Science.gov

Sample records for gravitational radiation observatory

  1. Omnidirectional Gravitational Radiation Observatory: Proceedings of the First International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velloso, W. F.; Aguiar, O. D.; Magalhães, N. S.

    1997-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Introduction: The OMNI-1 Workshop and the beginning of the International Gravitational Radiation Observatory * Opening Talks * Gravitational radiation sources for Acoustic Detectors * The scientific and technological benefits of gravitational wave research * Operating Second and Third Generation Resonant-Mass Antennas * Performance of the ALLEGRO detector -- and what our experience tells us about spherical detectors * The Perth Niobium resonant mass antenna with microwave parametric transducer * The gravitational wave detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS * Gravitational Waves and Astrophysical Sources for the Next Generation Observatory * What is the velocity of gravitational waves? * Superstring Theory: how it change our ideas about the nature of Gravitation * Statistical approach to the G.W. emission from radio pulsars * Gravitational waves from precessing millisecond pulsars * The production rate of compact binary G.W. sources in elliptical galaxies * On the possibility to detect Gravitational Waves from precessing galactic neutron stars * Gravitational wave output of the head-on collision of two black holes * SN as a powerfull source of gravitational radiation * Long thick cosmic strings radiating gravitational waves and particles * Non-Parallel Electric and Magnetic Fields in a gravitational background, stationary G.W. and gravitons * Exact solutions of gravitational waves * Factorization method for linearized quantum gravity at tree-level. Graviton, photon, electron processes * Signal Detection with Resonant-Mass Antennas * Study of coalescing binaries with spherical gravitational waves detectors * Influence of transducer asymmetries on the isotropic response of a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Performances and preliminary results of the cosmic-ray detector associated with NAUTILUS * Possible transducer configurations for a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Detectability of

  2. Building a Galactic Scale Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2016-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars with phenomenal rotational stability that can be used as celestial clocks in a variety of fundamental physics experiences. One of these experiments involves using a pulsar timing array of precisely timed millisecond pulsars to detect perturbations due to gravitational waves. The low frequency gravitational waves detectable through pulsar timing will most likely result from an ensemble of supermassive black hole binaries. I will introduce the efforts of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), a collaboration that monitors over 50 millisecond pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory, with a focus on our observation and data analysis methods. I will also describe how NANOGrav has joined international partners through the International Pulsar Timing Array to form a low-frequency gravitational wave detector of unprecedented sensitivity.

  3. Report from the Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido; Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team

    2016-03-01

    As a response to the selection of the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for ESA's L3 mission, ESA formed the Gravitational-Wave Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) to advise ESA on the scientific and technological approach for a gravitational wave observatory. NASA is participating with three US scientists and one NASA observer; JAXA was also invited and participates with one observer. The GOAT looked at a range of mission technologies and designs, discussed their technical readiness with respect to the ESA schedule, recommended technology development activities for selected technologies, and worked with the wider gravitational-wave community to analyze the impact on the science of the various mission designs. The final report is expected to be submitted to ESA early March and I plan to summarize its content.

  4. Space-borne gravitational wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The paper describes the progress toward a space-borne gravitational wave observatory and its foreseeable science potential. In particular the paper describes the status of the LISA-like mission called eLISA, the reference mission for the Gravitational Universe theme adopted by ESA for its Large mission L3, and the status of its precursor LISA Pathfinder, due to launch in 2015.

  5. Michelson geostationary gravitational wave observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A. J.

    Studies made during the previous year are outlined. These studies have indicated that a Michelson mm wave interferometer observatory (MGO) operating in geostationary orbit is the best configuration satisfying both current operational and design constraints. It is proposed to study the design of this space laboratory interferometer and to study the inclusion of an inertial transponder in this design.

  6. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  7. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  8. The Science of Gravitational Waves with Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2013-01-01

    After decades of effort, direct detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is on the horizon. Aside from teaching us about gravity itself, gravitational waves hold immense promise as a tool for general astrophysics. In this talk I will provide an overview of the science enabled by a space-based gravitational wave observatory sensitive in the milli-Hertz frequency band including the nature and evolution of massive black holes and their host galaxies, the demographics of stellar remnant compact objects in the Milky Way, and the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime. I will also summarize the current status of efforts in the US and Europe to implement a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  9. Toward a Space based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    A space-based GW observatory will produce spectacular science. The LISA mission concept: (a) Long history, (b) Very well-studied, including de-scopes, (c) NASAs Astrophysics Strategic Plan calls for a minority role in ESAs L3 mission opportunity. To that end, NASA is Participating in LPF and ST7 Developing appropriate technology for a LISA-like mission Preparing to seek an endorsement for L3 participation from the 2020 decadal review.

