Science.gov

Sample records for gravitational radiation observatory

  1. Omnidirectional Gravitational Radiation Observatory: Proceedings of the First International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velloso, W. F.; Aguiar, O. D.; Magalhães, N. S.

    1997-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Introduction: The OMNI-1 Workshop and the beginning of the International Gravitational Radiation Observatory * Opening Talks * Gravitational radiation sources for Acoustic Detectors * The scientific and technological benefits of gravitational wave research * Operating Second and Third Generation Resonant-Mass Antennas * Performance of the ALLEGRO detector -- and what our experience tells us about spherical detectors * The Perth Niobium resonant mass antenna with microwave parametric transducer * The gravitational wave detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS * Gravitational Waves and Astrophysical Sources for the Next Generation Observatory * What is the velocity of gravitational waves? * Superstring Theory: how it change our ideas about the nature of Gravitation * Statistical approach to the G.W. emission from radio pulsars * Gravitational waves from precessing millisecond pulsars * The production rate of compact binary G.W. sources in elliptical galaxies * On the possibility to detect Gravitational Waves from precessing galactic neutron stars * Gravitational wave output of the head-on collision of two black holes * SN as a powerfull source of gravitational radiation * Long thick cosmic strings radiating gravitational waves and particles * Non-Parallel Electric and Magnetic Fields in a gravitational background, stationary G.W. and gravitons * Exact solutions of gravitational waves * Factorization method for linearized quantum gravity at tree-level. Graviton, photon, electron processes * Signal Detection with Resonant-Mass Antennas * Study of coalescing binaries with spherical gravitational waves detectors * Influence of transducer asymmetries on the isotropic response of a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Performances and preliminary results of the cosmic-ray detector associated with NAUTILUS * Possible transducer configurations for a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Detectability of

  2. Report from the Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido; Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team

    2016-03-01

    As a response to the selection of the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for ESA's L3 mission, ESA formed the Gravitational-Wave Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) to advise ESA on the scientific and technological approach for a gravitational wave observatory. NASA is participating with three US scientists and one NASA observer; JAXA was also invited and participates with one observer. The GOAT looked at a range of mission technologies and designs, discussed their technical readiness with respect to the ESA schedule, recommended technology development activities for selected technologies, and worked with the wider gravitational-wave community to analyze the impact on the science of the various mission designs. The final report is expected to be submitted to ESA early March and I plan to summarize its content.

  3. Building a Galactic Scale Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2016-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars with phenomenal rotational stability that can be used as celestial clocks in a variety of fundamental physics experiences. One of these experiments involves using a pulsar timing array of precisely timed millisecond pulsars to detect perturbations due to gravitational waves. The low frequency gravitational waves detectable through pulsar timing will most likely result from an ensemble of supermassive black hole binaries. I will introduce the efforts of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), a collaboration that monitors over 50 millisecond pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory, with a focus on our observation and data analysis methods. I will also describe how NANOGrav has joined international partners through the International Pulsar Timing Array to form a low-frequency gravitational wave detector of unprecedented sensitivity.

  4. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  5. Linked Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Amy; Swearngin, Joseph; Wickes, Alexander; Willem Dalhuisen, Jan; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The electromagnetic knot is a topologically nontrivial solution to the vacuum Maxwell equations with the property that any two field lines belonging to either the electric, magnetic, or Poynting vector fields are closed and linked exactly once [1]. The relationship between the vacuum Maxwell and linearized Einstein equations, as expressed in the form of the spin-N massless field equations, suggests that gravitational radiation possesses analogous topologically nontrivial field configurations. Using twistor methods we find the analogous spin-2 solutions of Petrov types N, D, and III. Aided by the concept of tendex and vortex lines as recently developed for the physical interpretation of solutions in general relativity [2], we investigate the physical properties of these knotted gravitational fields by characterizing the topology of their associated tendex and vortex lines.[4pt] [1] Ranada, A. F. and Trueba, J. L., Mod. Nonlinear Opt. III, 119, 197 (2002).[2] Nichols, D. A., et al., Phys. Rev. D, 84 (2011).

  6. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  7. The Science of Gravitational Waves with Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2013-01-01

    After decades of effort, direct detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is on the horizon. Aside from teaching us about gravity itself, gravitational waves hold immense promise as a tool for general astrophysics. In this talk I will provide an overview of the science enabled by a space-based gravitational wave observatory sensitive in the milli-Hertz frequency band including the nature and evolution of massive black holes and their host galaxies, the demographics of stellar remnant compact objects in the Milky Way, and the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime. I will also summarize the current status of efforts in the US and Europe to implement a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  8. Toward a Space based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    A space-based GW observatory will produce spectacular science. The LISA mission concept: (a) Long history, (b) Very well-studied, including de-scopes, (c) NASAs Astrophysics Strategic Plan calls for a minority role in ESAs L3 mission opportunity. To that end, NASA is Participating in LPF and ST7 Developing appropriate technology for a LISA-like mission Preparing to seek an endorsement for L3 participation from the 2020 decadal review.

  9. Modeling Gravitational Radiation Waveforms from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. G.; Centrelia, J. M.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; VanMeter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from merging binary black hole systems is anticipated as a key source for gravitational wave observations. Ground-based instruments, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) may observe mergers of stellar-scale black holes, while the space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) observatory will be sensitive to mergers of massive galactic-center black holes over a broad range of mass scales. These cataclysmic events may emit an enormous amount of energy in a brief time. Gravitational waves from comparable mass mergers carry away a few percent of the system's mass-energy in just a few wave cycles, with peak gravitational wave luminosities on the order of 10^23 L_Sun. Optimal analysis and interpretation of merger observation data will depend on developing a detailed understanding, based on general relativistic modeling, of the radiation waveforms. We discuss recent progress in modeling radiation from equal mass mergers using numerical simulations of Einstein's gravitational field equations, known as numerical relativity. Our simulations utilize Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to allow high-resolution near the black holes while simultaneously keeping the outer boundary of the computational domain far from the black holes, and making it possible to read out gravitational radiation waveforms in the weak-field wave zone. We discuss the results from simulations beginning with the black holes orbiting near the system's innermost stable orbit, comparing the recent simulations with earlier "Lazarus" waveform estimates based on an approximate hybrid numerical/perturbative technique.

  10. Gravitating toward Science: Parent-Child Interactions at a Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szechter, Lisa E.; Carey, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the nature of parent-child conversations at an informal science education center housed in an active gravitational-wave observatory. Each of 20 parent-child dyads explored an interactive exhibit hall privately, without the distraction of other visitors. Parents employed a variety of strategies to support their children's…

  11. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This poster will discuss a possible mission concept, Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO-Mid) developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  12. Charge management for gravitational-wave observatories using UV LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S. E.; Turner, M. D.; Schlamminger, S.; Hagedorn, C. A.; Gundlach, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    Accumulation of electrical charge on the end mirrors of gravitational-wave observatories can become a source of noise limiting the sensitivity of such detectors through electronic couplings to nearby surfaces. Torsion balances provide an ideal means for testing gravitational-wave technologies due to their high sensitivity to small forces. Our torsion pendulum apparatus consists of a movable plate brought near a plate pendulum suspended from a nonconducting quartz fiber. A UV LED located near the pendulum photoejects electrons from the surface, and a UV LED driven electron gun directs photoelectrons towards the pendulum surface. We have demonstrated both charging and discharging of the pendulum with equivalent charging rates of {approx}10{sup 5}e/s, as well as spectral measurements of the pendulum charge resulting in a white noise level equivalent to 3x10{sup 5}e/{radical}(Hz).

  13. Charge management for gravitational-wave observatories using UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, S. E.; Turner, M. D.; Schlamminger, S.; Hagedorn, C. A.; Gundlach, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of electrical charge on the end mirrors of gravitational-wave observatories can become a source of noise limiting the sensitivity of such detectors through electronic couplings to nearby surfaces. Torsion balances provide an ideal means for testing gravitational-wave technologies due to their high sensitivity to small forces. Our torsion pendulum apparatus consists of a movable plate brought near a plate pendulum suspended from a nonconducting quartz fiber. A UV LED located near the pendulum photoejects electrons from the surface, and a UV LED driven electron gun directs photoelectrons towards the pendulum surface. We have demonstrated both charging and discharging of the pendulum with equivalent charging rates of ˜105e/s, as well as spectral measurements of the pendulum charge resulting in a white noise level equivalent to 3×105e/Hz.

  14. Gravitational Stokes parameters. [for electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anile, A. M.; Breuer, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electromagnetic and gravitational Stokes parameters are defined in the general theory of relativity. The general-relativistic equation of radiative transfer for polarized radiation is then derived in terms of the Stokes parameters for both high-frequency electromagnetic and gravitational waves. The concept of Stokes parameters is generalized for the most general class of metric theories of gravity, where six (instead of two) independent states of polarization are present.

  15. Constraints on Lorentz violation from gravitational Čerenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Tasson, Jay D.

    2015-10-01

    Limits on gravitational Čerenkov radiation by cosmic rays are obtained and used to constrain coefficients for Lorentz violation in the gravity sector associated with operators of even mass dimensions, including orientation-dependent effects. We use existing data from cosmic-ray telescopes to obtain conservative two-sided constraints on 80 distinct Lorentz-violating operators of dimensions four, six, and eight, along with conservative one-sided constraints on three others. Existing limits on the nine minimal operators at dimension four are improved by factors of up to a billion, while 74 of our explicit limits represent stringent first constraints on nonminimal operators. Prospects are discussed for future analyses incorporating effects of Lorentz violation in the matter sector, the role of gravitational Čerenkov radiation by high-energy photons, data from gravitational-wave observatories, the tired-light effect, and electromagnetic Čerenkov radiation by gravitons.

  16. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb groundbased observatories. This talk will discuss a possible mission concept developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  17. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-08-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970’s and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This talk will discuss a possible mission concept developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  18. Architectures for a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the science theme, the ``Gravitational Universe,'' for the third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has begun negotiating a NASA role. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, thereby augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described.

  19. Gravitational radiation quadrupole formula is valid for gravitationally interacting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Will, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    An argument is presented for the validity of the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation energy loss in the far field of nearly Newtonian (e.g., binary stellar) systems. This argument differs from earlier ones in that it determines beforehand the formal accuracy of approximation required to describe gravitationally self-interacting systems, uses the corresponding approximate equation of motion explicitly, and evaluates the appropriate asymptotic quantities by matching along the correct space-time light cones.

  20. LIMITS ON THE STOCHASTIC GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BACKGROUND FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN NANOHERTZ OBSERVATORY FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Nice, D.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Cordes, J. M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Lazio, J.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J.; Giampanis, S.; Finn, L. S.; Freire, P.; Jenet, F.; Lommen, A. N.; McLaughlin, M.; and others

    2013-01-10

    We present an analysis of high-precision pulsar timing data taken as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We have observed 17 pulsars for a span of roughly five years using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes. We analyze these data using standard pulsar timing models, with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-variable pulse shape terms. Sub-microsecond timing residuals are obtained in nearly all cases, and the best rms timing residuals in this set are {approx}30-50 ns. We present methods for analyzing post-fit timing residuals for the presence of a gravitational wave signal with a specified spectral shape. These optimally take into account the timing fluctuation power removed by the model fit, and can be applied to either data from a single pulsar, or to a set of pulsars to detect a correlated signal. We apply these methods to our data set to set an upper limit on the strength of the nHz-frequency stochastic supermassive black hole gravitational wave background of h{sub c} (1 yr{sup -1}) < 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} (95%). This result is dominated by the timing of the two best pulsars in the set, PSRs J1713+0747 and J1909-3744.

  1. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  2. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  3. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-01

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory "Dulkyn" which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  4. Electromagnetic and gravitational radiation from massless particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'Tsov, D. V.

    We demonstrate that full description of both electromagnetic and gravitational radiation from massless particles lies outside the scope of classical theory. Synchrotron radiation from the hypothetical massless charge in quantum electrodynamics in external magnetic field has finite total power while the corresponding classical formula diverges in the massless limit. We argue that in both cases classical theory describes correctly only the low-frequency part of the spectra, while the total power diverges because of absence of the UV frequency cutoff. Failure of description of gravitational radiation from massless particles by classical General Relativity may be considered as another appeal for quantization of gravity apart from the problem of singularities...

  5. Determining gravitational radiation from Newtonian self-gravitating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Lee Samuel; Evans, Charles R.

    1990-03-01

    Quadrupole gravitational radiation formulas are tested and compared in a calculation of rotating stellar core collapse. While the standard quadrupole formula (SQF) allows an economical calculation of the waveform in postlinear gravity, it has several shortcomings that become apparent in a finite difference (FD) calculation. These shortcomings are related to the large-moment arm of the quadrupole moment and the two (numerical) time derivatives that separate it from the waveform. These shortcomings lead to high-frequency noise in the SQF waveform. Several alternatives to the SQF are developed. Each is mathematically equivalent to the SQF and applicable to self-gravitating sources. For FD calculations, the new quadrupole formulas are all superior to the SQF and capable of producing waveforms free of the high-frequency noise characteristics of its use.

  6. The generation of gravitational radiation by escaping supernova neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, R.

    1978-01-01

    Formulae for the gravitational radiation due to the anisotropic axisymmetric emission of neutrinos from a small source are derived. We find that a burst of neutrinos released anisotropically from a supernova will generate a burst of gravitational radiation that may be comparable in amplitude and energy to the gravitational radiation generated by the fluid motion in the collapse of the supernova core.

  7. Radiative processes in external gravitational fields

    SciTech Connect

    Papini, Giorgio

    2010-07-15

    Kinematically forbidden processes may be allowed in the presence of external gravitational fields. These can be taken into account by introducing generalized particle momenta. The corresponding transition probabilities can then be calculated to all orders in the metric deviation from the field-free expressions by simply replacing the particle momenta with their generalized counterparts. The procedure applies to particles of any spin and to any gravitational fields. Transition probabilities, emission power, and spectra are, to leading order, linear in the metric deviation. It is also shown how a small dissipation term in the particle wave equations can trigger a strong backreaction that introduces resonances in the radiative process and deeply affects the resulting gravitational background.

  8. Gravitational radiation as radiation same level of electromagnetic and its generation in pulsed high-current discharge. Theory and experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, Stanislav; Fisenko, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The notion of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as the electromagnetic radiation is based on theoretically proved and experimentally confirmed fact of existence of stationary states of an electron in its gravitational field characterized by the gravitational constant K = 1042 G (G is the Newtonian gravitational constant) and unrecoverable space-time curvature Λ. This paper gives an overview of the authors' works, which set out the relevant results. Additionally, data is provided on the broadening of the spectra characteristic radiation. The data show that this broadening can be explained only by the presence of excited states of electrons in their gravitational field. What is more, the interpretation of the new line of X-ray emission spectrum according to the results of observation of MOS-camera of XMM-Newton observatory is of interest. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational radiation spectrum such that amplification of gravitational radiation may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  9. Core Collapse Supernovae Using CHIMERA: Gravitational Radiation from Non-Rotating Progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Chertkow, Merek A; Hix, William Raphael; Blondin, J. M.; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Yoshida, S.

    2011-01-01

    The CHIMERA code is a multi-dimensional multi-physics engine dedicated primarily to the simulation of core collapse supernova explosions. One of the most important aspects of these explosions is their capacity to produce gravitational radiation that is detectable by earth-based laser-interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO and VIRGO. We present here preliminary gravitational signatures of two-dimensional models with non-rotating progenitors. These simulations exhibit explosions, which are followed for more than half a second after stellar core bounce.

  10. Gravitational radiation from massless particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, Andrei; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    We compute classical gravitational bremsstrahlung from the gravitational scattering of two massless particles at leading order in the (centre of mass) deflection angle θ ∼ 4G\\sqrt{s}/b=8{GE}/b\\ll 1. The calculation, although non-perturbative in the gravitational constant, is surprisingly simple and yields explicit formulae—in terms of multidimensional integrals—for the frequency and angular distribution of the radiation. In the range {b}-1\\lt ω \\lt {({GE})}-1, the GW spectrum behaves like {log}(1/{GE}ω ){{d}}ω , is confined to cones of angular sizes (around the deflected particle trajectories) ranging from O(θ ) to O(1/ω b), and exactly reproduces, at its lower end, a well-known zero-frequency limit. At ω \\gt {({GE})}-1 the radiation is confined to cones of angular size of order θ {({GE}ω )}-1/2 resulting in a scale-invariant ({{d}}ω /ω ) spectrum. The total efficiency in GW production is dominated by this ‘high frequency’ region and is formally logarithmically divergent in the UV. If the spectrum is cutoff at the limit of validity of our approximations (where a conjectured bound on GW power is also saturated), the fraction of incoming energy radiated away turns out to be \\tfrac{1}{2π }{θ }2{log}{θ }-2 at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  11. Kerr Schild metrics and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natorf, Włodzimierz

    2005-10-01

    We describe conditions assuring that the Kerr Schild type solutions of Einstein's equations with pure radiation fields are asymptotically flat at future null infinity. Such metrics cannot describe “true” gravitational radiation from bounded sources—it is shown that the Bondi news function vanishes identically. We obtain formulae for the total energy and angular momentum at ℐ. As an example we consider a non-stationary generalization of the Kerr metric given by Vaidya and Patel. Angular momentum and total energy are expressed in closed form as functions of retarded time.

  12. Gravitational radiation from extreme Kerr black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Nakamura, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational radiation induced by a test particle falling into an extreme Kerr black hole was investigated analytically. Assuming the radiation is dominated by the infinite sequence of quasi-normal modes which has the limiting frequency m/(2M), where m is an azimuthal eigenvalue and M is the mass of the black hole, it was found that the radiated energy diverges logarithmically in time. Then the back reaction to the black hole was evaluated by appealing to the energy and angular momentum conservation laws. It was found that the radiation has a tendency to increase the ratio of the angular momentum to mass of the black hole, which is completely different from non-extreme case, while the contribution of the test particle is to decrease it.

  13. Gravitational radiation from realistic cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Paul; Allen, Bruce

    1995-10-01

    We examine the rates at which energy and momentum are radiated into gravitational waves by a large set of realistic cosmic string loops. The string loops are generated by numerically evolving parent loops with different initial conditions forward in time until they self-intersect, fragmenting into two child loops. The fragmentation of the child loops is followed recursively until only non-self-intersecting loops remain. The properties of the final non-self-intersecting loops are found to be independent of the initial conditions of the parent loops. We have calculated the radiated energy and momentum for a total of 11 625 stable child loops. We find that the majority of the final loops do not radiate significant amounts of spatial momentum. The velocity gained due to the rocket effect is typically small compared to the center-of-mass velocity of the fragmented loops. The distribution of gravitatoinal radiation rates in the center of mass frame of the loops, γ0≡(Gμ2)-1ΔE/Δτ, is strongly peaked in the range γ0=45-55 however, there are no loops found with γ0<40. Because the radiated spatial momentum is small, the distribution of gravitational radiation rates appears roughly the same in any reference frame. We conjecture that in the center-of-mass frame there is a lower bound γ0min>0 for the radiation rate from cosmic string loops. In a second conjecture, we identify a candidate for the loop with the minimal radiation rate and suggest that γ0min~=39.003.

  14. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  15. Progress and Prospects toward a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been much activity in the effort to produce a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. These efforts have enriched the understanding of the scientific capabilities of such an observatory leading to broad recognition of its value as an astronomical instrument. At the same time, rapidly developing events in the US and Europe have lead to a more complicated outlook than the baseline Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) project plan of a few years ago. I will discuss recent progress and developments resulting from the European eLISA study and the SGO study in the US and prospects looking forward.

  16. Telescope Technology Development Results for a Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories will enable the systematic study of the low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. Optical telescopes play an important role in these observatories by enabling displacement measurements between pairs of freely falling proof masses. The telescopes deliver laser light efficiently from one sciencecraft to another over million-kilometer scale separations and must transmit and receive light simultaneously. Transmitting and receiving at the same time puts tight constraints on the scattered light performance. In addition, the required displacement measurement accuracy requires ~ 1 pm/√Hz pathlength stability through the telescope in the measurement band. We report preliminary measurements on a prototype telescope.This work was funded in part by NASA SAT grant 11-SAT11-0027.

  17. Persistent Gravitational Radiation from Glitching Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.; Douglass, J. A.; Simula, T. P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum mechanical simulations of neutron star rotational glitches, triggered by vortex avalanches in the superfluid stellar interior, reveal that vortices pin nonaxisymmetrically to the crust during the intervals between glitches. Hence a glitching neutron star emits a persistent current quadrupole gravitational wave signal at the star’s rotation frequency, whose interglitch amplitude is constant and determined by the avalanche history since birth. The signal can be detected in principle by coherent searches planned for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), whether or not a glitch occurs during the observation, if the power-law distribution of glitch sizes extends up to {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max}/{{Ω }}≳ {10}-6{η }-1{({{Δ }}φ )}-1{({{Ω }}/{10}3 {rad} {{{s}}}-1)}-3(D/1 {kpc}) in the targeted object, where {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} and {{Δ }}φ are the largest angular velocity jump and avalanche opening angle, respectively, to have occurred in a glitch since birth, Ω is the angular velocity at present, η is the crustal fraction of the moment of inertia, and D is the distance from the Earth. A major caveat concerning detectability is whether the nonaxisymmetries observed in existing simulations with ≲ {10}3 vortices extrapolate to realistic neutron stars with ≳ {10}15 vortices. The arguments for and against extrapolation are discussed critically in the context of avalanche dynamics in self-organized critical systems, but the issue cannot be resolved without larger simulations and tighter observational limits on η {{Δ }}φ {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} from future LIGO (non)detections and radio timing campaigns.

  18. Time-asymmetric structure of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    1993-05-01

    Gravitational radiation reaction effects in the dynamics of an isolated system arise from the use of retarded potentials for the radiation field, satisfying time-asymmetric boundary conditions imposed at past-null infinity. Part one of this paper investigates the ``antisymmetric'' component, a solution of the wave equation of the type retarded minus advanced, of the linearized gravitational field generated by an isolated system in the exterior region of the system. At linearized order such a component is well defined and is ``time odd'' in the usual post-Newtonian (PN) sense. We introduce a new linearized coordinate system which generalizes the Burke and Thorne coordinate system both in its space-time domain of validity, which is no longer limited to the near zone of the source, and in the post-Newtonian smallness of the linear antisymmetric (``time-odd'') component of the metric, for all multipolarities of antisymmetric waves. These waves (as viewed in the near zone) define a generalized radiation reaction four-tensor potential Vαβreact of the linear theory. At the 2.5 post-Newtonian approximation, the tensor potential reduces to the standard Burke-Thorne scalar potential of the lowest-order local radiation reaction force. At the 3.5 PN approximation, the potential involves scalar (V00react) and vector (V0ireact) components which are associated with subdominant radiation reaction effects such as the recoil effect. At the higher-order PN approximations, the potential is intrinsically tensorial. A nonlinear exterior metric is iteratively constructed from the new linearized metric by the method of a previous work. Part two of this paper is devoted to the near-zone reexpansion of the nonlinear iterations of the exterior metric. We use a very convenient decomposition of the integral of the retarded potentials into a particular solution involving only ``instantaneous'' potentials, and a homogeneous solution of the antisymmetric type. The former particular solution is

  19. Towards a gravitational wave observatory designer: sensitivity limits of spaceborne detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barke, S.; Wang, Y.; Esteban Delgado, J. J.; Tröbs, M.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    The most promising concept for low frequency (millihertz to hertz) gravitational wave observatories are laser interferometric detectors in space. It is usually assumed that the noise floor for such a detector is dominated by optical shot noise in the signal readout. For this to be true, a careful balance of mission parameters is crucial to keep all other parasitic disturbances below shot noise. We developed a web application that uses over 30 input parameters and considers many important technical noise sources and noise suppression techniques to derive a realistic position noise budget. It optimizes free parameters automatically and generates a detailed report on all individual noise contributions. Thus one can easily explore the entire parameter space and design a realistic gravitational wave observatory. In this document we describe the different parameters, present all underlying calculations, and compare the final observatory’s sensitivity with astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. We use as an example parameters currently assumed to be likely applied to a space mission proposed to be launched in 2034 by the European Space Agency. The web application itself is publicly available on the Internet at http://spacegravity.org/designer. Future versions of the web application will incorporate the frequency dependence of different noise sources and include a more detailed model of the observatory’s residual acceleration noise.

  20. A Xylophone Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1997-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking searches for gravitational waves in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we describe a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. This technique provides also a way for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by nongravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector of gravitational radiation. In the assumption of calibrating the frequency fluctuations induced by the interplanetary plasma, a strain sensitivity equal to 4.7 x 10(exp -18) at 10(exp -3) Hz is estimated. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  1. Analytical model for ring heater thermal compensation in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Wang, Haoyu; Heintze, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors use high laser power to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses, causing aberrations in the main laser beam that must be minimized by the actuation of "ring heaters," which are additional heater elements that are aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors. In this article we derive the first, to the best of our knowledge, analytical model of the temperature field generated by an ideal ring heater. We express the resulting optical aberration contribution to the main laser beam in this axisymmetric case. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. PMID:27139664

  2. Analytical model for ring heater thermal compensation in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Wang, Haoyu; Heintze, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors use high laser power to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses, causing aberrations in the main laser beam that must be minimized by the actuation of "ring heaters," which are additional heater elements that are aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors. In this article we derive the first, to the best of our knowledge, analytical model of the temperature field generated by an ideal ring heater. We express the resulting optical aberration contribution to the main laser beam in this axisymmetric case. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

  3. ESA’s L3 mission: A space-based gravitational-wave observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido

    2016-04-01

    ESA selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for one of its future L-class missions. L3 will measure gravitational waves in the 10µHz to 100mHz window; probably the richest of all gravitational wave windows. Expected sources in this frequency band range from massive black hole mergers to extreme mass ratio inspirals to compact galactic binary systems.The L3 mission is expected to be based on the eLISA/LISA design which was submitted by the eLISA consortium as a notional mission concept. NASA started discussions with ESA how to join L3 and participates in ESA’s Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team. NASA is also in the process of setting up its own L3-Study team to look at potential US contributions to L3. This group will also act as the US partner for the eLISA consortium. In summary, the space component of the GW community has gained significant momentum over the last 12 months and a successful pathfinder mission and potential GW discoveries by Advanced LIGO and/or pulsar timing arrays should further strengthen the case for LISA.

  4. Sources of gravitational radiation; Proceedings of the Workshop, Seattle, Wash., July 24-August 4, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smarr, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Topics discussed are gravitational wave detection experiments, the theoretical foundations of gravitational wave physics, black holes, and neutron stars. Particular consideration is given to methods for circumventing the quantum limit for gravitational wave detectors, global problems in numerical relativity, massive black holes and gravitational radiation, the role of binaries in gravitational wave production, and astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation.

  5. Stochastic microhertz gravitational radiation from stellar convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A.

    2014-09-01

    High Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at S(f {sub peak}) = 5.2 × 10{sup –52} Hz{sup –1} at frequency f {sub peak} = 2.3 × 10{sup –7} Hz. However, at low observing frequencies f < 3 × 10{sup –4} Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to S {sub near}(f {sub peak}) = 4.1 × 10{sup –27} Hz{sup –1} because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance (∝d {sup –5}) in the near zone than in the far zone (∝d {sup –1}). Hence the Solar signal may prove relevant for pulsar timing arrays. Other individual sources and the universal background fall well below the projected sensitivities of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and next-generation pulsar timing arrays. Stellar convection sets a fundamental noise floor for more sensitive stochastic gravitational-wave experiments in the more distant future.

  6. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Bassan, M.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciani, G.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; De Rosa, R.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; García Marín, A. F.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Guzmán, F.; Grado, A.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Madden, S.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Monsky, A.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Raïs, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sanjuán, J.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Stanga, R.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Tröbs, M.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wand, V.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zambotti, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2 ±0.1 fm s-2/√{Hz } , or (0.54 ±0.01 ) ×10-15 g/√{Hz } , with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8 ±0.3 ) fm /√{Hz } , about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f ≤0.5 mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12 fm s-2/√{Hz } down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  7. Radiation Belt Storm Probes—Observatory and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Karen; Artis, David; Bushman, Stewart; Butler, Michael; Conde, Rich; Cooper, Stan; Fretz, Kristen; Herrmann, Carl; Hill, Adrian; Kelley, Jeff; Maurer, Richard; Nichols, Richard; Ottman, Geffrey; Reid, Mark; Rogers, Gabe; Srinivasan, Dipak; Troll, John; Williams, Bruce

    2013-11-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission that launched August 30, 2012, and is the latest science mission in NASA's Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, as well as the influence of the Sun on the Earth's environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning observatories in an elliptical orbit around earth with 600 km perigee, 30,000 km apogee and 10∘ inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin RBSP observatories (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) will follow slightly different orbits and will lap each other four times per year, offering simultaneous measurements over a range of observatory separation distances. A description of the observatory environment is provided along with protection for sensitive electronics to support operations in the harsh radiation belt environment. Spacecraft and subsystem key characteristics and instrument accommodations are included that allow the RBSP science objectives to be met.

  8. Simulation of Merger of Two Black Holes and Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a simulation of the merger of two black holes and the resulting emission of gravitational radiation. The colored fields represent a component of the curvature of space-time. The ou...

  9. Constraint on ghost-free bigravity from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Rampei; Tanaka, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yasuho

    2016-09-01

    We investigate gravitational Cherenkov radiation in a healthy branch of background solutions in the ghost-free bigravity model. In this model, because of the modification of dispersion relations, each polarization mode can possess subluminal phase velocities, and the gravitational Cherenkov radiation could be potentially emitted from a relativistic particle. In the present paper, we derive conditions for the process of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation to occur and estimate the energy emission rate for each polarization mode. We found that the gravitational Cherenkov radiation emitted even from an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray is sufficiently suppressed for the graviton's effective mass less than 100 eV, and the bigravity model with dark matter coupled to the hidden metric is therefore consistent with observations of high energy cosmic rays.

  10. Gravitational radiation by cosmic strings in a junction

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Karouby, J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Khosravi, S.

    2009-01-15

    The formalism for computing the gravitational power radiation from excitations on cosmic strings forming a junction is presented and applied to the simple case of co-planar strings at a junction when the excitations are generated along one string leg. The effects of polarization of the excitations and of the back-reaction of the gravitational radiation on the small scale structure of the strings are studied.

  11. Cosmic string structure at the gravitational radiation scale

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2007-06-15

    We use our model of the small scale structure on cosmic strings to develop further the result of Siemens, Olum, and Vilenkin that the gravitational radiation length scale on cosmic strings is smaller than the previously assumed {gamma}G{mu}t. We discuss some of the properties of cosmic string loops at this cutoff scale, and we argue that recent network simulations point to two populations of cosmic string loops, one near the horizon scale and one near the gravitational radiation cutoff.

  12. LIGO/VIRGO Searches for Gravitational Radiation in Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2002-08-01

    A torus around a stellar-mass Kerr black hole can emit about 10% of the spin energy of a black hole in gravitational radiation, which is potentially associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). Wide tori may develop buckling modes by the Papaloizou-Pringle instability and gravitational radiation-reaction forces in the Burke-Thorne approximation. Gravitational-wave experiments may discover these emissions in a fraction of nearby supernovae. This provides a test for Kerr black holes and for GRB inner engines by a comparison with the deredshifted durations of long GRBs.

  13. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    PubMed

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA. PMID:27341221

  14. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    PubMed

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  15. Gravitational radiation from collapsing magnetized dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Shijun; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2007-04-15

    In this article we study the influence of magnetic fields on the axial gravitational waves emitted during the collapse of a homogeneous dust sphere. We found that while the energy emitted depends weakly on the initial matter perturbations it has strong dependence on the strength and the distribution of the magnetic field perturbations. The gravitational wave output of such a collapse can be up to an order of magnitude larger or smaller calling for detailed numerical 3D studies of collapsing magnetized configurations.

  16. First long-term application of squeezed states of light in a gravitational-wave observatory.

    PubMed

    Grote, H; Danzmann, K; Dooley, K L; Schnabel, R; Slutsky, J; Vahlbruch, H

    2013-05-01

    We report on the first long-term application of squeezed vacuum states of light to improve the shot-noise-limited sensitivity of a gravitational-wave observatory. In particular, squeezed vacuum was applied to the German-British detector GEO 600 during a period of three months from June to August 2011, when GEO 600 was performing an observational run together with the French-Italian Virgo detector. In a second period, the squeezing application continued for about 11 months from November 2011 to October 2012. During this time, squeezed vacuum was applied for 90.2% (205.2 days total) of the time that science-quality data were acquired with GEO 600. A sensitivity increase from squeezed vacuum application was observed broadband above 400 Hz. The time average of gain in sensitivity was 26% (2.0 dB), determined in the frequency band from 3.7 to 4.0 kHz. This corresponds to a factor of 2 increase in the observed volume of the Universe for sources in the kHz region (e.g., supernovae, magnetars). We introduce three new techniques to enable the long-term application of squeezed light, and show that the glitch rate of the detector did not increase from squeezing application. Squeezed vacuum states of light have arrived as a permanent application, capable of increasing the astrophysical reach of gravitational-wave detectors.

  17. Gravitational radiation from magnetically funneled supernova fallback onto a magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Priymak, M. E-mail: m.priymak@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Protomagnetars spun up to millisecond rotation periods by supernova fallback are predicted to radiate gravitational waves via hydrodynamic instabilities for ∼10{sup 2} s before possibly collapsing to form a black hole. It is shown that magnetic funneling of the accretion flow (1) creates a magnetically confined polar mountain, which boosts the gravitational wave signal, and (2) 'buries' the magnetic dipole moment, delaying the propeller phase and assisting black hole formation.

  18. Gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries in circular orbits: limits from the North American nanohertz observatory for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J. A.; Demorest, P. B.; Deng, X.; Koop, M.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Garver-Daniels, N.; Lorimer, D. R.; Jenet, F.; Jones, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lommen, A. N.; Collaboration: NANOGrav Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    We perform a search for continuous gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries using robust frequentist and Bayesian techniques. We augment standard pulsar timing models with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency variable pulse shape terms. We apply our techniques to the Five Year Data Release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We find that there is no evidence for the presence of a detectable continuous gravitational wave; however, we can use these data to place the most constraining upper limits to date on the strength of such gravitational waves. Using the full 17 pulsar data set we place a 95% upper limit on the strain amplitude of h {sub 0} ≲ 3.0 × 10{sup –14} at a frequency of 10 nHz. Furthermore, we place 95% sky-averaged lower limits on the luminosity distance to such gravitational wave sources, finding that d{sub L} ≳ 425 Mpc for sources at a frequency of 10 nHz and chirp mass 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. We find that for gravitational wave sources near our best timed pulsars in the sky, the sensitivity of the pulsar timing array is increased by a factor of ∼four over the sky-averaged sensitivity. Finally we place limits on the coalescence rate of the most massive supermassive black hole binaries.

  19. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  20. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier E-mail: larry@gravity.phys.uwm.edu

    2010-08-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields.

  1. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr. E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu

    2012-10-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier.

  2. Gravitational radiation theory. M.A. Thesis - Rice Univ.; [survey of current research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of current research in the theory of gravitational radiation. The mathematical structure of gravitational radiation is stressed. Furthermore, the radiation problem is treated independently from other problems in gravitation. The development proceeds candidly through three points of view - scalar, rector, and tensor radiation theory - and the corresponding results are stated.

  3. Arm locking for space-based laser interferometry gravitational wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Mitryk, Shawn; Mueller, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Laser frequency stabilization is a critical part of the interferometry measurement system of space-based gravitational wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Arm locking as a proposed frequency stabilization technique transfers the stability of the long arm lengths to the laser frequency. The arm locking sensor synthesizes an adequately filtered linear combination of the interspacecraft phase measurements to estimate the laser frequency noise, which can be used to control the laser frequency. At the University of Florida we developed the hardware-based University of Florida LISA Interferometer Simulator to study and verify laser frequency noise reduction and suppression techniques under realistic LISA-like conditions. These conditions include the variable Doppler shifts among the spacecraft, LISA-like signal travel times, optical transponders, realistic laser frequency, and timing noise. We review the different types of arm locking sensors and discuss their expected performance in LISA. The presented results are supported by results obtained during experimental studies of arm locking under relevant LISA-like conditions. We measured the noise suppression as well as initial transients and frequency pulling in the presence of Doppler frequency errors. This work has demonstrated the validity and feasibility of arm locking in LISA.

  4. Gravitational radiation antennas - History, observations, and lunar surface opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J.

    1990-03-01

    The paper discusses the suitability of the lunar surface for observing the quadrupole modes with a long-period accelerometer as well as gravitational radiation by means of a low-frequency bar and interferometer antennas. The theoretical background of gravitational radiation antennas is described emphasizing the General theory of Relativity. One measurement method involves the use of an elastic solid such as an aluminum cylinder whose length changes as spacetime curvature changes. The second method described involves the use of a Michelson interferometer which measures fractional changes in length. Results of the measurements are given for the period during the supernova 1987A, and applications of the experimental apparatuses to lunar gravitational observations are discussed. The large cross sections of the lunar quadrupole modes make the moon a good place for the use of a long-period accelerometer.

  5. Gravitational radiation from rotating monopole-string systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.; Dokuchaev, V.; Kachelriess, M.

    2005-02-15

    We study the gravitational radiation from a rotating monopole-antimonopole pair connected by a string. While at not too high frequencies the emitted gravitational spectrum is described asymptotically by P{sub n}{proportional_to}n{sup -1}, the spectrum is exponentially suppressed in the high-frequency limit, P{sub n}{proportional_to}exp(-n/n{sub cr}). Below n{sub cr}, the emitted spectrum of gravitational waves is very similar to the case of an oscillating monopole pair connected by a string, and we argue, therefore, that the spectrum found holds approximately for any moving monopole-string system. As an application, we discuss the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by monopole-antimonopole pairs connected by strings in the early Universe and gravitational wave bursts emitted at present by monopole-string networks. We confirm that advanced gravitational wave detectors have the potential to detect a signal for string tensions as small as G{mu}{approx}10{sup -13}.

  6. Gravitational radiation and the ultimate speed in Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    In Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity the (local) speed of gravitational radiation is determined by the combined effects of cosmological boundary values and nearby concentrations of matter. It is possible for the speed of gravitational radiation to be less than the speed of light. It is here shown that the emission of gravitational radiation prevents particles of nonzero rest mass from exceeding the speed of gravitational radiation. Observations of relativistic particles place limits on the speed of gravitational radiation and the cosmological boundary values today, and observations of synchroton radiation from compact radio sources place limits on the cosmological boundary values in the past.

  7. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  8. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  9. On gravitational radiation with axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ivor

    1989-12-01

    General results are obtained for Robinson-Trautman metrics which satisfy reasonable conditions for radiation from a bounded source. For the axially symmetrical case, the degree of the one field equation is reduced from 5 to 2; a simplified proof is given of the Lukacs-Perjes-Porter-Sebestyen theorem and a systematic procedure is developed for formal solution in series.

  10. Thermal Stability Analysis for a Heliocentric Gravitational Radiation Detection Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W.; McElroy, P.; Miyake, R.; Bender, P.; Stebbins, R.; Supper, W.

    1994-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed for detailed studies of low-frequency gravitational radiation. The mission is currently a candidate for ESA's post-Horizon 2000 program. Thermal noise affects the measurement in at least two ways. Thermal variation of the length of the optical cavity to which the lasers are stabilized introduces phase variations in the interferometer signal, which have to be corrected for by using data from the two arms separately.

  11. Mission and Instrument Design Trades for a Space-based Gravitational Wave Observatory to Maximize Science Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Baker, John; Stebbins, Robin; Thorpe, James; Larson, Shane; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    A space-based gravitational wave observatory is required to access the rich array of astrophysical sources expected at frequencies between 0.0001 and 0.1 Hz. The European Space Agency (ESA) chose the Gravitational Universe as the science theme of its L3 launch opportunity. A call for mission proposals will be released soon after the completion of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission. LPF is scheduled to start science operations in March 2016, and finish by the end of the year, so an optimized mission concept is needed now. There are a number of possible design choices for both the instrument and the mission. One of the goals for a good mission design is to maximize the science return while minimizing risk and keeping costs low. This presentation will review some of the main design choices for a LISA-like laser interferometry mission and the impact of these choices on cost, risk, and science return.

  12. Influence of gravitation on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a general helicity-rotation coupling is demonstrated for electromagnetic waves propagating in the field of a slowly rotating body and in the Goedel universe. This coupling leads to differential focusing of circularly polarized radiation by a gravitational field which is detectable for a rapidly rotating collapsed body. The electromagnetic perturbations and their frequency spectrum are given for the Goedel universe. The spectrum of frequencies is bounded from below by the characteristic rotation frequency of the Goedel universe. If the universe were rotating, the differential focusing effect would be extremely small due to the present upper limit on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  13. Gravitational radiation in Bianchi Type V cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of the theory of embedding gravitational radiation fields in expanding universes pioneered by Hawking. The problem of embedding such fields in the expanding Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker dust-filled universe, considered by Hawking, is reexamined in a new formalism which permits an easy analysis, in particular, of the relationship between the boundary conditions and the satisfaction, by the Weyl tensor, of the conventional peeling-off behavior. Since gravity wave detectors are expected to pick up plane-fronted gravitational waves, the main thrust of this paper concerns the development of a formulation of Bianchi Type V cosmological models which enables the embedding of such plane-fronted waves to be carried out. This is worked out explicitly in the case of a perfect fluid, with pressure proportional to energy density, and with the histories of the fluid particles orthogonal to the surfaces of homogeneity. 18 references.

