distant lenses we cannot detect. In our poster we report on the preliminary results of a long term program of analysis designed to identify and study "rare" gravitational lensing events. We have focused on those rare events with light curve profiles that differ from the point-source/point-lens form. These unusual light curves provide additional information about the lens or source. We devote special effort to the study of a small set of events that appear to have been caused by nearby lenses. Nearby lenses are interesting, whatever the form of the light curve they generate. We show that some unusual events are common enough that their systematic study can be scientifically fruitful, allowing lensing programs to identify nearby (closer than a kiloparsec) compact objects and measure their masses, and to also identify and measure masses in nearby planetary systems. We have developed methods that should prove useful in a wide range of ground-based and space-based lensing studies.

  9. Empirical study of simulated two-planet microlensing events

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Penny, Matthew; Mao, Shude; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-10-10

    We undertake the first study of two-planet microlensing models recovered from simulations of microlensing events generated by realistic multiplanet systems in which 292 planetary events, including 16 two-planet events, were detected from 6690 simulated light curves. We find that when two planets are recovered, their parameters are usually close to those of the two planets in the system most responsible for the perturbations. However, in 1 of the 16 examples, the apparent mass of both detected planets was more than doubled by the unmodeled influence of a third, massive planet. This fraction is larger than but statistically consistent with the roughly 1.5% rate of serious mass errors due to unmodeled planetary companions for the 274 cases from the same simulation in which a single planet is recovered. We conjecture that an analogous effect due to unmodeled stellar companions may occur more frequently. For 7 out of 23 cases in which two planets in the system would have been detected separately, only one planet was recovered because the perturbations due to the two planets had similar forms. This is a small fraction (7/274) of all recovered single-planet models, but almost a third of all events that might plausibly have led to two-planet models. Still, in these cases, the recovered planet tends to have parameters similar to one of the two real planets most responsible for the anomaly.

  10. Gravitational microlensing - Powerful combination of ray-shooting and parametric representation of caustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambsganss, J.; Witt, H. J.; Schneider, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present a combination of two very different methods for numerically calculating the effects of gravitational microlensing: the backward-ray-tracing that results in two-dimensional magnification patterns, and the parametric representation of caustic lines; they are in a way complementary to each other. The combination of these methods is much more powerful than the sum of its parts. It allows to determine the total magnification and the number of microimages as a function of source position. The mean number of microimages is calculated analytically and compared to the numerical results. The peaks in the lightcurves, as obtained from one-dimensional tracks through the magnification pattern, can now be divided into two groups: those which correspond to a source crossing a caustic, and those which are due to sources passing outside cusps. We determine the frequencies of those two types of events as a function of the surface mass density, and the probability distributions of their magnitudes. We find that for low surface mass density as many as 40 percent of all events in a lightcurve are not due to caustic crossings, but rather due to passings outside cusps.

  11. The impact of gravitational microlensing on searches for extraterrestrial intelligence at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    2004-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) at optical wavelengths counts photons from target stars. The rationale is that the number of photons received from a solar-type star in a nanosecond is typically much less than unity and that an excess number of photons may be indicative of a laser pulse from a technological civilization. Extreme magnification gravitational microlensing is a possible contaminant to optical SETI programs as it would increase the photon rate and could masquerade as an optical pulse. We show that extreme magnification gravitational microlensing is unimportant, both because the required amplifications are difficult to obtain and because the time scales are too large. This conclusion holds both for the case of background stars in the field of view of the target star and from objects (such as planets) orbiting the target star.

  12. Gaia16aye microlensing event monitoring urgently requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2016-09-01

    Dr. Kirill Sokolovsky (National Observatory of Athens and Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University), has requested AAVSO assistance in monitoring the ongoing microlensing event Gaia16aye beginning immediately to catch transient behavior occurring now and continuing through the end of October (or until further notice). Sokolovsky writes: "Gaia16aye was first identified as an unusual variable object by Gaia on 2016 August 5 (V. Bakis et al., ATel #9376) and it was later realized that its achromatic light variations are consistent with being caused by microlensing of a distant M-type giant star by a binary star system (possibly consisting of main sequence dwarfs) crossing the line of sight. The complex geometry of the lens causes multiple brightness peaks corresponding to caustic crossings. According to preliminary modeling, the object's variability was noticed during decline after the first caustic crossing. The second brightness peak was observed on August 13 and the third peak on September 19. The source is expected to decline quickly in next days from its current magnitude V 14 to reach the plateau around V 16 between the caustics, in order to start rising again to cross the caustic in one or couple of weeks (L. Wyrzykowski et al., ATel #9507). A well-sampled lightcurve of the microlensing event, especially during the caustic crossing, is needed to constrain geometry and some physical parameters of the lens and the lensed star. CCD observations of Gaia16aye using any subset of B, V, Rc, Ic, g, r, i filters are requested starting immediately and continuing for about four weeks (until the decline from the expected next caustic crossing). If the object is at its bright state around V 14, time series observations are needed." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OGLE microlensing events in Galactic Bulge (Udalski+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Zebrun, K.; Szymanski, M.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Wozniak, P.

    2006-09-01

    We present the Catalog of microlensing events detected toward the Galactic bulge in three observing seasons, 1997-1999, during the OGLE-II microlensing survey. The search for microlensing events was performed using a database of about 4x109 photometric measurements of about 20.5 million stars from the Galactic bulge. The Catalog comprises 214 microlensing events found in the fields covering about 11 square degrees on the sky and distributed in different parts of the Galactic bulge. The sample includes 20 binary microlensing events, 14 of them are caustic crossing. In one case a double star is likely lensed. We present distribution of the basic parameters of microlensing events and show preliminary rate of microlensing in different regions of the Galactic bulge. The latter reveals clear dependence on the Galactic coordinates. The dependence on l indicates that the majority of lenses toward the Galactic bulge are located in the Galactic bar. Models of the Galactic bar seem to reasonably predict the observed spatial distribution of microlensing events in the Galactic bulge. All data presented in the Catalog and photometry of all events are available from the OGLE Internet archive. (3 data files).

  14. Gravitational microlensing of high-redshift supernovae by compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, K.P. )

    1991-06-01

    An analysis of the effect of microlensing by a cosmologically dominant density of compact objects is performed, using high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) as probes. The compact objects are modeled as a three-dimensional distribution of point masses, and Monte Carlo simulations are done to calculate the resulting amplification probability distributions for several column densities and cosmologies. By combining these distributions with the intrinsic SN Ia luminosity function and comparing with the results for a perfectly smooth universe, estimates are made of the number of supernovae that would need to be observed to confirm or rule out this lensing scenario. It is found that about 1000 SN Ia's with redshifts of z = 1 would be needed to perform this test, which is beyond what current searches can hope to accomplish. Observations of many fewer high-redshift supernovae, used merely as standard candles, appears a promising way of distinguishing between different cosmological models. 35 refs.

  15. Gravitational microlensing - The effect of random motion of individual stars in the lensing galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundic, Tomislav; Wambsganss, Joachim

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the influence of random motion of individual stars in the lensing galaxy on the light curve of a gravitationally lensed background quasar. We compare this with the effects of the transverse motion of the galaxy. We find that three-dimensional random motion of stars with a velocity dispersion sigma in each dimension is more effective in producing 'peaks' in a microlensed light curve by a factor a about 1.3 than motion of the galaxy with a transverse velocity v(t) = sigma. This effectiveness parameter a seems to depend only weakly on the surface mass density. With an assumed transverse velocity of v(t) = 600 km/s of the galaxy lensing the QSO 2237+0305 and a measured velocity dispersion of sigma = 215 km/s, the expected rate of maxima in the light curves calculated for bulk motion alone has to be increased by about 10 percent due to the random motion of stars. As a consequence, the average time interval Delta t between two high-magnification events is smaller than the time interval Delta(t) bulk, calculated for bulk motion alone, Delta t about 0.9 Delta(t) bulk.

  16. Planets, Moons, and Multiple Stars - Gravitational Microlensing by Three-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyrovsky, David; Danek, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing has proved to be a useful tool for detecting exoplanets, particularly those separated a few AU from the lens star. Of the 43 microlensing-detected planets published so far, four are members of two-planet systems, and a further three are associated with binary stars (two circumprimary and one circumbinary). While the lensing by a single star with a single planet is well understood, systematic insight into the substantially more diverse lensing by three-body systems is still lacking. We introduce efficient methods for studying and visualizing the different regimes of lensing by a triple lens with a given combination of masses. For illustration, we present here full analyses of critical-curve regimes of the following lenses in arbitrary spatial configuration: an equal-mass triple, an equal-mass binary with a planet, and a hierarchical star-planet-moon system. Such studies can facilitate the interpretation and analysis of observed microlensing light curves due to triple lenses.

  17. Application of Compressive Sensing to Gravitational Microlensing Data and Implications for Miniaturized Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korde-Patel, Asmita (Inventor); Barry, Richard K.; Mohsenin, Tinoosh

    2016-01-01

    Compressive Sensing is a technique for simultaneous acquisition and compression of data that is sparse or can be made sparse in some domain. It is currently under intense development and has been profitably employed for industrial and medical applications. We here describe the use of this technique for the processing of astronomical data. We outline the procedure as applied to exoplanet gravitational microlensing and analyze measurement results and uncertainty values. We describe implications for on-spacecraft data processing for space observatories. Our findings suggest that application of these techniques may yield significant, enabling benefits especially for power and volume-limited space applications such as miniaturized or micro-constellation satellites.

  18. Galactic Distribution of Planets From High-Magnification Microlensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer; Carey, Sean

    2015-10-01

    We will use Spitzer to measure microlens parallaxes for ~14 microlensing events that are high-magnification (as seen from Earth), in order to determine the Galactic distribution of planets. Simultaneous observations from Spitzer and Earth yield parallaxes because they are separated by ~1 AU, which is of order the size of the Einstein radius projected on the observer plane. Hence, Earth and Spitzer see substantially different lightcurves for the same event. These Spitzer parallaxes enable measurements of the distances to the lenses (and their masses), which is a crucial element for measuring the Galactic distribution of planets. High-mag events are exceptionally sensitive to planets: Gould+ (2010) detected 6 planets from 13 high-mag events. However, previously it was believed impossible to measure their parallaxes using Spitzer: scheduling constraints imply a 3-10 day delay from event recognition to first observation, while high-mag events are typically recognized only 1-2 days before peak. By combining aggressive observing protocols, a completely new photometry pipeline, and new mathematical techniques, we successfully measured parallaxes for 7 events with peak magnification A>100 and another ~7 with 50events. From this sample, we expect to detect ~4 planets (the number is smaller than Gould+ 2010 because our Spitzer sample will have lower mean magnification). These ~4 planets represent significant progress toward the ~12 necessary to measure the Galactic distribution. All lightcurves will be reduced using our customized software and then made public (unrestricted use), within 2 months of the completion of observations (as we did for our 2015 observations).

  19. ASTROMETRIC IMAGE CENTROID DISPLACEMENTS DUE TO GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, Yukiharu; Kitamura, Takao; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-10-20

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication, we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole moves slower. Such a difference, although it is very small, will be, in principle, applicable for detecting or constraining the Ellis wormhole by using future high-precision astrometry observations. In particular, the image centroid position gives us additional information, so that the parameter degeneracy existing in photometric microlensing can be partially broken. The anomalous shift reaches the order of a few micro arcseconds, if our galaxy hosts a wormhole with throat radius larger than 10{sup 5} km. When the source moves tangentially to the Einstein ring, for instance, the maximum position shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole is 0.18 normalized by the Einstein ring radius. For the same source trajectory, the maximum difference between the centroid displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens and that by the Schwarzschild one with the same Einstein ring radius is -0.16 in the units of the Einstein radius, where the negative means that the astrometric displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens is

  20. Quasar microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. W.; Wambsganss, J.

    2010-09-01

    Quasar microlensing deals with the effect of compact objects along the line of sight on the apparent brightness of the background quasars. Due to the relative motion between quasar, lenses and observer, the microlensing magnification changes with time which results in uncorrelated brightness variations in the various images of multiple quasar systems. The amplitudes of the signal can be more than a magnitude with time scales of weeks to months to years. The effect is due to the “granular” nature of the gravitational microlenses—stars or other compact objects in the stellar mass range. Quasar microlensing allows to study the quasar accretion disk with a resolution of tens of microarcseconds, hence quasar microlensing can be used to explore an astrophysical field that is hardly accessible by any other means. Quasar microlensing can also be used to study the lensing objects in a statistical sense, their nature (compact or smoothly distributed, normal stars or dark matter) as well as transverse velocities. Quasar microlensing light curves are now being obtained from monitoring programs across the electromagnetic spectrum from the radio through the infrared and optical range to the X-ray regime. Recently, spectroscopic microlensing was successfully applied, it provides quantitative comparisons with quasar/accretion disk models. There are now more than a handful of systems with several-year long light curves and significant microlensing signal, lending to detailed analysis. This review summarizes the current state of the art of quasar microlensing and shows that at this point in time, observational monitoring programs and complementary intense simulations provide a scenario where some of the early promises of quasar microlensing can be quantitatively applied. It has been shown, e.g., that smaller sources display more violent microlensing variability, first quantitative comparison with accretion disk models has been achieved, and quasar microlensing has been used to

  1. PLANETARY AND OTHER SHORT BINARY MICROLENSING EVENTS FROM THE MOA SHORT-EVENT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Kamiya, K.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Botzler, C. S.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Korpela, A. V.; Sullivan, D. J.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; and others

    2012-10-01

    We present the analysis of four candidate short-duration binary microlensing events from the 2006-2007 MOA Project short-event analysis. These events were discovered as a by-product of an analysis designed to find short-timescale single-lens events that may be due to free-floating planets. Three of these events are determined to be microlensing events, while the fourth is most likely caused by stellar variability. For each of the three microlensing events, the signal is almost entirely due to a brief caustic feature with little or no lensing attributable mainly to the lens primary. One of these events, MOA-bin-1, is due to a planet, and it is the first example of a planetary event in which the stellar host is only detected through binary microlensing effects. The mass ratio and separation are q (4.9 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and s = 2.10 {+-} 0.05, respectively. A Bayesian analysis based on a standard Galactic model indicates that the planet, MOA-bin-1Lb, has a mass of m{sub p} = 3.7 {+-} 2.1 M{sub Jup} and orbits a star of M{sub *} = 0.75{sub -0.41}{sup +}0{sup .33} M{sub Sun} at a semimajor axis of a = 8.3{sub -2.7}{sup +4.5} AU. This is one of the most massive and widest separation planets found by microlensing. The scarcity of such wide-separation planets also has implications for interpretation of the isolated planetary mass objects found by this analysis. If we assume that we have been able to detect wide-separation planets with an efficiency at least as high as that for isolated planets, then we can set limits on the distribution of planets in wide orbits. In particular, if the entire isolated planet sample found by Sumi et al. consists of planets bound in wide orbits around stars, we find that it is likely that the median orbital semimajor axis is >30 AU.

  2. Polarimetric microlensing of circumstellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We study the benefits of polarimetry observations of microlensing events to detect and characterize circumstellar discs around the microlensed stars located at the Galactic bulge. These discs which are unresolvable from their host stars make a net polarization effect due to their projected elliptical shapes. Gravitational microlensing can magnify these signals and make them be resolved. The main aim of this work is to determine what extra information about these discs can be extracted from polarimetry observations of microlensing events in addition to those given by photometry ones. Hot discs which are closer to their host stars are more likely to be detected by microlensing, owing to more contributions in the total flux. By considering this kind of discs, we show that although the polarimetric efficiency for detecting discs is similar to the photometric observation, but polarimetry observations can help to constraint the disc geometrical parameters e.g. the disc inner radius and the lens trajectory with respect to the disc semimajor axis. On the other hand, the time-scale of polarimetric curves of these microlensing events generally increases while their photometric time-scale does not change. By performing a Monte Carlo simulation, we show that almost four optically thin discs around the Galactic bulge sources are detected (or even characterized) through photometry (or polarimetry) observations of high-magnification microlensing events during 10-yr monitoring of 150 million objects.

  3. Central engine of a gamma-ray blazar resolved through the magnifying glass of gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neronov, Andrii; Vovk, Ievgen; Malyshev, Denys

    2015-08-01

    Gamma-ray emission from blazars is known to originate from jets emitted by supermassive black holes. However, the exact location and size of the γ-ray emitting part of the jets is uncertain. The main difficulty is the very small angular size of these sources, beyond the angular resolution of γ-ray telescopes. Here, we report a measurement of the projected size of the γ-ray jet, revealed by the detection of microlensing in the gravitationally lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. This measurement is consistent with a constraint from the intrinsic variability timescale of the blazar. Our measurement shows that the γ-ray emission originates from the vicinity of the central supermassive black hole. Combining the X-ray and γ-ray data, we use the microlensing effect to constrain the size of the X-ray source. We show that the effect of pair production of γ-rays on X-ray photons does not make the source opaque, owing to the large size of the X-ray emission region.

  4. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braibant, L.; Hutsemékers, D.; Sluse, D.; Anguita, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization Hα line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of Hα favors a flattened, virialized, low-ionization region whereas the symmetric microlensing effect measured in CIV can be reproduced by an emission line formed in a polar wind, without the need of fine-tuned caustic configurations. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT, Paranal, Chile; Proposals 076.B-0197 and 076.B-0607 (PI: Courbin).

  5. Predicting the 4th caustic crossing in Gaia16aye binary microlensing event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, P.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Rybicki, K.; Altavilla, G.; Bakis, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Birenbaum, G.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Bonanos, A.; Bozza, V.; Britavskiy, N.; Burgaz, U.; Butterley, T.; Capuozzo, P.; Carrasco, J. M.; Chruslinska, M.; Damljanovic, G.; Dennefeld, M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dominik, M.; Esenoglu, H.; Fossey, S.; Gomboc, A.; Hallokoun, N.; Hamanowicz, A.; Hardy, L. K.; Hudec, R.; Khamitov, I.; Klencki, J.; Kolaczkowski, Z.; Kolb, U.; Leonini, S.; Leto, G.; Lewis, F.; Liakos, A.; Littlefair, S. P.; Maoz, D.; Maund, J. R.; Mikolajczyk, P.; Palaversa, L.; Pawlak, M.; Penny, M.; Piascik, A.; Reig, P.; Rhodes, L.; Russell, D.; Sanchez, R. Z.; Shappee, B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Sitek, M.; Sniegowska, M.; Sokolovsky, K.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tomasella, L.; Trascinelli, L.; Wiersema, K.; Wilson, R. W.; Zharkov, I.; Zola, S.; Zubareva, A.

    2016-11-01

    Gaia16aye, nicknamed Ayers Rock (19:40:01.13 +30:07:53.4, J2000) is a spectacular binary microlensing event in the Northern Galactic Plane. The event has been observed by Gaia, ASAS-SN survey and a network of follow-up telescopes, coordinated by the Time Domain WP of the EC's OPTICON grant.

  6. Microlensing Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    The theory and practice of microlensing planet searches is developed in a systematic way, from an elementary treatment of the deflection of light by a massive body to a thorough discussion of the most recent results. The main concepts of planetary microlensing, including microlensing events, finite-source effects, and microlens parallax, are first introduced within the simpler context of point-lens events. These ideas are then applied to binary (and hence planetary) lenses and are integrated with concepts specific to binaries, including caustic topologies, orbital motion, and degeneracies, with an emphasis on analytic understanding. The most important results from microlensing planet searches are then reviewed, with emphasis both on understanding the historical process of discovery and the means by which scientific conclusions were drawn from light-curve analysis. Finally, the future prospects of microlensing planets searches are critically evaluated. Citations to original works provide the reader with multiple entry points into the literature.

  7. Using graphical and pictorial representations to teach introductory astronomy students about the detection of extrasolar planets via gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Chambers, Timothy G.; Prather, Edward E.; Brissenden, Gina

    2016-05-01

    The detection and study of extrasolar planets is an exciting and thriving field in modern astrophysics and an increasingly popular topic in introductory astronomy courses. One detection method relies on searching for stars whose light has been gravitationally microlensed by an extrasolar planet. In order to facilitate instructors' abilities to bring this interesting mix of general relativity and extrasolar planet detection into the introductory astronomy classroom, we have developed a new Lecture-Tutorial called "Detecting Exoplanets with Gravitational Microlensing." In this paper, we describe how this new Lecture-Tutorial's representations of astrophysical phenomena, which we selected and created based on theoretically motivated considerations of their pedagogical affordances, are used to help introductory astronomy students develop more expert-like reasoning abilities.

  8. BINARY ASTROMETRIC MICROLENSING WITH GAIA

    SciTech Connect

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2015-04-15

    We investigate whether or not Gaia can specify the binary fractions of massive stellar populations in the Galactic disk through astrometric microlensing. Furthermore, we study whether or not some information about their mass distributions can be inferred via this method. In this regard, we simulate the binary astrometric microlensing events due to massive stellar populations according to the Gaia observing strategy by considering (i) stellar-mass black holes, (ii) neutron stars, (iii) white dwarfs, and (iv) main-sequence stars as microlenses. The Gaia efficiency for detecting the binary signatures in binary astrometric microlensing events is ∼10%–20%. By calculating the optical depth due to the mentioned stellar populations, the numbers of the binary astrometric microlensing events being observed with Gaia with detectable binary signatures, for the binary fraction of about 0.1, are estimated to be 6, 11, 77, and 1316, respectively. Consequently, Gaia can potentially specify the binary fractions of these massive stellar populations. However, the binary fraction of black holes measured with this method has a large uncertainty owing to a low number of the estimated events. Knowing the binary fractions in massive stellar populations helps with studying the gravitational waves. Moreover, we investigate the number of massive microlenses for which Gaia specifies masses through astrometric microlensing of single lenses toward the Galactic bulge. The resulting efficiencies of measuring the mass of mentioned populations are 9.8%, 2.9%, 1.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. The numbers of their astrometric microlensing events being observed in the Gaia era in which the lens mass can be inferred with the relative error less than 0.5 toward the Galactic bulge are estimated as 45, 34, 76, and 786, respectively. Hence, Gaia potentially gives us some information about the mass distribution of these massive stellar populations.

  9. A NEW MICROLENSING EVENT IN THE DOUBLY IMAGED QUASAR Q 0957+561

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; Beach, Joseph N.; Le, Truong X.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Fadely, Ross; Falco, Emilio E. E-mail: cmorgan@usna.edu E-mail: m113678@usna.edu E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil E-mail: rfadely@haverford.edu

    2012-01-10

    We present evidence for ultraviolet/optical microlensing in the gravitationally lensed quasar Q 0957+561. We combine new measurements from our optical monitoring campaign at the United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff, with measurements from the literature and find that the time-delay-corrected r-band flux ratio m{sub A} - m{sub B} has increased by {approx}0.1 mag over a period of five years beginning in the fall of 2005. We apply our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis procedure to the composite light curves, obtaining a measurement of the optical accretion disk size, log ((r{sub s} /cm)[cos (i)/0.5]{sup 1/2}) = 16.2 {+-} 0.5, that is consistent with the quasar accretion disk size-black hole mass relation.

  10. Beyond the Wobbles: Teaching Students About Detecting Planets with the Transit and Gravitational Microlensing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Edward E.; Wallace, Colin Scott; Chambers, Timothy G.; Brissenden, Gina; Traub, Wesley A.; Greene, W. M.; Biferno, Anya A.; Rodriguez, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory in collaboration with JPL scientists, visualization experts, and education and public outreach professionals with the Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) have recently completed classroom field-testing of a new suite of educational materials to help learners better understand how extrasolar planets are detected using the transit and gravitational microlensing techniques. This collaboration has created a set of evidence-based Think-Pair-Share questions, Lecture-Tutorials, animations, presentation slides, and instrucotrs guide that can be used together or separately to actively engage learners in reasoning about the data and scientific representations associated with these exciting new extrasolar planet detection methods. In this talk we present several of the conceptually challenging collaborative learning tasks that students encounter with this new suite of educational materials and some of the assessment questions we are using to assess the efficacy of their use in general education, college-level astronomy courses.

  11. UKIRT Microlensing Surveys as a Pathfinder for WFIRST: The Detection of Five Highly Extinguished Low-∣b∣ Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Bryden, G.; Gould, A.; Henderson, C. B.; Howell, S. B.; Beichman, C.

    2017-02-01

    Optical microlensing surveys are restricted from detecting events near the Galactic plane and center, where the event rate is thought to be the highest due to the high optical extinction of these fields. In the near-infrared (NIR), however, the lower extinction leads to a corresponding increase in event detections and is a primary driver for the wavelength coverage of the WFIRST microlensing survey. During the 2015 and 2016 bulge observing seasons, we conducted NIR microlensing surveys with UKIRT in conjunction with and in support of the Spitzer and Kepler microlensing campaigns. Here, we report on five highly extinguished ({A}H=0.81{--}1.97), low-Galactic latitude (-0.98≤slant b≤slant -0.36) microlensing events discovered from our 2016 survey. Four of them were monitored with an hourly cadence by optical surveys but were not reported as discoveries, likely due to the high extinction. Our UKIRT surveys and suggested future NIR surveys enable the first measurement of the microlensing event rate in the NIR. This wavelength regime overlaps with the bandpass of the filter in which the WFIRST microlensing survey will conduct its highest-cadence observations, making this event rate derivation critically important for optimizing its yield.

  12. Spectroscopic characterisation of microlensing events. Towards a new interpretation of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Rojas Ayala, B.; Boisse, I.; Schlawin, E.; Almenara, J.-M.; Batista, V.; Bennett, D.; Díaz, R. F.; Figueira, P.; James, D. J.; Herter, T.; Lillo-Box, J.; Marquette, J. B.; Ranc, C.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.

    2016-11-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 is an exceptionally bright lens binary that was predicted to present radial velocity variation at the level of several km s-1. Pioneer radial velocity follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the ESO-VLT of this system clearly ruled out the large radial velocity variation, leaving a discrepancy between the observation and the prediction. In this paper, we further characterise the microlensing system by analysing its spectral energy distribution (SED) derived using the UVES spectrum and new observations with the ARCoIRIS (CTIO) near-infrared spectrograph and the Keck adaptive optics instrument NIRC2 in the J, H, and Ks-bands. We determine the mass and distance of the stars independently from the microlensing modelling. We find that the SED is compatible with a giant star in the Galactic bulge and a foreground star with a mass of 0.94 ± 0.09 M⊙ at a distance of 1.07 ± 0.24 kpc. We find that this foreground star is likely the lens. Its parameters are not compatible with the ones previously reported in the literature (0.52 ± 0.04 M⊙ at 0.95 ± 0.06 kpc), based on the microlensing light curve. A thoughtful re-analysis of the microlensing event is mandatory to fully understand the reason of this new discrepancy. More importantly, this paper demonstrates that spectroscopic follow-up observations of microlensing events are possible and provide independent constraints on the parameters of the lens and source stars, hence breaking some degeneracies in the analysis. UV-to-NIR low-resolution spectrographs like X-shooter (ESO-VLT) could substantially contribute to this follow-up efforts, with magnitude limits above all microlensing events detected so far. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 092.C-0763(A) and 093.C-0532(A).Based on observations at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of

  13. RED NOISE VERSUS PLANETARY INTERPRETATIONS IN THE MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2013-BLG-446

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; AlSubai, K.; Han, C.; Greenhill, J.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Gould, A.; Batista, V.; D’Ago, G.; Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Albrow, M. D.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P. E-mail: p.yock@auckland.ac.nz E-mail: abe@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: itow@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Collaboration: RoboNet collaboration; PLANET collaboration; μFUN collaboration; MOA collaboration; MiNDSTEp collaboration; and others

    2015-10-20

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A{sub max} ∼ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (∼3M{sub ⨁}) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  14. Red Noise Versus Planetary Interpretations in the Microlensing Event Ogle-2013-BLG-446

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Han, C.; Greenhill, J.; Street, R. A.; Gould, A.; D'Ago, G.; AlSubai, K.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; RoboNet Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Hill, K.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Pere, C.; Ranc, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Warren, D.; PLANET Collaboration; de Almeida, L. Andrade; Choi, J.-Y.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Hung, L.-W.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Nataf, D.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shin, I.-G.; Shporer, A.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Melchiorre, C.; Popovas, A.; Postiglione, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Schmidt, R. W.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, John; Stabile, An.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEp Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (Amax ˜ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (˜3M⊕) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  15. A companion on the planet/brown dwarf mass boundary on a wide orbit discovered by gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleski, R.; Udalski, A.; Bond, I. A.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Clanton, C.; Gaudi, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Koshimoto, N.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Evans, P.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Ranc, C.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yamada, T.; Yamada, T.; Yonehara, A.; Batista, V.; Marquette, J. B.

    2017-08-01

    We present the discovery of a substellar companion to the primary host lens in the microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-006. The companion-to-host mass ratio is 0.016, corresponding to a companion mass of ≈8 MJup(M∗/ 0.5 M⊙). Thus, the companion is either a high-mass giant planet or a low-mass brown dwarf, depending on the mass of the primary M∗. The companion signal was separated from the peak of the primary event by a time that was as much as four times longer than the event timescale. We therefore infer a relatively large projected separation of the companion from its host of ≈10 au(M∗/ 0.5 M⊙)1 / 2 for a wide range (3-7 kpc) of host star distances from the Earth. We also challenge a previous claim of a planetary companion to the lens star in microlensing event OGLE-2002-BLG-045.

  16. The OGLE view of microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds - I. A trickle of events in the OGLE-II LMC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Belokurov, V.; Smith, M. C.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Żebruń, K.

    2009-08-01

    We present the results from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment II (OGLE-II) survey (1996-2000) towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which has the aim of detecting the microlensing phenomena caused by dark matter compact objects in the Galactic halo [massive compact halo objects (MACHOs)]. We use high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images of the OGLE fields and derive the correction for the number of monitored stars in each field. This also yields blending distributions which we use in `catalogue-level' Monte Carlo simulations of the microlensing events in order to calculate the detection efficiency of the events. We detect two candidates for microlensing events in the All Stars Sample, which translates into an optical depth of 0.43 +/- 0.33 × 10-7. If both events were due to MACHO, the fraction of mass of compact dark matter objects in the Galactic halo would be 8 +/- 6 per cent. This optical depth, however, along with the characteristics of the events seems to be consistent with the self-lensing scenario, i.e. self-lensing alone is sufficient to explain the observed microlensing signal. Our results indicate the non-detection of MACHOs lensing towards the LMC with an upper limit on their abundance in the Galactic halo of 19 per cent for M = 0.4Msolar and 10 per cent for masses between 0.01 and 0.2Msolar. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3-m Warsaw Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. E-mail: wyrzykow@ast.cam.ac.uk ‡ Name pronunciation: Woocash Vizhikovsky.

  17. Microlensing events from the 11-year Observations of the Wendelstein Calar Alto Pixellensing Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.; Riffeser, A.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Koppenhoefer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of the decade-long M31 observation from the Wendelstein Calar Alto Pixellensing Project (WeCAPP). WeCAPP has monitored M31 from 1997 until 2008 in both R- and I-filters, and thus provides the longest baseline of all M31 microlensing surveys. The data are analyzed with difference imaging analysis, which is most suitable for studying variability in crowded stellar fields. We extracted light curves based on each pixel, and devised selection criteria that are optimized to identify microlensing events. This leads to 10 new events, and adds up to a total of 12 microlensing events from WeCAPP, for which we derive their timescales, flux excesses, and colors from their light curves. The colors of the lensed stars fall in the range (R - I) = 0.56 to 1.36, with a median of 1.0 mag, in agreement with our expectation that the sources are most likely bright, red stars at the post-main-sequence stage. The event FWHM timescales range from 0.5 to 14 days, with a median of 3 days, in good agreement with predictions based on the model of Riffeser et al.

  18. Discovery of a cool planet of 5.5 Earth masses through gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, J-P; Bennett, D P; Fouqué, P; Williams, A; Dominik, M; Jørgensen, U G; Kubas, D; Cassan, A; Coutures, C; Greenhill, J; Hill, K; Menzies, J; Sackett, P D; Albrow, M; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Calitz, J J; Cook, K H; Corrales, E; Desort, M; Dieters, S; Dominis, D; Donatowicz, J; Hoffman, M; Kane, S; Marquette, J-B; Martin, R; Meintjes, P; Pollard, K; Sahu, K; Vinter, C; Wambsganss, J; Woller, K; Horne, K; Steele, I; Bramich, D M; Burgdorf, M; Snodgrass, C; Bode, M; Udalski, A; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Wieckowski, T; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Szewczyk, O; Wyrzykowski, L; Paczyński, B; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Britton, T R; Gilmore, A C; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A V; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okada, C; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Sato, S; Sasaki, M; Sekiguchi, T; Sullivan, D J; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Yoshioka, T

    2006-01-26

    In the favoured core-accretion model of formation of planetary systems, solid planetesimals accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas if they are sufficiently massive. Around M-dwarf stars (the most common stars in our Galaxy), this model favours the formation of Earth-mass (M(o)) to Neptune-mass planets with orbital radii of 1 to 10 astronomical units (au), which is consistent with the small number of gas giant planets known to orbit M-dwarf host stars. More than 170 extrasolar planets have been discovered with a wide range of masses and orbital periods, but planets of Neptune's mass or less have not hitherto been detected at separations of more than 0.15 au from normal stars. Here we report the discovery of a 5.5(+5.5)(-2.7) M(o) planetary companion at a separation of 2.6+1.5-0.6 au from a 0.22+0.21-0.11 M(o) M-dwarf star, where M(o) refers to a solar mass. (We propose to name it OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, indicating a planetary mass companion to the lens star of the microlensing event.) The mass is lower than that of GJ876d (ref. 5), although the error bars overlap. Our detection suggests that such cool, sub-Neptune-mass planets may be more common than gas giant planets, as predicted by the core accretion theory.

  19. The POINT-AGAPE survey: comparing automated searches of microlensing events towards M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapras, Y.; Carr, B. J.; Weston, M. J.; Kerins, E.; Baillon, P.; Gould, A.; Paulin-Henriksson, S.

    2010-05-01

    Searching for microlensing in M31 using automated superpixel surveys raises a number of difficulties which are not present in more conventional techniques. Here we focus on the problem that the list of microlensing candidates is sensitive to the selection criteria or `cuts' imposed, and some subjectivity is involved in this. Weakening the cuts will generate a longer list of microlensing candidates but with a greater fraction of spurious ones; strengthening the cuts will produce a shorter list but may exclude some genuine events. We illustrate this by comparing three analyses of the same data set obtained from a 3 yr observing run on the Isaac Newton Telescope in La Palma. The results of two of these analyses have been already reported: Belokurov et al. obtained between three and 22 candidates, depending on the strength of their cuts, while Calchi Novati et al. obtained six candidates. The third analysis is presented here for the first time and reports 10 microlensing candidates, seven of which are new. Only two of the candidates are common to all three analyses. In order to understand why these analyses produce different candidate lists, a comparison is made of the cuts used by the three groups. Particularly crucial are the method employed to distinguish between a microlensing event and a variable star, and the extent to which one encodes theoretical prejudices into the cuts. Another factor is that the superpixel technique requires the masking of resolved stars and bad pixels. Belokurov et al. and the present analysis use the same input catalogue and the same masks but Calchi Novati et al. use different ones and a somewhat less automated procedure. Because of these considerations, one expects the lists of candidates to vary and it is not possible to pronounce a candidate a definite microlensing event. Indeed we accept that several of our new candidates, especially the long time-scale ones, may not be genuine. This uncertainty also impinges on one of the most

  20. Brown Dwarf Microlensing Diagram

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    For the first time, two space-based telescopes have teamed up with ground-based observatories to observe a microlensing event, a magnification of the light of a distant star due to the gravitational effects of an unseen object in the foreground. In this case, the cause of the microlensing event was a brown dwarf, dubbed OGLE-2015-BLG-1319, orbiting a star. In terms of mass, brown dwarfs fall somewhere between the size of the largest planets and the smallest stars. Curiously, scientists have found that, for stars roughly the mass of our sun, less than 1 percent have a brown dwarf orbiting within 3 AU (1 AU is the distance between Earth and the sun). This newly discovered brown dwarf may fall in that distance range. This microlensing event was observed by ground-based telescopes looking for these uncommon events, and subsequently seen by NASA's Spitzer and Swift space telescopes. As the diagram shows, Spitzer and Swift offer additional vantage points for viewing this chance alignment. While Swift orbits close to Earth, and saw (blue diamonds) essentially the same change in light that the ground-based telescopes measured (grey markers), Spitzer's location much farther away from Earth gave it a very different perspective on the event (red circles). In particular, Spitzer's vantage point resulted in a time lag in the microlensing event it observed, compared to what was seen by Swift and the ground-based telescope. This offset allowed astronomers to determine the distance to OGLE-2015-BLG-1319 as well as its mass: around 30-65 times that of Jupiter. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21077

  1. Resolving the Innermost Region of the Accretion Disk of the Lensed Quasar Q2237+0305 through Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, E.; Jiménez-vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.; Mediavilla, T.

    2015-12-01

    We study three high magnification microlensing events, generally recognized as probable caustic crossings, in the optical light curves of the multiply imaged quasar Q2237+0305. We model the light curve of each event as the convolution of a standard thin disk luminosity profile with a straight fold caustic. We also allow for a linear gradient that can account for an additional varying background effect of microlensing. This model not only matches noticeably well the global shape of each of the three independent microlensing events but also gives remarkably similar estimates for the disk size parameter. The measured average half-light radius, {R}1/2=(3.0+/- 1.5)\\sqrt{M/0.3M⊙ } light-days, agrees with previous estimates. In the three events, the core of the magnification profile exhibits “fine structure” related to the innermost region of the accretion disk (located at a radial distance of 2.7 ± 1.4 Schwarzschild radii according to our measurement). Relativistic beaming at the internal rim of the accretion disk can explain the shape and size of the fine structure, although alternative explanations are also possible. This is the first direct measurement of the size of a structure, likely the innermost stable circular orbit, at ˜3 Schwarzschild radii in a quasar accretion disk. The monitoring of thousands of lensed quasars with future telescopes will allow the study of the event horizon environment of black holes in hundreds of quasars in a wide range of redshifts (0.5 < z < 5).

  2. New method to measure proper motions of microlensed sources: Application to candidate free-floating-planet event MOA-2011-BLG-262

    SciTech Connect

    Skowron, Jan; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymański, Michał K. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl; and others

    2014-04-20

    We develop a new method to measure source proper motions in microlensing events, which can partially overcome problems due to blending. It takes advantage of the fact that the source position is known precisely from the microlensing event itself. We apply this method to the event MOA-2011-BLG-262, which has a short timescale t {sub E} = 3.8 day, a companion mass ratio q = 4.7 × 10{sup –3}, and a very high or high lens-source relative proper motion μ{sub rel} = 20 mas yr{sup –1} or 12 mas yr{sup –1} (for two possible models). These three characteristics imply that the lens could be a brown dwarf or a massive planet with a roughly Earth-mass 'moon'. The probability of such an interpretation would be greatly increased if it could be shown that the high lens-source relative proper motion was primarily due to the lens rather than the source. Based on the long-term monitoring data of the Galactic bulge from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, we measure the source proper motion that is small, μ{sub s}=(−2.3,−0.9)±(2.8,2.6) mas yr{sup −1} in a (north, east) Galactic coordinate frame. These values are then important input into a Bayesian analysis of the event presented in a companion paper by Bennett et al.

  3. AN EFFICIENT METHOD FOR MODELING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION PLANETARY MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, David P.

    2010-06-20

    I present a previously unpublished method for calculating and modeling multiple lens microlensing events that is based on the image centered ray-shooting approach of Bennett and Rhie. It has been used to model a wide variety of binary and triple lens systems, but it is designed to efficiently model high-magnification planetary microlensing events, because these high-magnification events are, by far, the most challenging events to model. It is designed to be efficient enough to handle complicated microlensing events, which include more than two lens masses and lens orbital motion. This method uses a polar coordinate integration grid with a smaller grid spacing in the radial direction than in the angular direction, and it employs an integration scheme specifically designed to handle limb-darkened sources. I present tests that show that these features achieve second-order accuracy for the light curves of a number of high-magnification planetary events. They improve the precision of the calculations by a factor of >100 compared to first-order integration schemes with the same grid spacing in both directions (for a fixed number of grid points). This method also includes a {chi}{sup 2} minimization method, based on the Metropolis algorithm, that allows the jump function to vary in a way that allows quick convergence to {chi}{sup 2} minima. Finally, I introduce a global parameter space search strategy that allows a blind search of parameter space for light curve models without requiring {chi}{sup 2} minimization over a large grid of fixed parameters. Instead, the parameter space is explored on a grid of initial conditions for a set of {chi}{sup 2} minimizations using the full parameter space. While this method may be somewhat faster than methods that find the {chi}{sup 2} minima over a large grid of parameters, I argue that the main strength of this method is for events with the signals of multiple planets, where a much higher dimensional parameter space must be explored

  4. Microlensing variability in the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO 2237+0305 ≡ the Einstein Cross . I. Spectrophotometric monitoring with the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenbrod, A.; Courbin, F.; Sluse, D.; Meylan, G.; Agol, E.