  10. Ground-based gravitational-wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaime, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    After decades of development and recent upgrades, a network of ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors has begun regular operation. Last year LIGO's two detectors ran for ca. 4 months, observing waves emitted during the inspiral and coalescence of pairs of black holes hundreds of megaparsec from Earth. The results from LIGO's first observational run will be described, as will plans and expectations for a larger network to include Virgo in Europe and other ground-based detectors in the coming years.

  11. Modeling Gravitational Radiation Waveforms from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. G.; Centrelia, J. M.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; VanMeter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from merging binary black hole systems is anticipated as a key source for gravitational wave observations. Ground-based instruments, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) may observe mergers of stellar-scale black holes, while the space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) observatory will be sensitive to mergers of massive galactic-center black holes over a broad range of mass scales. These cataclysmic events may emit an enormous amount of energy in a brief time. Gravitational waves from comparable mass mergers carry away a few percent of the system's mass-energy in just a few wave cycles, with peak gravitational wave luminosities on the order of 10^23 L_Sun. Optimal analysis and interpretation of merger observation data will depend on developing a detailed understanding, based on general relativistic modeling, of the radiation waveforms. We discuss recent progress in modeling radiation from equal mass mergers using numerical simulations of Einstein's gravitational field equations, known as numerical relativity. Our simulations utilize Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to allow high-resolution near the black holes while simultaneously keeping the outer boundary of the computational domain far from the black holes, and making it possible to read out gravitational radiation waveforms in the weak-field wave zone. We discuss the results from simulations beginning with the black holes orbiting near the system's innermost stable orbit, comparing the recent simulations with earlier "Lazarus" waveform estimates based on an approximate hybrid numerical/perturbative technique.

  12. LIGO: The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Abramovici, A; Althouse, W E; Drever, R W; Gürsel, Y; Kawamura, S; Raab, F J; Shoemaker, D; Sievers, L; Spero, R E; Thorne, K S; Vogt, R E; Weiss, R; Whitcomb, S E; Zucker, M E

    1992-04-17

    The goal of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Project is to detect and study astrophysical gravitational waves and use data from them for research in physics and astronomy. LIGO will support studies concerning the nature and nonlinear dynamics of gravity, the structures of black holes, and the equation of state of nuclear matter. It will also measure the masses, birth rates, collisions, and distributions of black holes and neutron stars in the universe and probe the cores of supernovae and the very early universe. The technology for LIGO has been developed during the past 20 years. Construction will begin in 1992, and under the present schedule, LIGO's gravitational-wave searches will begin in 1998.

  13. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2014-08-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected “The Gravitational Universe” as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  14. Gravitating toward Science: Parent-Child Interactions at a Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szechter, Lisa E.; Carey, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the nature of parent-child conversations at an informal science education center housed in an active gravitational-wave observatory. Each of 20 parent-child dyads explored an interactive exhibit hall privately, without the distraction of other visitors. Parents employed a variety of strategies to support their children's…

  15. Progress Toward a Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Stebbins, Robin T.

    The discovery of binary pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse & Taylor in 1974 established the existence of gravitational waves, for which the 1983 Nobel Prize was awarded. However, the measurement of astrophysical parameters from gravitational waves will open an entirely new spectrum for discovery and understanding of the Universe, not simply a new window in the electromagnetic spectrum like gamma ray telescopes in the 1970s. Two types of ground-based detectors, Advanced LIGO/Virgo and Pulsar Timing Arrays, are expected to directly detect gravitational waves in their respective frequency bands before the end of the decade. However, many of the most exciting sources are in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic and gravity gradient noise on Earth. The European Space Agency (ESA) has chosen the 'Gravitational Universe' as the science theme for its L3 Cosmic Visions opportunity, planned for launch in 2034. NASA is planning to participate as a junior partner. Here we summarize progress toward realizing a gravitational wave observatory in space.

  16. Classifying self-gravitating radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan

    2017-02-01

    We study a static system of self-gravitating radiations confined in a sphere by using numerical and analytical calculations. Because of the scaling symmetry of radiations, most of the main properties of a solution can be represented as a segment of a solution curve on a plane of two-dimensional scale invariant variables. We define an "approximate horizon" (AH) from the analogy with an apparent horizon. Any solution curve contains a unique point that corresponds to the AH. A given solution is uniquely labeled by three parameters representing the solution curve, the size of the AH, and the sphere size, which are an alternative to the data at the outer boundary. Various geometrical properties including the existence of an AH and the behaviors around the center can be identified from the parameters. We additionally present an analytic solution of the radiations on the verge of forming a black hole. Analytic formulas for the central mass of the naked singularity are given.