  14. Re-Examining Gravitational Tunneling Radiation when taking into account Quantum Gravity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, John; Prescott, Trevor; Blado, Gardo

    2015-03-01

    Although shown to theoretically exist, Hawking Radiation has yet to be detected. The paper entitled ``Gravitational Tunneling Radiation'' by Mario Rabinowitz proposed a possible explanation by considering the gravitational tunneling effects in the presence of other bodies in the vicinity of the black hole. Rabinowitz showed that the power radiated (through gravitational radiation) by a black hole,PR, is related to the power generated by Hawking Radiation, PSH by PR/T ~PSH where T is the gravitational tunneling probability. The presence of other bodies lowers the gravitational barrier which in turn increases the gravitational tunneling probability thereby decreasing the Hawking radiation, PSH. In this paper, we examine the modification of T in the presence of quantum gravity effects by incorporating the Generalized Uncertainty Principle.

  15. Gravitational radiation reaction and inspiral waveforms in the adiabatic limit.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Scott A; Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Eanna E; Franklin, Joel

    2005-06-10

    We describe progress evolving an important limit of binaries in general relativity: stellar mass compact objects spiraling into much larger black holes. Such systems are of great observational interest. We have developed tools to compute for the first time the radiation from generic orbits. Using global conservation laws, we find the orbital evolution and waveforms for special cases. For generic orbits, inspirals and waveforms can be found by augmenting our approach with an adiabatic self-force rule due to Mino. Such waveforms should be accurate enough for gravitational-wave searches. PMID:16090377

  16. Escape of gravitational radiation from the field of massive bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Richard H.; Pullin, Jorge; Kundu, Prasun K.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a compact source of gravitational waves of frequency omega in or near a massive spherically symmetric distribution of matter or a black hole. Recent calculations have led to apparently contradictory results for the influence of the massive body on the propagation of the waves. We show here that the results are in fact consistent and in agreement with the 'standard' viewpoint in which the high-frequency compact source produces the radiation as if in a flat background, and the background curvature affects the propagation of these waves.

  17. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Barnard

    2008-01-01

    "We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source. applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the $\\ell = m$ modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model."

  18. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, B. J.; Baker, J. G.; Boggs, W. D.; Centrella, J. M.; vanMeter, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source, applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the l = m modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  19. Spacelike gravitational radiation extraction from rotating binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbiriba, Breno C. O.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce an alternate method for gravitational radiation extraction for binary black hole mergers where we do not use a single extraction radius at the intermediate field region but instead use a whole spherical shell of three-dimensional (3D) data and continue its evolution using the linearized (Teukolsky) evolution to a final distant radiation extraction radius. We implement this using the Hahndol code for the 3D evolution, and use the “Lazarus” procedure to convert the numerical data into the linearized data. The final waveform is compatible with the ones obtained from the full 3D evolutions with some minor variations that require further study. In the process, we tested the “Lazarus” method with our numerical 3D implementation and gauges showing that even with the advanced gauges suitable for 3D rotating binary evolutions, we recover the same type of limited results obtained in the original work.

  20. High-Precision Lunar Ranging and Gravitational Parameter Estimation With the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nathan H.

    This dissertation is concerned with several problems of instrumentation and data analysis encountered by the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation. Chapter 2 considers crosstalk between elements of a single-photon avalanche photodiode detector. Experimental and analytic methods were developed to determine crosstalk rates, and empirical findings are presented. Chapter 3 details electronics developments that have improved the quality of data collected by detectors of the same type. Chapter 4 explores the challenges of estimating gravitational parameters on the basis of ranging data collected by this and other experiments and presents resampling techniques for the derivation of standard errors for estimates of such parameters determined by the Planetary Ephemeris Program (PEP), a solar-system model and data-fitting code. Possible directions for future work are discussed in Chapter 5. A manual of instructions for working with PEP is presented as an appendix.

  1. Information content of gravitational radiation and the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Halpern, Illan; Koeller, Jason

    2016-09-01

    Known entropy bounds, and the generalized second law, were recently shown to imply bounds on the information arriving at future null infinity. We complete this derivation by including the contribution from gravitons. We test the bounds in classical settings with gravity and no matter. In Minkowski space, the bounds vanish on any subregion of the future boundary, independently of coordinate choices. More generally, the bounds vanish in regions where no gravitational radiation arrives. In regions that do contain Bondi news, the bounds are compatible with the presence of information, including the information stored in gravitational memory. All of our results are consistent with the equivalence principle, which states that empty Riemann-flat spacetime regions contain no classical information. We also discuss the possibility that Minkowski space has an infinite vacuum degeneracy labeled by a choice of Bondi coordinates (a classical parameter, if physical). We argue that this degeneracy cannot have any observational consequences if the equivalence principle holds. Our bounds are consistent with this conclusion.

  2. Gravitational radiation from crystalline color-superconducting hybrid stars

    SciTech Connect

    Knippel, Bettina; Sedrakian, Armen

    2009-04-15

    The interiors of high mass compact (neutron) stars may contain deconfined quark matter in a crystalline color-superconducting (CCS) state. On a basis of microscopic nuclear and quark matter equations of states we explore the internal structure of such stars in general relativity. We find that their stable sequence harbors CCS quark cores with masses M{sub core}{<=}(0.78-0.82)M{sub {center_dot}} and radii R{sub core}{<=}7 km. The CCS quark matter can support nonaxisymmetric deformations, because of its finite shear modulus, and can generate gravitational radiation at twice the rotation frequency of the star. Assuming that the CCS core is maximally strained we compute the maximal quadrupole moment it can sustain. The characteristic strain of gravitational wave emission h{sub 0} predicted by our models are compared to the upper limits obtained by the LIGO and GEO 600 detectors. The upper limits are consistent with the breaking strain of CCS matter {sigma}{<=}10{sup -4} and large pairing gaps {delta}{approx}50 MeV, or, alternatively, with {sigma}{approx}10{sup -3} and small pairing gaps {delta}{approx}15 MeV. An observationally determined value of the characteristic strain h{sub 0} can pin down the product {sigma}{delta}{sup 2}. On the theoretical side a better understanding of the breaking strain of CCS matter will be needed to predict reliably the level of the deformation of CCS quark core from first principles.

  3. Nonlinear solutions of long-wavelength gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.

    1991-05-01

    In a significant improvement over homogeneous minisuperspace models, it is shown that the classical nonlinear evolution of inhomogeneous scalar fields and the metric is tractable when the wavelength of the fluctuations is larger than the Hubble radius. Neglecting second-order spatial gradients, one can solve the energy constraint as well as the evolution equations by invoking a transformation to new canonical variables. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation is separable and complete solutions are given for gravitational radiation and multiple scalar fields interacting through an exponential potential. Although the time parameter is arbitrary, the natural choice is the determinant of the three-metric. The momentum constraint may be simply expressed in terms of the new canonical variables which define the spatial coordinates. The long-wavelength analysis is essential for a proper formulation of stochastic inflation which enables one to model non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations for structure formation.

  4. Critical phenomena in the aspherical gravitational collapse of radiation fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Montero, Pedro J.

    2015-12-01

    We study critical phenomena in the gravitational collapse of a radiation fluid. We perform numerical simulations in both spherical symmetry and axisymmetry, and observe critical scaling in both supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of a black hole, and subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space. We identify the critical solution in spherically symmetric collapse, find evidence for its universality, and study the approach to this critical solution in the absence of spherical symmetry. For the cases that we consider, aspherical deviations from the spherically symmetric critical solution decay in damped oscillations in a manner that is consistent with the behavior found by Gundlach in perturbative calculations. Our simulations are performed with an unconstrained evolution code, implemented in spherical polar coordinates, and adopting "moving-puncture" coordinates.

  5. Electrodynamics of Radiating Charges in a Gravitational Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøn, Øyvind

    The electrodynamics of a radiating charge and its electromagnetic field based upon the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac (LAD) equation are discussed both with reference to an inertial reference frame and a uniformly accelerated reference frame. It is demonstrated that energy and momentum are conserved during runaway motion of a radiating charge and during free fall of a charge in a field of gravity. This does not mean that runaway motion is really happening. It may be an unphysical solution of the LAD equation of motion of a radiating charge due to the unrealistic point particle model of the charge upon which it is based. However it demonstrates the consistency of classical electrodynamics, including the LAD equation which is deduced from Maxwell's equations and the principle of energy-momentum conservation applied to a radiating charge and its electromagnetic field. The decisive role of the Schott energy in this connection is made clear and an answer is given to the question: What sort of energy is the Schott energy and where is it found? It is the part of the electromagnetic field energy which is proportional to (minus) the scalar product of the velocity and acceleration of a moving accelerated charged particle. In the case of the electromagnetic field of a point charge it is localized at the particle. This energy is negative if the acceleration is in the same direction as the velocity and positive if it is in the opposite direction. During runaway motion the Schott energy becomes more and more negative and in the case of a charged particle with finite extension, it is localized in a region with increasing extension surrounding the particle. The Schott energy provides the radiated energy of a freely falling charge. Also it is pointed out that a proton and a neutron fall with the same acceleration in a uniform gravitational field, although the proton radiates and the neutron does not. It is made clear that the question as to whether or not a charge radiates has a reference

  6. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (SGO) Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; McNamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a space-based gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return.

  7. Synchrotron Radiation from Outer Space and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    The universe provides numerous extremely interesting astrophysical sources of synchrotron X radiation. The Chandra X-ray Observatory and other X-ray missions provide powerful probes of these and other cosmic X-ray sources. Chandra is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program which also includes the Hubble Space telescope, the Spitzer Infrared Telescope Facility, and the now defunct Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory provides the best angular resolution (sub-arcsecond) of any previous, current, or planned (for the foreseeable near future) space-based X-ray instrumentation. We present here a brief overview of the technical capability of this X-Ray observatory and some of the remarkable discoveries involving cosmic synchrotron sources.

  8. Messages about the Messengers: Reception and Review of ``Astronomy's New Messengers,'' The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory's Interactive Public Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankins, Brooke; Cavagliá, Marco

    2010-10-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) is an endeavor to directly confirm the existence of gravitational waves, funded by the National Science Foundation. As a publicly funded research project, it is both within its directive and within its best interest to educate and inform the public at large of its efforts. The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) group within LIGO, under the direction of Marco Cavaglià, has developed an interactive exhibit to educate, explain and showcase LIGO to the general public. The exhibit, entitled ``Astronomy's New Messengers,'' debuted at the World Science Festival in New York City, and includes features to explain gravitational waves and their possible sources, an interferometer, the space-time fabric model, and the difficulties in identifying a gravitational wave. The exhibit visitors were asked to complete a survey about their experience at ``Astronomy's New Messengers,'' and the presentation will report the survey results, and explore the full exhibit's reception by the general public.

  9. Bondi-Sachs energy-momentum and the energy of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluf, J. W.; da Rocha-Neto, J. F.; Ulhoa, S. C.

    2015-07-01

    We construct the gravitational energy-momentum of the Bondi-Sachs space-time, in the famework of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR). The Bondi-Sachs line element describes gravitational radiation in the asymptotic region of the space-time, and is determined by the mass aspect and by two functions, c and d, that yield the news functions, which are interpreted as the radiating degrees of freedom of the gravitational field. The standard expression for the Bondi-Sachs energy-momentum is constructed in terms of the mass aspect only. The expression that we obtain in the context of the TEGR is given by the standard expression, which represents the gravitational energy of the source, plus a new term that is determined by the two functions c and d. We interpret this new term as the energy of gravitational radiation.

  10. [The use of a detector of the extremely weak radiation as a variometer of gravitation field].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, E S; Bondarenko, E G; Shapovalov, S N; Sokolovskiĭ, V V; Troshichev, O A

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that the detector of extremely weak radiation with selectively increased sensitivity to the nonelectromagnetic, including the gravitational component of the spectrum of active physical fields can be used as the basis for constructing a variometer of gravitational field of a new type.

  11. Gravitational self-force from radiation-gauge metric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam; Merlin, Cesar; Barack, Leor

    2014-01-01

    Calculations of the gravitational self-force (GSF) on a point mass in curved spacetime require as input the metric perturbation in a sufficiently regular gauge. A basic challenge in the program to compute the GSF for orbits around a Kerr black hole is that the standard procedure for reconstructing the metric perturbation is formulated in a class of “radiation” gauges, in which the particle singularity is nonisotropic and extends away from the particle’s location. Here we present two practical schemes for calculating the GSF using a radiation-gauge reconstructed metric as input. The schemes are based on a detailed analysis of the local structure of the particle singularity in the radiation gauges. We show that three types of radiation gauge exist: two containing a radial stringlike singularity emanating from the particle, either in one direction (“half-string” gauges) or both directions (“full-string” gauges); and a third type containing no strings but with a jump discontinuity (and possibly a delta function) across a surface intersecting the particle. Based on a flat-space example, we argue that the standard mode-by-mode reconstruction procedure yields the “regular half” of a half-string solution, or (equivalently) either of the regular halves of a no-string solution. For the half-string case, we formulate the GSF in a locally deformed radiation gauge that removes the string singularity near the particle. We derive a mode-sum formula for the GSF in this gauge, which is analogous to the standard Lorenz-gauge formula but requires a correction to the values of the regularization parameters. For the no-string case, we formulate the GSF directly, without a local deformation, and we derive a mode-sum formula that requires no correction to the regularization parameters but involves a certain averaging procedure. We explain the consistency of our results with Gralla’s invariance theorem for the regularization parameters, and we discuss the

  12. Managing radiation degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bissell, Bradley A.; Blackwell, William C.; Cameron, Robert A.; Chappell, Jon II.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Gage, Kenneth R.; Grant, Catherine E.; Harbison, Christine F.

    2005-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra Team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program - involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing - has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 2.9x10^-6 (2.3%) for the front- illuminated CCDs and 0.95x10^-6 (6.5%) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of Chandra radiation-management program.

  13. Search for correlations between the University of Maryland and the University of Rome gravitational radiation antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, V.; Pizzella, G.; Lee, M.; Weber, J.

    1982-05-15

    Results are presented for analyses of the outputs of gravitational radiation antennas in Rome and in Maryland during July 1978. These data give evidence for an external background exciting both antennas.

  14. Gravitational radiation from ultra high energy cosmic rays in models with large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Ben; Drescher, Hans-Joachim; Bleicher, Marcus

    2006-06-01

    The effects of classical gravitational radiation in models with large extra dimensions are investigated for ultra high energy cosmic rays (CRs). The cross sections are implemented into a simulation package (SENECA) for high energy hadron induced CR air showers. We predict that gravitational radiation from quasi-elastic scattering could be observed at incident CR energies above 10 9 GeV for a setting with more than two extra dimensions. It is further shown that this gravitational energy loss can alter the energy reconstruction for CR energies ECR ⩾ 5 × 10 9 GeV.

  15. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, C. E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; ODell, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  16. Managing Radiation Degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Cameron, Robert A.; Morris, David C.; Virani, Shanil N.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X ray Observatory are sensitive to radiation damage particularly from low-energy protons scattering off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. In its highly elliptical orbit, Chandra passes through a spatially and temporally varying radiation environment, ranging from the radiation belts to the solar wind. Translating thc Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) out of the focal position during radiation-belt passages has prevented loss of scientific utility and eventually functionality. However, carefully managing the radiation damage during the remainder of the orbit, without unnecessarily sacrificing observing time, is essential to optimizing the scientific value of this exceptional observatory throughout its planned 10-year mission. In working toward this optimization, the Chandra team developed aid applied radiation-management strategies. These strategies include autonomous instrument safing triggered by the on-board radiation monitor, as well as monitoring, alerts, and intervention based upon real-time space-environment data from NOAA and NASA spacecraft. Furthermore, because Chandra often spends much of its orbit out of the solar wind (in the Earth's outer magnetosphere and magnetosheath), the team developed the Chandra Radiation Model to describe the complete low-energy-proton environment. Management of the radiation damage has thus far succeeded in limiting degradation of the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) to less than 4.4*10^-6 and 1.4*10^-6 per year for the front-illuminated and back-illuminated CCDs, respectively.

  17. Shelter from the Storm: Protecting the Chandra X-ray Observatory from Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert A.; Morris, David C.; Virani, Shanil N.; Wolk, Scott J.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; O'dell, Stephen L.

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched in July 1999, and the first images were recorded by the ACIS x-ray detector in August 1999. Shortly after first light, degradation of the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency in the ACIS CCD detectors was observed, and this was quickly attributed to cumulative particle radiation damage in the CCD's, in particular from 100 keV to 200 keV protons. Since the onset of this radiation damage to ACIS, several improvements have been made to autonomous Chandra operation and ground-based operations and mission planning, to limit the effects of radiation while preserving optimum observing efficiency for the Observatory. These changes include implementing an automatic science instrument radiation protection system on Chandra, implementing a real-time radiation monitoring and alert system by the Science Operations Team, and improving the radiation prediction models used in mission planning for the Observatory. These satellite- and ground-based systems provide protection for Chandra from passages through the Earth's trapped radiation belts and outer magnetosphere and from flares and coronal mass ejections from the Sun. We describe the design and performance of the automatic on-board radiation protection system on Chandra, and the ground-based software systems and data products for real-time radiation monitoring. We also describe the development and characterize the performance of the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM), which provides predictions of the solar wind and magnetospheric proton fluxes along Chandra's orbit, indexed by the geomagnetic activity index, Kp. We compare the observed and predicted damage rates to ACIS based on net mission proton fluence, and outline planned enhancements to the CRM.

  18. On gravitational radiation and the energy flux of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluf, J. W.; Faria, F. F.

    2004-10-01

    A suitable derivative of Einstein's equations in the framework of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR) yields a continuity equation for the gravitational energy-momentum. In particular, the time derivative of the total gravitational energy is given by the sum of the total fluxes of gravitational and matter fields energy. We carry out a detailed analysis of the continuity equation in the context of Bondi and Vaidya's metrics. In the former space-time the flux of gravitational energy is given by the well known expression in terms of the square of the news function. It is known that the energy definition in the realm of the TEGR yields the ADM (Arnowitt-Deser-Misner) energy for appropriate boundary conditions. Here we show that the same energy definition also describes the Bondi energy. The analysis of the continuity equation in Vaidya's space-time shows that the variation of the total gravitational energy is determined by the energy flux of matter only.

  19. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory Radiation Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W. C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Smith, Shawn; Swift, Wesley R.; ODell, Stephen L.; Cameron, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    CRMFLX (Chandra Radiation Model of ion FluX) is an environmental risk mitigation tool for use as a decision aid in planning the operations times for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector. The accurate prediction of the proton flux environment with energies of 100 - 200 keV is needed in order to protect the ACIS detector against proton degradation. Unfortunately, protons of this energy are abundant in the region of space Chandra must operate, and the on-board Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) does not measure proton flux levels of the required energy range. In addition to the concerns arising from the radiation belts, substorm injections of plasma from the magnetotail may increase the protons flux by orders of magnitude in this energy range. The Earth's magnetosphere is a dynamic entity, with the size and location of the magnetopause driven by the highly variable solar wind parameters (number density, velocity, and magnetic field components). Operational times for the telescope must be made weeks in advance, decisions which are complicated by the variability of the environment. CRMFLX is an engineering model developed to address these problems and provides proton flux and fluence statistics for the terrestrial outer magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind for use in scheduling ACIS operations. CRMFLX implements a number of standard models to predict the bow shock, magnetopause, and plasma sheet boundaries based on the sampling of historical solar wind data sets. Measurements from the GEOTAIL and POLAR spacecraft are used to create the proton flux database. This paper describes the recently released CRMFLX v2 implementation that includes an algorithm that propagates flux from an observation location to other regions of the magnetosphere based on convective ExB and VB-curvature particle drift motions in electric and magnetic fields. This technique has the advantage of more completely filling out the database and makes maximum

  20. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  1. Cosmic gravitational background radiation as a basis of Karolyhazy hazy space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-Wen

    1998-03-01

    It is argued that the Karolyhazy hazy space-time should be related with the cosmic gravitational background radiation. A scheme to establish their relation is proposed. The Diosi-Lukacs type electromagnetic radiation is re-calculated. The result is smaller by 57 orders of magnitude than that of Diosi and Lukacs.

  2. Study of gravitational radiation from cosmic domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi E-mail: saikawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, following the previous study, we evaluate the spectrum of gravitational wave background generated by domain walls which are produced if some discrete symmetry is spontaneously broken in the early universe. We apply two methods to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum: One is to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum directly from numerical simulations, and another is to calculate it indirectly by estimating the unequal time anisotropic stress power spectrum of the scalar field. Both analysises indicate that the slope of the spectrum changes at two characteristic frequencies corresponding to the Hubble radius at the decay of domain walls and the width of domain walls, and that the spectrum between these two characteristic frequencies becomes flat or slightly red tilted. The second method enables us to evaluate the GW spectrum for the frequencies which cannot be resolved in the finite box lattice simulations, but relies on the assumptions for the unequal time correlations of the source.

  3. Astronomical polarization studies at radio and infrared wavelengths. Part 1: Gravitational deflection of polarized radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    The gravitational field is probed in a search for polarization dependence in the light bending. This involves searching for a splitting of a source image into orthogonal polarizations as the radiation passes through the solar gravitational field. This search was carried out using the techniques of very long and intermediate baseline interferometry, and by seeking a relative phase delay in orthogonal polarizations of microwaves passing through the solar gravitational field. In this last technique a change in the total polarization of the Helios 1 carrier wave was sought as the spacecraft passed behind the sun. No polarization splitting was detected.

  4. Prospects for detection of gravitational radiation by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports a calculation of the effect of gravitational radiation on the observed Doppler shift of a sinusoidal electromagnetic signal transmitted to, and coherently transponded from, distant spacecraft. It is found that the effect of plane gravitational waves on such observations is not intuitively immediate, and in fact depends sensitively on the spacecraft direction, which suggests the possibility of detecting such plane waves by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft. The need for broad band gravitational wave observations, the required stabilities of time keeping standards, and astrophysical sources expected in the Very Low Frequency band are briefly discussed.

  5. A study of the seasonal variations of the Chandra X-ray Observatory radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePasquale, Joseph M.; Virani, Shanil N.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Cameron, Robert A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-02-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), launched in July of 1999, contains two focal-plane imaging detectors and two transmission-grating spectrometers. Maintaining an optimal performance level for the observatory is the job of the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC), located in Cambridge, MA. One very important aspect of the observatory's performance is the science observing efficiency. The single largest factor which reduces the observing efficiency of the observatory is the interruption of observations due to passage through the Earth's radiation belts approximately every 2 2/3 days. During radiation belt passages, observations are suspended on average for over 15 hours and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) is moved out of the focus of the telescope to minimize damage from low-energy (100-200 keV) protons. The CXC has been using the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AE-8/AP-8 radiation belt model to predict the entry and exit from the radiation belts. However, it was discovered early in the mission that the AE-8/AP-8 model predictions were inadequate for science scheduling purposes and a 10ks "pad time" was introduced on ingress and egress of perigee to ensure protection from radiation damage. This pad time, totaling 20 ks per orbit, has recently been the subject of much analysis to determine if it can be reduced to maximize science observing efficiency. A recent analysis evaluating a possible correlation between the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM) and the Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN) found a greatest lower bound (GLB) in lieu of a correlation for the ingress and egress of each perigee. The GLB is a limit imposed on the CRM such that when the CRM exceeds this limit on ingress, this defines the new safing time and similarly for egress. We have shown that using this method we can regain a significant amount of lost science time at the expense of minimal radiation exposure. The GLB analysis also found that different GLB's produce varied

  6. Why gravitational contraction must be accompanied by emission of radiation in both Newtonian and Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2006-07-01

    By using virial theorem, Helmholtz and Kelvin showed that the contraction of a bound self-gravitating system must be accompanied by release of radiation energy irrespective of the details of the contraction process. This happens because the total Newtonian energy of the system EN (and not just the Newtonian gravitational potential energy EgN) decreases for such contraction. In the era of general relativity (GR) too, it is justifiably believed that gravitational contraction must release radiation energy. However no GR version of (Newtonian) Helmholtz- Kelvin (HK) process has ever been derived. Here, for the first time, we derive the GR version of the appropriate virial theorem and Helmholtz Kelvin mechanism by simply equating the well known expressions for the gravitational mass and the inertial mass of a spherically symmetric static fluid. Simultaneously, we show that the GR counterparts of global “internal energy”, “gravitational potential energy” and “binding energy” are actually different from what have been used so far. Existence of this GR HK process asserts that, in Einstein gravity too, gravitational collapse must be accompanied by emission of radiation irrespective of the details of the collapse process.

  7. Detecting a Non-Gaussian Stochastic Background of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Éanna É.

    2002-12-01

    We derive a detection method for a stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by events where the ratio of the average time between events to the average duration of an event is large. Such a signal would sound something like popcorn popping. Our derivation is based on the somewhat unrealistic assumption that the duration of an event is smaller than the detector time resolution.

  8. A Giant Leap Towards a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory: LISA Pathfinder, the LISA Test Package, and ST7-DRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James; McNamara, Paul; Ziemer, John; LPF Team, LTP Team, ST7-DRS Team

    2015-01-01

    The science case for a space-based gravitational wave instrument observing in the milliHertz band covers a wide area of topics in astrophysics and fundamental physics including galaxy formation and evolution, black hole growth, compact object demographics, gravitational physics, and cosmology. This strong science case is largely responsible for the high rankings received by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in major reviews in both the US and Europe. A key element of the development of LISA is the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) technology demonstrator mission, which will launch in the coming year. Led by ESA and a consortium of European national agencies and with a minority contribution from NASA, LPF will demonstrate several key technologies for the LISA concept. LPF includes two scientific payloads: the European LISA Technology Package (LTP) and the NASA-provided ST7-DRS. The mission will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, micro-Newton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. We will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, the LTP and ST7-DRS payloads, and their expected impact on the larger effort to realize a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  9. Constraints on general second-order scalar-tensor models from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rampei; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate that the general second-order scalar-tensor theories, which have attracted attention as possible modified gravity models to explain the late time cosmic acceleration, could be strongly constrained from the argument of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation. To this end, we consider the purely kinetic coupled gravity and the extended galileon model on a cosmological background. In these models, the propagation speed of tensor mode could be less than the speed of light, which puts very strong constraints from the gravitational Cherenkov radiation.

  10. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  11. Managing Radiation Degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory--III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Blackwell, William C.; Bucher, Sabina L.; Chappell, Jon H.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Grant, Catherine E.; Juda, Michael; Martin, Eric R.; Minow, Joseph I.; Murray, Stephen S.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Shropshire, Daniel P.; Spitzbart, Bradley J.; Viens, Paul R.; Wolk, Scott J.; Schwartz, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program--involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing--has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 3.2x 10(exp -6) (2.3 percent) for the front-illuminated CCDs and 1.0x10(exp -6) (6.7 percent) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of the Chandra radiation-management program, emphasizing enhancements implemented since the previous papers.

  12. Gravitational radiation from binary systems in alternative metric theories of gravity - Dipole radiation and the binary pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    The generation of gravitational radiation in several currently viable metric theories of gravitation (Brans-Dicke, Rosen, Ni, and Lightman-Lee) is analyzed, and it is shown that these theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation from systems containing gravitationally bound objects. In the binary system PSR 1913 + 16, this radiation results in a secular change in the orbital period of the system with a nominal magnitude of 3 parts in 100,000 per year. The size of the effect is proportional to the reduced mass of the system, to the square of the difference in (self-gravitational energy)/(mass) between the two components of the system, and to a parameter, xi, whose value varies from theory to theory. In general relativity xi equals 0, in Rosen's (1973) theory xi equals -20/3, and in Ni's (1973) theory xi equals -400/3. The current upper limit on such a secular period change is one part in 1 million per year. It is shown that further observations of the binary system that tighten this limit and that establish the masses of the components and the identity of the companion may provide a crucial test of otherwise viable alternatives to general relativity.

  13. Center of mass and spin for isolated sources of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozameh, Carlos N.; Quiroga, Gonzalo D.

    2016-03-01

    We define the center of mass and spin of an isolated system in general relativity. The resulting relationships between these variables and the total linear and angular momentum of the gravitational system are remarkably similar to their Newtonian counterparts, though only variables at the null boundary of an asymptotically flat spacetime are used for their definition. We also derive equations of motion linking their time evolution to the emitted gravitational radiation. The results are then compared to other approaches. In particular, one obtains unexpected similarities as well as some differences with results obtained in the post-Newtonian literature. These equations of motion should be useful when describing the radiation emitted by compact sources, such as coalescing binaries capable of producing gravitational kicks, supernovas, or scattering of compact objects.

  14. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  15. Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Radiation Environment and the AP-8/AE-8 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virani, S. N.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Butt, Y. M.; Mueller-Mellin, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of roughly 63.5 hours (approx. 2.6 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center (CXC) currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. However, our scheduling software only uses a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field. The resulting B, L magnet coordinates, do not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. We show this by comparing to the data from Chandra's on-board radiation monitor, the EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument particle detector) instrument. We present evidence that demonstrates this mis- of the radiation belts as well as data that also demonstrate the significant variability of one radiation belt transit to the next as experienced by the CXO. We present an explanation for why the dipole implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 gives inaccurate results. We are also investigating use of the Magnetospheric Specification and Forecast Model (MSM) - a model that also accounts for radiation belt variability and geometry.

  16. Chandra X-ray Observatory's radiation environment and the AP-8/AE-8 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virani, Shanil N.; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2000-07-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km X 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (approximately equals 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's `near Earth' AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. However, our scheduling software uses only a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field. The resulting B, L magnetic coordinates, do not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. We show this by comparing to the data from Chandra's on-board radiation monitor, the EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument particle detector) instrument. We present evidence that demonstrates this mis-timing of the outer electron radiation belt as well as data that also demonstrate the significant variability of one radiation belt transit to the next as experienced by the CXO. We also present an explanation for why the dipole implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 model is not ideally suited for the CXO. Lastly, we provide a brief discussion of our on-going efforts to identify a model that accounts for radiation belt variability, geometry, and one that can be used for observation scheduling purposes.

  17. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. N.

    2015-05-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO and eLISA will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present progress in the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar- tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as “direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations,” appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity. In another, mixed black hole- neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter.

  18. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar-tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as ``Direct Integration of the Relaxed Einstein equations,'' appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, mixed black hole-neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter. In another, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity.

  19. Improving the Science Observing Efficiency of the Chandra X-ray Observatory via Chandra Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virani, Shanil; Schwartz, Daniel; Cameron, Robert; Plucinsky, Paul; ODell, Stephen; Minow, Joseph; Blackwell, William

    2003-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA' latest "Great Observatory", swas launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (approx. 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. Our earlier analysis demonstrated that our implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 model (a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field) does not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. This led to a change in our operating procedure whereby we "padded" the start and end times of transit by 10 kiloseconds (ks) so that ACIS, the primary science instrument on-board Chandra, would not be exposed to the "fringes" of the Van Allen belts on ingress and egress for any given transit. This additional 20 ks per orbit during which Chandra is unable to perform science observations sums to approximately 3 Ms of "lost" science time per year and therefore reduces the science observing efficiency of the Observatory. To address the need for a higher fidelity radiation model appropriate for the Chandra orbit, the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM) was developed. The CRM is an ion model for the outer magnetosphere and is based on data from the EPIC/ICS instrument on-board the Geotail satellite as well as data from the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on-board the Polar satellite. With the production and implementation of the CRM, we present the results of a study designed to investigate the science observing time that may be recovered by using the CRM as a function of the additional low

  20. Naked singularities in non-self-similar gravitational collapse of radiation shells

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, P.S.; Dwivedi, I.H. )

    1992-03-15

    Non-self-similar gravitational collapse of imploding radiation is shown to give rise to a strong curvature naked singularity. The conditions are specified for the singularity to be globally naked and the strength of the same is examined along nonspacelike curves and along all the families of nonspacelike geodesics terminating at the singularity in the past.

  1. Bianchi type-I magnetized radiating cosmological model in self creation theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vimal Chand; Jain, Nikhil

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated Bianchi type-I cosmological model in the presence of magnetized field with disordered radiation in Barber's second self-creation theory of gravitation. To obtain exact solution we assume that the component of shear tensor is proportional to expansion ( θ). Some geometrical and physical properties of the model have also been discussed.

  2. Spin effects in gravitational radiation back reaction. I. The Lense-Thirring approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, László Á.; Perjés, Zoltán I.; Vasúth, Mátyás

    1998-01-01

    The gravitational radiation back reaction effects are considered in the Lense-Thirring approximation. New methods for parametrizing the orbit and for averaging the instantaneous radiative losses are developed. To first order in the spin S of the black hole, both in the absence and in the presence of gravitational radiation, a complete description of the test-particle orbit is given. This is achieved by two improvements over the existing descriptions: first, by introducing new angle variables with a straightforward geometrical meaning; second, by finding a new parametrization of a generic orbit, which assures that the integration over a radial period can be done in an especially simple way, by applying the residue theorem. The instantaneous gravitational radiation losses of the system are computed using the formulation of Blanchet, Damour and Iyer. All losses are given both in terms of the dynamical constants of motion and the properly defined orbital elements a, e, ι and Ψ0. The radiative losses of the constants characterizing the Lense-Thirring motion, when suitably converted, are in agreement with earlier results of Kidder, Will and Wiseman, Ryan and Shibata. In addition, the radiative losses of two slowly changing orbital elements Ψ0,Φ0 are given in order to complete the characterization of the orbit.

  3. Gravitational Radiation of a Vibrating Physical String as a Model for the Gravitational Emission of an Astrophysical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ray A.; Modanese, Giovanni

    Vibrating media offer an important testing ground for reconciling conflicts between General Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and other branches of physics. For sources like a Weber bar, the standard covariant formalism for elastic bodies can be applied. The vibrating string, however, is a source of gravitational waves which requires novel computational techniques, based on the explicit construction of a conserved and renormalized energy-momentum tensor. Renormalization (in a classical sense) is necessary to take into account the effect of external constraints, which affect the emission considerably. Our computation also relaxes usual simplifying assumptions like far-field approximation, spherical or plane wave symmetry, TT gauge and absence of internal interference. In a further step towards unification, the method is then adapted to give the radiation field of a transversal Alfven wave in a rarefied astrophysical plasma, where the tension is produced by an external static magnetic field.

  4. Gravitational radiation from inspiralling compact binaries completed at the third post-Newtonian order.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc; Damour, Thibault; Esposito-Farèse, Gilles; Iyer, Bala R

    2004-08-27

    The gravitational radiation from point particle binaries is computed at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) approximation of general relativity. Three previously introduced ambiguity parameters, coming from the Hadamard self-field regularization of the 3PN source-type mass quadrupole moment, are consistently determined by means of dimensional regularization, and proved to have the values xi=-9871/9240, kappa=0, and zeta=-7/33. These results complete the derivation of the general relativistic prediction for compact binary inspiral up to 3.5PN order, and should be of use for searching and deciphering the signals in the current network of gravitational wave detectors.

  5. Gravitational radiation from a particle in bound orbit around a black hole; relativistic correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ashok; Khanal, Udayaraj

    2016-05-01

    Gravitational radiation from a system of two body, one as test particle and other as black hole (we assume, mi is mass of the test particle and m 2 is mass of black hole in bound orbits (orbital eccentricities e < 1) and E 2 < 1; E is the energy, is calculated with relativistic correction using the method of inertia tensor and multipole formalism. Plots of power versus eccentricity of the bound orbit of first kind are presented, and average total power radiated as a function of eccentricity is plotted according to inertia tensor method. According to multipole formalism the power radiated in gravitational waves from an bound orbit is given by enhancement factor g(n,e) times the function of other parameters is plotted. The calculations apply for arbitrary eccentricity of the relative orbit, assuming orbital velocities are small.

  6. Gravitational radiation reaction and balance equations to post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    1997-01-01

    Gravitational radiation reaction forces and balance equations are investigated to 3/2 post-Newtonian (1.5PN) order beyond the quadrupole approximation, corresponding to the 4PN order in the equations of motion of an isolated system. By matching a post-Newtonian solution for the gravitational field inside the system to a post-Minkowskian solution (obtained in a previous work) for the gravitational field exterior to the system, we determine the 1PN relativistic corrections to the ``Newtonian'' radiation reaction potential of Burke and Thorne. The 1PN reaction potential involves both scalar and vectorial components, with the scalar component depending on the mass-type quadrupole and octupole moments of the system, and the vectorial component depending in particular on the current-type quadrupole moment. In the case of binary systems, the 1PN radiation reaction potential has been shown elsewhere to yield consistent results for the 3.5PN approximation in the binary's equations of motion. Adding up the effects of tails, the radiation reaction is then written to 1.5PN order. In this paper, we establish the validity to 1.5PN order, for general systems, of the balance equations relating the losses of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum in the system to the corresponding fluxes in the radiation field far from the system.

  7. Radiative-condensation instability in gravitating strongly coupled dusty plasma with polarization force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Bhakta, S.

    2015-06-01

    The radiative-condensation instability (RCI) in self-gravitating strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) is investigated considering the effects of dust thermal velocity and polarization force on the massive dust particulates. In particular, the outer core of the dense neutron star which is supposed to be strongly coupled in nature with temperature T˜107 K and number density n˜1.3×1030 cm-3 is analyzed. The modified generalized hydrodynamic (GH) equations and electron temperature perturbation equation with radiative effects are solved using the linear perturbation method. In the classical hydrodynamic limit, the modified condition of Jeans instability owing to radiative condensation, polarization force and dust thermal velocity is obtained. In the kinetic limit, velocity of compressional mode also modifies the condition of Jeans instability. The dust thermal velocity and viscoelastic effects have stabilizing whereas polarization force and radiative cooling have destabilizing influence on the growth rate of the Jeans instability. The radiative effects stabilize the growth rate of unstable radiative modes. In isobaric mode (short wavelength), the basic condition of radiative instability is obtained which is unaffected due to the presence of polarization force and viscoelastic effects. The radiative cooling time in the outer core of neutron star is estimated and compared with the gravitational free fall time, and it is found that the cooling takes place too fast for self-gravity to be important.

  8. Detection of cosmic rays using microwave radiation at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Luis, P. Facal; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Radiation in the microwave band has been measured in coincidence with the passage of a particle beam through a dedicated chamber. This radiation could provide a new technique for the study of ultra high energy cosmic rays, its main advantages being the possibility to instrument a large area with a detector sensitive to the mass compostion of cosmic rays, 100% duty cycle, virtually no atmospheric attenuation and the use of relatively cheap equipment. Cosmic ray detection in the GHz band is being actively pursued at the Pierre Auger Observatory with three different set-ups: MIDAS and AMBER are prototypes of an imaging radio-detector based on a parabolic dish reflector, while EASIER instruments the surface detector stations with a radio system of wide angular coverage. The status of microwave R&D activities at Auger, including the first event detected by EASIER, is reported.

  9. DETECTION OF IMBHs WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OBSERVATORIES: A BIOGRAPHY OF A BINARY OF BLACK HOLES, FROM BIRTH TO DEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Santamaria, LucIa E-mail: Lucia.Santamaria@aei.mpg.d

    2010-10-20

    Even though the existence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs; black holes with masses ranging between 10{sup 2} M{sub sun} and 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}) has not yet been corroborated observationally, these objects are of high interest for astrophysics. Our understanding of the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes, as well as galaxy evolution modeling and cosmography would dramatically change if an IMBH were to be observed. From the point of view of traditional photon-based astronomy, which relies on the monitoring of innermost stellar kinematics, the direct detection of an IMBH seems to be rather far in the future. However, the prospect of the detection and characterization of an IMBH has good chances in lower frequency gravitational-wave (GW) astrophysics using ground-based detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), Virgo, and the future Einstein Telescope (ET). We present an analysis of the signal of a system of a binary of IMBHs based on a waveform model obtained with numerical relativity simulations coupled with post-Newtonian calculations at the highest available order. IMBH binaries with total masses between 200 and 20,000 M{sub sun} would produce significant signal-to-noise ratios in Advanced LIGO and Virgo and the ET. We have computed the expected event rate of IMBH binary coalescences for different configurations of the binary, finding interesting values that depend on the spin of the IMBHs. The prospects for IMBH detection and characterization with ground-based GW observatories would not only provide us with a robust test of general relativity, but would also corroborate the existence of these systems. Such detections should allow astrophysicists to probe the stellar environments of IMBHs and their formation processes.