    2008-03-01

    We present the results of the first long-term (2.2 years) spectroscopic monitoring of a gravitationally lensed quasar, namely the Einstein Cross QSO 2237+0305. The goal of this paper is to present the observational facts to be compared in follow-up papers with theoretical models to constrain the inner structure of the source quasar. We spatially deconvolve deep VLT/FORS1 spectra to accurately separate the spectrum of the lensing galaxy from the spectra of the quasar images. Accurate cross-calibration of the 58 observations at 31-epoch from October 2004 to December 2006 is carried out with non-variable foreground stars observed simultaneously with the quasar. The quasar spectra are further decomposed into a continuum component and several broad emission lines to infer the variations of these spectral components. We find prominent microlensing events in the quasar images A and B, while images C and D are almost quiescent on a timescale of a few months. The strongest variations are observed in the continuum of image A. Their amplitude is larger in the blue (0.7 mag) than in the red (0.5 mag), consistent with microlensing of an accretion disk. Variations in the intensity and profile of the broad emission lines are also reported, most prominently in the wings of the C III and center of the C IV emission lines. During a strong microlensing episode observed in June 2006 in quasar image A, the broad component of the C III is more highly magnified than the narrow component. In addition, the emission lines with higher ionization potentials are more magnified than the lines with lower ionization potentials, consistent with the results obtained with reverberation mapping. Finally, we find that the V-band differential extinction by the lens, between the quasar images, is in the range 0.1-0.3 mag. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT Unit Telescope # 2 Kueyen (Cerro Paranal, Chile; Proposals 073.B-0243(A&B), 074.B-0270(A), 075.B-0350(A), 076.B-0197(A), 177.B-0615(A&B), PI

  5. Binary Source Microlensing Event OGLE-2016-BLG-0733: Interpretation of a Long-Term Asymmetric Perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Y. K.; Udalski, A.; Yee, J. C.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Albrow, M. D.; Lee, C.-U.; Bennett, D. P.; Suzuki, D.

    2017-01-01

    In the process of analyzing an observed light curve, one often confronts various scenarios that can mimic the planetary signals causing difficulties in the accurate interpretation of the lens system. In this paper, we present the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-0733. The light curve of the event shows a long-term asymmetric perturbation that would appear to be due to a planet. From the detailed modeling of the lensing light curve, however, we find that the perturbation originates from the binarity of the source rather than the lens. This result demonstrates that binary sources with roughly equal-luminosity components can mimic long-term perturbations induced by planets with projected separations near the Einstein ring. The result also represents the importance of the consideration of various interpretations in planet-like perturbations and of high-cadence observations for ensuring the unambiguous detection of the planet.

  6. Binary Source Microlensing Event OGLE-2016-BLG-0733: Interpretation of a Long-term Asymmetric Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Y. K.; Udalski, A.; Yee, J. C.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Albrow, M. D.; Lee, C.-U.; Kim, S.-L.; Chung, S.-J.; Hwang, K.-H.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Shin, I.-G.; Zhu, W.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; KMTNet Collaboration; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pawlak, M.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Barry, R.; Bond, I. A.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yamada, T.; Yamada, T.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    In the process of analyzing an observed light curve, one often confronts various scenarios that can mimic the planetary signals causing difficulties in the accurate interpretation of the lens system. In this paper, we present the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-0733. The light curve of the event shows a long-term asymmetric perturbation that would appear to be due to a planet. From the detailed modeling of the lensing light curve, however, we find that the perturbation originates from the binarity of the source rather than the lens. This result demonstrates that binary sources with roughly equal-luminosity components can mimic long-term perturbations induced by planets with projected separations near the Einstein ring. The result also represents the importance of the consideration of various interpretations in planet-like perturbations and of high-cadence observations for ensuring the unambiguous detection of the planet.

  7. MiNDSTEp differential photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI 2033-4723 and HE 0047-1756: microlensing and a new time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, E.; Schmidt, R. W.; Wambsganss, J.; Alsubai, K.; Andersen, J. M.; Anguita, T.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Calchi Novati, S.; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Elyiv, A.; Fang, X.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Gu, S.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M. S.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Masi, G.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M.; Proft, S.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Sahu, K.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present V and R photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI 2033-4723 and HE 0047-1756. The data were taken by the MiNDSTEp collaboration with the 1.54 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory from 2008 to 2012. Methods: Differential photometry has been carried out using the image subtraction method as implemented in the HOTPAnTS package, additionally using GALFIT for quasar photometry. Results: The quasar WFI 2033-4723 showed brightness variations of order 0.5 mag in V and R during the campaign. The two lensed components of quasar HE 0047-1756 varied by 0.2-0.3 mag within five years. We provide, for the first time, an estimate of the time delay of component B with respect to A of Δt = (7.6 ± 1.8) days for this object. We also find evidence for a secular evolution of the magnitude difference between components A and B in both filters, which we explain as due to a long-duration microlensing event. Finally we find that both quasars WFI 2033-4723 and HE 0047-1756 become bluer when brighter, which is consistent with previous studies. Based on data collected by MiNDSTEp with the Danish 1.54 m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory.

  8. A New Nonplanetary Interpretation of the Microlensing Event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho; Bennett, David P.; Udalski, Andrzej; Jung, Youn Kil

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the discovery of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown-dwarf host in a binary system was reported from the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723. We reanalyze the event considering the possibility of other interpretations. From this, we find a new solution where the lens is composed of two bodies, in contrast to the three-body solution of the previous analysis. The new solution better explains the observed light curve than the previous solution with Δχ 2 ˜ 202, suggesting that the new solution is a correct model for the event. From the estimation of the physical parameters based on the new interpretation, we find that the lens system is composed of two low-mass stars with ˜0.2 M ⊙ and ˜0.1 M ⊙ and located at a distance of ˜3 kpc. The fact that the physical parameters correspond to those of the most common lens population located at a distance with a large lensing probability further supports the likelihood of the new interpretation. Considering that two dramatically different solutions can approximately explain the observed light curve, the event suggests the need for carefully testing all possible lens-system geometries.

  9. A PLANETARY LENSING FEATURE IN CAUSTIC-CROSSING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Uk E-mail: kyuha@kasi.re.kr E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2012-05-20

    Current microlensing follow-up observations focus on high-magnification events because of the high efficiency of planet detection. However, central perturbations of high-magnification events caused by a planet can also be produced by a very close or a very wide binary companion, and the two kinds of central perturbations are not generally distinguished without time consuming detailed modeling (a planet-binary degeneracy). Hence, it is important to resolve the planet-binary degeneracy that occurs in high-magnification events. In this paper, we investigate caustic-crossing high-magnification events caused by a planet and a wide binary companion. From this investigation, we find that because of the different magnification excess patterns inside the central caustics induced by the planet and the binary companion, the light curves of the caustic-crossing planetary-lensing events exhibit a feature that is discriminated from those of the caustic-crossing binary-lensing events, and the feature can be used to immediately distinguish between the planetary and binary companions. The planetary-lensing feature appears in the interpeak region between the two peaks of the caustic-crossings. The structure of the interpeak region for the planetary-lensing events is smooth and convex or boxy, whereas the structure for the binary-lensing events is smooth and concave. We also investigate the effect of a finite background source star on the planetary-lensing feature in the caustic-crossing high-magnification events. From this, we find that the convex-shaped interpeak structure appears in a certain range that changes with the mass ratio of the planet to the planet-hosting star.

  10. COSMOGRAIL: the COSmological MOnitoring of GRAvItational Lenses. XI. Techniques for time delay measurement in presence of microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.

    2013-05-01

    Measuring time delays between the multiple images of gravitationally lensed quasars is now recognized as a competitive way to constrain the cosmological parameters, and it is complementary with other cosmological probes. This requires long and well sampled optical light curves of numerous lensed quasars, such as those obtained by the COSMOGRAIL collaboration. High-quality data from our monitoring campaign call for novel numerical techniques to robustly measure the delays, as well as the associated random and systematic uncertainties, even in the presence of microlensing variations. We propose three different point estimators to measure time delays, which are explicitly designed to handle light curves with extrinsic variability. These methods share a common formalism, which enables them to process data from n-image lenses. Since the estimators rely on significantly contrasting ideas, we expect them to be sensitive to different bias sources. For each method and data set, we empirically estimate both the precision and accuracy (bias) of the time delay measurement using simulated light curves with known time delays that closely mimic the observations. Finally, we test the self-consistency of our approach, and we demonstrate that our bias estimation is serviceable. These new methods, including the empirical uncertainty estimator, will represent the standard benchmark for analyzing the COSMOGRAIL light curves.

  11. Observational limits on Omega in stars, brown dwarfs, and stellar remnants from gravitational microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Canizares, Claude R.; Granados, Arno; Steidel, Charles C.; Stocke, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Microlensing by compact objects with masses between approximately 0.001 solar masses and approximately 300 solar masses will amplify the continuum emission of a quasar, without significantly changing its line emission. Thus, compact objects with masses associated with stars, subdwarfs, and stellar remnants will reduce the apparent equivalent widths of quasar emission lines. It is possible to detect this population of lenses by searching for an increase in the number of small equivalent width quasars with redshift. This increase was looked for, but not found, in quasar samples taken from the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey and the Steidel & Sargent absorption-line studies. Thus, Omega(sub c), the cosmological density of compact objects relative to the critical density, is less than or approximately equal to 0.1 in the mass range 0.01 solar masses-20 solar masses (for Omega less than 0.6). For any value of Omega, Omega(sub c) less than or approximately equal to 0.2 in the larger mass range 0.001 solar masses-60 solar masses, and Omega(sub c) less than 1 for 0.001 solar masses-300 solar masses. Subdwarfs, stellar objects, or their remnants (e.g., MACHOS) cannot close the universe.

  12. Observational limits on Omega in stars, brown dwarfs, and stellar remnants from gravitational microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Canizares, Claude R.; Granados, Arno; Steidel, Charles C.; Stocke, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Microlensing by compact objects with masses between approximately 0.001 solar masses and approximately 300 solar masses will amplify the continuum emission of a quasar, without significantly changing its line emission. Thus, compact objects with masses associated with stars, subdwarfs, and stellar remnants will reduce the apparent equivalent widths of quasar emission lines. It is possible to detect this population of lenses by searching for an increase in the number of small equivalent width quasars with redshift. This increase was looked for, but not found, in quasar samples taken from the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey and the Steidel & Sargent absorption-line studies. Thus, Omega(sub c), the cosmological density of compact objects relative to the critical density, is less than or approximately equal to 0.1 in the mass range 0.01 solar masses-20 solar masses (for Omega less than 0.6). For any value of Omega, Omega(sub c) less than or approximately equal to 0.2 in the larger mass range 0.001 solar masses-60 solar masses, and Omega(sub c) less than 1 for 0.001 solar masses-300 solar masses. Subdwarfs, stellar objects, or their remnants (e.g., MACHOS) cannot close the universe.

  13. Properties of Microlensing Events by Wide-separation Planets with a Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the properties of microlensing events caused by planetary systems where planets with a moon are widely separated from their host stars. From this investigation, we find that the moon feature generally appears as a very short-duration perturbation on the smooth asymmetric light curve of the lensing event induced by the wide-separation planet; thus it can be easily discriminated from the planet feature responsible for the overall asymmetric light curve. For typical Galactic lensing events with an Einstein radius of ˜2 au, the asymmetry of the light curves due to bound planets can be noticed up to ˜20 au. We also find that the perturbations of wide planetary systems become dominated by the moon as the projected star-planet separation increases, and eventually the light curves of events produced by such systems appear as the single lensing light curve of the planet itself with a very short-duration perturbation induced by the moon, which is a representative light curve of the event induced by a star and a planet, except on the Einstein timescale of the planet. We also study the effect of a finite source star on the moon feature in wide planetary lensing events. From this study, we find that when the lunar caustic is sufficiently separated from the planetary caustic, the lower limit on the ratio of the size of the lunar caustic to the source radius causing a ≥5% lunar deviation depends mostly on the projected planet-moon separation regardless of the moon/star mass ratio, and it decreases as the planet-moon separation becomes smaller or larger than the planetary Einstein radius.

  14. OGLE-2016-BLG-1003: First Resolved Caustic-crossing Binary-source Event Discovered by Second-generation Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Y. K.; Udalski, A.; Bond, I. A.; Yee, J. C.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Albrow, M. D.; Lee, C.-U.; Kim, S.-L.; Hwang, K.-H.; Chung, S.-J.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Shin, I.-G.; Zhu, W.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, H.-W.; Pogge, R. W.; KMTNet Collaboration; Skowron, J.; Szymański, M. K.; Poleski, R.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Barry, R.; Sumi, T.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Evans, P.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yamada, T.; Yamada, T.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We report the analysis of the first resolved caustic-crossing binary-source microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-1003. The event is densely covered by round-the-clock observations of three surveys. The light curve is characterized by two nested caustic-crossing features, which is unusual for typical caustic-crossing perturbations. From the modeling of the light curve, we find that the anomaly is produced by a binary source passing over a caustic formed by a binary lens. The result proves the importance of high-cadence and continuous observations, and the capability of second-generation microlensing experiments to identify such complex perturbations that are previously unknown. However, the result also raises the issues of the limitations of current analysis techniques for understanding lens systems beyond two masses and of determining the appropriate multiband observing strategy of survey experiments.

  15. Statistical searches for microlensing events in large, non-uniformly sampled time-domain surveys: A test using palomar transient factory data

    SciTech Connect

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Fournier, Amanda P.; Street, Rachel; Ofek, Eran O.; Covey, Kevin R.; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason

    2014-01-20

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ∼20,000 deg{sup 2} footprint. While the median 7.26 deg{sup 2} PTF field has been imaged ∼40 times in the R band, ∼2300 deg{sup 2} have been observed >100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from fields with >10 R-band observations, 1.1 × 10{sup 9} light curves, uncovering three candidate microlensing events. We lack simultaneous, multi-color photometry to confirm these as microlensing events. However, their number is consistent with predictions for the event rate in the PTF footprint over the survey's three years of operations, as estimated from near-field microlensing models. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large data sets, which will be useful to future time-domain surveys, such as that planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  16. Confirmation of the Planetary Microlensing Signal and Star and Planet Mass Determinations for Event OGLE-2005-BLG-169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Anderson, J.; Bond, I. A.; Anderson, N.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Gilbert, E.; Gould, A.; Pfeifle, R.; Pogge, R. W.; Suzuki, D.; Terry, S.; Udalski, A.

    2015-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the source and lens stars for planetary microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169, which confirm the relative proper motion prediction due to the planetary light curve signal observed for this event. This (and the companion Keck result) provide the first confirmation of a planetary microlensing signal, for which the deviation was only 2%. The follow-up observations determine the flux of the planetary host star in multiple passbands and remove light curve model ambiguity caused by sparse sampling of part of the light curve. This leads to a precise determination of the properties of the OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb planetary system. Combining the constraints from the microlensing light curve with the photometry and astrometry of the HST/WFC3 data, we find star and planet masses of {M}*=0.69+/- 0.02{M}⊙ and {m}{{p}}=14.1+/- 0.9{M}\\oplus . The planetary microlens system is located toward the Galactic bulge at a distance of {D}L=4.1+/- 0.4 kpc and the projected star-planet separation is {a}\\perp =3.5+/- 0.3 AU, corresponding to a semimajor axis of a={4.0}-0.6+2.2 AU.

  17. Free-floating planets from core accretion theory: microlensing predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sizheng; Mao, Shude; Ida, Shigeru; Zhu, Wei; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the microlensing event rate and typical time-scales for the free-floating planet (FFP) population that is predicted by the core accretion theory of planet formation. The event rate is found to be ˜1.8 × 10-3 of that for the stellar population. While the stellar microlensing event time-scale peaks at around 20 d, the median time-scale for FFP events (˜0.1 d) is much shorter. Our values for the event rate and the median time-scale are significantly smaller than those required to explain the Sumi et al. result, by factors of ˜13 and ˜16, respectively. The inclusion of planets at wide separations does not change the results significantly. This discrepancy may be too significant for standard versions of both the core accretion theory and the gravitational instability model to explain satisfactorily. Therefore, either a modification to the planet formation theory is required or other explanations to the excess of short-time-scale microlensing events are needed. Our predictions can be tested by ongoing microlensing experiment such as Korean Microlensing Telescope Network, and by future satellite missions such as WFIRST and Euclid.

  18. Discovery of a Gas Giant Planet in Microlensing Event Ogle-2014-BLG-1760

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the planetary microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760, which shows a strong light-curve signal due to the presence of a Jupiter mass ratio planet. One unusual feature of this event is that the source star is quite blue, with V-I = 1.48 +/- 0.08. This is marginally consistent with a source star in the Galactic bulge, but it could possibly indicate a young source star on the far side of the disk. Assuming a bulge source, we perform a Bayesian analysis assuming a standard Galactic model, and this indicates that the planetary system resides in or near the Galactic bulge at D(sub L) = 6.9 +/- 1.1 kpc. It also indicates a host-star mass of M(sub *) = 0.51(sup + 0.44/sub -0.28) M(sub theta), a planet mass of m(sub p ) = 0.56(sup +0.34/sub -0.26) M(sub J), and a projected star-planet separation of a(perpendicular) = 1.75(sup +0.33/sub -0.34) au. The lens-source relative proper motion is micro(sub rel) = 6.5 +/- 1.1mas per yr. The lens (and stellar host star) is estimated to be very faint compared to the source star, so it is most likely that it can be detected only when the lens and source stars start to separate. Due to the relatively high relative proper motion, the lens and source will be resolved to about approximately 46 mas in 6-8 yr after the peak magnification. So, by 2020-2022, we can hope to detect the lens star with deep, high-resolution images.

  19. Discovery of a Gas Giant Planet in Microlensing Event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; MOA Collaboration; Skowron, J.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Mróz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; OGLE Collaboration; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; D'Ago, G.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; ROBONET Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present the analysis of the planetary microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760, which shows a strong light-curve signal due to the presence of a Jupiter mass ratio planet. One unusual feature of this event is that the source star is quite blue, with V-I=1.48+/- 0.08. This is marginally consistent with a source star in the Galactic bulge, but it could possibly indicate a young source star on the far side of the disk. Assuming a bulge source, we perform a Bayesian analysis assuming a standard Galactic model, and this indicates that the planetary system resides in or near the Galactic bulge at {D}L=6.9+/- 1.1 {kpc}. It also indicates a host-star mass of {M}* ={0.51}-0.28+0.44{M}⊙ , a planet mass of {m}{{p}}={0.56}-0.26+0.34{M}J, and a projected star-planet separation of {a}\\perp ={1.75}-0.33+0.34 au. The lens-source relative proper motion is {μ }{rel}=6.5+/- 1.1 mas yr-1. The lens (and stellar host star) is estimated to be very faint compared to the source star, so it is most likely that it can be detected only when the lens and source stars start to separate. Due to the relatively high relative proper motion, the lens and source will be resolved to about ˜46 mas in 6-8 yr after the peak magnification. So, by 2020-2022, we can hope to detect the lens star with deep, high-resolution images.

  20. Discovery of a Gas Giant Planet in Microlensing Event Ogle-2014-BLG-1760

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the planetary microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760, which shows a strong light-curve signal due to the presence of a Jupiter mass ratio planet. One unusual feature of this event is that the source star is quite blue, with V-I = 1.48 +/- 0.08. This is marginally consistent with a source star in the Galactic bulge, but it could possibly indicate a young source star on the far side of the disk. Assuming a bulge source, we perform a Bayesian analysis assuming a standard Galactic model, and this indicates that the planetary system resides in or near the Galactic bulge at D(sub L) = 6.9 +/- 1.1 kpc. It also indicates a host-star mass of M(sub *) = 0.51(sup + 0.44/sub -0.28) M(sub theta), a planet mass of m(sub p ) = 0.56(sup +0.34/sub -0.26) M(sub J), and a projected star-planet separation of a(perpendicular) = 1.75(sup +0.33/sub -0.34) au. The lens-source relative proper motion is micro(sub rel) = 6.5 +/- 1.1mas per yr. The lens (and stellar host star) is estimated to be very faint compared to the source star, so it is most likely that it can be detected only when the lens and source stars start to separate. Due to the relatively high relative proper motion, the lens and source will be resolved to about approximately 46 mas in 6-8 yr after the peak magnification. So, by 2020-2022, we can hope to detect the lens star with deep, high-resolution images.

  1. PLANETESIMAL DISK MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2009-12-10

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  2. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  3. The First Simultaneous Microlensing Observations by Two Space Telescopes: Spitzer and Swift Reveal a Brown Dwarf in Event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Li, Z.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Street, R. A.; Calchi Novati, S.; Hundertmark, M.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the "microlens parallax". We report the discovery of a 30-65M J brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in the microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of approximately 5 kpc toward the Galactic Bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by Spitzer and Swift, allowing a measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an eight-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either approximately 0.25 au or approximately 45 au. This is the first microlensing event observed by Swift, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which Swift is sensitive, finding that though Swift could not measure the microlens parallax with respect to ground-based observations for this event, it can be important for other events. Specifically, it is important for detecting nearby brown dwarfs and free-floating planets in high magnification events.

  4. The First Simultaneous Microlensing Observations by Two Space Telescopes: Spitzer and Swift Reveal a Brown Dwarf in Event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Li, Z.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Street, R. A.; Calchi Novati, S.; Hundertmark, M.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Drummond, J.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Tan, T. G.; Wibking, B.; Pogge, R. W.; Yee, J. C.; Zhu, W.; (Spitzer Team; Tsapras, Y.; Bachelet, E.; Dominik, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Steele, I. A.; Menzies, J.; Mao, S.; (RoboNet; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; (OGLE Group; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Fukui, A.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Nishioka, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; (MOA Group; Jørgensen, U. G.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Hinse, T. C.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Peixinho, N.; Verma, P.; (MiNDSTEp; Sbarufatti, B.; Kennea, J. A.; Gehrels, N.; (Swift

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the “microlens parallax.” We report the discovery of a 30-65M J brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in the microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of ˜5 kpc toward the Galactic Bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by Spitzer and Swift, allowing a measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an eight-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either ˜0.25 au or ˜45 au. This is the first microlensing event observed by Swift, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which Swift is sensitive, finding that though Swift could not measure the microlens parallax with respect to ground-based observations for this event, it can be important for other events. Specifically, it is important for detecting nearby brown dwarfs and free-floating planets in high magnification events.

  5. OGLE-2016-BLG-0263Lb: Microlensing Detection of a Very Low-mass Binary Companion through a Repeating Event Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bond, I. A.; and; Albrow, M. D.; Chung, S.-J.; Jung, Y. K.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Shin, I.-G.; Yee, J. C.; Zhu, W.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, S.-L.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, C.-U.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; The KMTNet Collaboration; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; The OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Evans, P.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Ranc, C.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yamada, T.; Yamada, T.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We report the discovery of a planet-mass companion to the microlens OGLE-2016-BLG-0263L. Unlike most low-mass companions that were detected through perturbations to the smooth and symmetric light curves produced by the primary, the companion was discovered through the channel of a repeating event, in which the companion itself produced its own single-mass light curve after the event produced by the primary had ended. Thanks to the continuous coverage of the second peak by high-cadence surveys, the possibility of the repeating nature due to source binarity is excluded with a 96% confidence level. The mass of the companion estimated by a Bayesian analysis is {M}{{p}}={4.1}-2.5+6.5 {M}{{J}}. The projected primary-companion separation is {a}\\perp ={6.5}-1.9+1.3 au. The ratio of the separation to the snow-line distance of {a}\\perp /{a}{sl}∼ 15.4 corresponds to the region beyond Neptune, the outermost planet of the solar system. We discuss the importance of high-cadence surveys in expanding the range of microlensing detections of low-mass companions and future space-based microlensing surveys.

  6. Simulation of Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This simulation shows the 22-year journey of a star moving through space and passing directly in front of a more distant background star. All stars drift through space. Occasionally, a star lines u...

  7. EXTREME MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2008-BLG-279: STRONG LIMITS ON PLANETARY COMPANIONS TO THE LENS STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, J. C.; Dong, Subo; Kozlowski, S. E-mail: jyee@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the extreme high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2008-BLG-279, which peaked at a maximum magnification of A approx 1600 on 2008 May 30. The peak of this event exhibits both finite-source effects and terrestrial parallax, from which we determine the mass of the lens, M{sub l} = 0.64 +- 0.10 M {sub sun}, and its distance, D{sub l} = 4.0 +- 0.6 kpc. We rule out Jupiter-mass planetary companions to the lens star for projected separations in the range 0.5-20 AU. More generally, we find that this event was sensitive to planets with masses as small as 0.2 M{sub +}{approx_equal}2 M{sub Mars} with projected separations near the Einstein ring (approx3 AU).

  8. Microlensing search towards M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Iovane, G.; Marino, A. A.; Aurière, M.; Baillon, P.; Bouquet, A.; Bozza, V.; Capaccioli, M.; Capozziello, S.; Cardone, V.; Covone, G.; De Paolis, F.; de Ritis, R.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gould, A.; Ingrosso, G.; Jetzer, Ph.; Kaplan, J.; Lambiase, G.; Le Du, Y.; Mancini, L.; Piedipalumbo, E.; Re, V.; Roncadelli, M.; Rubano, C.; Scarpetta, G.; Scudellaro, P.; Sereno, M.; Strafella, F.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first results of the analysis of data collected during the 1998-99 observational campaign at the 1.3 meter McGraw-Hill Telescope, towards the Andromeda galaxy (M 31), aimed to detect gravitational microlensing effects as a probe for the presence of dark matter in our Galaxy and in the M 31 halo. The analysis is performed using the pixel lensing technique, which consists of the study of flux variations of unresolved sources and has been proposed and implemented by the AGAPE collaboration. We carry out a shape analysis by demanding that the detected flux variations be achromatic and compatible with a Paczyński light curve. We apply the Durbin-Watson hypothesis test to the residuals. Furthermore, we consider the background of variables sources. Finally five candidate microlensing events emerge from our selection. Comparing with the predictions of a Monte Carlo simulation, assuming a standard spherical model for the M 31 and Galactic haloes, and typical values for the MACHO mass, we find that our events are only marginally consistent with the distribution of observable parameters predicted by the simulation.

  9. Structure of Quasar Continuum Emission Regions and Cosmology from Optical and X-Ray Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-02

    available. The flux of each component of the multiply-imaged quasars was measured in many seasons of ground-based optical imagery. Lightcurves were...constructed from the flux measurements, and Monte Carlo methods were used to analyze the microlensing variability in the lightcurves . The results of...available. The flux of each component of the multiply-imaged quasars was measured in many seasons of ground-based optical imagery. Lightcurves were

  10. The Manchester Microlensing Conference: The 12th International Conference and ANGLES Microlensing Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Mao, S.; Rattenbury, N.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    The Manchester Microlensing Conference (M2C) was held at the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics at Manchester University in the UK from 21st-25th January 2008. M2C comprised two elements: the ANGLES Microlensing Workshop and the 12th International Conference on gravitational microlensing. M2C began with the two-day Workshop, providing interactive Master Classes to around 60 researchers on selected hot topics in microlensing. The Master Classes were delivered by world-leading experts on each of the topics. The topics reflected the diverse techniques and applications of microlensing, such as crowded-field photometry, modelling of extra-solar planetary systems, and the use of microlensing in cosmology. The 12th International Conference on microlensing followed immediately after the Workshop and was attended by around 90 researchers. The Conference covered all aspects of current research in microlensing, including: Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds; Cosmological Microlensing; Stellar and Galactic Microlensing; Galactic Microlensing Surveys; Follow-up Programmes and Planetary Microlensing; M31 Microlensing; and Future Directions. The M2C Proceedings serve three functions. Through the expert master classes the M2C Proceedings provide a great starting point for those who wish to enter the field or who just wish to learn more about microlensing at a depth beyond that usually covered by a single review article. The M2C proceedings also provide a snapshot of the state-of-the art in microlensing observations and theory as of January 2008, in what is a rapidly developing field. Lastly, the M2C meeting and its Proceedings are dedicated to the memory of the late Bohdan Paczynski, a towering figure and founding father of modern day microlensing research.

  11. Microlensing for extrasolar planets : improving the photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajek, David J.

    2013-08-01

    Gravitational Microlensing, as a technique for detecting Extrasolar Planets, is recognised for its potential in discovering small-mass planets similar to Earth, at a distance of a few Astronomical Units from their host stars. However, analysing the data from microlensing events (which statistically rarely reveal planets) is complex and requires continued and intensive use of various networks of telescopes working together in order to observe the phenomenon. As such the techniques are constantly being developed and refined; this project outlines some steps of the careful analysis required to model an event and ensure the best quality data is used in the fitting. A quantitative investigation into increasing the quality of the original photometric data available from any microlensing event demonstrates that 'lucky imaging' can lead to a marked improvement in the signal to noise ratio of images over standard imaging techniques, which could result in more accurate models and thus the calculation of more accurate planetary parameters. In addition, a simulation illustrating the effects of atmospheric turbulence on exposures was created, and expanded upon to give an approximation of the lucky imaging technique. This further demonstrated the advantages of lucky images which are shown to potentially approach the quality of those expected from diffraction limited photometry. The simulation may be further developed for potential future use as a 'theoretical lucky imager' in our research group, capable of producing and analysing synthetic exposures through customisable conditions.

  12. Microlensing Constraints on Quasar Spins and X-ray Reflection Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2017-08-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides a unique probe of the innermost parts of quasar accretion disks, close to the event horizon of supermassive black holes. Using Chandra monitoring data of six lenses from two Large Programs in Cycles 11 and 14/15, we identified two microlensing effects that can be used to constrain black hole spins and X-ray reflection regions for high redshift quasars. The first effect is the excess iron line equivalent widths of lensed quasars compared to normal AGN, and the second is the distribution of iron line peak energies of lensed quasars. A microlensing analysis of the iron line equivalent widths prefers high spin values and very steep iron line emissivity profiles for quasars at z~2. We will also discuss the prospect of measuring quasar spins with microlensing using the next generation of X-ray telescopes.

  13. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M.; Kaluzny, J.; Kubiak, M.; Mateo, Mario

    1992-01-01

    The technical features are described of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, which aims to detect a statistically significant number of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge. Clusters of galaxies observed during the 1992 season are listed and discussed and the reduction methods are described. Future plans are addressed.

  14. Detections of Planets in Binaries Through the Channel of Chang-Refsdal Gravitational Lensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho; Shin, In-Gu; Jung, Youn Kil

    2017-02-01

    Chang-Refsdal (C-R) lensing, which refers to the gravitational lensing of a point mass perturbed by a constant external shear, provides a good approximation in describing lensing behaviors of either a very wide or a very close binary lens. C-R lensing events, which are identified by short-term anomalies near the peak of high-magnification lensing light curves, are routinely detected from lensing surveys, but not much attention is paid to them. In this paper, we point out that C-R lensing events provide an important channel to detect planets in binaries, both in close and wide binary systems. Detecting planets through the C-R lensing event channel is possible because the planet-induced perturbation occurs in the same region of the C-R lensing-induced anomaly and thus the existence of the planet can be identified by the additional deviation in the central perturbation. By presenting the analysis of the actually observed C-R lensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319, we demonstrate that dense and high-precision coverage of a C-R lensing-induced perturbation can provide a strong constraint on the existence of a planet in a wide range of planet parameters. The sample of an increased number of microlensing planets in binary systems will provide important observational constraints in giving shape to the details of planet formation, which have been restricted to the case of single stars to date.

  15. Detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation microlensing events via next-generation ground-based surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2014-04-20

    Even though the recently discovered high-magnification event MOA-2010-BLG-311 had complete coverage over its peak, confident planet detection did not happen due to extremely weak central perturbations (EWCPs, fractional deviations of ≲ 2%). For confident detection of planets in EWCP events, it is necessary to have both high cadence monitoring and high photometric accuracy better than those of current follow-up observation systems. The next-generation ground-based observation project, Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), satisfies these conditions. We estimate the probability of occurrence of EWCP events with fractional deviations of ≤2% in high-magnification events and the efficiency of detecting planets in the EWCP events using the KMTNet. From this study, we find that the EWCP events occur with a frequency of >50% in the case of ≲ 100 M {sub E} planets with separations of 0.2 AU ≲ d ≲ 20 AU. We find that for main-sequence and sub-giant source stars, ≳ 1 M {sub E} planets in EWCP events with deviations ≤2% can be detected with frequency >50% in a certain range that changes with the planet mass. However, it is difficult to detect planets in EWCP events of bright stars like giant stars because it is easy for KMTNet to be saturated around the peak of the events because of its constant exposure time. EWCP events are caused by close, intermediate, and wide planetary systems with low-mass planets and close and wide planetary systems with massive planets. Therefore, we expect that a much greater variety of planetary systems than those already detected, which are mostly intermediate planetary systems, regardless of the planet mass, will be significantly detected in the near future.

  16. Microlensing Parallax for Observers in Heliocentric Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Scarpetta, G.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the ongoing Spitzer observational campaign, and the forthcoming K2 one, we revisit, working in an heliocentric reference frame, the geometrical foundation for the analysis of the microlensing parallax, as measured with the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from two observers with relative distance of order au. For the case of observers at rest, we discuss the well-known fourfold microlensing parallax degeneracy and determine an equation for the degenerate directions of the lens trajectory. For the case of observers in motion, we write down an extension of the Gould relationship between the microlensing parallax and the observable quantities and, at the same time, highlight the functional dependence of these same quantities from the timescale of the underlying microlensing event. Furthermore, through a series of examples, we show the importance of taking into account themotion of the observers to correctly recover the parameters of the underlying microlensing event. In particular, we discuss the cases of the amplitude of the microlensing parallax and that of the difference of the timescales between the observed microlensing events, which are key to understand the breaking of the microlensing parallax degeneracy. Finally, we consider the case of the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from the ground and two satellites, a case relevant for the expected joint K2 and Spitzer observational programs in 2016.

  17. New limits on primordial black hole dark matter from an analysis of Kepler source microlensing data.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Lehner, Matthew J

    2013-11-01

    We present new limits on the allowed masses of a dark matter (DM) halo consisting of primordial black holes (PBH) (or any other massive compact halo object). We analyze two years of data from the Kepler satellite, searching for short-duration bumps caused by gravitational microlensing. After removing background events consisting of variable stars, flare events, and comets or asteroids moving through the Kepler field, we find no microlensing candidates. We measure the efficiency of our selection criteria by adding millions of simulated microlensing lensing events into the Kepler light curves. We find that PBH DM with masses in the range 2 × 10(-9) M[Symbol: see text] to 10(-7)M[Symbol: see text] cannot make up the entirety of the DM in the Milky Way. At the low-mass end, this decreases the allowed mass range by more than an order of magnititude.

  18. Microlensing of Kepler stars as a method of detecting primordial black hole dark matter.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Lehner, Matthew J; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-02

    If the dark matter consists of primordial black holes (PBHs), we show that gravitational lensing of stars being monitored by NASA's Kepler search for extrasolar planets can cause significant numbers of detectable microlensing events. A search through the roughly 150,000 light curves would result in large numbers of detectable events for PBHs in the mass range 5×10(-10) M(⊙) to 10(-4) M(⊙). Nondetection of these events would close almost 2 orders of magnitude of the mass window for PBH dark matter. The microlensing rate is higher than previously noticed due to a combination of the exceptional photometric precision of the Kepler mission and the increase in cross section due to the large angular sizes of the relatively nearby Kepler field stars. We also present a new formalism for calculating optical depth and microlensing rates in the presence of large finite-source effects.

  19. A super-jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapras, Y.; Street, R. A.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Kains, N.; Ipatov, S.; Alsubai, K. A.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Collaboration: RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; and others

    2014-02-10

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M {sub J} planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M {sub ☉} early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  20. Microlensing Candidates in M87 and the Virgo Cluster with the Hubble Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E

    2004-01-21

    The position of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 at the center of the Virgo Cluster means that the inferred column density of dark matter associated with both the cluster halo and the galaxy halo is quite large. This system is thus an important laboratory for studying massive dark objects in elliptical galaxies and galaxy clusters by gravitational microlensing, strongly complementing the studies of spiral galaxy halos performed in the Local Group. We have performed a microlensing survey of M87 with the WFPC2 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. Over a period of thirty days, with images taken once daily, we discover seven variable sources. Four are variable stars of some sort, two are consistent with classical novae, and one exhibits an excellent microlensing lightcurve, though with a very blue color implying the somewhat disfavored possibility of a horizontal branch source being lensed. Based on sensitivity calculations from artificial stars and from artificial lightcurves, we estimate the expected microlensing rate. We find that the detection of one event is consistent with a dark halo with a 20% contribution of microlensing objects for both M87 and the Virgo Cluster, similar to the value found from observations in the Local Group. Further work is required to test the hypothesized microlensing component to the cluster.

  1. OGLE-2016-BLG-0596Lb: A High-mass Planet from a High-magnification Pure-survey Microlensing Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mróz, P.; Han, C.; and; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE group; Albrow, M. D.; Cha, S.-M.; Chung, S.-J.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D.-J.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Shin, I.-G.; Yee, J. C.; Zhu, W.; Gould, A.; (KMTNet group

    2017-04-01

    We report the discovery of a high mass ratio planet, q = 0.012, i.e., 13 times higher than the Jupiter/Sun ratio. The host mass has not yet been measured but can be determined or strongly constrained from adaptive optics imaging. The planet was discovered in a small archival study of high-magnification events in pure-survey microlensing data, which was unbiased by the presence of anomalies. The fact that it was previously unnoticed may indicate that more such planets lie in archival data and could be discovered by a similar systematic study. In order to understand the transition from predominantly survey+followup to predominately survey-only planet detections, we conduct the first analysis of these detections in the observational (s, q) plane. Here s is the projected separation in units of the Einstein radius. We find some evidence that survey+followup is relatively more sensitive to planets near the Einstein ring, but that there is no statistical difference in sensitivity by mass ratio.

  2. The Frequency of Snowline-Region Planets from Four Years of OGLE-MOA-Wise Second-Generation Microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Poleski, R.; Szymanski, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Kozlowski, S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the first four seasons from a second-generation microlensing survey for extrasolar planets, consisting of near-continuous time coverage of 8 deg to the 2nd power of the Galactic bulge by the Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE), Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA), and Wise microlensing surveys. During this period, 224 microlensing events were observed by all three groups. Over 12% of the events showed a deviation from single-lens microlensing, and for approx. 1/3 of those the anomaly is likely caused by a planetary companion. For each of the 224 events, we have performed numerical ray-tracing simulations to calculate the detection efficiency of possible companions as a function of companion-to-host mass ratio and separation. Accounting for the detection efficiency, we find that 55 +34 -22%of microlensed stars host a snowline planet. Moreover, we find that Neptune-mass planets are approx.10 times more common than Jupiter-mass planets. The companion-to-host mass-ratio distribution shows a deficit at q approx. 10 (exp -2), separating the distribution into two companion populations, analogous to the stellar-companion and planet populations, seen in radial-velocity surveys around solar-like stars. Our survey, however, which probes mainly lower mass stars, suggests a minimum in the distribution in the super-Jupiter mass range, and a relatively high occurrence of brown-dwarf companions.

  3. Implications of the gravitational wave event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-07-01

    The era of gravitational-wave astronomy began on 14 September 2015, when the LIGO Scientific Collaboration detected the merger of two ˜30 M_⊙ black holes at a distance of {˜ }400 Mpc. This event has facilitated qualitatively new tests of gravitational theories, and has also produced exciting information about the astrophysical origin of black hole binaries. In this review we discuss the implications of this event for gravitational physics and astrophysics, as well as the expectations for future detections. In brief: (1) because the spins of the black holes could not be measured accurately and because mergers are not well calculated for modified theories of gravity, the current analysis of GW150914 does not place strong constraints on gravity variants that change only the generation of gravitational waves, but (2) it does strongly constrain alterations of the propagation of gravitational waves and alternatives to black holes. Finally, (3) many astrophysical models for the origin of heavy black hole binaries such as the GW150914 system are in play, but a reasonably robust conclusion that was reached even prior to the detection is that the environment of such systems needs to have a relatively low abundance of elements heavier than helium.