  17. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This poster will discuss a possible mission concept, Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO-Mid) developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  18. Charge management for gravitational-wave observatories using UV LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S. E.; Turner, M. D.; Schlamminger, S.; Hagedorn, C. A.; Gundlach, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    Accumulation of electrical charge on the end mirrors of gravitational-wave observatories can become a source of noise limiting the sensitivity of such detectors through electronic couplings to nearby surfaces. Torsion balances provide an ideal means for testing gravitational-wave technologies due to their high sensitivity to small forces. Our torsion pendulum apparatus consists of a movable plate brought near a plate pendulum suspended from a nonconducting quartz fiber. A UV LED located near the pendulum photoejects electrons from the surface, and a UV LED driven electron gun directs photoelectrons towards the pendulum surface. We have demonstrated both charging and discharging of the pendulum with equivalent charging rates of {approx}10{sup 5}e/s, as well as spectral measurements of the pendulum charge resulting in a white noise level equivalent to 3x10{sup 5}e/{radical}(Hz).

  19. Gravitational Stokes parameters. [for electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anile, A. M.; Breuer, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electromagnetic and gravitational Stokes parameters are defined in the general theory of relativity. The general-relativistic equation of radiative transfer for polarized radiation is then derived in terms of the Stokes parameters for both high-frequency electromagnetic and gravitational waves. The concept of Stokes parameters is generalized for the most general class of metric theories of gravity, where six (instead of two) independent states of polarization are present.

  20. Multipole expansions of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Kip S.

    1980-04-01

    This paper brings together, into a single unified notation, the multipole formalisms for gravitational radiation which various people have constructed. It also extends the results of previous workers. More specifically: Part One of this paper reviews the various scalar, vector, and tensor spherical harmonics used in the general relativity literature-including the Regge-Wheeler harmonics, the symmetric, trace-free ("STF") tensors of Sachs and Pirani, the Newman-Penrose spin-weighted harmonics, and the Mathews-Zerilli Clebsch-Gordan-coupled harmonics-which include "pure-orbital" harmonics and "pure-spin" harmonics. The relationships between the various harmonics are presented. Part One then turns attention to gravitational radiation. The concept of "local wave zone" is introduced to facilitate a clean separation of "wave generation" from "wave propagation." The generic radiation field in the local wave zone is decomposed into multipole components. The energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum in the waves are expressed as infinite sums of multipole contributions. Attention is then restricted to sources that admit a nonsingular, spacetime-covering de Donder coordinate system. (This excludes black holes.) In such a coordinate system the multipole moments of the radiation field are expressed as volume integrals over the source. For slow-motion systems, these source integrals are re-expressed as infinite power series in Lλ/≡(size of source)(reduced wavelength of waves). The slow-motion source integrals are then specialized to systems with weak internal gravity to yield (i) the standard Newtonian formulas for the multipole moments, (ii) the post-Newtonian formulas of Epstein and Wagoner, and (iii) post-post-Newtonian formulas. Part Two of this paper derives a multipole-moment wave-generation formalism for slow-motion systems with arbitrarily strong internal gravity, including systems that cannot be covered by de Donder coordinates. In this formalism one calculates

  1. Cryogenically cooled ultra low vibration silicon mirrors for gravitational wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Brett; Adhikari, Rana X.; Aguiar, Odylio; Bonilla, Edgard; Fan, Danyang; Gan, Litawn; Gomez, Ian; Khandelwal, Sanditi; Lantz, Brian; MacDonald, Tim; Madden-Fong, Dakota

    2017-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave observatories recently launched a new field of gravitational wave astronomy with the first detections of gravitational waves in 2015. The number and quality of these detections is limited in part by thermally induced vibrations in the mirrors, which show up as noise in these interferometers. One way to reduce this thermally induced noise is to use low temperature mirrors made of high purity single-crystalline silicon. However, these low temperatures must be achieved without increasing the mechanical vibration of the mirror surface or the vibration of any surface within close proximity to the mirrors. The vibration of either surface can impose a noise inducing phase shift on the light within the interferometer or physically push the mirror through oscillating radiation pressure. This paper proposes a system for the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) to achieve the dual goals of low temperature and low vibration to reduce the thermally induced noise in silicon mirrors. Experimental results are obtained at Stanford University to prove that these dual goals can be realized simultaneously.