  10. A virtual radiation belt observatory: Looking forward to the electronic geophysical year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Green, J. C.; Kroehl, H. W.; Kihn, E.; Virbo Team

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new capabilities pursuing the major IGY objectives of collecting geophysical data as widely as possible and providing free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. A key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories. The worldwide scientific community has now endorsed and is promoting an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the 50th anniversary of the IGY in 2007-2008 and would provide a forward impetus to geophysics in the 21st century, similar to that provide by the IGY fifty years ago. The eGY concept advocates the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being deployed in cyberspace. We are developing the concept of a Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory (ViRBO) that will bring together near-earth particle and field measurements acquired by NASA, NOAA, DoD, DOE, and other spacecraft. We discuss plans to aggregate these measurements into a readily accessible database along with analysis, visualization, and display tools that will make radiation belt information available and useful both to the scientific community and to the user community. We envision that data from the various agencies along with models being developed under the auspices of the National Science Foundation Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) will help us to provide an excellent `climatology' of the radiation belts over the past several decades. In particular, we would plan to use these data to drive physical models of the radiation belts to form a gridded database which would characterize particle and field properties on solar-cycle (11-year) time scales. ViRBO will also provide up-to-date specification of conditions for event analysis and anomaly resolution. We are even examining the possibilities for near-realtime acquisition of

  11. Impact of gravitational radiation higher order modes on single aligned-spin gravitational wave searches for binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón Bustillo, Juan; Husa, Sascha; Sintes, Alicia M.; Pürrer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Current template-based gravitational wave searches for compact binary coalescences use waveform models that omit the higher order modes content of the gravitational radiation emitted, considering only the quadrupolar (ℓ,|m |)=(2 ,2 ) modes. We study the effect of such omission for the case of aligned-spin compact binary coalescence searches for equal-spin (and nonspinning) binary black holes in the context of two versions of Advanced LIGO: the upcoming 2015 version, known as early Advanced LIGO (eaLIGO) and its zero-detuned high-energy power version, which we will refer to as Advanced LIGO (AdvLIGO). In addition, we study the case of a nonspinning search for initial LIGO (iLIGO). We do this via computing the effectualness of the aligned-spin SEOBNRv1 reduced order model waveform family, which only considers quadrupolar modes, toward hybrid post-Newtonian/numerical relativity waveforms which contain higher order modes. We find that for all LIGO versions losses of more than 10% of events occur in the case of AdvLIGO for mass ratio q ≥6 and total mass M ≥100 M⊙ due to the omission of higher modes, this region of the parameter space being larger for eaLIGO and iLIGO. Moreover, while the maximum event loss observed over the explored parameter space for AdvLIGO is of 15% of events, for iLIGO and eaLIGO, this increases up to (39,23)%. We find that omission of higher modes leads to observation-averaged systematic parameter biases toward lower spin, total mass, and chirp mass. For completeness, we perform a preliminar, nonexhaustive comparison of systematic biases to statistical errors. We find that, for a given signal-to-noise ratio, systematic biases dominate over statistical errors at much lower total mass for eaLIGO than for AdvLIGO.

  12. Modeling the Spin Equilibrium of Neutron Stars in LMXBs Without Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the spin-equilibrium of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs. We demonstrate that, when combined with a naive spin-up torque, the observed data leads to inferred magnetic fields which are at variance with those of galactic millisecond radiopulsars. This indicates the need for either additional spin-down torques (eg. gravitational radiation) or an improved accretion model. We show that a simple consistent accretion model can be arrived at by accounting for radiation pressure in rapidly accreting systems (above a few percent of the Eddington accretion rate). In our model the inner disk region is thick and significantly sub-Keplerian, and the estimated equilibrium periods are such that the LMXB neutron stars have properties that accord well with the galactic millisecond radiopulsar sample. The implications for future gravitational-wave observations are also discussed briefly.

  13. Radiative degrees of freedom of the gravitational field in exact general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1981-12-01

    The radiative degrees of freedom of the gravitational field are isolated by analyzing the structure available at null infinity, JIt is shown thay they are coded in certain equivalence classes {D} of connections; all information about gravitational radiation can be extracted from the curvature tensors of these connections directly on J without any reference to the interior of space-time. The space of classical vacua—i.e., of {D} with trivial curvature—is analyzed. It is shown that the quotient ST/T of the BMS supertranslation group by its translation subgroup acts simply and transitively on this space. The available structure is compared with that of gauge theories. Since the entire discussion can be carried out onJ without any reference to the interior, it suggests a new approach to quantum gravity. This approach will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper.

  14. Relativistic astrophysics. [studies of gravitational radiation in asymptotic de sitter space and post Newtonian approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    The coordinate independence of gravitational radiation and the parameterized post-Newtonian approximation from which it is extended are described. The general consistency of the field equations with Bianchi identities, gauge conditions, and the Newtonian limit of the perfect fluid equations of hydrodynamics are studied. A technique of modification is indicated for application to vector-metric or double metric theories, as well as to scalar-tensor theories.

  15. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  16. Gravitational Radiation Reaction of Inspiralling Compact Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Michael E.; Will, Clifford M.

    1998-04-01

    We outline a technique for obtaining the spacetime metric and local equations of motion for compact binary systems to high post-Newtonian (PN) order. Our approach is based upon direct integration of the ``relaxed Einstein equations'' (DIRE) and casts its solution as a retarded flat-spacetime integral involving a non-compact source. Although mathematical ambiguities have accompanied similar approaches in the past, we obtain results manifestly free of divergences to high PN orders using a method first introduced by Will and Wiseman(C.M. Will and A.G. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. D 54), 4813 (1996).. To 3.5 PN ((v/c)^7 beyond Newtonian) order we calculate the radiation reaction terms in the equations of motion and compare our results with other treatments (B.R. Iyer and C.M. Will, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70), 113 (1993); Phys. Rev. D 52, 6882 (1995); L. Blanchet, Phys. Rev. D 47, 4392 (1993); ibid. 55 714 (1997). We discuss the status of obtaining the non-dissipative, 3PN terms in the equations of motion.

  17. Reducing spurious gravitational radiation in binary-black-hole simulations by using conformally curved initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2009-06-01

    At early times in numerical evolutions of binary black holes, current simulations contain an initial burst of spurious gravitational radiation (also called 'junk radiation') which is not astrophysically realistic. The spurious radiation is a consequence of how the binary-black-hole initial data are constructed: the initial data are typically assumed to be conformally flat. In this paper, I adopt a curved conformal metric that is a superposition of two boosted, non-spinning black holes that are approximately 15 orbits from merger. I compare junk radiation of the superposed-boosted-Schwarzschild (SBS) initial data with the junk of corresponding conformally flat, maximally sliced (CFMS) initial data. The SBS junk is smaller in amplitude than the CFMS junk, with the junk's leading-order spectral modes typically being reduced by a factor of order 2 or more.

  18. Detecting high-frequency gravitational waves with optically levitated sensors.

    PubMed

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2013-02-15

    We propose a tunable resonant sensor to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range of 50-300 kHz using optically trapped and cooled dielectric microspheres or microdisks. The technique we describe can exceed the sensitivity of laser-based gravitational wave observatories in this frequency range, using an instrument of only a few percent of their size. Such a device extends the search volume for gravitational wave sources above 100 kHz by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude, and could detect monochromatic gravitational radiation from the annihilation of QCD axions in the cloud they form around stellar mass black holes within our galaxy due to the superradiance effect.

  19. On the gravitational field of a radiating, isothermal perfect gas cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers a static isotropic self-gravitating perfect gas in the presence of thermal radiation. The gravitational field is specified in terms of the radiation and gas pressures. Assuming that the thermodynamic internal energy is small compared with relativistic rest energy, it is shown that the gas pressure satisfies the Lane-Emden equation; the assumption of dominant intrinsic relativistic rest energy is satisfied by the hottest stars. Six-solutions of the Lane-Enden equation are obtained together with the corresponding gravitational fields. The basis for comparison is the singular solution I decaying like the inverse square of the radius, that is the leading term of the asymptotic solution V. Two semi-linear solutions are obtained using as variables nonlinear functions of the gas pressure, leading to nonlinear second-order differential equations that can be linearized; one solution II holds for small radius and leads to zero, finite or infinite central pressure, and the other solution III holds asymptomatically and exhibits pressure oscillations. The singular solution I for large radius is matched to a power series solution IV for small radius leading to a solution valid for all radii. The asymptotic solutions III and V: (i) coincide in their common domain of validity; (ii) can be truncated with good accuracy leading to the solution VI.

  20. Gravitational radiation by point particle eccentric binary systems in the linearised characteristic formulation of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedeño Montaña, C. E.; de Araujo, J. C. N.

    2016-04-01

    We study a binary system composed of point particles of unequal masses in eccentric orbits in the linear regime of the characteristic formulation of general relativity, generalising a previous study found in the literature in which a system of equal masses in circular orbits is considered. We also show that the boundary conditions on the time-like world tubes generated by the orbits of the particles can be extended beyond circular orbits. Concerning the power lost by the emission of gravitational waves, it is directly obtained from the Bondi's News function. It is worth stressing that our results are completely consistent, because we obtain the same result for the power derived by Peters and Mathews, in a different approach, in their seminal paper of 1963. In addition, the present study constitutes a powerful tool to construct extraction schemes in the characteristic formalism to obtain the gravitational radiation produced by binary systems during the inspiralling phase.

  1. Gravitational time delay in orthogonally polarized radiation passing by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two parallel investigations into the degree, if any, to which orthogonally polarized rays are deflected differently on passing through the gravitational field of the sun were previously conducted. The first involved very long and intermediate length baseline radio interferometry. The second was initially based on observations of radiation transmitted by the Pioneer 6 spacecraft, on passing behind the sun in 1968. This work was extended by using Helios-A and Helios-B spacecraft. It was calculated that the differential deflection between orthogonally polarized components is less than one part in 10 to the 7th power of the total gravitational deflection, or less than about 10 to the -7th power arc sec, in total.

  2. Upper limits on a stochastic background of gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, J; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Buonanno, A; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; DeBra, D; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandar, S; Díaz, M; Di Credico, A; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ehrens, P; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Frey, R E; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Goda, K; Goggin, L; González, G; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, L; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Khan, A; Kim, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Luna, M; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, K; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, A; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J; Smith, M R; Spjeld, O; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; van Putten, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-11-25

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of omega0 < 8.4 x 10(-4) in the 69-156 Hz band is approximately 10(5) times lower than the previous result in this frequency range. PMID:16384203

  3. Gravitational radiation from a spinning compact object around a supermassive Kerr black hole in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wenbiao

    2010-10-15

    The gravitational waves and energy radiation from a spinning compact object with stellar mass in a circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole are investigated in this paper. The effect of how the spin acts on energy and angular moment fluxes is discussed in detail. The calculation results indicate that the spin of a small body should be considered in waveform-template production for the upcoming gravitational wave detections. It is clear that when the direction of spin axes is the same as the orbitally angular momentum ('positive' spin), spin can decrease the energy fluxes which radiate to infinity. For antidirection spin ('negative'), the energy fluxes to infinity can be enlarged. And the relations between fluxes (both infinity and horizon) and spin look like quadratic functions. From frequency shift due to spin, we estimate the wave-phase accumulation during the inspiraling process of the particle. We find that the time of particle inspiral into the black hole is longer for positive spin and shorter for negative compared with the nonspinning particle. Especially, for extreme spin value, the energy radiation near the horizon of the extreme Kerr black hole is much more than that for the nonspinning one. And consequently, the maximum binging energy of the extreme spinning particle is much larger than that of the nonspinning particle.

  4. Nonchaotic evolution of triangular configuration due to gravitational radiation reaction in the three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kei; Asada, Hideki

    2016-04-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication [H. Asada, Phys. Rev. D 80, 064021 (2009)], the gravitational radiation reaction to Lagrange's equilateral triangular solution of the three-body problem is investigated in an analytic method. The previous work is based on the energy balance argument, which is sufficient for a two-body system because the number of degrees of freedom (the semimajor axis and the eccentricity in quasi-Keplerian cases, for instance) equals that of the constants of motion such as the total energy and the orbital angular momentum. In a system with three (or more) bodies, however, the number of degrees of freedom is more than that of the constants of motion. Therefore, the present paper discusses the evolution of the triangular system by directly treating the gravitational radiation reaction force to each body. The perturbed equations of motion are solved by using the Laplace transform technique. It is found that the triangular configuration is adiabatically shrinking and is kept in equilibrium by increasing the orbital frequency due to the radiation reaction if the mass ratios satisfy the Newtonian stability condition. Long-term stability involving the first post-Newtonian corrections is also discussed.

  5. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of “Violin-Mode” resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level “Violin-Mode” (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent “noise-gain peaking” arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes’ two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup −1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  6. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  7. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. PMID:25430131

  8. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  9. Gravitational radiations of generic isolated horizons and nonrotating dynamical horizons from asymptotic expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-H.; Wang, C.-H.

    2009-09-15

    Instead of using a three-dimensional analysis on quasilocal horizons, we adopt a four-dimensional asymptotic expansion analysis to study the next order contributions from the nonlinearity of general relativity. From the similarity between null infinity and horizons, the proper reference frames are chosen from the compatible constant spinors for an observer to measure the energy-momentum and flux near quasilocal horizons. In particular, we focus on the similarity of Bondi-Sachs gravitational radiation for the quasilocal horizons and compare our results with Ashtekar-Kirshnan flux formula. The quasilocal energy-momentum and flux of generic isolated horizons and nonrotating dynamical horizons are discussed in this paper.

  10. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-01

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  11. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped. PMID:27367380

  12. Second post-Newtonian gravitational radiation reaction for two-body systems: Nonspinning bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopakumar, A.; Iyer, Bala R.; Iyer, Sai

    1997-05-01

    Starting from the recently obtained post-post-Newtonian (2PN) accurate forms of the energy and angular momentum fluxes from inspiraling compact binaries, we deduce the gravitational radiation reaction to 2PN order beyond the quadrupole approximation-4.5PN terms in the equation of motion-using the refined balance method proposed by Iyer and Will. We explore critically the features of their construction and illustrate them by contrast with other possible variants. The equations of motion are valid for general binary orbits and for a class of coordinate gauges. The limiting cases of circular orbits and radial infall are also discussed.

  13. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  14. Radiation pressure-driven galactic winds from self-gravitating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Thompson, Todd A.

    2012-08-01

    We study large-scale winds driven from uniformly bright self-gravitating discs radiating near the Eddington limit. We show that the ratio of the radiation pressure force to the gravitational force increases with height above the disc surface to a maximum of twice the value of the ratio at the disc surface. Thus, uniformly bright self-gravitating discs radiating at the Eddington limit are fundamentally unstable to driving large-scale winds. These results contrast with the spherically symmetric case, where super-Eddington luminosities are required for wind formation. We apply this theory to galactic winds from rapidly star-forming galaxies that approach the Eddington limit for dust. For hydrodynamically coupled gas and dust, we find that the asymptotic velocity of the wind is v∞≃ 1.5 vrot and that v∞∝ SFR0.36, where vrot is the disc rotation velocity and SFR is the star formation rate, both of which are in agreement with observations. However, these results of the model neglect the gravitational potential of the surrounding dark matter halo and a (potentially massive) old passive stellar bulge or an extended disc, which act to decrease v∞. A more realistic treatment shows that the flow can either be unbound or bound, forming a 'fountain flow' with a typical turning time-scale of tturn˜ 0.1-1 Gyr, depending on the ratio of the mass and radius of the rapidly star-forming galactic disc relative to the total mass and break (or scale) radius of the dark matter halo or bulge. We provide quantitative criteria and scaling relations for assessing whether or not a rapidly star-forming galaxy of given properties can drive unbound flows via the mechanism described in this paper. Importantly, we note that because tturn is longer than the star formation time-scale (gas mass/star formation rate) in the rapidly star-forming galaxies and ultraluminous infrared galaxies for which our theory is most applicable, if rapidly star-forming galaxies are selected as such, they may

  15. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  16. Collapsing objects with the same gravitational trajectory can radiate away different amount of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-07-01

    We study radiation emitted during the gravitational collapse from two different types of shells. We assume that one shell is made of dark matter and is completely transparent to the test scalar (for simplicity) field which belongs to the standard model, while the other shell is made of the standard model particles and is totally reflecting to the scalar field. These two shells have exactly the same mass, charge and angular momentum (though we set the charge and angular momentum to zero), and therefore follow the same geodesic trajectory. However, we demonstrate that they radiate away different amount of energy during the collapse. This difference can in principle be used by an asymptotic observer to reconstruct the physical properties of the initial collapsing object other than mass, charge and angular momentum. This result has implications for the information paradox and expands the list of the type of information which can be released from a collapsing object.

  17. Dynamic Universe Model predicts frequency shifting in electromagnetic radiation near gravitating masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, Dynamic Universe Model studies the light rays and other electromagnetic radiation passing grazingly near any gravitating mass. This change in frequency will depend on relative direction of movement between mass and radiation. Change in frequency depends on relative direction between ray and the Gravitating mass. Here in this paper we will mathematically derive the results and show these predictions. Dynamic Universe Model uses a new type of Tensor. There are no differential or integral equations here. No singularities and body to body collisions in this model. Many papers were published in USA and CANADA. See Dynamic Universe Model Blog for further details and papers Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step Keywords: Dynamic Universe Model, Hubble Space telescope (HST), SITA simulations , singularity-free cosmology,

  18. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (<5 Myr) of turbulent, 106 M⊙ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an initial mass function (IMF) with an efficiency of 20 per cent per free-fall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster particle formation efficiency by a few per cent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of cluster formation efficiencies of 37-71 per cent for the most unbound to the most bound model. The total number of clusters increases while the maximum mass cluster decreases with an increasing initial virial parameter, resulting in steeper mass distributions. The star formation rates in our cluster particles are initially consistent with observations but rise to higher values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  19. Gravitation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Muehlner, D. J.; Benford, R. L.; Owens, D. K.; Pierre, N. A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon measurements were made of the far infrared background radiation. The radiometer used and its calibration are discussed. An electromagnetically coupled broadband gravitational antenna is also considered. The proposed antenna design and noise sources in the antenna are reviewed. A comparison is made between interferometric broadband and resonant bar antennas for the detection of gravitational wave pulses.

  20. Accretion-driven gravitational radiation from nonrotating compact objects: Infalling quadrupolar shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Alessandro; Díaz, Guillermo; Pons, José A.; Font, José A.

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports results from numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation emitted from non-rotating compact objects (both neutron stars and Schwarzschild black holes) as a result of the accretion of matter. We adopt a hybrid procedure in which we evolve numerically, and assuming axisymmetry, the linearized equations describing metric and fluid perturbations coupled to a fully nonlinear hydrodynamics code that calculates the motion of the accreting matter. The initial matter distribution, which is initially at rest, is shaped in the form of extended quadrupolar shells of either dust or obeying a perfect fluid equation of state. Self-gravity of the accreting layers of fluid is neglected, as well as radiation reaction effects. We use this idealized setup in order to understand the qualitative features appearing in the energy spectrum of the gravitational wave emission from compact stars or black holes, subject to accretion processes involving extended objects. A comparison for the case of point-like particles falling radially onto black holes is also provided. Our results show that, when the central object is a black hole, the spectrum is far from having only one clear, monochromatic peak at the frequency of the fundamental quasi-normal mode. On the contrary, it shows a complex pattern, with distinctive interference fringes produced by the interaction between the infalling matter and the underlying perturbed spacetime, in close agreement with results for point-like particles. Remarkably, most of the energy is emitted at frequencies lower than that of the fundamental mode of the black hole. Similar results are obtained for extended shells accreting onto neutron stars, but in this case the contribution of the stellar fundamental mode stands clearly in the energy spectrum. Our analysis illustrates that the gravitational wave signal driven by accretion onto compact objects is influenced more by the details and dynamics of the process, and the external

  1. Mergers of Non-spinning Black-hole Binaries: Gravitational Radiation Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; vanMeter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from black-hole binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our primary goal is to present relatively complete information about the waveforms, including all the leading multipolar components, to interested researchers. In our analysis, we pursue the simplest physical description of the dominant features in the radiation, providing an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This interpretation applies uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We emphasize strong relationships among the l = m modes that persist through the full wavetrain. Exploring the structure of the waveforms in more detail, we conduct detailed analytic fitting of the late-time frequency evolution, identifying a key quantitative feature shared by the l = m modes among all mass-ratios. We identify relationships, with a simple interpretation in terms of the implicit rotating source, among the evolution of frequency and amplitude, which hold for the late-time radiation. These detailed relationships provide sufficient information about the late-time radiation to yield a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modeling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  2. Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes: Advances in the Perturbative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, C. O.

    2005-08-01

    After the work of Regge, Wheeler, Zerilli, Teukolsky and others in the 1970s, it became possible to accurately compute the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of two black holes (in the extreme-mass limit). It was soon evident that, to first perturbative order, a particle in a circular orbit would continue orbiting forever if the radiative corrections to the particle motion that make the orbit decay were not taken into account. When I entered the field in 1996, a quick search of the literature showed that this problem was still unsolved. A straightforward computation leads to infinities produced by the representation of the particle in terms of Dirac delta functions. Since 1938, when Dirac had solved the equivalent problem in electromagnetic theory, nobody had succeeded in regularizing this in a self-consistent manner. Fortunately, the solution was arrived at much sooner than we expected. In 1997, Mino, Sasaki and Tanaka, and Quinn and Wald published the equations of motion that a particle obeys after self-force corrections. This essentially gave birth to the field of radiation reaction/self-force computations. The aim of this programme is first to obtain the corrections to the geodesic motion of a particle in the background of a single black hole, and then to use this corrected trajectory to compute second-order perturbations of the gravitational field. This will give us the energy-momentum radiated to infinity and into the hole, as well as the waveforms that we will eventually be able to measure with ground- or space-based gravitational wave detectors. As mentioned, the programme as a whole will give us waveforms accurate to second perturbative order in the mass ratio of the black holes, i.e. Script O[(m/M)2]. This will be a good approximation for galactic binary black holes of the order of a few solar masses, in the right frequency range (few hundred Hertz) to be detected by ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO and VIRGO

  3. A historical fluence analysis of the radiation environment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and implications for continued radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePasquale, J. M.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Schwartz, D. A.

    2006-06-01

    Now in operation for over 6 years, the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has sampled a variety of space environments. Its highly elliptical orbit, with a 63.5 hr period, regularly takes the spacecraft through the Earth's radiation belts, the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath and into the solar wind. Additionally, the CXO has weathered several severe solar storms during its time in orbit. Given the vulnerability of Chandra's Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) to radiation damage from low energy protons, proper radiation management has been a prime concern of the Chandra team. A comprehensive approach utilizing scheduled radiation safing, in addition to both on-board autonomous radiation monitoring and manual intervention, has proved successful at managing further radiation damage. However, the future of autonomous radiation monitoring on-board the CXO faces a new challenge as the multi-layer insulation (MLI) on its radiation monitor, the Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument (EPHIN), continues to degrade, leading to elevated temperatures. Operating at higher temperatures, the data from some EPHIN channels can become noisy and unreliable for radiation monitoring. This paper explores the full implication of the loss of EPHIN to CXO radiation monitoring by evaluating the fluences the CXO experienced during 40 autonomous radiation safing events from 2000 through 2005 in various hypothetical scenarios which include the use of EPHIN in limited to no capacity as a radiation monitor. We also consider the possibility of replacing EPHIN with Chandra's High Resolution Camera (HRC) for radiation monitoring.

  4. Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes: Advances in the Perturbative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, C. O.

    2005-08-01

    After the work of Regge, Wheeler, Zerilli, Teukolsky and others in the 1970s, it became possible to accurately compute the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of two black holes (in the extreme-mass limit). It was soon evident that, to first perturbative order, a particle in a circular orbit would continue orbiting forever if the radiative corrections to the particle motion that make the orbit decay were not taken into account. When I entered the field in 1996, a quick search of the literature showed that this problem was still unsolved. A straightforward computation leads to infinities produced by the representation of the particle in terms of Dirac delta functions. Since 1938, when Dirac had solved the equivalent problem in electromagnetic theory, nobody had succeeded in regularizing this in a self-consistent manner. Fortunately, the solution was arrived at much sooner than we expected. In 1997, Mino, Sasaki and Tanaka, and Quinn and Wald published the equations of motion that a particle obeys after self-force corrections. This essentially gave birth to the field of radiation reaction/self-force computations. The aim of this programme is first to obtain the corrections to the geodesic motion of a particle in the background of a single black hole, and then to use this corrected trajectory to compute second-order perturbations of the gravitational field. This will give us the energy-momentum radiated to infinity and into the hole, as well as the waveforms that we will eventually be able to measure with ground- or space-based gravitational wave detectors. As mentioned, the programme as a whole will give us waveforms accurate to second perturbative order in the mass ratio of the black holes, i.e. Script O[(m/M)2]. This will be a good approximation for galactic binary black holes of the order of a few solar masses, in the right frequency range (few hundred Hertz) to be detected by ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO and VIRGO

  5. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  6. Measurement of a high electrical quality factor in a niobium resonator for a gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical quality factors of a 10-g niobium resonator were measured at 4.4 K and were found to be 8.1 x 10 to the 6th, and 3.8 x 10 to the 6th, respectively. The value for the electrical quality factor is high enough for a system operating at 50 mK at a sensitivity level of one phonon. The resonator's low damping properties make it suitable for use as a transducer for a cryogenic three-mode gravitational radiation detector. A practical design is given for the mounting of the resonator on a 2400-kg aluminum-bar detector. Projections are made for the sensitivity of a 2400-kg bar instrumented as a three-mode system with this resonator inductively coupled to a SQUID.

  7. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  8. Spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction of strain, news and gravitational radiation flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handmer, Casey J.; Szilágyi, Béla; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    We present a new approach for the Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) of gravitational radiation strain, news function, and the flux of the energy–momentum, supermomentum and angular momentum associated with the Bondi–Metzner–Sachs asymptotic symmetries. In CCE, a characteristic evolution code takes numerical data on an inner worldtube supplied by a Cauchy evolution code, and propagates it outwards to obtain the space–time metric in a neighborhood of null infinity. The metric is first determined in a scrambled form in terms of coordinates determined by the Cauchy formalism. In prior treatments, the waveform is first extracted from this metric and then transformed into an asymptotic inertial coordinate system. This procedure provides the physically proper description of the waveform and the radiated energy but it does not generalize to determine the flux of angular momentum or supermomentum. Here we formulate and implement a new approach which transforms the full metric into an asymptotic inertial frame and provides a uniform treatment of all the radiation fluxes associated with the asymptotic symmetries. Computations are performed and calibrated using the spectral Einstein code.

  9. Improving the science observing efficiency of the Chandra X-ray Observatory via the Chandra radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virani, Shanil N.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Cameron, Robert A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-02-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA's latest "Great Observatory", was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, with an apogee altitude of 120,000 km and a perigee altitude 20,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (≍ 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. Our earlier analysis (Virani et al, 2000) demonstrated that our implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 model (a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field) does not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. This led to a change in our operating procedure whereby we "padded" the start and end times of transit as determined by the AE-8 model by 10 ks so that ACIS, the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and the primary science instrument on-board Chandra, would not be exposed to the "fringes" of the Van Allen belts on ingress and egress for any given transit. This additional 20 ks per orbit during which Chandra is unable to perform science observations integrates to approximately 3 Ms of "lost" science time per year and therefore reduces the science observing efficiency of the Observatory. To address the need for a higher fidelity radiation model appropriate for the Chandra orbit, the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM) was developed. The CRM is an ion model for the outer magnetosphere and is based on data from the EPIC/ICS instrument on-board the Geotail satellite as well as data from the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on-board the Polar satellite. With the production and implementation of the CRM Version 2.3, we present the results of a study

  10. Improving the Science Observing Efficiency of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory via the Chandra Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virani, Shanil; Schwartz, Daniel; Cameron, Robert; Plucinsky, Paul; O'Dell, Stephen; Munow, Joseph; Blackwell, William

    2003-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA's latest "Great Observatory", was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (N 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. Our earlier analysis demonstrated that our implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 model (a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field) does not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. This led to a change in our operating procedure whereby we "padded" the start and end times of transit by 10 kiloseconds (ks) so that ACIS, the primary science instrument on-board Chandra, would not be exposed to the "fringes" of the Van Allen belts on ingress and egress for any given transit. This additional 20 ks per orbit during which Chandra is unable to perform science observations sums to approximately 3 Ms of "lost" science time per year and therefore reduces the science observing efficiency of the Observatory. To address the need for a higher fidelity radiation model appropriate for the Chandra orbit, the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM) was developed. The CRM is an ion model for the outer magnetosphere and is based on data from the EPIC/ICS instrument on-board the Geotail satellite as well as data from the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on-board the Polar satellite. With the production and Implementation of the CRM, we present the results of a study designed to investigate the science observing time that may be recovered by using the CRM as a function of the additional low

  11. Tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction: Time nonlocality and renormalization group evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.; Ross, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at the fourth post-Newtonian order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is nonlocal in time and features both a dissipative and a "conservative" term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet (UV) divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared (IR) singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit—shrinking the binary to a point—which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential and total mass/energy, and find agreement with the results obtained imposing the conservation of the (pseudo) stress-energy tensor in the radiation theory. While the calculation of the leading tail contribution to the effective action involves only one diagram, five are needed for the one-point function. This suggests logarithmic corrections may be easier to incorporate in this fashion. We conclude with a few remarks on the nature of these IR/UV singularities, the (lack of) ambiguities recently discussed in the literature, and the completeness of the analytic post-Newtonian framework.

  12. Study of cloud enhanced surface UV radiation at the atmospheric observatory of Southern Patagonia, Río Gallegos, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Elian A.; Salvador, Jacobo; Orte, Facundo; Bulnes, Daniela; D'Elia, Raul; Antón, Manuel; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Ozone and ultraviolet (UV) radiation are two important issues in the study of Earth's atmosphere. The anthropogenic perturbation of the ozone layer has induced change in the amount of UV radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, mainly through the Antarctic ozone hole. Also clouds have been identified as the main modulator of UV amount over short time scales. While clouds can decrease direct radiation, they can produce an increase in the diffuse component, and as a consequence the surface UV radiation may be higher than during an equivalent clear sky scenario. In particular this situation can be important when a low ozone column and partially cloud coverered skies occur simultaneously. These situations happen frequently in southern Patagonia, where the CEILAP Lidar Division has established the Atmospheric Observatory of Southern Patagonia, an atmospheric remote sensing site near the city of Río Gallegos (51°55'S, 69°14'W). In this paper, the impact of clouds on UV radiation is investigated by the use of ground based measurements from the passive remote sensing instruments operating at this site, mainly broad and moderate narrow band filter radiometers. Cloud modification factors (CMF, ratio between the measured UV radiation in a cloudy sky and the simulated radiation under cloud-free conditions) are evaluated for the study site. CMFs higher than 1 are found during spring and summer time, when lower total ozone columns, higher solar elevations and high cloud cover occur simultaneously, producing extreme erythemal irradiance at the ground surface. Enhancements as high as 25% were registered. The maximum duration of the enhancement was around 30 minutes. This produces dangerous sunbathing conditions for the Río Gallegos citizen.

  13. Terahertz calorimetry: an absolute power meter for terahertz radiation and the absorptivity of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope mirror coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, Tjeerd O.; Hovenier, J. Niels; Fischer, Jacqueline; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-04-01

    A new calorimetric absolute power meter has been developed for THz radiation. This broad band THz power meter measures average power at ambient temperature and pressure, does not use a window, and is insensitive to polarization and time structure of THz radiation. The operation of the power meter is based on the calorimetric method: in order to determine the power of a beam of THz radiation, the beam is used to illuminate a highly absorbing surface with known BRDF characteristics until a stable temperature is reached. The power in the incident beam can then be determined by measuring the electric power needed to cause the sample temperature rise. The new power meter was used with laser calorimetry to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 Kelvin to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit around the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. The absorptivity of both clean and dust-contaminated samples was measured at 70, 118, 184 and 496 mm and found to be in the range 0.2 - 0.8%.

  14. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  15. Analysis of Snow Albedo, Grain Size and Radiative Forcing based on the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Climate is expected to be most vulnerable in mountainous and arctic regions where the atmosphere and the hydrosphere are directly linked to the cryosphere. A combination of modeling and large-scale observational efforts is required to investigate related scientific questions. NASA's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory addresses some of these needs by establishing new quantitative observational capabilities in regional mapping of mountain snow properties. In addition, ASO's key products showed that we are able to achieve societal benefits by improving water resources management. We will show the first analysis of snow optical products (albedo, grain size, and radiative forcing) from the spring 2013 ASO campaign in the Sierra Nevada, CA, USA. In addition, we will present the retrieval methods used to derive these products based on airborne imaging spectroscopy, LiDAR, as well as radiative transfer models. The preliminary findings provide new important insights into the temporal and spatial aspects of Western US mountain snow and its melt.

  16. Magnetogasdynamic spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes, in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to power law. The radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model and the heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law for heat conduction. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. It is shown that an increase of the gravitational parameter or the Alfven-Mach number or the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas decreases the compressibility of the gas in the flow-field behind the shock, and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is formed at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of a flare produced shock in the solar wind, central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion etc. The solutions obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Haystack Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Radio astronomy programs comprise three very-long-baseline interferometer projects, ten spectral line investigations, one continuum mapping in the 0.8 cm region, and one monitoring of variable sources. A low-noise mixer was used in mapping observations of 3C273 at 31 GHz and in detecting of a new methyl alcohol line at 36,169 MHz in Sgr B2. The new Mark 2 VLBI recording terminal was used in galactic H2O source observations using Haystack and the Crimean Observatory, USSR. One feature in W29 appears to have a diameter of 0.3 millisec of arc and a brightness temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 15th power K. Geodetic baseline measurements via VLBI between Green Bank and Haystack are mutually consistent within a few meters. Radar investigations of Mercury, Venus, Mars, and the Moon have continued. The favorable opposition of Mars and improvements in the radar permit measurements on a number of topographic features with unprecedented accuracy, including scarps and crater walls. The floor of Mare Serenitatis slopes upward towards the northeast and is also the location of a strong gravitational anomaly.

  18. Simulating Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes Mergers as LISA Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the simulation of gravitational waves from Binary Massive Black Holes with LISA observations is shown. The topics include: 1) Massive Black Holes (MBHs); 2) MBH Binaries; 3) Gravitational Wavws from MBH Binaries; 4) Observing with LISA; 5) How LISA sees MBH binary mergers; 6) MBH binary inspirals to LISA; 7) Numerical Relativity Simulations; 8) Numerical Relativity Challenges; 9) Recent Successes; 10) Goddard Team; 11) Binary Black Hole Simulations at Goddard; 12) Goddard Recent Advances; 13) Baker, et al.:GSFC; 13) Starting Farther Out; 14) Comparing Initial Separation; 15) Now with AMR; and 16) Conclusion.

  19. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  20. Bianchi VI cosmological models representing perfect fluid and radiation with electric-type free gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Banerjee, S. K.

    1992-11-01

    A homogeneous Bianchi type VIh cosmological model filled with perfect fluid, null electromagnetic field and streaming neutrinos is obtained for which the free gravitational field is of the electric type. The barotropic equation of statep = (γ-1)ɛ is imposed in the particular case of Bianchi VI0 string models. Various physical and kinematical properties of the models are discussed.

  1. Gravitational wave luminosity and net momentum flux in head-on mergers of black holes: Radiative patterns and mode mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranha, Rafael Fernandes; Soares, Ivano Damião; Tonini, Eduardo Valentino

    2016-09-01

    We show that gravitational wave radiative patterns from a point test particle falling radially into a Schwarzschild black hole, as derived by Davis, Ruffini, Press and Price [M. Davis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 27, 1466 (1971).], are present in the nonlinear regime of head-on mergers of black holes. We use the Bondi-Sachs characteristic formulation and express the gravitational wave luminosity and the net momentum flux in terms of the news functions. We then evaluate the (-2 )-spin-weighted ℓ-multipole decomposition of these quantities via exact expressions valid in the nonlinear regime and defined at future null infinity. Our treatment is made in the realm of Robinson-Trautman dynamics, with characteristic initial data corresponding to the head-on merger of two black holes. We consider mass ratios in the range 0.01 ≤α ≤1 . We obtain the exponential decay with ℓ of the total energy contributed by each multipole ℓ, with an accurate linear correlation in the log-linear plot of the points up to α ≃0.7 . Above this mass ratio the contribution of the odd modes to the energy decreases faster than that of the even modes, leading to the breaking of the linear correlation; for α =1 the energy in all odd modes is zero. The dominant contribution to the total radiated energy comes from the quadrupole mode ℓ=2 corresponding, for instance, to about ≃84 % for small mass ratios up to ≃99.8 % for the limit case α =1 . The total rescaled radiated energy EWtotal/m0α2 decreases linearly with decreasing α , yielding for the point particle limit α →0 the value ≃0.0484 , about 5 times larger than the result of Davis et al. [1]. The mode decomposition of the net momentum flux and of the associated gravitational wave impulses results in an adjacent-even-odd mode-mixing pattern. We obtain that the impulses contributed by each (ℓ,ℓ+1 ) mixed mode also accurately satisfy the exponential decay with ℓ, for the whole mass ratio domain considered, 0.01 ≤α <1

  2. Gravitational radiation in black-hole collisions at the speed of light. I. Perturbation treatment of the axisymmetric collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'eath, P. D.; Payne, P. N.

    1992-07-01

    In this and the two following papers II and III we study the axisymmetric collision of two black holes at the speed of light, with a view to understanding the more realistic collision of two black holes with a large but finite incoming Lorentz factor γ. The curved radiative region of the space-time, produced after the two incoming impulsive plane-fronted shock waves have collided, is treated using perturbation theory, following earlier work by Curtis and Chapman. The collision is viewed in a frame to which a large Lorentz boost has been applied, giving a strong shock with energy ν off which a weak shock with energy λ<<ν scatters. This yields a singular perturbation problem, in which the Einstein field equations are solved by expanding in powers of λ/ν around flat space-time. When viewed back in the center-of-mass frame, this gives a good description of the regions of the space-time in which gravitational radiation propagates at small angles θ^ but a large distance from the symmetry axis, near each shock as it continues to propagate, having been distorted and deflected in the initial collision. The news function c0(τ^,θ^) describing the gravitational radiation is expected to have a convergent series expansion c0(τ^,θ^) =tsum∞n=0a2n(τ^)sin2nθ^, where τ^ is a retarded time coordinate. First-order perturbation theory gives an expression for a0(τ^) in agreement with that found previously by studying the finite-γ collisions. Second-order perturbation theory gives a2(τ^) as a complicated integral expression. A new mass-loss formula is derived, which shows that if the end result of the collision is a single Schwarzschild black hole at rest, plus gravitational radiation which is (in a certain precise sense) accurately described by the above series for c0(τ^,θ^), then the final mass can be determined from knowledge only of a0(τ^) and a2(τ^). This leads to an interesting test of the cosmic censorship hypothesis. The numerical calculation of a2(τ^) is

  3. The effect of radiation pressure on planar, self-gravitating H II regions and its neutral environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, J. C.; Raga, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We study the hydrostatic configuration of an isothermal gas layer surrounding a planar distribution of stars, in which the gravitational effects (due to the stars and the self-gravity of the gas) and the radiation pressure due to dust absorption and photoionization of H are important. We consider an infinite planar distribution, and derive a model for the vertical stratification. We obtain the density profiles of a photoionized gas layer, which is covered by a neutral region. We find that the solutions range between cases in which the photoionized layer extends to infinity, to cases in which the vertical extent of the photoionized layer is negligible in comparison with the characteristic height of the enclosing, neutral layer. We find that in cases with a significant dust content, the effect of the radiation pressure together with the self-gravity generates dense, narrow neutral layers in which further star formation might occur.

  4. Orbital Observatory GLAST - New Step in the Study of Cosmic Gamma Radiation: Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a overview of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now named Fermi Space Telescope. The new telescope is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2008. It contains the high energy gamma-ray telescope LAT (Large Area Telescope) and the GMB (GLAST Burst Monitor). The science objectives of GLAST cover almost every area of high energy astrophysics, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), including Extragalactic background light (EBL), Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), Pulsars, Diffuse gamma-radiation, EGRET unidentified sources, Solar physics, Origin of Cosmic Rays and, Dark Matter and New Physics. Also included in this overview is a discussion of the preparation to the analysis of the science data.

  5. Gravitational Radiation - a New Window Onto the Universe. (Karl Schwarzschild Lecture 1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    A summary is given of the current status and plans for gravitational-wave searches at all plausible wavelengths, from the size of the observable universe to a few kilometers. The anticipated scientific payoff from these searches is described, including expectations for detailed studies of black holes and neutron stars, high-accuracy tests of general relativity, and hopes for the discovery of exotic new kinds of objects.

  6. Low-Frequency Gravitational Radiation from Coalescing Massive Black Hole Binaries in Hierarchical Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, Alberto; Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero; Volonteri, Marta

    2004-08-01

    We compute the expected low-frequency gravitational wave signal from coalescing massive black hole (MBH) binaries at the center of galaxies in a hierarchical structure formation scenario in which seed holes of intermediate mass form far up in the dark halo ``merger tree.'' The merger history of dark matter halos and associated MBHs is followed via cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy from redshift z=20 to the present in a ΛCDM cosmology. MBHs get incorporated through halo mergers into larger and larger structures, sink to the center because of dynamical friction against the dark matter background, accrete cold material in the merger remnant, and form MBH binary systems. Stellar dynamical (three-body) interactions cause the hardening of the binary at large separations, while gravitational wave emission takes over at small radii and leads to the final coalescence of the pair. A simple scheme is applied in which the ``loss cone'' is constantly refilled and a constant stellar density core forms because of the ejection of stars by the shrinking binary. The integrated emission from inspiraling MBH binaries at all redshifts is computed in the quadrupole approximation and results in a gravitational wave background (GWB) with a well-defined shape that reflects the different mechanisms driving the late orbital evolution. The characteristic strain spectrum has the standard hc(f)~f-2/3 behavior only in the range f=10-9to10-6 Hz. At lower frequencies the orbital decay of MBH binaries is driven by the ejection of background stars (``gravitational slingshot''), and the strain amplitude increases with frequency, hc(f)~f. In this range the GWB is dominated by 109-1010 Msolar MBH pairs coalescing at 0<~z<~2. At higher frequencies, f>10-6Hz, the strain amplitude, as steep as hc(f)~f-1.3, is shaped by the convolution of last stable circular orbit emission by lighter binaries (102-107 Msolar) populating galaxy halos at all redshifts. We discuss the

  7. Influence of dust charge fluctuation and polarization force on radiative condensation instability of magnetized gravitating dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Bhakta, S.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of dust charge fluctuation, thermal speed and polarization force due to massive charged dust grains is studied on the radiative condensation instability (RCI) of magnetized self-gravitating astrophysical dusty (complex) plasma. The dynamics of the charged dust and inertialess electrons are considered while the Boltzmann distributed ions are assumed to be thermal. The dusty fluid model is formulated and the general dispersion relations are derived analytically using the plane wave solutions under the long wavelength limits in both the presence and the absence of dust charge fluctuations. The combined effects of polarization force, dust thermal speed, dust charge fluctuation and dust cyclotron frequency are observed on the low frequency wave modes and radiative modified Jeans Instability. The classical criterion of RCI is also derived which remains unaffected due to the presence of these parameters. Numerical calculations have been performed to calculate the growth rate of the system and plotted graphically. We find that dust charge fluctuation, radiative cooling and polarization force have destabilizing while dust thermal speed and dust cyclotron frequency have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability. The results have been applied to understand the radiative cooling process in dusty molecular cloud when both the dust charging and polarization force are dominant.