  4. Microlensing Discovery of an Earth-Mass Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    What do we know about planet formation around stars that are so light that they cant fuse hydrogen in their cores? The new discovery of an Earth-mass planet orbiting what is likely a brown dwarf may help us better understand this process.Planets Around Brown Dwarfs?Comparison of the sizes of the Sun, a low-mass star, a brown dwarf, Jupiter, and Earth. [NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCB]Planets are thought to form from the material inprotoplanetary disks around their stellar hosts. But the lowest-mass end of the stellar spectrum brown dwarfs, substellar objects so light that they straddle the boundary between planet and star will have correspondingly light disks. Do brown dwarfs disks typically have enough mass to form Earth-mass planets?To answer this question, scientists have searched for planets around brown dwarfs with marginal success. Thus far, only four such planets have been found and these systems may not be typical, since they were discovered via direct imaging. To build a more representative sample, wed like to discover exoplanets around brown dwarfs via a method that doesnt rely on imaging the faint light of the system.A diagram of how planets are detected via gravitational microlensing. The detectable planet is in orbit around the foreground lens star. [NASA]Lensed Light as a GiveawayConveniently, such a method exists and its recently been used to make a major discovery! The planet OGLE-2016-BLG-1195Lb was detected as a result of a gravitational microlensing event that was observed both from the ground and from space.The discovery of a planet via microlensing occurs when the light of a distant source star is magnified by a passing foreground star hosting a planet. The light curve of the source shows a distinctive magnification signature as a result of the gravitational lensing from the foreground star, and the gravitational field of the lensing stars planet can add its own detectable blip to the curve.OGLE-2016-BLG-1195LbThe magnification curve of OGLE-2016-BLG-1195

  5. Probing the Broad-Line Region and the Accretion Disk in the Lensed Quasars HE 0435-1223, WFI 2033-4723, and HE 2149-2745 Using Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Rojas, K.; Falco, E. E.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    We use single-epoch spectroscopy of three gravitationally lensed quasars, HE 0435-1223, WFI 2033-4723, and HE 2149-2745, to study their inner structure (broad-line region [BLR] and continuum source). We detect microlensing-induced magnification in the wings of the broad emission lines of two of the systems (HE 0435-1223 and WFI 2033-4723). In the case of WFI 2033-4723, microlensing affects two “bumps” in the spectra that are almost symmetrically arranged on the blue (coincident with an Al iii emission line) and red wings of C iii]. These match the typical double-peaked profile that follows from disk kinematics. The presence of microlensing in the wings of the emission lines indicates the existence of two different regions in the BLR: a relatively small one with kinematics possibly related to an accretion disk, and another one that is substantially more extended and insensitive to microlensing. There is good agreement between the estimated size of the region affected by microlensing in the emission lines, {r}s={10}-7+15\\sqrt{M/{M}ȯ } lt-day (red wing of C iv in HE 0435-1223) and {r}s={11}-7+28\\sqrt{M/{M}ȯ } lt-day (C iii] bumps in WFI 2033-4723), and the sizes inferred from the continuum emission, {r}s={13}-4+5\\sqrt{M/{M}ȯ } lt-day (HE 0435-1223) and {r}s={10}-2+3\\sqrt{M/{M}ȯ } lt-day (WFI 2033-4723). For HE 2149-2745 we measure an accretion disk size {r}s={8}-5+11\\sqrt{M/{M}ȯ } lt-day. The estimates of p, the exponent of the size versus wavelength ({r}s\\propto {λ }p), are 1.2 ± 0.6, 0.8 ± 0.2, and 0.4 ± 0.3 for HE 0435-1223, WFI 2033-4723, and HE 2149-2745, respectively. In conclusion, the continuum microlensing amplitude in the three quasars and chromaticity in WFI 2033-4723 and HE 2149-2745 are below expectations for the thin-disk model. The disks are larger and their temperature gradients are flatter than predicted by this model.

  6. Revisiting the Microlensing Event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A Solar Mass Star with Two Cold Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Fukui, A.; Marquette, J.-B.; Brillant, S.; Cole, A. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.

    2016-01-01

    Two cold gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main-sequence star in the galactic disk were previously discovered in the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. Here, we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, H = 16.39 +/- 0.08. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B and C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3 m H-band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of an approximately 4-9 Gyr lens star of M(sub lens) = 1.06 +/- 0.05 solar mass at a distance of D(sub lens) = 4.0 +/- 0.3 kpc, orbited by two giant planets of 0.145 +/- 0.008 M(sub Jup) and 0.86 +/- 0.06 M(sub Jup), with projected separations of 4.0 +/- 0.5 au and 4.8 +/- 0.7 au, respectively. Because the lens is brighter than the source star by 16 +/- 8% in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity using subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8-10 m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.

  7. Revisiting the Microlensing Event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A Solar Mass Star with Two Cold Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Fukui, A.; Marquette, J.-B.; Brillant, S.; Cole, A. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.

    2016-01-01

    Two cold gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main-sequence star in the galactic disk were previously discovered in the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. Here, we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, H = 16.39 +/- 0.08. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B and C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3 m H-band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of an approximately 4-9 Gyr lens star of M(sub lens) = 1.06 +/- 0.05 solar mass at a distance of D(sub lens) = 4.0 +/- 0.3 kpc, orbited by two giant planets of 0.145 +/- 0.008 M(sub Jup) and 0.86 +/- 0.06 M(sub Jup), with projected separations of 4.0 +/- 0.5 au and 4.8 +/- 0.7 au, respectively. Because the lens is brighter than the source star by 16 +/- 8% in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity using subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8-10 m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.

  8. Revisiting the Microlensing Event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A Solar Mass Star with Two Cold Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Fukui, A.; Marquette, J.-B.; Brillant, S.; Cole, A. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Koshimoto, N.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Pogge, R.; Yee, J.

    2016-06-01

    Two cold gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main-sequence star in the galactic disk were previously discovered in the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. Here, we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, H = 16.39 ± 0.08. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B&C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3 m H-band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of a ˜4-9 Gyr lens star of M lens = 1.06 ± 0.05 M ⊙ at a distance of D lens = 4.0 ± 0.3 kpc, orbited by two giant planets of 0.145 ± 0.008 M Jup and 0.86 ± 0.06 M Jup, with projected separations of 4.0 ± 0.5 au and 4.8 ± 0.7 au, respectively. Because the lens is brighter than the source star by 16 ± 8% in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity using subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8-10 m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.

  9. Rapid Radio Followups of LIGO Gravitational Wave Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenet, Rick; Stevens, Jamie; Wieringa, Mark; Creighton, Teviet

    2010-10-01

    We propose real time follow-up observations with the ATCA to search for radio counterparts to candidate gravitational-wave events detected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors. Electromagnetic and gravitational radiation provide complementary views of the Universe: the former being generated by the microphysical processes of charged particles, the latter by coherent bulk motion of masses. A complete picture of the most violent events in nature, such as supernovae and mergers of stellar remnants, will require both types of observation: Gravitational waves (GWs) to uncover the mechanics of the underlying (gravitational) energy source, and electromagnetic waves to reveal how that energy is then dissipated in matter. The search for GWs is entering an exciting phase with kilometer-scale interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo achieving sensitivities for which detection of GWs is plausible. Since the sensitivity of these instruments improves incrementally, it is likely that the first verifiable detections of GWs will have signal-to-noise ratios that are just barely statistically significant. Observations in the electromagnetic spectrum will help confirm the first GW detections.

  10. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2014-06-20

    We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.

  11. The Arithmetic of events and a new theory of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Malek

    2012-04-01

    Of fundamental importance in physics is the concept of event. This study tries; first, to provide a mathematical background showing how must deal with these events and based on what laws the watches, another important concept used frequently in this research, record them. Armed, then, with this mathematical background, the Gravitational Clouds Theory, a novel theory of gravitation concerning the role of the matter and energy in the universe, is proposed. This completely new theory leads to miscellanies results some of which are: the second Einstein's postulate; the well known identity E = mc2; the time-dilation phenomenon and Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction. This theory will also explain why indeed we never feel the speed of the Earth, what is the origin of Dark matter-energy and many other extraordinary results associated with cosmology.

  12. The Arithmetic of Events and a New Theory of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Malek

    2012-10-01

    Of fundamental importance in physics is the concept of event. This study tries, first, to provide a mathematical background showing how must deal with these events and based on what laws the watches, another important concept used frequently in this research, record them. Armed, then, with this mathematical background, the Gravitational Clouds Theory, a novel theory of gravitation concerning the role of the matter and energy in the universe, is proposed. This completely new theory leads to miscellanies results some of which are: the second Einstein's postulate; the well known identity E = mc2; the time-dilation phenomenon and Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction. This theory will also explain why indeed we never feel the speed of the Earth, what is the origin of Dark matter-energy and many other extraordinary results associated with cosmology.

  13. Faint-Source-Star Planetary Microlensing: The Discovery of the Cold Gas-Giant Planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rattenbury, N. J.; Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N.; Bond, I. A.; Udalski, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Barry, R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb via gravitational microlensing. Observations for the lensing event were made by the following groups: Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics; Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment; Wise Observatory; RoboNETLas Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope; Microlensing Network for the Detection of Small Terrestrial Exoplanets; and -FUN. All analyses of the light-curve data favoura lens system comprising a planetary mass orbiting a host star. The most-favoured binary lens model has a mass ratio between the two lens masses of (4.78 +/- 0.13) 10(exp -3). Subject to some important assumptions, a Bayesian probability density analysis suggests the lens system comprises a 3.09(+1.02/-1.12) MJ planet orbiting a 0.62(+0.20/-0.22) solar mass host star at a deprojected orbital separation of 4.40(+2.16/-1.46) au. The distance to the lens system is 2.22(+0.96/-0.83) kpc. Planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb provides additional data to the growing number of cool planets discover redusing gravitational microlensing against which planetary formation theories may be tested. Most of the light in the baseline of this event is expected to come from the lens and thus high-resolution imaging observations could confirm our planetary model interpretation.

  14. Faint-source-star planetary microlensing: the discovery of the cold gas-giant planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattenbury, N. J.; Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N.; Bond, I. A.; Udalski, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Dominik, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Evans, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Alsubai, K.; Browne, P.; Andersen, J. M.; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Dreizler, S.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Liebig, C.; Hundertmark, M.; Juncher, D.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Martin, R.; Mathiasen, M.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Surdej, J.; Taylor, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; D'Ago, G.; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Steele, I. A.

    2017-04-01

    We report the discovery of a planet - OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb- via gravitational microlensing. Observations for the lensing event were made by the following groups: Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics; Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment; Wise Observatory; RoboNET/Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope; Microlensing Network for the Detection of Small Terrestrial Exoplanets; and μ-FUN. All analyses of the light-curve data favour a lens system comprising a planetary mass orbiting a host star. The most-favoured binary lens model has a mass ratio between the two lens masses of (4.78 ± 0.13) × 10-3. Subject to some important assumptions, a Bayesian probability density analysis suggests the lens system comprises a 3.09_{-1.12}^{+1.02} MJ planet orbiting a 0.62_{-0.22}^{+0.20} M⊙ host star at a deprojected orbital separation of 4.40_{-1.46}^{+2.16} au. The distance to the lens system is 2.22_{-0.83}^{+0.96} kpc. Planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb provides additional data to the growing number of cool planets discovered using gravitational microlensing against which planetary formation theories may be tested. Most of the light in the baseline of this event is expected to come from the lens and thus high-resolution imaging observations could confirm our planetary model interpretation.

  15. The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network: Expectations for a Cold Exoplanet Census through a Global Microlensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen Barnett

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) consists of three 1.6m telescopes each with a 4 deg2 field of view (FoV) and is dedicated to monitoring the Galactic bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. My dissertation focuses on the results of simulations I have written and analyses I have performed that together provide estimates of and facilitate intuition about the number and variety of systmes KMTNet will detect and how best to maximize their scientific yield. First I present my simulations that optimize the observing strategy for, and predict the planetary yields of, KMTNet. I estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 ≤Mp/M⊕ ≤1000 and 0.4 ≤ a/AU ≤ 16, respectively, and also for free-floating planets. I furthermore investigate the dependence of these detection rates on the number of observatories, the photometric precision limit, and optimistic assumptions regarding seeing, throughput, and flux measurement uncertainties. Next I explore several possible avenues for constraining the flux of the lens for these predicted KMTNet detections. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by 1) imaging the lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, 2) measuring the elongation of the point spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and 3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities, future ground-based AO facilities, and future space telescopes. Lastly, I provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens

  16. Polarimetry Microlensing of Close-in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Hundertmark, Markus

    2017-04-01

    A close-in giant planetary (CGP) system has a net polarization signal whose value varies depending on the orbital phase of the planet. This polarization signal is either caused by the stellar occultation or by reflected starlight from the surface of the orbiting planet. When the CGP system is located in the Galactic bulge, its polarization signal becomes too weak to be measured directly. One method for detecting and characterizing these weak polarization signatures due to distant CGP systems is gravitational microlensing. In this work, we focus on potential polarimetric observations of highly magnified microlensing events of CGP systems. When the lens is passing directly in front of the source star with its planetary companion, the polarimetric signature caused by the transiting planet is magnified. As a result, some distinct features in the polarimetry and light curves are produced. In the same way, microlensing amplifies the reflection-induced polarization signal. While the planet-induced perturbations are magnified whenever these polarimetric or photometric deviations vanish for a moment, the corresponding magnification factor of the polarization component(s) is related to the planet itself. Finding these exact times in the planet-induced perturbations helps us to characterize the planet. In order to evaluate the observability of such systems through polarimetric or photometric observations of high-magnification microlensing events, we simulate these events by considering confirmed CGP systems as their source stars and conclude that the efficiency for detecting the planet-induced signal with the state-of-the-art polarimetric instrument (FORS2/VLT) is less than 0.1%. Consequently, these planet-induced polarimetry perturbations can likely be detected under favorable conditions by the high-resolution and short-cadence polarimeters of the next generation.

  17. The Next Generation Microlensing Search: SuperMacho

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A; Cook, K; Hiriart, R; Keller, S; Miknaitis, G; Nilolaev, S; Olsen, K; Prochter, G; Rest, A; Schmidt, B; Smith, C; Stubbs, C; Suntzeff, N; Welch, D; Becker, A; Clocchiati, A; Covarrubias, R

    2003-10-27

    Past microlensing experiments such as the MACHO project have discovered the presence of a larger than expected number of microlensing events toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These events could represent a large fraction of the dark matter in the halo of our Galaxy, if they are indeed due to halo lenses. However the locations of most of the lenses are poorly defined. The SuperMacho project will detect and follow up {approx}60 microlensing events exhibiting special properties due to binarity, etc., will allow us to better determine the location and nature of the lenses causing the LMC microlensing events.

  18. Brown Dwarf Microlensing (Illustration)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    This illustration depicts a newly discovered brown dwarf, an object that weighs in somewhere between our solar system's most massive planet (Jupiter) and the least-massive-known star. This brown dwarf, dubbed OGLE-2015-BLG-1319, interests astronomers because it may fall in the "desert" of brown dwarfs. Scientists have found that, for stars roughly the mass of our sun, less than 1 percent have a brown dwarf orbiting within 3 AU (1 AU is the distance between Earth and the sun). This brown dwarf was discovered when it and its star passed between Earth and a much more distant star in our galaxy. This created a microlensing event, where the gravity of the system amplified the light of the background star over the course of several weeks. This microlensing was observed by ground-based telescopes looking for these uncommon events, and was the first to be seen by two space-based telescopes: NASA's Spitzer and Swift missions. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21076

  19. AGILE Observations of the Gravitational-wave Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Giuliani, A.; Donnarumma, I.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Antonelli, L. A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Ferrari, A.; Longo, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Minervini, G.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Pellizzoni, A.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Sabatini, S.; Vercellone, S.; Vittorini, V.; Giommi, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cardillo, M.; Galli, M.; Fuschino, F.

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of an extensive search through the AGILE data for a gamma-ray counterpart to the LIGO gravitational-wave (GW) event GW150914. Currently in spinning mode, AGILE has the potential of cover 80% of the sky with its gamma-ray instrument, more than 100 times a day. It turns out that AGILE came within a minute of the event time of observing the accessible GW150914 localization region. Interestingly, the gamma-ray detector exposed ˜65% of this region during the 100 s time intervals centered at -100 and +300 s from the event time. We determine a 2σ flux upper limit in the band 50 MeV-10 GeV, UL = 1.9 × 10-8 erg cm-2 s-1, obtained ˜300 s after the event. The timing of this measurement is the fastest ever obtained for GW150914, and significantly constrains the electromagnetic emission of a possible high-energy counterpart. We also carried out a search for a gamma-ray precursor and delayed emission over five timescales ranging from minutes to days: in particular, we obtained an optimal exposure during the interval -150/-30 s. In all these observations, we do not detect a significant signal associated with GW150914. We do not reveal the weak transient source reported by Fermi-GBM 0.4 s after the event time. However, even though a gamma-ray counterpart of the GW150914 event was not detected, the prospects for future AGILE observations of GW sources are decidedly promising.

  20. Extracting Binary Orbital Periods Using Timing Analysis of Microlensing Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Esin, A.; Di Stefano, R.

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing events provide unique opportunities to discover and study binaries. A large number of binary lenses have already been found by the microlensing surveys. For the majority of these systems, the binary orbital period is much longer than the duration of the lensing event, so orbital motion can be safely ignored. However, a few lenses have already been discovered that show strong evidence of orbital motion on the timescale of the lensing event. We expect that more such systems will be seen in the future. For binaries whose orbital period is comparable to the event duration, the orbital motion can cause the lensing signal to deviate drastically from that of a static binary lens. The most striking property of such lightcurves is the presence of quasi-periodic features, produced as the source traverses the same regions in the rotating lens plane. Those repeated features contain information about the orbital period of the lens. If this period can be extracted, we immediately learn a lot about the lensing system even without performing the detailed lightcurve modeling. However, the relative transverse motion between the source and the lens significantly complicates the problem of period extraction. To resolve this difficulty, we present a modification to the standard Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis. We test our method for 6 representative binary lens systems and demonstrate its efficiency in correctly extracting binary orbital periods.

  1. Microlensing detection of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Emanuela; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2013-05-01

    We review the method of exoplanetary microlensing with a focus on two-body planetary lensing systems. The physical properties of planetary systems can be successfully measured by means of a deep analysis of lightcurves and high-resolution imaging of planetary systems, countering the concern that microlensing cannot determine planetary masses and orbital radii. Ground-based observers have had success in diagnosing properties of multi-planet systems from a few events, but space-based observations will be much more powerful and statistically more complete. Since microlensing is most sensitive to exoplanets beyond the snow line, whose statistics, in turn, allow for testing current planetary formation and evolution theories, we investigate the retrieval of semi-major axis density by a microlensing space-based survey with realistic parameters. Making use of a published statistical method for projected exoplanets quantities (Brown 2011), we find that one year of such a survey might distinguish between simple power-law semi-major axis densities. We conclude by briefly reviewing ground-based results hinting at a high abundance of free-floating planets and describing the potential contribution of space-based missions to understanding the frequency and mass distribution of these intriguing objects, which could help unveil the formation processes of planetary systems.

  2. Microlensing detection of extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, Emanuela; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2013-05-01

    We review the method of exoplanetary microlensing with a focus on two-body planetary lensing systems. The physical properties of planetary systems can be successfully measured by means of a deep analysis of lightcurves and high-resolution imaging of planetary systems, countering the concern that microlensing cannot determine planetary masses and orbital radii. Ground-based observers have had success in diagnosing properties of multi-planet systems from a few events, but space-based observations will be much more powerful and statistically more complete. Since microlensing is most sensitive to exoplanets beyond the snow line, whose statistics, in turn, allow for testing current planetary formation and evolution theories, we investigate the retrieval of semi-major axis density by a microlensing space-based survey with realistic parameters. Making use of a published statistical method for projected exoplanets quantities (Brown 2011), we find that one year of such a survey might distinguish between simple power-law semi-major axis densities. We conclude by briefly reviewing ground-based results hinting at a high abundance of free-floating planets and describing the potential contribution of space-based missions to understanding the frequency and mass distribution of these intriguing objects, which could help unveil the formation processes of planetary systems.

  3. Optimal detection of burst events in gravitational wave interferometric observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viceré, Andrea

    2002-09-01

    We consider the problem of detecting a burst signal of unknown shape in the data from gravitational wave interferometric detectors. We introduce a statistic which generalizes the excess power statistic proposed first by Flanagan and Hughes, and then extended by Anderson et al. to the multiple detector case. The statistic that we propose is shown to be optimal for an arbitrary noise spectral characteristic, under the two hypotheses that the noise is Gaussian, albeit colored, and that the prior for the signal is uniform. The statistic derivation is based on the assumption that a signal affects only N|| samples in the data stream, but that no other information is a priori available, and that the value of the signal at each sample can be arbitrary. This is the main difference from previous works, where different assumptions were made, such as a signal distribution uniform with respect to the metric induced by the (inverse) noise correlation matrix. The two choices are equivalent if the noise is white, and in that limit the two statistics do indeed coincide. In the general case, we believe that the statistic we propose may be more appropriate, because it does not reflect the characteristics of the noise affecting the detector on the supposed distribution of the gravitational wave signal. Moreover, we show that the proposed statistic can be easily implemented in its exact form, combining standard time-series analysis tools which can be efficiently implemented. We generalize this version of an excess power statistic to the multiple detector case, considering first a noise uncorrelated among the different instruments, and then including the effect of correlated noise. We discuss exact and approximate forms of the statistic; the choice depends on the characteristics of the noise and on the assumed length of the burst event. As an example, we show the sensitivity of the network of interferometers to a δ-function burst.

  4. Gravitational black hole hair from event horizon supertranslations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averin, Artem; Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar; Lüst, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    We discuss BMS supertranslations both at null-infinity BMS- and on the horizon {BMS}^{mathscr{H}} for the case of the Schwarzschild black hole. We show that both kinds of supertranslations lead to infinetly many gapless physical excitations. On this basis we construct a quotient algebra mathcal{A}equiv {BMS}^{mathscr{H}}/{BMS}- using suited superpositions of both kinds of transformations which cannot be compensated by an ordinary BMS-supertranslation and therefore are intrinsically due to the presence of an event horizon. We show that transformations in mathcal{A} are physical and generate gapless excitations on the horizon that can account for the gravitational hair as well as for the black hole entropy. We identify the physics of these modes as associated with Bogolioubov-Goldstone modes due to quantum criticality. Classically the number of these gapless modes is infinite. However, we show that due to quantum criticality the actual amount of information-carriers becomes finite and consistent with Bekenstein entropy. Although we only consider the case of Schwarzschild geometry, the arguments are extendable to arbitrary space-times containing event horizons.

  5. Microlensing Constraints on Quasar Emission Regions: Athena's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides a unique tool to study the emission regions of quasars from the smallest X-ray emission region to the larger BLR region. I will review the recent progress of the field focusing on the constraints on the non-thermal X-ray emission, based on our Chandra long-term monitoring results (over 3 Msec) of a sample of lenses. We discover for the first time chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands in the X-ray continuum emission. Our results indicate that the coronae above the accretion disk thought to generate X-rays have a non-uniform electron distribution, and the hard X-ray emission region is smaller than the soft region in two cases tracking the event horizon of black holes. We detect metal emission lines for almost all X-ray images in all lenses. We measure larger equivalent line widths in lensed quasars compared to a large sample of normal non-lensed AGNs of similar luminosities. We conclude that the iron line emission region is smaller than that of the X-ray continuum, possibly resulting from strong gravitational lensing near the black hole. Both the X-ray and optical emission region sizes scale with the black hole mass with similar slopes, but with a much smaller normalization for the X-ray emission. With the order of magnitude increase of effective area by Athena, I will discuss the perspective of quasar microlensing in the Athena era.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Microlensing optical depth & event rates from MOA-II (Sumi+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, T.; Penny, M. T.

    2016-11-01

    We use the same data set as Sumi+ (2013, J/ApJ/778/150), which used the data taken in the 2006 and 2007 seasons by the MOA-II survey, with the 1.8m MOA-II telescope located at the Mt. John University Observatory, New Zealand. The centers of the 22 Galactic bulge (GB) fields of the MOA-II survey are listed in Table 1. The images were taken using the custom MOA-Red wide-band filter, which is equivalent to the sum of the standard Kron/Cousins R and I bands. Each field is divided into 80 subfields and each subfield is individually calibrated using the red clump giant (RCG) feature in each subfield CMD more precisely. The number of subfields used in the final analysis is 1536 in total and also given in Table 1 for each field. The coordinates and other properties of the subfields are listed in Table 4. The OGLE (Udalski 2003AcA....53..291U) also conducts a microlensing survey toward the GB with the 1.3m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The median seeing is about 1.3 arcsec. Most observations are taken in the standard Kron-Cousin I band with occasional observations in the Johnson V band. (1 data file).

  7. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  8. Finding Free-Floating Black Holes using Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jessica R.; Ofek, Eran Oded; Sinukoff, Evan; Udalski, Andrzej; Kozlowski, Szymon

    2017-01-01

    Our Galaxy most likely hosts 10-100 million stellar mass black holes. The exact number and mass function of these black holes contains important information regarding our Galaxy's star formation history, stellar mass function, and the fate of very massive stars. However, isolated stellar black holes have yet to be detected. To date, stellar mass black holes have only been definitively detected in binary systems with accreting companions or merging to produce gravitational waves. In principle, the presence of isolated black holes can be inferred from astrometric and photometric signatures produced when they lens light from a background star. We attempt to detect the astrometric lensing signatures of several photometrically identified microlensing events, toward the Galactic Bulge. Long-duration events (t_Einstein > 100 days) were selected as the most likely black hole candidates and were observed using several years of laser-guided adaptive optics observations from the W. M. Keck telescopes. We present results from this search.

  9. Extended-Source Effect and Chromaticity in Two-Point-Mass Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Heyrovský, David

    2009-01-01

    We explore the sensitivity of two-point-mass gravitational microlensing to the extended nature of the source star, as well as the related sensitivity to its limb darkening. We demonstrate that the sensitive region, usually considered to be limited to a source-diameter-wide band along the caustic, is strongly expanded near cusps, most prominently along their outer axis. In the case of multicomponent caustics, facing cusps may form a region with a non-negligible extended-source effect spanning the gap between them. We demonstrate that for smaller sources the size of the sensitive region extending from a cusp measured in units of source radii increases, scaling as the inverse cube root of the radius. We study the extent of different sensitivity contours and show that for a microlensed Galactic bulge giant the probability of encountering at least a 1% extended-source effect is higher than the probability of caustic crossing by 40-60% when averaged over a typical range of lens-component separations, with the actual value depending on the mass ratio of the components. We derive analytical expressions for the extended-source effect and chromaticity for a source positioned off the caustic. These formulae are more generally applicable to any gravitational lens with a sufficiently small source. Using exactly computed amplifications we test the often used linear-fold caustic approximation and show that it may lead to errors on the level of a few percent even in near-ideal caustic-crossing events. Finally, we discuss several interesting cases of observed binary and planetary microlensing events and point out the importance of our results for the measurement of stellar limb darkening from microlensing light curves.

  10. Progresses of Search for Gravitational Wave Events Using TAMA300 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, N.; Ando, M.; Nakano, H.; Soida, K.; Tagoshi, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tatsumi, D.; Tsunesada, Y.; TAMA Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    We implemented and evaluated the Gravitational wave event search in TAMA 300 data analysis. Our searches are for the inspiral gravitational wave from coalescing compact binary, Black Hole (BH) quasi-normal ringing, supernova bursts, and continuous wave from SN1987a remnant. Using TAMA's over 2000 hours of observation data, we have progresses of the searches and improved the upper limits.

  11. Stochastic Microlensing: Mathematical Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teguia, Alberto Mokak

    expected number of minimum images in the limit of an infinite number of stars. This global expectation is bounded, while the global expected number of images and the global expected number of saddle images diverge as the order of the number of stars. Finally, we outline a framework for the study of stochastic microlensing in the neighbourhood of lensed images. This framework is related to the study of the local geometry of a random surface. In our case, the surface is non-Gaussian, and therefore standard literature on the subject does not apply. We explore the case of a random gravitational field caused by a random star.

  12. OGLE-2012-BLG-0455/MOA-2012-BLG-206: Microlensing event with ambiguity in planetary interpretations caused by incomplete coverage of planetary signal

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Kavka, A.; Pogge, R. W.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Fouqué, P.; Christie, G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Lee, C.-U.; Monard, L. A. G.; Collaboration: μFUN Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; and others

    2014-05-20

    Characterizing a microlensing planet is done by modeling an observed lensing light curve. In this process, it is often confronted that solutions of different lensing parameters result in similar light curves, causing difficulties in uniquely interpreting the lens system, and thus understanding the causes of different types of degeneracy is important. In this work, we show that incomplete coverage of a planetary perturbation can result in degenerate solutions even for events where the planetary signal is detected with a high level of statistical significance. We demonstrate the degeneracy for an actually observed event OGLE-2012-BLG-0455/MOA-2012-BLG-206. The peak of this high-magnification event (A {sub max} ∼ 400) exhibits very strong deviation from a point-lens model with Δχ{sup 2} ≳ 4000 for data sets with a total of 6963 measurements. From detailed modeling of the light curve, we find that the deviation can be explained by four distinct solutions, i.e., two very different sets of solutions, each with a twofold degeneracy. While the twofold (so-called close/wide) degeneracy is well understood, the degeneracy between the radically different solutions is not previously known. The model light curves of this degeneracy differ substantially in the parts that were not covered by observation, indicating that the degeneracy is caused by the incomplete coverage of the perturbation. It is expected that the frequency of the degeneracy introduced in this work will be greatly reduced with the improvement of the current lensing survey and follow-up experiments and the advent of new surveys.

  13. Astrometric microlensing with the GAIA satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokurov, V. A.; Evans, N. W.

    2002-04-01

    GAIA is the `super-Hipparcos ' survey satellite selected as a Cornerstone 6 mission by the European Space Agency. GAIA can measure microlensing by the brightening of source stars. For the broad G -band photometer, the all-sky source-averaged photometric optical depth is ~10-7 . There are ~1300 photometric microlensing events for which GAIA will measure at least one data point on the amplified light curve. GAIA can also measure microlensing by the small excursions of the light centroid that occur during events. The all-sky source-averaged astrometric microlensing optical depth is ~2.5×10-5 . Some ~25000 sources will have a significant variation of the centroid shift, together with a closest approach, during the lifetime of the mission. This is not the actual number of events that can be extracted from the GAIA data set, as the false detection rate has not been assessed. A covariance analysis is used to study the propagation of errors and the estimation of parameters from realistic sampling of the GAIA data stream of transits in the along-scan direction during microlensing events. The mass of the lens can be calculated to good accuracy if the lens is nearby so that the angular Einstein radius θ E is large; if the Einstein radius projected on to the observer plane r~ E is approximately an astronomical unit; or if the duration of the astrometric event is long (>~1yr) or the source star is bright . Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the ~2500 events for which the mass can be recovered with an error of <50 per cent. These high-quality events are dominated by disc lenses within a few tens of parsecs and source stars within a few hundred parsecs. We show that the local mass function can be recovered from the high-quality sample to good accuracy. GAIA is the first instrument with the capability of measuring the mass locally in very faint objects such as black holes and very cool white and brown dwarfs. For only ~5 per cent of all astrometric events will GAIA record

  14. FREQUENCY OF SOLAR-LIKE SYSTEMS AND OF ICE AND GAS GIANTS BEYOND THE SNOW LINE FROM HIGH-MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENTS IN 2005-2008

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C. E-mail: gaudi@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-09-10

    We present the first measurement of the planet frequency beyond the 'snow line', for the planet-to-star mass-ratio interval -4.5 < log q < -2, corresponding to the range of ice giants to gas giants. We find (d{sup 2}N{sub pl})/(d log q d log s) = (0.36{+-}0.15) dex{sup -2} at the mean mass ratio q = 5 x 10{sup -4} with no discernible deviation from a flat (Oepik's law) distribution in log-projected separation s. The determination is based on a sample of six planets detected from intensive follow-up observations of high-magnification (A>200) microlensing events during 2005-2008. The sampled host stars have a typical mass M{sub host} {approx} 0.5 M {sub sun}, and detection is sensitive to planets over a range of planet-star-projected separations (s {sup -1}{sub max} R {sub E}, s{sub max} R {sub E}), where R {sub E} {approx} 3.5 AU(M{sub host}/M{sub sun}){sup 1/2} is the Einstein radius and s {sub max} {approx} (q/10{sup -4.3}){sup 1/3}. This corresponds to deprojected separations roughly three times the 'snow line'. We show that the observations of these events have the properties of a 'controlled experiment', which is what permits measurement of absolute planet frequency. High-magnification events are rare, but the survey-plus-follow-up high-magnification channel is very efficient: half of all high-mag events were successfully monitored and half of these yielded planet detections. The extremely high sensitivity of high-mag events leads to a policy of monitoring them as intensively as possible, independent of whether they show evidence of planets. This is what allows us to construct an unbiased sample. The planet frequency derived from microlensing is a factor 8 larger than the one derived from Doppler studies at factor {approx}25 smaller star-planet separations (i.e., periods 2-2000 days). However, this difference is basically consistent with the gradient derived from Doppler studies (when extrapolated well beyond the separations from which it is measured). This

  15. Challenges in Timeseries Analysis from Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, R. A.

    2017-06-01

    Despite a flood of discoveries over the last ~ 20 years, our knowledge of the exoplanet population is incomplete owing to a gap between the sensitivities of different detection techniques. However, a census of exoplanets at all separations from their host stars is essential to fully understand planet formation mechanisms. Microlensing offers an effective way to bridge the gap around 1-10 AU and is therefore one of the major science goals of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission. WFIRST's survey of the Galactic Bulge is expected to discover ~ 20,000 microlensing events, including ~ 3000 planets, which represents a substantial data analysis challenge with the modeling software currently available. This paper highlights areas where further work is needed. The community is encouraged to join new software development efforts aimed at making the modeling of microlensing events both more accessible and rigorous.

  16. Detecting extrasolar asteroid belts through their microlensing signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ethan; Zheng, Zheng; Dong, Subo

    2017-02-01

    We propose that extrasolar asteroid belts can be detected through their gravitational microlensing signatures. Asteroid belt + star lens systems create so-called 'pseudo-caustics', regions in the source plane where the magnification exhibits a finite but discontinuous jump. These features allow such systems to generate distinctive signatures in the microlensing light curves for a wide range of belt configurations, with source trajectories as far as tenths of the Einstein ring radius from the centre of the lens. Sample light curves for a range of asteroid belt parameters are presented. In the near future, space-based microlensing surveys like WFIRST, which will have the power of detecting per cent-level changes in microlensing light curves even with subminute exposure times, may be able to discover extrasolar asteroid belts with masses of the order of an earth mass.

  17. Stellar, Remnant, Planetary, and Dark-Object Masses from Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew P.; Bennett, David P.; Boden, Andrew; Depoy, Darren L.; Gaudi, Scott B.; Griest, Kim; Han, Cheongho; Paczynski, Bohdan; Reid, I. Neill

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of our project is to make a complete census of the stellar population of the Galaxy. We are broadening the term stellar here to include both ordinary stars and dark stars. Ordinary stars, burning their nuclear fuel and shining, can perhaps best be studied with traditional astronomical techniques, but dark stars, by which we include old brown dwarfs, black holes, old white dwarfs, neutron stars, and perhaps exotic objects such as mirror matter stars or primordial black holes, can only be studied by their gravitational effects. Traditionally, these objects have been probed in binaries, and thus selected in a way that may or may not be representative of their respective field populations. The only way to examine the field population of these stars is through microlensing, the deflection of light from a visible star in the background by an object (dark or not) in the foreground. When lensed, there are two images of the background star. Although these images cannot be resolved when the lens has a stellar mass, the lensing effect can be detected in two ways: photometrically, i.e. by measuring the magnification of the source by the lens, and astrometrically, i.e. by measuring the shift in the centroid of the two images. Photometric microlensing experiments have detected hundreds of microlensing events over the past decade. Despite its successes, photometric microlensing has so far been somewhat frustrating because these events are difficult to interpret. Almost nothing is known about the masses of individual lenses and very little is known about the statistical properties of the lenses treated as a whole, such as their average mass. Although probably over 100 of the lenses are in fact dark objects, we can't determine which they are, let alone investigate finer details such as what their masses are, and where they are in the Galaxy. With SIM, we will break the microlensing degeneracy, and allow detailed interpretation of individual microlensing events. We

  18. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  19. On searches for gravitational waves from mini-creation events by laser interferometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmah, B. P.; Banerjee, S. K.; Dhurandhar, S. V.; Narlikar, J. V.

    2006-06-01

    As an alternative view to the standard big bang cosmology, the quasi-steady-state cosmology argues that the Universe was not created in a single great explosion: it did not have a beginning, nor will it ever come to an end. The creation of new matter in the Universe is a regular feature occurring through finite explosive events. Each creation event is called a mini-bang, or a mini-creation event. Gravitational waves are expected to be generated as a result of any anisotropy present in this process of creation. A mini-creation event that ejects matter in two oppositely directed jets is thus a source of gravitational waves, which can in principle be detected by laser interferometric detectors. In the present work we consider the gravitational waveforms propagated by linear jets and then estimate the response of laser interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  20. Do Elevated Gravitational-Force Events While Driving Predict Crashes and Near Crashes?

    PubMed Central

    Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Zhang, Zhiwei; Jackson, John C.; Albert, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the extent to which elevated gravitational-force event rates predict crashes and near crashes. Accelerometers, global positioning systems, cameras, and other technology were installed in vehicles driven by 42 newly licensed Virginia teenage drivers for a period of 18 months between 2006 and 2009. Elevated gravitational force and crash and near-crash events were identified, and rates per miles driven were calculated. (One mile = 1.6 km.) The correlation between crashes and near crashes and elevated gravitational-force event rates was 0.60. Analyses were done by using generalized estimating equations with logistic regression. Higher elevated gravitational-force event rates in the past month substantially increased the risk of a crash in the subsequent month (odds ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.12). Although the difference in this relation did not vary significantly by time, it was highest in the first 6 months compared with the second and third 6-month periods. With a receiver operating characteristic curve, the risk models showed relatively high predictive accuracy with an area under the curve of 0.76. The authors conclude that elevated gravitational-force event rates can be used to assess risk and to show high predictive accuracy of a near-future crash. PMID:22271924

  1. MACHO project 2nd year LMC microlensing results and dark matter implications

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R.A.; Alves, D.

    1996-02-01

    The MACHO Project is searching for galactic dark matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (Machos). Millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and Galactic bulge are photometrically monitored in an attempt to detect rare gravitational microlensing events caused by otherwise invisible Machos. Analysis of two years of photometry on 8.5 million stars in the LMC reveals 8 candidate microlensing events, far more than the one event expected from lensing by low-mass stars in known galactic populations. Five these eight events we estimate the optical depth towards the LMC from events with 2 < i < 200 days to be r2 280 about 2.9+1 4/-0.8 X 10-7. This exceeds the optical depth of 0.5 x 10-7 expected for known stars and is to be compared with an optical depth of 4.7 X 10-7 predicted for a `standard` halo composed entirely of Machos. The total mass in this lensing population is 2 +1.2/-0.7 x 10+11 Mo (within 50 kpc from the Galactic center). Event timescales yield a most probable Macho Mass of 0.5 +0.3/-0.2 Mo, although this value is quite model dependent. -0.2

  2. Microlensing of quasar ultraviolet iron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Muñoz, J. A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.; Rojas, K.

    2013-12-01

    We measure the differential microlensing of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission line blends between 14 quasar image pairs in 13 gravitational lenses. We find that the UV iron emission is strongly microlensed in four cases with amplitudes comparable to that of the continuum. Statistically modeling the magnifications, we infer a typical size of r{sub s}∼4√(M/M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the Fe line-emitting regions, which is comparable to the size of the region generating the UV continuum (∼3-7 light-days). This may indicate that a significant part of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission originates in the quasar accretion disk.

  3. The MACHO project: Microlensing and variable stars

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Bennett, D. P.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.

    1996-10-01

    The MACHO Project monitors millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud and the bulge of the Milky Way searching for the gravitational microlensing signature of baryonic dark matter. This Project has yielded surprising results. An analysis of two years of data monitoring the Large Magellanic Cloud points to {approximately} 50% of the mass of the Milky Way`s halo in compact objects of {approximately} 0.5 solar mass. An analysis of one year of monitoring the bulge has yielded more microlensing than predicted without invocation of a massive bar or significant disk dark matter. The huge database of light curves created by this search is yielding information on extremely rare types of astrophysical variability as well as providing temporal detail for the study of well known variable astrophysical phenomena. The variable star catalog created from this database is previewed and example light curves are presented. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. THE MICROLENSING PROPERTIES OF A SAMPLE OF 87 LENSED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, A. M.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing is a powerful tool for probing the physical properties of quasar accretion disks and properties of the lens galaxy such as its dark matter fraction and mean stellar mass. Unfortunately, the number of lensed quasars ({approx}90) exceeds our monitoring capabilities. Thus, estimating their microlensing properties is important for identifying good microlensing candidates as well as for the expectations of future surveys. In this work, we estimate the microlensing properties of a sample of 87 lensed quasars. While the median Einstein radius crossing timescale is 20.6 years, the median source crossing timescale is 7.3 months. Broadly speaking, this means that on {approx}10 year timescales roughly half the lenses will be quiescent, with the source in a broad demagnified valley, and roughly half will be active with the source lying in the caustic ridges. We also found that the location of the lens system relative to the cosmic microwave background dipole has a modest effect on microlensing timescales, and in theory microlensing could be used to confirm the kinematic origin of the dipole. As a corollary of our study we analyzed the accretion rate parameters in a sub-sample of 32 lensed quasars. At fixed black hole mass, it is possible to sample a broad range of luminosities (i.e., Eddington factors) if it becomes feasible to monitor fainter lenses.

  5. REVEALING THE STRUCTURE OF AN ACCRETION DISK THROUGH ENERGY-DEPENDENT X-RAY MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chartas, G.; Moore, D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Mosquera, A. M.; Blackburne, J. A.; Dai, X.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from monitoring observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar RX J1131-1231 performed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The X-ray observations were planned with relatively long exposures that allowed a search for energy-dependent microlensing in the soft (0.2-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) light curves of the images of RX J1131-1231. We detect significant microlensing in the X-ray light curves of images A and D, and energy-dependent microlensing of image D. The magnification of the soft band appears to be larger than that in the hard band by a factor of {approx}1.3 when image D becomes more magnified. This can be explained by the difference between a compact, softer-spectrum corona that is producing a more extended, harder spectrum reflection component off the disk. This is supported by the evolution of the fluorescent iron line in image D over three consecutive time-averaged phases of the light curve. In the first period, an Fe line at E = 6.35{sup +0.14}{sub -0.14} keV is detected (at >99% confidence). In the second period, two Fe lines are detected, one at E = 5.50{sup +0.03}{sub -0.08} keV (detected at >99% confidence) and another at E = 6.04{sup +0.10}{sub -0.07} keV (marginally detected at >90% confidence), and in the third period, a broadened Fe line at 6.42{sup +0.16}{sub -0.14} keV is detected (at >99% confidence). This evolution of the Fe line profile during the microlensing event is consistent with the line distortion expected when a caustic passes over the inner disk where the shape of the fluorescent Fe line is distorted by general relativistic and Doppler effects.