  2. Gravitational radiation from the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hils, D.; Bender, P. L.; Webbink, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral flux of gravitational radiation incident on earth from the Galactic W UMa binaries, unevolved binaries, cataclysmic binaries, neutron star binaries, black hole-neutron star binaries, and close white dwarf binary (CWDB) systems is calculated. The peak values for the strain amplitude hv produced by the binaries are: log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.40 Hz for W UMa's; log hv = -16.5/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.50 Hz for unevolved binaries; log hv = -18.2/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.15 Hz for neutron star binaries; log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.7 Hz for black hole-neutron star binaries; log hv = -18.0 /sq rt Hz at log v = -4.10 Hz for cataclysmic binaries, and log hv = -27.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.0 Hz for CWDBs. The gravitational flux at ultralow frequencies is emitted mainly by unevolved binaries. The integrated flux incident on earth is about 2.4 x 10 to the -9th ergs/sq cm/s.

  3. Gravitational radiation from the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hils, D.; Bender, P.L.; Webbink, R.F. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-09-01

    The spectral flux of gravitational radiation incident on earth from the Galactic W UMa binaries, unevolved binaries, cataclysmic binaries, neutron star binaries, black hole-neutron star binaries, and close white dwarf binary (CWDB) systems is calculated. The peak values for the strain amplitude hv produced by the binaries are: log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.40 Hz for W UMa's; log hv = -16.5/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.50 Hz for unevolved binaries; log hv = -18.2/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.15 Hz for neutron star binaries; log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.7 Hz for black hole-neutron star binaries; log hv = -18.0 /sq rt Hz at log v = -4.10 Hz for cataclysmic binaries, and log hv = -27.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.0 Hz for CWDBs. The gravitational flux at ultralow frequencies is emitted mainly by unevolved binaries. The integrated flux incident on earth is about 2.4 x 10 to the -9th ergs/sq cm/s. 74 refs.

  4. Gravitational radiation observations on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, R. T.; Saulson, P. R.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hellings, R. W.; Bender, P. L.; Drever, R. W. P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the features of a laser-interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) which is planned for operation in the Unitied States, with special attention given to the benefits gained from an addition of a low-mass laser gravitational wave antenna on the moon to the earth-based antennas. It is pointed out that the addition of a moon-based antenna would improve the angular resolution for burst signals by a factor of about 50 (in the plane containing the source, the moon, and the earth), which would be of major importance in studies of gravitational wave sources.

  5. Telescopes for a Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Shannon; Livas, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Telescopes are an important part of the science measurement for a space-based gravitational wave observatory. The telescopes should not introduce excess phase noise which might lower the signal-to-noise of the gravitational wave signal. This requirement constrains both the telescope stability and the phase noise due to scattered light. The photoreceiver senses a combination of a local beam, the received beam and scattered light. If the scattered light has significant spatial overlap, and if there is displacement noise in the scatter path, the signal-to-noise of the main measurement can be impacted. We will discuss our approach to addressing this concern. We model the scattered power from the telescope under expected conditions and use these models for evaluating potential telescope designs. We also determine allowable mirror surface roughness and contamination levels from the scattered light models. We implement the best designs by fabricating a series of prototype telescopes of increasing flight readiness, using eLISA as a reference mission for design specifications. Finally, we perform laboratory tests of the fabricated prototype telescope to validate the models and inform our understanding of the eventual flight telescopes.

  6. Architectures for a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the science theme, the ``Gravitational Universe,'' for the third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has begun negotiating a NASA role. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, thereby augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described.

  7. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb groundbased observatories. This talk will discuss a possible mission concept developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  8. Gravitational radiation resistance, radiation damping and field fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1981-03-01

    Application is made of two different generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorems and their derivations to the calculation of the gravitational quadrupole radiation resistance using the radiation-reaction force given by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler and the usual tidal force on one hand and the tidal force and the free gravitational radiation field on the other hand. The quantum-mechanical version (including thermal generalizations) of the well known classical quadrupole radiation damping formula is obtained as a function of the radiation resistance.