  8. Beyond Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: Beating the Quantum Limit with Squeezed States of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    After two decades of technology development, the first direct observation of gravitational waves appears to be imminent. Ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors world-wide are about to come back on-line after a major upgrade aimed to significantly improve their sensitivity. As these advanced detectors become a reality, the gravitational wave community is looking at new ways of further expanding their astrophysical reach. The quantum nature of light imposes a fundamental limit to the sensitivity that gravitational wave detectors can achieve, due to statistical fluctuations in the arrival time of photons at the interferometer output (shot noise) and the recoil of the mirrors due to radiation pressure noise. In this talk I will show how mature technology can be used to push interferometric precision measurement beyond the standard quantum limit by means of squeezed states of light, and current ideas on how to integrate this technology into the Advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO).

  9. Shuttle and Transfer Orbit Thermal Analysis and Testing of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Charge-Couple Device Imaging Spectrometer Radiator Shades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal analyses of the Shuttle and Transfer Orbit of the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), one of two science instruments on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, revealed a low-earth orbit (LEO) overheating problem on the goldized Kapton faces of two radiator shades. The shades were coated with the goldized Kapton to provide a low hemispherical emittance to minimize direct and backloaded heating from the sun and the observatory and high specularity to optimize the coupling to space on two passive radiators which cool the focal plane to -120 C +/- 1 C during on-orbit operations. Since the observatory has a highly elliptical final orbit of 10,000 kilometers by 140,000 kilometers and the ACIS radiators and shades are oriented anti-sun, the high solar absorptance to emittance ratio of the goldized Kapton was not an issue. However, during Shuttle bay-to-earth operations, the short duration solar heating occurring near the eclipse entry and exit resulted in shade temperatures in excess of the cure temperature of the adhesive used to bond the goldized Kapton and honeycomb face-sheets. The detailed thermal analysis demonstrating the LEO overheating as well as the redesign options and thermal testing of a redesigned development unit shade are presented.

  10. Nearly scale invariant spectrum of gravitational radiation from global phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Jones-Smith, Katherine; Krauss, Lawrence M; Mathur, Harsh

    2008-04-01

    Using a large N sigma model approximation we explicitly calculate the power spectrum of gravitational waves arising from a global phase transition in the early Universe and we confirm that it is scale invariant, implying an observation of such a spectrum may not be a unique feature of inflation. Moreover, the predicted amplitude can be over 3 orders of magnitude larger than the naive dimensional estimate, implying that even a transition that occurs after inflation may dominate in cosmic microwave background polarization or other gravity wave signals.

  11. High-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning with the Large Observatory for x-ray Timing (LOFT) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Smith, David M.; Brandt, Søren; Briggs, Michael S.; Budz-Jørgensen, Carl; Campana, Riccardo; Carlson, Brant E.; Celestin, Sebastien; Connaughton, Valerie; Cummer, Steven A.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fullekrug, Martin; Fuschino, Fabio; Gjesteland, Thomas; Neubert, Torsten; Østgaard, Nikolai; Tavani, Marco

    2015-04-01

    We explore the possible contributions of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT) mission to the study of high-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning. LOFT is a mission dedicated to X-ray timing studies of astrophysical sources, characterised by a very large effective area of about 8.5 square meters at 8 keV. Although the main scientific target of the mission is the fundamental physics of matter under extreme conditions, the peculiar instrument concept allows significant contributions to a wide range of other science topics, including the cross-disciplinary field of high-energy atmospheric physics, at the crossroad between geophysics, space physics and astrophysics. In this field we foresee the following major contributions: detect ˜ 700 Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) per year, probing the TGF intensity distribution at low fluence values and providing an unbiased sample of bright events thanks to the intrinsic robustness against dead-time and pile-up; provide the largest TGF detection rate surface density above the equator, allowing for correlation studies with lightning activity on short time scales and small regional scales, to probe the TGF / lightning relationship; lower by a factor ˜ 5 the minimum detectable fluence for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs), an additional tool to probe TGF production mechanism and the lower edge of TGF intensity distribution; open up a discovery space for the detection of high-altitude electron beams and weak X-ray emissions associated to Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). LOFT has been studied as a candidate ESA M3 mission during an extensive assessment phase. The high level of readiness and maturity of the mission, as well as the clean and solid assessment of its unique science case, make LOFT a competitive mission with a compelling science case. For this reason, its development has been continued, aiming at new launch opportunities.

  12. Interplanetary phase scintillation and the search for very low frequency gravitational radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Woo, R.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of radio-wave phase scintillation are reported which used the Viking spacecraft having an earth-spacecraft link very similar to that which will be used in very low-frequency (VLF) gravitational-wave searches. The phase power-spectrum level varies by seven orders of magnitude as the sun-earth-spacecraft (elongation) angle changes from 1 to 175 deg. It is noteworthy that a broad minimum in the S-band (2.3 GHz) phase fluctuation occurs in the antisolar direction; the corresponding fractional frequency stability (square root Allan variance) is about 3 x 10 to the -14th for 1000-s integration times. A simultaneous two-frequency two-station observation indicates that the contribution to the phase fluctuation from the ionosphere is significant but dominated by the contribution from the interplanetary medium. Nondispersive tropospheric scintillation was not detected (upper limit to fractional frequency stability about 5 x 10 to the -14th). Evidently, even observations in the antisolar direction will require higher radio frequencies, phase scintillation calibration, and correlation techniques in the data processing, for detection of gravitational bursts at the anticipated strain amplitude levels of no more than 10 to the -15th.

  13. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0-1.1 M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of non-rotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  14. Gravitational radiation and angular momentum flux from a slowly rotating dynamical black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Huei; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2011-04-15

    A four-dimensional asymptotic expansion scheme is used to study the next-order effects of the nonlinearity near a spinning dynamical black hole. The angular-momentum flux and energy flux formula are then obtained by constructing the reference frame in terms of the compatible constant spinors and the compatibility of the coupling leading-order Newman-Penrose equations. By using the slow rotation and small-tide approximation for a spinning black hole, the horizon cross-section we chose is spherical symmetric. It turns out the flux formula is rather simple and can be compared with the known results. Directly from the energy flux formula of the slow-rotating dynamical horizon, we find that the physically reasonable condition on requiring the positivity of the gravitational energy flux yields that the shear will monotonically decrease with time. Thus a slow-rotating dynamical horizon will asymptotically approach an isolated horizon during late time.

  15. THE BENEFITS OF VLBI ASTROMETRY TO PULSAR TIMING ARRAY SEARCHES FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, D. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2013-11-10

    Precision astrometry is an integral component of successful pulsar timing campaigns. Astrometric parameters are commonly derived by fitting them as parameters of a timing model to a series of pulse times of arrival (TOAs). TOAs measured to microsecond precision over spans of several years can yield position measurements with sub-milliarcsecond precision. However, timing-based astrometry can become biased if a pulsar displays any red spin noise or a red signal produced by the stochastic gravitational wave background. We investigate how noise of different spectral types is absorbed by timing models, leading to significant estimation biases in the astrometric parameters. We find that commonly used techniques for fitting timing models in the presence of red noise (Cholesky whitening) prevent the absorption of noise into the timing model remarkably well if the time baseline of observations exceeds several years, but are inadequate for dealing with shorter pulsar data sets. Independent of timing, pulsar-optimized very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is capable of providing position estimates precise to the sub-milliarcsecond levels needed for high-precision timing. In order to make VLBI astrometric parameters useful in pulsar timing models, the transformation between the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and the dynamical solar system ephemeris used for pulsar timing must be constrained to within a few microarcseconds. We compute a transformation between the ICRF and pulsar timing frames and quantitatively discuss how the transformation will improve in coming years. We find that incorporating VLBI astrometry into the timing models of pulsars for which only a couple of years of timing data exist will lead to more realistic assessments of red spin noise and could enhance the amplitude of gravitational wave signatures in post-fit timing residuals by factors of 20 or more.

  16. Carnegie Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Carnegie Observatories were founded in 1902 by George Ellery Hale. Their first facility was the MOUNT WILSON OBSERVATORY, located in the San Gabriel Mountains above Pasadena, California. Originally a solar observatory, it moved into stellar, galactic and extragalactic research with the construction of the 60 in (1.5 m), and 100 in (2.5 m) telescopes, each of which was the largest in the world...

  17. Joint approach for reducing eccentricity and spurious gravitational radiation in binary black hole initial data construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Szilágyi, Béla

    2013-10-01

    At the beginning of binary black hole simulations, there is a pulse of spurious radiation (or junk radiation) resulting from the initial data not matching astrophysical quasi-equilibrium inspiral exactly. One traditionally waits for the junk radiation to exit the computational domain before taking physical readings, at the expense of throwing away a segment of the evolution, and with the hope that junk radiation exits cleanly. We argue that this hope does not necessarily pan out, as junk radiation could excite long-lived constraint violation. Another complication with the initial data is that they contain orbital eccentricity that needs to be removed, usually by evolving the early part of the inspiral multiple times with gradually improved input parameters. We show that this procedure is also adversely impacted by junk radiation. In this paper, we do not attempt to eliminate junk radiation directly, but instead tackle the much simpler problem of ameliorating its long-lasting effects. We report on the success of a method that achieves this goal by combining the removal of junk radiation and eccentricity into a single procedure. Namely, we periodically stop a low resolution simulation; take the numerically evolved metric data and overlay it with eccentricity adjustments; run it through an initial data solver (i.e. the solver receives as free data the numerical output of the previous iteration); restart the simulation; repeat until eccentricity becomes sufficiently low; and then launch the high resolution “production run” simulation. This approach has the following benefits: (1) We do not have to contend with the influence of junk radiation on eccentricity measurements for later iterations of the eccentricity reduction procedure. (2) We reenforce constraints every time the initial data solver is invoked, removing the constraint violation excited by junk radiation previously. (3) The wasted simulation segment associated with the junk radiation’s evolution is

  18. Recent developments in the measurement of space time curvature. [resonant capacitor displacement sensor and multistage suspension system for gravitational radiation antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    Development of a highly sensitive resonant capacitor displacement sensor and a multistage suspension system for a low-temperature gravitational radiation antenna is discussed; the antenna is suitable for studying gravitational collapses. The sensitivity limit of the device is assessed as a function of preamplifier noise. Experiments indicate that an electric field of about 160,000 v/cm may be applied to the resonator surface without a significant increase in Brownian noise. Use of the resonant capacitor sensor with very high Q antennae is also considered.

  19. Convergence of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs: sensitivity to the implementation of radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. K. M.; Forgan, D. H.; Armitage, P. J.

    2012-02-01

    Recent simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs, carried out using a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code by Meru & Bate, have been interpreted as implying that three-dimensional global discs fragment much more easily than would be expected from a two-dimensional local model. Subsequently, global and local two-dimensional models have been shown to display similar fragmentation properties, leaving it unclear whether the three-dimensional results reflect a physical effect or a numerical problem associated with the treatment of cooling or artificial viscosity in SPH. Here, we study how fragmentation of self-gravitating disc flows in SPH depends upon the implementation of cooling. We run disc simulations that compare a simple cooling scheme, in which each particle loses energy based upon its internal energy per unit mass, with a method in which the cooling is derived from a smoothed internal energy density field. For the simple per particle cooling scheme, we find a significant increase in the minimum cooling time-scale for fragmentation with increasing resolution, matching previous results. Switching to smoothed cooling, however, results in lower critical cooling time-scales, and tentative evidence for convergence at the highest spatial resolution tested. We conclude that precision studies of fragmentation using SPH require careful consideration of how cooling (and, probably, artificial viscosity) is implemented, and that the apparent non-convergence of the fragmentation boundary seen in prior simulations is likely a numerical effect. In real discs, where cooling is physically smoothed by radiative transfer effects, the fragmentation boundary is probably displaced from the two-dimensional value by a factor that is only of the order of unity.

  20. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Silva, Hector; Berti, Emanuele; Sotani, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects such as neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories to test our understanding of the fundamental interactions in the regime of supranuclear densities, unachievable by terrestrial experiments. Despite recent progress, the description of matter (i.e., the equation of state) at such densities is still debatable. This translates into uncertainties in the bulk properties of neutron stars, masses and radii for instance. Here we will consider low-mass neutron stars. Such stars are expected to carry important information on nuclear matter near the nuclear saturation point. It has recently been shown that the masses and surface redshifts of low-mass neutron stars smoothly depend on simple functions of the central density and of a characteristic parameter η associated with the choice of equation of state. Here we extend these results to slowly-rotating and tidally deformed stars and obtain empirical relations for various quantities, such as the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love numbers, and rotational apsidal constants. We discuss how these relations might be used to constrain the equation of state by future observations in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra.

  1. Gravitational wave production by Hawking radiation from rotating primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruifeng; Kinney, William H.; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyze in detail a rarely discussed question of gravity wave production from evaporating primordial black holes. These black holes emit gravitons which are, at classical level, registered as gravity waves. We use the latest constraints on their abundance, and calculate the power emitted in gravitons at the time of their evaporation. We then solve the coupled system of equations that gives us the evolution of the frequency and amplitude of gravity waves during the expansion of the universe. The spectrum of gravitational waves that can be detected today depends on multiple factors: fraction of the total energy density which was occupied by primordial black holes, the epoch in which they were formed, and quantities like their mass and angular momentum. We conclude that very small primordial black holes which evaporate before the big-bang nucleosynthesis emit gravitons whose spectral energy fraction today can be as large as 10‑7.5. On the other hand, those which are massive enough so that they still exist now can yield a signal as high as 10‑6.5. However, typical frequencies of the gravity waves from primordial black holes are still too high to be observed with the current and near future gravity wave observations.

  2. Astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The layout and equipment of astronomical observatories, the oldest scientific institutions of human society are discussed. The example of leading observatories of the USSR allows the reader to familiarize himself with both their modern counterparts, as well as the goals and problems on which astronomers are presently working.

  3. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  4. Gravitational waves from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  5. Shuttle and Transfer Orbit Thermal Analysis and Testing of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory CCD Imaging Spectrometer Radiator Shades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Contents include the following: (1) Introduction: Chandra X-ray observatory. Advanced CCD imaging spectrometer. (2) LEO and transfer orbit analyses: Geometric modeling in TSS w/specularity. Low earth orbital heating calculations. (3) Thermal testing and LMAC. (4) Problem solving. (5) VDA overcoat analyses. (6) VDA overcoat testing and MSFC. (7) Post-MSFC test evaluation.

  6. Evidence for Orbital Decay of RX J1914.4+2456: Gravitational Radiation and the Nature of the X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RX J1914.4+2456 is a candidate double-degenerate binary (AM CVn) with a putative 569 s orbital period. If this identification is correct, then it has one of the shortest binary orbital periods known, and gravitational radiation should drive the orbital evolution and mass transfer if the binary is semi-detached. Here we report the results of a coherent timing study of the archival ROSAT data for RX J1914.4+2456. We performed a phase coherent timing analysis using all five ROSAT observations spanning a four-year period. We demonstrate that all the data can be phase connected, and we show that the 1.756 mHz orbital frequency is increasing at a rate of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -17) Hz/s consistent with the expected loss of angular momentum from the binary system via gravitational radiation. In addition to providing evidence for the emission of gravitational waves, our measurement of the orbital v(dot) constrains models for the X-ray emission and the nature of the secondary. If stable mass accretion drives the X-ray flux, then a positive v(dot) is inconsistent with a degenerate donor. A helium burning dwarf is compatible if indeed such systems can have periods as short as that of RX J1914.4+2456, an open theoretical question. Our measurement of a positive v(dot) is consistent with the unipolar induction model of Wu et al. which does not require accretion to drive the X-ray flux. We discuss how future timing measurements of RX J1914.4+2456 (and systems like it) with for example, Chandra and XMM-Newton, can provide a unique probe of the interaction between mass loss and gravitational radiation. We also discuss the importance of such measurements in the context of gravitational wave detection from space, such as is expected in the future with the LISA mission.

  7. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations as Tools for Testing General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2004-01-01

    We continued a project, to analyse the ways in which detection and study of gravitational waves could provide quantitative tests of general relativity, with particular emphasis on waves that would be detectable by space-based observatories, such as LISA. This work had three foci: 1) Tests of scalar-tensor theories of gravity that, could be done by analyzing gravitational waves from neutron stars inspiralling into massive black holes, as detectable by LISA; 2) Study of alternative theories of gravity in which the graviton could be massive, and of how gravitational-wave observations by space-based detectors, solar-system tests, and cosmological observations could constrain such theories; and 3) Study of gravitational-radiation back reaction of particles orbiting black holes in general relativity, with emphasis on the effects of spin.

  8. Study the Effects of Charged Particle Radiation on Gravitational Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Space-flight charging of free floating masses poses an unusual problem-- how can one control charge on the object without exerting a significant force on it? One approach is to make contact to the object with a fine wire. However, for many precision applications no physical contact is permissible, so charge must be conveyed in, a more sophisticated manner. One method has already been developed: Gravitational Probe B (GP-B) uses an ultraviolet photo-emission system described in ref 1. This system meets the experiment requirements, yet poses a number of constraints, including high power dissipation (approximately 10 W peak, approximately 1 W average), low current output (approximately 10(exp -13) A), and potential reliability problems associated with fiber optics system and the UV source. The aim of the current research is to improve this situation and, if possible, develop a more rugged and lower power alternative, usable in a wide range of situations. An potential alternative to the UV electron source is a Spindt-type field emission cathode. These consist of an array of extremely sharp silicon tips mounted in a standard IC package with provision for biasing them relative to the case potential. They are attractive as electron sources for space applications due to their low power consumption (10(exp -5) W), high current levels (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -5) A), and the absence of mechanical switching. Unfortunately, existing cathodes require special handling to avoid contamination and gas absorption. These contaminants can cause severe current fluctuations and eventual destruction of the cathode tips. Another potential drawback is the absence of any data indicating the possibility of bipolar current flow. This capability is needed because of the large uncertainties in the net charge transfer from cosmic rays to a free floating mass in space. More recent devices reduce the current fluctuations and destructive arcing by mounting the tips on a resistive substrate rather than

  9. NASA'S Great Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Why are space observatories important? The answer concerns twinkling stars in the night sky. To reach telescopes on Earth, light from distant objects has to penetrate Earth's atmosphere. Although the sky may look clear, the gases that make up our atmosphere cause problems for astronomers. These gases absorb the majority of radiation emanating from celestial bodies so that it never reaches the astronomer's telescope. Radiation that does make it to the surface is distorted by pockets of warm and cool air, causing the twinkling effect. In spite of advanced computer enhancement, the images finally seen by astronomers are incomplete. NASA, in conjunction with other countries' space agencies, commercial companies, and the international community, has built observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory to find the answers to numerous questions about the universe. With the capabilities the Space Shuttle provides, scientist now have the means for deploying these observatories from the Shuttle's cargo bay directly into orbit.

  10. Measurements of mechanical dissipation in high sound velocity materials: implications for resonant-mass gravitational radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, En-Ke; Zhou, C.; Mann, L.; Michelson, P. F.; Price, J. C.

    1991-07-01

    The sensitivity of resonant-mass gravitational radiation detectors depends on both the antenna cross-section and the detector noise. The cross-section is determined by the sound velocity vs and density ϱ of the antenna material, while the principal detector noise sources are thermal Nyquist noise and noise due to the readout electromechanical amplifier. The thermal noise is proportional to T/Q, where T is the temperature and Q is the antenna's mechanical quality factor. For a given frequency and antenna geometry, the cross-section is proportional to ϱ v5s. Thus the speed of sound and Q are important figures-of-merit in selecting the antenna material. Materials with high vs are available that in principle could provide about a hundred-fold increase in the cross-section of resonant-mass gravity wave detectors as compared to current generation detectors. In this Letter we report the results of measurements of the temperature-dependent mechanical losses associated with excitation of the fundamental longitudinal acoustic mode in several potentially suitable materials. We also discuss the impact that these materials could have on the sensitivity of resonant-mass detectors.

  11. Tartu Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Tartu Observatory (TO) is a research institution in Estonia accommodating the northernmost 1.5 m telescope in the world. It is located in Estonia, about 20 km south-west of Tartu in the village of Tõravere (58°16'08''.4 N, 26°27'32''.4 E). TO performs research in astrophysics and atmospheric physics and popularizes those branches of science. TO was founded in 1808 as an observatory of Tartu Unive...

  12. Taosi Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Taosi observatory is the remains of a structure discovered at the later Neolithic Taosi site located in Xiangfen County, Shanxi Province, in north-central China. The structure is a walled enclosure on a raised platform. Only rammed-earth foundations of the structure remained. Archaeoastronomical studies suggest that this structure functioned as an astronomical observatory. Historical circumstantial evidence suggests that it was probably related to the legendary kingdom of Yao from the twenty-first century BC.

  13. Gravitational and radiative effects on the escape of helium from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    On the moon, and probably on Mercury and other similar regolith-covered bodies with tenuous atmosphere, the dominant gas is He-4. It arises as the radiogenic product of the decay of uranium and thorium within any planet, but its major source appears to be the alpha particle flux of the solar wind. The moon intercepts solar wind helium at an average rate of 1.1 times 10 to the 24th atom/sec, and loses it at the same rate. Some helium may escape directly as the result of the process of solar wind soil bombardment which may release previously trapped helium at superthermal speeds. Atmospheric models have been calculated with the total helium influx as source. Subsequent comparison of model and measured helium concentrations indicates that the fraction of helium escaping via the atmosphere may range from 20% to 100% of the solar wind influx. Of the escaping atmosphere, most of the helium (about 93%) becomes trapped in earth orbit, while about 5% gets trapped in satellite orbits about the moon. Owing to a 6 month lifetime for helium in solar radiation, the satellite atoms form a lunar corona that exceeds the lunar atmosphere in total abundance by a factor of 4 to 5.

  14. Effect of neutral collision and radiative heat-loss function on self-gravitational instability of viscous thermally conducting partially-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Soni, Ghanshyam D.; Chhajlani, Rajendra K.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of thermal instability and gravitational instability is investigated for a partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations. We use normal mode analysis method in this problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Effects of collisions with neutrals, radiative heat-loss function, viscosity, thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength, on the instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the effect of various physical parameters on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. The temperature-dependent heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field and neutral collision have stabilizing effect, while density-dependent heat-loss function has a destabilizing effect on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. With the help of Routh-Hurwitz's criterion, the stability of the system is discussed.

  15. Keele Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Albinson, James; Bagnall, Alan; Bryant, Lian; Caisley, Dave; Doody, Stephen; Johnson, Ian; Klimczak, Paul; Maddison, Ron; Robinson, StJohn; Stretch, Matthew; Webb, John

    2015-08-01

    Keele Observatory was founded by Dr. Ron Maddison in 1962, on the hill-top campus of Keele University in central England, hosting the 1876 Grubb 31cm refractor from Oxford Observatory. It since acquired a 61cm research reflector, a 15cm Halpha solar telescope and a range of other telescopes. Run by a group of volunteering engineers and students under directorship of a Keele astrophysicist, it is used for public outreach as well as research. About 4,000 people visit the observatory every year, including a large number of children. We present the facility, its history - including involvement in the 1919 Eddington solar eclipse expedition which proved Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity - and its ambitions to erect a radio telescope on its site.

  16. Testing Modified Gravity with Gravitational-Wave Observations from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Yunes, Nicolas

    The inspiral of stellar compact objects into massive black holes sitting at galactic centers, usually known as extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs), is one of the most important sources of gravitational radiation for the future Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), an ESA-NASA mission. It is expected that LISA will determine the physical parameters of these sources with a high precision. These precise measurements open the possibility of making robust tests of the existence of black holes, of their geometry, and even of the gravitational interaction. In relation to this, intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) are also of interest to advance ground-based gravitational-wave observatories. In this talk, we discuss how modifications to the gravitational interaction can affect the signals emitted by EMRIs and the detectability of these modifications by LISA. To that end, we present results from an study of a particular modification of General Relativity (GR): Chern-Simons modified gravity, a theory that emerges in different quantum gravitational approaches and where spinning black holes have a geometry different from the Kerr geometry predicted by GR. References: C. F. Sopuerta and N. Yunes "Extreme and Intermediate-Mass Ratio Inspirals in Dynamical Chern-Simons Modified Gravity" Physical Review D80, 064006 (2009). e-Print: arXiv:0904.4501 [gr-qc

  17. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Koranda, S; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J H; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, G H; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger. PMID:26918975

  18. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderón; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. 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G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0 ×10-21. It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 σ . The source lies at a luminosity distance of 41 0-180+160 Mpc corresponding to a redshift z =0.0 9-0.04+0.03 . In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 3 6-4+5M⊙ and 2 9-4+4M⊙ , and the final black hole mass is 6 2-4+4M⊙ , with 3. 0-0.5+0.5M⊙ c2 radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  19. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    PubMed

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Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; 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Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Koranda, S; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J H; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, G H; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  20. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of pure gravitational radiation. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Pascual; Ehlers, Jürgen; Sachs, Rainer K.

    2013-12-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Pascual Jordan, Juergen Ehlers and Rainer Sachs, first published in 1961 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was part 2 of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (Parts 1 and 4 of the series have already been reprinted, parts 3 and 5 will be printed as Golden Oldies in near future.) This second paper discusses the geometry of geodesic null congruences, the algebraic classification of the Weyl tensor by spinor methods, and applies these to a study of the propagation of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. It has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for republication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. The republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A. H. MacCallum and Wolfgang Kundt.

  1. WNCC Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, L. F.

    2003-05-01

    Western Nevada Community College (WNCC), located in Carson City, Nevada, is a small two year college with only 6,000 students. Associate degrees and Cer- tificates of Achievement are awarded. The college was built and started classes in 1971 and about 12 years ago the chair of the physics department along with a few in administration had dreams of building a small observatory for education. Around that time a local foundation, Nevada Gaming Foundation for Education Excellence, was looking for a beneficiary in the education field to receive a grant. They decided an observatory at the college met their criteria. Grants to the foundation instigated by Senators, businesses, and Casinos and donations from the local public now total $1.3 million. This paper will explain the different facets of building the observatory, the planning, construction, telescopes and equipment decisions and how we think it will operate for the public, education and research. The organization of local volunteers to operate and maintain the observatory and the planned re- search will be explained.

  2. Monitoring the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Radiation Environment: Correlations between GOES-8 and Chandra/EPHIN, During DOY 89-106, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virani, S. N.; Cameron, R. A.; Pluchinsky, P. P.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; O'dell, S. L.

    2002-01-01

    The time period between DOY 89 (March 30) and DOY 106 (April 16), 2001 will likely be remembered as one of the most active time spans in this solar cycle. During this period of activity, the Sun unleashed many M and X-class solar flares. Two of which, an X20 and an X17, were amongst the largest solar flares recorded in the last 10 years. Indeed the sunspot group responsible for this activity, AR 9393, will also likely be recorded as the most active sunspot group of this solar cycle. The Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's latest "Great Observatory", was launched on July 23, 1999. The highly elliptical orbit of the CXO (perigee ~ 10,000 km, apogee ~ 140,000 km, 28.5 degree initial inclination) takes the satellite outside of the Earth's magnetosphere during a large fraction of the year. In this location, the CXO is directly exposed to the particles released during solar flares/CMEs, resulting in high background and possible damage to the science instruments. In this poster, we present data from the radiation monitor on-board the CXO, the EPHIN, as well as from the EPAM instrument on-board the ACE satellite (located at L1), and the SEM instrument on-board the GOES-8 satellite (in a geostationary, near-Earth orbit). In particular, we find a very strong correlation between the EPHIN P4 channel and the GOES-8 P2 channel; there is also a correlation between the EPHIN P41 channel and the GOES-8 P5 channel. These correlations allow the Science Operations Team of the CXO to better gauge the radiation environment of the CXO and to take preventive measures, such as suspending science and protecting the science instruments, when necessary.

  3. The Gravitational Universe - ESA's L3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido; Ando, Masaki; Binetruy, Pierre; Bouyer, Philippe; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Cruise, Mike; Favata, Fabio; Gehler, Martin; Genzel, Reinhard; Jennrich, Oliver; Kasevich, Mark; Klipstein, Bill; Perryman, Michael; Safa, Frederic; Schutz, Bernard; Stebbins, Robin; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Following the advice of ESA's Senior Survey Committee (SSC) the Science Programme Committee (SPC) decided in November 2013 to select the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for their L3 mission. The Director of Science and Robotic Exploration (D/SRE) has established a Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) to advise on the scientific and technological approaches for a gravitational wave observatory with a planned launch date in 2034. Our team is comprised of scientists from Europe and the US as well as scientists and engineers from ESA and observers from NASA and JAXA. We meet about every ten weeks, evaluate the technical readiness of all necessary technologies, study the science impact of different mission designs, and will advise ESA on the required future technology development. We will report on our progress and plans forward to a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. For JAXA.

  4. Models of Metal-poor Stars with Gravitational Settling and Radiative Accelerations. II. The Age of the Oldest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Richard, O.; Michaud, G.; Richer, J.

    2002-05-01

    Isochrones for ages between 12 and 18 Gyr have been derived from the evolutionary tracks presented in Paper I (Richard et al.) for masses from 0.5 to 1.0 Msolar and initial chemical abundances corresponding to (1) Y=0.2352, Z=1.69×10-4 ([Fe/H]=-2.31,[α/Fe]=0.3) and (2) Y=0.2370, Z=1.69×10-3 ([Fe/H=-1.31,[α/Fe]=0.3). These are the first models for Population II stars in which both gravitational settling and radiative accelerations have been taken into account. Allowance for these diffusive processes leads to a 10%-12% reduction in age at a given turnoff luminosity. However, in order for the diffusive models to satisfy the constraints from Li and Fe abundance data (see Paper I) and to reproduce the observed morphologies of globular cluster (GC) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) in a straightforward way, extra mixing just below the boundary of the convective envelope seems to be necessary. Indeed, when additional turbulent mixing is invoked, the resultant models are able to satisfy all of these constraints, as well as those provided by the CMDs of local subdwarfs, rather well. Moreover, they imply an age near 13.5 Gyr for M92, which is one of the most metal-deficient (and presumably one of the oldest) of the Galaxy's GCs, if the field subgiant HD 140283 is used to derive the cluster distance. Comparisons of field subdwarfs and subgiants with a recently published fiducial for M5 suggests that the cluster has [Fe/H]<~-1.4, in conflict with some estimates based on high-resolution spectroscopy, if the metallicities of the field stars are to be trusted. In addition, an age of ~11.5 Gyr is found for M5, irrespective of whether diffusive or nondiffusive isochrones are employed in the analysis. The implications of our results for the extragalactic distance scale and for the Hubble constant are briefly discussed in the context of the presently favored ΩM~0.35, ΩΛ~0.65 cosmological model.

  5. OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The description, development history, test history, and orbital performance analysis of the OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory are presented. The OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory was the sixth flight model of a series of scientific spacecraft designed to provide a stable platform for experiments engaged in the collection of solar and celestial radiation data. The design objective was 180 days of orbital operation. The OSO-6 has telemetered an enormous amount of very useful experiment and housekeeping data to GSFC ground stations. Observatory operation during the two-year reporting period was very successful except for some experiment instrument problems.

  6. Grand Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.

    2002-01-01

    Various concepts have been recently presented for a 100 m class astronomical observatory. The science virtues of such an observatory are many: resolving planets orbiting around other stars, resolving the surface features of other stars, extending our temporal reach back toward the beginning (at and before stellar and galactic development), improving on the Next Generation Space Telescope, and other (perhaps as yet) undiscovered purposes. This observatory would be a general facility instrument with wide spectral range from at least the near ultraviolet to the mid infrared. The concept espoused here is based on a practical, modular design located in a place where temperatures remain (and instruments could operate) within several degrees of absolute zero with no shielding or cooling. This location is the bottom of a crater located near the north or south pole of the moon, most probably the South Polar Depression. In such a location the telescope would never see the sun or the earth, hence the profound cold and absence of stray light. The ideal nature of this location is elaborated herein. It is envisioned that this observatory would be assembled and maintained remotely through the use of expert robotic systems. A base station would be located above the crater rim with (at least occasional) direct line-of-sight access to the earth. Certainly it would be advantageous, but not absolutely essential, to have humans travel to the site to deal with unexpected contingencies. Further, observers and their teams could eventually travel there for extended observational campaigns. Educational activities, in general, could be furthered thru extended human presence. Even recreational visitors and long term habitation might follow.

  7. Detectable gravitational waves from very strong phase transitions in the general NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Stephan J.; Konstandin, Thomas; Nardini, Germano; Rues, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    We study the general NMSSM with an emphasis on the parameter regions with a very strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT). In the presence of heavy fields coupled to the Higgs sector, the analysis can be problematic due to the existence of sizable radiative corrections. In this paper we propose a subtraction scheme that helps to circumvent this problem. For simplicity we focus on a parameter region that is by construction hidden from the current collider searches. The analysis proves that (at least) in the identified parameter region the EWPT can be very strong and striking gravitational wave signals can be produced. The corresponding gravitational stochastic background can potentially be detected at the planned space-based gravitational wave observatory eLISA, depending on the specific experiment design that will be approved.

  8. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  9. Testing Chern-Simons modified gravity with gravitational-wave detections of extreme-mass-ratio binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, Priscilla; Gair, Jonathan R.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2012-08-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRI) binaries, comprising a stellar-mass compact object orbiting around a massive black hole, is one of the main targets for low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors in space, like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) or evolved LISA/New Gravitational Observatory (eLISA/NGO). The long-duration gravitational-waveforms emitted by such systems encode the structure of the strong field region of the massive black hole, in which the inspiral occurs. The detection and analysis of EMRIs will therefore allow us to study the geometry of massive black holes and determine whether their nature is as predicted by general relativity and even to test whether general relativity is the correct theory to describe the dynamics of these systems. To achieve this, EMRI modeling in alternative theories of gravity is required to describe the generation of gravitational waves. However, up to now, only a restricted class of theories has been investigated. In this paper, we explore to what extent EMRI observations with a space-based gravitational-wave observatory like LISA or eLISA/NGO might be able to distinguish between general relativity and a particular modification of it, known as dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity. Our analysis is based on a parameter estimation study which uses approximate gravitational waveforms obtained via a radiative-adiabatic method. In this framework, the trajectory of the stellar object is modeled as a sequence of geodesics in the spacetime of the modified-gravity massive black hole. The evolution between geodesics is determined by flux formulae based on general relativistic post-Newtonian and black hole perturbation theory computations. Once the trajectory of the stellar compact object has been obtained, the waveforms are computed using the standard multipole formulae for gravitational radiation applied to this trajectory. Our analysis is restricted to a five

  10. On the road to discovery of relic gravitational waves: The TE and BB correlations in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Baskaran, D.; Grishchuk, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of primordial gravitational waves is one of the biggest challenges of the present time. The existing (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) observations are helpful in achieving this goal, and the forthcoming experiments (Planck) are likely to complete this mission. We show that the 5-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe TE data contain a hint of the presence of the gravitational wave contribution. In terms of the parameter R, which gives the ratio of contributions from gravitational waves and density perturbations to the temperature quadrupole, the best-fit model produced R=0.24. Because of large residual noises, the uncertainty of this determination is still large, and it easily includes the R=0 hypothesis. However, the uncertainty will be strongly reduced in the forthcoming observations which are more sensitive. We numerically simulated the Planck data and concluded that the relic gravitational waves with R=0.24 will be present at a better than 3σ level in the TE observational channel, and at a better than 2σ level in the “realistic” BB channel. The balloon-borne and ground-based observations may provide healthy competition for Planck in some parts of the lower-ℓ spectrum.

  11. Ice Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    blugerman, n.

    2015-10-01

    My project is to make ice observatories to perceive astral movements as well as light phenomena in the shape of cosmic rays and heat, for example.I find the idea of creating an observation point in space, that in time will change shape and eventually disappear, in consonance with the way we humans have been approaching the exploration of the universe since we started doing it. The transformation in the elements we use to understand big and small transformations, within the universe elements.

  12. Periodic gravitational waves from small cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubath, Florian; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2007-07-01

    We consider a population of small, high-velocity cosmic string loops. We assume the typical length of these loops is determined by the gravitational radiation scale and use the results of Polchinski and Rocha which pointed out their highly relativistic nature. A study of the gravitational wave emission from such a population is carried out. The large Lorentz boost involved causes the lowest harmonics of the loops to fall within the frequency band of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory detector. Because of this feature the gravitational waves emitted by such loops can be detected in a periodic search rather than in burst or stochastic analysis. It is shown that, for interesting values of the string tension (10-10≲Gμ≲10-8), the detector can observe loops at reasonably high redshifts and that detection is, in principle, possible. We compute the number of expected observations produced by such a process. For a 10 h search we find that this number is of order O(10-4). This is a consequence of the low effective number density of the loops traveling along the line of sight. However, small probabilities of reconnection and longer observation times can improve the result.

  13. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.; Mroue, A.

    2013-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such “hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass and unequal mass non-spinning binaries. We also explore the possibility of using these hybrid waveforms as a detection template bank for Advanced LIGO. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  14. NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.

    2009-12-20

    In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 5}4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

  15. Gravitational energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2005-12-01

    Observers at rest in a stationary spacetime flat at infinity can measure small amounts of rest-mass + internal energies + kinetic energies + pressure energy in a small volume of fluid attached to a local inertial frame. The sum of these small amounts is the total 'matter energy', EM, for those observers. If Mc2 is the total mass energy, the difference Mc2 - EM is the binding gravitational energy. Misner, Thorne and Wheeler (MTW) evaluated the gravitational energy of a spherically symmetric static spacetime. Here we show how to calculate gravitational energy in any static and stationary spacetimes with isolated sources with a set of observers at rest. The result of MTW is recovered and we find that electromagnetic and gravitational 3-covariant energy densities in conformastatic spacetimes are of opposite signs. Various examples suggest that gravitational energy is negative in spacetimes with special symmetries or when the energy momentum tensor satisfies usual energy conditions.

  16. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  17. Scalar Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-03-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degree of freedom in the extended effective field theory (EFT) of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. Linearized around flat space this quantum scalar degree of freedom combines with the conformal part of the metric and predicts the existence of scalar spin-0 ``breather'' propagating gravitational waves in addition to the transverse tensor spin-2 waves of classical General Relativity. Estimates of the expected strength of scalar gravitational radiation from compact astrophysical sources are given.

  18. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of gravitational radiation fields. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang; Trümper, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Wolfgang Kundt and Manfred Trümper, first published in 1962 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was the last of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (All the other parts of the series have already been re-published as Golden Oldies.) This fifth contribution summarizes key points of the earlier papers and applies them, in particular results from papers II and IV in the series, in the context of the propagation of gravitational radiation when matter is present. The paper has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A.H. MacCallum and by a brief autobiography of Manfred Trümper.

  19. Probing the size of extra dimensions with gravitational wave astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Kent; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-04-15

    In the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model, it has been conjectured, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, that a brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale l cannot be static, and it is dual to a four-dimensional BH emitting Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on l by performing Fisher analyses. We found that the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and the Big Bang Observatory (DECIGO/BBO) can give a stronger constraint than the current tabletop result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 10{sup 5} BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we find that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure l down to l=0.33 {mu}m for a 5 yr observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the tabletop experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to l=1.5 {mu}m due to strong degeneracies between l and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on l from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 141601 (2010)]. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  20. The challenge of detecting gravitational radiation is creating a new chapter in quantum electronics: Quantum nondemolition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, V. B.; Vorontsov, Y. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Future gravitational wave antennas will be approximately 100 kilogram cylinders, whose end-to-end vibrations must be measured so accurately (10 to the -19th power centimeters) that they behave quantum mechanically. Moreover, the vibration amplitude must be measured over and over again without perturbing it (quantum nondemolition measurement). This contrasts with quantum chemistry, quantum optics, or atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics where measurements are usually made on an ensemble of identical objects, and care is not given to whether any single object is perturbed or destroyed by the measurement. Electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements are described as well as the theory underlying them.

  1. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post) sup 5/2 -Newtonian order: Late-time evolution and gravitational radiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The late-time evolution of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) is studied using the Damour-Derueele (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian equations of motion with relativistic corrections of all orders up to and including radiation reaction. Using the method of close orbital elements from celestial mechanics, the author evolves the orbits to separations of r {approx} 2 m, where m is the total mass, at which point the (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian approximation breaks down. With the orbits as input, he calculates the gravitational waveform and luminosity using a post-Newtonian formalism of Wagoner and Will. Results are obtained for systems containing various combinations of compact objects, for various values of the mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}, and forg various initial values of the orbital eccentricity.