  6. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  7. Studies on the high-energy follow-up of gravitational wave transient events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzano, Massimiliano; Patricelli, Barbara; Cella, Giancarlo; Fidecaro, Francesco; Pian, Elena; Stamerra, Antonio; Branchesi, Marica

    2016-05-01

    Second-generation gravitational wave interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, will soon reach sensitivities sufficient to first detect gravitational waves and open a new era in the multi-messenger investigations of the cosmos. The most violent and energetic astrophysical phenomena, including the mergers of compact objects or the core collapse of massive stars, are promising sources of gravitational waves, and are thought to be connected with transient phenomena such as Gamma Ray Bursts and supernovae. Combined observations of gravitational and electromagnetic signals from these events will thus provide a unique opportunity to unveil their progenitors and study the physics of compact objects. In particular, gamma-ray ground-based and space observatories such as Fermi or the Air Cherenkov Telescopes will be crucial to observe the high-energy electromagnetic counterparts of transient gravitational wave signals and provide a robust identification based on a precise sky localization. We will report on our studies of possible joint observation strategies carried on by gravitational interferometers and gamma-ray telescopes, with particular attention to the high-energy follow-up of Gamma Ray Bursts.

  8. Determination of Microlensing Selection Criteria for the SuperMACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, A

    2008-10-10

    The SuperMACHO project is a 5 year survey to determine the nature of the lens population responsible for the excess microlensing rate toward the Large Magellanic Cloud observed by the MACHO project [1]. The survey probes deeper than earlier surveys unveiling many more extragalactic contaminants, particularly type Ia supernovae and active galactic nuclei. Using {approx}10{sup 7} simulated light curves of both microlensing events and type Ia supernovae we determine selection criteria optimized to maximize the microlensing detection efficiency while minimizing the contamination rate from non-microlensing events. We discuss these simulations and the selection criteria.

  9. Microlensing and the structure of active galactic nucleus accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, Kevin P.; Blandford, Roger D.

    1991-01-01

    Rapid variability has been reported in two of the four gravitationally lensed images of Q2237 + 0305, and this is attributed to microlensing caused by the intervening stars. The associated constraints on the source size and properties are studied and compared with a variety of stationary accretion disk models. The reported microlensing variation in Q2237 + 0305 requires the disk size to be over 3 times smaller than a blackbody disk of similar luminosity, implying that the optical emission is either nonthermal or optically tin. An exploration of nonstationary disk models including orbiting, transient hot spots leads to a similar conclusion. Implications for models of active galactic nucleus optical continua are briefly discussed.

  10. Microlenses of smectic flowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Francesca; Gharbi, Mohamed-Amine; Liu, Iris B.; Luo, Yimin; Bade, Nathan D.; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2015-03-01

    The search for new and tunable optical components finds suitable candidates in liquid crystals, which have both reconfigurability and unique optical properties. Here we discuss smectic liquid crystals arranged in focal conic domains (FCDs), which can work as gradient-refractive index microlenses. We exploit this property to create an assembly of microlenses that resembles an insect compound eye. The system consists of a thin layer of smectics on a substrate patterned with microposts. The smectic film is pinned at the microposts, creating a curved interface that induces a hierarchical assembly of FCDs called the ''flower pattern'': each FCD resembles the petal of a flower around the micropost. The arrangement of FCDs, with the largest FCDs pinned at the top of the microposts and the smallest FCDs in the low-curvature regions far from the post, is mirrored into a hierarchy of focal lengths of the microlenses. This structure is reconfigurable by melting and cooling and it allows visualizing objects placed at different distances, hence it can be exploited for 3D image reconstruction. Similarly to the insect eyes, the flower pattern is sensitive to light polarization: the large FCDs, with the largest eccentricity, only work as microlenses for one direction of light polarization. We thank the MRSEC NSF Grant DMR11-20901.

  11. High-Energy Neutrino follow-up of first gravitational wave event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleiro, Alexis; Baret, Bruny; Pradier, Thierry; ANTARES collaboration

    2017-09-01

    On September 14th 2015, LIGO/Virgo collaboration has detected the first significant gravitational wave event. Consequently, a neutrino followup was performed using both ANTARES and IceCube online data selection to search for a potential neutrino counterpart to this event. No neutrino candidate in both temporal and spatial coincidence with GW150914 had been detected within ± 500 s from the event. This non-detection was used to constrain the neutrino fluence and the total energy emitted in neutrinos for a standard E‑2 source spectrum as well as a spectral cutoff at 100 TeV. This first joint study does demonstrate the multimessenger synergies between ANTARES, IceCube and LIGO/Virgo. A coincident gravitational wave and neutrino detection would open a new era in multimessenger astrophysics.

  12. Microlensing on extended structures having a spherically-symmetric mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V.; Alexandrov, A.; Stashko, O.

    2016-06-01

    Different dark matter (DM) models predict various clustering properties, i.e. the possibility of DM to form massive objects on different scales. The lower mass limit of these objects according to [1, 2]. may be of the order of planetary masses. The gravitational microlensing can be used to confirm or to reject the existence of such structures and therefore to argue in favor or against concrete DM theories. There are observational programs (OGLE, EROS etc) yielding the light curves of a remote objects in high amplification events (HAE) due to microlensing on foreground masses of the Galaxy. In case when the foreground mass is an extended one, then the light curve in HAE must differ from the light curve due to ordinary microlensing on a point mass. However the question is: what is the value of this difference and is it possible to register this difference with modern observational facilities. This question has been studied elsewhere [3–5] by means of special model lens mappings. In this paper we study this problem starting directly from mass distribution of the extended structure. Namely, we consider microlensing on an extended DM clump with the cored spherically-symmetric mass profile (without a singularity in the center). We present examples of the amplification curves in both cases. Then we generate the amplification curves in case of the extended clump model for different values R, γ when the clump moves uniformly with respect to the line of sight with some impact parameter p and velocity V. These curves are then fitted with the point microlens model (with free parameters p and V) and we estimate the difference between the curves. The general outcome is that the amplification curves in case of the extended clumps are very similar to those in case of the point microlens (with appropriately chosen parameters p and V that cannot be derived from observations independently), and it would be difficult to distinguish them on the basis of observations if we deal with

  13. A new parameter space study of cosmological microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2013-09-01

    Cosmological gravitational microlensing is a useful technique for understanding the structure of the inner parts of a quasar, especially the accretion disc and the central supermassive black hole. So far, most of the cosmological microlensing studies have focused on single objects from ˜90 currently known lensed quasars. However, present and planned all-sky surveys are expected to discover thousands of new lensed systems. Using a graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated ray-shooting code, we have generated 2550 magnification maps uniformly across the convergence (κ) and shear (γ) parameter space of interest to microlensing. We examine the effect of random realizations of the microlens positions on map properties such as the magnification probability distribution (MPD). It is shown that for most of the parameter space a single map is representative of an average behaviour. All of the simulations have been carried out on the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysics Research.

  14. High-energy neutrino follow-up search of gravitational wave event GW150914 with ANTARES and IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Pǎvǎlaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Antares Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present the high-energy-neutrino follow-up observations of the first gravitational wave transient GW150914 observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors on September 14, 2015. We search for coincident neutrino candidates within the data recorded by the IceCube and Antares neutrino detectors. A possible joint detection could be used in targeted electromagnetic follow-up observations, given the significantly better angular resolution of neutrino events compared to gravitational waves. We find no neutrino candidates in both temporal and spatial coincidence with the gravitational wave event. Within ±500 s of the gravitational wave event, the number of neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and Antares were three and zero, respectively. This is consistent with the expected atmospheric background, and none of the neutrino candidates were directionally coincident with GW150914. We use this nondetection to constrain neutrino emission from the gravitational-wave event.

  15. Modeling of the Microlensed Fe Kα Emission from the Quasar RX J1131-1231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric; Chartas, George

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of detailed general relativistic ray tracing simulations of the microlensed Fe Kα emission from the gravitationally lensed quasar RX J1131-1231. The microlensing can amplify the extremely red and blueshifted emission from the innermost parts of the accretion flow. We present a systematic exploration of the quasar and microlensing parameter spaces. The comparison of the simulated energy spectra with RX J1131-1231 energy spectra obtained with the Chandra X-ray telescope allows us to constrain the spin and inclination of the black hole and the properties of the lensing galaxy including its stellar to dark matter mass ratio.

  16. Observation of the microlensing toward the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, V. V.; Sazhin, M. V.; Gorbatko, N. P.

    Observation of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) stars microlensed by dark bodies in the halo of our Galaxy is considered. Observations toward the Andromeda galaxy significantly increase the probability to reveal microlensing effects in comparison with MACHO and EROS procedures for observations of LMC and SMC. This is due to: greater amount of background stars (stars from M31) for which it is possible to observe the microlensing effect; greater distance to M31 (690 kps). This fact allows us to consider ALL the dark bodies in our Galaxy whereas LMC and SMC are actually situated INSIDE (55 kps) the halo of the Galaxy. The probability of microlensing effects, their characteristic times and the maximum factor of M31 star brightness amplification are estimated for different models. If the mass of a dark body in the halo of our Galaxy is of the order of 1M, it is possible to detect 5-6 microlensing events in one year. When the maximum factor of brightness amplification is 10, the characteristic time of the event is 7-10 days. If masses of dark bodies is of the order of 10-3 M it is possible detect 175-200 events per year and duration of these events is 0.2-0.3 days provided that the maximum amplification factor is 10. Procedures of real astronomical observations to search for the microlensing effect are discussed in detail. Information about observational series obtained is given. This series was obtained with the telescope AFR-1 in observatory at Mount Majdanak in 1990-1992 (total duration of the series is about 1.5 years). Processing of long observational series is being performed for the purpose of revealing microlensing effect. Preliminary results of the processing are presented.

  17. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  18. Extracting Microlensing Signals from K2 Campaign 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Huang, C. X.; Udalski, A.; Soares-Furtado, M.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; KozŁowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.

    2017-10-01

    The reduction of the K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) microlensing data is challenging mostly because of the very crowded field and the unstable pointing of the spacecraft. In this work, we present the first method that can extract microlensing signals from this K2C9 data product. The raw light curves and the astrometric solutions are first derived using the techniques from Soares-Furtado et al. and Huang et al. for K2 dense field photometry. We then minimize and remove the systematic effect by performing simultaneous modeling with the microlensing signal. We also derive precise ({K}p-I) versus (V-I) color-color relations that can predict the microlensing source flux in the Kepler bandpass. By implementing the color-color relation in the light curve modeling, we show that the microlensing parameters can be better constrained. Finally, we use two example microlensing events, OGLE-2016-BLG-0980 and OGLE-2016-BLG-0940, to test our method.

  19. Direct imaging constraints on planet populations detected by microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanz, S. P.; Lafrenière, D.; Meyer, M. R.; Reggiani, M. M.; Buenzli, E.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Results from gravitational microlensing suggested the existence of a large population of free-floating planetary mass objects. The main conclusion from this work was partly based on constraints from a direct imaging survey. This survey determined upper limits for the frequency of stars that harbor giant exoplanets at large orbital separations. Aims: We want to verify to what extent upper limits from direct imaging do indeed constrain the microlensing results. Methods: We examine the current derivation of the upper limits used in the microlensing study and re-analyze the data from the corresponding imaging survey. We focus on the mass and semi-major axis ranges that are most relevant in context of the microlensing results. We also consider new results from a recent M-dwarf imaging survey as these objects are typically the host stars for planets detected by microlensing. Results: We find that the upper limits currently applied in context of the microlensing results are probably underestimated. This means that a larger fraction of stars than assumed may harbor gas giant planets at larger orbital separations. Also, the way the upper limit is currently used to estimate the fraction of free-floating objects is not strictly correct. If the planetary surface density of giant planets around M-dwarfs is described as dfPlanet ∝ aβda, we find that β ≲ 0.5-0.6 is consistent with results from different observational studies probing semi-major axes between ~0.03-30 AU. Conclusions: Having a higher upper limit on the fraction of stars that may have gas giant planets at orbital separations probed by the microlensing data implies that more of the planets detected in the microlensing study are potentially bound to stars rather than free-floating. The current observational data are consistent with a rising planetary surface density for giant exoplanets around M-dwarfs out to ~30 AU. Future direct imaging surveys will show out to what semi-major axis the above mentioned

  20. MEASURING MICROLENSING USING SPECTRA OF MULTIPLY LENSED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Munoz, J. A. E-mail: emg@iac.es E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es

    2012-08-10

    We report on a program of spectroscopic observations of gravitationally lensed QSOs with multiple images. We seek to establish whether microlensing is occurring in each QSO image using only single-epoch observations. We calculate flux ratios for the cores of emission lines in image pairs to set a baseline for no microlensing. The offset of the continuum flux ratios relative to this baseline yields the microlensing magnification free from extinction, as extinction affects the continuum and the lines equally. When we find chromatic microlensing, we attempt to constrain the size of the QSO accretion disk. SDSSJ1004+4112 and HE1104-1805 show chromatic microlensing with amplitudes 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.6 and 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.4 mag, respectively. Modeling the accretion disk with a Gaussian source (I{proportional_to}exp (- R{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s})) of size r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p} and using magnification maps to simulate microlensing, we find r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 7 {+-} 3 lt-day(18.1 {+-} 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.4 for SDSS1004+4112, and r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 6 {+-} 2 lt-day(15.5 {+-} 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 0.7 {+-} 0.1 for HE1104-1805. For SDSSJ1029+2623, we find strong chromaticity of {approx}0.4 mag in the continuum flux ratio, which probably arises from microlensing, although not all the available data fit within this explanation. For Q0957+561, we measure B - A magnitude differences of 0.4 mag, much greater than the {approx}0.05 mag amplitude usually inferred from light-curve variability. It may substantially modify the current interpretations of microlensing in this system, likely favoring the hypothesis of smaller sources and/or larger microdeflectors. For HS0818+1227, our data yield possible evidence of microlensing.

  1. Exoplanet Demographics with Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B.

    2014-04-01

    Because of its unique sensitivity to low-mass, long-period, and free-floating planets, microlensing is an essential complement to our arsenal of planet detection methods. I motivate microlensing surveys for exoplanets, and in particular describe how they can be used to test models for planet formation, as well as inform our understanding of the frequency and potential habitability of low-mass planets located in the habitable zones of their host stars. I review results from current microlensing surveys, and then discuss expectations for next-generation experiments. I explain why a space-based mission is necessary to realize the full potential of microlensing. When combined with the results from complementary surveys such as Kepler, a space-based microlensing survey will yield a nearly complete picture of the demographics of planetary systems throughout the Galaxy.

  2. Astrophysical applications of quasar microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, E.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a quick overview of several examples that illustrate the application of quasar microlensing to various problems of great interest in Astrophysics and Cosmology. We start introducing the main tool for simulating quasar microlensing, the magnification map. Then, the flux magnification statistics obtained from the magnification maps is used to study the quasar accretion disk size and temperature profile with results that challenge the thin disk model. The microlensing flux magnification statistics is also useful to determine the radial slope of the dark matter distribution in lens galaxies. The extremely high microlensing magnification at caustics allows to scan with horizon scale accuracy the quasar accretion disk, spiraling around the central super massive black hole, resolving the innermost stable circular orbit. Finally, transverse peculiar velocities of the lens galaxies, of great interest in cosmology, can be inferred either counting peaks in the microlensing light curves or directly from astrometric measurements of the highly magnified relative motions between lensed quasar images.

  3. INTEGRAL upper limits on gamma-ray emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Mereghetti, S.; Natalucci, L.; Kuulkers, E.

    2016-06-01

    Using observations of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), we put tight upper limits on the gamma-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914, discovered by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. The omni-directional view of the INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS has allowed us to constrain the fraction of energy emitted in the hard X-ray electromagnetic component for the full high-probability sky region of LIGO/Virgo trigger. Our upper limits on the hard X-ray fluence at the time of the event range from F_{γ}=2 × 10^{-8} erg cm^{-2} to F_{γ}=10^{-6} erg cm^{-2} in the 75 keV - 2 MeV energy range for typical spectral models. Our results constrain the ratio of the energy promptly released in gamma-rays in the direction of the observer to the gravitational wave energy E_γ/E_{GW}<10^{-6}. We discuss the implication of gamma-ray limits on the characteristics of the gravitational wave source, based on the available predictions for prompt electromagnetic emission. This work has been possible thanks to a Memorandum of Understanding with the LIGO-Virgo scientific collaboration and is presented on behalf of a larger collaboration.

  4. The Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets: Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleski, Radosław; Zhu, Wei; Christie, Grant W.; Udalski, Andrzej; Gould, Andrew; Bachelet, Etienne; Skottfelt, Jesper; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Group; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; Spitzer Team; Beatty, T. G.; Eastman, J. D.; Drummond, J.; Friedmann, M.; Henderson, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; McCrady, N.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Porritt, I.; Relles, H. M.; Sliski, D. H.; Tan, T.-G.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Wright, J. T.; μFUN Group; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Menzies, J.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Wambsganss, J.; Schmidt, R.; Cassan, A.; Ranc, C.; Mao, S.; project, RoboNet; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Hundertmark, M. P. G.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Rasmussen, R. T.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Verma, P.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEp Group

    2016-05-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ({{\\boldsymbol{μ }}}{cl}(N,E)=(+0.36+/- 0.10,+1.42+/- 0.10) {{mas}} {{{yr}}}-1) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE) photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between the Earth and Spitzer.

  5. First Searches for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational-Wave Candidate Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  6. First Searches for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational-wave Candidate Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kucharczyk, C.; Kudla, S.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lloyd, D.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Mokler, F.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.; Necula, V.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega Larcher, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Ou, J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pindor, B.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poole, V.; Poux, C.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Roever, C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Soden, K.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Sperandio, L.; Staley, A.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stevens, D.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vlcek, B.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vrinceanu, D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wibowo, S.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yum, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Akerlof, C.; Baltay, C.; Bloom, J. S.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Dhillon, V.; Fox, D. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Klotz, A.; Laas-Bourez, M.; Laher, R. R.; Law, N. M.; Majcher, A.; Małek, K.; Mankiewicz, L.; Nawrocki, K.; Nissanke, S.; Nugent, P. E.; Ofek, E. O.; Opiela, R.; Piotrowski, L.; Poznanski, D.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rapoport, S.; Richards, J. W.; Schmidt, B.; Siudek, M.; Sokołowski, M.; Steele, I. A.; Sullivan, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zheng, W.

    2014-03-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  7. Astrometric microlensing and rotation of extragalactic reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. I.; Alexandrov, A. N.; Fedorova, E. V.

    Gravitational field of foreground stars of the Galaxy causes additional motion of images of extragalactic sources. We estimate characteristics of stochastic and average motions of these images. The probability distribution for the image motions and their changes is obtained for general spatial density of microlenses. We show that collective motion of stars induces small nonzero dragging velocity of the reference frame. The results obtained are compared to the other relativistic effects in optical satellite-oriented reference frame.

  8. Effect of Binary Source Companions on the Microlensing Optical Depth Determination toward the Galactic Bulge Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho

    2005-11-01

    Currently, gravitational microlensing survey experiments toward the Galactic bulge field use two different methods of minimizing the blending effect for the accurate determination of the optical depth τ. One is measuring τ based on clump giant (CG) source stars, and the other is using ``difference image analysis'' (DIA) photometry to measure the unblended source flux variation. Despite the expectation that the two estimates should be the same assuming that blending is properly considered, the estimates based on CG stars systematically fall below the DIA results based on all events with source stars down to the detection limit. Prompted by the gap, we investigate the previously unconsidered effect of companion-associated events on τ determination. Although the image of a companion is blended with that of its primary star and thus not resolved, the event associated with the companion can be detected if the companion flux is highly magnified. Therefore, companions work effectively as source stars to microlensing, and thus the neglect of them in the source star count could result in a wrong τ estimation. By carrying out simulations based on the assumption that companions follow the same luminosity function as primary stars, we estimate that the contribution of the companion-associated events to the total event rate is ~5fbi% for current surveys and can reach up to ~6fbi% for future surveys monitoring fainter stars, where fbi is the binary frequency. Therefore, we conclude that the companion-associated events comprise a nonnegligible fraction of all events. However, their contribution to the optical depth is not large enough to explain the systematic difference between the optical depth estimates based on the two different methods.

  9. Variable focal length microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L. G., Commander; Day, S. E.; Selviah, D. R.

    2000-04-01

    Refractive surface relief microlenses (150 μm diameter) are immersed in nematic liquid crystal in a cell. Application of a variable voltage across the cell effectively varies the refractive index of the liquid crystal and results in a change of the focal length by the lensmakers formula (E. Hecht, Optics, 2nd edn., Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts, 1987, p. 138). We describe the cell design and construction and demonstrate a range of focal lengths from +490 to +1000 μm for 2 to 12 V applied. A diverging lens results when the voltage is lower. Theoretical models are developed to account for some of the observed aberrations.

  10. Search for Neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande Associated with Gravitational-wave Events GW150914 and GW151226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Haga, K.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Orii, A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tasaka, S.; Tomura, T.; Akutsu, R.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Gustafson, J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Nantais, C. M.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Park, R. G.; Himmel, A.; Li, Z.; O'Sullivan, E.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Ishizuka, T.; Nakamura, T.; Jang, J. S.; Choi, K.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Friend, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yano, T.; Cao, S. V.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Jiang, M.; Minamino, A.; Nakaya, T.; Patel, N. D.; Wendell, R. A.; Suzuki, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Itow, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Mijakowski, P.; Frankiewicz, K.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Li, X.; Palomino, J. L.; Santucci, G.; Wilking, M. J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Fukuda, D.; Ishino, H.; Kayano, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Xu, C.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Suda, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Bronner, C.; Calland, R. G.; Hartz, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Suzuki, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; Tanaka, H. A.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Wan, L.; Zhang, Y.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We report the results from a search in Super-Kamiokande for neutrino signals coincident with the first detected gravitational-wave events, GW150914 and GW151226, as well as LVT151012, using a neutrino energy range from 3.5 MeV to 100 PeV. We searched for coincident neutrino events within a time window of ±500 s around the gravitational-wave detection time. Four neutrino candidates are found for GW150914, and no candidates are found for GW151226. The remaining neutrino candidates are consistent with the expected background events. We calculated the 90% confidence level upper limits on the combined neutrino fluence for both gravitational-wave events, which depends on event energy and topologies. Considering the upward-going muon data set (1.6 GeV-100 PeV), the neutrino fluence limit for each gravitational-wave event is 14-37 (19-50) cm-2 for muon neutrinos (muon antineutrinos), depending on the zenith angle of the event. In the other data sets, the combined fluence limits for both gravitational-wave events range from 2.4 × 104 to 7.0 × 109 cm-2.

  11. Optimal survey strategies and predicted planet yields for the Korean microlensing telescope network

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Calen B.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Skowron, Jan; Penny, Matthew T.; Gould, Andrew P.; Han, Cheongho; Nataf, David

    2014-10-10

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) will consist of three 1.6 m telescopes each with a 4 deg{sup 2} field of view (FoV) and will be dedicated to monitoring the Galactic Bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. Here we present simulations that optimize the observing strategy for and predict the planetary yields of KMTNet. We find preferences for four target fields located in the central Bulge and an exposure time of t {sub exp} = 120 s, leading to the detection of ∼2200 microlensing events per year. We estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and 0.4 ≤ a/AU ≤ 16, respectively. Normalizing these rates to the cool-planet mass function of Cassan et al., we predict KMTNet will be approximately uniformly sensitive to planets with mass 5 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and will detect ∼20 planets per year per dex in mass across that range. For lower-mass planets with mass 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} < 5, we predict KMTNet will detect ∼10 planets per year. We also compute the yields KMTNet will obtain for free-floating planets (FFPs) and predict KMTNet will detect ∼1 Earth-mass FFP per year, assuming an underlying population of one such planet per star in the Galaxy. Lastly, we investigate the dependence of these detection rates on the number of observatories, the photometric precision limit, and optimistic assumptions regarding seeing, throughput, and flux measurement uncertainties.

  12. Testing LMC Microlensing Scenarios: The Discrimination Power of the SuperMACHO Microlensing Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A; Stubbs, C; Becker, A C; Miknaitis, G A; Miceli, A; Covarrubias, R; Hawley, S L; Smith, C; Suntzeff, N B; Olsen, K; Prieto, J; Hiriart, R; Welch, D L; Cook, K; Nikolaev, S; Proctor, G; Clocchiatti, A; Minniti, D; Garg, A; Challis, P; Keller, S C; Scmidt, B P

    2004-05-27

    Characterizing the nature and spatial distribution of the lensing objects that produce the observed microlensing optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains an open problem. They present an appraisal of the ability of the SuperMACHO Project, a next-generation microlensing survey pointed toward the LMC, to discriminate between various proposed lensing populations. they consider two scenarios: lensing by a uniform foreground screen of objects and self-lensing of LMC stars. The optical depth for ''screen-lensing'' is essentially constant across the face of the LMC; whereas, the optical depth for self-lensing shows a strong spatial dependence. they have carried out extensive simulations, based upon actual data obtained during the first year of the project, to assess the SuperMACHO survey's ability to discriminate between these two scenarios. In the simulations they predict the expected number of observed microlensing events for each of their fields by adding artificial stars to the images and estimating the spatial and temporal efficiency of detecting microlensing events using Monte-Carlo methods. They find that the event rate itself shows significant sensitivity to the choice of the LMC luminosity function shape and other parameters, limiting the conclusions which can be drawn from the absolute rate. By instead determining the differential event rate across the LMC, they can decrease the impact of these systematic uncertainties rendering the conclusions more robust. With this approach the SuperMACHO Project should be able to distinguish between the two categories of lens populations and provide important constraints on the nature of the lensing objects.

  13. Event Rate for LISA Gravitational Wave Signals from Black Hole-Massive Black Hole Coalescences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2002-01-01

    Earlier work under a previous grant had been mainly on investigating the event rate for coalescences of white dwarfs or neutron stars with massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Under the new grant, two studies were undertaken. One was an approximate extension of the earlier study to stellar mass black holes as the lighter object, with masses in the range of roughly 3 to 20 solar mass rather than about 1 solar mass. The other was an improved estimate of the confusion noise due to galactic binaries against which the signals from BH-MBH coalescences would have to be detected. In the earlier work, the mass of the white dwarfs (WDs) and neutron stars (NSs) was assumed to be about the same as that of the evolved stars in the density cusp around the galactic center MBH. However, with the BH mass being substantially larger, the sinking down of pHs toward the center (mass segregation) became important, and was included in the model. A single representative mass of 7 solar mass was used. The other main difference involved what happened after the compact object got scattered in close enough to the MBH to start losing appreciable energy and angular momentum by gravitational radiation. For WDs or NSs, it had been found in most cases that the object would be perturbed considerably by other stars in the cusp before much energy had been lost. Thus the angular momentum would either increase enough so that gravitational radiation would be cut off, or would decrease enough so that the WD or NS would plunge into the MBH in just a few revolutions. The latter event would mean that the signal-to noise ratio would not have time to build up, and the event would not be detectable. The ratio of gradual energy loss events to plunges was found to be roughly one to a few percent, and thus substantially decreased the expected rate of detectable events.

  14. Fermi GBM Observations of LIGO Gravitational-Wave Event Gw150914

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Zhang, B.-B.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Hui, C. M.; Jenke, P.; hide

    2016-01-01

    With an instantaneous view of 70% of the sky, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an excellent partner in the search for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events. GBM observations at the time of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) event GW150914 reveal the presence of a weak transient above 50 keV, 0.4 s after the GW event, with a false-alarm probability of 0.0022 (2.9(sigma)). This weak transient lasting 1 s was not detected by any other instrument and does not appear to be connected with other previously known astrophysical, solar, terrestrial, or magnetospheric activity. Its localization is ill-constrained but consistent with the direction of GW150914. The duration and spectrum of the transient event are consistent with a weak short gamma-ray burst (GRB) arriving at a large angle to the direction in which Fermi was pointing where the GBM detector response is not optimal. If the GBM transient is associated with GW150914, then this electromagnetic signal from a stellar mass black hole binary merger is unexpected. We calculate a luminosity in hard X-ray emission between 1 keV and 10 MeV of 1.8(sup +1.5, sub -1.0) x 10(exp 49) erg/s. Future joint observations of GW events by LIGO/Virgo and Fermi GBM could reveal whether the weak transient reported here is a plausible counterpart to GW150914 or a chance coincidence, and will further probe the connection between compact binary mergers and short GRBs.

  15. Infographic: Finding Planets With Microlensing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-14

    This infographic explains how NASA Spitzer Space Telescope can be used in tandem with a telescope on the ground to measure the distances to planets discovered using the microlensing technique. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19332

  16. Primordial Black Hole Scenario for the Gravitational-Wave Event GW150914.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Misao; Suyama, Teruaki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2016-08-05

    We point out that the gravitational-wave event GW150914 observed by the LIGO detectors can be explained by the coalescence of primordial black holes (PBHs). It is found that the expected PBH merger rate would exceed the rate estimated by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration if PBHs were the dominant component of dark matter, while it can be made compatible if PBHs constitute a fraction of dark matter. Intriguingly, the abundance of PBHs required to explain the suggested lower bound on the event rate, >2  events  Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1}, roughly coincides with the existing upper limit set by the nondetection of the cosmic microwave background spectral distortion. This implies that the proposed PBH scenario may be tested in the not-too-distant future.

  17. Creep events and creep noise in gravitational-wave interferometers: Basic formalism and stationary limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    In gravitational-wave interferometers, test masses are suspended on thin fibers which experience considerable tension stress. Sudden microscopic stress release in a suspension fiber, which I call a “creep event,” would excite motion of the test mass that would be coupled to the interferometer’s readout. The random test-mass motion due to a time sequence of creep events is referred to as “creep noise.” In this paper I present an elastodynamic calculation for the test-mass motion due to a creep event. I show that within a simple suspension model, the main coupling to the optical readout occurs via a combination of a “dc” horizontal displacement of the test mass and excitation of the violin and pendulum modes, and not, as was thought previously, via lengthening of the fiber. When the creep events occur sufficiently frequently and their statistics is time independent, the creep noise can be well approximated by a stationary Gaussian random process. I derive the functional form of the creep noise spectral density in this limit, with the restrictive assumption that the creep events are statistically independent from each other.

  18. Gravitational lensing of gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kei Wong, Wang; Ng, Kwan Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational lensing phenomena are widespread in electromagnetic astrophysics, and in principle may also be uncovered with gravitational waves. We examine gravitational wave events lensed by elliptical galaxies in the limit of geometric optics, where we expect to see multiple signals from the same event with different arrival times and amplitudes. By using mass functions for compact binaries from population-synthesis simulations and a lensing probability calculated from Planck data, we estimate the rate of lensed signals for future gravitational wave missions.

  19. Microlensing Effects on Emission Lines from Homologously Expanding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Bryce, H. M.; Hendry, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    We have been investigating the influence of microlensing on a variety of spectroscopic signatures relevant to circumstellar flows. Here we report on recent results for line profiles that form in spherically symmetric winds during a microlensing event. As a convenient test case, we have adopted a homologous velocity law (v ∝ r, from r=Rphot to rmax). Results are discussed for resonance scattering P Cygni lines and recombination emission lines. Somewhat surprisingly, the rectified line profiles show rather mild variations in response to microlensing. The reason is that both the line emission from the extended wind and the stellar photosphere are lensed, so that the strong magnification effects of lensing seen in either component are partially supressed when showing the continuum normalized spectrum (which is the common form of display for such data). Still, significant and observable variations in the line equivalent width do result. This research has been supported in part by NSF grant AST-0354261.

  20. A DECam Search for an Optical Counterpart to the LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW151226

    DOE PAGES

    Cowperthwaite, P.S.; et al.

    2016-07-29

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera optical follow-up of the gravitational-wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg(2) of the localization region in the i and z bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hr after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at 2–24 days after the GW detection. We achievemore » $$5\\sigma $$ point-source limiting magnitudes of $$i\\approx 21.7$$ and $$z\\approx 21.5$$, with a scatter of 0.4 mag, in our difference images. Given the two-day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with $$\\gtrsim 3\\sigma $$ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged active galactic nuclei. The fourth source is offset by 5.8 arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by 0.5 mag over 4 days, and has a red color of $$i-z\\approx 0.3$$ mag. These properties could satisfy a set of cuts designed to identify kilonovae. However, this source was detected several times, starting 94 days prior to GW151226, in the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (dubbed as PS15cdi) and is therefore unrelated to the GW event. Given its long-term behavior, PS15cdi is likely a Type IIP supernova that transitioned out of its plateau phase during our observations, mimicking a kilonova-like behavior. We comment on the implications of this detection for contamination in future optical follow-up observations.« less

  1. A DECam Search for an Optical Counterpart to the LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW151226

    SciTech Connect

    Cowperthwaite, P.S.; et al.

    2016-07-29

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera optical follow-up of the gravitational-wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg(2) of the localization region in the i and z bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hr after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at 2–24 days after the GW detection. We achieve $5\\sigma $ point-source limiting magnitudes of $i\\approx 21.7$ and $z\\approx 21.5$, with a scatter of 0.4 mag, in our difference images. Given the two-day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with $\\gtrsim 3\\sigma $ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged active galactic nuclei. The fourth source is offset by 5.8 arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by 0.5 mag over 4 days, and has a red color of $i-z\\approx 0.3$ mag. These properties could satisfy a set of cuts designed to identify kilonovae. However, this source was detected several times, starting 94 days prior to GW151226, in the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (dubbed as PS15cdi) and is therefore unrelated to the GW event. Given its long-term behavior, PS15cdi is likely a Type IIP supernova that transitioned out of its plateau phase during our observations, mimicking a kilonova-like behavior. We comment on the implications of this detection for contamination in future optical follow-up observations.

  2. A DECam Search for an Optical Counterpart to the LIGO Gravitational-wave Event GW151226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Berger, E.; Soares-Santos, M.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chen, H. Y.; Chornock, R.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gill, M. S. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Herner, K.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Matheson, T.; Metzger, B. D.; Neilsen, E. H., Jr.; Quataert, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Strampelli, G. M.; Villar, V. A.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Williams, P. K. G.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Weller, J.; DES Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera optical follow-up of the gravitational-wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg2 of the localization region in the i and z bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hr after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at 2-24 days after the GW detection. We achieve 5σ point-source limiting magnitudes of i≈ 21.7 and z≈ 21.5, with a scatter of 0.4 mag, in our difference images. Given the two-day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with ≳ 3σ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged active galactic nuclei. The fourth source is offset by 5.8 arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by 0.5 mag over 4 days, and has a red color of i-z≈ 0.3 mag. These properties could satisfy a set of cuts designed to identify kilonovae. However, this source was detected several times, starting 94 days prior to GW151226, in the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (dubbed as PS15cdi) and is therefore unrelated to the GW event. Given its long-term behavior, PS15cdi is likely a Type IIP supernova that transitioned out of its plateau phase during our observations, mimicking a kilonova-like behavior. We comment on the implications of this detection for contamination in future optical follow-up observations.

  3. A DECam Search for an Optical Counterpart to the LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW151226

    SciTech Connect

    Cowperthwaite, P. S.

    2016-07-29

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera optical follow-up of the gravitational-wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg(2) of the localization region in the i and z bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hr after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at 2–24 days after the GW detection. We achieve $5\\sigma $ point-source limiting magnitudes of $i\\approx 21.7$ and $z\\approx 21.5$, with a scatter of 0.4 mag, in our difference images. Given the two-day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with $\\gtrsim 3\\sigma $ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged active galactic nuclei. The fourth source is offset by 5.8 arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by 0.5 mag over 4 days, and has a red color of $i-z\\approx 0.3$ mag. These properties could satisfy a set of cuts designed to identify kilonovae. However, this source was detected several times, starting 94 days prior to GW151226, in the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (dubbed as PS15cdi) and is therefore unrelated to the GW event. Given its long-term behavior, PS15cdi is likely a Type IIP supernova that transitioned out of its plateau phase during our observations, mimicking a kilonova-like behavior. We comment on the implications of this detection for contamination in future optical follow-up observations.

  4. A DECam Search for an Optical Counterpart to the LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW151226

    DOE PAGES

    Cowperthwaite, P. S.

    2016-07-29

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera optical follow-up of the gravitational-wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg(2) of the localization region in the i and z bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hr after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at 2–24 days after the GW detection. We achievemore » $$5\\sigma $$ point-source limiting magnitudes of $$i\\approx 21.7$$ and $$z\\approx 21.5$$, with a scatter of 0.4 mag, in our difference images. Given the two-day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with $$\\gtrsim 3\\sigma $$ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged active galactic nuclei. The fourth source is offset by 5.8 arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by 0.5 mag over 4 days, and has a red color of $$i-z\\approx 0.3$$ mag. These properties could satisfy a set of cuts designed to identify kilonovae. However, this source was detected several times, starting 94 days prior to GW151226, in the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (dubbed as PS15cdi) and is therefore unrelated to the GW event. Given its long-term behavior, PS15cdi is likely a Type IIP supernova that transitioned out of its plateau phase during our observations, mimicking a kilonova-like behavior. We comment on the implications of this detection for contamination in future optical follow-up observations.« less

  5. Detecting Extrasolar Asteroid Belts Through Their Microlensing Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ethan; Zheng, Zheng; Dong, Subo

    2016-03-01

    We propose that extrasolar asteroid belts can be detected through their gravitational microlensing signatures and present a simple theoretical understanding of how asteroid belts behave as gravitational lenses. Asteroid belt + star lens systems create so-called ``pseudo-caustics'', which are regions in the source plane where the magnification of the source exhibits a discontinuous jump. Such a magnification change can be associated with either a change in image multiplicity or with a sudden change in the size of an image. The existence of pseudo-caustics and the complex interplay between them and the formal caustics (which possess formally infinite magnification) lead to several interesting consequences, such as the presence of open caustics and the violation of Burke's theorem. These features allow such systems to generate very distinctive microlensing light curves across a wide region of asteroid belt parameter space and possess remarkably large lensing cross-sections. By constructing simulated light curves for a range of asteroid belt parameters, we demonstrate that upcoming space-based microlensing surveys like WFIRST are well-poised to discover extrasolar asteroid belts with masses on the order of 0 . 1M⊕ .

  6. MICROLENSING BINARIES WITH CANDIDATE BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during the 2004-2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found seven candidate events: OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} and 0.019 {+-} 0.002 M {sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well-covered light curves increases with new-generation searches.

  7. Event Trigger Generator for Gravitational-Wave Data based on Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Edwin J.; Chu, Hyoungseok; Kim, Young-Min; Blackburn, Lindy; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kim, Hwansun; Oh, John J.; Oh, Sang Hoon; Robinet, Florent

    2015-08-01

    The Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is composed of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA). The EMD decomposes any time series data into a small number of components called the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs), compared to the Discrete Fourier Transform which decomposes a data into a large number of harmonic functions. Each IMF has varying amplitude and frequency with respect to time, which can be obtained by HSA. The time resolution of the modes in HHT is the same as that of the given time series, while in the Wavelet Transform, Constant Q Transform and Short-Time Fourier Transform, there is a tradeoff between the resolutions in frequency and time. Based on the time-dependent amplitudes of IMFs, we develop an Event Trigger Generator and demonstrate its efficiency by applying it to gravitational-wave mock data.

  8. Electromagnetic counterparts to Gravitational Wave events with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, Giacomo; Omodei, Nicola; Racusin, Judith L.; McEnery, Julie E.; Chiang, James; Buson, Sara; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    At least a fraction of Gravitational Wave (GW) progenitors is expected to emit an electromagnetic (EM) signal in the form of a short gamma-ray burst (sGRB). The discovery of such a transient EM counterpart is challenging because the LIGO/VIRGO localization region is much larger (several hundreds of square degrees) than the field of view of X-ray, optical and radio telescopes. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has a wide field of view (~ 2.4 sr), and detects ~2-3 sGRBs per year above 100 MeV. It can detect them not only during the short prompt phase but also during their long-lasting high-energy afterglow phase. If other wide-field high-energy instruments such as Fermi-GBM, Swift-BAT or INTEGRAL-ISGRI cannot detect or localize with enough precision an EM counterpart during the prompt phase, the LAT can potentially pinpoint it with < 10 arcmin accuracy during the afterglow phase. This routinely happens in the case of gamma-ray bursts. Moreover, the LAT covers the entire localization region within hours of any GW triggers during normal operations, allowing upper bounds to be evaluated. This has been demonstrated in the case of the three known GW events (GW150914, LVT151012, and GW151226). Over the coming years, as LIGO and Virgo approach design sensitivity and will soon be able to detect these mergers, LAT will continue to provide a unique capability to potentially localize and characterize gravitational wave events.