  9. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-02-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. The author summarizes recent developments in two areas in which approximations are important: (1) the quadrupole approximation, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (2) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  10. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  11. The Observatory for Multi-Epoch Gravitational Lens Astrophysics (OMEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Bolton, Adam J.; Booth, Jeffrey T.; Bullock, James S.; Cheng, Edward; Coe, Dan; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Heneghan, Cate; Keeton, Charles R.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Lawrence, Charles R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Metcalf, R. Benton; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Nikzad, Shouleh; Peterson, Bradley M.; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Dark matter in a universe dominated by a cosmological constant seeds the formation of structure and is the scaffolding for galaxy formation. The nature of dark matter remains one of the fundamental unsolved problems in astrophysics and physics even though it represents 85% of the mass in the universe, and nearly one quarter of its total mass-energy budget. The mass function of dark matter "substructure" on sub-galactic scales may be enormously sensitive to the mass and properties of the dark matter particle. On astrophysical scales, especially at cosmological distances, dark matter substructure may only be detected through its gravitational influence on light from distant varying sources. Specifically, these are largely active galactic nuclei (AGN), which are accreting super-massive black holes in the centers of galaxies, some of the most extreme objects ever found. With enough measurements of the flux from AGN at different wavelengths, and their variability over time, the detailed structure around AGN, and even the mass of the super-massive black hole can be measured. The Observatory for Multi-Epoch Gravitational Lens Astrophysics (OMEGA) is a mission concept for a 1.5-m near-UV through near-IR space observatory that will be dedicated to frequent imaging and spectroscopic monitoring of ~100 multiply-imaged active galactic nuclei over the whole sky. Using wavelength-tailored dichroics with extremely high transmittance, efficient imaging in six channels will be done simultaneously during each visit to each target. The separate spectroscopic mode, engaged through a flip-in mirror, uses an image slicer spectrograph. After a period of many visits to all targets, the resulting multidimensional movies can then be analyzed to a) measure the mass function of dark matter substructure; b) measure precise masses of the accreting black holes as well as the structure of their accretion disks and their environments over several decades of physical scale; and c) measure a

  12. LIMITS ON THE STOCHASTIC GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BACKGROUND FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN NANOHERTZ OBSERVATORY FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Nice, D.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Cordes, J. M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Lazio, J.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J.; Giampanis, S.; Finn, L. S.; Freire, P.; Jenet, F.; Lommen, A. N.; McLaughlin, M.; and others

    2013-01-10

    We present an analysis of high-precision pulsar timing data taken as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We have observed 17 pulsars for a span of roughly five years using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes. We analyze these data using standard pulsar timing models, with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-variable pulse shape terms. Sub-microsecond timing residuals are obtained in nearly all cases, and the best rms timing residuals in this set are {approx}30-50 ns. We present methods for analyzing post-fit timing residuals for the presence of a gravitational wave signal with a specified spectral shape. These optimally take into account the timing fluctuation power removed by the model fit, and can be applied to either data from a single pulsar, or to a set of pulsars to detect a correlated signal. We apply these methods to our data set to set an upper limit on the strength of the nHz-frequency stochastic supermassive black hole gravitational wave background of h{sub c} (1 yr{sup -1}) < 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} (95%). This result is dominated by the timing of the two best pulsars in the set, PSRs J1713+0747 and J1909-3744.

  13. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  14. The generation of gravitational radiation by escaping supernova neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, R.

    1978-01-01

    Formulae for the gravitational radiation due to the anisotropic axisymmetric emission of neutrinos from a small source are derived. We find that a burst of neutrinos released anisotropically from a supernova will generate a burst of gravitational radiation that may be comparable in amplitude and energy to the gravitational radiation generated by the fluid motion in the collapse of the supernova core.

  15. Resonant-mass detectors of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Price, John C.; Taber, Robert C.

    1987-07-01

    A network of second-generation low-temperature gravitational radiation detectors is nearing completion. These detectors, sensitive to mechanical strains of order 10 to the -18th, are possible because of a variety of technical innovations that have been made in cryogenics, low-noise superconducting instrumentation, and vibration isolation techniques. Another five orders of magnitude improvement in energy sensitivity of resonant-mass detectors is possible before the linear amplifier quantum limit is encountered.

  16. Core Collapse Supernovae Using CHIMERA: Gravitational Radiation from Non-Rotating Progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Chertkow, Merek A; Hix, William Raphael; Blondin, J. M.; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Yoshida, S.

    2011-01-01

    The CHIMERA code is a multi-dimensional multi-physics engine dedicated primarily to the simulation of core collapse supernova explosions. One of the most important aspects of these explosions is their capacity to produce gravitational radiation that is detectable by earth-based laser-interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO and VIRGO. We present here preliminary gravitational signatures of two-dimensional models with non-rotating progenitors. These simulations exhibit explosions, which are followed for more than half a second after stellar core bounce.