  2. Sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1989-01-01

    Sources of low frequency gravitational radiation are reviewed from an astrophysical point of view. Cosmological sources include the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei, the capture by such holes of neutron stars, the coalescence of orbiting pairs of giant black holes, and various means of producing a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the early universe. Sources local to our Galaxy include various kinds of close binaries and coalescing binaries. Gravitational wave astronomy can provide information that no other form of observing can supply; in particular, the positive identification of a cosmological background originating in the early universe would be an event as significant as was the detection of the cosmic microwave background.

  3. A New Multi-energy Neutrino Radiation-Hydrodynamics Code in Full General Relativity and Its Application to the Gravitational Collapse of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2016-02-01

    We present a new multi-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code for massive stellar core-collapse in full general relativity (GR). Employing an M1 analytical closure scheme, we solve spectral neutrino transport of the radiation energy and momentum based on a truncated moment formalism. Regarding neutrino opacities, we take into account a baseline set in state-of-the-art simulations, in which inelastic neutrino-electron scattering, thermal neutrino production via pair annihilation, and nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung are included. While the Einstein field equations and the spatial advection terms in the radiation-hydrodynamics equations are evolved explicitly, the source terms due to neutrino-matter interactions and energy shift in the radiation moment equations are integrated implicitly by an iteration method. To verify our code, we first perform a series of standard radiation tests with analytical solutions that include the check of gravitational redshift and Doppler shift. A good agreement in these tests supports the reliability of the GR multi-energy neutrino transport scheme. We then conduct several test simulations of core-collapse, bounce, and shock stall of a 15{M}⊙ star in the Cartesian coordinates and make a detailed comparison with published results. Our code performs quite well to reproduce the results of full Boltzmann neutrino transport especially before bounce. In the postbounce phase, our code basically performs well, however, there are several differences that are most likely to come from the insufficient spatial resolution in our current 3D-GR models. For clarifying the resolution dependence and extending the code comparison in the late postbounce phase, we discuss that next-generation Exaflops class supercomputers are needed at least.

  4. Gravitational wave detection in the laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. T.; Kawashima, N.; Othman, M.; Chia, S. P.; Karim, M.; Sanugi, B.; Lim, B. H.; Chong, K. K.

    1998-09-01

    After reviewing the research work of gravitational wave detection in the laboratory, particularly long base laser interferometer detectors, the authors report on the recent progress of gravitational wave detection using laser interferometer (Tianyin-100) in Malaysia. The authors also outline the brief plan for Tianyin-500 in the future as a full-scale observatory competitive to other projects such as Ligo, Geo600, etc.

  5. Gravitating Hopfions

    SciTech Connect

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    2015-12-15

    We construct solutions of the 3 + 1 dimensional Faddeev–Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat. They are characterized by a topological Hopf number. We investigate the dependence of the ADM masses of gravitating Hopfions on the gravitational coupling. When gravity is coupled to flat space solutions, a branch of gravitating Hopfion solutions arises and merges at a maximal value of the coupling constant with a second branch of solutions. This upper branch has no flat space limit. Instead, in the limit of a vanishing coupling constant, it connects to either the Bartnik–McKinnon or a generalized Bartnik–McKinnon solution. We further find that in the strong-coupling limit, there is no difference between the gravitating solitons of the Skyrme model and the Faddeev–Skyrme model.

  6. Gravitational waves and the death-dance of compact stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1996-05-01

    The completion of a network of advanced laser-interferometric gravitational-wave observatories (US LIGO and European VIRGO projects) around 2001 will make possible the study of the inspiral and coalescence of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), using gravitational radiation. To extract useful information from the waves, such as the masses and spins of the bodies, theoretical general relativistic gravitational waveforms will be used as templates, cross-correlated against the detector output, in a matched filtering process. Because the broad-band detectors will be very sensitive to the non-linearly evolving phase of the waves, the templates must be extremely accurate in their treatment of the gravitational back-reaction on the orbital frequency, probably as accurate as O[(v/c)^6] beyond the predictions of the quadrupole formula. This presents a major challenge to theorists. Recently, templates accurate to O[(v/c)^4] were obtained by two independent methods (L. Blanchet, T. Damour, B. R. Iyer, C. M. Will and A. G. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 3515 (1995), and extensions to O[(v/c)^5] and higher are in progress. We summarize one of these methods, which extends and improves an earlier framework due to Epstein and Wagoner (R. Epstein and R. V. Wagoner, Astrophys. J. 210), 764 (1975), in which Einstein's equations are recast as a flat spacetime wave equation with source comprised of matter confined to compact regions and gravitational non-linearities extending to infinity. The new method (C. M. Will and A. G. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. D, submitted), carried through O[(v/c)^4], is free of divergences or undefined integrals, correctly predicts all gravitational wave ``tail'' effects caused by backscatter of the outgoing radiation off the background curved spacetime, and yields radiation that propagates asymptotically along true null cones of the curved spacetime.

  7. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum. Keywords: Gravitational wave astrophysics; gravitational radiation; gravitational wave detectors; black holes.

  8. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas.

  9. RAY-TRACING ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPIC NEUTRINO RADIATION FOR ESTIMATING GRAVITATIONAL WAVES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kotake, Kei; Yamada, Shoichi

    2009-10-20

    We propose a ray-tracing method to estimate gravitational waves (GWs) generated by anisotropic neutrino emission in supernova cores. To calculate the gravitational waveforms, we derive analytic formulae in a useful form, which are applicable also for three-dimensional computations. Pushed by evidence of slow rotation prior to core-collapse, we focus on asphericities in neutrino emission and matter motions outside the protoneutron star. Based on the two-dimensional models, which mimic standing accretion shock instability (SASI)-aided neutrino heating explosions, we compute the neutrino anisotropies via the ray-tracing method in a post-processing manner and calculate the resulting waveforms. For simplicity, neutrino absorption and emission by free nucleons, dominant processes outside the protoneutron stars, are only taken into account, while the neutrino scattering and the velocity-dependent terms in the transport equations are neglected. With these computations, it is found that the waveforms exhibit more variety in contrast to the ones previously estimated by the ray-by-ray analysis. In addition to a positively growing feature, which was predicted to determine the total wave amplitudes predominantly, the waveforms are shown to exhibit large negative growth for some epochs during the growth of SASI. These features are found to stem from the excess of neutrino emission in lateral directions, which can be precisely captured by the ray-tracing calculation. Reflecting the nature of SASI which grows chaotically with time, there is little systematic dependence of the input neutrino luminosities on the maximum wave amplitudes. Due to the negative contributions and the neutrino absorptions appropriately taken into account by the ray-tracing method, the wave amplitudes become more than one order of magnitude smaller than the previous estimation, thus making their detections very hard for a Galactic source. On the other hand, it is pointed out that the GW spectrum from matter

  10. Comparing numerical and analytic approximate gravitational waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Nousha; Lovelace, Geoffrey; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A direct observation of gravitational waves will test Einstein's theory of general relativity under the most extreme conditions. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, began searching for gravitational waves in September 2015 with three times the sensitivity of initial LIGO. To help Advanced LIGO detect as many gravitational waves as possible, a major research effort is underway to accurately predict the expected waves. In this poster, I will explore how the gravitational waveform produced by a long binary-black-hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown is affected by how fast the larger black hole spins. In particular, I will present results from simulations of merging black holes, completed using the Spectral Einstein Code (black-holes.org/SpEC.html), including some new, long simulations designed to mimic black hole-neutron star mergers. I will present comparisons of the numerical waveforms with analytic approximations.

  11. On the gravitational redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2014-08-01

    The study of the gravitational redshift-a relative wavelength increase of ≈2×10-6 was predicted for solar radiation by Einstein in 1908-is still an important subject in modern physics. In a dispute whether or not atom interferometry experiments can be employed for gravitational redshift measurements, two research teams have recently disagreed on the physical cause of the shift. Regardless of any discussion on the interferometer aspect-we find that both groups of authors miss the important point that the ratio of gravitational to the electrostatic forces is generally very small. For instance, the ratio of the gravitational force acting on an electron in a hydrogen atom situated in the Sun’s photosphere to the electrostatic force between the proton and the electron in such an atom is approximately 3×10-21. A comparison of this ratio with the predicted and observed solar redshift indicates a discrepancy of many orders of magnitude. With Einstein’s early assumption that the frequencies of spectral lines depend only on the generating ions themselves as starting point, we show that a solution can be formulated based on a two-step process in analogy with Fermi’s treatment of the Doppler effect. It provides a sequence of physical processes in line with the conservation of energy and momentum resulting in the observed shift and does not employ a geometric description. The gravitational field affects the release of the photon and not the atomic transition. The control parameter is the speed of light. The atomic emission is then contrasted with the gravitational redshift of matter-antimatter annihilation events.

  12. Demagnified gravitational waves from cosmological double neutron stars and gravitational wave foreground cleaning around 1 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Naoki

    2009-11-15

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from cosmological double neutron star binaries (NS+NS) can be significantly demagnified by the strong gravitational lensing effect, and the proposed future missions such as the Big Bang Observer or Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory might miss some of the demagnified GW signals below a detection threshold. The undetectable binaries would form a GW foreground, which might hamper detection of a very weak primordial GW signal. We discuss the outlook of this potential problem, using a simple model based on the singular isothermal sphere lens profile. Fortunately, it is expected that, for a presumable merger rate of NS+NSs, the residual foreground would be below the detection limit {omega}{sub GW,lim}{approx}10{sup -16} realized with the Big Bang Observer/Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory by correlation analysis.

  13. Conservative, gravitational self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole in a radiation gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Abhay G.; Friedman, John L.; Price, Larry R.; Keidl, Tobias S.; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2011-03-15

    This is the second of two companion papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge; more precisely, the method uses a radiation gauge for the radiative part of the metric perturbation, together with an arbitrarily chosen gauge for the parts of the perturbation associated with changes in black-hole mass and spin and with a shift in the center of mass. In a test of the method delineated in the first paper, we compute the conservative part of the self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. The gauge vector relating our radiation gauge to a Lorenz gauge is helically symmetric, implying that the quantity h{sub {alpha}{beta}u}{sup {alpha}u{beta}} must have the same value for our radiation gauge as for a Lorenz gauge; and we confirm this numerically to one part in 10{sup 14}. As outlined in the first paper, the perturbed metric is constructed from a Hertz potential that is in a term obtained algebraically from the retarded perturbed spin-2 Weyl scalar, {psi}{sub 0}{sup ret}. We use a mode-sum renormalization and find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in L=l+1/2 to the large-L behavior of the expression for the self-force in terms of the retarded field h{sub {alpha}{beta}}{sup ret}; we similarly find the leading renormalization coefficients of h{sub {alpha}{beta}u}{sup {alpha}u{beta}} and the related change in the angular velocity of the particle due to its self-force. We show numerically that the singular part of the self-force has the form f{sub {alpha}}{sup S}=<{nabla}{sub {alpha}{rho}}{sup -1}>, the part of {nabla}{sub {alpha}{rho}}{sup -1} that is axisymmetric about a radial line through the particle. This differs only by a constant from its form for a Lorenz gauge. It is because we do not use a radiation gauge to describe the change in black-hole mass that the singular part of the self-force has no singularity along a radial line through the particle and, at least in this example, is spherically

  14. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falta, David; Fisher, Robert; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-05-01

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore—like SNe II—potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation.

  15. Gravitational lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of gravitational-lens phenomena are reviewed, and sample numerical data are presented in tables. Particular attention is given to luminous arcs, radio rings, galaxy-quasar associations, the problem of deriving actually or practically unique models of individual lens systems, and time delays and the Hubble constant.

  16. Methodological Gravitism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaman, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the case of the exchange marriage system to delineate a model of methodological gravitism. Such a model is not a deviation from or alteration to the existing qualitative research approaches. I have adopted culturally specific methodology to investigate spouse selection in line with the Grounded Theory Method. This…

  17. Gravitational Physics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational physics research at ISPAE is connected with NASA's Relativity Mission (Gravity Probe B (GP-B)) which will perform a test of Einstein's General Relativity Theory. GP-B will measure the geodetic and motional effect predicted by General Relativity Theory with extremely stable and sensitive gyroscopes in an earth orbiting satellite. Both effects cause a very small precession of the gyroscope spin axis. The goal of the GP-B experiment is the measurement of the gyroscope precession with very high precision. GP-B is being developed by a team at Stanford University and is scheduled for launch in the year 2001. The related UAH research is a collaboration with Stanford University and MSFC. This research is focussed primarily on the error analysis and data reduction methods of the experiment but includes other topics concerned with experiment systems and their performance affecting the science measurements. The hydrogen maser is the most accurate and stable clock available. It will be used in future gravitational physics missions to measure relativistic effects such as the second order Doppler effect. The HMC experiment, currently under development at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), will test the performance and capability of the hydrogen maser clock for gravitational physics measurements. UAH in collaboration with the SAO science team will study methods to evaluate the behavior and performance of the HMC. The GP-B data analysis developed by the Stanford group involves complicated mathematical operations. This situation led to the idea to investigate alternate and possibly simpler mathematical procedures to extract the GP-B measurements form the data stream. Comparison of different methods would increase the confidence in the selected scheme.

  18. The Boulder magnetic observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Finn, Carol A.; Pedrie, Kolby L.; Blum, Cletus C.

    2015-08-14

    The Boulder magnetic observatory has, since 1963, been operated by the Geomagnetism Program of the U.S. Geological Survey in accordance with Bureau and national priorities. Data from the observatory are used for a wide variety of scientific purposes, both pure and applied. The observatory also supports developmental projects within the Geomagnetism Program and collaborative projects with allied geophysical agencies.

  19. Gravitational radiation reaction in the equations of motion of compact binaries to 3.5 post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissanke, Samaya; Blanchet, Luc

    2005-03-01

    We compute the radiation-reaction force on the orbital motion of compact binaries to the 3.5 post-Newtonian (3.5PN) approximation, i.e. one PN order beyond the dominant effect. The method is based on a direct PN iteration of the near-zone metric and equations of motion of an extended isolated system, using appropriate 'asymptotically matched' flat-spacetime retarded potentials. The formalism is subsequently applied to binary systems of point particles, with the help of the Hadamard self-field regularization. Our result is the 3.5PN acceleration term in a general harmonic coordinate frame. Restricting the expression to the centre-of-mass frame, we find perfect agreement with the result derived in a class of coordinate systems by Iyer and Will using the energy and angular-momentum balance equations.

  20. Gravitational Lensing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  1. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  2. LISA in the gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John; Cornish, Neil

    2015-04-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves in the second half of this decade by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays, and with the launch of LISA Pathfinder in the summer of this year, this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. Recently, NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner. Both agencies formed a committee to advise them on the scientific and technological approaches for a space based gravitational wave observatory. The leading mission design, Evolved LISA or eLISA, is a slightly de-scoped version of the earlier LISA design. This talk will describe activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group (GWSIG) under the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG), focusing on LISA technology development in both the U.S. and Europe, including the LISA Pathfinder mission.

  3. Magnetar asteroseismology with long-term gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Ioka, Kunihito

    2011-04-15

    Magnetic flares and induced oscillations of magnetars (supermagnetized neutron stars) are promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs). We suggest that the GW emission, if any, would last longer than the observed x-ray quasiperiodic oscillations (X-QPOs), calling for longer-term GW analyses lasting a day to months, compared to current searches' durations. Like the pulsar timing, the oscillation frequency would also evolve with time because of the decay or reconfiguration of the magnetic field, which is crucial for the GW detection. With the observed GW frequency and its time-derivatives, we can probe the interior magnetic field strength of {approx}10{sup 16} G and its evolution to open a new GW asteroseismology with the next generation interferometers like the advanced laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory, the advanced Virgo gravitational wave detector at the European Gravitational Observatory, the Large-scale cryogenic gravitational wave telescope, and the Einstein telescope.

  4. Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Gravity bends light rays in a way analogous to, but quantitatively different from, the way it bends trajectories of passing particles. If light from some bright object passes close enough to some foreground mass, that object's image will be altered. The effect is more like a piece of bathroom glass in the sky than a precision-ground and well-focused lens, but the terms `gravitational lensing' or ...

  5. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Davidson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    SOFIA, (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) is a planned 2.5 meter telescope to be installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft and operated at altitudes from 41,000 to 46,000 feet. It will permit routine measurement of infrared radiation inaccessible from the ground-based sites, and observation of astronomical objects and transient events from anywhere in the world. The concept is based on 18 years of experience with NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), which SOFIA would replace.

  6. Experimental gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; di Virgilio, Angela

    2016-06-01

    100 years after the invention of General Relativity (GR) and 110 years after the development of Special Relativity (SR) we have to state that until now no single experiment or observation allows any doubt about the validity of these theories within the accuracy of the available data. Tests of GR can be divided into three categories: (i) test of the foundations of GR, (ii) tests of the consequences of GR, and (iii) test of the interplay between GR and quantum mechanics. In the first category, we have tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle and the structure of the Newton axioms, in the second category we have effects like the gravitational redshift, light defection, gravitational time delay, the perihelion shift, the gravitomagnetic effects as the Lense-Thirring and Schiff effect, and gravitational waves. Tests of the effects of gravity on quantum systems are a first step towards experiments searching for a quantum gravity theory. In this paper, we also highlight practical applications in positioning, geodesy, and the International Atomic Time. After 100 years, GR can now definitely be regarded also as practical and applied science.

  7. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a

  8. Gravitational-wave stochastic background from cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Siemens, Xavier; Mandic, Vuk; Creighton, Jolien

    2007-03-16

    We consider the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by a network of cosmic strings and assess their accessibility to current and planned gravitational wave detectors, as well as to big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background (CMB), and pulsar timing constraints. We find that current data from interferometric gravitational wave detectors, such as Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), are sensitive to areas of parameter space of cosmic string models complementary to those accessible to pulsar, BBN, and CMB bounds. Future more sensitive LIGO runs and interferometers such as Advanced LIGO and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be able to explore substantial parts of the parameter space. PMID:17501038

  9. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  10. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-10-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking's area theorem.

  11. Optical telescope system-level design considerations for a space-based gravitational wave mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-07-01

    The study of the Universe through gravitational waves will yield a revolutionary new perspective on the Universe, which has been intensely studied using electromagnetic signals in many wavelength bands. A space-based gravitational wave observatory will enable access to a rich array of astrophysical sources in the measurement band from 0.1 to 100 mHz, and nicely complement observations from ground-based detectors as well as pulsar timing arrays by sampling a different range of compact object masses and astrophysical processes. The observatory measures gravitational radiation by precisely monitoring the tiny change in the proper distance between pairs of freely falling proof masses. These masses are separated by millions of kilometers and, using a laser heterodyne interferometric technique, the change in their proper separation is detected to ~ 10 pm over timescales of 1000 seconds, a fractional precision of better than one part in 1019. Optical telescopes are essential for the implementation of this precision displacement measurement. In this paper we describe some of the key system level design considerations for the telescope subsystem in a mission context. The reference mission for this purpose is taken to be the enhanced Laser Interferometry Space Antenna mission (eLISA), a strong candidate for the European Space Agency's Cosmic Visions L3 launch opportunity in 2034. We will review the flow-down of observatory level requirements to the telescope subsystem, particularly pertaining to the effects of telescope dimensional stability and scattered light suppression, two performance specifications which are somewhat different from the usual requirements for an image forming telescope.

  12. Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Moniez, M.; Horne, K.; Street, R.

    2012-04-01

    Gravitational microlensing is a well established and unique field of time-domain astrophysics. For two decades microlensing surveys have been regularly observing millions of stars to detect elusive events that follow a characteristic Paczyński lightcurve. This workshop reviewed the current state of the field, and covered the major topics related to microlensing: searches for extrasolar planets, and studies of dark matter. There were also discussions of issues relating to the organisation of follow-up observations for microlensing, as well as serendipitous scientific outcomes resulting from extensive microlensing data.

  13. On the rotation of polarization by a gravitational lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, V.

    1993-05-01

    It is proved that the field of a gravitational lens induces no rotation in the polarization vector of electromagnetic radiation, in agreement with the previous literature, but with a different approach. The result is generalized to the case of less conventional gravitational lenses (static cosmic strings and gravitational waves).

  14. The Terzan 2 Cluster Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The dramatic change in x-ray emission from the Terzan 2 cluster is shown in this series of 2.5-minute exposures taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory immediately before, during, and after the burst. Total exposure (20 minutes) of the object, including the outburst, is shown in the fourth photograph. These images represent the first observation of an x-ray burst in progress. The actual burst lasted 50 seconds. Among the rarest, and most bizarre, phenomena observed by x-ray astronomers are the so-called cosmic bursters (x-ray sources that suddenly and dramatically increase in intensity then subside). These sudden bursts of intense x-ray radiation apparently come from compact objects with a diameter smaller than 30 miles (48 kilometers). Yet, despite their minuscule size, a typical x-ray burster can release more x-ray energy in a single brief burst than our Sun does in an entire week. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO was designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. Image of the Quasar 3C 273 Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This image is an observation of Quasar 3C 273 by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. It reveals the presence of a new source (upper left) with a red shift that indicates that it is about 10 billion light years away. Quasars are mysterious, bright, star-like objects apparently located at the very edge of the visible universe. Although no bigger than our solar system, they radiate as much visible light as a thousand galaxies. Quasars also emit radio signals and were previously recognized as x-ray sources. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2 was designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  17. The Detection of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Stefano; Fidecaro, Francesco

    The detection of gravitational waves is challenging researchers since half a century. The relative precision required, 10^{-21}, is difficult to imagine, this is 10^{-5} the diameter of a proton over several kilometres, using masses of tens of kilograms, or picometres over millions of kilometres. A theoretical description of gravitational radiation and its effects on matter, all consequence of the general theory of relativity, is given. Then the astrophysical phenomena that are candidates of gravitational wave emission are discussed, considering also amplitudes and rates. The binary neutron star system PSR1913+16, which provided the first evidence for energy loss by gravitational radiation in 1975, is briefly discussed. Then comes a description of the experimental developments, starting with ground-based interferometers, their working principles and their most important sources of noise. The earth-wide network that is being built describes how these instruments will be used in the observation era. Several other detection techniques, such as space interferometry, pulsar timing arrays and resonant detectors, covering different bands of the gravitational wave frequency spectrum complete these lectures.

  18. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Rideout, C.; Vanlew, K.

    1998-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction is nearly completed and first light is planned for fall 1998. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. That telescope has been in use for the past four years by up to 50 schools per month. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have applied for an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  19. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Sackett, C.

    1999-05-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction of the building and dome has been completed, and first light is planned for spring 1999. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have received an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  20. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2015-07-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at 0T > 16 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  1. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2015-07-16

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T>160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  2. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2015-07-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at 0T > 16 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  3. Chiral primordial gravitational waves from a Lifshitz point.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Soda, Jiro

    2009-06-12

    We study primordial gravitational waves produced during inflation in quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point proposed by Horava. Assuming power-counting renormalizability, foliation-preserving diffeomorphism invariance, and the condition of detailed balance, we show that primordial gravitational waves are circularly polarized due to parity violation. The chirality of primordial gravitational waves is a quite robust prediction of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point which can be tested through observations of cosmic microwave background radiation and stochastic gravitational waves.

  4. The Norwegian Naval Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Bjørn Ragnvald

    2007-07-01

    Archival material has revealed milestones and new details in the history of the Norwegian Naval Observatories. We have identified several of the instrument types used at different epochs. Observational results have been extracted from handwritten sources and an extensive literature search. These allow determination of an approximate location of the first naval observatory building (1842) at Fredriksvern. No physical remains exist today. A second observatory was established in 1854 at the new main naval base at Horten. Its location is evident on military maps and photographs. We describe its development until the Naval Observatory buildings, including archives and instruments, were completely demolished during an allied air bomb raid on 23 February 1945. The first director, C.T.H. Geelmuyden, maintained scientific standards at the the Observatory between 1842 and 1870, and collaborated with university astronomers to investigate, develop, and employ time-transfer by telegraphy. Their purpose was accurate longitude determination between observatories in Norway and abroad. The Naval Observatory issued telegraphic time signals twice weekly to a national network of sites, and as such served as the first national time-service in Norway. Later the Naval Observatory focused on the particular needs of the Navy and developed into an internal navigational service.

  5. INTERMAGNET and magnetic observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Chulliat, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic observatory is a specially designed ground-based facility that supports time-series measurement of the Earth’s magnetic field. Observatory data record a superposition of time-dependent signals related to a fantastic diversity of physical processes in the Earth’s core, mantle, lithosphere, ocean, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and, even, the Sun and solar wind.

  6. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  7. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  8. Einstein Observatory (HEAO-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, P.; Murdin, P.

    2002-04-01

    The second in the series of HIGH ENERGY ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORIES was launched by an Atlas-Centaur rocket on 13 November 1978. Soon after its insertion into a 470 km circular orbit inclined at 23.5° to the equator, HEAO-2 was named the Einstein Observatory, in celebration of the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth....

  9. The Space Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Odell, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    A convenient guide to the expected characteristics of the Space Telescope Observatory for astronomers and physicists is presented. An attempt is made to provide enough detail so that a professional scientist, observer or theorist, can plan how the observatory may be used to further his observing programs or to test theoretical models.

  10. Strasbourg's "Academy" observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André

    2011-08-01

    The observing post located on the roof of Strasbourg's 19th-century "Academy" is generally considered as the second astronomical observatory of the city: a transitional facility between the (unproductive) turret lantern at the top of the Hospital Gate and the German (Wilhelminian) Observatory. The current paper reviews recent findings from archives (blueprints, inventories, correspondence, decrees and other documents) shedding some light on this observatory of which virtually nothing was known to this day. While being, thanks to Chrétien Kramp (1760-1826), an effective attempt to establish an actual observatory equipped with genuine instrumentation, the succession of political regimes in France and the continual bidding for moving the university to other locations, together with the faltering of later scholars, torpedoed any significant scientific usage of the place. A meridian instrument with a Cauchoix objective doublet was however recovered by the German observatory and is still existing.

  11. Environmental effects on lunar astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Wetzel, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The Moon offers a stable platform with excellent seeing conditions for astronomical observations. Some troublesome aspects of the lunar environment will need to be overcome to realize the full potential of the Moon as an observatory site. Mitigation of negative effects of vacuum, thermal radiation, dust, and micrometeorite impact is feasible with careful engineering and operational planning. Shields against impact, dust, and solar radiation need to be developed. Means of restoring degraded surfaces are probably essential for optical and thermal control surfaces deployed in long-lifetime lunar facilities. Precursor missions should be planned to validate and enhance the understanding of the lunar environment (e.g., dust behavior without and with human presence) and to determine environmental effects on surfaces and components. Precursor missions should generate data useful in establishing keepout zones around observatory facilities where rocket launches and landings, mining, and vehicular traffic could be detrimental to observatory operation.

  12. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 in orbit. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978. The HEAO-2 was originally identified as HEAO-B but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  13. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  14. Electromagnetic waves propagation nearby rotating gravitating astrophysical object with atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Tereshin, A. A.; Fomin, I. V.; Chelnokov, M. B.; Kauts, V. L.; Gladysheva, T. M.; Bazleva, D. D.

    The aim of the article to explore the effects of gravitational lensing and attraction of electromagnetic radiation in the description of the propagation of radiation nearby the atmospheres of rotating astrophysical objects.

  15. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A. E.; VanLew, K.; Melsheimer, T.; Sackett, C.

    1999-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction of the dome and the remote control system has been completed, and the telescope is now on-line and operational over the Internet. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations have prioritized access to the telescope, and there are monthly opportunities for public viewing. In the future, the telescope will be open after midnight to world-wide use by schools following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. With funding from an IDEAS grant, we have begun teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  16. The Virtual Observatory: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    The concept of the Virtual Observatory arose more-or-less simultaneously in the United States and Europe circa 2000. Ten pages of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium: Panel Reports (National Academy Press, Washington, 2001), that is, the detailed recommendations of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the 2000 Decadal Survey in Astronomy, are dedicated to describing the motivation for, scientific value of, and major components required in implementing the National Virtual Observatory. European initiatives included the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory at the European Southern Observatory, the AstroGrid project in the United Kingdom, and the Euro-VO (sponsored by the European Union). Organizational/conceptual meetings were held in the US at the California Institute of Technology (Virtual Observatories of the Future, June 13-16, 2000) and at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany (Mining the Sky, July 31-August 4, 2000; Toward an International Virtual Observatory, June 10-14, 2002). The nascent US, UK, and European VO projects formed the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) at the June 2002 meeting in Garching, with yours truly as the first chair. The IVOA has grown to a membership of twenty-one national projects and programs on six continents, and has developed a broad suite of data access protocols and standards that have been widely implemented. Astronomers can now discover, access, and compare data from hundreds of telescopes and facilities, hosted at hundreds of organizations worldwide, stored in thousands of databases, all with a single query.

  17. Exploring Gravitational Waves in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; McLin, Kevin M.; Peruta, Carolyn; Simonnet, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    On September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) received the first confirmed gravitational wave signals. Now known as GW150914 (for the date on which the signals were received), the event represents the coalescence of two black holes that were previously in mutual orbit. LIGO’s exciting discovery provides direct evidence of what is arguably the last major unconfirmed prediction of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. The Education and Public Outreach group at Sonoma State University has created an educator's guide that provides a brief introduction to LIGO and to gravitational waves, along with two simple demonstration activities that can be done in the classroom to engage students in understanding LIGO’s discovery. Additional resources have also been provided to extend student explorations of Einstein’s Universe.

  18. Gravitational Wave Experiments - Proceedings of the First Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, E.; Pizzella, G.; Ronga, F.

    1995-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Notes on Edoardo Amaldi's Life and Activity * PART I. INVITED LECTURES * Sources and Telescopes * Sources of Gravitational Radiation for Detectors of the 21st Century * Neutrino Telescopes * γ-Ray Bursts * Space Detectors * LISA — Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for Gravitational Wave Measurements * Search for Massive Coalescing Binaries with the Spacecraft ULYSSES * Interferometers * The LIGO Project: Progress and Prospects * The VIRGO Experiment: Status of the Art * GEO 600 — A 600-m Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Antenna * 300-m Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detector (TAMA300) in Japan * Resonant Detectors * Search for Continuous Gravitational Wave from Pulsars with Resonant Detector * Operation of the ALLEGRO Detector at LSU * Preliminary Results of the New Run of Measurements with the Resonant Antenna EXPLORER * Operation of the Perth Cryogenic Resonant-Bar Gravitational Wave Detector * The NAUTILUS Experiment * Status of the AURIGA Gravitational Wave Antenna and Perspectives for the Gravitational Waves Search with Ultracryogenic Resonant Detectors * Ultralow Temperature Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors: Current Status of the Stanford Program * Electromechanical Transducers and Bandwidth of Resonant-Mass Gravitational-Wave Detectors * Fully Numerical Data Analysis for Resonant Gravitational Wave Detectors: Optimal Filter and Available Information * PART II. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Sources and Telescopes * The Local Supernova Production * Periodic Gravitational Signals from Galactic Pulsars * On a Possibility of Scalar Gravitational Wave Detection from the Binary Pulsars PSR 1913+16 * Kazan Gravitational Wave Detector “Dulkyn”: General Concept and Prospects of Construction * Hierarchical Approach to the Theory of Detection of Periodic Gravitational Radiation * Application of Gravitational Antennae for Fundamental Geophysical Problems * On

  19. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  20. Prototype optical SETI observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Stuart A.

    1996-06-01

    The Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (OSETI) is based on the premise that there are ETIs within our galaxy which are targeting star systems like our own with free-space beams. Upon these beams will ride attention- getting beacon signals and wideband data channels. Perhaps the wideband channels form part of a Galactic Information Superhighway, a Galactic Internet to which we are presently oblivious. The Columbus Optical SETI Observatory described in this paper is intended to be a prototype observatory which might lead to a new renaissance in both optical SETI and optical astronomy. It is hoped that the observatory design will be emulated by both the professional and amateur communities. The modern-day OSETI observatory is one that is more affordable than ever. With the aid of reasonably priced automatic telescopes, low-cost PCs, software and signal processing boards, Optical SETI can become accessible to all nations, professional scientific groups, amateur astronomy societies and even individuals.

  1. Global Health Observatory (GHO)

    MedlinePlus

    ... repository Reports Country statistics Map gallery Standards Global Health Observatory (GHO) data Monitoring health for the SDGs ... relevant web pages on the theme. Monitoring the health goal: indicators of overall progress Mortality and global ...

  2. Observatory Improvements for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Robert A.; Jensen, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a joint project between NASA and Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), the German Space Agency. SOFIA is based in a Boeing 747 SP and flown in the stratosphere to observe infrared wavelengths unobservable from the ground. In 2007 Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) inherited and began work on improving the plane and its telescope. The improvements continue today with upgrading the plane and improving the telescope. The Observatory Verification and Validation (V&V) process is to ensure that the observatory is where the program says it is. The Telescope Status Display (TSD) will provide any information from the on board network to monitors that will display the requested information. In order to assess risks to the program, one must work through the various threats associate with that risk. Once all the risks are closed the program can work towards improving the observatory.

  3. Gravitational memory, BMS supertranslations and soft theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The transit of a gravitating radiation pulse past arrays of detectors stationed near future null infinity in the vacuum is considered. It is shown that the relative positions and clock times of the detectors before and after the radiation transit differ by a BMS supertranslation. An explicit expression for the supertranslation in terms of moments of the radiation energy flux is given. The relative spatial displacement found for a pair of nearby detectors reproduces the well-known and potentially measurable gravitational memory effect. The displacement memory formula is shown to be equivalent to Weinberg's formula for soft graviton production.

  4. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Orr, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Lava from Kilauea volcano flowing through a forest in the Royal Gardens subdivision, Hawai'i, in February 2008. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitors the volcanoes of Hawai'i and is located within Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. HVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Kilauea and HVO at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  5. Twin mirrors for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Sassolas, Benoît; Benoît, Quentin; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Franc, Janyce; Galimberti, Massimo; Lacoudre, Aline; Michel, Christophe; Montorio, Jean-Luc; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational-wave detectors such as Virgo and the laser interferometric gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) use a long-baseline Michelson interferometer with Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms to search for gravitational waves. The symmetry between the two Fabry-Perot cavities is crucial to reduce the interferometer's sensitivity to the laser amplitude and frequency noise. To this purpose, the transmittance of the mirrors in both cavities should be as close as possible. This paper describes the realization and the characterization of the first twin large low-loss mirrors with transmissions differing by less than 0.01%. PMID:21532671

  6. Low-frequency gravitational-wave science with eLISA/NGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Aoudia, Sofiane; Babak, Stanislav; Binétruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohé, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J.; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-François; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N.; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T.; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Sesana, Alberto; Stebbins, Robin; Sumner, Tim; Vallisneri, Michele; Vitale, Stefano; Volonteri, Marta; Ward, Henry

    2012-06-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultra-compact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA’s high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  7. Low-Frequency Gravitational-Wave Science with eLISA/ NGO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Aoudia, Sofiane; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J.; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N.; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T.; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Stebbins, Robin; Vallisneri, Michele

    2011-01-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  8. Measurements of UV radiation on rotating vertical plane at the ALOMAR Observatory (69° N, 16° E), Norway, June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewski, P.; Krzyścin, J. W.; Jarosławski, J.; Stebel, K.

    2008-01-01

    Erythemaly weighted UV and total UVA irradiance measured at the ALOMAR (Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research; 69° N, 16° E) in June 2007 by two Kipp & Zonen UV broadband meters type, UV-S-AE-T, are examined. One unit is movable and mounted to rotating vertical plane, and the other is permanently fixed horizontally. The UV broadband meters measure simultaneously to allow the comparison of UV irradiances on vertical and horizontal plane. The entire range of relative exposure variations during clear-sky conditions over ALOMAR is examined using STAR and Radonic1 model (developed at the Meteorological Institute, Munich) for various action spectra (erythema, UVA, and vitamin D3). It seems that multiplication of the daily mean dose from a standard broadband meter placed horizontally by 0.5 gives reasonable estimation of the daily mean exposure on a vertical plane randomly oriented towards Sun. The extreme value and daily variability of relative exposure are the highest for UVA, next for UVB, then for vitamin D3 weighed UV irradiance. The minima of relative exposure (~0.20-0.30) are almost the same for all weighting functions. Specific cloud configuration could lead to significant enhancement of UV relative exposure of rotating plane being the most pronounced when biometer is in shadow. A statistical model is proposed, that it is able to simulate vitamin D3 weighted UV irradiances on vertical surface using explanatory variables: erythemal and total UVA irradiance from standard (horizontal) observations by Kipp & Zonen dual band biometer, the orientation of vertical plane, solar zenith angle, and column amount of total ozone. Statistical model will allow to reconstruct (or monitor) vitamin D3 weighted UV irradiances using available past (or actual) data.

  9. Measurements of UV radiation on rotating vertical plane at the ALOMAR Observatory (69° N, 16° E), Norway, June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewski, P.; Krzyścin, J. W.; Jaroslawski, J.; Stebel, K.

    2008-06-01

    Erythemaly weighted UV and total UV-A irradiance measured at the ALOMAR (Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research; 69° N, 16° E) in June 2007 by two Kipp & Zonen UV broadband meters type, UV-S-EA-T, are examined. One unit is mounted on rotating vertical plane and the other is permanently fixed horizontally. The UV broadband meters measure simultaneously to compare UV irradiances on vertical and horizontal planes. The entire range of such relative exposure variations during clear-sky and overcast conditions over ALOMAR in the period March June 2007 is examined using STAR and Radonic1 model (developed at the Meteorological Institute, University of Munich) for various action spectra: erythema, UV-A, and vitamin D3. The model and observations support that the daily means of relative exposures are quite stable, i.e., vary within the range 0.4 0.6 with the mean around 0.5 when the averaged intra-day, day-to-day, and seasonal changes of the relative erythemal exposures are considered. It seems that multiplication of the daily mean dose from a broadband meter placed horizontally by the factor of 0.5 gives reasonable estimation of the daily mean exposure on a vertically oriented receiver randomly oriented towards the Sun. The model studies during clear-sky conditions show that the extreme value and daily variability of relative exposure are the highest for UV-A, next for erythemal UV, then for vitamin D3 weighed UV irradiance. The minima of relative exposure (~0.20 0.30) are almost the same for all weighting functions. The comparison of model simulations and measurements suggests that specific cloud configuration could lead to significant enhancement of UV exposure of rotating receiver.

  10. Gravitational lens time delays and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A. Department of Astronomy Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Harari, D.D.; Surpi, G.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Using Fermat's principle, we analyze the effects of very long wavelength gravitational waves upon the images of a gravitationally lensed quasar. We show that the lens equation in the presence of gravity waves is equivalent to that of a lens with a different alignment between source, deflector, and observer in the absence of gravity waves. Contrary to a recent claim, we conclude that measurements of time delays in gravitational lenses cannot serve as a method to detect or constrain a stochastic background of gravitational waves of cosmological wavelengths, because the wave-induced time delay is observationally indistinguishable from an intrinsic time delay due to the lens geometry.

  11. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns.

  12. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3).

  13. The gravitational control for drag-free missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Valerio; Trenkel, Christian; Weber, William Joseph

    The suppression of the static gravitational field and field gradient due to the satellite is very important in gravitational missions that use free falling test-masses. Indeed the residual field needs to be balanced to some extent by applied electromagnetic force that invariably fluctuate in time, and both field and gradient convert the satellite motion into fluctuating forces on the test-masses. In LISA Pathfinder, the gravitational field on the test masses is estimated and balanced with sub-nano-g accuracy, by a control protocol based on measurements of the position and the mass of all parts that constitute the satellite, and on a finite element calculation tool. We describe the method, how the uncertainties on the mass and the position are propagated to the final results and the overall expected accuracy. We also discuss the relevance of the method for other gravitational missions, including space based gravitational wave observatories like eLISA.

  14. Creating Griffith Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Griffith Observatory has been the iconic symbol of the sky for southern California since it began its public mission on May 15, 1935. While the Observatory is widely known as being the gift of Col. Griffith J. Griffith (1850-1919), the story of how Griffith’s gift became reality involves many of the people better known for other contributions that made Los Angeles area an important center of astrophysics in the 20th century. Griffith began drawing up his plans for an observatory and science museum for the people of Los Angeles after looking at Saturn through the newly completed 60-inch reflector on Mt. Wilson. He realized the social impact that viewing the heavens could have if made freely available, and discussing the idea of a public observatory with Mt. Wilson Observatory’s founder, George Ellery Hale, and Director, Walter Adams. This resulted, in 1916, in a will specifying many of the features of Griffith Observatory, and establishing a committee managed trust fund to build it. Astronomy popularizer Mars Baumgardt convinced the committee at the Zeiss Planetarium projector would be appropriate for Griffith’s project after the planetarium was introduced in Germany in 1923. In 1930, the trust committee judged funds to be sufficient to start work on creating Griffith Observatory, and letters from the Committee requesting help in realizing the project were sent to Hale, Adams, Robert Millikan, and other area experts then engaged in creating the 200-inch telescope eventually destined for Palomar Mountain. A Scientific Advisory Committee, headed by Millikan, recommended that Caltech Physicist Edward Kurth be put in charge of building and exhibit design. Kurth, in turn, sought help from artist Russell Porter. The architecture firm of John C. Austin and Fredrick Ashley was selected to design the project, and they adopted the designs of Porter and Kurth. Philip Fox of the Adler Planetarium was enlisted to manage the completion of the Observatory and become its

  15. Earth Atmosphere Observatory Formation at L2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Acikmese, A. Behcet; Breckenridge, William G.; Mecenka, Steven A.; Tubbs, Eldred F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a product of research supported by NASA under RASC (the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts) program. It presents an overall system architecture, and covers issues of deployment, navigation, and control related to a formation of two spacecraft in the neighborhood of the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point (on the Sun-Earth line), that serves as an observatory of Earth's atmosphere. The observatory concept definition study was a multi-center NASA effort conducted in 2003, and covered a much wider scope than is presented in this focused paper.The Earth observatory at L2 is a unique design concept that can improve the knowledge and understanding of dynamic, chemical and radiative mechanisms that cause changes in the atmosphere, and can lead to the development of models and techniques to predict short and long-term climate changes.