  9. Swift Follow-Up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-Wave Transient Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  10. Combining Gravitational Wave Events with their Electromagnetic Counterparts: A Realistic Joint False-Alarm Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LIGO Team

    2017-01-01

    We present a false-alarm rate for a joint detection of gravitational wave (GW) events and associated electromagnetic (EM) counterparts for Advanced LIGO and Virgo (LV) observations during the first years of operation. Using simulated GW events and their recostructed probability skymaps, we tile over the error regions using sets of archival wide-field telescope survey images and recover the number of astrophysical transients to be expected during LV-EM followup. With the known GW event injection coordinates we inject artificial electromagnetic (EM) sources at that site based on theoretical and observational models on a one-to-one basis. We calculate the EM false-alarm probability using an unsupervised machine learning algorithm based on shapelet analysis which has shown to be a strong discriminator between astrophysical transients and image artifacts while reducing the set of transients to be manually vetted by five orders of magnitude. We also show the performance of our method in context with other machine-learned transient classification and reduction algorithms, showing comparability without the need for a large set of training data opening the possibility for next-generation telescopes to take advantage of this pipeline for LV-EM followup missions.

  11. Swift Follow-up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-wave Transient Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eikenberry, S.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McDaniel, P.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  12. Topics in gravitation - numerical simulations of event horizons and parameter estimation for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Michael Isaac

    2011-08-01

    In Part I, we consider numerical simulations of event horizons. Event horizons are the defining physical features of black hole spacetimes, and are of considerable interest in studying black hole dynamics. Here, we reconsider three techniques to find event horizons in numerical spacetimes, and find that straightforward integration of geodesics backward in time is most robust. We apply this method to various systems, from a highly spinning Kerr hole through to an asymmetric binary black hole inspiral. We find that the exponential rate at which outgoing null geodesics diverge from the event horizon of a Kerr black hole is the surface gravity of the hole. In head-on mergers we are able to track quasi-normal ringing of the merged black hole through seven oscillations, covering a dynamic range of about 10^5. In the head-on "kick" merger, we find that computing the Landau-Lifshitz velocity of the event horizon is very useful for an improved understanding of the kick behaviour. Finally, in the inspiral simulations, we find that the topological structure of the black holes does not produce an intermediate toroidal phase, though the structure is consistent with a potential re-slicing of the spacetime in order to introduce such a phase. We further discuss the topological structure of non-axisymmetric collisions. In Part II, we consider parameter estimation of cosmic string burst gravitational waves in Mock LISA data. A network of observable, macroscopic cosmic (super-)strings may well have formed in the early Universe. If so, the cusps that generically develop on cosmic-string loops emit bursts of gravitational radiation that could be detectable by gravitational-wave interferometers, such as the ground-based LIGO/Virgo detectors and the planned, space-based LISA detector. We develop two versions of a LISA-oriented string-burst search pipeline within the context of the Mock LISA Data Challenges, which rely on the publicly available MultiNest and PyMC software packages

  13. Effects of Kerr strong gravity on quasar x-ray microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, E.; Kantowski, R.

    2013-06-01

    Recent quasar microlensing observations have constrained the sizes of X-ray emission regions to be within about 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. Therefore, the X-ray emission from lensed quasars is first strongly lensed by the black hole before it is lensed by the foreground galaxy and star fields. We present a scheme that combines the initial strong lensing of a Kerr black hole with standard linearized microlensing by intervening stars. We find that X-ray microlensed light curves incorporating Kerr strong gravity can differ significantly from standard curves. The amplitude of the fluctuations in the light curves can increase or decrease by ∼0.65-0.75 mag by including Kerr strong gravity. Larger inclination angles give larger amplitude fluctuations in the microlensing light curves. Consequently, current X-ray microlensing observations can under or overestimate the sizes of the X-ray emission regions. We estimate this bias using a simple metric based on the amplitude of magnitude fluctuations. The half-light radius of the X-ray emission region can be underestimated by up to ∼50% or overestimated by up to ∼20% depending on the spin of the black hole, the emission profile, and the inclination angle of the observer. Underestimates were found in most situations we investigated. The only exception was for a disk with large spin and a radially flat emission profile, observed nearly face-on. We thus conclude that more accurate microlensing size constraints should be obtainable by including Kerr lensing. We also find that the caustic crossing time can differ by months when Kerr strong gravity is included. A simultaneous monitoring of gravitational lensed quasars in both X-ray and optical bands with densely sampled X-ray light curves should reveal this feature. We conclude that it should be possible to constrain important parameters such as inclination angles and black hole spins from combined Kerr and microlensing effects.

  14. The effect of macromodel uncertainties on microlensing modelling of lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Cosmological gravitational microlensing has been proven to be a powerful tool to constrain the structure of multiply imaged quasars, especially the accretion disc and central supermassive black hole system. However, the derived constraints on models may be affected by large systematic errors introduced in the various stages of modelling, namely, the macromodels, the microlensing magnification maps, and the convolution with realistic disc profiles. In particular, it has been known that different macromodels of the galaxy lens that fit the observations equally well, can lead to different values of convergence, κ, and shear, γ, required to generate magnification maps. So far, ˜25 microlensed quasars have been studied using microlensing techniques, where each system has been modelled and analysed individually, or in small samples. This is about to change due to the upcoming synoptic all-sky surveys, which are expected to discover thousands of quasars suitable for microlensing studies. In this study, we investigate the connection between macromodels of the galaxy lens and microlensing magnification maps throughout the parameter space in preparation for future studies of large statistical samples of systems displaying microlensing. In particular, we use 55 900 maps produced by the GERLUMPH parameter survey (available online at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au) and identify regions of parameter space where macromodel uncertainties (Δκ, Δγ) lead to statistically different magnification maps. Strategies for mitigating the effect of Δκ, Δγ uncertainties are discussed in order to understand and control this potential source of systematic errors in accretion disc constraints derived from microlensing.

  15. Liquid Tunable Microlenses based on MEMS techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xuefeng; Jiang, Hongrui

    2013-01-01

    The recent rapid development in microlens technology has provided many opportunities for miniaturized optical systems, and has found a wide range of applications. Of these microlenses, tunable-focus microlenses are of special interest as their focal lengths can be tuned using micro-scale actuators integrated with the lens structure. Realization of such tunable microlens generally relies on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies. Here, we review the recent progress in tunable liquid microlenses. The underlying physics relevant to these microlenses are first discussed, followed by description of three main categories of tunable microlenses involving MEMS techniques, mechanically driven, electrically driven, and those integrated within microfluidic systems. PMID:24163480

  16. Searching for Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Hole MACHOs in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan A.

    2007-05-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is one of a new generation of detectors of gravitational radiation. The existence of gravitational radiation was first predicted by Einstein in 1916, however gravitational waves have not yet been directly observed. One source of gravitation radiation is binary inspiral. Two compact bodies orbiting each other, such as a pair of black holes, lose energy to gravitational radiation. As the system loses energy the bodies spiral towards each other. This causes their orbital speed and the amount of gravitational radiation to increase, producing a characteristic ``chirp'' waveform in the LIGO sensitive band. In this thesis, matched filtering of LIGO science data is used to search for low mass binary systems in the halo of dark matter surrounding the Milky Way. Observations of gravitational microlensing events of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud suggest that some fraction of the dark matter in the halo may be in the form of Massive Astrophysical Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs). It has been proposed that low mass black holes formed in the early universe may be a component of the MACHO population; some fraction of these black hole MACHOs will be in binary systems and detectable by LIGO. The inspiral from a MACHO binary composed of two 0.5 solar mass black holes enters the LIGO sensitive band around 40 Hz. The chirp signal increases in amplitude and frequency, sweeping through the sensitive band to 4400 Hz in 140 seconds. By using evidence from microlensing events and theoretical predictions of the population an upper limit is placed on the rate of black hole MACHO inspirals in the galactic halo.

  17. XMM-Newton Slew Survey Observations of the Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, E.; Read, A. M.; Tiengo, A.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-05-01

    The detection of the first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914 prompted an extensive campaign of follow-up observations at all wavelengths. Although no dedicated XMM-Newton observations have been performed, the satellite passed through the GW150914 error region during normal operations. Here we report the analysis of the data taken during these satellite slews performed two hours and two weeks after the GW event. Our data cover 1.1 and 4.8 deg2 of the final GW localization region. No X-ray counterpart to GW150914 is found down to a sensitivity of 6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.2-2 keV band. Nevertheless, these observations show the great potential of XMM-Newton slew observations for searching for the electromagnetic counterparts of GW events. A series of adjacent slews performed in response to a GW trigger would take ≲1.5 days to cover most of the typical GW credible region. We discuss this scenario and its prospects for detecting the X-ray counterpart of future GW detections.

  18. Microlensing of circumstellar envelopes. III. Line profiles from stellar winds in homologous expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, M. A.; Ignace, R.; Bryce, H. M.

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines line profile evolution due to the linear expansion of circumstellar material obsverved during a microlensing event. This work extends our previous papers on emission line profile evolution from radial and azimuthal flow during point mass lens events and fold caustic crossings. Both "flavours" of microlensing were shown to provide effective diagnostics of bulk motion in circumstellar envelopes. In this work a different genre of flow is studied, namely linear homologous expansion, for both point mass lenses and fold caustic crossings. Linear expansion is of particular relevance to the effects of microlensing on supernovae at cosmological distances. We derive line profiles and equivalent widths for the illustrative cases of pure resonance and pure recombination lines, modelled under the Sobolev approximation. The efficacy of microlensing as a diagnostic probe of the stellar environs is demonstrated and discussed.

  19. A search for electron antineutrinos associated with gravitational-wave events GW150914 and GW151226 using KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashi, A.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Karino, Y.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Oura, T.; Ozaki, H.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takai, T.; Tamae, K.; Teraoka, Y.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Berger, B. E.; Fujikawa, B. K.; O’Donnell, T.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Sakai, M.; Winslow, L. A.; Krupczak, E.; Ouellet, J.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2016-09-30

    Here, we present a search, using KamLAND, a kiloton-scale anti-neutrino detector, for low-energy anti-neutrino events that were coincident with the gravitational-wave (GW) events GW150914 and GW151226, and the candidate event LVT151012. We find no inverse beta-decay neutrino events within ±500 s of either GW signal. This non-detection is used to constrain the electron anti-neutrino fluence and the total integrated luminosity of the astrophysical sources.

  20. A search for electron antineutrinos associated with gravitational-wave events GW150914 and GW151226 using KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashi, A.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Karino, Y.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Oura, T.; Ozaki, H.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takai, T.; Tamae, K.; Teraoka, Y.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Berger, B. E.; Fujikawa, B. K.; O’Donnell, T.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Sakai, M.; Winslow, L. A.; Krupczak, E.; Ouellet, J.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2016-09-30

    Here, we present a search, using KamLAND, a kiloton-scale anti-neutrino detector, for low-energy anti-neutrino events that were coincident with the gravitational-wave (GW) events GW150914 and GW151226, and the candidate event LVT151012. We find no inverse beta-decay neutrino events within ±500 s of either GW signal. This non-detection is used to constrain the electron anti-neutrino fluence and the total integrated luminosity of the astrophysical sources.

  1. Discovering Exoplanets with Microlensing: Transition to the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    We propose to continue our successful program of planet discovery using the gravitaional microlensing technique. Our work will specifically focus on so-called "high- magnification events", which are exceptionally sensitive to planets, and which allow us to extract exceptionally detailed information about each planetary system. These results will be of high scientific interest in their own right, but will also play a key role in the transition to "next-generation" surveys that will discover many times more planets in "low-magnification events". We will continue to operate and build our network of approximately 30 amateur+professional astronomers (about half each) on 6 continents plus Oceania, which enables the 24 hour coverage that is crucial to extracting planetary science from microlensing events. In particular, by engaging the amateurs at a high scientific level, we will both improve the quantity and quality of amateur data and utilize their role as a "transmission belt" to the broader public. Over the past few years, high-mag events have enabled the first detection of a Jupiter- Saturn analog system, the first census of ice and gas giants beyond the snow line, the recognition that "cold Neptunes" are extremely common, and the detection of 3 very massive, super-Jupiter planets orbiting M dwarfs (which may challenge the standard "core-accretion" paradigm). Analysis of these events has also led to key theoretical insights, including the fact that planet orbital motion can be detected in microlensing events and that careful effort is required to disentangle this from "parallax effects" (due to the Earth's own orbital motion). The direct impact of our proposed work will be to increase the still small statistics of high-mag planet detections (due to the intrinsic rarity of high-mag events) and to exploit the sensitivity of these events to higher-order effects (including parallax, planet orbital motion, and multiple planets) to gain deeper knowledge of detected systems

  2. A DECam search for an optical counterpart to the LIGO gravitational-wave event GW151226

    SciTech Connect

    Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Berger, E.; Soares-Santos, M.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chen, H. Y.; Chornock, R.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gill, M. S. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Herner, K.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Matheson, T.; Metzger, B. D.; Neilsen Jr., E. H.; Quataert, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Strampelli, G. M.; Villar, V. A.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Williams, P. K. G.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Costa, L. N. da; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Weller, J.

    2016-07-29

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera (DECam) optical follow-up of the gravitational wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced LIGO detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg2 of the localization region in the i and z bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hours after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at 2–24 days after the GW detection. We achieve 5σ point-source limiting magnitudes of i ≈ 21.7 and z ≈ 21.5 , with a scatter of 0.4 mag, in our difference images. Given the two day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with ≳3σ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged AGN. The fourth source is offset by 5.8 arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by 0.5 mag over 4 days, and has a red color of i–z ≈ 0.3 mag. These properties roughly match the expectations for a kilonova. However, this source was detected several times, starting 94 days prior to GW151226, in the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (dubbed as PS15cdi) and is therefore unrelated to the GW event. Given its long-term behavior, PS15cdi is likely a Type IIP supernova that transitioned out of its plateau phase during our observations, mimicking a kilonova-like behavior. As a result, we comment on the implications of this detection for contamination in future optical follow-up observations.

  3. Gravitational Lens Amplification of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander F.; Baryshev, Yuri V.

    In a recent paper by Wang, Turner and Stebbins (1996) an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the geometrical optics approximation model for gravitational lensing and thus they gave overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al. concluced. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form template, especially gravitational wave template of periodic sources and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector like LISA.

  4. Influence of gravitational lensing on gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander F.

    In a paper by [Wang, Y., Stebbins, A., Turner, E.L. Gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2875 2878, 1996] an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the geometrical optics approximation model for gravitational lensing and thus they gave an overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that a more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as [Wang, Y., Stebbins, A., Turner, E.L. Gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2875 2878, 1996] concluded.

  5. The gravitational bending of light by stars: a continuing story of curiosity, scepticism, surprise, and fascination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Driven entirely by human curiosity, the effect of the gravitational bending of light has evolved on unforeseen paths, in an interplay between shifts in prevailing paradigms and advance of technology, into the most unusual way to study planet populations. The confirmation of the bending angle predicted by Einstein with the Solar Eclipse measurements from 1919 marked the breakthrough of the theory of General Relativity, but it was not before the detection of the double image of the quasar 0957+561 that `gravitational lensing' really entered the observational era. The observation of a characteristic transient brightening of a star caused by the gravitational deflection of its light by an intervening foreground star, constituting a `microlensing event', required even further advance in technology before it could first emerge in 1993. While it required more patience in waiting before `Einstein's blip' for the first time revealed the presence of a planet orbiting a star other than the Sun, such detections can now be monitored live, and gravitational microlensing is not only sensitive to masses as low as that of the Moon, but can even reveal planets around stars in galaxies other than the Milky Way.

  6. Microlensing by Kuiper, Oort, and Free-Floating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Microlensing is generally thought to probe planetary systems only out to a few Einstein radii. Microlensing events generated by bound planets beyond about 10 Einstein radii generally do not yield any trace of their hosts, and so would be classified as free floating planets (FFPs). I show that it is already possible, using adaptive optics (AO), to constrain the presence of potential hosts to FFP candidates at separations comparable to the Oort Cloud. With next-generation telescopes, planets at Kuiper-Belt separations can be probed. Next generation telescopes will also permit routine vetting for all FFP candidates, simply by obtaining second epochs 4-8 years after the event.At present, the search for such hosts is restricted to within the ``confusion limit'' of θ_\\confus ˜ 0.25'' but future WFIRST (Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope) observations will allow one to probe beyond this confusion limit as well.

  7. HST imaging of MEGA Microlensing Candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Cseresnjes, Patrick; Crotts, Arlin P.S.; de Jong, Jelte T.A.; Bergier, Alex; Baltz, Edward A.; Gyuk, Geza; Kuijken, Konrad; Widrow, Lawrence M.; /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys. /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Leiden Observ. /Queen's U., Kingston

    2005-07-14

    We investigate HST/ACS and WFPC2 images at the positions of five candidate microlensing events from a large survey of variability in M31 (MEGA). Three closely match unresolved sources, and two produce only flux upper limits. All are confined to regions of the color-magnitude diagram where stellar variability is unlikely to be easily confused with microlensing. Red variable stars cannot explain these events (although background supernova are possible for two). If these lenses arise in M31's halo, they are due to masses 0.08 < m/M{sub {circle_dot}} < 0.85 (95% certainty, for a {delta}-function mass distribution), brown dwarfs for disk/disk, and stellar masses for disk/bulge ''self-lensing''.

  8. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Ranc, C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Poleski, R.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; SPITZER Team; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNET Group; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; WISE Group; Hundertmark, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dong, Subo; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Mao, S.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNeT Team; Skottfelt, J.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Tronsgaard, R.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEP Group

    2016-07-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  9. Microlensing of the Broad Line Region in the Most Anomalous Lensed Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeton, Charles

    2009-07-01

    The gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J0924+0219 has highly anomalous flux ratios: image D is more than a factor of 10 fainter than expected if the lens galaxy has a smooth mass distribution. From previous HST spectra {Keeton et al. 2006} and photometric variability {Morgan et al. 2006} we know the anomalous continuum flux ratios are caused by microlensing by stars in the lens galaxy. However, with existing data we do not know whether the anomalous emission line flux ratios are caused by microlensing by stars or millilensing by dark matter clumps. With just four orbits we can measure spectra at two more epochs and determine unambiguously whether the quasar's broad line region {BLR} is microlensed. If the emission line flux ratios vary, that would prove the BLR is microlensed and make SDSS0924 only the second known quasar with microlensing of an optical broad emission line. In this case we would be able to constrain the BLR size and and relative densities of stars and dark matter in the lens galaxy. Conversely, if the emission line flux ratios do not vary, that would prove the BLR is millilensed rather than microlensed, and make SDSS0924 the first lens known to have both microlensing {of the continuum} and millilensing {of the BLR}. This would usher in a new and rich field of multiscale lensing. The conclusions about small-scale structure in galaxies and quasars will be exciting in either case. This experiment is infeasible with ground-based telescopes, but with HST it is easy and fast to make this powerful test of small-scale structure in SDSS0924.

  10. DISCOVERY OF ENERGY-DEPENDENT X-RAY MICROLENSING IN Q2237+0305

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Dai Xinyu; Kochanek, C. S.; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Chartas, George; Kozlowski, Szymon

    2011-10-20

    We present our long-term Chandra X-ray monitoring data for the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 with 20 epochs spanning 10 years. We easily detect microlensing variability between the images in the full (0.2-8 keV), soft (0.2-2 keV), and hard (2-8 keV) bands at very high confidence. We also detect, for the first time, chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands. The hard X-ray band is more strongly microlensed than the soft band, suggesting that the corona above the accretion disk thought to generate the X-rays has a non-uniform electron distribution, in which the hotter and more energetic electrons occupy more compact regions surrounding the black holes. Both the hard and soft X-ray bands are more strongly microlensed than the optical (rest-frame UV) emission, indicating that the X-ray emission is more compact than the optical, confirming the microlensing results from other lenses.

  11. GERLUMPH Data Release 2: 2.5 Billion Simulated Microlensing Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Bate, N. F.; Croton, D.; Vohl, D.

    2015-04-01

    In the upcoming synoptic all-sky survey era of astronomy, thousands of new multiply imaged quasars are expected to be discovered and monitored regularly. Light curves from the images of gravitationally lensed quasars are further affected by superimposed variability due to microlensing. In order to disentangle the microlensing from the intrinsic variability of the light curves, the time delays between the multiple images have to be accurately measured. The resulting microlensing light curves can then be analyzed to reveal information about the background source, such as the size of the quasar accretion disk. In this paper we present the most extensive and coherent collection of simulated microlensing light curves; we have generated \\gt 2.5 billion light curves using the GERLUMPH high resolution microlensing magnification maps. Our simulations can be used to train algorithms to measure lensed quasar time delays, plan future monitoring campaigns, and study light curve properties throughout parameter space. Our data are openly available to the community and are complemented by online eResearch tools, located at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au.

  12. On extreme transient events from rotating black holes and their gravitational wave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Della Valle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The super-luminous object ASASSN-15lh (SN2015L) is an extreme event with a total energy Erad ≃ 1.1 × 1052 erg in blackbody radiation on par with its kinetic energy Ek in ejecta and a late time plateau in the UV, which defies a nuclear origin. It likely presents a new explosion mechanism for hydrogen-deprived supernovae. With no radio emission and no H-rich environment, we propose to identify Erad with dissipation of a baryon-poor outflow in the optically thick remnant stellar envelope produced by a central engine. By negligible time-scales of light crossing and radiative cooling of the envelope, SN2015L's light curve closely tracks the evolution of this engine. We here model its light curve by the evolution of black hole spin during angular momentum loss in Alvén waves to matter at the Inner Most Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO). The duration is determined by σ = MT/M of the torus mass MT around the black hole of mass M: σ ˜ 10-7 and σ ˜ 10-2 for SN2015L and, respectively, a long GRB. The observed electromagnetic radiation herein represents a minor output of the rotational energy Erot of the black hole, while most is radiated unseen in gravitational radiation. This model explains the high-mass slow-spin binary progenitor of GWB150914, as the remnant of two CC-SNe in an intra-day binary of two massive stars. This model rigorously predicts a change in magnitude Δm ≃ 1.15 in the light curve post-peak, in agreement with the light curve of SN2015L with no fine-tuning.

  13. A Search for an Optical Counterpart to the Gravitational-wave Event GW151226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Chen, T.-W.; Inserra, C.; Wright, D. E.; Coughlin, M.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Heinze, A.; Jerkstrand, A.; Magnier, E. A.; Maguire, K.; Mueller, B.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Della Valle, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Dimitriadis, G.; Firth, R. E.; Fraser, M.; Frohmaier, C.; Gal-Yam, A.; Harmanen, J.; Kankare, E.; Kotak, R.; Kromer, M.; Mandel, I.; Sollerman, J.; Gibson, B.; Primak, N.; Willman, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave source GW151226. Using the Pan-STARRS1 telescope we mapped out 290 square degrees in the optical i P1 filter, starting 11.5 hr after the LIGO information release and lasting for an additional 28 days. The first observations started 49.5 hr after the time of the GW151226 detection. We typically reached sensitivity limits of i P1 = 20.3-20.8 and covered 26.5% of the LIGO probability skymap. We supplemented this with ATLAS survey data, reaching 31% of the probability region to shallower depths of m ≃ 19. We found 49 extragalactic transients (that are not obviously active galactic nuclei), including a faint transient in a galaxy at 7 Mpc (a luminous blue variable outburst) plus a rapidly decaying M-dwarf flare. Spectral classification of 20 other transient events showed them all to be supernovae. We found an unusual transient, PS15dpn, with an explosion date temporally coincident with GW151226, that evolved into a type Ibn supernova. The redshift of the transient is secure at z = 0.1747 ± 0.0001 and we find it unlikely to be linked, since the luminosity distance has a negligible probability of being consistent with that of GW151226. In the 290 square degrees surveyed we therefore do not find a likely counterpart. However we show that our survey strategy would be sensitive to NS-NS mergers producing kilonovae at D L ≲ 100 Mpc, which is promising for future LIGO/Virgo searches.

  14. The OGLE view of microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds - III. Ruling out subsolar MACHOs with the OGLE-III LMC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.

    2011-05-01

    In the third part of the series presenting the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) microlensing studies of the dark matter halo compact objects (MACHOs), we describe results of the OGLE-III monitoring of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This unprecedented data set contains almost continuous photometric coverage over 8 years of about 35 million objects spread over 40 deg2. We report a detection of two candidate microlensing events found with the automated pipeline and an additional two, less probable, candidate events found manually. The optical depth derived for the two main candidates was calculated following a detailed blending examination and detection efficiency determination and was found to be τ= (0.16 ± 0.12) × 10-7. If the microlensing signal we observe originates from MACHOs, then it means their masses are around 0.2 M⊙ and they comprise only f= 3 ± 2 per cent of the mass of the Galactic halo. However, the more likely explanation of our detections does not involve dark matter compact objects at all and relies on the natural effect of self-lensing of LMC stars by LMC lenses. In such a scenario, we can almost completely rule out MACHOs in the subsolar mass range with an upper limit at f < 7 per cent reaching its minimum of f < 4 per cent at M= 0.1 M⊙. For masses around M= 10 M⊙, the constraints on the MACHOs are more lenient with f˜ 20 per cent. Owing to limitations of the survey, there is no reasonable limit found for heavier masses, leaving only a tiny window of mass spectrum still available for dark matter compact objects. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3-m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  15. Planet Sensitivity from Combined Ground- and Space-based Microlensing Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Beichman, Charles; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Yee, Jennifer C.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Rattenbury, N.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedmann, M.; The Wise Group

    2015-12-01

    To move one step forward toward a Galactic distribution of planets, we present the first planet sensitivity analysis for microlensing events with simultaneous observations from space and the ground. We present this analysis for two such events, OGLE-2014-BLG-0939 and OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, which both show substantial planet sensitivity even though neither of them reached high magnification. This suggests that an ensemble of low to moderate magnification events can also yield significant planet sensitivity, and therefore probability, for detecting planets. The implications of our results to the ongoing and future space-based microlensing experiments to measure the Galactic distribution of planets are discussed.

  16. Statistics of Microlensing Caustic Crossings in Q 2237+0305: Peculiar Velocity of the Lens Galaxy and Accretion Disk Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, E.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.; Mediavilla, T.; Ariza, O.

    2015-01-01

    We use the statistics of caustic crossings induced by microlensing in the lens system Q 2237+0305 to study the lens galaxy peculiar velocity. We calculate the caustic crossing rates for a comprehensive family of stellar mass functions and find a dependence of the average number of caustic crossings with the effective transverse velocity and the average mass, < n > \\propto {veff / \\sqrt{< m > }}, equivalent to the theoretical prediction for the case of microlenses with identical masses. We explore the possibilities of the method to measure v eff using the ~12 yr of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment monitoring of the four images of Q 2237+0305. To determine a lower limit for v eff, we count, conservatively, a single caustic crossing for each one of the four high magnification events identified in the literature (plus one additional proposed by us) obtaining veff ≳ 240\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } km s-1 at 68% of confidence. From this value and the average FWHM of the four high magnification events, we obtain a lower limit of rs ≳ 1.4 \\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } light-days for the radius of the source (rs = FWHM/2.35). Tentative identification of three additional caustic crossing events leads to estimates of veff≃ (493+/- 246)\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } km s-1 for the effective transverse velocity and of rs ≃ (2.7+/- 1.3)\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } light-days for the source size. The estimated transverse peculiar velocity of the galaxy is vt ≃ (429+/- 246)\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } km s-1.

  17. Techniques for Targeted Fermi-GBM Follow-Up of Gravitational-Wave Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; Christensen, N.; Veitch, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors are projected to come online 2015 2016, reaching a final sensitivity sufficient to observe dozens of binary neutron star mergers per year by 2018. We present a fully-automated, targeted search strategy for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in offline Fermi-GBM data. The multi-detector method makes use of a detailed model response of the instrument, and benefits from time and sky location information derived from the gravitational-wave signal.

  18. Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Yoshida, Shin

    2010-04-15

    In addition to producing loud gravitational waves, the dynamics of a binary black hole system could induce emission of electromagnetic radiation by affecting the behavior of plasmas and electromagnetic fields in their vicinity. We study how the electromagnetic fields are affected by a pair of orbiting black holes through the merger. In particular, we show how the binary's dynamics induce a variability in possible electromagnetically induced emissions as well as an enhancement of electromagnetic fields during the late-merge and merger epochs. These time dependent features will likely leave their imprint in processes generating detectable emissions and can be exploited in the detection of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves.

  19. OGLE-2013-BLG-0578L: A Microlensing Binary Composed of a Brown Dwarf and an M Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Determining the physical parameters of binary microlenses is hampered by the lack of information about the angular Einstein radius due to the difficulty involved in resolving caustic crossings. In this paper, we present an analysis of the binary microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0578, for which the caustic exit was precisely predicted in advance from real-time analysis, enabling us to densely resolve the caustic crossing and to measure the Einstein radius. From the mass measurement of the lens system based on the Einstein radius, combined with additional information about the lens parallax, we determine that the lens is a binary composed of a late-type M dwarf primary and a substellar brown dwarf companion. This event demonstrates the capability of current real-time microlensing modeling and the usefulness of microlensing for detecting and characterizing faint or dark objects in the Galaxy.

  20. Gravitational Waves from Merging Intermediate-mass Black Holes. II. Event Rates at Ground-based Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2017-02-01

    Based on a dynamical formation model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH), we estimate the expected observational profile of gravitational waves at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Noting that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up (especially with KAGRA owing to its location at less seismic noise), we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH with mass M< 2× {10}3{M}ȯ . This enables us to check the sequence of BH mergers to SMBHs via intermediate-mass BHs. We estimate the number density of galaxies from the halo formation model and estimate the number of BH mergers from the giant molecular cloud model assuming hierarchical growth of merged cores. At the designed KAGRA (and/or advanced LIGO/VIRGO), we find that the BH merger of its total mass M∼ 60{M}ȯ is at the peak of the expected mass distribution. With its signal-to-noise ratio ρ =10 (30), we estimate the event rate R∼ 200 (20) per year in the most optimistic case, and we also find that BH mergers in the range M< 150{M}ȯ are R> 1 per year for ρ =10. Thus, if we observe a BH with more than 100{M}ȯ in future gravitational-wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  1. Maximizing the probability of detecting an electromagnetic counterpart of gravitational-wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Michael; Stubbs, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. These are among the most promising sources for joint detection of electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational-wave (GW) emission. To maximize the science performed with these objects, it is essential to undertake a followup observing strategy that maximizes the likelihood of detecting the EM counterpart. We present a follow-up strategy that maximizes the counterpart detection probability, given a fixed investment of telescope time. We show how the prior assumption on the luminosity function of the electro-magnetic counterpart impacts the optimized followup strategy. Our results suggest that if the goal is to detect an EM counterpart from among a succession of GW triggers, the optimal strategy is to perform long integrations in the highest likelihood regions. For certain assumptions about source luminosity and mass distributions, we find that an optimal time investment that is proportional to the 2/3 power of the surface density of the GW location probability on the sky. In the future, this analysis framework will benefit significantly from the 3-dimensional localization probability.

  2. Size of the Accretion Disk in the Graviationally Lensed Quasar SDSS J1004+4112 from the Statistics of Microlensing Magnifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fian, C.; Mediavilla, E.; Hanslmeier, A.; Oscoz, A.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Muñoz, J. A.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.

    2016-10-01

    We present eight monitoring seasons of the four brightest images of the gravitational lens SDSS J1004+4112 observed between 2003 December and 2010 October. Using measured time delays for the images A, B, and C and the model predicted time delay for image D we have removed the intrinsic quasar variability, finding microlensing events of about 0.5 and 0.7 mag of amplitude in the images C and D. From the statistics of microlensing amplitudes in images A, C, and D, we have inferred the half-light radius (at {λ }{rest}=2407 \\mathringA ) for the accretion disk using two different methods, {R}1/2={8.7}-5.5+18.5\\sqrt{M/0.3{M}⊙ } (histogram product) and {R}1/2={4.2}-2.2+3.2\\sqrt{M/0.3{M}⊙ } lt-days ({χ }2). The results are in agreement within uncertainties with the size predicted from the black hole mass in SDSS J1004+4112 using thin disk theory.

  3. Gravitational wave signatures of the absence of an event horizon: Nonradial oscillations of a thin-shell gravastar

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Chen Yanbei; Norte, Richard

    2009-12-15

    Gravitational waves from compact objects provide information about their structure, probing deep into strong-gravity regions. Here we illustrate how the presence or absence of an event horizon can produce qualitative differences in the gravitational waves emitted by ultracompact objects. In order to set up a straw-man ultracompact object with no event horizon, but which is otherwise almost identical to a black hole, we consider a nonrotating thin-shell model inspired by Mazur and Mottola's gravastar, which has a Schwarzschild exterior, a de Sitter interior and an infinitely thin shell with finite tension separating the two regions. As viewed from the external space-time, the shell can be located arbitrarily close to the Schwarzschild radius, so a gravastar might seem indistinguishable from a black hole when tests are only performed on its external metric. We study the linearized dynamics of the system, and, in particular, the junction conditions connecting internal and external gravitational perturbations. As a first application of the formalism we compute polar and axial oscillation modes of a thin-shell gravastar. We show that the quasinormal mode spectrum is completely different from that of a black hole, even in the limit when the surface redshift becomes infinite. Polar quasinormal modes depend on the equation of state of matter on the shell and can be used to distinguish between different gravastar models. Our calculations suggest that low-compactness gravastars could be unstable when the sound speed on the shell v{sub s}/c > or approx. 0.92.

  4. Search for high-energy neutrinos from gravitational wave event GW151226 and candidate LVT151012 with ANTARES and IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; de Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; di Palma, I.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Grégoire, T.; Gracia Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Nezri, E.; Pǎvǎlaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzoca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Benzvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Bron, S.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; de Clercq, C.; Del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Gladstone, L.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; in, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Micallef, J.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Peiffer, P.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vogel, E.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Waza, A.; Weaver, Ch.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; de, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; de Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; Derosa, R. T.; Desalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; di Fiore, L.; di Giovanni, M.; di Girolamo, T.; di Lieto, A.; di Pace, S.; di Palma, I.; di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernández Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; MacLeod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The Advanced LIGO observatories detected gravitational waves from two binary black hole mergers during their first observation run (O1). We present a high-energy neutrino follow-up search for the second gravitational wave event, GW151226, as well as for gravitational wave candidate LVT151012. We find two and four neutrino candidates detected by IceCube, and one and zero detected by Antares, within ±500 s around the respective gravitational wave signals, consistent with the expected background rate. None of these neutrino candidates are found to be directionally coincident with GW151226 or LVT151012. We use nondetection to constrain isotropic-equivalent high-energy neutrino emission from GW151226, adopting the GW event's 3D localization, to less than 2 ×1 051- 2 ×1 054 erg .

  5. The Exoplanet Microlensing Survey by the Proposed WFIRST Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the . coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing. measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory. with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  6. Geographic and Annual Influences on Optical Follow-up of Gravitational Wave Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Varun; Bhalerao, Varun; Ravi, Aravind P.; Ghosh, Archisman; Bose, Sukanta

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effects of observatory location on the probability of discovering optical/infrared (OIR) counterparts of gravitational wave sources. We show that, for the LIGO–Virgo network, the odds of discovering OIR counterparts show some latitude dependence. A stronger effect is seen to arise from the timing of LIGO–Virgo observing runs during the year, with northern OIR observatories having a better chance of finding the counterparts in northern winters. Assuming identical technical capabilities, the tentative mid-2017 three-detector network observing run favors southern OIR observatories for the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts.

  7. Exoplanet detection via microlensing with RoboNet-1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M. J.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Bode, M. F.; Horne, K. D.; Steele, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Tsapras, Y.

    2007-04-01

    RoboNet-1.0 is a prototype global network of three two-meter robotic telescopes, placed in La Palma (Canary Islands), Maui (Hawaii), and Siding Spring (Australia). In April 2004, funding for RoboNet-1.0 until July 2007 was approved by PPARC's Science Committee, and the project commenced in earnest in August 2004. The search for cool extra-solar planets by optimised robotic monitoring of Galactic microlensing events is one of the two core elements of its scientific programme - observations of gamma-ray bursts is the other. During the 2005 observing season, light curves of more than 60 microlensing events have been sampled at regular intervals. One particular event, OGLE-2005-BLG-71, showed an anomaly caused by an extrasolar planet, which constituted the second detection of a planet by microlensing. As a by-product, our dense monitoring during caustic crossing events can resolve the brightness profile of observed source stars, providing an observational test of stellar atmosphere models. Current development work uses e-science to create a fully automated chain linking event monitoring to the detection of anomalies in the microlensing lightcurves that could be indications of planetary companions and on to the triggering of follow-up observations. In order to fully exploit the potential of such a network for detecting exoplanets, it will be necessary to complement the existing RoboNet with additional telescopes in the southern hemisphere.

  8. Using HST to Detect Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bond, H. E.; Bond, I.; Brown, T. M.; Casertano, S.; Dominik, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fryer, C.; Livio, M.; Mao, S.; Perrott, Y.; Udalski, A.; Yock, P.

    2012-05-01

    To date, Black Hole (BH) and Neutron Star (NS) masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated stellar-mass BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. We have underway a large, 3-year HST program (192 orbits) designed to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated BHs and NSs in the direction of the Galactic bulge. Our program consists of monitoring of 12 fields in the Sagittarius window of the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our observations have a typical cadence of one observation every two weeks, and are primarily targeted towards detecting microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated BHs and NSs in the Galactic disk and bulge. The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, which can be determined from the light curve as measured by HST (and supplemented by GEMINI) observations, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. Our program is optimized to detect long-duration events, which are more likely to be caused by massive lenses. We expect to detect a few dozen long-duration microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses.

  9. Microlenses and their applications in endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuefeng

    Microlenses have been developed in the past and play an important role in many fields, including optical communication, photolithography, imaging systems and lab on chips. Microlenses with fixed focal length and tunable focus have their individual applications. Several methods and mechanisms have been reported to realize microlenses; however, they have their advantages and disadvantages. In this work, two kinds of microlenses are studied: microlens arrays with fixed focal length and liquid tunable-focus microlenses actuated by stimuli-responsive hydrogels. The design, fabrication, testing and applications of these microlenses are explored. The gist of these microlenses is to utilize surface tension of liquid-air and/or immiscible liquid-liquid interfaces because surface tension dominates over gravity at the micro-scale. Microlens arrays with fixed focal length, made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), are fabricated through liquid-phase photopolymerization and molding. Liquid menisci of photopolymerizable solutions at liquid-air interfaces are first formed and cured under ultraviolet (UV) radiance to obtain the mold. The resultant polymerized mold is then transferred to PDMS utilizing two molding steps to form a microlens array. The liquid tunable-focus microlens is formed by a water-oil interface that is pinned at a hydrophobic-hydrophilic boundary at the top edge of an aperture. Multiple hydrogel microstructures, whose volume is responsive to a certain stimuli, are formed around the lens aperture under UV radiance and regulate the pressure across the meniscus of the water-oil interface, varying the focal length of the microlens. The liquid tunable-focus microlenses responsive to infrared (IR) light are integrated at the end of fiber endoscopes and can scan the areas of interest with minimal back-and-forth movements of the scopes themselves. The operation of the microlens and the image acquisition are realized through light transmitted via optical fibers. Benefitting

  10. Possible microlensing in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej; Szymanski, Michal

    1999-02-01

    The OGLE Early Warning System triggered a microlensing candidate located in the Galactic disk field in Carina. The I=18.0 mag (V=19.6) star designated CAR_SC2 24589 (RA2000=11:07:26.72, DEC2000=-61:22:30.6, l=290.8,b=-1.0) is currently brightening with the light curve consistent with microlensing rise of brightness.

  11. New Methods for Identifying Nearby Gravitational Lenses in All-Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandlish, Samuel; Di Stefano, R.

    2011-01-01

    All-sky catalogs provide a wealth of information about gravitational lensing events that has not yet been utilized. We present a method for matching lensing events to catalogs and finding the probability that the association is genuine. Given a likely candidate for the lens object associated with an event, it is possible to break the inherent degeneracy in microlensing and estimate the mass of the lens, depending on its distance. Eight percent of microlensing events have matches in the 2MASS catalog, and there are many more matches in catalogs that cover other wave bands. In addition to detecting the associated lens or source, it is possible that the cataloged object is a companion or host to the actual lens. This opens up the possibility of finding dark nearby lenses, such as stellar remnants or planets that are associated with cataloged objects. We propose various methods for determining which events are most likely to be caused by nearby lenses, and apply them to our matches. We present some interesting matched objects and the results of observations of those objects. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  12. OGLE-2016-BLG-1469L: Microlensing Binary Composed of Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Albrow, M. D.; Chung, S.-J.; Jung, Y. K.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Shin, I.-G.; Yee, J. C.; Zhu, W.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, S.-L.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, C.-U.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; KMTNet Collaboration; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yamada, T.; Yamada, T.; Yonehara, A.; Barry, R.; The MOA Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    We report the discovery of a binary composed of two brown dwarfs, based on the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-1469. Thanks to the detection of both finite-source and microlens-parallax effects, we are able to measure both the masses {M}1˜ 0.05 {M}⊙ and {M}2˜ 0.01 {M}⊙ , and the distance {D}{{L}}˜ 4.5 {kpc}, as well as the projected separation {a}\\perp ˜ 0.33 au. This is the third brown-dwarf binary detected using the microlensing method, demonstrating the usefulness of microlensing in detecting field brown-dwarf binaries with separations of less than 1 au.

  13. High-Energy Electromagnetic Offline Follow-Up of Ligo-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Binary Coalescence Candidate Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Veitch, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present two different search methods for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events from ground-based detectors using archival NASA high-energy data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and RXTE All-sky Monitor (ASM) instruments. To demonstrate the methods, we use a limited number of representative GW background noise events produced by a search for binary neutron star coalescence over the last two months of the LIGO-Virgo S6/VSR3 joint science run. Time and sky location provided by the GW data trigger a targeted search in the high-energy photon data. We use two custom pipelines: one to search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in GBM, and the other to search for a variety of X-ray afterglow model signals in ASM. We measure the efficiency of the joint pipelines to weak gamma-ray burst counterparts, and a family of model X-ray afterglows. By requiring a detectable signal in either electromagnetic instrument coincident with a GW event, we are able to reject a large majority of GW candidates. This reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the loudest surviving GW background event by around 15-20 percent.