  17. Gravitational radiation from massless particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, Andrei; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    We compute classical gravitational bremsstrahlung from the gravitational scattering of two massless particles at leading order in the (centre of mass) deflection angle θ ∼ 4G\\sqrt{s}/b=8{GE}/b\\ll 1. The calculation, although non-perturbative in the gravitational constant, is surprisingly simple and yields explicit formulae—in terms of multidimensional integrals—for the frequency and angular distribution of the radiation. In the range {b}-1\\lt ω \\lt {({GE})}-1, the GW spectrum behaves like {log}(1/{GE}ω ){{d}}ω , is confined to cones of angular sizes (around the deflected particle trajectories) ranging from O(θ ) to O(1/ω b), and exactly reproduces, at its lower end, a well-known zero-frequency limit. At ω \\gt {({GE})}-1 the radiation is confined to cones of angular size of order θ {({GE}ω )}-1/2 resulting in a scale-invariant ({{d}}ω /ω ) spectrum. The total efficiency in GW production is dominated by this ‘high frequency’ region and is formally logarithmically divergent in the UV. If the spectrum is cutoff at the limit of validity of our approximations (where a conjectured bound on GW power is also saturated), the fraction of incoming energy radiated away turns out to be \\tfrac{1}{2π }{θ }2{log}{θ }-2 at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  18. Gravitational radiation from extreme Kerr black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Nakamura, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational radiation induced by a test particle falling into an extreme Kerr black hole was investigated analytically. Assuming the radiation is dominated by the infinite sequence of quasi-normal modes which has the limiting frequency m/(2M), where m is an azimuthal eigenvalue and M is the mass of the black hole, it was found that the radiated energy diverges logarithmically in time. Then the back reaction to the black hole was evaluated by appealing to the energy and angular momentum conservation laws. It was found that the radiation has a tendency to increase the ratio of the angular momentum to mass of the black hole, which is completely different from non-extreme case, while the contribution of the test particle is to decrease it.

  19. On the measurement of spinning compact binaries with the gravitational-wave observatory Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Vivien; LIGO Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    After years of developments, the Advanced LIGO observatories have completed their first run. This 5-month long record of the gravitational-wave universe is the most sensitive to date, an improvement of several times over the initial instruments. Coalescences of spinning neutron stars and/or black holes are expected to be a main source of gravitational-wave signals, and the extraction of their parameters is especially promising. Spin measurements in particular hold great potential in astrophysical formation scenarios, strong field dynamics, and other fields. In this presentation we report on the spin parameter estimation methods and their applications in the advanced gravitational-wave detector era.

  20. Hawking radiation via gravitational anomalies in nonspherical topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios; Skamagoulis, Petros

    2009-04-15

    We study the method of calculating Hawking radiation via gravitational anomalies in gravitational backgrounds of constant negative curvature. We apply the method to topological black holes and also to topological black holes conformally coupled to a scalar field.

  1. Enabling the Discovery of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational radiation was announced with the publication of the results of a physics experiment involving over a thousand participants. This was preceded by a century of theoretical work, involving a similarly large group of physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists. This huge effort was enabled by a substantial commitment of resources, both public and private, to develop the different strands of this complex research enterprise, and to build a community of scientists to carry it out. In the excitement following the discovery, the role of key enablers of this success has not always been adequately recognized in popular accounts. In this talk, I will try to call attention to a few of the key ingredients that proved crucial to enabling the successful discovery of gravitational waves, and the opening of a new field of science.

  2. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  3. Radiation reaction in a system of relativistic gravitating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtsov, D. V.

    A Lorentz-covariant approach is developed to the description of electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in general relativity. A model of a relativistic system of gravitating point particles is constructed in which energy losses can be interpreted in terms of radiation-reaction forces. These forces are applied not only to the point particles but also to fields generated by these particles in the near zone. It is concluded that radiation friction in a system of relativistic gravitating particles is collective in character.