  16. Gravitational waves from self-ordering scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fenu, Elisa; Durrer, Ruth; Figueroa, Daniel G.; García-Bellido, Juan E-mail: daniel.figueroa@uam.es E-mail: juan.garciabellido@uam.es

    2009-10-01

    Gravitational waves were copiously produced in the early Universe whenever the processes taking place were sufficiently violent. The spectra of several of these gravitational wave backgrounds on subhorizon scales have been extensively studied in the literature. In this paper we analyze the shape and amplitude of the gravitational wave spectrum on scales which are superhorizon at the time of production. Such gravitational waves are expected from the self ordering of randomly oriented scalar fields which can be present during a thermal phase transition or during preheating after hybrid inflation. We find that, if the gravitational wave source acts only during a small fraction of the Hubble time, the gravitational wave spectrum at frequencies lower than the expansion rate at the time of production behaves as Ω{sub GW}(f) ∝ f{sup 3} with an amplitude much too small to be observable by gravitational wave observatories like LIGO, LISA or BBO. On the other hand, if the source is active for a much longer time, until a given mode which is initially superhorizon (kη{sub *} << 1), enters the horizon, for kη ∼> 1, we find that the gravitational wave energy density is frequency independent, i.e. scale invariant. Moreover, its amplitude for a GUT scale scenario turns out to be within the range and sensitivity of BBO and marginally detectable by LIGO and LISA. This new gravitational wave background can compete with the one generated during inflation, and distinguishing both may require extra information.

  17. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This illustration is a schematic of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 and its experiments. It shows the focal plane instruments (at the right) plus the associated electronics for operating the telescope as it transmitted its observations to the ground. A fifth instrument, the Monitor Proportional Counter, is located near the front of the telescope. Four separate astronomical instruments are located at the focus of this telescope and they could be interchanged for different types of observations as the observatory pointed at interesting areas of the Sky. Two of these instruments produced images; a High Resolution Imaging Detector and an Imaging Proportional Counter. The other two instruments, the Solid State Spectrometer and the Crystal Spectrometer, measured the spectra of x-ray objects. A fifth instrument, the Monitor Proportional Counter, continuously viewed space independently to study a wider band of x-ray wavelengths and to examine the rapid time variations in the sources. The HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978. The HEAO-2 was originally identified as HEAO-B but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  18. Iranian National Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroshahi, H. G.; Danesh, A.; Molaeinezhad, A.

    2016-09-01

    The Iranian National Observatory is under construction at an altitude of 3600m at Gargash summit 300km southern Tehran. The site selection was concluded in 2007 and the site monitoring activities have begun since then, which indicates a high quality of the site with a median seeing of 0.7 arcsec through the year. One of the major observing facilities of the observatory is a 3.4m Alt-Az Ritchey-Chretien optical telescope which is currently under design. This f/11 telescope will be equipped with high resolution medium-wide field imaging cameras as well as medium and high resolution spectrographs. In this review, I will give an overview of astronomy research and education in Iran. Then I will go through the past and present activities of the Iranian National Observatory project including the site quality, telescope specifications and instrument capabilities.

  19. The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, N.; Freeland, S.; Cheung, M.; Bose, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory (CHO) would provide a robust framework and enabling tools to fully utilize the VOs for scientific discovery and collaboration. Scientists across the realm of heliophysics would be able to create, use and share applications -- either as services using familiar tools or through intuitive workflows -- that orchestrate access to data across all virtual observatories. These applications can be shared freely knowing that proper recognition of data and processing components are acknowledged; that erroneous use of data is flagged; and that results from the analysis runs will in themselves be shared Ð all in a transparent and automatic fashion. In addition, the CHO would incorporate cross-VO models and tools to weave the various virtual observatories into a unified system. These provide starting points for interactions across the solar/heliospheric and heliospheric/magnetospheric boundaries.

  20. Gravitation in Material Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium…

  1. Detecting stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    For the past decade the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with two other international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA, as well as our sensitivity to stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves. I will show that a detection of the background produced by supermassive black hole binaries is possible by the end of the decade. Supported by the NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center.

  2. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  3. Arecibo Observatory for All

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidro, Gloria M.; Pantoja, C. A.; Bartus, P.; La Rosa, C.

    2006-12-01

    We describe new materials available at Arecibo Observatory for visitors with visual impairments. These materials include a guide in Braille that describes the telescope, some basic terms used in radio astronomy and frequently asked questions. We have also designed a tactile model of the telescope. We are interested that blind visitors can participate of the excitement of the visit to the worlds largest radio telescope. We would like to thank the "Fundacion Comunitaria de Puerto Rico" for the scholarship that allowed GMI to work on this project. We would like to express our gratitude to the Arecibo Observatory/NAIC for their support.

  4. WFIRST Observatory Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    The WFIRST observatory will be a powerful and flexible wide-field near-infrared facility. The planned surveys will provide data applicable to an enormous variety of astrophysical science. This presentation will provide a description of the observatory and its performance characteristics. This will include a discussion of the point spread function, signal-to-noise budgets for representative observing scenarios and the corresponding limiting sensitivity. Emphasis will be given to providing prospective Guest Observers with information needed to begin thinking about new observing programs.

  5. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  6. Long Valley Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Hill, David

    2008-01-01

    The ~300-year-old lava on Paoha Island in Mono Lake was produced by the most recent eruption in the Long Valley Caldera area in east-central California. The Long Valley Caldera was formed by a massive volcanic eruption 760,000 years ago. The region is monitored by the Long Valley Observatory (LVO), one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about the Long Valley Caldera region and LVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/lvo.

  7. Gravitational-wave Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver; Stebbins, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has indicated an interest in participating. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described. Note that all results are based on models, methods and assumptions used in NASA studies

  8. Quantum metrology for gravitational wave astronomy.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Roman; Mavalvala, Nergis; McClelland, David E; Lam, Ping K

    2010-11-16

    Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts that accelerating mass distributions produce gravitational radiation, analogous to electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charges. These gravitational waves (GWs) have not been directly detected to date, but are expected to open a new window to the Universe once the detectors, kilometre-scale laser interferometers measuring the distance between quasi-free-falling mirrors, have achieved adequate sensitivity. Recent advances in quantum metrology may now contribute to provide the required sensitivity boost. The so-called squeezed light is able to quantum entangle the high-power laser fields in the interferometer arms, and could have a key role in the realization of GW astronomy.

  9. Quantum metrology for gravitational wave astronomy.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Roman; Mavalvala, Nergis; McClelland, David E; Lam, Ping K

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts that accelerating mass distributions produce gravitational radiation, analogous to electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charges. These gravitational waves (GWs) have not been directly detected to date, but are expected to open a new window to the Universe once the detectors, kilometre-scale laser interferometers measuring the distance between quasi-free-falling mirrors, have achieved adequate sensitivity. Recent advances in quantum metrology may now contribute to provide the required sensitivity boost. The so-called squeezed light is able to quantum entangle the high-power laser fields in the interferometer arms, and could have a key role in the realization of GW astronomy. PMID:21081919

  10. Detection of high-energy gamma radiation from quasar 3C 279 by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hunter, S. D.; Kwok, P. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Mattox, J. R.; Kanbach, G.; Nel, H. I.; Sreekumar, P.

    1992-01-01

    Intense gamma radiation has been observed from the direction of the quasar 3C 279 throughout the energy range from 30 MeV to over 5 GeV by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) during the period June 15-28, 1991. Its spectrum is well represented by a photon differential power-law exponent of 2.0 +/- 0.1, with a photon intensity above 100 MeV of (2.8 +/- 0.4) x 10 exp -6/sq cm s. For E is greater than 100 MeV, the 2-sigma upper limits were 1.0 x 10 exp -6/sq cm s in 1973 from the SAS 2 observations and 0.3 x 10 exp -6/sq cm s for the combined 1976, 1978, and 1980 COS B observations. Hence, there has been a large increase in high-energy gamma-ray intensity relative to the earlier times, as there has been in the radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray ranges. This source is the most distant and by far the most luminous gamma-ray source yet detected.

  11. Strasbourg's "First" astronomical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André

    2011-08-01

    The turret lantern located at the top of the Strasbourg Hospital Gate is generally considered as the first astronomical observatory of the city, but such a qualification must be treated with caution. The thesis of this paper is that the idea of a tower-observatory was brought back by a local scholar, Julius Reichelt (1637-1717), after he made a trip to Northern Europe around 1666 and saw the "Rundetårn" (Round Tower) recently completed in Copenhagen. There, however, a terrace allowed (and still allows) the full viewing of the sky, and especially of the zenith area where the atmospheric transparency is best. However, there is no such terrace in Strasbourg around the Hospital Gate lantern. Reichelt had also visited Johannes Hevelius who was then developing advanced observational astronomy in Gdansk, but nothing of the kind followed in Strasbourg. Rather, the Hospital Gate observatory was built essentially for the prestige of the city and for the notoriety of the university, and the users of this observing post did not make any significant contributions to the progress of astronomical knowledge. We conclude that the Hospital Gate observatory was only used for rudimentary viewing of bright celestial objects or phenomena relatively low on the horizon.

  12. The IT Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Kai Iok Tong; Sousa, Antonio C. M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the IT Observatory, a service of the Macau Productivity and Technology center (CPTTM) that provides information on demand using information technology. The CPTTM is a nonprofit organization funded by the Macau government and private businesses to enhance the productivity of Macau businesses by introducing new technologies and new…

  13. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  14. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  15. Arecibo Observatory for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartus, P.; Isidro, G. M.; La Rosa, C.; Pantoja, C. A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe new materials available at the Arecibo Observatory for visitors with visual impairments. These materials include a guide in Braille that describes the telescope, explains some basic terms used in radio astronomy, and lists frequently asked questions. We have also designed a tactile model of the telescope. Our interest is in enabling…

  16. Gravitational waves and light cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depies, Matthew

    Gravitational wave signatures from cosmic strings are analyzed numerically. Cosmic string networks form during phase transistions in the early universe and these networks of long cosmic strings break into loops that radiate energy in the form of gravitational waves until they decay. The gravitational waves come in the form of harmonic modes from individual string loops, a "confusion noise" from galactic loops, and a stochastic background of gravitational waves from a network of loops. In this study string loops of larger size a and lower string tensions G m, (where m the mass per unit length of the string) are investigated than in previous studies. Several detectors are currently searching for gravitational waves and a space based satellite, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), is in the final stages of pre-flight. The results for large loop sizes (a = 0.1) put an upper limit of about G m < 10 -9 and indicate that gravitational waves from string loops down to G m [approximate] 10 -20 could be detectabe by LISA. The string tension is related to the energy scale of the phase transition and the Planck mass via Gm = [Special characters omitted.] , so the limits on G m set the energy scale of any phase transition L s < 10^-4.5 m pl . Our results indicate that loops may form a significant gravitational wave signal, even for string tensions too low to have larger cosmological effects.

  17. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation and General Relativity Compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 18 proofs and indications with a reasonable, non-fallacious explanation stating Gravity and Gravitation are electromagnetic and alternating, functioning in nuclei and alternating electromagnetic coupling between nuclei and other nuclei in other masses. This is according to Maxwell, Quantum, and Newtonian Laws. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation passes the Cavendish test. With the 18 proofs and indications of NQG it is clear that Gravity and Gravitation are electromagnetic and thoroughly explained by the Nuclear Quantum Gravitation theory. In comparison, General Relativity pictures mass somehow effects ``Time-Space'' about the mass, producing gravity about that mass. This is not described as an electromagnetic effect, but as a geometric function; the changing of geometry about mass. GR lists as a proof the bending of light in the area near the Sun. However, recently it was observed that the temperature of the Sun's corona is in the millions of degrees, and thus the bending of light and other electromagnetic radiation is caused by the refraction effects of the corona and heliosphere; NOT GR. The other ``proofs'' of GR are not definitive, and no one has yet explained the ``somehow'' of GR. General Relativity fails the Cavendish experiment and cannot account for the attractions between masses. It should be realized that Nuclear Quantum Gravitation provides a coherent, factual, scientific and direct physical explanation of Gravity and Gravitation thus Unifying the Physical Forces.

  18. Gravitational Wave Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio

    2005-02-01

    There is only one experimental proof that gravitational waves exist. With such a limitation, it may seem premature to suggest the possibility that gravitational waves can became a preferred space propulsion technique. The present understanding of the problem indicates that this is not the case. The emission of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources has been confirmed by observation, the respective detection at large distance from the source is difficult and actually we have no confirmation of a successful detection. Therefore the required preliminary discovery has been already made. This opinion is enforced by many different proposals for building the required powerful gravitational wave generators that have recently appeared in the literature and discussed at conferences. It is no longer reasonable to wait for additional confirmation of the existence of gravitational waves to start a program for building generators and testing their possible application to space travel. A vast literature shows that gravitational waves can be employed for space propulsion. Gravitational wave rockets have been proposed, non-linearity of Einstein equations allows the conversion of gravitational waves to a static gravitational field and ``artificial gravity assist'' may become a new way of travelling in space-time. Different approaches to gravitational wave propulsion are reviewed and compared. Gravitational wave propulsion is also compared to traditional rocket propulsion and an undeniable advantage can be demonstrated in terms of efficiency and performance. Testing the predictions will require gravitational wave generators with high power and wavelength short enough for producing high energy densities. Detectors designed for the specific application must be developed, taking into account that non-linearity effects are expected. The study and development of Gravitational wave propulsion is a very challenging endeavor, involving the most complex theories, sophisticated

  19. Post-Newtonian gravitational bremsstrahlung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M.; Will, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Formulae and numerical results are presented for the gravitational radiation emitted during a low-deflection encounter between two massive bodies. Results are valid through post-Newtonian order within general relativity. The gravitational waveform, the total luminosity and total emitted energy, the angular distribution of emitted energy, and the frequency spectrum are discussed in detail. A method boosting the accuracy of these quantities to post Newtonian order is also presented. A numerical comparison of results with those of Peters, and of Kovacs and Thorne shows that the post Newtonian method is reliable to better than 0.1 percent at v = 0.1 c, to a few percent at v = 0.35 c, and to 10 to 20 percent at v = 0.5 c.

  20. From Measure Zero to Measure Hero: Periodic Kerr Orbits and Gravitational Wave Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Giz, Gabriel

    2011-12-01

    A direct observational detection of gravitational waves -- perhaps the most fundamental prediction of a theory of curved spacetime -- looms close at hand. Stellar mass compact objects spiraling into supermassive black holes have received particular attention as sources of gravitational waves detectable by space-based gravitational wave observatories. A well-established approach models such an extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRI) as an adiabatic progression through a series of Kerr geodesics. Thus, the direct detection of gravitational radiation from EMRIs and the extraction of astrophysical information from those waveforms require a thorough knowledge of the underlying geodesic dynamics. This dissertation adopts a dynamical systems approach to the study of Kerr orbits, beginning with equatorial orbits. We deduce a topological taxonomy of orbits that hinges on a correspondence between periodic orbits and rational numbers. The taxonomy defines the entire dynamics, including aperiodic motion, since every orbit is in or near the periodic set. A remarkable implication of this periodic orbit taxonomy is that the simple precessing ellipse familiar from planetary orbits is not allowed in the strong-field regime. Instead, eccentric orbits trace out precessions of multi-leaf clovers in the final stages of inspiral. Furthermore, for any black hole, there is some orbital angular momentum value in the strong-field regime below which zoom-whirl behavior becomes unavoidable. We then generalize the taxonomy to help identify nonequatorial orbits whose radial and polar frequencies are rationally related, or in resonance. The thesis culminates by describing how those resonant orbits can be leveraged for an order of magnitude or more reduction in the computational cost of adiabatic order EMRI trajectories, which are so prohibitively expensive that no such relativistically correct inspirals have been generated to date.

  1. The Origin of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng Ming

    2012-10-01

    In the natural world, people have discovered four kinds of forces: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Although the gravitation has been discovered more than three hundred years, its mechanism of origin is unclear until today. While investigating the origin of gravitation, I do some experiments discover the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I do some experiments discover the light interference fringes are produced by the gravitation: my discovery demonstrate light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. Furthermore, applications of this discovery to other moving particles show a similar effect. In a word: the micro particle moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force. Then I do quantity experiment get a general formula: Reveal the essence of gravitational mass and the essence of electric charge; reveal the origin of gravitation and the essence of matter wave. Along this way, I unify the gravitation and electromagnetic force. Namely I find a natural law that from atomic world to star world play in moving track. See website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter

  2. High Energy Astronomy Observatory program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtalik, F. S.

    1979-01-01

    The series of three orbiting high energy astronomy observatories that comprise the HEAO program are described. Several unique designs as well as the attitude control and determination system, used for observatory scan rotation of the first and third missions and for precision pointing on the second mission, are analyzed. Attention is given to observatory requirements, design characteristics, and the RGA performance summary.

  3. NASA's Great Observatories: Paper Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational brief discusses observatory stations built by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for looking at the universe. This activity for grades 5-12 has students build paper models of the observatories and study their history, features, and functions. Templates for the observatories are included. (MVL)

  4. ESO's Two Observatories Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    On February 1, 2005, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has merged its two observatories, La Silla and Paranal, into one. This move will help Europe's prime organisation for astronomy to better manage its many and diverse projects by deploying available resources more efficiently where and when they are needed. The merged observatory will be known as the La Silla Paranal Observatory. Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General, comments the new development: "The merging, which was planned during the past year with the deep involvement of all the staff, has created unified maintenance and engineering (including software, mechanics, electronics and optics) departments across the two sites, further increasing the already very high efficiency of our telescopes. It is my great pleasure to commend the excellent work of Jorge Melnick, former director of the La Silla Observatory, and of Roberto Gilmozzi, the director of Paranal." ESO's headquarters are located in Garching, in the vicinity of Munich (Bavaria, Germany), and this intergovernmental organisation has established itself as a world-leader in astronomy. Created in 1962, ESO is now supported by eleven member states (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom). It operates major telescopes on two remote sites, all located in Chile: La Silla, about 600 km north of Santiago and at an altitude of 2400m; Paranal, a 2600m high mountain in the Atacama Desert 120 km south of the coastal city of Antofagasta. Most recently, ESO has started the construction of an observatory at Chajnantor, a 5000m high site, also in the Atacama Desert. La Silla, north of the town of La Serena, has been the bastion of the organization's facilities since 1964. It is the site of two of the most productive 4-m class telescopes in the world, the New Technology Telescope (NTT) - the first major telescope equipped with active optics - and the 3.6-m, which hosts HARPS

  5. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  6. Mount Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mount Wilson Observatory, located in the San Gabriel Mountains near Pasadena, California, was founded in 1904 by George Ellery Hale with financial support from Andrew Carnegie. In the 1920s and 1930s, working at the 2.5 m Hooker telescope, Edwin Hubble made two of the most important discoveries in the history of astronomy: first, that `nebulae' are actually island universes—galaxies—each with bil...

  7. Jodrell Bank Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Jodrell Bank Observatory is part of the University of Manchester and was founded by Bernard Lovell in December 1945. Its prime instrument, the 76 m, MK1 radio-telescope, was completed in 1957. It was given a major upgrade in 1971 and is now known as the Lovell Telescope. In its early years it pioneered the technique of long baseline interferometry which led to the discovery of quasars. A majo...

  8. Arecibo Observatory for All

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartus, P.; Isidro, G. M.; La Rosa, C.; Pantoja, C. A.

    We describe new materials available at the Arecibo Observatory for visitors with visual impairments. These materials include a guide in Braille that describes the telescope, explains some basic terms used in radio astronomy, and lists frequently asked questions. We have also designed a tactile model of the telescope. Our interest is in enabling blind visitors to participate in the excitement of visiting the world's largest radio telescope.

  9. Moon exploration: lunar radio observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsky, Alexandre; Zelenyi, Lev; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Gurvits, Leonid; Sadovski, Andrei; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Gotlib, Vladimir

    The Moon is an attractive base for fundamental scientific studies. The conducting ionosphere of Earth prevents propagation of radio emission coming from the outer space to the Earth’s surface at frequencies below a few MHz. In contrast, the Moon surrounded by a very thin atmosphere and ionosphere is a perfect site for an ultra-long-wavelength (ULW) facility for studies of cosmic radio emission at frequencies below the Earth’s ionosphere cut-off. This range of frequencies is the last unexplored window in the spectrum of the universe’s electromagnetic emission, The radio facility deployed on the Moon’s surface will be a multidisciplinary tool for addressing a wide range of scientific disciplines from cosmology to astrophysics to planetology, solar-terrestrial physics and geophysics. The Moon-based ULW observatory will be an experimental and observational facility for transformational science. One of the most intriguing objectives for the ULW science is a search for terrestrial-like planets in the exosolar systems, i.e. extra-solar planets possessing an intrinsic magnetic field and magnetospheres interacting with a stellar wind. Such the interaction generates radio emission similar to the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) of the terrestrial magnetosphere. The intrinsic magnetic field shielding the planetary surface from the cosmic radiation is one of the strong indicators of possible habitability of an exoplanet. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This work was supported by the PP RAS 22 grant.

  10. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  11. Megalithic observatory Kokino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenev, Gj.

    2006-05-01

    In 2001, on the footpath of a mountain peak, near the village of Kokino, archeologist Jovica Stankovski discovered an archeological site from The Bronze Age. The site occupies a large area and is scaled in two levels. Several stone seats (thrones) are dominant in this site and they are pointing towards the east horizon. The high concentration of the movable archeological material found on the upper platform probably indicates its use in a function containing still unknown cult activities. Due to precise measurements and a detailed archaeoastronomical analysis of the site performed in the past three years by Gjore Cenev, physicist from the Planetarium in Skopje, it was shown that the site has characteristics of a sacred site, but also of a Megalithic Observatory. The markers found in this observatory point on the summer and winter solstices and spring and autumn equinoxes. It can be seen that on both sides of the solstice markers, that there are markers for establishing Moon's positions. The markers are crafted in such a way that for example on days when special rites were performed (harvest rites for example) the Sun filled a narrow space of the marker and special ray lighted the man sitting on only one of the thrones, which of course had a special meaning. According to the positions of the markers that are used for Sun marking, especially on the solstice days, it was calculated that this observatory dates from 1800 B.C.

  12. Gravitational energy, local holography and non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    We study the properties of gravitational systems in finite regions bounded by gravitational screens. We present a detailed construction of the total energy of such regions and of the energy and momentum balance equations due to the flow of matter and gravitational radiation through the screen. We establish that the gravitational screen possesses analogs of surface tension, internal energy, and viscous stress tensor, while the conservations are analogs of nonequilibrium balance equations for a viscous system. This gives a precise correspondence between gravity in finite regions and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

  13. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Lal, N.; McGuire, R. E.; Szabo, A.; Narock, T. W.; Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.; Hill, M. E.; Vandergriff, J. D.; McKibben, R. B.; Lopate, C.; Tranquille, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events, acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  14. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; McKibben, Robert B.; Lopate, Clifford; Tranquille, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  15. Gravitation in material media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-03-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium is herein derived on the basis of classical, Newtonian gravitational theory and by a general relativistic use of Archimedes' principle. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate students and those undergraduate students having prior experience with vector analysis and potential theory.

  16. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  17. Inflationary gravitational waves and the evolution of the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: moroi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of various phenomena which may have happened in the early universe on the spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves. The phenomena include phase transitions, entropy productions from non-relativistic matter, the production of dark radiation, and decoupling of dark matter/radiation from thermal bath. These events can create several characteristic signatures in the inflationary gravitational wave spectrum, which may be direct probes of the history of the early universe and the nature of high-energy physics.

  18. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with protoneutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    We examine the time evolution of the frequencies of the gravitational wave after the bounce within the framework of relativistic linear perturbation theory using the results of one-dimensional numerical simulations of core-collapse supernovae. Protoneutron star models are constructed in such a way that the mass and the radius of the protoneutron star become equivalent to the results obtained from the numerical simulations. Then we find that the frequencies of gravitational waves radiating from protoneutron stars strongly depend on the mass and the radius of protoneutron stars, but almost independently of the profiles of the electron fraction and the entropy per baryon inside the star. Additionally, we find that the frequencies of gravitational waves can be characterized by the square root of the average density of the protoneutron star irrespective of the progenitor models, which are completely different from the empirical formula for cold neutron stars. The dependence of the spectra on the mass and the radius is different from that of the g -mode: the oscillations around the surface of protoneutron stars due to the convection and the standing accretion-shock instability. Careful observation of these modes of gravitational waves can determine the evolution of the mass and the radius of protoneutron stars after core bounce. Furthermore, the expected frequencies of gravitational waves are around a few hundred hertz in the early stages after bounce, which must be a good candidate for the ground-based gravitational wave detectors.

  19. Time Evolution of Pure Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyama, S. M.

    1981-03-01

    Numerical solutions to the Einstein equations in the case of pure gravitational waves are given. The system is assumed to be axially symmetric and non-rotating. The time symmetric initial data and the conformally flat initial data are obtained by solving the constraint equations at t=0. The time evolution of these initial data depends strongly on the initial amplitude of the gravitational waves. In the case of the low initial amplitude, waves only disperse to null infinity. By comparing the initial gravitational energy with the total energy loss through an r=constant surface, it is concluded that the Newman-Penrose method and the Gibbon-Hawking method are the most desirable for measuring the energy flux of gravitational radiation numerically. In the case that the initial ratio of the spatial extent of the gravitational waves to the Schwarzschild radius (M/2) is smaller than about 300, the waves collapse by themselves, leading to formation of a black hole. The analytic solutions of the linearized Einstein equations for the pure gravitational waves are also shown.

  20. Search for gravitational radiation from intermediate mass black hole binaries in data from the second LIGO-Virgo joint science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports on an unmodeled, all-sky search for gravitational waves from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). The search was performed on data from the second joint science run of the LIGO and Virgo detectors (July 2009-October 2010) and was sensitive to IMBHBs with a range up to ˜200 Mpc, averaged over the possible sky positions and inclinations of the binaries with respect to the line of sight. No significant candidate was found. Upper limits on the coalescence-rate density of nonspinning IMBHBs with total masses between 100 and 450 M⊙ and mass ratios between 0.25 and 1 were placed by combining this analysis with an analogous search performed on data from the first LIGO-Virgo joint science run (November 2005-October 2007). The most stringent limit was set for systems consisting of two 88 M⊙ black holes and is equal to 0.12 Mpc-3 Myr-1 at the 90% confidence level. This paper also presents the first estimate, for the case of an unmodeled analysis, of the impact on the search range of IMBHB spin configurations: the visible volume for IMBHBs with nonspinning components is roughly doubled for a population of IMBHBs with spins aligned with the binary's orbital angular momentum and uniformly distributed in the dimensionless spin parameter up to 0.8, whereas an analogous population with antialigned spins decreases the visible volume by ˜20%.

  1. Astronomical publications of Melbourne Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andropoulos, Jenny Ioanna

    2014-05-01

    During the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, four well-equipped government observatories were maintained in Australia - in Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. These institutions conducted astronomical observations, often in the course of providing a local time service, and they also collected and collated meteorological data. As well, some of these observatories were involved at times in geodetic surveying, geomagnetic recording, gravity measurements, seismology, tide recording and physical standards, so the term "observatory" was being used in a rather broad sense! Despite the international renown that once applied to Williamstown and Melbourne Observatories, relatively little has been written by modern-day scholars about astronomical activities at these observatories. This research is intended to rectify this situation to some extent by gathering, cataloguing and analysing the published astronomical output of the two Observatories to see what contributions they made to science and society. It also compares their contributions with those of Sydney, Adelaide and Perth Observatories. Overall, Williamstown and Melbourne Observatories produced a prodigious amount of material on astronomy in scientific and technical journals, in reports and in newspapers. The other observatories more or less did likewise, so no observatory of those studied markedly outperformed the others in the long term, especially when account is taken of their relative resourcing in staff and equipment.

  2. Distributed Observatory Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, M. A.; Bellingham, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    A collection of tools for collaboratively managing a coastal ocean observatory have been developed and used in a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary field experiment. The Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network program created these tools to support the Adaptive Sampling and Prediction (ASAP) field experiment that occurred in Monterey Bay in the summer of 2006. ASAP involved the day-to-day participation of a large group of researchers located across North America. The goal of these investigators was to adapt an array of observational assets to optimize data collection and analysis. Achieving the goal required continual interaction, but the long duration of the observatory made sustained co-location of researchers difficult. The ASAP team needed a remote collaboration tool, the capability to add non-standard, interdisciplinary data sets to the overall data collection, and the ability to retrieve standardized data sets from the collection. Over the course of several months and "virtual experiments," the Ocean Observatory Portal (COOP) collaboration tool was created, along with tools for centralizing, cataloging, and converting data sets into common formats, and tools for generating automated plots of the common format data. Accumulating the data in a central location and converting the data to common formats allowed any team member to manipulate any data set quickly, without having to rely heavily on the expertise of data generators to read the data. The common data collection allowed for the development of a wide range of comparison plots and allowed team members to assimilate new data sources into derived outputs such as ocean models quickly. In addition to the standardized outputs, team members were able to produce their own specialized products and link to these through the collaborative portal, which made the experimental process more interdisciplinary and interactive. COOP was used to manage the ASAP vehicle program from its start in July 2006. New summaries were

  3. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  4. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  5. Portable coastal observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frye, Daniel; Butman, Bradford; Johnson, Mark; von der Heydt, Keith; Lerner, Steven

    2000-01-01

    Ocean observational science is in the midst of a paradigm shift from an expeditionary science centered on short research cruises and deployments of internally recording instruments to a sustained observational science where the ocean is monitored on a regular basis, much the way the atmosphere is monitored. While satellite remote sensing is one key way of meeting the challenge of real-time monitoring of large ocean regions, new technologies are required for in situ observations to measure conditions below the ocean surface and to measure ocean characteristics not observable from space. One method of making sustained observations in the coastal ocean is to install a fiber optic cable from shore to the area of interest. This approach has the advantage of providing power to offshore instruments and essentially unlimited bandwidth for data. The LEO-15 observatory offshore of New Jersey (yon Alt et al., 1997) and the planned Katama observatory offshore of Martha's Vineyard (Edson et al., 2000) use this approach. These sites, along with other cabled sites, will play an important role in coastal ocean science in the next decade. Cabled observatories, however, have two drawbacks that limit the number of sites that are likely to be installed. First, the cable and the cable installation are expensive and the shore station needed at the cable terminus is often in an environmentally sensitive area where competing interests must be resolved. Second, cabled sites are inherently limited geographically to sites within reach of the cable, so it is difficult to cover large areas of the coastal ocean.

  6. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  7. Next Generation Virtual Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual Observatories (VO) are now being established in a variety of geoscience disciplines beyond their origins in Astronomy and Solar Physics. Implementations range from hydrology and environmental sciences to solid earth sciences. Among the goals of VOs are to provide search/ query, access and use of distributed, heterogeneous data resources. With many of these goals being met and usage increasing, new demands and requirements are arising. In particular there are two of immediate and pressing interest. The first is use of VOs by non-specialists, especially for information products that go beyond the usual data, or data products that are sought for scientific research. The second area is citation and attribution of artifacts that are being generated by VOs. In some sense VOs are re-publishing (re-packaging, or generating new synthetic) data and information products. At present only a few VOs address this need and it is clear that a comprehensive solution that includes publishers is required. Our work in VOs and related semantic data framework and integration areas has lead to a view of the next generation of virtual observatories which the two above-mentioned needs as well as others that are emerging. Both of the needs highlight a semantic gap, i.e. that the meaning and use for a user or users beyond the original design intention is very often difficult or impossible to bridge. For example, VOs created for experts with complex, arcane or jargon vocabularies are not accessible to the non-specialist and further, information products the non-specialist may use are not created or considered for creation. In the second case, use of a (possibly virtual) data or information product (e.g. an image or map) as an intellectual artifact that can be accessed as part of the scientific publication and review procedure also introduces terminology gaps, as well as services that VOs may need to provide. Our supposition is that formalized methods in semantics and semantic web

  8. Strasbourg Observatory Archives Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, A.

    2002-12-01

    Official talks in France and Germany after World War I were generally of hatred and revenge. Strasbourg Observatory had just changed nationality (from Prussian to French) for the first time (this would happen again at the outbreak of WWII and after the conflict). Documents show that astronomers did not share the general attitude. For example the inventory book started in German was continued in French after 1918. It is moving to see those different handwritings in two different languages on the same pages -- making of that book a unique document in various respects, but also reminding us that the native language of the region was in fact Alsacian.

  9. ESO's Two Observatories Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    On February 1, 2005, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has merged its two observatories, La Silla and Paranal, into one. This move will help Europe's prime organisation for astronomy to better manage its many and diverse projects by deploying available resources more efficiently where and when they are needed. The merged observatory will be known as the La Silla Paranal Observatory. Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General, comments the new development: "The merging, which was planned during the past year with the deep involvement of all the staff, has created unified maintenance and engineering (including software, mechanics, electronics and optics) departments across the two sites, further increasing the already very high efficiency of our telescopes. It is my great pleasure to commend the excellent work of Jorge Melnick, former director of the La Silla Observatory, and of Roberto Gilmozzi, the director of Paranal." ESO's headquarters are located in Garching, in the vicinity of Munich (Bavaria, Germany), and this intergovernmental organisation has established itself as a world-leader in astronomy. Created in 1962, ESO is now supported by eleven member states (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom). It operates major telescopes on two remote sites, all located in Chile: La Silla, about 600 km north of Santiago and at an altitude of 2400m; Paranal, a 2600m high mountain in the Atacama Desert 120 km south of the coastal city of Antofagasta. Most recently, ESO has started the construction of an observatory at Chajnantor, a 5000m high site, also in the Atacama Desert. La Silla, north of the town of La Serena, has been the bastion of the organization's facilities since 1964. It is the site of two of the most productive 4-m class telescopes in the world, the New Technology Telescope (NTT) - the first major telescope equipped with active optics - and the 3.6-m, which hosts HARPS

  10. NASA's Heliophysics System Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Steven

    2016-04-01

    NASA formulates and implements a national research program for understanding the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system and how these phenomena impact life and society. This research provides theory, data, and modeling development services to national and international space weather efforts utilizing a coordinated and complementary fleet of spacecraft, called the Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO), to understand the Sun and its interactions with Earth and the solar system, including space weather. This presentation will focus on NASA's role in space weather research and the contributions the agency continues to provide to the science of space weather, leveraging inter-agency and international collaborations for the benefit of society.

  11. Interaction of gravitational waves with magnetic and electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Barrabes, C.; Hogan, P. A.

    2010-03-15

    The existence of large-scale magnetic fields in the universe has led to the observation that if gravitational waves propagating in a cosmological environment encounter even a small magnetic field then electromagnetic radiation is produced. To study this phenomenon in more detail we take it out of the cosmological context and at the same time simplify the gravitational radiation to impulsive waves. Specifically, to illustrate our findings, we describe the following three physical situations: (1) a cylindrical impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a magnetic field, (2) an axially symmetric impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with an electric field and (3) a 'spherical' impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a small magnetic field. In cases (1) and (3) electromagnetic radiation is produced behind the gravitational wave. In case (2) no electromagnetic radiation appears after the wave unless a current is established behind the wave breaking the Maxwell vacuum. In all three cases the presence of the magnetic or electric fields results in a modification of the amplitude of the incoming gravitational wave which is explicitly calculated using the Einstein-Maxwell vacuum field equations.

  12. Strasbourg Observatory in World War II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.

    During World War II, the Reichsuniversitat Strassburg was installed by the German authorities and Johannes Hellerich (1888-1963) was appointed director of the Observatory. A review of his life and his astro- nomical career as an assistant and professor in Kiel, Hamburg, Strasbourg, and Muenster is given. His activity in Strasbourg from mid-1941 to mid-1943 was focussed on bringing the Observatory into working operations, and on carrying out the monitoring of solar radiation and atmospheric extinction. After being drafted to the army and spending some time as a prisoner of war, he returned to Hamburg to complete a review on variable-star research in wartime Germany. He was called to Muenster University in 1947 to teach astronomy, and, from 1949 onward, to serve as director of the small Astronomical Institute till his retirement in 1954.

  13. Gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations with Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Armstrong, J. W.; Campbell, J. K.; Estabrook, F. B.; Krisher, T. P.; Lau, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    The gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations that are to be conducted during the cruise and Orbiter phases of the Galileo Mission cover four investigation categories: (1) the gravity fields of Jupiter and its four major satellites; (2) a search for gravitational radiation; (3) mathematical modeling of general relativistic effects on Doppler ranging data; and (4) improvements of the Jupiter ephemeris via Orbiter ranging. Also noted are two secondary objectives, involving a range fix during Venus flyby and the determination of the earth's mass on the bases of the two earth gravity assists used by the mission.

  14. Are cosmic strings gravitationally stable topological defects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleiser, Reinaldo; Pullin, Jorge

    1989-08-01

    A possible mechanism for the dissapearance of an open cosmic string into gravitational radiation is described. This involves the splitting of an infinite straight cosmic string into two pieces whose ends are traveling outward at the speed of light with the associated emission of a gravitational shock wave. This model can also be used to describe the following situations: (1) the development of a growing region of different string tension within a cosmic string, and (2) the creation of a cosmic string in an otherwise flat background.

  15. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This booklet is devoted to NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory and is aimed at people interested in astronomy and BAO, pupils and students, BAO visitors and others. The booklet is made as a visiting card and presents concise and full information about BAO. A brief history of BAO, the biography of the great scientist Viktor Ambartsumian, brief biographies of 13 other deserved scientists formerly working at BAO (B.E. Markarian, G.A. Gurzadyan, L.V. Mirzoyan, M.A. Arakelian, et al.), information on BAO telescopes (2.6m, 1m Schmidt, etc.) and other scientific instruments, scientific library and photographic plate archive, Byurakan surveys (including the famous Markarian Survey included in the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register), all scientific meetings held in Byurakan, international scientific collaboration, data on full research staff of the Observatory, as well as former BAO researchers, who have moved to foreign institutions are given in the booklet. At the end, the list of the most important books published by Armenian astronomers and about them is given.

  16. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  17. Emission of gravitational waves by precession of slim accretion disks dynamically driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, W. D.; Sánchez, L. A.; Mosquera, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted from some astrophysical objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGN), micro-quasars (M-QSRs), and central engines of gamma-ray burst (GRBs), seems to have a similar physical origin: a powerful jet of plasma ejected from a localized system, presumably composed of an accretion disk encircling a compact object. This radiation is generally beamed in the polar directions and in some cases, it appears to have a spiral-like structure that could be explained if the central system itself precesses. In this work, we use the slim disk accretion model, presented by Popham et al. (1999), to studying the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by the precession of the accretion disk around a solar-mass Kerr black hole (KBH). For practical purposes, this model describes the central engine of a class of GRBs when some astrophysical constrains are fulfilled. The induced precession considered here is driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect, which results from the combination of viscous effects in such disks and the relativistic frame-dragging effect. We evaluate the feasibility of direct detection of the GWs computed for such a model and show that the precession of this kind of systems could be detected by gravitational wave observatories like DECIGO, ultimate-DECIGO, and BBO, with higher probability if such a class of sources are placed at distances less than 1 Mpc.

  18. Golden legacy from ESA's observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    'milestone number' of 1000 scientific papers was reached. Even now ISO's data archive remains a valuable source of new results. For example, some of the latest papers describe the detection of water in 'protostars', which are stars in the process of being born, and studies of numerous nearby galaxies. "Of course we were confident ISO was going to do very well, but its actual productivity has been far beyond our expectations. The publication rate does not even seem to have peaked yet! We expect many more results," Salama says. Note for editors ISO's data archive contains scientific data from about 30 000 observations. Astronomers from all over the world have downloaded almost eight times the equivalent of the entire scientific archive. As much as 35% of all ISO observations have already been published at least once in prestigious scientific journals. ESA is now preparing to continue its infrared investigation of the Universe. The next generation of infrared space observatories is already in the pipeline. ISO is to be followed by the NASA SIRTF observatory to be launched later this year. Then, in 2007, ESA will follow up the pioneering work of ISO with the Herschel Space Observatory, which will become the largest imaging telescope ever put into space. ISO The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was launched in 1995 and operated from November that year to May 1998, when it ran out of the coolant needed to keep its detectors working. At the time it was the most sensitive infrared satellite ever launched and made particularly important studies of the dusty regions of the Universe, where visible light telescopes can see nothing. ESA will reopen its examination of the infrared Universe when Herschel is launched in 2007. Herschel Herschel will be the largest space telescope when, in 2007, it is launched on an Ariane-5 rocket, together with ESA’s cosmology mission, Planck. Herschel’s 3.5-metre diameter mirror will collect longwave infrared radiation from some of the coolest and most

  19. Towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    This chapter is meant to introduce the reader to the forthcoming network of second-generation interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, at a time when their construction is close to completion and there is the ambition to detect gravitational waves for the first time in the next few years and open the way to gravitational wave astronomy. The legacy of first-generation detectors is discussed before giving an overview of the technology challenges that have been faced to make advanced detectors possible. The various aspects outlined here are then discussed in more detail in the subsequent chapters of the book.