  14. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTROMAGNETIC OFFLINE FOLLOW-UP OF LIGO-VIRGO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE BINARY COALESCENCE CANDIDATE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Remillard, R. A.; Veitch, J.

    2015-03-15

    We present two different search methods for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events from ground-based detectors using archival NASA high-energy data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and RXTE All-sky Monitor (ASM) instruments. To demonstrate the methods, we use a limited number of representative GW background noise events produced by a search for binary neutron star coalescence over the last two months of the LIGO-Virgo S6/VSR3 joint science run. Time and sky location provided by the GW data trigger a targeted search in the high-energy photon data. We use two custom pipelines: one to search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in GBM, and the other to search for a variety of X-ray afterglow model signals in ASM. We measure the efficiency of the joint pipelines to weak gamma-ray burst counterparts, and a family of model X-ray afterglows. By requiring a detectable signal in either electromagnetic instrument coincident with a GW event, we are able to reject a large majority of GW candidates. This reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the loudest surviving GW background event by around 15–20%.

  15. High-Energy Electromagnetic Offline Follow-Up of Ligo-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Binary Coalescence Candidate Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Veitch, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present two different search methods for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events from ground-based detectors using archival NASA high-energy data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and RXTE All-sky Monitor (ASM) instruments. To demonstrate the methods, we use a limited number of representative GW background noise events produced by a search for binary neutron star coalescence over the last two months of the LIGO-Virgo S6/VSR3 joint science run. Time and sky location provided by the GW data trigger a targeted search in the high-energy photon data. We use two custom pipelines: one to search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in GBM, and the other to search for a variety of X-ray afterglow model signals in ASM. We measure the efficiency of the joint pipelines to weak gamma-ray burst counterparts, and a family of model X-ray afterglows. By requiring a detectable signal in either electromagnetic instrument coincident with a GW event, we are able to reject a large majority of GW candidates. This reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the loudest surviving GW background event by around 15-20 percent.

  16. CAN THE MASSES OF ISOLATED PLANETARY-MASS GRAVITATIONAL LENSES BE MEASURED BY TERRESTRIAL PARALLAX?

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Botzler, C. S.; Bray, J. C.; Cherrie, J. M.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Philpott, L. C.; Abe, F.; Muraki, Y.; Albrow, M. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Christie, G. W.; Natusch, T.; Dionnet, Z.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Heyrovský, D.; McCormick, J. M.; Skowron, J.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Recently Sumi et al. reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits ≥10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large, and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3σ level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 ± 0.30 M {sub J} and 0.80 ± 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ∼40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.

  17. Can the Masses of Isolated Planetary-mass Gravitational Lenses be Measured by Terrestrial Parallax?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M.; Philpott, L. C.; Abe, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Bray, J. C.; Cherrie, J. M.; Christie, G. W.; Dionnet, Z.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Heyrovský, D.; McCormick, J. M.; Moorhouse, D. M.; Muraki, Y.; Natusch, T.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Skowron, J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tan, T.-G.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.

    2015-02-01

    Recently Sumi et al. reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits >=10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large, and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3σ level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 ± 0.30 M J and 0.80 ± 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ~40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.

  18. A Dark Energy Camera Search for an Optical Counterpart to the First Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Santos, M.

    2016-05-27

    We report initial results of a deep search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW150914, the first trigger from the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors. We used the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to image a 102 deg$^2$ area, corresponding to 38% of the initial trigger high-probability sky region and to 11% of the revised high-probability region. We observed in i and z bands at 4-5, 7, and 24 days after the trigger. The median $5\\sigma$ point-source limiting magnitudes of our search images are i=22.5 and z=21.8 mag. We processed the images through a difference-imaging pipeline using templates from pre-existing Dark Energy Survey data and publicly available DECam data. Due to missing template observations and other losses, our effective search area subtends 40 deg$^{2}$, corresponding to 12% total probability in the initial map and 3% of the final map. In this area, we search for objects that decline significantly between days 4-5 and day 7, and are undetectable by day 24, finding none to typical magnitude limits of i= 21.5,21.1,20.1 for object colors (i-z)=1,0,-1, respectively. Our search demonstrates the feasibility of a dedicated search program with DECam and bodes well for future research in this emerging field.

  19. A Dark Energy Camera Search for an Optical Counterpart to the First Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Santos, M.; Kessler, R.; Berger, E.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Chen, H.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J.; Gruendl, R. A.; Herner, K.; Holz, D.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Neilsen, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sobreira, F.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brown, D. A.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Chornock, R.; Crocce, M.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drout, M. R.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fairhurst, S.; Fernandez, E.; Fischer, J.; Fong, W.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Fryer, C. L.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Margutti, R.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; McMahon, R. G.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, N.; Smith, R. C.; Stebbins, A.; Sutton, P. J.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.

    2016-05-27

    We report initial results of a deep search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW150914, the first trigger from the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors. We used the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to image a 102 deg$^2$ area, corresponding to 38% of the initial trigger high-probability sky region and to 11% of the revised high-probability region. We observed in i and z bands at 4-5, 7, and 24 days after the trigger. The median $5\\sigma$ point-source limiting magnitudes of our search images are i=22.5 and z=21.8 mag. We processed the images through a difference-imaging pipeline using templates from pre-existing Dark Energy Survey data and publicly available DECam data. Due to missing template observations and other losses, our effective search area subtends 40 deg$^{2}$, corresponding to 12% total probability in the initial map and 3% of the final map. In this area, we search for objects that decline significantly between days 4-5 and day 7, and are undetectable by day 24, finding none to typical magnitude limits of i= 21.5,21.1,20.1 for object colors (i-z)=1,0,-1, respectively. Our search demonstrates the feasibility of a dedicated search program with DECam and bodes well for future research in this emerging field.

  20. RTT-150 detected the new brightening of the Gaia16aye binary microlensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamitov, I.; Bikmaev, I.; Burenin, R.; Grebenev, S.; Tkachenko, A.; Irtuganov, E.; Melnikov, S.; Sakhibullin, N.; Pavlinsky, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Esenoglu, H.; Koseoglu, D.; Bakis, V.; Sipahi, E.

    2016-11-01

    The 1.5-m Russian-Turkish optical telescope RTT-150 (Antalya, Turkey) monitored the Galactic transient Gaia16aye, suspected to be the first binary microlensing event ever discovered towards the Galactic Plane (ATel #9376, #9507), since Sep. 25, 2016.

  1. Zeldovich and the Missing Baryons, Results from Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Rudolph E.

    2016-10-01

    Central to Zeldovich's attempts to understand the origin of cosmological structure was his exploration of the fluid dynamical effects in the primordial gas, and how the baryonic dark matter formed. Unfortunately microlensing searches for condensed objects in the foreground of the Magellanic Clouds were flawed by the assumption that the objects would be uniformly (Gaussian) distributed, and because the cadence of daily observations strongly disfavored detection of planet mass microlenses. But quasar microlensing showed them to exist at planetary mass at the same time that a hydro-gravitational theory predicted the planet-mass population as fossils of turbulence at the time of recombination (z = 1100; Gibson 1996, 2001). Where the population has now been detected from MACHO searches to the LMC (Sumi et al. 2011) we compare the quasar microlensing results to the recent determination of the mass distribution function measured for the planetary mass function, and show that the population can account for the baryonic dark matter.

  2. Influence of gravitational lensing on gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A.

    In a paper by Wang, Turner and Stebbins (PRL, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) p.2875) an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the incorrect model for this case and thus they gave overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al. concluded. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form template, especially gravitational wave template of periodic sources and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector like LISA. Recently, the Galactic center was considered by Ruffa (ApJ, 1999) as a gravitational lens that focuses a gravitational wave energy to the Earth. The author used the wave optic approximation to solve this problem and concluded that amplification due to the gravitational lens focusing could be very huge. The conclusion is based on the perfect location of the gravitational wave source, namely the source lies very close to the line passing through the Earth and the gravitational lens (the Galactic Center), therefore the probability of the huge magnification of gravitational wave sources is negligible.

  3. Stochastic template bank for gravitational wave searches for precessing neutron-star-black-hole coalescence events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indik, Nathaniel; Haris, K.; Dal Canton, Tito; Fehrmann, Henning; Krishnan, Badri; Lundgren, Andrew; Nielsen, Alex B.; Pai, Archana

    2017-03-01

    Gravitational wave searches to date have largely focused on nonprecessing systems. Including precession effects greatly increases the number of templates to be searched over. This leads to a corresponding increase in the computational cost and can increase the false alarm rate of a realistic search. On the other hand, there might be astrophysical systems that are entirely missed by nonprecessing searches. In this paper we consider the problem of constructing a template bank using stochastic methods for neutron star-black hole binaries allowing for precession, toward but with the restrictions that the orientation of the total angular momentum of the binary is pointing toward the detector and that the neutron star spin is negligible relative to that of the black hole. We quantify the number of templates required for the search, and we explicitly construct the template bank. We show that despite the large number of templates, stochastic methods can be adapted to solve the problem. We quantify the parameter space region over which the nonprecessing search might miss signals.

  4. Stochastic Template Bank for Gravitational Wave Searches for Precessing Neutron Star-Black Hole Coalescence Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indik, Nathaniel; Haris, K.; Dal Canton, Tito; Fehrmann, Henning; Krishnan, Badri; Lundgren, Andrew; Nielsen, Alex B.; Pai, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave searches to date have largely focused on non-precessing systems. Including precession effects greatly increases the number of templates to be searched over. This leads to a corresponding increase in the computational cost and can increase the false alarm rate of a realistic search. On the other hand, there might be astrophysical systems that are entirely missed by non-precessing searches. In this paper we consider the problem of constructing a template bank using stochastic methods for neutron star-black hole binaries allowing for precession, but with the restrictions that the total angular momentum of the binary is pointing toward the detector and that the neutron star spin is negligible relative to that of the black hole. We quantify the number of templates required for the search, and we explicitly construct the template bank. We show that despite the large number of templates, stochastic methods can be adapted to solve the problem. We quantify the parameter space region over which the non-precessing search might miss signals.

  5. Wide-field X-ray afterglow searches for gravitational wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawhan, Peter; Tervala, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors are on track to begin collecting science data soon and to reach full sensitivity by 2019. Low-latency analysis of the GW data will provide triggers for astronomers to seek electromagnetic transient counterparts. Many instruments will contribute to that effort, but instruments with very large fields of view will have a natural advantage for following up the typically large GW error regions. In particular, we consider ISS-Lobster, a proposed NASA mission to be deployed on the International Space Station, which features a focusing imager for soft X-rays with a field of view of over 800 square degrees. Our study using binary neutron star coalescence simulations from Singer et al. shows that a single ISS-Lobster pointing will, on average, cover over 95% of a LIGO-Virgo 3-detector sky map, while even a 2-detector sky map can be over 85% covered (on average) by a sequence of four pointings. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF Grants PHY-1068549 and PHY-1404121.

  6. Stochastic Template Bank for Gravitational Wave Searches for Precessing Neutron Star-Black Hole Coalescence Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indik, Nathaniel; Haris, K.; Dal Canton, Tito; Fehrmann, Henning; Krishnan, Badri; Lundgren, Andrew; Nielsen, Alex B.; Pai, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave searches to date have largely focused on non-precessing systems. Including precession effects greatly increases the number of templates to be searched over. This leads to a corresponding increase in the computational cost and can increase the false alarm rate of a realistic search. On the other hand, there might be astrophysical systems that are entirely missed by non-precessing searches. In this paper we consider the problem of constructing a template bank using stochastic methods for neutron star-black hole binaries allowing for precession, but with the restrictions that the total angular momentum of the binary is pointing toward the detector and that the neutron star spin is negligible relative to that of the black hole. We quantify the number of templates required for the search, and we explicitly construct the template bank. We show that despite the large number of templates, stochastic methods can be adapted to solve the problem. We quantify the parameter space region over which the non-precessing search might miss signals.

  7. Halo Microlensing and Dark Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, A. P. S.

    1993-12-01

    (While Pierce lectures review past accomplishments, customarily, this talk concerns efforts which we have pursued for some years and which are now reaching fruition. We present elsewhere at this meeting results from research cited for the Prize.) Dark matter exists in the halos of spiral galaxies, and the least radical alternative for its identity is normal matter produced by primordial nucleosynthesis. This matter could easily be hidden in large, condensed objects. Paczynski pointed out in 1986 that if condensations of Galactic halo matter are sufficiently massive, they will produce detectable amplification of background starlight by gravitational lensing. Several groups recently reported possible detections of this effect after surveying large numbers of stars in the Galactic Bulge and LMC. The connection between these events and massive, dark halos is unclear and likely to remain so for some time, given the rate at which they are detected. Following Paczynski's realization, we stressed that a much higher event rate, a statistical control sample, sensitivity to a much broader mass range, and modulation of the predicted lensing rate with galactocentric distance can all be realized by a different experiment: observing the halo of M31 (and the Galaxy) using stars in M31. In some ways, M31 is a more difficult target than the LMC or the Bulge, given the faintness of its stars, but our observations in 1991 and 1993 indicate that these problems have been surmounted. We can detect stellar variability even under extremely crowded conditions like those in M31's inner disk, and can monitor a sufficient number of stars to study halo lensing. We present results from our initial survey which indicates that the required sensitivity can be reached to confirm or reject the hypothesis that sub-solar masses like those detected in our Galaxy make up the missing spiral galaxy mass. It is possible that we may use the data already obtained (and still being analyzed) to place

  8. MOA-2011-BLG-322Lb: a `second generation survey' microlensing planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Han, C.; Abe, F.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.

    2014-03-01

    Global `second-generation' microlensing surveys aim to discover and characterize extrasolar planets and their frequency, by means of round-the-clock high-cadence monitoring of a large area of the Galactic bulge, in a controlled experiment. We report the discovery of a giant planet in microlensing event MOA-2011-BLG-322. This moderate-magnification event, which displays a clear anomaly induced by a second lensing mass, was inside the footprint of our second-generation microlensing survey, involving MOA, OGLE and the Wise Observatory. The event was observed by the survey groups, without prompting alerts that could have led to dedicated follow-up observations. Fitting a microlensing model to the data, we find that the time-scale of the event was tE = 23.2 ± 0.8 d, and the mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is q = 0.028 ± 0.001. Finite-source effects are marginally detected, and upper limits on them help break some of the degeneracy in the system parameters. Using a Bayesian analysis that incorporates a Galactic structure model, we estimate the mass of the lens at 0.39^{+0.45}_{-0.19} M_{⊙}, at a distance of 7.56 ± 0.91 kpc. Thus, the companion is likely a planet of mass 11.6^{+13.4}_{-5.6} M_J, at a projected separation of 4.3^{+1.5}_{-1.2} AU, rather far beyond the snow line. This is the first pure-survey planet reported from a second-generation microlensing survey, and shows that survey data alone can be sufficient to characterize a planetary model. With the detection of additional survey-only planets, we will be able to constrain the frequency of extrasolar planets near their systems' snow lines.

  9. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%-50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1-0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  10. Microlensing planet detection via geosynchronous and low Earth orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogavero, F.; Beaulieu, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Planet detection through microlensing is usually limited by a well-known degeneracy in the Einstein timescale tE, which prevents mass and distance of the lens to be univocally determined. It has been shown that a satellite in geosynchronous orbit could provide masses and distances for most standard planetary events (tE ≈ 20 days) via a microlens parallax measurement. This paper extends the analysis to shorter Einstein timescales, tE ≈ 1 day, when dealing with the case of Jupiter-mass lenses. We then study the capabilities of a low Earth orbit satellite on even shorter timescales, tE ≈ 0.1 days. A Fisher matrix analysis is employed to predict how the 1-σ error on parallax depends on tE and the peak magnification of the microlensing event. It is shown that a geosynchronous satellite could detect parallaxes for Jupiter-mass free floaters and discover planetary systems around very low-mass brown dwarfs. Moreover, a low Earth orbit satellite could lead to the discovery of Earth-mass free-floating planets. Limitations to these results can be the strong requirements on the photometry, the effects of blending, and in the case of the low orbit, the Earth's umbra.

  11. GW150914: First Search for the Electromagnetic Counterpart of a Gravitational-wave Event by the TOROS Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Mario C.; Beroiz, Martín; Peñuela, Tania; Macri, Lucas M.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Yuan, Wenlong; García Lambas, Diego; Cabral, Juan; Colazo, Carlos; Domínguez, Mariano; Sánchez, Bruno; Gurovich, Sebastián; Lares, Marcelo; Schneiter, Matías; Graña, Darío; Renzi, Víctor; Rodriguez, Horacio; Starck, Manuel; Vrech, Rubén; Artola, Rodolfo; Chiavassa Ferreyra, Antonio; Girardini, Carla; Quiñones, Cecilia; Tapia, Luis; Tornatore, Marina; Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Branchesi, Marica; Brocato, Enzo; Padilla, Nelson; Pereyra, Nicolas A.; Mukherjee, Soma; Benacquista, Matthew; Key, Joey

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of the optical follow-up conducted by the TOROS collaboration of the first gravitational-wave event GW150914. We conducted unfiltered CCD observations (0.35-1 μm) with the 1.5 m telescope at Bosque Alegre starting ˜2.5 days after the alarm. Given our limited field of view (˜100 arcmin2), we targeted 14 nearby galaxies that were observable from the site and were located within the area of higher localization probability. We analyzed the observations using two independent implementations of difference-imaging algorithms, followed by a Random-Forest-based algorithm to discriminate between real and bogus transients. We did not find any bona fide transient event in the surveyed area down to a 5σ limiting magnitude of r = 21.7 mag (AB). Our result is consistent with the LIGO detection of a binary black hole merger, for which no electromagnetic counterparts are expected, and with the expected rates of other astrophysical transients.

  12. The formation and coalescence sites of the first gravitational wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Raffaella; Graziani, Luca; Marassi, Stefania; Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela; Alparone, Matteo; de Bennassuti, Matteo

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel theoretical model to characterize the formation and coalescence sites of compact binaries in a cosmological context. This is based on the coupling between the binary population synthesis code SeBa with a simulation following the formation of a Milky Way-like halo in a well resolved cosmic volume of 4 cMpc, performed with the GAMESH pipeline. We have applied this technique to investigate when and where systems with properties similar to the recently observed LIGO/VIRGO events are more likely to form and where they are more likely to reside when they coalesce. We find that more than 70% of GW151226 and LVT151012-like systems form in galaxies with stellar mass M* > 10^8 Msun in the redshift range [0.06 - 3] and [0.14 - 11.3], respectively. All GW150914-like systems form in low-metallicity dwarfs with M* < 5 10^6 Msun at 2.4 < z < 4.2. Despite these initial differences, by the time they reach coalescence the observed events are most likely hosted by star forming galaxies with M* > 10^{10} Msun. Due to tidal stripping and radiative feedback, a non negligible fraction of GW150914-like candidates end-up in galaxies with properties similar to dwarf spheroidals and ultra-faint satellites.

  13. Direct Laser Printing of Tailored Polymeric Microlenses.

    PubMed

    Florian, Camilo; Piazza, Simonluca; Diaspro, Alberto; Serra, Pere; Duocastella, Martí

    2016-07-13

    We report a laser-based approach for the fast fabrication of high-optical-quality polymeric microlenses and microlens arrays with controllable geometry and size. Our strategy consists of the direct laser printing of microdroplets of a highly viscous UV prepolymer at targeted positions, followed by photocuring. We study the morphological characteristics and imaging performance of the microlenses as a function of the substrate and laser parameters and investigate optimal printing conditions and printing mechanisms. We show that the microlens size and focusing properties can be easily tuned by the laser pulse energy, with minimum volumes below 20 fL and focal lengths ranging from 7 to 50 μm.

  14. The Angstrom Project: a new microlensing candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  15. Is the Gravitational-Wave Ringdown a Probe of the Event Horizon?

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Vitor; Franzin, Edgardo; Pani, Paolo

    2016-04-29

    It is commonly believed that the ringdown signal from a binary coalescence provides a conclusive proof for the formation of an event horizon after the merger. This expectation is based on the assumption that the ringdown waveform at intermediate times is dominated by the quasinormal modes of the final object. We point out that this assumption should be taken with great care, and that very compact objects with a light ring will display a similar ringdown stage, even when their quasinormal-mode spectrum is completely different from that of a black hole. In other words, universal ringdown waveforms indicate the presence of light rings, rather than of horizons. Only precision observations of the late-time ringdown signal, where the differences in the quasinormal-mode spectrum eventually show up, can be used to rule out exotic alternatives to black holes and to test quantum effects at the horizon scale.

  16. Influence of Gravitational Lensing on Sources of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. F.

    In a recent paper by Wang, Turner and Stebbins (1996) an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the incorrect model for this case and thus they gave overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al. concluded. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form template, especially gravitational wave template of periodic sources and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector like LISA.

  17. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  18. Two Stars Two Ways: Confirming a Microlensing Binary Lens Solution with a Spectroscopic Measurement of the Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Johnson, John Asher; Skowron, Jan; Gould, Andrew; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Eastman, Jason; Vanderburg, Andrew; Howard, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Light curves of microlensing events involving stellar binaries and planetary systems can provide information about the orbital elements of the system due to orbital modulations of the caustic structure. Accurately measuring the orbit in either the stellar or planetary case requires detailed modeling of subtle deviations in the light curve. At the same time, the natural, Cartesian parameterization of a microlensing binary is partially degenerate with the microlens parallax. Hence, it is desirable to perform independent tests of the predictions of microlens orbit models using radial velocity (RV) time series of the lens binary system. To this end, we present 3.5 years of RV monitoring of the binary lens system OGLE-2009-BLG-020 L, for which Skowron et al. constrained all internal parameters of the 200-700 day orbit. Our RV measurements reveal an orbit that is consistent with the predictions of the microlens light curve analysis, thereby providing the first confirmation of orbital elements inferred from microlensing events.

  19. Event Rate for LISA Gravitational Wave Signals from Black Hole-Massive Black Hole Coalescences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Peter L.; Salamon, Michael H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Earlier work under a previous grant had been mainly on investigating the event rate for coalescences of white dwarfs or neutron stars with massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Under the new grant, two studies were undertaken. One was an approximate extension of the earlier study to stellar mass black holes as the lighter object, with masses in the range of roughly 3 to 20 M_sun, rather than about 1 M_sun. The other was an improved estimate of the confusion noise due to galactic binaries against which the signals from BH-MDH coalescences would have to be detected. In the earlier work, the mass of the white dwarfs (WDs) and neutron stars (NSs) was assumed to be about the same as that of the unevolved stars in the density cusp around the galactic center MBH. However, with the BH mass being substantially larger, the sinking down of BHs toward the center (mass segregation) became important and was included in the model. A single representative mass of 7 M_sun was used.

  20. A Dark Energy Camera Search for an Optical Counterpart to the First Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Soares-Santos, M.

    2016-05-27

    We report the results of a deep search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave (GW) event GW150914, the first trigger from the Advanced LIGO GW detectors. We used the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to image a 102 deg2 area, corresponding to 38% of the initial trigger high-probability sky region and to 11% of the revised high-probability region. We observed in the i and z bands at 4–5, 7, and 24 days after the trigger. The median 5σ point-source limiting magnitudes of our search images are i = 22.5 and z = 21.8 mag. We processed the images throughmore » a difference-imaging pipeline using templates from pre-existing Dark Energy Survey data and publicly available DECam data. Due to missing template observations and other losses, our effective search area subtends 40 deg2, corresponding to a 12% total probability in the initial map and 3% in the final map. In this area, we search for objects that decline significantly between days 4–5 and day 7, and are undetectable by day 24, finding none to typical magnitude limits of i = 21.5, 21.1, 20.1 for object colors (i – z) = 1, 0, –1, respectively. Lastly, our search demonstrates the feasibility of a dedicated search program with DECam and bodes well for future research in this emerging field.« less

  1. A Dark Energy Camera Search for an Optical Counterpart to the First Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares-Santos, M.; Kessler, R.; Berger, E.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Chen, H.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J.; Gruendl, R. A.; Herner, K.; Holz, D.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Neilsen, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sobreira, F.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brown, D. A.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Chornock, R.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drout, M. R.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fairhurst, S.; Fernandez, E.; Fischer, J.; Fong, W.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Fryer, C. L.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Margutti, R.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; McMahon, R. G.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, N.; Smith, R. C.; Stebbins, A.; Sutton, P. J.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; DES Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of a deep search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave (GW) event GW150914, the first trigger from the Advanced LIGO GW detectors. We used the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to image a 102 deg2 area, corresponding to 38% of the initial trigger high-probability sky region and to 11% of the revised high-probability region. We observed in the i and z bands at 4-5, 7, and 24 days after the trigger. The median 5σ point-source limiting magnitudes of our search images are i = 22.5 and z = 21.8 mag. We processed the images through a difference-imaging pipeline using templates from pre-existing Dark Energy Survey data and publicly available DECam data. Due to missing template observations and other losses, our effective search area subtends 40 deg2, corresponding to a 12% total probability in the initial map and 3% in the final map. In this area, we search for objects that decline significantly between days 4-5 and day 7, and are undetectable by day 24, finding none to typical magnitude limits of i = 21.5, 21.1, 20.1 for object colors (i - z) = 1, 0, -1, respectively. Our search demonstrates the feasibility of a dedicated search program with DECam and bodes well for future research in this emerging field.

  2. A Dark Energy Camera Search for an Optical Counterpart to the First Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares-Santos, M.; Kessler, R.; Burger, E.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Chen, H.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H.T.; Doctor, Z.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a deep search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave (GW) event GW150914, the first trigger from the Advanced LIGO GW detectors. We used the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to image a 102 deg(exp 2) area, corresponding to 38% of the initial trigger high-probability sky region and to 11% of the revised high-probability region. We observed in the i and z bands at 4-5, 7, and 24 days after the trigger. The median 5(sigma) point-source limiting magnitudes of our search images are i = 22.5 and z = 21.8 mag. We processed the images through a difference-imaging pipeline using templates from pre-existing Dark Energy Survey data and publicly available DECam data. Due to missing template observations and other losses, our effective search area subtends 40 deg(exp 2), corresponding to a 12% total probability in the initial map and 3% in the final map. In this area, we search for objects that decline significantly between days 4-5 and day 7, and are undetectable by day 24, finding none to typical magnitude limits of i = 21.5, 21.1, 20.1 for object colors (i-z)= 1, 0, -1, respectively. Our search demonstrates the feasibility of a dedicated search program with DECam and bodes well for future research in this emerging field.

  3. The most powerful astrophysical events: Gravitational-wave peak luminosity of binary black holes as predicted by numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keitel, David; Forteza, Xisco Jiménez; Husa, Sascha; London, Lionel; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Harms, Enno; Nagar, Alessandro; Hannam, Mark; Khan, Sebastian; Pürrer, Michael; Pratten, Geraint; Chaurasia, Vivek

    2017-07-01

    For a brief moment, a binary black hole (BBH) merger can be the most powerful astrophysical event in the visible Universe. Here we present a model fit for this gravitational-wave peak luminosity of nonprecessing quasicircular BBH systems as a function of the masses and spins of the component black holes, based on numerical relativity (NR) simulations and the hierarchical fitting approach introduced by X. Jiménez-Forteza et al. [Phys. Rev. D 95, 064024 (2017)., 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.064024]. This fit improves over previous results in accuracy and parameter-space coverage and can be used to infer posterior distributions for the peak luminosity of future astrophysical signals like GW150914 and GW151226. The model is calibrated to the ℓ≤6 modes of 378 nonprecessing NR simulations up to mass ratios of 18 and dimensionless spin magnitudes up to 0.995, and includes unequal-spin effects. We also constrain the fit to perturbative numerical results for large mass ratios. Studies of key contributions to the uncertainty in NR peak luminosities, such as (i) mode selection, (ii) finite resolution, (iii) finite extraction radius, and (iv) different methods for converting NR waveforms to luminosity, allow us to use NR simulations from four different codes as a homogeneous calibration set. This study of systematic fits to combined NR and large-mass-ratio data, including higher modes, also paves the way for improved inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform models.

  4. Searching for Frozen Super Earth via Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Cassan, A.; Coutures, C.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. B.

    2009-04-01

    Microlensing planet hunt is a unique method to probe efficiently for frozen Super Earth orbiting the most common stars of our galaxy. It is nicely complementing the parameter space probed by very high accuracy radial velocity measurements and future space based detections of low mass transiting planets. In order to maximize the planet catch, the microlensing community is engaged in a total cooperation among the different groups (OGLE, MicroFUN, MOA, PLANET/RoboNET) by making the real time data available, and mutual informing/reporting about modeling efforts. Eight planets have been published so far by combinations of the different groups, 4 Jovian analogues, one Neptune and two Super Earth. Given the microlensing detection efficiency, it suggests that these Neptunes/Super Earths may be quite common. Using networks of dedicated 1-2m class telescopes, the microlensing community has entered a new phase of planet discoveries, and will be able to provide constraints on the abundance of frozen Super-Earths in the near future. Statistics about Mars to Earth mass planets, extending to the habitable zone will be achieved with space based wide field imagers (EUCLID) at the horizon 2017.

  5. Chalcogenide glass microlenses by inkjet printing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Eric A.; Waldmann, Maike; Arnold, Craig B.

    2011-05-10

    We demonstrate micrometer scale mid-IR lenses for integrated optics, using solution-based inkjet printing techniques and subsequent processing. Arsenic sulfide spherical microlenses with diameters of 10-350 {mu}m and focal lengths of 10-700 {mu}m have been fabricated. The baking conditions can be used to tune the precise focal length.

  6. THE EFFECT OF A TIME-VARYING ACCRETION DISK SIZE ON QUASAR MICROLENSING LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-08-01

    Microlensing perturbations to the magnification of gravitationally lensed quasar images are dependent on the angular size of the quasar. If quasar variability at visible wavelengths is caused by a change in the area of the accretion disk, it will affect the microlensing magnification. We derive the expected signal, assuming that the luminosity scales with some power of the disk area, and estimate its amplitude using simulations. We discuss the prospects for detecting the effect in real-world data and for using it to estimate the logarithmic slope of the luminosity's dependence on disk area. Such an estimate would provide a direct test of the standard thin accretion disk model. We tried fitting six seasons of the light curves of the lensed quasar HE 0435-1223 including this effect as a modification to the Kochanek et al. approach to estimating time delays. We find a dramatic improvement in the goodness of fit and relatively plausible parameters, but a robust estimate will require a full numerical calculation in order to correctly model the strong correlations between the structure of the microlensing magnification patterns and the magnitude of the effect. We also comment briefly on the effect of this phenomenon for the stability of time-delay estimates.

  7. One or more bound planets per Milky Way star from microlensing observations.

    PubMed

    Cassan, A; Kubas, D; Beaulieu, J-P; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Greenhill, J; Wambsganss, J; Menzies, J; Williams, A; Jørgensen, U G; Udalski, A; Bennett, D P; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Coutures, Ch; Cook, K H; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Hill, K; Kains, N; Kane, S; Marquette, J-B; Martin, R; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Vinter, C; Warren, D; Watson, B; Zub, M; Sumi, T; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Poleski, R; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrzyński, G; Wyrzykowski, L

    2012-01-11

    Most known extrasolar planets (exoplanets) have been discovered using the radial velocity or transit methods. Both are biased towards planets that are relatively close to their parent stars, and studies find that around 17-30% (refs 4, 5) of solar-like stars host a planet. Gravitational microlensing, on the other hand, probes planets that are further away from their stars. Recently, a population of planets that are unbound or very far from their stars was discovered by microlensing. These planets are at least as numerous as the stars in the Milky Way. Here we report a statistical analysis of microlensing data (gathered in 2002-07) that reveals the fraction of bound planets 0.5-10 AU (Sun-Earth distance) from their stars. We find that 17(+6)(-9)% of stars host Jupiter-mass planets (0.3-10 M(J), where M(J) = 318 M(⊕) and M(⊕) is Earth's mass). Cool Neptunes (10-30 M(⊕)) and super-Earths (5-10 M(⊕)) are even more common: their respective abundances per star are 52(+22)(-29)% and 62(+35)(-37)%. We conclude that stars are orbited by planets as a rule, rather than the exception.

  8. Accurate Mass Determination of the Ancient White Dwarf ER 8 Through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2005-07-01

    We propose to determine the mass of the very cool white dwarf ER 8 through astrometric microlensing. We have predicted that ER 8 will pass very close to a 15th-mag background star in January 2006, with an impact parameter of less than 0.05 arcsec. As it passes in front, it will cause a deflection of the background star's image by >8 milliarcsec, an amount easily detectable with HST/FGS. The gravitational deflection angle depends only on the distances and relative positions of the stars, and on the mass of the white dwarf. Since the distances and positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of the white dwarf to high accuracy {<5%}. Unlike all other stellar mass determinations, this technique works for single stars {but only if they are nearby and of sufficient mass}. The mass of ER 8 is of special interest because it is a member of the Galactic halo, and appears to be the oldest known field white dwarf. This object can thus set a lower limit on the age of the Galactic halo, but since white-dwarf cooling rates depend on their masses, the mass is a necessary ingredient in the age determination. As a byproduct, we will obtain an accurate parallax for ER 8, and thus its luminosity and {from its effective temperature} its radius. Such quantities are at present rather poorly known for the coolest white dwarfs, and will provide strong constraints on white-dwarf physics.

  9. Accurate Mass Determination of the Ancient White Dwarf ER 8 Through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2004-07-01

    We propose to determine the mass of the very cool white dwarf ER 8 through astrometric microlensing. We have predicted that ER 8 will pass very close to a 15th-mag background star in January 2006, with an impact parameter of less than 0.05 arcsec. As it passes in front, it will cause a deflection of the background star's image by >8 milliarcsec, an amount easily detectable with HST/FGS. The gravitational deflection angle depends only on the distances and relative positions of the stars, and on the mass of the white dwarf. Since the distances and positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of the white dwarf to high accuracy {<5%}. Unlike all other stellar mass determinations, this technique works for single stars {but only if they are nearby and of sufficient mass}. The mass of ER 8 is of special interest because it is a member of the Galactic halo, and appears to be the oldest known field white dwarf. This object can thus set a lower limit on the age of the Galactic halo, but since white-dwarf cooling rates depend on their masses, the mass is a necessary ingredient in the age determination. As a byproduct, we will obtain an accurate parallax for ER 8, and thus its luminosity and {from its effective temperature} its radius. Such quantities are at present rather poorly known for the coolest white dwarfs, and will provide strong constraints on white-dwarf physics.

  10. Spitzer Microlens Parallaxes for Long Events as a Preparatory Step for WFIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleski, Radoslaw; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Gould, Andrew; Udalski, Andrzej; Yee, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    We propose additional observations of eight long microlensing events that were observed this year by Spitzer or K2. Spitzer December observations will increase the number of microlensing parallax measurements used for determination of the Galactic distribution of planets. These events are the first for which satellite photometry is obtained in two well-separated windows, hence, as we explain below, they will serve as an empirical test of the ability to extract parallax measurements of microlensing events observed from the WFIRST satellite.

  11. Adventures in the microlensing cloud: Large datasets, eResearch tools, and GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2014-10-01

    As astronomy enters the petascale data era, astronomers are faced with new challenges relating to storage, access and management of data. A shift from the traditional approach of combining data and analysis at the desktop to the use of remote services, pushing the computation to the data, is now underway. In the field of cosmological gravitational microlensing, future synoptic all-sky surveys are expected to bring the number of multiply imaged quasars from the few tens that are currently known to a few thousands. This inflow of observational data, together with computationally demanding theoretical modeling via the production of microlensing magnification maps, requires a new approach. We present our technical solutions to supporting the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). This extensive dataset for cosmological microlensing modeling comprises over 70 000 individual magnification maps and ˜106 related results. We describe our approaches to hosting, organizing, and serving ˜ 30 TB of data and metadata products. We present a set of online analysis tools developed with PHP, JavaScript and WebGL to support access and analysis of GELRUMPH data in a Web browser. We discuss our use of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate data production, and we release the core of the GPU-D direct inverse ray-shooting code (Thompson et al., 2010, 2014) used to generate the magnification maps. All of the GERLUMPH data and tools are available online from http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au. This project made use of gSTAR, the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysical Research.

  12. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2011-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  13. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2012-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  14. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2013-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  15. Microlensing of the Lensed Quasar SDSS 0924+0219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, C. S.; Morgan, Nicholas D.; Falco, Emilio E.

    2006-08-01

    We analyze V-, I-, and H-band HST images and two seasons of R-band monitoring data for the gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS 0924+0219. We clearly see that image D is a point-source image of the quasar at the center of its host galaxy. We can easily track the host galaxy of the quasar close to image D because microlensing has provided a natural coronograph that suppresses the flux of the quasar image by roughly an order of magnitude. We observe low-amplitude, uncorrelated variability between the four quasar images due to microlensing, but no correlated variations that could be used to measure a time delay. Monte Carlo models of the microlensing variability provide estimates of the mean stellar mass in the lens galaxy (0.03 h2 Msolar<~<~2.0 h2 Msolar), the accretion disk size (the disk temperature is 5×104 K at 1.3×1014 h-1 cm<~rs<~4.7×1014 h-1 cm), and the black hole mass (6.6×106 Msolar<~MBH h3/2 η-1/20.1 (L/LEdd)1/2<~4.4×107 Msolar), all at 68% confidence. The black hole mass estimate based on microlensing is mildly inconsistent with an estimate of MBH=(2.8+/-0.9)×108 Msolar from the Mg II emission-line width. If we extrapolate the best-fitting light curve models into the future, we expect images A and B to fade and images C and D to brighten. In particular, we estimate that image D has a roughly 16% probability of brightening by a factor of 2 during the next year and a 40% probability of brightening by an order of magnitude over the next decade. Based on observations obtained with the Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) 1.3 m, which is operated by the SMARTS Consortium; the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; the WIYN Observatory, which is owned and operated by the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO); the 6.5 m Magellan Baade telescope, which is a collaboration between

  16. The NuSTAR spectrum of Mrk 335: extreme relativistic effects within two gravitational radii of the event horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Grupe, D.; Dauser, T.; Matt, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Brenneman, L.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Gallo, L. C.; Hailey, C. J.; Kara, E.; Komossa, S.; Marinucci, A.; Miller, J. M.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-09-01

    We present 3-50 keV NuSTAR observations of the active galactic nuclei Mrk 335 in a very low flux state. The spectrum is dominated by very strong features at the energies of the iron line at 5-7 keV and Compton hump from 10-30 keV. The source is variable during the observation, with the variability concentrated at low energies, which suggesting either a relativistic reflection or a variable absorption scenario. In this work, we focus on the reflection interpretation, making use of new relativistic reflection models that self consistently calculate the reflection fraction, relativistic blurring and angle-dependent reflection spectrum for different coronal heights to model the spectra. We find that the spectra can be well fitted with relativistic reflection, and that the lowest flux state spectrum is described by reflection alone, suggesting the effects of extreme light-bending occurring within ˜2 gravitational radii (RG) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 RG as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3σ confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper limit on the reflection fraction to our models, we demonstrate that this can be a powerful way of constraining the spin parameter, particularly in reflection dominated states. We also calculate a detailed emissivity profile for the iron line, and find that it closely matches theoretical predictions for a compact source within a few RG of the black hole.

  17. The Nustar Spectrum of Mrk 335: Extreme Relativistic Effects Within Two Gravitational Radii of the Event Horizon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Grupe, D.; Dauser, T.; Matt, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Brenneman, L.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present 3-50 keV NuSTAR observations of the active galactic nuclei Mrk 335 in a very low flux state. The spectrum is dominated by very strong features at the energies of the iron line at 5-7 keV and Compton hump from 10-30 keV. The source is variable during the observation, with the variability concentrated at low energies, which suggesting either a relativistic reflection or a variable absorption scenario. In this work, we focus on the reflection interpretation, making use of new relativistic reflection models that self consistently calculate the reflection fraction, relativistic blurring and angle-dependent reflection spectrum for different coronal heights to model the spectra. We find that the spectra can be well fitted with relativistic reflection, and that the lowest flux state spectrum is described by reflection alone, suggesting the effects of extreme light-bending occurring within approx. 2 gravitational radii (RG) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 RG as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3(sigma) confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper limit on the reflection fraction to our models, we demonstrate that this can be a powerful way of constraining the spin parameter, particularly in reflection dominated states. We also calculate a detailed emissivity profile for the iron line, and find that it closely matches theoretical predictions for a compact source within a few RG of the black hole.

  18. OGLE-2013-BLG-0102LA,B: MICROLENSING BINARY WITH COMPONENTS AT STAR/BROWN DWARF AND BROWN DWARF/PLANET BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Y. K.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Mróz, P.; Kubiak, M.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; and others

    2015-01-10

    We present an analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0102. The light curve of the event is characterized by a strong short-term anomaly superposed on a smoothly varying lensing curve with a moderate magnification A {sub max} ∼ 1.5. It is found that the event was produced by a binary lens with a mass ratio between the components of q = 0.13 and the anomaly was caused by the passage of the source trajectory over a caustic located away from the barycenter of the binary. Based on the analysis of the effects on the light curve due to the finite size of the source and the parallactic motion of the Earth, we determine the physical parameters of the lens system. The measured masses of the lens components are M {sub 1} = 0.096 ± 0.013 M {sub ☉} and M {sub 2} = 0.012 ± 0.002 M {sub ☉}, which correspond to near the hydrogen-burning and deuterium-burning mass limits, respectively. The distance to the lens is 3.04 ± 0.31 kpc and the projected separation between the lens components is 0.80 ± 0.08 AU.