  4. Persistent Gravitational Radiation from Glitching Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.; Douglass, J. A.; Simula, T. P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum mechanical simulations of neutron star rotational glitches, triggered by vortex avalanches in the superfluid stellar interior, reveal that vortices pin nonaxisymmetrically to the crust during the intervals between glitches. Hence a glitching neutron star emits a persistent current quadrupole gravitational wave signal at the star’s rotation frequency, whose interglitch amplitude is constant and determined by the avalanche history since birth. The signal can be detected in principle by coherent searches planned for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), whether or not a glitch occurs during the observation, if the power-law distribution of glitch sizes extends up to {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max}/{{Ω }}≳ {10}-6{η }-1{({{Δ }}φ )}-1{({{Ω }}/{10}3 {rad} {{{s}}}-1)}-3(D/1 {kpc}) in the targeted object, where {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} and {{Δ }}φ are the largest angular velocity jump and avalanche opening angle, respectively, to have occurred in a glitch since birth, Ω is the angular velocity at present, η is the crustal fraction of the moment of inertia, and D is the distance from the Earth. A major caveat concerning detectability is whether the nonaxisymmetries observed in existing simulations with ≲ {10}3 vortices extrapolate to realistic neutron stars with ≳ {10}15 vortices. The arguments for and against extrapolation are discussed critically in the context of avalanche dynamics in self-organized critical systems, but the issue cannot be resolved without larger simulations and tighter observational limits on η {{Δ }}φ {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} from future LIGO (non)detections and radio timing campaigns.

  5. Progress and Prospects toward a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been much activity in the effort to produce a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. These efforts have enriched the understanding of the scientific capabilities of such an observatory leading to broad recognition of its value as an astronomical instrument. At the same time, rapidly developing events in the US and Europe have lead to a more complicated outlook than the baseline Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) project plan of a few years ago. I will discuss recent progress and developments resulting from the European eLISA study and the SGO study in the US and prospects looking forward.

  6. Stochastic Microhertz Gravitational Radiation from Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A.

    2014-09-01

    High Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at S(f peak) = 5.2 × 10-52 Hz-1 at frequency f peak = 2.3 × 10-7 Hz. However, at low observing frequencies f < 3 × 10-4 Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to S near(f peak) = 4.1 × 10-27 Hz-1 because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance (vpropd -5) in the near zone than in the far zone (vpropd -1). Hence the Solar signal may prove relevant for pulsar timing arrays. Other individual sources and the universal background fall well below the projected sensitivities of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and next-generation pulsar timing arrays. Stellar convection sets a fundamental noise floor for more sensitive stochastic gravitational-wave experiments in the more distant future.

  7. Gravitational radiative corrections from effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Ross, Andreas

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we construct an effective field theory (EFT) that describes long wavelength gravitational radiation from compact systems. To leading order, this EFT consists of the multipole expansion, which we describe in terms of a diffeomorphism invariant point particle Lagrangian. The EFT also systematically captures 'post-Minkowskian' corrections to the multipole expansion due to nonlinear terms in general relativity. Specifically, we compute long distance corrections from the coupling of the (mass) monopole moment to the quadrupole moment, including up to two mass insertions. Along the way, we encounter both logarithmic short distance (UV) and long wavelength (IR) divergences. We show that the UV divergences can be (1) absorbed into a renormalization of the multipole moments and (2) resummed via the renormalization group. The IR singularities are shown to cancel from properly defined physical observables. As a concrete example of the formalism, we use this EFT to reproduce a number of post-Newtonian corrections to the gravitational wave energy flux from nonrelativistic binaries, including long distance effects up to 3 post-Newtonian (v{sup 6}) order. Our results verify that the factorization of scales proposed in the NRGR framework of Goldberger and Rothstein is consistent up to order 3PN.

  8. Stochastic microhertz gravitational radiation from stellar convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A.

    2014-09-01

    High Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at S(f {sub peak}) = 5.2 × 10{sup –52} Hz{sup –1} at frequency f {sub peak} = 2.3 × 10{sup –7} Hz. However, at low observing frequencies f < 3 × 10{sup –4} Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to S {sub near}(f {sub peak}) = 4.1 × 10{sup –27} Hz{sup –1} because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance (∝d {sup –5}) in the near zone than in the far zone (∝d {sup –1}). Hence the Solar signal may prove relevant for pulsar timing arrays. Other individual sources and the universal background fall well below the projected sensitivities of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and next-generation pulsar timing arrays. Stellar convection sets a fundamental noise floor for more sensitive stochastic gravitational-wave experiments in the more distant future.