  20. Inverting Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, P. R.; Spiteri, R. J.

    2002-02-01

    Gravitational lensing provides a powerful tool to study a number of fundamental questions in astrophysics. Fortuitously, one can begin to explore some non-trivial issues associated with this phenomenon without a lot of very sophisticated mathematics, making an elementary treatment of this topic tractable even to senior undergraduates. In this paper, we give a relatively self-contained outline of the basic concepts and mathematics behind gravitational lensing as a recent and exciting topic for courses in mathematical modeling or scientific computing. To this end, we have designed and made available some interactive software to aid in the simulation and inversion of gravitational lenses in a classroom setting.

  1. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellerive, A.; Klein, J. R.; McDonald, A. B.; Noble, A. J.; Poon, A. W. P.

    2016-07-01

    This review paper provides a summary of the published results of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment that was carried out by an international scientific collaboration with data collected during the period from 1999 to 2006. By using heavy water as a detection medium, the SNO experiment demonstrated clearly that solar electron neutrinos from 8B decay in the solar core change into other active neutrino flavors in transit to Earth. The reaction on deuterium that has equal sensitivity to all active neutrino flavors also provides a very accurate measure of the initial solar flux for comparison with solar models. This review summarizes the results from three phases of solar neutrino detection as well as other physics results obtained from analyses of the SNO data.

  2. LCOGT network observatory operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, Andrew; Hjelstrom, Annie; Boroson, Todd; Burleson, Ben; Conway, Patrick; De Vera, Jon; Elphick, Mark; Haworth, Brian; Rosing, Wayne; Saunders, Eric; Thomas, Doug; White, Gary; Willis, Mark; Walker, Zach

    2014-08-01

    We describe the operational capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network. We summarize our hardware and software for maintaining and monitoring network health. We focus on methodologies to utilize the automated system to monitor availability of sites, instruments and telescopes, to monitor performance, permit automatic recovery, and provide automatic error reporting. The same jTCS control system is used on telescopes of apertures 0.4m, 0.8m, 1m and 2m, and for multiple instruments on each. We describe our network operational model, including workloads, and illustrate our current tools, and operational performance indicators, including telemetry and metrics reporting from on-site reductions. The system was conceived and designed to establish effective, reliable autonomous operations, with automatic monitoring and recovery - minimizing human intervention while maintaining quality. We illustrate how far we have been able to achieve that.

  3. The virtual observatory registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Greene, G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-11-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources-typically, data and services-that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention common usage patterns and open issues as appropriate.

  4. Hanohano: Hawaiian antineutrino observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maricic, Jelena; Hanohano Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Design studies are underway for the deep ocean antineutrino observatory Hanohano. The 10 kton monolitic underwater detector will be able to make precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters (including θ13 and neutrino mass hierarchy) if stationed around 60 km offshore, from the nuclear reactor. Hanohano will be a mobile detector and placing it in a mid-Pacific location will provide the first ever flux measurement of geoneutrinos (antineutrinos emitted in the radioactive decay series of uranium and thorium), coming from the Earth's mantle and perform a sensitivity search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in the Earth's core. Additional deployment at a different mid-ocean location will lead to tests of lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in the Earth's mantle. These measurements would provide an important insight into deep-Earth geophysics, mantle composition and understanding of the Earth's heat flow and sources of energy inside the Earth.

  5. Orbiting Carbon Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Human impact on the environment has produced measurable changes in the geological record since the late 1700s. Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 today may cause the global climate to depart for its natural behavior for many millenia. CO2 is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory goals are to help collect measurements of atmospheric CO2, answering questions such as why the atmospheric CO2 buildup varies annually, the roles of the oceans and land ecosystems in absorbing CO2, the roles of North American and Eurasian sinks and how these carbon sinks respond to climate change. The present carbon cycle, CO2 variability, and climate uncertainties due atmospheric CO2 uncertainties are highlighted in this presentation.

  6. Shot noise in gravitational-wave detectors with Fabry-Perot arms.

    PubMed

    Lyons, T T; Regehr, M W; Raab, F J

    2000-12-20

    Shot-noise-limited sensitivity is calculated for gravitational-wave interferometers with Fabry-Perot arms, similar to those being installed at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Italian-French Laser Interferometer Collaboration (VIRGO) facility. This calculation includes the effect of nonstationary shot noise that is due to phase modulation of the light. The resulting formula is experimentally verified by a test interferometer with suspended mirrors in the 40-m arms. PMID:18354690

  7. Global geodetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Claude; Pearlman, Mike; Sarti, Pierguido

    2015-01-01

    Global geodetic observatories (GGO) play an increasingly important role both for scientific and societal applications, in particular for the maintenance and evolution of the reference frame and those applications that rely on the reference frame for their viability. The International Association of Geodesy (IAG), through the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), is fully involved in coordinating the development of these systems and ensuring their quality, perenniality and accessibility. This paper reviews the current role, basic concepts, and some of the critical issues associated with the GGOs, and advocates for their expansion to enhance co-location with other observing techniques (gravity, meteorology, etc). The historical perspective starts with the MERIT campaign, followed by the creation of international services (IERS, IGS, ILRS, IVS, IDS, etc). It provides a basic definition of observing systems and observatories and the build up of the international networks and the role of co-locations in geodesy and geosciences and multi-technique processing and data products. This paper gives special attention to the critical topic of local surveys and tie vectors among co-located systems in sites; the agreement of space geodetic solutions and the tie vectors now place one of the most significant limitations on the quality of integrated data products, most notably the ITRF. This topic focuses on survey techniques, extrapolation to instrument reference points, computation techniques, systematic biases, and alignment of the individual technique reference frames into ITRF. The paper also discusses the design, layout and implementation of network infrastructure, including the role of GGOS and the benefit that would be achieved with better standardization and international governance.

  8. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  9. LIGO and the Search for Gravitational Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Norna A.

    2006-10-16

    Gravitational waves, predicted to exist by Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity but as yet undetected, are expected to be emitted during violent astrophysical events such as supernovae, black hole interactions and the coalescence of compact binary systems. Their detection and study should lead to a new branch of astronomy. However the experimental challenge is formidable: ground-based detection relies on sensing displacements of order 10^-18 m over a frequency range of tens of hertz to a few kHz. There is currently a large international effort to commission and operate long baseline interferometric detectors including those that comprise LIGO - the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - in the USA. In this talk I will give an introduction to the topic of gravitational wave detection and in particular review the status of the LIGO project which is currently taking data at its design sensitivity. I will also look to the future to consider planned improvements in sensitivity for such detectors, focusing on Advanced LIGO, the proposed upgrade to the LIGO project

  10. LIGO and the Search for Gravitational Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Norna A.

    2006-10-16

    Gravitational waves, predicted to exist by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity but as yet undetected, are expected to be emitted during violent astrophysical events such as supernovae, black hole interactions and the coalescence of compact binary systems. Their detection and study should lead to a new branch of astronomy. However the experimental challenge is formidable: ground-based detection relies on sensing displacements of order 10{sup -18} m over a frequency range of tens of hertz to a few kHz. There is currently a large international effort to commission and operate long baseline interferometric detectors including those that comprise LIGO - the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - in the USA. In this talk I will give an introduction to the topic of gravitational wave detection and in particular review the status of the LIGO project which is currently taking data at its design sensitivity. I will also look to the future to consider planned improvements in sensitivity for such detectors, focusing on Advanced LIGO, the proposed upgrade to the LIGO project.

  11. Rolloff Roof Observatory Construction (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulowetz, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) Lessons learned about building an observatory by someone with limited construction experience, and the advantages of having one for imaging and variable star studies. Sample results shown of composite light curves for cataclysmic variables UX UMa and V1101 Aql with data from my observatory combined with data from others around the world.

  12. Gravitational-wave joy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    seyithocuk; jjeherrera; eltodesukane; GrahamRounce; rloldershaw; Beaker, Dr; Sandhu, G. S.; Ophiuchi

    2016-03-01

    In reply to the news article on the LIGO collaboration's groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves, first predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, from two black holes colliding (pp5, 6-7 and http://ow.ly/Ylsyt).

  13. Gravitational clustering: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labini, Francesco Sylos

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the differences and analogies of gravitational clustering in finite and infinite systems. The process of collective, or violent, relaxation leading to the formation of quasi-stationary states is one of the distinguished features in the dynamics of self-gravitating systems. This occurs, in different conditions, both in a finite than in an infinite system, the latter embedded in a static or in an expanding background. We then discuss, by considering some simple and paradigmatic examples, the problems related to the definition of a mean-field approach to gravitational clustering, focusing on role of discrete fluctuations. The effect of these fluctuations is a basic issue to be clarified to establish the range of scales and times in which a collision-less approximation may describe the evolution of a self-gravitating system and for the theoretical modeling of the non-linear phase.

  14. Space Detection of Gravitational Waves (lisa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. Neves; Buchman, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Danzmann, K.; Doles, R.; Fontana, G.; Hanso, J.; Hueller, M.; Sigurdsso, S.; Turneaure, J.; Ungarell, C.; Vecchi, A.; Vital, S.; Webe, W.

    2002-12-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed to observe gravitational waves from galactic and extra-galactic binary systems, including gravitational waves generated in the vicinity of the very massive black holes found in the centers of many galaxies. Acting as a giant Michelson interferometer the three spacecraft flying 5 million km apart will open the era of astronomy in the gravitational spectrum. We give an introduction to the mission and describe the status of selected experimental, theoretical, and planning LISA work, as reported at the Ninth Marcel Grossman Meeting in 2000 in Rome. We discuss the three areas of technology challenges facing the mission inertial sensors, micronewton thrusters, and picometer interferometry. We report on the progress in the development of free falling moving test-masses for LISA and for the related technology demonstration mission. We present simple formulas to evaluate the performance of the device as a function of the various design parameters, and we compare them with preliminary experimental results from a test prototype we are developing. Quantitative agreement is found. The gravitational radiation emitted during the final stages of coalescence of stellar mass compact objects with low massive black holes is a signal detectable by LISA. It will also provide the opportunity of measuring relativistic strong field effects. A brief discussion addresses the detection by LISA of gravitational waves generated by cataclysmic binary variables at frequencies below 1 mHz. Finally the prospects for cosmology work with LISA type antennas are being analyzed.

  15. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This discussion examines these gravitational patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. The focus is on recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by the space-based gravitational wave detector LISA.

  16. Proposed Ultra-High Sensitivity High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Stephenson, Gary V.; Li, Fangyu

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the proposed improvement of a High-Frequency Relic Gravitational Wave (HFRGW) detector designed by Li, Baker, Fang, Stephenson and Chen in order to greatly improve its sensitivity. The improved detector is inspired by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory or LIGO, but is sensitive to the high-frequency end of the gravitational-wave spectrum. As described in prior papers it utilizes the Gertsenshtein effect, which introduces the conversion of gravitational waves to electromagnetic (EM) waves in the presence of a static magnetic field. Such a conversion, if it leads to photons moving in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the EM waves and the magnetic field, will allow for ultra-high sensitivity HFRGW detection. The use of sensitive microwave, single photon detectors such as a circuit QED and/or the Rydberg Atom Cavity Detector, or off-the-shelf detectors, could lead to such detection. When the EM-detection photons are focused at the microwave detectors by fractal-membrane reflectors sensitivity is also improved. Noise sources external to the HFRGW detector will be eliminated by placing a tight mosaic of superconducting tiles (e.g., YBCO) and/or fractal membranes on the interior surface of the detector's cryogenic containment vessel in order to provide a perfect Faraday cage. Internal thermal noise will be eliminated by means of a microwave absorbing (or reflecting) interior enclosure shaped to conform to a high-intensity continuous microwave Gaussian beam (GB), will reduce any background photon flux (BPF) noise radiated normal to the GB's axis. Such BPF will be further attenuated by a series of microwave absorbing baffles forming tunnels to the sensitive microwave detectors on each side of the GB and at right angles to the static magnetic field. A HFGW detector of bandwidth of 1 KHz to 10 KHz or less in the GHz band has been selected. It is concluded that the utilization of the new ultra-high-sensitivity microwave detectors

  17. Ancient "Observatories" - A Relevant Concept?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    It is quite common, when reading popular books on astronomy, to see a place referred to as "the oldest observatory in the world". In addition, numerous books on archaeoastronomy, of various levels of quality, frequently refer to the existence of "prehistoric" or "ancient" observatories when describing or citing monuments that were certainly not built with the primary purpose of observing the skies. Internet sources are also guilty of this practice. In this chapter, the different meanings of the word observatory will be analyzed, looking at how their significances can be easily confused or even interchanged. The proclaimed "ancient observatories" are a typical result of this situation. Finally, the relevance of the concept of the ancient observatory will be evaluated.

  18. X ray timing observations and gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Wood, Kent S.

    1989-01-01

    Photon-rich x ray observations on bright compact galactic sources will make it possible to detect many fast processes that may occur in these systems on millisecond and submillisecond timescales. Many of these processes are of direct relevance to gravitational physics because they arise in regions of strong gravity near neutron stars and black holes where the dynamical timescales for compact objects of stellar mass are milliseconds. To date, such observations have been limited by the detector area and telemetry rates available. However, instruments such as the proposed X ray Large Array (XLA) would achieve collecting areas of about 100 sq m. This instrument has been described elsewhere (Wood and Michelson 1988) and was the subject of a recent prephase A feasibility study at Marshall Space Flight Center. Observations with an XLA class instrument will directly impact five primary areas of astrophysics research: the attempt to detect gravitational radiation, the study of black holes, the physics of mass accretion onto compact objects, the structure of neutron stars and nuclear matter, and the characterization of dark matter in the universe. Those observations are discussed that are most directly relevant to gravitational physics: the search for millisecond x ray pulsars that are potential sources of continuous gravitational radiation; and the use of x ray timing observations to probe the physical conditions in extreme relativistic regions of space near black holes, both stellar-sized and supermassive.

  19. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.; Lasky, Paul D.; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳1010M⊙ can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  20. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo A; Lasky, Paul D; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-11

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳10^{10}M_{⊙} can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms. PMID:27015470

  1. Gravitational-wave detection using redshifted 21-cm observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Somnath; Guha Sarkar, Tapomoy

    2009-06-15

    A gravitational-wave traversing the line of sight to a distant source produces a frequency shift which contributes to redshift space distortion. As a consequence, gravitational waves are imprinted as density fluctuations in redshift space. The gravitational-wave contribution to the redshift space power spectrum has a different {mu} dependence as compared to the dominant contribution from peculiar velocities. This, in principle, allows the two signals to be separated. The prospect of a detection is most favorable at the highest observable redshift z. Observations of redshifted 21-cm radiation from neutral hydrogen hold the possibility of probing very high redshifts. We consider the possibility of detecting primordial gravitational waves using the redshift space neutral hydrogen power spectrum. However, we find that the gravitational-wave signal, though present, will not be detectable on superhorizon scales because of cosmic variance and on subhorizon scales where the signal is highly suppressed.

  2. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewan, G. T.

    1992-04-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector is a 1000 ton heavy water (D2O) Cherenkov detector designed to study neutrinos from the sun and other astrophysical sources. The use of heavy water allows both electron neutrinos and all other types of neutrinos to be observed by three complementary reactions. The detector will be sensitive to the electron neutrino flux and energy spectrum shape and to the total neutrino flux irrespective of neutrino type. These measurements will provide information on both vacuum neutrino oscillations and matter-enhanced oscillations, the MSW effect. In the event of a supernova it will be very sensitive to muon and tau neutrinos as well as the electron neutrinos emitted in the initial burst, enabling sensitive mass measurements as well as providing details of the physics of stellar collapse. On behalf of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Collaboration : H.C . Evans, G.T . Ewan, H.W. Lee, J .R . Leslie, J .D. MacArthur, H .-B . Mak, A.B . McDonald, W. McLatchie, B.C . Robertson, B. Sur, P. Skensved (Queen's University) ; C.K . Hargrove, H. Mes, W.F. Davidson, D. Sinclair, 1 . Blevis, M. Shatkay (Centre for Research in Particle Physics) ; E.D. Earle, G.M. Milton, E. Bonvin, (Chalk River Laboratories); J .J . Simpson, P. Jagam, J . Law, J .-X . Wang (University of Guelph); E.D . Hallman, R.U. Haq (Laurentian University); A.L. Carter, D. Kessler, B.R . Hollebone (Carleton University); R. Schubank . C.E . Waltha m (University of British Columbia); R.T. Kouzes, M.M. Lowry, R.M. Key (Princeton University); E.W. Beier, W. Frati, M. Newcomer, R. Van Berg (University of Penn-sylvania), T.J . Bowles, P.J . Doe, S.R . Elliott, M.M. Fowler, R.G.H. Robertson, D.J . Vieira, J .B . Wilhelmy, J .F. Wilker-son, J .M. Wouters (Los Alamos National Laboratory) ; E. Norman, K. Lesko, A. Smith, R. Fulton, R. Stokstad (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), N.W. Tanner, N. JCIILY, P. Trent, J . Barton, D.L . Wark (University of Oxford).

  3. Dyadosphere formed in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, Remo; Xue Shesheng

    2008-10-10

    We first recall the concept of Dyadosphere (electron-positron-photon plasma around a formed black holes) and its motivation, and recall on (i) the Dirac process: annihilation of electron-positron pairs to photons; (ii) the Breit-Wheeler process: production of electron-positron pairs by photons with the energy larger than electron-positron mass threshold; the Sauter-Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian and rate for the process of electron-positron production in a constant electric field. We present a general formula for the pair-production rate in the semi-classical treatment of quantum mechanical tunneling. We also present in the Quantum Electro-Dynamics framework, the calculations of the Schwinger rate and effective Lagrangian for constant electromagnetic fields. We give a review on the electron-positron plasma oscillation in constant electric fields, and its interaction with photons leading to energy and number equipartition of photons, electrons and positrons. The possibility of creating an overcritical field in astrophysical condition is pointed out. We present the discussions and calculations on (i) energy extraction from gravitational collapse; (ii) the formation of Dyadosphere in gravitational collapsing process, and (iii) its hydrodynamical expansion in Reissner Nordstroem geometry. We calculate the spectrum and flux of photon radiation at the point of transparency, and make predictions for short Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  4. Black holes as gravitational atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Cenalo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, it was argued [A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1207.3123, A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1304.6483], via a delicate thought experiment, that it is not consistent to simultaneously require that (a) Hawking radiation is pure, (b) effective field theory is valid outside a stretched horizon and (c) infalling observers encounter nothing unusual as they cross the horizon. These are the three fundamental assumptions underlying Black Hole Complementarity and the authors proposed that the most conservative resolution of the paradox is that (c) is false and the infalling observer burns up at the horizon (the horizon acts as a "firewall"). However, the firewall violates the equivalence principle and breaks the CPT invariance of quantum gravity. This led Hawking to propose recently that gravitational collapse may not end up producing event horizons, although he did not give a mechanism for how this may happen. Here we will support Hawking's conclusion in a quantum gravitational model of dust collapse. We will show that continued collapse to a singularity can only be achieved by combining two independent and entire solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We interpret the paradox as simply forbidding such a combination. This leads naturally to a picture in which matter condenses on the apparent horizon during quantum collapse.

  5. Klimovskaya: A new geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Sidorov, R. V.; Krasnoperov, R. I.; Grudnev, A. A.; Khokhlov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    In 2011 Geophysical Center RAS (GC RAS) began to deploy the Klimovskaya geomagnetic observatory in the south of Arkhangelsk region on the territory of the Institute of Physiology of Natural Adaptations, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPNA UB RAS). The construction works followed the complex of preparatory measures taken in order to confirm that the observatory can be constructed on this territory and to select the optimal configuration of observatory structures. The observatory equipping stages are described in detail, the technological and design solutions are described, and the first results of the registered data quality control are presented. It has been concluded that Klimovskaya observatory can be included in INTERMAGNET network. The observatory can be used to monitor and estimate geomagnetic activity, because it is located at high latitudes and provides data in a timely manner to the scientific community via the web-site of the Russian-Ukrainian Geomagnetic Data Center. The role of ground observatories such as Klimovskaya remains critical for long-term observations of secular variation and for complex monitoring of the geomagnetic field in combination with low-orbiting satellite data.

  6. The Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is the first Space Weather Mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. SDO's main goal is to understand, driving towards a predictive capability, those solar variations that influence life on Earth and humanity's technological systems. The past decade has seen an increasing emphasis on understanding the entire Sun, from the nuclear reactions at the core to the development and loss of magnetic loops in the corona. SDO's three science investigations (HMI, AIA, and EVE) will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. SDO will return full-disk Dopplergrams, full-disk vector magnetograms, full-disk images at nine EIUV wavelengths, and EUV spectral irradiances, all taken at a rapid cadence. This means you can 'observe the database' to study events, but we can also move forward in producing quantitative models of what the Sun is doing today. SDO is scheduled to launch in 2008 on an Atlas V rocket from the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite will fly in a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit about the longitude of New Mexico, where a dedicated Ka-band ground station will receive the 150 Mbps data flow. How SDO data will transform the study of the Sun and its affect on Space Weather studies will be discussed.

  7. 10 meter airborne observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Ritter, Joseph M.

    2008-07-01

    Inside an aircraft fuselage there is little room for the mass of all the instrumentation of a ground-based observatory much less a primary objective aperture at the scale of 10 meters. We have proposed a solution that uses a primary objective grating (POG) which matches the considerable length of the aircraft, approximately 10 meters, and conforms to aircraft aerodynamics. Light collected by the POG is diffracted at an angle of grazing exodus inside the aircraft where it is disambiguated by an optical train that fits within to the interior tunnel. Inside the aircraft, light is focused by a parabolic mirror onto a spectrograph slit. The design has a special benefit in that all objects in the field-of-view of the free spectral range of the POG can have their spectra taken as the aircraft changes orientation. We suggest flight planes that will improve integration times, angular resolution and spectral resolution to acquire targets of high stellar magnitudes or alternatively increase the number of sources acquired per flight at the cost of sensitivity.

  8. Beyond concordance cosmology with magnification of gravitational-wave standard sirens.

    PubMed

    Camera, Stefano; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2013-04-12

    We show how future gravitational-wave detectors would be able to discriminate between the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmological model and up-to-date competing alternatives, e.g., dynamical dark energy (DE) models or modified gravity (MG) theories. Our method consists of using the weak-lensing magnification effect that affects a standard-siren signal because of its traveling through the Universe's large scale structure. As a demonstration, we present constraints on DE and MG from proposed gravitational-wave detectors, namely Einstein Telescope and DECI-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Big-Bang Observer. PMID:25167243

  9. On the unreasonable effectiveness of the post-Newtonian approximation in gravitational physics.

    PubMed

    Will, Clifford M

    2011-04-12

    The post-Newtonian approximation is a method for solving Einstein's field equations for physical systems in which motions are slow compared to the speed of light and where gravitational fields are weak. Yet it has proven to be remarkably effective in describing certain strong-field, fast-motion systems, including binary pulsars containing dense neutron stars and binary black hole systems inspiraling toward a final merger. The reasons for this effectiveness are largely unknown. When carried to high orders in the post-Newtonian sequence, predictions for the gravitational-wave signal from inspiraling compact binaries will play a key role in gravitational-wave detection by laser-interferometric observatories.

  10. Error analysis of numerical gravitational waveforms from coalescing binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Heather; Chu, Tony; Kumar, Prayush; Pfeiffer, Harald; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel; Kidder, Lawrence; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) has finished a successful first observation run and will commence its second run this summer. Detection of compact object binaries utilizes matched-filtering, which requires a vast collection of highly accurate gravitational waveforms. This talk will present a set of about 100 new aligned-spin binary black hole simulations. I will discuss their properties, including a detailed error analysis, which demonstrates that the numerical waveforms are sufficiently accurate for gravitational wave detection purposes, as well as for parameter estimation purposes.

  11. Beyond concordance cosmology with magnification of gravitational-wave standard sirens.

    PubMed

    Camera, Stefano; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2013-04-12

    We show how future gravitational-wave detectors would be able to discriminate between the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmological model and up-to-date competing alternatives, e.g., dynamical dark energy (DE) models or modified gravity (MG) theories. Our method consists of using the weak-lensing magnification effect that affects a standard-siren signal because of its traveling through the Universe's large scale structure. As a demonstration, we present constraints on DE and MG from proposed gravitational-wave detectors, namely Einstein Telescope and DECI-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Big-Bang Observer.

  12. Beyond Concordance Cosmology with Magnification of Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, Stefano; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    We show how future gravitational-wave detectors would be able to discriminate between the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmological model and up-to-date competing alternatives, e.g., dynamical dark energy (DE) models or modified gravity (MG) theories. Our method consists of using the weak-lensing magnification effect that affects a standard-siren signal because of its traveling through the Universe’s large scale structure. As a demonstration, we present constraints on DE and MG from proposed gravitational-wave detectors, namely Einstein Telescope and DECI-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Big-Bang Observer.

  13. Constraints on singular evolution from gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate how the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism can potentially constrain the form of a Type IV singularity. Specifically, we study two different models with interesting phenomenology, that realize two distinct Type IV singularities, one occurring at the end of inflation and one during the radiation domination era or during the matter domination era. As we demonstrate, the Type IV singularities occurring at the matter domination era or during the radiation domination era are constrained by the gravitational baryogenesis, in such a way so that these do not render the baryon to entropy ratio singular. Both the cosmological models we study cannot be realized in the context of ordinary Einstein-Hilbert gravity, and hence our work can only be realized in the context of F(R) gravity and more generally in the context of modified gravity only.

  14. Astronomers Discover Six-Image Gravitational Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    -Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). "When we understand this system, we will have a much clearer picture of how galaxies are changed by being part of a bigger cluster of galaxies," he added. B1359+154 was discovered in 1999 by the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey, an international collaboration of astronomers who use radio telescopes to search the sky for gravitational lenses. Images made by the NSF's Very Large Array in New Mexico and by Britain's MERLIN radio telescope showed six objects suspected of being gravitational-lens images, but the results were inconclusive. Rusin and his team used the VLBA and HST in 1999 and 2000 to make more-detailed studies of B1359+154. The combination of data from the VLBA and HST convinced the astronomers that B1359+154 actually consists of six lensed images of a single background galaxy. The VLBA images were made from data collected during observations at a radio frequency of 1.7 GHz. "This is a great example of modern, multi-wavelength astronomy," said Rusin. "We need the radio telescopes to detect the gravitational lenses in the first place, then we need the visible-light information from Hubble to show us additional detail about the structure of the system." Armed with the combined VLBA and HST data about the positions and brightnesses of the six images of the background galaxy as well as the positions of the three intermediate galaxies, the astronomers did computer simulations to show how the gravitation of the three galaxies could produce the lens effect. They were able to design a computer model of the system that, in fact, produces the six images seen in B1359+154. "Our computer model certainly is not perfect, and we need to do more observations of this system to refine it, but we have clearly demonstrated that the three galaxies we see can produce a six-image lens system," said Martin Norbury, a graduate student at Jodrell Bank Observatory in Britain. "We think this work will give us an excellent tool for studying much-denser clusters of

  15. Snowstorm at the geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čop, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Sinji Vrh Geomagnetic Observatory (hereinafter the Observatory) is situated on Gora above Ajdovščina, a highland karst plateau, in the southwestern part of Slovenia. The Observatory operates in exceptional geological and meteorological conditions due to its location. The very first measurements at the time of initial tests showed that weather fronts induce changes in the local magnetic field. The first measurements intended to determine the value of this influence were carried out at the end of summer 2011. In 2013 the first such measurements were carried out in January. This article presents the results of these measurements, showing how the snowstorm induced changes in Earth's magnetic field.

  16. Boyden Observatory, then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Heerden, H. J.

    2008-08-01

    In this article the history of Boyden Observatory, 'the first truly international observatory', from its establishment in 1889 to the present will be discussed. There will be looked at locations, personnel, research done and discoveries made. The discussion will also include sections on the instruments used during that time, with specific emphasis on the 60-inch Boyden Rockefeller Telescope. Details about the instrument's specifications, upgrades, new equipment and role as research instrument will be examined. A final section will then be devoted to where Boyden Observatory finds itself today and where it wants to position itself in the future, specifically in terms of research and education.

  17. On propagation of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain an equation for the propagation time of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe. The velocity of electromagnetic waves propagation depends on the velocity of the interstellar medium in the observer's frame of reference. Gravitational radiation interacts weakly with the substance, so electromagnetic and gravitational waves propagate from a remote astrophysical object to the terrestrial observer at different time. Gravitational waves registration enables the inverse problem solution - by the difference in arrival time of electromagnetic and gravitational-wave signal, we can determine the characteristics of the emitting area of the astrophysical object.

  18. Relic gravitational waves and extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Wilczek, Frank

    1990-01-01

    In extended inflation, a new version of inflation where the transition from an inflationary to a radiation-dominated universe is accomplished by bubble nucleation, bubble collisions supply a potent - and potentially detectable - source of gravitational waves. The energy density in relic gravitons from bubble collisions is expected to be about 0.00005 of closure density. Their characteristic wavelength depends on the reheating temperature. If black holes are produced by bubble collisions, they will evaporate, producing shorter-wavelength gravitons.

  19. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  20. Gauss-Bonnet gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this letter we study some variant forms of gravitational baryogenesis by using higher order terms containing the partial derivative of the Gauss-Bonnet scalar coupled to the baryonic current. This scenario extends the well known theory that uses a similar coupling between the Ricci scalar and the baryonic current. One appealing feature of the scenario we study is that the predicted baryon asymmetry during a radiation domination era is non-zero. We calculate the baryon to entropy ratio for the Gauss-Bonnet term and by using the observational constraints we investigate which are the allowed forms of the R + F (G) gravity controlling the evolution. Also we briefly discuss some alternative higher order terms that can generate a non-zero baryon asymmetry, even in the conformal invariance limit.

  1. The sky pattern of the linearized gravitational memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mädler, Thomas; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The gravitational memory effect leads to a net displacement in the relative positions of test particles. This memory is related to the change in the strain of the gravitational radiation field between infinite past and infinite future retarded times. There are three known sources of the memory effect: (i) the loss of energy to future null infinity by massless fields or particles, (ii) the ejection of massive particles to infinity from a bound system and (iii) homogeneous, source-free gravitational waves. In the context of linearized theory, we show that asymptotic conditions controlling these known sources of the gravitational memory effect rule out any other possible sources with physically reasonable stress–energy tensors. Except for the source-free gravitational waves, the two other known sources produce gravitational memory with E-mode radiation strain, characterized by a certain curl-free sky pattern of their polarization. Thus our results show that the only known source of B-mode gravitational memory is of primordial origin, corresponding in the linearized theory to a homogeneous wave entering from past null infinity.

  2. The sky pattern of the linearized gravitational memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mädler, Thomas; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The gravitational memory effect leads to a net displacement in the relative positions of test particles. This memory is related to the change in the strain of the gravitational radiation field between infinite past and infinite future retarded times. There are three known sources of the memory effect: (i) the loss of energy to future null infinity by massless fields or particles, (ii) the ejection of massive particles to infinity from a bound system and (iii) homogeneous, source-free gravitational waves. In the context of linearized theory, we show that asymptotic conditions controlling these known sources of the gravitational memory effect rule out any other possible sources with physically reasonable stress-energy tensors. Except for the source-free gravitational waves, the two other known sources produce gravitational memory with E-mode radiation strain, characterized by a certain curl-free sky pattern of their polarization. Thus our results show that the only known source of B-mode gravitational memory is of primordial origin, corresponding in the linearized theory to a homogeneous wave entering from past null infinity.

  3. Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory-Science Highlights for the First 8 Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the science highlights for the first 8 months of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory. Results from pulsars, flaring AGN, gamma ray bursts, diffuse radiation, LMC and electron spectrum are also presented.

  4. Circular polarization of primordial gravitational waves in string-inspired inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Masaki; Soda, Jiro; Kanno, Sugumi

    2008-01-15

    We study a mechanism to produce the circular polarization of primordial gravitational waves. The circular polarization is generated during the superinflation driven by the Gauss-Bonnet term in the string-inspired cosmology. The instability in the tensor mode caused by the Gauss-Bonnet term and the parity violation due to the gravitational Chern-Simons term are the essential ingredients of the mechanism. We also discuss detectability of the produced circular polarization of gravitational waves. It turns out that the simple model of single-field inflation contradicts cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose a two-field inflation model. In this two-field model, the circular polarization of gravitational waves is created in the frequency range designed by the big-bang observer (BBO) or the deci-hertz gravitational-wave observatory (DECIGO)

  5. The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George; Kessler, Martin F.

    1995-01-01

    ISO, scheduled to launch in 1995, will carry into orbit the most sophisticated infrared observatory of the decade. Overviews of the mission, instrument payload and scientific program are given, along with a comparison of the strengths of ISO and SOFIA.

  6. Haystack Observatory Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudoin, Chris; Corey, Brian; Niell, Arthur; Cappallo, Roger; Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Technology development at MIT Haystack Observatory were focused on four areas in 2012: VGOS developments at GGAO; Digital backend developments and workshop; RFI compatibility at VLBI stations; Mark 6 VLBI data system development.

  7. Islamic Astronomical Instruments and Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, Tofigh

    This chapter is a brief survey of astronomical instruments being used and developed in Islamic territories from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries as well as a concise account of major observatories and observational programs in this period.

  8. An astronomical observatory for Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Mar, Juan Quintanilla; Sicardy, Bruno; Giraldo, Víctor Ayma; Callo, Víctor Raúl Aguilar

    2011-06-01

    Peru and France are to conclude an agreement to provide Peru with an astronomical observatory equipped with a 60-cm diameter telescope. The principal aims of this project are to establish and develop research and teaching in astronomy. Since 2004, a team of researchers from Paris Observatory has been working with the University of Cusco (UNSAAC) on the educational, technical and financial aspects of implementing this venture. During an international astronomy conference in Cusco in July 2009, the foundation stone of the future Peruvian Observatory was laid at the top of Pachatusan Mountain. UNSAAC, represented by its Rector, together with the town of Oropesa and the Cusco regional authority, undertook to make the sum of 300,000€ available to the project. An agreement between Paris Observatory and UNSAAC now enables Peruvian students to study astronomy through online teaching.

  9. Status of the SOFIA Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    The SOFIA observatory has been in routine science operations since returning in January from a 6 month-long heavy maintenance period for the aircraft and the telescope assembly. These operations include a successful 6 week deployment to the Southern hemisphere. This presentation will provide an update to the current operational status of the SOFIA observatory, concentrating on the improvements and upgrades that have been implemented since the heavy maintenance period.

  10. Sofia Observatory Performance and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temi, Pasquale; Miller, Walter; Dunham, Edward; McLean, Ian; Wolf, Jurgen; Becklin, Eric; Bida, Tom; Brewster, Rick; Casey, Sean; Collins, Peter; Jakob, Holger; Killebrew, Jana; Lampater, Ulrich; Mandushev, Georgi; Marcum, Pamela; Meyer, Allan; Pfueller, Enrico; Reinacher, Andreas; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Savage, Maureen; Teufel, Stefan; Wiedemann, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently concluded a set of engineering flights for Observatory performance evaluation. These in-flight opportunities have been viewed as a first comprehensive assessment of the Observatory's performance and will be used to address the development activity that is planned for 2012, as well as to identify additional Observatory upgrades. A series of 8 SOFIA Characterization And Integration (SCAI) flights have been conducted from June to December 2011. The HIPO science instrument in conjunction with the DSI Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC) have been used to evaluate pointing stability, including the image motion due to rigid-body and flexible-body telescope modes as well as possible aero-optical image motion. We report on recent improvements in pointing stability by using an Active Mass Damper system installed on Telescope Assembly. Measurements and characterization of the shear layer and cavity seeing, as well as image quality evaluation as a function of wavelength have been performed using the HIPO+FLITECAM Science Instrument configuration (FLIPO). A number of additional tests and measurements have targeted basic Observatory capabilities and requirements including, but not limited to, pointing accuracy, chopper evaluation and imager sensitivity. SCAI activities included in-flight partial Science Instrument commissioning prior to the use of the instruments as measuring engines. This paper reports on the data collected during the SCAI flights and presents current SOFIA Observatory performance and characterization.

  11. Supersymmetry and gravitational duality

    SciTech Connect

    Argurio, Riccardo; Dehouck, Francois; Houart, Laurent

    2009-06-15

    We study how the supersymmetry algebra copes with gravitational duality. As a playground, we consider a charged Taub-Newman-Unti-Tamburino(NUT) solution of D=4, N=2 supergravity. We find explicitly its Killing spinors, and the projection they obey provides evidence that the dual magnetic momenta necessarily have to appear in the supersymmetry algebra. The existence of such a modification is further supported using an approach based on the Nester form. In the process, we find new expressions for the dual magnetic momenta, including the NUT charge. The same expressions are then rederived using gravitational duality.

  12. Galaxies as gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Barnothy, J; Barnothy, M F

    1968-10-18

    Of all the galaxies in the visible part of the universe, 500 million are seen through intervening galaxies. In some instances the foreground galaxy will act as a gravitational lens and produce distorted and (in brightness) greatly amplified images of the galaxy behind it; such images may simulate starlike superluminous objects such as quasars (quasi-stellar objects). The number of gravitational lenses is several times greater than the number of quasars yet observed. In other instances the superposition of the image upon a visible foreground galaxy may simulate morphological configurations resembling N-type, dumbbell, spiral, or barred-spiral galaxies. PMID:17836654

  13. Gravitation: Foundations and Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-01-01

    1. Special relativity; 2. Scalar and electromagnetic fields in special relativity; 3. Gravity and spacetime geometry: the inescapable connection; 4. Metric tensor, geodesics and covariant derivative; 5. Curvature of spacetime; 6. Einstein's field equations and gravitational dynamics; 7. Spherically symmetric geometry; 8. Black holes; 9. Gravitational waves; 10. Relativistic cosmology; 11. Differential forms and exterior calculus; 12. Hamiltonian structure of general relativity; 13. Evolution of cosmological perturbations; 14. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime; 15. Gravity in higher and lower dimensions; 16. Gravity as an emergent phenomenon; Notes; Index.

  14. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  15. Gravitational lenses and particle properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of observations of gravitational lens systems for the determination of cosmological constants and for tests of the nature and distribution of dark matter is illustrated. The advantages and disadvantages of gravitational lenses as cosmological probes are evaluated.

  16. LIGO Education and Outreach at Twin Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thacker, John

    2007-04-01

    LIGO has twin Gravitational Wave observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. Both sites have active outreach programs but each has a different emphasis and methodology. We will briefly describe the nature of these outreach programs. We will then focus attention on the Livingston facility since its outreach program is centered on a new 9000 sq.ft. Science Education Center. We will describe the facility and its exhibits then discuss the structure of the outreach program at the Center. The objectives of the Center are to: communicate LIGO-related science concepts to the public; strengthen skills and abilities of in-service and pre-service teachers and enhance the science and mathematics skills of a broad spectrum of students in Louisiana and the surrounding region. By partnering with a museum (The Exploratorium), a university (Southern University at Baton Rouge) and a state education agency for education reform, LA GEAR UP, we have been able to quickly open up opportunities. Benefiting from our fine collaborators, we've been able to create positive impact in the local science education community in a relatively brief time span.

  17. The Carl Sagan solar and stellar observatories as remote observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo-Morales, J.; Loera-Gonzalez, P.

    In this work we summarize recent efforts made by the University of Sonora, with the goal of expanding the capability for remote operation of the Carl Sagan Solar and Stellar Observatories, as well as the first steps that have been taken in order to achieve autonomous robotic operation in the near future. The solar observatory was established in 2007 on the university campus by our late colleague A. Sánchez-Ibarra. It consists of four solar telescopes mounted on a single equatorial mount. On the other hand, the stellar observatory, which saw the first light on 16 February 2010, is located 21 km away from Hermosillo, Sonora at the site of the School of Agriculture of the University of Sonora. Both observatories can now be remotely controlled, and to some extent are able to operate autonomously. In this paper we discuss how this has been accomplished in terms of the use of software as well as the instruments under control. We also briefly discuss the main scientific and educational objectives, the future plans to improve the control software and to construct an autonomous observatory on a mountain site, as well as the opportunities for collaborations.

  18. Testing gravity with gravitational wave source counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Battaglia, Nicholas; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise ratio (ρ) from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as {R}-1, thus we expect the source counts to follow {{d}}{N}/{{d}}ρ \\propto {ρ }-4. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the strain falls as {R}-γ , where γ =1 recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled Universe, and forecast the sensitivity of future observations to deviations from standard General Relativity. We first consider the case of few objects, seven sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on γ, finding γ \\gt 0.33 at 95% confidence level. The distribution of our simulated sample is very consistent with the distribution of the trigger events reported by Advanced LIGO. Future measurements will improve these constraints: with 100 events, we estimate that γ can be measured with an uncertainty of 15%. We generalize the formalism to account for a range of chirp masses and the possibility that the signal falls as {exp}(-R/{R}0)/{R}γ .

  19. Research on gravitational physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Dahl, A. O.

    1974-01-01

    The topic of gravitational plant physiology was studied through aspects of plant development (in ARABIDOPSIS) and of behavior (in HELIANTHUS) as these were affected by altered g experience. The effect of increased g levels on stem polarity (in COLEUS) was also examined.