  19. BVI photometric confirmation of a microlensing nature for ASASSN-16oe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Frigo, A.

    2016-12-01

    ASASSN-16oe was discovered on UT 2016-11-30.35 at V 13.3 mag. The progenitor is present in many all sky surveys, including Gaia DR1. The quiescence brightness according to APASS is B=16.83 and V=15.93 mag. Strader et al. (Atel #9860) have recently suggested that ASASSN-16oe could be a microlensing event based on the preliminary ASASSN photometry and a spectrum they obtained for the object.

  20. Halo cold dark matter and microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Evalyn; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-12-01

    There is good evidence that most of the baryons in the Universe are dark and some evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is nonbaryonic with cold dark matter (cdm) being a promising possibility. We discuss expectations for the abundance of baryons and cdm in the halo of our galaxy and locally. We show that in plausible cdm models the local density of cdm is at least $10^{-25}\\gcmm3$. We also discuss what one can learn about the the local cdm density from microlensing of stars in the LMC by dark stars in the halo and, based upon a suite of reasonable two-component halo models, conclude that microlensing is not a sensitive probe of the local cdm density.

  1. Black hole, neutron star and white dwarf candidates from microlensing with OGLE-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Iłkiewicz, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.

    2016-05-01

    Most stellar remnants so far have been found in binary systems, where they interact with matter from their companions. Isolated neutron stars and black holes are difficult to find as they are dark, yet they are predicted to exist in our Galaxy in vast numbers. We explored the OGLE-III data base of 150 million objects observed in years 2001-2009 and found 59 microlensing events exhibiting a parallax effect due to the Earth's motion around the Sun. Combining parallax and brightness measurements from microlensing light curves with expected proper motions in the Milky Way, we identified 13 microlensing events which are consistent with having a white dwarf, neutron star or a black hole lens and we estimated their masses and distances. The most massive of our black hole candidates has 9.3 M⊙ and is at a distance of 2.4 kpc. The distribution of masses of our candidates indicates a continuum in mass distribution with no mass gap between neutron stars and black holes. We also present predictions on how such events will be observed by the astrometric Gaia mission.

  2. Microlensing Signature of Binary Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Sahu, Kailash; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the light curves of galactic bulge stars magnified via microlensing by stellar-mass binary black holes along the line-of-sight. We show the sensitivity to measuring various lens parameters for a range of survey cadences and photometric precision. Using public data from the OGLE collaboration, we identify two candidates for massive binary systems, and discuss implications for theories of star formation and binary evolution.

  3. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  4. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  5. The WFIRST Microlensing Survey: Expectations and Unexpectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Penny, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The WFIRST microlensing survey will provide the definitive determination of the demographics of cool planets with semimajor axes > 1 AU and masses greater than that of the Earth, including free-floating planets. Together with the results from Kepler, TESS, and PLATO, WFIRST will complete the statistical census of planets in the Galaxy. These expectations are based on the most basic and conservative assumptions about the data quality, and assumes that the analysis methodologies will be similar to that used for current ground-based microlensing. Yet, in fact, the data quality will be dramatically better, and information content substantially richer, for the WFIRST microlensing survey as compared to current ground-based surveys. Thus WFIRST should allow for orders of magnitude improvement in both sensitivity and science yield. We will review some of these expected improvements and opportunities (the "known unknowns"), and provide a "to do list" of what tasks will need to be completed in order to take advantage of these opportunities. We will then speculate on the opportunities that we may not be aware of yet (the "unknown unknowns"), how we might go about determining what those opportunities are, and how we might figure out what we will need to do to take advantage of them.This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX14AF63G.

  6. Liquid Crystal Microlenses for Autostereoscopic Displays

    PubMed Central

    Algorri, José Francisco; Urruchi, Virginia; García-Cámara, Braulio; Sánchez-Pena, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional vision has acquired great importance in the audiovisual industry in the past ten years. Despite this, the first generation of autostereoscopic displays failed to generate enough consumer excitement. Some reasons are little 3D content and performance issues. For this reason, an exponential increase in three-dimensional vision research has occurred in the last few years. In this review, a study of the historical impact of the most important technologies has been performed. This study is carried out in terms of research manuscripts per year. The results reveal that research on spatial multiplexing technique is increasing considerably and today is the most studied. For this reason, the state of the art of this technique is presented. The use of microlenses seems to be the most successful method to obtain autostereoscopic vision. When they are fabricated with liquid crystal materials, extended capabilities are produced. Among the numerous techniques for manufacturing liquid crystal microlenses, this review covers the most viable designs for its use in autostereoscopic displays. For this reason, some of the most important topologies and their relation with autostereoscopic displays are presented. Finally, the challenges in some recent applications, such as portable devices, and the future of three-dimensional displays based on liquid crystal microlenses are outlined. PMID:28787837

  7. Planetary Caustic Perturbations of a Close-separation Planet on Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Kim, Han-Seek; Chung, Sun-Ju; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Most planetary events discovered up to date by the planetary caustic of close-separation planets have low-mass ratios. In next-generation microlensing experiments with a wider field of view and a higher cadence, it is possible to obtain densely covered planetary signals induced by the planetary caustic of close-separation planets without missing events. Therefore, the planetary caustic perturbation of close-separation planets would be the more important channel to detect low-mass exoplanets in the next generation of microlensing surveys. In this paper, we investigate the theoretical properties and detection conditions for the planetary caustic perturbation of close-separation planets. To find the properties of the planetary caustic perturbation, we construct deviation maps by subtracting the single-lensing magnification of the lens star from the planetary lensing magnification for various lensing parameters. We find that each deviation area of the positive and negative perturbations disappears at the same normalized source radius according to a given deviation threshold regardless of mass ratio but disappears at a different normalized source radius according to the separation. We also estimate the upper limit of the normalized source radius to detect the planetary caustic perturbation. We find simple relations between the upper limit of the normalized source radius and the lensing parameters. From the relations, we obtain an analytic condition for the theoretical detection limit of the planet, which shows that we can sufficiently discover a planet with a sub-Earth-mass for typical microlensing events. Therefore, we conclude that our planet-detection condition of can be used as an important criteria for maximal planet detections, considering the source type and the photometric accuracy and expect that a number of low-mass planets will be added from the next-generation microlensing experiments.

  8. MICROLENSING BINARIES DISCOVERED THROUGH HIGH-MAGNIFICATION CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, S.-Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Hung, L.-W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-02-20

    Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a 3{sigma} confidence level for three events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is q {approx} 0.1, making the companion of the lens a strong brown dwarf candidate.

  9. Predictions on the detection of the free-floating planet population with K2 and spitzer microlensing campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamolli, L.; De Paolis, F.; Hafizi, M.; Nucita, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) by the Kepler satellite for microlensing observations towards the Galactic bulge started on April 7, 2016, and is going to last for about three months. It offers the first chance to measure the masses of members of the large population of the isolated dark low-mass objects further away in our Galaxy, free-floating planets (FFPs). Intentionally, this observational period of K2 will overlap with that of the 2016 Spitzer follow-up microlensing project expected to start in June, 2016. Therefore, for the first time it is going to be possible to observe simultaneously the same microlensing events from a ground-based telescope and two satellites. This will help in removing the two-fold degeneracy of the impact parameter and in estimating the FFP mass, provided that the angular Einstein ring radius ΘE is measured. In this paper we calculate the probability that a microlensing event is detectable by two or more telescopes and study how it depends on the mass function index of FFPs and the position of the observers on the orbit.

  10. The chemically homogeneous evolutionary channel for binary black hole mergers: rates and properties of gravitational-wave events detectable by advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, S. E.; Mandel, I.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the predictions for detectable gravitational-wave signals from merging binary black holes formed through chemically homogeneous evolution in massive short-period stellar binaries. We find that ˜500 events per year could be detected with advanced ground-based detectors operating at full sensitivity. We analyse the distribution of detectable events, and conclude that there is a very strong preference for detecting events with nearly equal components (mass ratio >0.66 at 90 per cent confidence in our default model) and high masses (total source-frame mass between 57 and 103 M⊙ at 90 per cent confidence). We consider multiple alternative variations to analyse the sensitivity to uncertainties in the evolutionary physics and cosmological parameters, and conclude that while the rates are sensitive to assumed variations, the mass distributions are robust predictions. Finally, we consider the recently reported results of the analysis of the first 16 double-coincident days of the O1 LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) observing run, and find that this formation channel is fully consistent with the inferred parameters of the GW150914 binary black hole detection and the inferred merger rate.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROLENSING PLANETS WITH MODERATELY WIDE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cheongho

    2009-08-01

    In future high-cadence microlensing surveys, planets can be detected through a new channel of an independent event produced by the planet itself. The two populations of planets to be detected through this channel are wide-separation planets and free-floating planets. Although they appear as similar short timescale events, the two populations of planets are widely different in nature and thus distinguishing them is important. In this paper, we investigate the lensing properties of events produced by planets with moderately wide separations from host stars. We find that the lensing behavior of these events is well described by the Chang-Refsdal lensing, and the shear caused by the primary not only produces a caustic but also makes the magnification contour elongated along the primary-planet axis. The elongated magnification contour implies that the light curves of these planetary events are generally asymmetric, and thus the asymmetry can be used to distinguish the events from those produced by free-floating planets. The asymmetry can be noticed from the overall shape of the light curve and thus can hardly be missed unlike the very short duration central perturbation caused by the caustic. In addition, the asymmetry occurs regardless of the event magnification, and thus the bound nature of the planet can be identified for majority of these events. The close approximation of the lensing light curve to that of the Chang-Refsdal lensing implies that the analysis of the light curve yields only the information about the projected separation between the host star and the planet.

  12. Strong gravitational lensing: relativity in action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Deflection of light by gravity was predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity and observationally confirmed in 1919. In the following decades, various aspects of the gravitational lens effect were explored theoretically, among them measuring the Hubble constant from multiple images of a background source, making use of the magnifying effect as a gravitational telescope, or the possibility of a “relativistic eclipse” as a perfect test of GR. Only in 1979, gravitational lensing became an observational science when the first doubly imaged quasar was discovered. Today lensing is a booming part of astrophysics and cosmology. A whole suite of strong lensing phenomena have been investigated: multiple quasars, giant luminous arcs, Einstein rings, quasar microlensing, and galactic microlensing. The most recent lensing application is the detection of extrasolar planets. Lensing has contributed significant new results in areas as different as the cosmological distance scale, mass determination of galaxy clusters, physics of quasars, searches for dark matter in galaxy halos, structure of the Milky Way, stellar atmospheres and exoplanets. A guided tour through some of these applications will illustrate how gravitational lensing has established itself as a very useful universal astrophysical tool.

  13. Strong Gravitational Lensing: Relativity in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    2009-05-01

    Deflection of light by gravity was predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity and observationally confirmed in 1919. In the following decades, various aspects of the gravitational lens effect were explored theoretically, among them measuring the Hubble constant from multiple images of a background source, making use of the magnifying effect as a gravitational telescope, or the possibility of a "relativistic eclipse" as a perfect test of GR. Only in 1979, gravitational lensing became an observational science when the first doubly imaged quasar was discovered. Today lensing is a booming part of astrophysics and cosmology. A whole suite of strong lensing phenomena have been investigated since: multiple quasars, giant luminous arcs, Einstein rings, quasar microlensing, and galactic microlensing. The most recent lensing application is the detection of extrasolar planets. Lensing has contributed significant new results in areas as different as the cosmological distance scale, mass determination of galaxy clusters, physics of quasars, searches for dark matter in galaxy halos, structure of the Milky Way, stellar atmospheres and exoplanets. A guided tour through some of these applications -- with both photometric and astrometric signatures of lensing being discussed -- will illustrate how gravitational lensing has established itself as a very useful universal astrophysical tool.

  14. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  15. IMPROVED THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS OF MICROLENSING RATES FOR THE DETECTION OF PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE DARK MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Griest, Kim

    2013-04-20

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) remain a dark matter (DM) candidate of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Previously, we proposed a new method of constraining the remaining PBH DM mass range using microlensing of stars monitored by NASA's Kepler mission. We improve this analysis using a more accurate treatment of the population of the Kepler source stars, their variability, and limb darkening. We extend the theoretically detectable PBH DM mass range down to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub Sun }, two orders of magnitude below current limits and one-third order of magnitude below our previous estimate. We address how to extract the DM properties, such as mass and spatial distribution, if PBH microlensing events were detected. We correct an error in a well-known finite-source limb-darkening microlensing formula and also examine the effects of varying the light curve cadence on PBH DM detectability. We also introduce an approximation for estimating the predicted rate of detection per star as a function of the star's properties, thus allowing for selection of source stars in future missions, and extend our analysis to planned surveys, such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope.

  16. Gravitational wave signatures of the absence of an event horizon. II. Extreme mass ratio inspirals in the spacetime of a thin-shell gravastar

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Chen Yanbei; Norte, Richard

    2010-04-15

    We study gravitational wave emission from the quasicircular, extreme mass ratio inspiral of compact objects of mass m{sub 0} into massive objects of mass M>>m{sub 0} whose external metric is identical to the Schwarzschild metric, except for the absence of an event horizon. To be specific we consider one of the simplest realizations of such an object: a nonrotating thin-shell gravastar. The power radiated in gravitational waves during the inspiral shows distinctive peaks corresponding to the excitation of the polar oscillation modes of the gravastar. For ultracompact gravastars the frequency of these peaks depends mildly on the gravastar compactness. For masses M{approx}10{sup 6}M{sub {center_dot}}the peaks typically lie within the optimal sensitivity bandwidth of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, potentially providing a unique signature of the horizonless nature of the central object. For relatively modest values of the gravastar compactness the radiated power has even more peculiar features, carrying the signature of the microscopic properties of the physical surface replacing the event horizon.

  17. The background rate of false positives: Combining simulations of gravitational wave events with an unsupervised algorithm for transient identification in crowded image-subtracted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We are now entering the era of multimessenger gravitational wave (GW) astronomy with the completion of the first observing run of Advanced LIGO. Multiwavelength electromagnetic (EM) emission is expected to accompany gravitational radiation from compact object binary mergers, such as those between neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes, where Advanced LIGO is most sensitive to their detection. Attempting to perform EM follow-up over the 10-100s deg2 error regions will be faced with many challenges, including the identification and removal of O (105) false positive transients that appear as a commotion of background events and as image artifacts in crowded image-subtracted fields. We present an update to our automated unsupervised algorithm including how our pipeline uses the existing coherent WaveBurst pipeline in an attempt to develop optimized EM follow-up schema. Our end-to-end pipeline combines simulated GW events with actual observational data from a number of ground-based optical observatories, including PTF, ROTSE, and DECam. Our performance is reported both in terms of the number of coincident false positives as well as the efficiency of recovery.

  18. Refractive microlenses for ultraflat photolithographic projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Eisner, Martin; Ossmann, Christian; Weible, Kenneth J.

    2000-08-01

    We report on the fabrication of high quality microlens arrays on 4', 6' and 8'-fused silica wafers. Refractive, plano-convex microlenses are fabricated by using photolithography; a reflow or melting resist technique and reactive ion etching. A diffraction-limited optical performance (p-v wave aberrations of < (lambda) /8, Strehl ratio GTR 0.97) is achieved. Aspherical lens profiles are obtained by varying the etch parameters during the reactive ion etching transfer. The microlens arrays are used for Microlens Projection Lithography (MPL) and within UV-light illumination systems. Microlens Projection Lithography is an innovative technique using KARL SUSS Mask Aligners equipped with an ultra-flat microlens-based projection system. The projection system consists of 500.000 identical micro-objectives side- by-side. Each micro-objective consists of 3 to 4 microlenses. A fully symmetrical optical design eliminates coma, distortion and lateral color. The lens system is frontal- and backside telecentric to provide a unit magnification (+1) over the whole depth of focus. Each micro- objective images a small part of the photomask pattern onto the wafer. The partial images from different channels overlap consistently and form a complete aerial image of the photomask. Microlens Projection Lithography provides an increased depth of focus (GTR 50 microns) at a larger working distance ($GTR 1 mm)than standard proximity printing. Microlens Projection Lithography allows photolithography on curved on non-planar substrates, in V-grooves, holes, etc. using a KARL SUSS Mask Aligner.

  19. pyLIMA : an open source microlensing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    Planetary microlensing is a unique tool to detect cold planets around low-mass stars which is approaching a watershed in discoveries as near-future missions incorporate dedicated surveys. NASA and ESA have decided to complement WFIRST-AFTA and Euclid with microlensing programs to enrich our statistics about this planetary population. Of the nany challenges in- herent in these missions, the data analysis is of primary importance, yet is often perceived as time consuming, complex and daunting barrier to participation in the field. We present the first open source modeling software to conduct a microlensing analysis. This software is written in Python and use as much as possible existing packages.

  20. Interpreting the Strongly Lensed Supernova iPTF16geu: Time Delay Predictions, Microlensing, and Lensing Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Anupreeta; Suyu, Sherry H.; Oguri, Masamune; More, Surhud; Lee, Chien-Hsiu

    2017-02-01

    We present predictions for time delays between multiple images of the gravitationally lensed supernova, iPTF16geu, which was recently discovered from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). As the supernova is of Type Ia where the intrinsic luminosity is usually well known, accurately measured time delays of the multiple images could provide tight constraints on the Hubble constant. According to our lens mass models constrained by the Hubble Space Telescope F814W image, we expect the maximum relative time delay to be less than a day, which is consistent with the maximum of 100 hr reported by Goobar et al. but places a stringent upper limit. Furthermore, the fluxes of most of the supernova images depart from expected values suggesting that they are affected by microlensing. The microlensing timescales are small enough that they may pose significant problems to measure the time delays reliably. Our lensing rate calculation indicates that the occurrence of a lensed SN in iPTF is likely. However, the observed total magnification of iPTF16geu is larger than expected, given its redshift. This may be a further indication of ongoing microlensing in this system.

  1. Discovery of the distant cool sub-Neptune mass planet OGLE 2005-BLG-390Lb by microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, J P; Bennett, D P; Fouque, P; Williams, A; Dominik, M; Jorgensen, U G; Kubas, D; Cassan, A; Coutures, C; Greenhill, J; Hill, K; Menzies, J; Sackett, P D; Albrow, M; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J R; Calitz, J J; Cook, K H; Corrales, E; Desort, M; Dieters, S; Dominis, D; Donatowicz, J; Hoffman, M; Kane, S; Marquette, J B; Martin, R; Meintjes, P; Pollard, K; Sahu, K; Vinter, C; Wambsganss, J; Woller, K; Horne, K; Steele, I; Bramich, D M; Burgdorf, M; Snodgrass, C; Bode, M; Udalski, A; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Wieckowski, T; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Wyrzykowski, L; Paczynski, B; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Britton, T R; Gilmore, A C; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A V; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okada, C; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Sato, S; Sasaki, M; Sekiguchi, T; Sullivan, D J; Tristram, P J; Yock, P M; Yoskioka, T

    2005-11-07

    The favoured theoretical explanation for planetary systems formation is the core-accretion model in which solid planetesimals accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas if they are sufficiently massive. Around M-dwarf stars, the most common stars of our Galaxy, this model favours the formation of Earth- to Neptune-mass planets in a few million years with orbital sizes of 1 to 10 AU, which is consistent with the small number of detections of giant planets with M-dwarf host stars. More than 170 extrasolar planets have been discovered so far with a wide range of masses and orbital periods, but planets of Neptune's mass or less have not previously been detected at separations of more than 0.15 AU from normal stars. Here we report the discovery of a 5.5{sub -2.7}{sup +5.5} Earthmass planetary companion at a separation of 2.6{sub -0.6}{sup +1.5}AU from a 0.22{sub -0.11}{sup +0.21} M{sub e} M-dwarf star, which is the lens star for gravitational microlensing event OGLE 2005-BLG-390. This is the lowest mass ever reported for an extrasolar planet orbiting a main sequence star, although the error bars overlap those for the mass of GJ876d. Our detection suggests that such cool, sub-Neptune mass planets may be common than gas giant planets, as predicted by the core accretion theory.

  2. A simple method to determine time delays in the presence of microlensing: application to HE 0435-1112 and PG 1115+080

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, V. S.; Shulga, V. M.; Berdina, L. A.

    2016-10-01

    A method for determining the time delays in gravitationally lensed quasars is proposed. This method offers a simple and transparent procedure to mitigate the effects of microlensing. It is based on the fundamental properties of representation of quadratically integrable functions by their expansions in orthogonal polynomials series. The method was tested on the artificial light curves simulated for the Time Delay Challenge campaign (TDC0). The new estimates of the time delays in the gravitationally lensed quasars HE 0435-1223 and PG 1115+080 are obtained and compared with the results reported earlier by other authors.

  3. Microlensing Surveys of M31 in the Wide Field Imaging ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E.

    2004-10-27

    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way, thus it is an important laboratory for studying massive dark objects in galactic halos (MACHOs) by gravitational microlensing. Such studies strongly complement the studies of the Milky Way halo using the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We consider the possibilities for microlensing surveys of M31 using the next generation of wide field imaging telescopes with fields of view in the square degree range. We consider proposals for such imagers both on the ground and in space. For concreteness, we specialize to the SNAP proposal for a space telescope and the LSST proposal for a ground based telescope. We find that a modest space-based survey of 50 visits of one hour each is considerably better than current ground based surveys covering 5 years. Crucially, systematic effects can be considerably better controlled with a space telescope because of both the infrared sensitivity and the angular resolution. To be competitive, 8 meter class wide-field ground based imagers must take exposures of several hundred seconds with several day cadence.

  4. Variability of GeV gamma-ray emission in QSO B0218+357 due to microlensing on intermediate size structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitarek, J.; Bednarek, W.

    2016-06-01

    Strong gravitational lensing leads to an occurrence of multiple images, with different magnifications, of a lensed source. Those magnifications can in turn be modified by microlensing on smaller mass scales within the lens. Recently, measurements of the changes in the magnification ratio of the individual images have been proposed as a powerful tool for estimation of the size and velocity of the emission region in the lensed source. The changes of the magnification ratios in blazars PKS1830-211 and QSO B0218+357, if interpreted as caused by a microlensing on individual stars, put strong constraints on those two variables. These constraints are difficult to accommodate with the current models of gamma-ray emission in blazars. In this paper we study if similar changes in the magnification ratio can be caused by microlensing on intermediate size structures in the lensing galaxy. We investigate in details three classes of possible lenses: globular clusters (GCs), open clusters (OCs) and giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We apply this scenario to the case of QSO B0218+357. Our numerical simulations show that changes in magnifications with similar time-scales can be obtained for relativistically moving emission regions with sizes up to 0.01 pc in the case of microlensing on the cores of GCs or clumps in GMCs. From the density of such structures in spiral galaxies we estimate however that lensing in GMCs would be more common.

  5. A dark energy camera search for missing supergiants in the LMC after the advanced LIGO gravitational-wave event GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Annis, J.

    2016-05-27

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg2 of the localization area, including 38 deg2 on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We constructmore » a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf–Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. Lastly, we discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.« less

  6. A dark energy camera search for missing supergiants in the LMC after the advanced LIGO gravitational-wave event GW150914

    SciTech Connect

    Annis, J.

    2016-05-27

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg2 of the localization area, including 38 deg2 on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf–Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. Lastly, we discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  7. A Dark Energy Camera Search for Missing Supergiants in the LMC after the Advanced LIGO Gravitational-wave Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Chen, H.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J.; Gruendl, R. A.; Herner, K.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Neilsen, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Smith, M.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Walker, A. R.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Fischer, J.; Fong, W.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Fryer, C. L.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Martini, P.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Peoples, J.; Petravic, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, R. C.; Stebbins, A.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; DES Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg2 of the localization area, including 38 deg2 on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  8. A dark energy camera search for missing supergiants in the LMC after the advanced LIGO gravitational-wave event GW150914

    SciTech Connect

    Annis, J.

    2016-05-27

    In this study, the collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg2 of the localization area, including 38 deg2 on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf–Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  9. A Dark Energy Camera Search for Missing Supergiants in the LMC After the Advanced LIGO Gravitational-Wave Event GW150914

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Chen, H.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Cenko, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg(exp.2) of the localization area,including 38 deg(exp. 2) on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates:less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  10. High-throughput plastic microlenses fabricated using microinjection molding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appasamy, Sreeram; Li, Weizhuo; Lee, Se Hwan; Boyd, Joseph T.; Ahn, Chong H.

    2005-12-01

    A novel fabrication scheme to develop high-throughput plastic microlenses using injection-molding techniques is realized. The initial microlens mold is fabricated using the well-known reflow technique. The reflow process is optimized to obtain reliable and repeatable microlens patterns. The master mold insert for the injection-molding process is fabricated using metal electroforming. The electroplating process is optimized for obtaining a low stress electroform. Two new plastic materials, cyclo olefin copolymer (COC) and Poly IR 2 are introduced in this work for fabricating microlenses. The plastic microlenses have been characterized for their focal lengths that range from 200 µm to 1.9 mm. This technique enables high-volume production of plastic microlenses with cycle times for a single chip being of the order of 60 s.

  11. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino follow-up of gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    On September 14, 2015 the Advanced LIGO detectors observed their first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914. This was followed by a second GW event observed on December 26, 2015. Both events were inferred to have arisen from the merger of black holes in binary systems. Such a system may emit neutrinos if there are magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the two black holes. With the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory we can search for neutrinos with energy Eν above 100 PeV from pointlike sources across the sky with equatorial declination from about -6 5 ° to +6 0 ° , and, in particular, from a fraction of the 90% confidence-level inferred positions in the sky of GW150914 and GW151226. A targeted search for highly inclined extensive air showers, produced either by interactions of downward-going neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere or by the decays of tau leptons originating from tau-neutrino interactions in the Earth's crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos), yielded no candidates in the Auger data collected within ±500 s around or 1 day after the coordinated universal time (UTC) of GW150914 and GW151226, as well as in the same search periods relative to the UTC time of the GW candidate event LVT151012. From the nonobservation we constrain the amount of energy radiated in ultrahigh-energy neutrinos from such remarkable events.

  12. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino follow-up of gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D’Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2016-12-30

    On September 14, 2015 the Advanced LIGO detectors observed their first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914. This was followed by a second GW event observed on December 26, 2015. Both events were inferred to have arisen from the merger of black holes in binary systems. Such a system may emit neutrinos if there are magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the two black holes. With the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory we can search for neutrinos with energy Eν above 100 PeV from point like sources across the sky with equatorial declination from about -65° to +60°, and, in particular, from a fraction of the 90% confidence-level inferred positions in the sky of GW150914 and GW151226. A targeted search for highly inclined extensive air showers, produced either by interactions of downward-going neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere or by the decays of tau leptons originating from tau-neutrino interactions in the Earth’s crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos), yielded no candidates in the Auger data collected within ±500 s around or 1 day after the coordinated universal time (UTC) of GW150914 and GW151226, as well as in the same search periods relative to the UTC time of the GW candidate event LVT151012. As a result, from the non-observation we constrain the amount of energy radiated in ultrahigh-energy neutrinos from such remarkable events.

  13. Dynamics and Origin of Extra-solar Planetary Systems and Microlensing Detection of Extra-solar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    We compare a space-based microlensing search for planets, with a ground based microlensing search originally proposed by D. Tytler (Beichman, et al. 1996). Perturbations of microlensing light curves when the lens star has a planetary companion are sought by one wide angle survey telescope and an array of three or four followup narrow angle telescopes distributed in longitude that follow events with high precision, high time resolution photometry. Alternative ground based programs are considered briefly. With the four 2 meter telescopes distributed in longitude in the southern hemisphere in the Tytler proposal, observational constraints on a ground-based search for planets during microlensing events toward the center of the galaxy are severe. Probably less than 100 events could be monitored per year with high precision, high time resolution photometry with only about 42% coverage on the average regardless of how many events were discovered by the survey telescope. Statistics for the occurrence and properties for Jupiter-mass planets would be meaningful but relatively meager four years after the program was started, and meaningful statistics for Earth-mass planets would be non existent. In contrast, the 14,500 events in a proposed 4 year space based program (GEST = Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope) would yield very sound statistics on the occurrence, masses and separations of Jupiter-mass planets, and significant constraints on similar properties for Earth-mass planets. The significance of the Jupiter statistics would be to establish the frequency of planetary systems like our own, where terrestrial planets could exist inside the orbits of the giants.

  14. The conceptual origins of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls-Gabaud, David

    2006-11-01

    We critically examine the evidence available of the early ideas on the bending of light due to a gravitational attraction, which led to the concept of gravitational lenses, and attempt to present an undistorted historical perspective. Contrary to a widespread but baseless claim, Newton was not the precursor to the idea, and the first Query in his Opticks is totally unrelated to this phenomenon. We briefly review the roles of Voltaire, Marat, Cavendish, Soldner and Einstein in their attempts to quantify the gravitational deflection of light. The first, but unpublished, calculations of the lensing effect produced by this deflection are found in Einstein's 1912 notebooks, where he derived the lensing equation and the formation of images in a gravitational lens. The brief 1924 paper by Chwolson which presents, without calculations, the formation of double images and rings by a gravitational lens passed mostly unnoticed. The unjustly forgotten and true pioneer of the subject is F. Link, who not only published the first detailed lensing calculations in 1936, nine months prior to Einstein's famous paper in Science, but also extended the theory to include the effects of finite-size sources and lenses, binary sources, and limb darkening that same year. Link correctly predicted that the microlensing effect would be easier to observe in crowded fields or in galaxies, as observations confirmed five decades later. The calculations made by Link are far more detailed than those by Tikhov and Bogorodsky. We discuss briefly some papers of the early 1960s which marked the renaissance of this theoretical subject prior to the first detection of a gravitational lens in 1979, and we conclude with the unpublished chapter of Petrou's 1981 PhD thesis addressing the microlensing of stars in the Magellanic clouds by dark objects in the Galactic halo.

  15. Fabrication process of Si microlenses for OCT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovic, A.; Pandraud, G.; Zinoviev, K.; Rubio, J. L.; Margallo, E.; Sarro, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present Si microlenses fabricated using dry ICP plasma etching of silicon and thermal photoresist reflow. The process is insensitive to thermal reflow time and it can be easily incorporated into fabrication flows for complex optical systems. Using this process, we were able to fabricate microlenses with diameter of 150 μm, radius of curvature of 682 μm and with a surface roughness of only 25 nm.

  16. MOA 2010-BLG-477Lb: CONSTRAINING THE MASS OF A MICROLENSING PLANET FROM MICROLENSING PARALLAX, ORBITAL MOTION, AND DETECTION OF BLENDED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelet, E.; Fouque, P.; Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Marquette, J.-B.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Heyrovsky, D.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Collaboration: PLANET Collaboration; FUN muCollaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-07-20

    Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA 2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is q = (2.181 {+-} 0.004) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and the projected separation is s = 1.1228 {+-} 0.0006 in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large {theta}{sub E} = 1.38 {+-} 0.11 mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the 'microlens parallax' and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range 0.13 < M/M{sub Sun} < 1.0. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of M{sub *} = 0.67{sup +0.33}{sub -0.13} M{sub Sun} and m{sub p} = 1.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.3} M{sub JUP} at a distance of D = 2.3 {+-} 0.6 kpc, and with a semi-major axis of a = 2{sup +3}{sub -1} AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.

  17. Chromatic control in coextruded layered polymer microlenses.

    PubMed

    Crescimanno, Michael; Oder, Tom N; Andrews, James H; Zhou, Chuanhong; Petrus, Joshua B; Merlo, Cory; Bagheri, Cameron; Hetzel, Connor; Tancabel, James; Singer, Kenneth D; Baer, Eric

    2014-12-01

    We describe the formation, characterization and theoretical understanding of microlenses comprised of alternating polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate layers produced by multilayer coextrusion. These lenses are fabricated by photolithography, using a grayscale mask followed by plasma etching, so that the refractive index alternation of the bilayer stack appears across the radius of the microlens. The alternating quarter-wave thick layers form a one-dimensional photonic crystal whose dispersion augments the material dispersion, allowing one to sculpt the chromatic dispersion of the lens by adjusting the layered structure. Using Huygen's principle, we model our experimental measurements of the focal length of these lenses across the reflection band of the multilayer polymer film from which the microlens is fashioned. For a 56 μm diameter multilayered lens of focal length 300 μm, we measured a ∼ 25% variation in the focal length across a shallow, 50 nm-wide reflection band.

  18. The OGLE view of microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds - II. OGLE-II Small Magellanic Cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Belokurov, V.; Smith, M. C.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Szewczyk, O.

    2010-09-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to provide evidence that can prove true or false the hypothesis that dark matter in the Galactic halo can clump into stellar-mass compact objects. If such objects exist, they would act as lenses to external sources in the Magellanic Clouds, giving rise to an observable effect of microlensing. We present the results of our search for such events, based on data from the second phase of the OGLE survey (1996-2000) towards the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The data set we used comprises 2.1 million monitored sources distributed over an area of 2.4deg2. We found only one microlensing event candidate, however its poor-quality light curve limited our discussion of the exact distance to the lensing object. Given a single event, taking blending (crowding of stars) into account for the detection-efficiency simulations and deriving the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)-corrected number of monitored stars, the microlensing optical depth is τ = (1.55 +/- 1.55) × 10-7. This result is consistent with the expected SMC self-lensing signal, with no need to introduce dark matter microlenses. Rejecting the unconvincing event leads to an upper limit on the fraction of dark matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) of f < 20 per cent for deflector masses around 0.4Msolar and f < 11 per cent for masses between 0.003 and 0.2Msolar (95 per cent confidence limit). Our result indicates that the Milky Way's dark matter is unlikely to be clumpy and to form compact objects in the subsolar-mass range. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3-m Warsaw Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. E-mail: wyrzykow@ast.cam.ac.uk ‡ Name pronunciation: Woocash Vizhikovsky

  19. Is the Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Due to an Intervening Dwarf Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.; Peterson, B. A.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Rodgers, A. W.; Rorabeck, A.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; Tomaney, A. B.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D. L.

    1997-11-01

    The recent suggestion that the microlensing events observed toward the Large Magellanic Cloud are due to an intervening Sgr-like dwarf galaxy is examined. A search for foreground RR Lyrae in the MACHO photometry database yields 20 stars whose distance distribution follow the expected halo density profile. Cepheid and red giant branch clump stars in the MACHO database are consistent with membership in the LMC. There is also no evidence in the literature for a distinct kinematic population, for intervening gas, or for the turnoff of such a hypothetical galaxy. We conclude that if the lenses are in a foreground galaxy, it must be a particularly dark galaxy.

  20. The Pan-STARRS, Mauna Kea, and PESSTO search for optical counterparts to aLIGO gravitational wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.; Pan-STARRS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We have searched for an optical counterpart to the first gravitational wave source discovered by the Advanced LIGO experiment, GW150914, using the Pan-STARRS wide-field telescope and associated data processing to identify transient objects. Interesting candidates are then followed up using the UH88, Gemini, and PESSTO for the spectroscopic characterization. We mapped out 442 square degrees of the northern sky region of the initial LIGO map. We discovered 56 astrophysical transients over a period of 41 days from the discovery of the source. Of these, 19 were spectroscopically classied and a further 13 have host galaxy redshifts. All transients appear to be fairly normal supernovae and AGN variability and none are obviously linked with GW150914. We find one high energey type II supernova with an estimated explosion date consistent with that of GW150914, but no causal link can be inferred. We discuss our results as demonstration of the survey capability of Pan-STARRS, and the spectroscopic capabilities of PESSTO and Mauna Kea.

  1. Influence of gravitational lensing on sources of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander F.; Baryshev, Yuri V.

    2002-04-01

    In a recent paper by Wang et al (Wang Y, Stebbins A, and Turner E L 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 2875) the influence of gravitational lensing on increasing the estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the incorrect model for this case and thus they gave an overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We also show that if we use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that stronger influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al concluded. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form templates, especially the gravitational wave template of periodic sources, and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector such as LISA.

  2. Microlensing Constraints on the Mass of Single Stars from HST Astrometric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kains, N.; Calamida, A.; Sahu, K. C.; Casertano, S.; Anderson, J.; Udalski, A.; Zoccali, M.; Bond, H.; Albrow, M.; Bond, I.; Brown, T.; Dominik, M.; Fryer, C.; Livio, M.; Mao, S.; Rejkuba, M.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the first results from a large-scale observing campaign aiming to use astrometric microlensing to detect and place limits on the mass of single objects, including stellar remnants. We used the Hubble Space Telescope to monitor stars near the Galactic Center for three years, and we measured the brightness and positions of ˜2 million stars at each observing epoch. In addition to this, we monitored the same pointings using the VIMOS imager on the Very Large Telescope. The stars we monitored include several bright microlensing events observed from the ground by the OGLE collaboration. In this paper, we present the analysis of our photometric and astrometric measurements for six of these events, and derive mass constraints for the lens in each of them. Although these constraints are limited by the photometric precision of ground-based data, and our ability to determine the lens distance, we were able to constrain the size of the Einstein ring radius thanks to our precise astrometric measurements—the first routine measurements of this type from a large-scale observing program. This demonstrates the power of astrometric microlensing as a tool to constrain the masses of stars, stellar remnants, and, in the future, extrasolar planets, using precise ground- and space-based observations. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programmes 091.D-0489(A) and 093.D-0522(A). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  3. Reevaluating the feasibility of ground-based Earth-mass microlensing planet detections

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Youn Kil; Park, Hyuk; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Shin, In-Gu; Choi, Joon-Young

    2014-05-10

    An important strength of the microlensing method to detect extrasolar planets is its high sensitivity to low-mass planets. However, many believe that microlensing detections of Earth-mass planets from ground-based observation would be difficult because of limits set by finite-source effects. This view comes from the previous estimation of planet detection probability based on the fractional deviation of planetary signals; however, a proper probability estimation is required when considering the source brightness, which is directly related to the photometric precision. In this paper, we reevaluate the feasibility of low-mass planet detections by considering photometric precision for different populations of source stars. From this, we find that the contribution of improved photometric precision to the planetary signal of a giant-source event is large enough to compensate for the decrease in magnification excess caused by finite-source effects. As a result, we conclude that giant-source events are suitable targets for Earth-mass planet detections with significantly higher detection probability than events involved with source stars of smaller radii, and we predict that Earth-mass planets could be detected by prospective high-cadence surveys.

  4. MOA-2011-BLG-028Lb: A Neptune-mass Microlensing Planet in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Dominik, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Bozza, V.; Harpsøe, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Skottfelt, J.; MiNDSTEp Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet orbiting a 0.8+/- 0.3{M}⊙ star in the Galactic bulge. The planet manifested itself during the microlensing event MOA-2011-BLG-028/OGLE-2011-BLG-0203 as a low-mass companion to the lens star. The analysis of the light curve provides the measurement of the mass ratio (1.2+/- 0.2)× {10}-4, which indicates that the mass of the planet is 12-60 Earth masses. The lensing system is located at 7.3 ± 0.7 kpc away from the Earth near the direction of Baade’s Window. The projected separation of the planet at the time of the microlensing event was 3.1-5.2 au. Although the microlens parallax effect is not detected in the light curve of this event, preventing the actual mass measurement, the uncertainties of mass and distance estimation are narrowed by the measurement of the source star proper motion on the OGLE-III images spanning eight years, and by the low amount of blended light seen, proving that the host star cannot be too bright and massive. We also discuss the inclusion of undetected parallax and orbital motion effects into the models and their influence onto the final physical parameters estimates. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3 m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory operated by the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  5. GRB 130427A and SN 2013cq: A Multi-wavelength Analysis of An Induced Gravitational Collapse Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Wang, Y.; Enderli, M.; Muccino, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a data analysis of the observations by the Swift, NuStar, and Fermi satellites in order to probe the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae (SNe) in the terra incognita of GRB 130427A. We compare our data analysis with those in the literature. We have verified that GRB 130427A conforms to the IGC paradigm by examining the power law behavior of the luminosity in the early 104 s of the XRT observations. This has led to the identification of the four different episodes of the binary driven hypernovae (BdHNe) and to the prediction, on 2013 May 2, of the occurrence of SN 2013cq, which was also observed in the optical band on 2013 May 13. The exceptional quality of the data has allowed the identification of novel features in Episode 3 including: (1) the confirmation and the extension of the existence of the recently discovered nested structure in the late X-ray luminosity in GRB 130427A, as well as the identification of a spiky structure at 102 s in the cosmological rest-frame of the source; (2) a power law emission of the GeV luminosity light curve and its onset at the end of Episode 2; and (3) different Lorentz Γ factors for the emitting regions of the X-ray and GeV emissions in this Episode 3. These results make it possible to test the details of the physical and astrophysical regimes at work in the BdHNe: (1) a newly born neutron star and the supernova ejecta, originating in Episode 1; (2) a newly formed black hole originating in Episode 2; and (3) the possible interaction among these components, observable in the standard features of Episode 3.

  6. Reactivation of a Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation observed during the recent seismic events in Central Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Gabriele; Aringoli, Domenico; Devoti, Roberto; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Galvani, Alessandro; Pambianchi, Gilberto; Sepe, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DSGSDs) represent an important geomorphological feature of the European mountain chains and several cases from Central Apennine (Italy) are accurately described in literature. These phenomena generally present evident geomorphological markers (e.g. double ridges, trenches, counterslopes) and low activity rates (i.e. mm to cm per year), which can be triggered by many different means (e.g. seismic activity, erosional processes, rainfall, post-glacial debuttressing). To understand which is the most influential factor in DSGSDs' activity is rarely an easy task because this can vary from case to case. This work illustrates the outcomes provided by a monitoring activity conducted along the Mt. Frascare slope (Fiastra Lake, Marche region, Italy). The monitoring system is composed by 4 low cost GPS stations, based on single-frequency receivers, and 2 double-frequency GPS stations, aimed to cross-check the surface deformations measured by the two types of monitoring stations. The 6 GPS stations have been operated in place starting from October 2014 grounded on the base of a geomorphological field survey of the investigated phenomenon. Two stations have been equipped with both receiver types in order to facilitate the comparison of the results. The Fiastra DSGSD affects a marly limestone bedrock throughout a >5km2 area and along a slope against which a dam for hydroelectric power leans. Our monitoring system allowed to measure the Fiastra DSGSD's seismically induced relative displacements on the order of two mean steps of about 10 cm, due to the recent seismic sequence occurred in Central Italy in 2016, which resulted considerably higher than the observed mean annual velocity (≈5mm/y).

  7. GRB 130427A AND SN 2013cq: A MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF AN INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, R.; Wang, Y.; Enderli, M.; Muccino, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.; Penacchioni, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a data analysis of the observations by the Swift, NuStar, and Fermi satellites in order to probe the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae (SNe) in the terra incognita of GRB 130427A. We compare our data analysis with those in the literature. We have verified that GRB 130427A conforms to the IGC paradigm by examining the power law behavior of the luminosity in the early 10{sup 4} s of the XRT observations. This has led to the identification of the four different episodes of the binary driven hypernovae (BdHNe) and to the prediction, on 2013 May 2, of the occurrence of SN 2013cq, which was also observed in the optical band on 2013 May 13. The exceptional quality of the data has allowed the identification of novel features in Episode 3 including: (1) the confirmation and the extension of the existence of the recently discovered nested structure in the late X-ray luminosity in GRB 130427A, as well as the identification of a spiky structure at 10{sup 2} s in the cosmological rest-frame of the source; (2) a power law emission of the GeV luminosity light curve and its onset at the end of Episode 2; and (3) different Lorentz Γ factors for the emitting regions of the X-ray and GeV emissions in this Episode 3. These results make it possible to test the details of the physical and astrophysical regimes at work in the BdHNe: (1) a newly born neutron star and the supernova ejecta, originating in Episode 1; (2) a newly formed black hole originating in Episode 2; and (3) the possible interaction among these components, observable in the standard features of Episode 3.

  8. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino follow-up of gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; ...

    2016-12-30

    On September 14, 2015 the Advanced LIGO detectors observed their first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914. This was followed by a second GW event observed on December 26, 2015. Both events were inferred to have arisen from the merger of black holes in binary systems. Such a system may emit neutrinos if there are magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the two black holes. With the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory we can search for neutrinos with energy Eν above 100 PeV from point like sources across the sky with equatorial declination from aboutmore » -65° to +60°, and, in particular, from a fraction of the 90% confidence-level inferred positions in the sky of GW150914 and GW151226. A targeted search for highly inclined extensive air showers, produced either by interactions of downward-going neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere or by the decays of tau leptons originating from tau-neutrino interactions in the Earth’s crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos), yielded no candidates in the Auger data collected within ±500 s around or 1 day after the coordinated universal time (UTC) of GW150914 and GW151226, as well as in the same search periods relative to the UTC time of the GW candidate event LVT151012. As a result, from the non-observation we constrain the amount of energy radiated in ultrahigh-energy neutrinos from such remarkable events.« less

  9. Preparing for the WFIRST Microlensing Survey: Simulations, Requirements, Survey Strategies, and Precursor Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, Bernard

    As one of the four primary investigations of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, the microlensing survey will monitor several square degrees of the Galactic bulge for a total of roughly one year. Its primary science goal is to "Complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from the outer habitable zone to free floating planets, including analogs of all of the planets in our Solar System with the mass of Mars or greater.'' WFIRST will therefore (a) measure the mass function of cold bound planets with masses greater than that of roughly twice the mass of the moon, including providing an estimate of the frequency of sub-Mars-mass embryos, (b) determine the frequency of free-floating planets with masses down to the Earth and below, (c) inform the frequency and habitability of potentially habitable worlds, and (d) revolutionize our understanding of the demographics of cold planets with its exquisite sensitivity to, and large expected yield of, planets in a broad and unexplored region of parameter space. In order for the microlensing survey to be successful, we must develop a plan to go from actual survey observations obtained by the WFIRST telescope and hardware to the final science products. This plan will involve many steps, the development of software, data reduction, and analysis tools at each step, and a list of requirements for each of these components. The overarching goal of this proposal is thus to develop a complete flowdown from the science goals of the microlensing survey to the mission design and hardware components. We have assembled a team of scientists with the breadth of expertise to achieve this primary goal. Our specific subgoals are as follows. Goal 1: We will refine the input Galactic models in order to provide improved microlensing event rates in the WFIRST fields. Goal 2: We will use the improved event rate estimates, along with improvements in our simulation methodology, to provide higher

  10. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  11. Reconfigurable and responsive droplet-based compound micro-lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagelberg, Sara; Zarzar, Lauren D.; Nicolas, Natalie; Subramanian, Kaushikaram; Kalow, Julia A.; Sresht, Vishnu; Blankschtein, Daniel; Barbastathis, George; Kreysing, Moritz; Swager, Timothy M.; Kolle, Mathias

    2017-03-01

    Micro-scale optical components play a crucial role in imaging and display technology, biosensing, beam shaping, optical switching, wavefront-analysis, and device miniaturization. Herein, we demonstrate liquid compound micro-lenses with dynamically tunable focal lengths. We employ bi-phase emulsion droplets fabricated from immiscible hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon liquids to form responsive micro-lenses that can be reconfigured to focus or scatter light, form real or virtual images, and display variable focal lengths. Experimental demonstrations of dynamic refractive control are complemented by theoretical analysis and wave-optical modelling. Additionally, we provide evidence of the micro-lenses' functionality for two potential applications--integral micro-scale imaging devices and light field display technology--thereby demonstrating both the fundamental characteristics and the promising opportunities for fluid-based dynamic refractive micro-scale compound lenses.

  12. Microlenses Fabricated on Silicone Rubber Using F2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Hiromitsu; Miyagami, Hideyuki; Okoshi, Masayuki; Inoue, Narumi

    2005-04-01

    Microlenses are fabricated on silicone rubber surfaces employing phenomena in which silicone rubber swells and is modified to SiO2 by F2 laser irradiation at a laser fluence lower than the ablation threshold. In this method, silicone rubber is irradiated using a F2 laser beam through a mask which has circular apertures 10, 20, and 25 μm in diameter. Since silicone rubber swells by laser irradiation, it is necessary to separate the mask from the silicone rubber surface. The swelling is spherical and its surface becomes smooth when the distance between the mask and the silicone rubber surface is very small. The focal lengths of the microlenses are 10-170 μm, which are controlled by adjusting the number of irradiated pulses. Additionally, a 790 nm femtosecond laser beam is focused by the fabricated microlenses, and enables the microdrilling of fluorinated rubber.

  13. Reconfigurable and responsive droplet-based compound micro-lenses

    PubMed Central

    Nagelberg, Sara; Zarzar, Lauren D.; Nicolas, Natalie; Subramanian, Kaushikaram; Kalow, Julia A.; Sresht, Vishnu; Blankschtein, Daniel; Barbastathis, George; Kreysing, Moritz; Swager, Timothy M.; Kolle, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Micro-scale optical components play a crucial role in imaging and display technology, biosensing, beam shaping, optical switching, wavefront-analysis, and device miniaturization. Herein, we demonstrate liquid compound micro-lenses with dynamically tunable focal lengths. We employ bi-phase emulsion droplets fabricated from immiscible hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon liquids to form responsive micro-lenses that can be reconfigured to focus or scatter light, form real or virtual images, and display variable focal lengths. Experimental demonstrations of dynamic refractive control are complemented by theoretical analysis and wave-optical modelling. Additionally, we provide evidence of the micro-lenses' functionality for two potential applications—integral micro-scale imaging devices and light field display technology—thereby demonstrating both the fundamental characteristics and the promising opportunities for fluid-based dynamic refractive micro-scale compound lenses. PMID:28266505

  14. Imaging transient events at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Gail H.

    2016-08-01

    Resolving the spatial structure of transient events provides insights into their physical nature and origin. Recent observations using long baseline optical/infrared interferometry have revealed the size, shape, and angular expansion of bright novae within a few days after their outbursts. This has implications for understanding the timescale for the development of asymmetric features in novae ejecta. Additionally, combining spectroscopic measurements of the expansion velocity with the angular expansion rate provides a way to measure a geometric distance to the nova. In this paper, I provide a review of interferometric observations of novae, with a focus on recent results on the expansion and spatial structure of nova V339 Del in 2013. I also discuss other promising applications of interferometry to transient sources, such as measuring the image size and centroid displacements to measure planetary masses in gravitational microlensing events. Given the timescales of transient events, it is critical for interferometric arrays to respond rapidly to targets of opportunity in order to optimize the instrumental sensitivity and baselines required to resolve the source while its brightness and size change over time.

  15. Liquid crystal bubbles forming a tunable micro-lenses array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, R.; Petriashvili, G.; Lombardo, G.; De Santo, M. P.; Barberi, R.

    2011-10-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with long pitch confined in homeotropic cells can be used to generate stable but distorted and localized liquid crystal structures exhibiting spherulitic textures, known as "bubbles." As these bubbles can be induced by an external electric field with a narrow range following the confinement ratio C=d/p ≈1 (d representing cell thickness and p representing cholesteric pitch), it is possible to obtain electrically controlled micro-lenses. Here we investigated the optical and electro-optical properties of such liquid crystal bubbles for creating an array of micro-lenses with electrically tunable focal length.

  16. A MICROLENSING MEASUREMENT OF DARK MATTER FRACTIONS IN THREE LENSING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bate, N. F.; Webster, R. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Floyd, D. J. E.

    2011-04-10

    Direct measurements of dark matter distributions in galaxies are currently only possible through the use of gravitational lensing observations. Combinations of lens modeling and stellar velocity dispersion measurements provide the best constraints on dark matter distributions in individual galaxies, however they can be quite complex. In this paper, we use observations and simulations of gravitational microlensing to measure the smooth (dark) matter mass fraction at the position of lensed images in three lens galaxies: MG 0414+0534, SDSS J0924+0219, and Q2237+0305. The first two systems consist of early-type lens galaxies, and both display a flux ratio anomaly in their close image pair. Anomalies such as these suggest that a high smooth matter percentage is likely, and indeed we prefer {approx}50% smooth matter in MG 0414+0534 and {approx}80% in SDSS J0924+0219 at the projected locations of the lensed images. Q2237+0305 differs somewhat in that its lensed images lie in the central kiloparsec of the barred spiral lens galaxy, where we expect stars to dominate the mass distribution. In this system, we find a smooth matter percentage that is consistent with zero.

  17. Where and When: Optimal Scheduling of the Electromagnetic Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Events Based on Counterpart Light-curve Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salafia, Om Sharan; Colpi, Monica; Branchesi, Marica; Chassande-Mottin, Eric; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Vergani, Susanna D.

    2017-09-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) follow-up of a gravitational-wave (GW) event requires scanning a wide sky region, defined by the so-called “skymap,” to detect and identify a transient counterpart. We propose a novel method that exploits the information encoded in the GW signal to construct a “detectability map,” which represents the time-dependent (“when”) probability of detecting the transient at each position of the skymap (“where”). Focusing on the case of a neutron star binary inspiral, we model the associated short gamma-ray burst afterglow and macronova emission using the probability distributions of binary parameters (sky position, distance, orbit inclination, mass ratio) extracted from the GW signal as inputs. The resulting family of possible light curves is the basis for constructing the detectability map. As a practical example, we apply the method to a simulated GW signal produced by a neutron star merger at 75 Mpc whose localization uncertainty is very large (∼1500 deg2). We construct observing strategies for optical, infrared, and radio facilities based on the detectability maps, taking VST, VISTA, and MeerKAT as prototypes. Assuming limiting fluxes of r∼ 24.5, J∼ 22.4 (AB magnitudes), and 500 μ {Jy} (1.4 {GHz}) for ∼1000 s of exposure each, the afterglow and macronova emissions are successfully detected with a minimum observing time of 7, 15, and 5 hr respectively.

  18. Microlensing Constraints on Broad Absorption and Emission Line Flows in the Quasar H1413+117

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Webster, Rachel L.; Labrie, Kathleen; Rogers, Joshua

    2015-11-01

    We present new integral field spectroscopy of the gravitationally lensed broad absorption line (BAL) quasar H1413+117, covering the ultraviolet restframe spectral range. We observe strong microlensing signatures in lensed image D, and we use this microlensing to simultaneously constrain both the broad emission and broad absorption line gas. The wavelength independence of image D magnifications across the broad emission lines (BELs) indicates a lower limit on the broad emission line region (BELR) size equal to the Einstein radius (ER) of the system: ≳11 {(< M> /{M}⊙ )}0.5 lt-day for a lens redshift of 1.4 and ≳15 {(< M> /{M}⊙ )}0.5 lt-day for zL = 0.94. Lensing simulations verify that the observed wavelength independence is very unlikely for BELRs with significant velocity stratification at size scales below an ER. We perform spectral decomposition to derive the intrinsic BEL and continuum spectrum, subject to BAL absorption. We reconstruct the intrinsic BAL absorption profile, whose features allow us to constrain outflow kinematics in the context of a disk-wind model. We find a very sharp, blueshifted onset of absorption of 1500 km s-1 in both C iv and N v, which may correspond to an inner edge of a disk-wind’s radial outflow. The lower ionization Si iv and Al iii have higher-velocity absorption onsets, consistent with a decreasing ionization parameter with radius in an accelerating outflow. There is evidence of strong absorption in the BEL component, which indicates a high covering factor for absorption over two orders of magnitude in outflow radius.

  19. OGLE-2014-BLG-0257L: A Microlensing Brown Dwarf Orbiting a Low-mass M Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Jung, Y. K.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report the discovery of a binary composed of a brown dwarf (BD) and a low-mass M dwarf from observation of the microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-0257. The resolution of the very brief caustic crossing combined with the detection of subtle continuous deviation in the lensing light curve induced by the Earth’s orbital motion enable us to precisely measure both the Einstein radius {θ }{{E}} and the lens parallax {π }{{E}}, which are the two quantities needed to unambiguously determine the mass and distance to the lens. It is found that the companion is a substellar BD with a mass of 0.036+/- 0.005 {M}⊙ (37.7+/- 5.2 {M}{{J}}) and it is orbiting an M dwarf with a mass of 0.19+/- 0.02 {M}⊙ . The binary is located at a distance of 1.25 ± 0.13 kpc toward the Galactic bulge and the projected separation between the binary components is 0.61 ± 0.07 au. The separation scaled by the mass of the host is 3.2 {{au}}/{M}⊙ . Based on the assumption that separations scale with masses, the discovered BD is located in the BD desert. With the growing sample of BDs in various environments, microlensing will provide a powerful probe of BDs in the Galaxy.

  20. Gravitation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Muehlner, D. J.; Benford, R. L.; Owens, D. K.; Pierre, N. A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon measurements were made of the far infrared background radiation. The radiometer used and its calibration are discussed. An electromagnetically coupled broadband gravitational antenna is also considered. The proposed antenna design and noise sources in the antenna are reviewed. A comparison is made between interferometric broadband and resonant bar antennas for the detection of gravitational wave pulses.

  1. The complete catalogue of light curves in equal-mass binary microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebig, Christine; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Bozza, Valerio; Dominik, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The light curves observed in microlensing events due to binary lenses span an extremely wide variety of forms, characterized by U-shaped caustic crossings and/or additional smoother peaks. However, all peaks of the binary-lens light curve can be traced back to features of caustics of the lens system. Moreover, all peaks can be categorized as one of only four types (cusp-grazing, cusp-crossing, fold-crossing or fold-grazing). This enables us to present the first complete map of the parameter space of the equal-mass case by identifying regions in which light curves feature the same number and nature of peaks. We find that the total number of morphologies that can be obtained is 73 out of 232 different regions. The partition of the parameter space so-obtained provides a new key to optimize modelling of observed events through a clever choice of initial conditions for fitting algorithms.

  2. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  3. Microlenses with tuned focal characteristics for optical wireless imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xian; Guerrero, Daniel; Klukas, Richard; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2014-07-01

    Microlenses are fabricated and investigated for integrated imaging applications. The microlenses are fabricated by an in situ polymer electro-dispensing technique that enables user-controlled microlens sizes and shapes, by direct-dispensing and voltage-tuning with a metal micro-needle tip in a filler solution. Theoretical and experimental analyses are carried out for three limiting-cases of electro-dispensed microlenses: an acute-angle microlens with a 30° contact angle, a right-angle microlens with a 90° contact angle, and an obtuse-angle microlens with a 120° contact angle. It is found that the right-angle microlens, with a 500 μm diameter, yields an especially short focal length (700 μm) and exceedingly large numerical aperture (0.533). These characteristics can meet the needs of emerging applications, such as optical wireless devices, which demand compact device integration and broad field-of-view imaging. The microlenses are tested in optical wireless imaging receivers, for signal-to-noise ratio performance, and it is found that the right-angle microlens can offer significant (10 dB) performance enhancements.

  4. Exoplanet Demographics with a Space-Based Microlensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. Scott

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of the frequency of exoplanets over a broad range of planet and host star properties provide fundamental empirical constraints on theories of planet formation and evolution. Because of its unique sensitivity to low-mass, long-period, and free-floating planets, microlensing is an essential complement to our arsenal of planet detection methods. I motivate microlensing surveys for exoplanets, and in particular describe how they can be used to test the currently-favored paradigm for planet formation, as well as inform our understanding of the frequency and potential habitability of low-mass planets located in the habitable zones of their host stars. I explain why a space-based mission is necessary to realize the full potential of microlensing, and outline the expected returns of such surveys. When combined with the results from complementary surveys such as Kepler, a space-based microlensing survey will yield a nearly complete picture of the demographics of planetary systems throughout the Galaxy.

  5. Testing local Lorentz invariance with gravitational waves

    DOE PAGES

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2016-04-20

    The effects of local Lorentz violation on dispersion and birefringence of gravitational waves are investigated. The covariant dispersion relation for gravitational waves involving gauge-invariant Lorentz violating operators of arbitrary mass dimension is constructed. The chirp signal from the gravitational wave event GW150914 is used to place numerous first constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Microlensing Constraints on the Frequency of Jupiter-Mass Companions: Analysis of 5 Years of PLANET Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. S.; Albrow, M. D.; An, J.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; DePoy, D. L.; Dominik, M.; Gould, A.; Greenhill, J.; Hill, K.; Kane, S.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Naber, R. M.; Pel, J.-W.; Pogge, R. W.; Pollard, K. R.; Sackett, P. D.; Sahu, K. C.; Vermaak, P.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Watson, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-02-01

    We analyze 5 years of PLANET photometry of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge to search for the short-duration deviations from single-lens light curves that are indicative of the presence of planetary companions to the primary microlenses. Using strict event-selection criteria, we construct a well-defined sample of 43 intensively monitored events. We search for planetary perturbations in these events over a densely sampled region of parameter space spanning two decades in mass ratio and projected separation, but find no viable planetary candidates. By combining the detection efficiencies of the events, we find that, at 95% confidence, less than 25% of our primary lenses have companions with mass ratio q=10-2 and separations in the lensing zone, [0.6-1.6]θE, where θE is the Einstein ring radius. Using a model of the mass, velocity, and spatial distribution of bulge lenses, we infer that the majority of our lenses are likely M dwarfs in the Galactic bulge. We conclude that less than 33% of M dwarfs in the Galactic bulge have companions with mass mp=MJ between 1.5 and 4 AU, and less than 45% have companions with mp=3MJ between 1 and 7 AU, the first significant limits on planetary companions to M dwarfs. We consider the effects of the finite size of the source stars and changing our detection criterion, but find that these do not alter our conclusions substantially.

  7. OGLE-2015-BLG-0196: Ground-based Gravitational Microlens Parallax Confirmed by Space-based Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zhu, Wei; and; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; The OGLE Collaboration; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Calchi Novati, S.; Carey, S.; Bryden, C.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, Calen B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; The Spitzer Microlensing Team

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0196. The event lasted for almost a year, and the light curve exhibited significant deviations from the lensing model based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion, enabling us to measure the microlens parallax. The ground-based microlens parallax is confirmed by the data obtained from space-based microlens observations using the Spitzer telescope. By additionally measuring the angular Einstein radius from the analysis of the resolved caustic crossing, the physical parameters of the lens are determined up to the twofold degeneracy, u0 < 0 and u0 > 0, solutions caused by the well-known “ecliptic” degeneracy. It is found that the binary lens is composed of two M dwarf stars with similar masses, M1 = 0.38 ± 0.04 M⊙ (0.50 ± 0.05 M⊙) and M2 = 0.38 ± 0.04 M⊙ (0.55 ± 0.06 M⊙), and the distance to the lens is DL = 2.77 ± 0.23 kpc (3.30 ± 0.29 kpc). Here the physical parameters outside and inside the parentheses are for the u0 < 0 and u0 > 0 solutions, respectively.

  8. Gravitating Hopfions

    SciTech Connect

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    2015-12-15

    We construct solutions of the 3 + 1 dimensional Faddeev–Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat. They are characterized by a topological Hopf number. We investigate the dependence of the ADM masses of gravitating Hopfions on the gravitational coupling. When gravity is coupled to flat space solutions, a branch of gravitating Hopfion solutions arises and merges at a maximal value of the coupling constant with a second branch of solutions. This upper branch has no flat space limit. Instead, in the limit of a vanishing coupling constant, it connects to either the Bartnik–McKinnon or a generalized Bartnik–McKinnon solution. We further find that in the strong-coupling limit, there is no difference between the gravitating solitons of the Skyrme model and the Faddeev–Skyrme model.

  9. Sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1989-01-01

    Sources of low frequency gravitational radiation are reviewed from an astrophysical point of view. Cosmological sources include the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei, the capture by such holes of neutron stars, the coalescence of orbiting pairs of giant black holes, and various means of producing a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the early universe. Sources local to our Galaxy include various kinds of close binaries and coalescing binaries. Gravitational wave astronomy can provide information that no other form of observing can supply; in particular, the positive identification of a cosmological background originating in the early universe would be an event as significant as was the detection of the cosmic microwave background.

  10. Gravitational induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Chicone, Carmen; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2008-11-01

    We study the linear post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity known as gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM); in particular, we examine the similarities and differences between GEM and electrodynamics. Notwithstanding some significant differences between them, we find that a special nonstationary metric in GEM can be employed to show explicitly that it is possible to introduce gravitational induction within GEM in close analogy with Faraday's law of induction and Lenz's law in electrodynamics. Some of the physical implications of gravitational induction are briefly discussed.

  11. PROSPECTS FOR CHARACTERIZING HOST STARS OF THE PLANETARY SYSTEM DETECTIONS PREDICTED FOR THE KOREAN MICROLENSING TELESCOPE NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Calen B.

    2015-02-10

    I investigate the possibility of constraining the flux of the lens (i.e., host star) for the types of planetary systems the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network is predicted to find. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by (1) imaging the lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, (2) measuring the elongation of the point-spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and (3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate the observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities (specifically NACO on the Very Large Telescope), future ground-based AO facilities (GMTIFS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, GMT), and future space telescopes (NIRCAM on the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST). Given the predicted distribution of relative lens-source proper motions, I find that the lens flux could be measured to a precision of σ{sub H{sub ℓ}}≤0.1 for ≳60% of planet detections ≥5 yr after each microlensing event for a simulated observing program using GMT, which images resolved lenses. NIRCAM on JWST would be able to carry out equivalently high-precision measurements for ∼28% of events Δt = 10 yr after each event by imaging resolved lenses. I also explore the effects various blend components would have on the mass derived from prompt follow-up photometry, including companions to the lens, companions to the source, and unassociated interloping stars. I find that undetected blend stars would cause catastrophic failures (i.e., >50% fractional uncertainty in the inferred lens mass) for ≲ (16 · f {sub bin})% of planet detections, where f {sub bin} is the binary fraction, with the majority of these failures occurring for host stars with mass ≲0.3 M {sub ☉}.

  12. Reflection aspherical microlenses for planar optics fabricated by electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Shiono, T; Ogawa, H

    1992-04-15

    Reflection aspherical microlenses are proposed for planar optics. These microlenses have the structure of a nonconcentric elliptical concave mirror. Broadband light can be used for these microlenses because these microlenses have no chromatic aberration. The microlens fabricated by electron-beam lithography and Ag deposition was found to have a smooth surface as designed. The focal length of the microlens was constant independent of the wavelength. The measured spot sizes agreed with diffraction-limited values at two different wavelengths. By using the array of this microlens, multiple images with excellent contrast were obtained under incoherent white-light illumination.

  13. Constraining the Frequency of Free-floating Planets from a Synthesis of Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Survey Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2017-01-01

    A microlensing survey by Sumi et al. exhibits an overabundance of short-timescale events (STEs; tE < 2 days) relative to what is expected from known stellar populations and a smooth power-law extrapolation down to the brown dwarf regime. This excess has been interpreted as a population of approximately Jupiter-mass objects that outnumber main-sequence stars nearly twofold; however the microlensing data alone cannot distinguish between events due to wide-separation (a ≳ 10 au) and free-floating planets. Assuming these STEs are indeed due to planetary-mass objects, we aim to constrain the fraction of these events that can be explained by bound but wide-separation planets. We fit the observed timescale distribution with a lens mass function comprised of brown dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and stellar remnants, finding and thus corroborating the initial identification of an excess of STEs. We then include a population of bound planets that are expected not to show signatures of the primary lens (host) in their microlensing light curves and that are also consistent with results from representative microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find that bound planets alone cannot explain the entire STE excess without violating the constraints from the surveys we consider and thus some fraction of these events must be due to free-floating planets, if our model for bound planets holds. We estimate a median fraction of STEs due to free-floating planets to be f = 0.67 (0.23 ≤ f ≤ 0.85 at 95% confidence) when assuming “hot-start” planet evolutionary models and f = 0.58 (0.14 ≤ f ≤ 0.83 at 95% confidence) for “cold-start” models. Assuming a delta-function distribution of free-floating planets of mass {m}p=2 {M}{Jup} yields a number of free-floating planets per main-sequence star of N = 1.4 (0.48 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “hot-start” case and N = 1.2 (0.29 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “cold-start” case.

  14. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for more than three decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2003-2.

  15. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2011-1.

  16. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  17. The Theory of Multiscale Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeton, Charles

    2005-07-01

    Strong gravitational lensing probes the mass distributions of distant galaxies on scales from tens of kiloparsecs {dark matter halos and "macrolensing"} through parsecs {dark matter substructure and "millilensing"} all the way down to individual stars {"microlensing"}. Wonderful data are now available, thanks in large part to HST. However, the theoretical understanding of lensing on different scales is much less mature, which has complicated efforts to interpret the data. We have begun a comprehensive theoretical study of multiscale lensing, to develop a formalism that will enable us both to interpret existing data and to inspire and guide new observations. In this proposal, we specifically seek to develop the first code that simultaneously includes macro-, milli-, and microlensing. We will then use it to: {1} Find clear observational signatures that reveal the scale{s} being probed in data, and then resolve the debate about whether millilensing truly reveals Cold Dark Matter substructure. {2} Show how observations at different scales can constrain the mass function of stars in lens galaxies, and apply the method to existing HST data for seven distant galaxies. {3} Examine non-linearities that link micro-, milli-, and macrolensing, and use the combined analysis to open a new window on dark matter studies with strong lensing. We will also make the code available to the community as part of PI Keeton's public lensing software.

  18. The First Circumbinary Planet Found by Microlensing: OGLE-2007-BLG-349L(AB)c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Rhie, S. H.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Kubas, D.; Bond, I. A.; Greenhill, J.; Cassan, A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the first circumbinary planet microlensing event, OGLE-2007-BLG-349. This event has a strong planetary signal that is best fit with a mass ratio of q approx. = 3.4×10(exp -4), but there is an additional signal due to an additional lens mass, either another planet or another star. We find acceptable light-curve fits with two classes of models: two-planet models (with a single host star) and circumbinary planet models. The light curve also reveals a significant microlensing parallax effect, which constrains the mass of the lens system to be M(sub L) approx. = 0.7 Stellar Mass. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images resolve the lens and source stars from their neighbors and indicate excess flux due to the star(s) in the lens system. This is consistent with the predicted flux from the circumbinary models, where the lens mass is shared between two stars, but there is not enough flux to be consistent with the two-planet, one-star models. So, only the circumbinary models are consistent with the HST data. They indicate a planet of mass m(sub c) = 80 +/- 13 Stellar Mass, orbiting a pair of M dwarfs with masses of M(sub A) = 0.41+/- 0.07 and M(sub B) = 0.30 +/- 0.07, which makes this the lowest-mass circumbinary planet system known. The ratio of the separation between the planet and the center of mass to the separation of the two stars is approx.40, so unlike most of the circumbinary planets found by Kepler, the planet does not orbit near the stability limit.

  19. The First Circumbinary Planet Found by Microlensing: OGLE-2007-BLG-349L(AB)c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Rhie, S. H.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Kubas, D.; Bond, I. A.; Greenhill, J.; Cassan, A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Boyajian, T. S.; Luhn, J.; Penny, M. T.; Anderson, J.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Botzler, C. S.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the first circumbinary planet microlensing event, OGLE-2007-BLG-349. This event has a strong planetary signal that is best fit with a mass ratio of q approx. = 3.4×10(exp -4), but there is an additional signal due to an additional lens mass, either another planet or another star. We find acceptable light-curve fits with two classes of models: two-planet models (with a single host star) and circumbinary planet models. The light curve also reveals a significant microlensing parallax effect, which constrains the mass of the lens system to be M(sub L) approx. = 0.7 Stellar Mass. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images resolve the lens and source stars from their neighbors and indicate excess flux due to the star(s) in the lens system. This is consistent with the predicted flux from the circumbinary models, where the lens mass is shared between two stars, but there is not enough flux to be consistent with the two-planet, one-star models. So, only the circumbinary models are consistent with the HST data. They indicate a planet of mass m(sub c) = 80 +/- 13 Stellar Mass, orbiting a pair of M dwarfs with masses of M(sub A) = 0.41+/- 0.07 and M(sub B) = 0.30 +/- 0.07, which makes this the lowest-mass circumbinary planet system known. The ratio of the separation between the planet and the center of mass to the separation of the two stars is approx.40, so unlike most of the circumbinary planets found by Kepler, the planet does not orbit near the stability limit.

  20. The First Circumbinary Planet Found by Microlensing: OGLE-2007-BLG-349L(AB)c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Rhie, S. H.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Kubas, D.; Bond, I. A.; Greenhill, J.; Cassan, A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Boyajian, T. S.; Luhn, J.; Penny, M. T.; Anderson, J.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Botzler, C. S.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Perrott, Y. C.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; Yock, P. C. M.; MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Allen, W.; DePoy, D.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Monard, I. A. G.; Ofek, E.; Pogge, R. W.; μFUN Collaboration; Street, R. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Robonet Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Ranc, C.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; PLANET Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present the analysis of the first circumbinary planet microlensing event, OGLE-2007-BLG-349. This event has a strong planetary signal that is best fit with a mass ratio of q ≈ 3.4 × 10-4, but there is an additional signal due to an additional lens mass, either another planet or another star. We find acceptable light-curve fits with two classes of models: two-planet models (with a single host star) and circumbinary planet models. The light curve also reveals a significant microlensing parallax effect, which constrains the mass of the lens system to be M L ≈ 0.7 {M}⊙ . Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images resolve the lens and source stars from their neighbors and indicate excess flux due to the star(s) in the lens system. This is consistent with the predicted flux from the circumbinary models, where the lens mass is shared between two stars, but there is not enough flux to be consistent with the two-planet, one-star models. So, only the circumbinary models are consistent with the HST data. They indicate a planet of mass m c = 80 ± 13 {M}\\oplus , orbiting a pair of M dwarfs with masses of M A = 0.41 ± 0.07 and M B = 0.30 ± 0.07, which makes this the lowest-mass circumbinary planet system known. The ratio of the separation between the planet and the center of mass to the separation of the two stars is ˜40, so unlike most of the circumbinary planets found by Kepler, the planet does not orbit near the stability limit.

  1. OGLE-2011-BLG-0265Lb: A Jovian Microlensing Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Shin, I.-G.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Gould, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Street, R. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Bennett, D. P.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; MOA Collaboration; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedmann, M.; Wise Group; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; Choi, J.-Y.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Lee, C.-U.; McCormick, J.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J.-B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Ranc, C.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; PLANET Collaboration; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; RoboNet Collaboration; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Calchi Novati, S.; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X.-S.; Gu, C.-H.; Hardis; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEp Consortium

    2015-05-01

    We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the discovery is important for theoretical studies of planetary formation and evolution. High-cadence temporal coverage of the planetary signal, combined with extended observations throughout the event, allows us to accurately model the observed light curve. However, the final microlensing solution remains degenerate, yielding two possible configurations of the planet and the host star. In the case of the preferred solution, the mass of the planet is {{M}p}=0.9+/- 0.3 {{M}J}, and the planet is orbiting a star with a mass M=0.22+/- 0.06 {{M}⊙ }. The second possible configuration (2σ away) consists of a planet with {{M}p}=0.6+/- 0.3 {{M}J} and host star with M=0.14+/- 0.06 {{M}⊙ }. The system is located in the Galactic disk 3-4 kpc toward the Galactic bulge. In both cases, with an orbit size of 1.5-2.0 AU, the planet is a “cold Jupiter”—located well beyond the “snow line” of the host star. Currently available data make the secure selection of the correct solution difficult, but there are prospects for lifting the degeneracy with additional follow-up observations in the future, when the lens and source star separate.

  2. A method for the microlensed flux variance of QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jeremy; Sun, Ai-Lei

    2014-06-01

    A fast and practical method is described for calculating the microlensed flux variance of an arbitrary source by uncorrelated stars. The required inputs are the mean convergence and shear due to the smoothed potential of the lensing galaxy, the stellar mass function, and the absolute square of the Fourier transform of the surface brightness in the source plane. The mathematical approach follows previous authors but has been generalized, streamlined, and implemented in publicly available code. Examples of its application are given for Dexter and Agol's inhomogeneous-disc models as well as the usual Gaussian sources. Since the quantity calculated is a second moment of the magnification, it is only logarithmically sensitive to the sizes of very compact sources. However, for the inferred sizes of actual quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), it has some discriminatory power and may lend itself to simple statistical tests. At the very least, it should be useful for testing the convergence of microlensing simulations.

  3. Broadband Plasmonic Microlenses based on Patches of Nanoholes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hanwei; Hyun, Jerome K.; Lee, Min Hyung; Yang, Jiun-Chan; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Odom, Teri W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a new type of diffractive microlens based on finite-areas of 2D arrays of circular nanoholes (patches). The plasmonic microlenses can focus single wavelengths of light across the entire visible spectrum as well as broadband white light with little divergence. The focal length is determined primarily by the overall size of the patch and is tolerant to significant changes in patch substructure, including lattice geometry and local order of the circular nanoholes. The optical throughput, however, depends sensitively on the patch substructure and is determined by the wavelengths of surface plasmon resonances. This simple diffractive lens design enables millions of broadband plasmonic microlenses to be fabricated in parallel using soft nanolithographic techniques. PMID:20839781

  4. Completing the Exoplanet Census with the WFIRST Microlensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.; WFIRST Science Definition Team

    2011-09-01

    The WFIRST mission is the top rated large space mission from last year's decadal survey. It has three major science programs, a microlensing planet search program, a dark energy program, and a general observer program. WFIRST's microlensing planet search program will provide a statistical census of exoplanets with masses greater than one tenth of an Earth mass and orbital separations ranging from 0.5AU to infinity. This includes analogs to all the Solar System’s planets except for Mercury, as well as most types of planets predicted by planet formation theories. In combination with Kepler's census of planets in shorter period orbits, WFIRST's planet search program will provide a complete statistical census of the planets that populate our Galaxy. The current status of the WFIRST mission design will be presented.

  5. The Microlensing Planet Search Program of the WFIRST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.

    2011-01-01

    The recently Decadal Survey report, "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" recommends a new mission called WFIRST as its top ranked large space mission for the next decade. The WFIRST mission is to have two major science programs that will drive the design requirements: a dark energy program and a microlensing planet search program. WFIRST's microlensing planet search program will provide a statistical census of exoplanets with masses greater than one tenth of an Earth mass and orbital separations ranging from 0.5AU to infinity. This includes analogs to all the Solar System's planets except for Mercury, as well as most types of planets predicted by planet formation theories. In combination with Kepler's census of planets in shorter period orbits, WFIRST's planet search program will provide a complete statistical census of the planets that populate our Galaxy.

  6. The Microlensing Planet Search Program of the WFIRST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.

    2010-10-01

    The recently Decadal Survey report, "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" recommends a new mission called WFIRST as its top ranked large space mission for the next decade. The WFIRST mission is to have two major science programs that will drive the design requirements: a dark energy program and a microlensing planet search program. WFIRST's microlensing planet search program will provide a statistical census of exoplanets with masses greater than one tenth of an Earth mass and orbital separations ranging from 0.5AU to infinity. This includes analogs to all the Solar System's planets except for Mercury, as well as most types of planets predicted by planet formation theories. In combination with Kepler's census of planets in shorter period orbits, WFIRST's planet search program will provide a complete statistical census of the planets that populate our Galaxy.

  7. Forward electrohydrodynamic inkjet printing of optical microlenses on microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Vespini, V; Coppola, S; Todino, M; Paturzo, M; Bianco, V; Grilli, S; Ferraro, P

    2016-01-21

    We report a novel method for direct printing of viscous polymers based on a pyro-electrohydrodynamic repulsion system capable of overcoming limitations on the material type, geometry and thickness of the receiving substrate. In fact, the results demonstrate that high viscosity polymers can be easily manipulated for optical functionalizing of lab-on-a-chip devices through demonstration of direct printing of polymer microlenses onto microfluidic chips and optical fibre terminations. The present system has great potential for applications from biomolecules to nano-electronics. Moreover, in order to prove the effectiveness of the system, the optical performance of such microlenses has been characterized by testing their imaging capabilities when the fibroblast cells were allowed to flow inside the microfluidic channel, showing one of their possible applications on-board a LoC platform.

  8. The First Detection of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Królak, Andrzej; Patil, Mandar

    2017-07-01

    This article deals with the first detection of gravitational waves by the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 14 September 2015, where the signal was generated by two stellar mass black holes with masses 36 $ M_{\\odot}$ and 29 $ M_{\\odot}$ that merged to form a 62 $ M_{\\odot}$ black hole, releasing 3 $M_{\\odot}$ energy in gravitational waves, almost 1.3 billion years ago. We begin by providing a brief overview of gravitational waves, their sources and the gravitational wave detectors. We then describe in detail the first detection of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger. We then comment on the electromagnetic follow up of the detection event with various telescopes. Finally, we conclude with the discussion on the tests of gravity and fundamental physics with the first gravitational wave detection event.

  9. Astrophysical Applications of Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Muñoz, Jose A.; Garzón, Francisco; Mahoney, Terence J.

    2016-10-01

    Contributors; Participants; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Lensing basics Sherry H. Suyu; 2. Exoplanet microlensing Andrew Gould; 3. Case studies of microlensing Veronica Motta and Emilio Falco; 4. Microlensing of quasars and AGN Joachim Wambsganss; 5. DM in clusters and large-scale structure Peter Schneider; 6. The future of strong lensing Chris Fassnacht; 7. Methods for strong lens modelling Charles Keeton; 8. Tutorial on inverse ray shooting Jorge Jimenez-Vicente.

  10. MICROLENSING EVIDENCE THAT A TYPE 1 QUASAR IS VIEWED FACE-ON

    SciTech Connect

    Poindexter, Shawn; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-03-20

    Using a microlensing analysis of 11 years of OGLE V-band photometry of the four image gravitational lens Q2237+0305, we measure the inclination i of the accretion disk to be cos i > 0.66 at 68% confidence. Very edge on (cos i < 0.39) solutions are ruled out at 95% confidence. We measure the V-band radius of the accretion disk, defined by the radius where the temperature matches the monitoring band photon emission, to be R{sub V} = 5.8{sup +3.8}{sub -2.3} x 10{sup 15} cm assuming a simple thin disk model and including the uncertainties in its inclination. The projected radiating area of the disk remains too large to be consistent with the observed flux for a T {proportional_to} R {sup -3/4} thin disk temperature profile. There is no strong correlation between the direction of motion (peculiar velocity) of the lens galaxy and the orientation of the disk.

  11. Fast computation of quadrupole and hexadecapole approximations in microlensing with a single point-source evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    The exoplanet detection rate from gravitational microlensing has grown significantly in recent years thanks to a great enhancement of resources and improved observational strategy. Current observatories include ground-based wide-field and/or robotic world-wide networks of telescopes, as well as space-based observatories such as satellites Spitzer or Kepler/K2. This results in a large quantity of data to be processed and a