  20. Probing gravitational dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jing; He, Hong-Jian

    2015-03-01

    So far all evidences of dark matter (DM) come from astrophysical and cosmological observations, due to the gravitational interactions of DM. It is possible that the true DM particle in the universe joins gravitational interactions only, but nothing else. Such a Gravitational DM (GDM) may act as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), which is conceptually simple and attractive. In this work, we explore this direction by constructing the simplest scalar GDM particle χs. It is a Bbb Z2 odd singlet under the standard model (SM) gauge group, and naturally joins the unique dimension-4 interaction with Ricci curvature, ξsχs2Script R, where ξs is the dimensionless nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that this gravitational interaction ξsχs2Script R, together with Higgs-curvature nonminimal coupling term ξhH†HScript R, induces effective couplings between χs2 and SM fields, and can account for the observed DM thermal relic abundance. We analyze the annihilation cross sections of GDM particles and derive the viable parameter space for realizing the DM thermal relic density. We further study the direct/indirect detections and the collider signatures of such a scalar GDM. These turn out to be highly predictive and testable.

  1. Probing gravitational dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jing; He, Hong-Jian

    2015-03-27

    So far all evidences of dark matter (DM) come from astrophysical and cosmological observations, due to the gravitational interactions of DM. It is possible that the true DM particle in the universe joins gravitational interactions only, but nothing else. Such a Gravitational DM (GDM) may act as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), which is conceptually simple and attractive. In this work, we explore this direction by constructing the simplest scalar GDM particle χ{sub s}. It is a ℤ{sub 2} odd singlet under the standard model (SM) gauge group, and naturally joins the unique dimension-4 interaction with Ricci curvature, ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, where ξ{sub s} is the dimensionless nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that this gravitational interaction ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, together with Higgs-curvature nonminimal coupling term ξ{sub h}H{sup †}HR, induces effective couplings between χ{sub s}{sup 2} and SM fields, and can account for the observed DM thermal relic abundance. We analyze the annihilation cross sections of GDM particles and derive the viable parameter space for realizing the DM thermal relic density. We further study the direct/indirect detections and the collider signatures of such a scalar GDM. These turn out to be highly predictive and testable.

  2. Non-gravitational perturbations and satellite geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, A.; Nobill, A.M.; Farinella, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the basic ideas of the physics of non-gravitational perturbations and the mathematics required to compute their orbital effects. It conveys the relevance of the different problems that must be solved to achieve a given level of accuracy in orbit determination and in recovery of geophysically significant parameters. Selected Contents are: Orders of Magnitude of the Perturbing Forces, Tides and Apparent Forces, Tools from Celestial Mechanics, Solar Radiation Pressure-Direct Effects: Satellite-Solar Radiation Interaction, Long-Term Effects on Semi-Major Axis, Radiation Pressure-Indirect Effects: Earth-Reflected Radiation Pressure, Anisotropic Thermal Emission, Drag: Orbital Perturbations by a Drag-Like Force, and Charged Particle Drag.

  3. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  4. GEOSCOPE Observatory Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, N.; Pardo, C.; Bonaime, S.; Stutzmann, E.; Maggi, A.

    2010-12-01

    The GEOSCOPE observatory consists of a global seismic network and a data center. The 31 GEOSCOPE stations are installed in 19 countries, across all continents and on islands throughout the oceans. They are equipped with three component very broadband seismometers (STS1 or STS2) and 24 or 26 bit digitizers, as required by the Federation of Seismic Digital Network (FDSN). In most stations, a pressure gauge and a thermometer are also installed. Currently, 23 stations send data in real or near real time to GEOSCOPE Data Center and tsunami warning centers. In 2009, two stations (SSB and PPTF) have been equipped with warpless base plates. Analysis of one year of data shows that the new installation decreases long period noise (20s to 1000s) by 10 db on horizontal components. SSB is now rated in the top ten long period stations for horizontal components according to the LDEO criteria. In 2010, Stations COYC, PEL and RER have been upgraded with Q330HR, Metrozet electronics and warpless base plates. They have been calibrated with the calibration table CT-EW1 and the software jSeisCal and Calex-EW. Aluminum jars are now installed instead of glass bells. A vacuum of 100 mbars is applied in the jars which improves thermal insulation of the seismometers and reduces moisture and long-term corrosion in the sensor. A new station RODM has just been installed in Rodrigues Island in Mauritius with standard Geoscope STS2 setup: STS2 seismometer on a granite base plate and covered by cooking pot and thermal insulation, it is connected to Q330HR digitizer, active lightning protection, Seiscomp PC and real-time internet connection. Continuous data of all stations are collected in real time or with a delay by the GEOSCOPE Data Center in Paris where they are validated, archived and made available to the international scientific community. Data are freely available to users by different interfaces according data types (see : http://geoscope.ipgp.fr) - Continuous data in real time coming

  5. Development of solar tower observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  6. Enhancing the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, D.; Lillie, C.

    2010-03-01

    We present results of systems studies expected to significantly enhance the science utility and reduce technical as well as cost risks for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Our Northrop Grumman team draws on the experience of building and operating Chandra and others of NASA's premier astrophysical observatories (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope) as well as our experience as a leading developer of deployable space structures. For IXO, we have developed (a) an optical bench concept that has the potential to increase the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements; (b) an instrument and system layout that increases the accessible field of regard; and (c) a number of design choices based on flight proven concepts that reduce cost risk. Our concept for the IXO deployable bench is a Tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. While the overall concept is innovative and will require further evaluation, it is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require any new technology. We have also explored the options opened by using hinged, articulating solar panels, and found that when used along with a fully enclosed MLI tent surrounding the optical bench, and an instrument module utilizing radially facing radiator panels, the enhanced configuration will enable us to greatly increase IXO's field of regard without distorting the optical bench beyond acceptable tolerances, making more of the sky accessible for observation at any given time.

  7. Enhancing the International X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Dean; Danner, Rolf; Lillie, Chuck

    2009-09-01

    We present preliminary results of systems studies expected to significantly enhance the science utility and reduce technical as well as cost risks for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Our Northrop Grumman team draws on the experience of building and operating Chandra and others of NASA's premier astrophysical observatories (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope) as well as our experience as a leading developer of deployable space structures. For IXO, we have developed (a) an optical bench concept that increases the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements; (b) an instrument and system layout that increases the accessible field of regard; and (c) a number of design choices based on flight proven concepts that reduce cost risk. Our concept for the IXO deployable bench is a tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. While the overall concept is innovative and will require further evaluation, it is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require any new technology. We have also explored the options opened by using hinged, articulating solar panels, and found that when used along with a fully enclosed MLI tent surrounding the optical bench, and an instrument module utilizing radially facing radiator panels, the enhanced configuration will enable us to greatly increase IXO's field of regard without distorting the optical bench beyond acceptable tolerances, making more of the sky accessible for observation at any given time.

  8. Enhancing the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, D.; Lillie, C.

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results of systems studies expected to significantly enhance the science utility and reduce technical as well as cost risks for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Our Northrop Grumman team draws on the experience of building and operating Chandra and others of NASA's premier astrophysical observatories (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope) as well as our experience as a leading developer of deployable space structures. For IXO, we have developed (a) an optical bench concept that increases the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements; (b) an instrument and system layout that increases the accessible field of regard; and (c) a number of design choices based on flight proven concepts that reduce cost risk. Our concept for the IXO deployable bench is a Tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. While the overall concept is innovative and will require further evaluation, it is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require any new technology. We have also explored the options opened by using hinged, articulating solar panels, and found that when used along with a fully enclosed MLI tent surrounding the optical bench, and an instrument module utilizing radially facing radiator panels, the enhanced configuration will enable us to greatly increase IXO's field of regard without distorting the optical bench beyond acceptable tolerances, making more of the sky accessible for observation at any given time.

  9. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L.; Baker, John G.

    2013-09-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ˜ 10(-5) - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  10. Observatory Bibliographies as Research Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Winkelman, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, observatory bibliographies were maintained to provide insight in how successful a observatory is as measured by its prominence in the (refereed) literature. When we set up the bibliographic database for the Chandra X-ray Observatory (http://cxc.harvard.edu/cgi-gen/cda/bibliography) as part of the Chandra Data Archive ((http://cxc.harvard.edu/cda/), very early in the mission, our objective was to make it primarily a useful tool for our user community. To achieve this we are: (1) casting a very wide net in collecting Chandra-related publications; (2) including for each literature reference in the database a wealth of metadata that is useful for the users; and (3) providing specific links between the articles and the datasets in the archive that they use. As a result our users are able to browse the literature and the data archive simultaneously. As an added bonus, the rich metadata content and data links have also allowed us to assemble more meaningful statistics about the scientific efficacy of the observatory. In all this we collaborate closely with the Astrophysics Data System (ADS). Among the plans for future enhancement are the inclusion of press releases and the Chandra image gallery, linking with ADS semantic searching tools, full-text metadata mining, and linking with other observatories' bibliographies. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC) and depends critically on the services provided by the ADS.

  11. Using Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Daniel E.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2005-08-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive binary black hole (BBH) in-spirals are potentially powerful standard sirens (the GW analog to standard candles; see work of B. Schutz). Because these systems are well modeled, the space-based GW observatory LISA will be able to measure the luminosity distance (but not the redshift) to some distant massive BBH systems with 1%-10% accuracy. This accuracy is largely limited by pointing error: GW sources are generally poorly localized on the sky. Localizing the binary independently (e.g., through association with an electromagnetic counterpart) greatly reduces this positional error. An electromagnetic counterpart may also allow determination of the event's redshift. In this case, BBH coalescence would constitute an extremely precise (better than 1%) standard candle visible to high redshift. In practice, gravitational lensing degrades this precision, although the candle remains precise enough to provide useful information about the distance-redshift relation. Even if very rare, these GW standard sirens would complement, and increase confidence in, other standard candles.

  12. The Exoplanet Microlensing Survey by the Proposed WFIRST Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the . coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing. measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory. with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  13. Overview of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (originally called the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - AXAF) is the X-Ray component of NASA's "Great Observatory" Program. Chandra is a NASA facility that provides scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to scientific proposals for its use. The Observatory is the product of the efforts of many organizations in the United States and Europe. The Great Observatories also include the Hubble Space Telescope for space-based observations of astronomical objects primarily in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the now defunct Compton Gamma- Ray Observatory that was designed to observe gamma-ray emission from astronomical objects, and the soon-to-be-launched Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (hereafter CXO) is sensitive to X-rays in the energy range from below 0.1 to above 10.0 keV corresponding to wavelengths from 12 to 0.12 nanometers. The relationship among the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, sorted by characteristic temperature and the corresponding wavelength, is illustrated. The German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen discovered what he thought was a new form of radiation in 1895. He called it X-radiation to summarize its properties. The radiation had the ability to pass through many materials that easily absorb visible light and to free electrons from atoms. We now know that X-rays are nothing more than light (electromagnetic radiation) but at high energies. Light has been given many names: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, X-ray and gamma radiation are all different forms. Radio waves are composed of low energy particles of light (photons). Optical photons - the only photons perceived by the human eye - are a million times more energetic than the typical radio photon, whereas the energies of X-ray photons range from hundreds to thousands of times higher than that of optical photons. Very low temperature systems

  14. The Scientific Potential of Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.

    The millihertz gravitational wave band can only be accessed with a space-based interferometer, but it is one of the richest in potential sources. Observations in this band have amazing scientific potential. The mergers between massive black holes with mass in the range 104-107M_{⊙}, which are expected to occur following the mergers of their host galaxies, produce strong millihertz gravitational radiation. Observations of these systems will trace the hierarchical assembly of structure in the Universe in a mass range that is very difficult to probe electromagnetically. Stellar mass compact objects falling into such black holes in the centres of galaxies generate detectable gravitational radiation for several years prior to the final plunge and merger with the central black hole. Measurements of these systems offer an unprecedented opportunity to probe the predictions of general relativity in the strong-field and dynamical regime. Millihertz gravitational waves are also generated by millions of ultra-compact binaries in the Milky Way, providing a new way to probe galactic stellar populations. ESA has recognised this great scientific potential by selecting The Gravitational Universe as its theme for the L3 large satellite mission, scheduled for launch in ˜ 2034. In this article we will review the likely sources for millihertz gravitational wave detectors and describe the wide applications that observations of these sources could have for astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics.

  15. Australian network of magnetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C. E.

    Six magnetic observatories are presently operated by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics (BMR), with assistance from various other organizations. Variometer recordings are made of three or more elements of the field at minute intervals, and absolute measurements are made weekly. There are four observatories on the continent (Canberra, Gnangara, Charters Towers, and Learmonth), one on Macquarie Island, and one at Mawson Station in eastern Antarctica (Figure 1). In addition, semiweekly absolute observations of the field (D, H, and F) are made at the other two permanent Australian Antarctic bases (Casey and Davis). A three-axis fluxgate magnetometer (EDA Electronics, Toronto , Canada) is operated independently by the Upper Atmosphere Physics group at Davis. Monthly mean values, K indices, and information about magnetic disturbances are published monthly in the BMR Geophysical Observatory Report.

  16. Three-point statistics of cosmological stochastic gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Adshead, Peter; Lim, Eugene A.

    2010-07-15

    We consider the three-point function (i.e. the bispectrum or non-Gaussianity) for stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves. We estimate the amplitude of this signal for the primordial inflationary background, gravitational waves generated during preheating, and for gravitational waves produced by self-ordering scalar fields following a global phase transition. To assess detectability, we describe how to extract the three-point signal from an idealized interferometric experiment and compute the signal to noise ratio as a function of integration time. The three-point signal for the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by inflation is unsurprisingly tiny. For gravitational radiation generated by purely causal, classical mechanisms we find that, no matter how nonlinear the process is, the three-point correlations produced vanish in direct detection experiments. On the other hand, we show that in scenarios where the B-mode of the cosmic microwave background is sourced by gravitational waves generated by a global phase transition, a strong three-point signal among the polarization modes is also produced. This may provide another method of distinguishing inflationary B-modes. To carry out this computation, we have developed a diagrammatic approach to the calculation of stochastic gravitational waves sourced by scalar fluids, which has applications beyond the present scenario.

  17. Environmental Observatories and Hydrologic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, R. P.; Duncan, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    During the past several years, the environmental sciences community has been attempting to design large- scale obsevatories that will transform the science. A watershed-based observatory has emerged as an effective landscape unit for a broad range of environmental sciences and engineering. For an effective observatory, modeling is a central requirement because models are precise statements of the hypothesized conceptual organization of watersheds and of the processes believed to be controlling hydrology of the watershed. Furthermore, models can serve to determine the value of existing data and the incremental value of any additional data to be collected. Given limited resources, such valuation is mandatory for an objective design of an observatory. Modeling is one part of a "digital watershed" that must be constructed for any observatory, a concept that has been developed by the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information Systems project. A digital watershed has three functions. First, it permits assembly of time series (such as stream discharge or precipitation measurements), static spatial coverages (such as topography), and dynamic fields (such as precipitation radar and other remotely sensed data). Second, based upon this common data description, a digital observatory permits multiple conceptualizations of the observatory to be created and to be stored. These conceptualizations could range from lumped box-and-arrow watershed models, to semi-distributed topographically based models, to three-dimensional finite element models. Finally, each conceptualization can lead to multiple models--that is, a set of equations that quantitatively describe hydrologic (or biogeochemical or geomorphologic) processes through libraries of tools that can be linked as workflow sequences. The advances in cyberinfrastructure that allow the storage of multiple conceptualizations and multiple model formulations of these conceptualizations promise to accelerate advances in environmental science both

  18. eLISA and the Gravitational Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-08-01

    The last century has seen enormous progress in our understanding of the Universe. We know the life cycles of stars, the structure of galaxies, the remnants of the big bang, and have a general understanding of how the Universe evolved. We have come remarkably far using electromagnetic radiation as our tool for observing the Universe. However, gravity is the engine behind many of the processes in the Universe, and much of its action is dark. Opening a gravitational window on the Universe will let us go further than any alternative. Gravity has its own messenger: Gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime. They travel essentially undisturbed and let us peer deep into the formation of the first seed black holes, exploring redshifts as large as z ~ 20, prior to the epoch of cosmic re-ionisation. Exquisite and unprecedented measurements of black hole masses and spins will make it possible to trace the history of black holes across all stages of galaxy evolution, and at the same time constrain any deviation from the Kerr metric of General Relativity. eLISA will be the first ever mission to study the entire Universe with gravitational waves. eLISA is an all-sky monitor and will offer a wide view of a dynamic cosmos using gravitational waves as new and unique messengers to unveil The Gravitational Universe. It provides the closest ever view of the early processes at TeV energies, has guaranteed sources in the form of verification binaries in the Milky Way, and can probe the entire Universe, from its smallest scales around singularities and black holes, all the way to cosmological dimensions.

  19. Gravitational waves from binaries on unbound orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majár, János; Forgács, Péter; Vasúth, Mátyás

    2010-09-01

    A generalized true anomaly-type parametrization, convenient to describe both bound and open orbits of a two-body system in general relativity is introduced. A complete description of the time evolution of both the radial and angular equations of a binary system taking into account the first order post-Newtonian (1PN) corrections is given. The gravitational radiation field emitted by the system is computed in the 1PN approximation including higher multipole moments beyond the standard quadrupole term. The gravitational waveforms in the time domain are explicitly given up to the 1PN order for unbound orbits, but the results are also illustrated on binaries on elliptic orbits with special attention given to the effects of eccentricity.

  20. Gravitational wave memory in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the gravitational wave memory effect in an expanding FLRW spacetime. We find that if the gravitational field is decomposed into gauge-invariant scalar, vector, and tensor modes after the fashion of Bardeen, only the tensor mode gives rise to memory, and this memory can be calculated using the retarded Green's function associated with the tensor wave equation. If locally similar radiation source events occur on flat and FLRW backgrounds, we find that the resulting memories will differ only by a redshift factor, and we explore whether or not this factor depends on the expansion history of the FLRW universe. We compare our results to related work by Bieri, Garfinkle, and Yau.

  1. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  2. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (Editor); Gehrels, Neil (Editor); Dennis, Brian (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  3. NOAA Atmospheric Baseline Observatories in the Arctic: Alaska & Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel, B. A.; Butler, J. H.; Schnell, R. C.; Crain, R.; Haggerty, P.; Greenland, S.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates two year-round, long-term climate research facilities, known as Atmospheric Baseline Observatories (ABOs), in the Arctic Region. The Arctic ABOs are part of a core network to support the NOAA Global Monitoring Division's mission to acquire, evaluate, and make available accurate, long-term records of atmospheric gases, aerosol particles, and solar radiation in a manner that allows the causes of change to be understood. The observatory at Barrow, Alaska (BRW) was established in 1973 and is now host to over 200 daily measurements. Located a few kilometers to the east of the village of Barrow at 71.3° N it is also the northernmost point in the United States. Measurement records from Barrow are critical to our understanding of the Polar Regions including exchange among tundra, atmosphere, and ocean. Multiple data sets are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, ozone, meteorology, and numerous others. The surface, in situ carbon dioxide record alone consists of over 339,000 measurements since the system was installed in July 1973. The observatory at Summit, Greenland (SUM) has been a partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Polar Programs since 2004, similar to that for South Pole. Observatory data records began in 1997 from this facility located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet at 72.58° N. Summit is unique as the only high-altitude (3200m), mid-troposphere, inland, Arctic observatory, largely free from outside local influences such as thawing tundra or warming surface waters. The measurement records from Summit help us understand long-range transport across the Arctic region, as well as interactions between air and snow. Near-real-time data are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, meteorology, ozone, and numerous others. This poster will highlight the two facilities

  4. Tools for Coordinated Planning Between Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Fishman, Mark; Grella, Vince; Kerbel, Uri; Maks, Lori; Misra, Dharitri; Pell, Vince; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the realization of NASA's era of great observatories, there are now more than three space-based telescopes operating in different wavebands. This situation provides astronomers with a unique opportunity to simultaneously observe with multiple observatories. Yet scheduling multiple observatories simultaneously is highly inefficient when compared to observations using only one single observatory. Thus, programs using multiple observatories are limited not due to scientific restrictions, but due to operational inefficiencies. At present, multi-observatory programs are conducted by submitting observing proposals separately to each concerned observatory. To assure that the proposed observations can be scheduled, each observatory's staff has to check that the observations are valid and meet all the constraints for their own observatory; in addition, they have to verify that the observations satisfy the constraints of the other observatories. Thus, coordinated observations require painstaking manual collaboration among the observatory staff at each observatory. Due to the lack of automated tools for coordinated observations, this process is time consuming, error-prone, and the outcome of the requests is not certain until the very end. To increase observatory operations efficiency, such manpower intensive processes need to undergo re-engineering. To overcome this critical deficiency, Goddard Space Flight Center's Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch is developing a prototype effort called the Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT). The main objective of the VOLT project is to provide visual tools to help automate the planning of coordinated observations by multiple astronomical observatories, as well as to increase the scheduling probability of all observations.

  5. Black Hole Kicks as New Gravitational Wave Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher J.

    2016-07-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as ˜500 km s-1 , which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  6. Black Hole Kicks as New Gravitational Wave Observables.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as ∼500  km s^{-1}, which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy. PMID:27419556

  7. Neutron interference in the gravitational field of a ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Robert D.; Mallett, Ronald L.

    2015-07-01

    The neutron split-beam interferometer has proven to be particularly useful in measuring Newtonian gravitational effects such as those studied by Colella, Overhauser, and Werner (COW). The development of the ring laser has led to numerous applications in many areas of physics including a recent general relativistic prediction of frame dragging in the gravitational field produced by the electromagnetic radiation in a ring laser. This paper introduces a new general technique based on a canonical transformation of the Dirac equation for the gravitational field of a general linearized spacetime. Using this technique it is shown that there is a phase shift in the interference of two neutron beams due to the frame-dragging nature of the gravitational field of a ring laser.

  8. Black Hole Kicks as New Gravitational Wave Observables.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as ∼500  km s^{-1}, which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  9. Gravitational lensing by gravastars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    As a possible method to detect gravastars (gravitational-vacuum-star), which was originally proposed by Mazur and Mottola, we study their gravitational lensing effects. Specifically, we adopt a spherical thin-shell model of a gravastar developed by Visser and Wiltshire, which connects interior de Sitter geometry and exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and assume that its surface is optically transparent. We calculate the image of a companion which rotates around the gravastar; we find that some characteristic images appear, depending on whether the gravastar possess unstable circular orbits of photons (Model 1) or not (Model 2). For Model 2, we calculate the total luminosity change, which is called microlensing effects; the maximal luminosity could be considerably larger than the black hole with the same mass.

  10. Gravitational coset models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Paul P.; Fleming, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The algebra A {/D - 3 + + +} dimensionally reduces to the E D-1 symmetry algebra of (12 - D)-dimensional supergravity. An infinite set of five-dimensional gravitational objects embedded in D-dimensions is constructed by identifying the null geodesic motion on cosets embedded in the generalised Kac-Moody algebra A {/D - 3 + + +}. By analogy with super-gravity these are bound states of dual gravitons. The metric interpolates continuously between exotic gravitational solutions generated by the action of an affine sub-group. We investigate mixed-symmetry fields in the brane sigma model, identify actions for the full interpolating bound state and investigate the dualisation of the bound state to a solution of the Einstein-Hilbert action via the Hodge dual on multiforms. We conclude that the Hodge dual is insufficient to reconstruct solutions to the Einstein-Hilbert action from mixed-symmetry tensors.

  11. Applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Neal

    I derive the basic principles of gravitational lensing, and proceed to describe several astrophysical applications. First, invariants in gravitational lensing magnification are derived using techniques of multidimensional residue calculus, and illustrated with example calculations. Then I discuss how these invariant quantities may be useful for measuring the properties of lenses. Next, I discuss the use of astrometric microlensing for studying extrasolar planets. Finally, the use of lensing for the study of substructure in dark matter halos is presented, along with ramifications for the small-scale power spectrum of matter fluctuations. The strongest bounds to date are placed on the mass of the dark matter particle, as well as bounds on the neutrino mass and slope of the primordial power spectrum.

  12. Self-gravitating skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Canfora, Fabrizio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    A self-gravitating Skyrmion is an analytic and globally regular solution of the Einstein-Skyrme system with nonvanishing topological charge. The spacetime is the direct product R × S3 and the Skyrmion is the self-gravitating generalization of the static hedgehog solution of Manton and Ruback. This solution can be promoted to a dynamical one in which the spacetime is a cosmology of the Bianchi type-IX and, through an analytic continuation, it can also be turned into a transversable asymptotically AdS Lorentzian wormhole. The stress-energy of this wormhole satisfies physically realistic energy conditions and the only “exotic matter” required by it is a negative cosmological constant.

  13. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  14. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  15. Gravitational wave astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, L. S.

    Astronomers rely on a multiplicity of observational perspectives in order to infer the nature of the Universe. Progress in astronomy has historically been associated with new or improved observational perspectives. Gravitational wave detectors now under construction will provide us with a perspective on the Universe fundamentally different from any we have come to know. With this new perspective comes the hope of new insights and understanding, not just of exotic astrophysical processes, but of "bread-and-butter" astrophysics: e.g., stars and stellar evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, neutron star structure, and cosmology. In this report the author discusses briefly a small subset of the areas of conventional, "bread-and-butter" astrophysics where we can reasonably hope that gravitational wave observations will provide us with valuable new insights and understandings.

  16. Spacetime and gravitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopczyński, W.; Trautman, A.

    This book is a revised translation of the Polish original "Czasoprzestrzeń i grawitacja", Warszawa (Poland), Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, 1984. Ideas about space and time are at the root of one's understanding of nature, both at the intuitive level of everyday experience and in the framework of sophisticated physical theories. These ideas have led to the development of geometry and its applications to physics. The contemporary physical theory of space and time, including its extention to the phenomena of gravitation, is Einstein's theory of relativity. The book is a short introduction to this theory. A great deal of emphasis is given to the geometrical aspects of relativity theory and its comparison with the Newtonian view of the world. There are short chapters on the origins of Einstein's theory, gravitational waves, cosmology, spinors and the Einstein-Cartan theory.

  17. Bipolar outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon — Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyambuya, Golden Gadzirayi

    2010-11-01

    This paper is part of a series on the Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (ASTG). This theory is built on Laplace-Poisson's well known equation and it has been shown that the ASTG is capable of explaining, from a purely classical physics standpoint, the precession of the perihelion of solar planets as a consequence of the azimuthal symmetry emerging from the spin of the Sun. This symmetry has and must have an influence on the emergent gravitational field. We show herein that the emergent equations from the ASTG, under some critical conditions determined by the spin, do possess repulsive gravitational fields in the polar regions of the gravitating body in question. This places the ASTG on an interesting pedestal to infer the origins of outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon. Outflows are a ubiquitous phenomenon found in star forming systems and their true origin is a question yet to be settled. Given the current thinking on their origin, the direction that the present paper takes is nothing short of an asymptotic break from conventional wisdom; at the very least, it is a complete paradigm shift because gravitation is not at all associated with this process, but rather it is thought to be an all-attractive force that only tries to squash matter together onto a single point. Additionally, we show that the emergent Azimuthally Symmetric Gravitational Field from the ASTG strongly suggests a solution to the supposed Radiation Problem that is thought to be faced by massive stars in their process of formation. That is, at ~ 8-10 , radiation from the nascent star is expected to halt the accretion of matter. We show that in-falling material will fall onto the equatorial disk and from there, this material will be channeled onto the forming star via the equatorial plane, thus accretion of mass continues well past the value of ~ 8-10 , albeit via the disk. Along the equatorial plane, the net force (with the radiation force included) on any material there

  18. Quasars and gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Turner, E L

    1984-03-23

    Despite the expenditure of large amounts of telescope time and other resources, most of the fundamental questions concerning quasi-stellar objects (quasars) remain unanswered. A complex phenomenology of radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray properties has accumulated but has not yielded even a satisfactory classification system. The large red shifts (distances) of quasars make them very valuable tools for studying cosmology and the properties of intervening matter in the Universe through observations of absorption lines and gravitational lenses.

  19. Undulator Gravitational Deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.

    2005-01-31

    This note estimates distortions imposed by gravity on LCLS undulator strong-backs. Because of the strongback's asymmetric cross section, gravitational forces cause both torsion as well as simple bending. The superposition of these two effects yields a 4.4 {micro}m maximum deflection and a 0.16 milli radian rotation of the undulator axis. The choice of titanium is compared to aluminum.

  20. Cultural Heritage of Observatories and Instruments - From Classical Astronomy to Modern Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Until the middle of the 19th century positioal astronomy with meridian circles played the dominant role. Pulkovo Observatory, St. Petersburg, was the leading institution for this kind of research. The design of this observatory was a model for the construction of observatories in the 19th century. In addition, in Hamburg Observatory and in some other observatories near the coast, time keeping and teaching of navigation were important tasks for astronomers. Around 1860 astronomy underwent a revolution. Astronomers began to investigate the properties of celestial bodies with physical and chemical methods. In the context of “classical astronomy”, only the direction of star light was studied. In the 1860s quantity and quality of radiation were studied for the first time. This was the beginning of modern “astrophysics”, a notion coined in 1865 by the Leipzig astronomer Karl Friedrich Zöllner (1834-1882). It is remarkable that many amateurs started this new astrophysics in private observatories but not in the established observatories like Greenwich, Paris or Pulkovo. In Germany this development started in Bothkamp Observatory near Kiel, with Hermann Carl Vogel (1841-1907), strongly influenced by Zöllner. An important enterprise was the foundation of the Astrophysical Observatory in Potsdam, near Berlin, in 1874 as the first observatory in the world dedicated to astrophysics - a foundation that inspired others. Important innovations and discoveries were made in Potsdam. The new field of astrophysics caused, and was caused by, new instrumentation: spectrographs, instruments for astrophotography, photometers and solar physics instruments. In particular, the glass mirror reflecting telescope was recognised as a more important instrument than a large refractor; for the new observatory in Hamburg-Bergedorf a 1-m reflector, the fourth largest in the world, made by Zeiss of Jena, was acquired in 1911. Another change was made in the architecture, the idea of a park

  1. The National Ecological Observatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michener, W. K.

    2006-05-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a research platform designed to advance understanding of how ecosystems and organisms respond to variations in climate and changes in land use. NEON is the first long-term ecological observatory conceived as a continental-scale network; equipped with standardized sensors, cyberinfrastructure, and data-collection protocols across the network; and designed to simultaneously address a common set of research questions and support investigator-driven ecological research in all regions of the United States. The Observatory focuses on variations in climate and land use because they are primary drivers of the Nation's environmental challenges, as identified by the National Research Council--i.e., biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, climate change, hydroecology, infectious disease, invasive species, and land use. At the broadest scale, NEON links the complexity of climate variation to the behavior of ecological systems, a core aspect of ecological complexity. At the same time, because of the complexity of the interactions among humans and ecosystems, the network design includes NEON sites in wild, managed and urban systems within climate domains. Observatory data will also be part of a national education program designed to advance ecological science literacy through new programs and activities that develop and promote scientific ways of thinking.

  2. Planetary research at Lowell Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific goals include a better determination of the basic physical characteristics of cometary nuclei, a more complete understanding of the complex processes in the comae, a survey of abundances and gas/dust ratios in a large number of comets, and measurement of primordial (12)C/(13)C and (14)N/(15)N ratios. The program also includes the observation of Pluto-Charon mutual eclipses to derive dimensions. Reduction and analysis of extensive narrowband photometry of Comet Halley from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Perth Observatory, Lowell Observatory, and Mauna Kea Observatory were completed. It was shown that the 7.4-day periodicity in the activity of Comet Halley was present from late February through at least early June 1986, but there is no conclusive evidence of periodic variability in the preperihelion data. Greatly improved NH scalelengths and lifetimes were derived from the Halley data which lead to the conclusion that the abundance of NH in comets is much higher than previously believed. Simultaneous optical and thermal infrared observations were obtained of Comet P/Temple 2 using the MKO 2.2 m telescope and the NASA IRTF. Preliminary analysis of these observations shows that the comet's nucleus is highly elongated, very dark, and quite red.

  3. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  4. ISS images for Observatory protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Zamorano, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    Light pollution is the main factor of degradation of the astronomical quality of the sky along the history. Astronomical observatories have been monitoring how the brightness of the sky varies using photometric measures of the night sky brightness mainly at zenith. Since the sky brightness depends in other factors such as sky glow, aerosols, solar activity and the presence of celestial objects, the continuous increase of light pollution in these enclaves is difficult to trace except when it is too late.Using models of light dispersion on the atmosphere one can determine which light pollution sources are increasing the sky brightness at the observatories. The input satellite data has been provided by DMSP/OLS and SNPP/VIIRS. Unfortunately their panchromatic bands (color blinded) are not useful to detect in which extension the increase is due to the dramatic change produced by the irruption of LED technology in outdoor lighting. The only instrument in the space that is able to distinguish between the various lighting technologies are the DSLR cameras used by the astronauts onboard the ISS.Current status for some astronomical observatories that have been imaged from the ISS is presented. We are planning to send an official request to NASA with a plan to get images for the most important astronomical observatories. We ask support for this proposal by the astronomical community and especially by the US-based researchers.

  5. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  6. Gravitational Wave Astronomy:The High Frequency Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Nils; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    As several large scale interferometers are beginning to take data at sensitivities where astrophysical sources are predicted, the direct detection of gravitational waves may well be imminent. This would (finally) open the long anticipated gravitational-wave window to our Universe, and should lead to a much improved understanding of the most violent processes imaginable; the formation of black holes and neutron stars following core collapse supernovae and the merger of compact objects at the end of binary inspiral. Over the next decade we can hope to learn much about the extreme physics associated with, in particular, neutron stars. This contribution is divided in two parts. The first part provides a text-book level introduction to gravitational radiation. The key concepts required for a discussion of gravitational-wave physics are introduced. In particular, the quadrupole formula is applied to the anticipated bread-and-butter source for detectors like LIGO, GEO600, EGO and TAMA300: inspiralling compact binaries. The second part provides a brief review of high frequency gravitational waves. In the frequency range above (say) 100 Hz, gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information concerning the various stages of collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the supranuclear equation of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational-wave signal. As the amount of exciting physics one may be able to study via the detections of gravitational waves from these sources is truly inspiring, there is strong motivation for the development of future generations of ground based detectors sensitive in the range from hundreds of Hz to several kHz.

  7. Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Bénédicte; Mienert, Jürgen; Winther, Svein; Hageberg, Anne; Rune Godoe, Olav; Partners, Noon

    2010-05-01

    The Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON) is led by the University of Tromsø and collaborates with the Universities of Oslo and Bergen, UniResearch, Institute of Marine Research, Christian Michelsen Research and SINTEF. It is supported by the Research Council of Norway and oil and gas (O&G) industries like Statoil to develop science, technology and new educational programs. Main topics relate to ocean climate and environment as well as marine resources offshore Norway from the northern North Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean. NOON's vision is to bring Norway to the international forefront in using cable based ocean observatory technology for marine science and management, by establishing an infrastructure that enables real-time and long term monitoring of processes and interactions between hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere. This activity is in concert with the EU funded European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) roadmap and European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observation (EMSO) project to attract international leading research developments. NOON envisions developing towards a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC). Beside, the research community in Norway already possesses a considerable marine infrastructure that can expand towards an international focus for real-time multidisciplinary observations in times of rapid climate change. PIC The presently established cable-based fjord observatory, followed by the establishment of a cable-based ocean observatory network towards the Arctic from an O&G installation, will provide invaluable knowledge and experience necessary to make a successful larger cable-based observatory network at the Norwegian and Arctic margin (figure 1). Access to large quantities of real-time observation from the deep sea, including high definition video, could be used to provide the public and future recruits to science a fascinating insight into an almost unexplored part of the Earth beyond the Arctic Circle

  8. Optimized multilayer dielectric mirror coatings for gravitational wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agresti, Juri; Castaldi, Giuseppe; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Pierro, Vincenzo; Pinto, Innocenzo M.

    2006-08-01

    The limit sensitivity of interferometric gravitational wave antennas is set by the thermal noise in the dielectric mirror coatings. These are currently made of alternating quarter-wavelength high/low index material layers with low mechanical losses. The quarter-wavelength design yields the maximum reflectivity for a fixed number of layers, but not the lowest noise for a prescribed reflectivity. This motivated our recent investigation of optimal thickness configurations, which guarantee the lowest thermal noise for a targeted reflectivity. This communication provides a compact overview of our results, involving nonperiodic genetically-engineered and truncated periodically-layered configurations. Possible implications for the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) are discussed.

  9. Nonlinear metric perturbation enhancement of primordial gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Bastero-Gil, M; Macias-Pérez, J; Santos, D

    2010-08-20

    We present the evolution of the full set of Einstein equations during preheating after inflation. We study a generic supersymmetric model of hybrid inflation, integrating fields and metric fluctuations in a 3-dimensional lattice. We take initial conditions consistent with Einstein's constraint equations. The induced preheating of the metric fluctuations is not large enough to backreact onto the fields, but preheating of the scalar modes does affect the evolution of vector and tensor modes. In particular, they do enhance the induced stochastic background of gravitational waves during preheating, giving an energy density in general an order of magnitude larger than that obtained by evolving the tensor fluctuations in an homogeneous background metric. This enhancement can improve the expectations for detection by planned gravitational wave observatories. PMID:20868087

  10. Phasing of gravitational waves from inspiralling eccentric binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Gopakumar, Achamveedu; Iyer, Bala R.

    2005-05-01

    We develop a method for analytically constructing highly accurate post-Newtonian (PN) templates for gravitational-wave signals emitted by compact binaries moving in inspiralling eccentric orbits. Employing an improved 'method of variation of constants', applied to 2PN accurate generalized quasi-Keplerian parametrization for the orbital motion, we combine three relevant time scales associated with the orbital period, periastron precession and radiation reaction, without treating the radiative time scale in an adiabatic manner. We explicitly implement our method to obtain 2.5PN accurate 'post-adiabatic' gravitational waveforms h+,×. Using the 'effective one-body' approach, we define the domain of validity of our method. We also discuss how to extend our method to construct 'ready to use' search templates for gravitational waves from inspiralling eccentric orbits. For a detailed version of this article, see Damour T, Gopakumar A and Iyer B R 2004 Phys. Rev. D 70 064028

  11. Chiral primordial gravitational waves from dilaton induced delayed chromonatural inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Ippei; Soda, Jiro; CLEO Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We study inflation driven by a dilaton and an axion, both of which are coupled to a SU(2) gauge field. We find that the inflation driven by the dilaton occurs in the early stage of inflation during which the gauge field grows due to the gauge-kinetic function. When the energy density of magnetic fields catches up with that of electric fields, chromonatural inflation takes over in the late stage of inflation, which we call delayed chromonatural inflation. Thus, the delayed chromonatural inflation driven by the axion and the gauge field is induced by the dilaton. The interesting outcome of the model is the generation of chiral primordial gravitational waves on small scales. Since the gauge field is inert in the early stage of inflation, it is viable in contrast to the conventional chromonatural inflation. We find the parameter region where chiral gravitational waves are generated in a frequency range higher than nHz, which are potentially detectable in future gravitational wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays such as DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO), evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), and Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  12. SOFIA - Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  13. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Eric; Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  14. The Classical and Quantum Aspects of the Detection of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factourovich, Maxim

    Detection of gravitational waves has been one of the major undertakings of science for the past several decades. The elusive phenomenon first emerged as a natural consequence of the A. Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, but for many years was beyond the reach of the existing technological capabilities. Today, a radical effort is underway to take the measurement technology to a new, unprecedented level of sensitivity, in order to give a definite answer to one of the most fundamental aspects of our understanding of the Universe. The currently accepted detection scheme utilizes interference of near-infrared light inside a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, and has achieved resolution on a scale of 10-21 as compared to the cavity length. At this scale, the signal becomes very sensitive to all kinds of unwanted inputs which include, but not limited to, the seismic activity, acoustic vibrations, thermal effects and radiation pressure noise. Moreover, the sensitivity requirements place it near the fundamental limit of quantum uncertainty which poses the ultimate barrier for lowering the detection threshold. Additionally, at the large kilometer-scale size of the installations, the signal propagation delays become significant enough to call for precise synchronization between the remote sensors and electronics within the main data collector. The need for this becomes even more evident considering a possibility of triangulation the otherwise non-directional signal, by unifying the data collected from different observatories spread around the globe. In this work, we first address the aspect of precise timing synchronization implemented in the US-based Advanced Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatories (LIGO) located at Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The developed Advanced LIGO Timing System allows for synchronization of virtually unlimited number of devices to an accuracy of better than 1 microsecond, regardless of the distances involved. The machinery uses

  15. Laser Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observation: LISA and LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1mHz-100mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to the large ground motions of the Earth. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermasive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and possibly from as yet unimagined sources. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset oF 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such us spacecraft control with micro-newton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. An introduction to laser interferometric gravitational wave detection, ground-based observatories, and a detailed description of the two missions together with an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will bc discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented

  16. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  17. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials.

  18. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-07-14

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials.

  19. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  20. The Magnetic Observatory Buildings at the Royal Observatory, Cape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    During the 1830s there arose a strong international movement, promoted by Carl Friedrich Gauss and Alexander von Humboldt, to characterise the earth's magnetic field. By 1839 the Royal Society in London, driven by Edward Sabine, had organised a "Magnetic Crusade" - the establishment of a series of magnetic and meteorological observatories around the British Empire, including New Zealand, Australia, St Helena and the Cape. This article outlines the history of the latter installation, its buildings and what became of them.