  9. Towards a gravitational wave observatory designer: sensitivity limits of spaceborne detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barke, S.; Wang, Y.; Esteban Delgado, J. J.; Tröbs, M.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    The most promising concept for low frequency (millihertz to hertz) gravitational wave observatories are laser interferometric detectors in space. It is usually assumed that the noise floor for such a detector is dominated by optical shot noise in the signal readout. For this to be true, a careful balance of mission parameters is crucial to keep all other parasitic disturbances below shot noise. We developed a web application that uses over 30 input parameters and considers many important technical noise sources and noise suppression techniques to derive a realistic position noise budget. It optimizes free parameters automatically and generates a detailed report on all individual noise contributions. Thus one can easily explore the entire parameter space and design a realistic gravitational wave observatory. In this document we describe the different parameters, present all underlying calculations, and compare the final observatory’s sensitivity with astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. We use as an example parameters currently assumed to be likely applied to a space mission proposed to be launched in 2034 by the European Space Agency. The web application itself is publicly available on the Internet at http://spacegravity.org/designer. Future versions of the web application will incorporate the frequency dependence of different noise sources and include a more detailed model of the observatory’s residual acceleration noise.

  10. Simulation of Merger of Two Black Holes and Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a simulation of the merger of two black holes and the resulting emission of gravitational radiation. The colored fields represent a component of the curvature of space-time. The ou...

  11. Constraint on ghost-free bigravity from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Rampei; Tanaka, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yasuho

    2016-09-01

    We investigate gravitational Cherenkov radiation in a healthy branch of background solutions in the ghost-free bigravity model. In this model, because of the modification of dispersion relations, each polarization mode can possess subluminal phase velocities, and the gravitational Cherenkov radiation could be potentially emitted from a relativistic particle. In the present paper, we derive conditions for the process of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation to occur and estimate the energy emission rate for each polarization mode. We found that the gravitational Cherenkov radiation emitted even from an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray is sufficiently suppressed for the graviton's effective mass less than 100 eV, and the bigravity model with dark matter coupled to the hidden metric is therefore consistent with observations of high energy cosmic rays.

  12. Plans for a Next Generation Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Stebbins, Robin T.; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is currently in the process of selecting a mission for the Cosmic Visions Program. A space-based gravitational wave observatory in the low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of the gravitational wave spectrum is one of the leading contenders. This low frequency band has a rich spectrum of astrophysical sources, and the LISA concept has been the key mission to cover this science for over twenty years. Tight budgets have recently forced ESA to consider a reformulation of the LISA mission concept that wi" allow the Cosmic Visions Program to proceed on schedule either with the US as a minority participant, or independently of the US altogether. We report on the status of these reformulation efforts.

  13. Analytical model for ring heater thermal compensation in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Wang, Haoyu; Heintze, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors use high laser power to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses, causing aberrations in the main laser beam that must be minimized by the actuation of "ring heaters," which are additional heater elements that are aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors. In this article we derive the first, to the best of our knowledge, analytical model of the temperature field generated by an ideal ring heater. We express the resulting optical aberration contribution to the main laser beam in this axisymmetric case. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

  14. ESA’s L3 mission: A space-based gravitational-wave observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido

    2016-04-01

    ESA selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for one of its future L-class missions. L3 will measure gravitational waves in the 10µHz to 100mHz window; probably the richest of all gravitational wave windows. Expected sources in this frequency band range from massive black hole mergers to extreme mass ratio inspirals to compact galactic binary systems.The L3 mission is expected to be based on the eLISA/LISA design which was submitted by the eLISA consortium as a notional mission concept. NASA started discussions with ESA how to join L3 and participates in ESA’s Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team. NASA is also in the process of setting up its own L3-Study team to look at potential US contributions to L3. This group will also act as the US partner for the eLISA consortium. In summary, the space component of the GW community has gained significant momentum over the last 12 months and a successful pathfinder mission and potential GW discoveries by Advanced LIGO and/or pulsar timing arrays should further strengthen the case for LISA.

  15. High Stability Low Scatter Telescope for a Space-based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Sankar, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    A laser interferometer space-based gravitational wave observatory requires an optical telescope to efficiently transfer laser light between pairs of widely-separated sciencecraft. The application is precision interferometric metrology, and therefore requires the telescope to have high optical pathlength stability, and low scattered light performance. We discuss the expected on-orbit environment and present the latest design, including materials choice trades, surface roughness and cleanliness requirements, and an optical prescription optimized to reduce scattered light. We will also discuss some of the remaining system-level trades. This work is supported by NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant 14-SAT14-0014.

  16. Application of Compressive Sensing to Gravitational Microlensing Data and Implications for Miniaturized Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korde-Patel, Asmita (Inventor); Barry, Richard K.; Mohsenin, Tinoosh

    2016-01-01

    Compressive Sensing is a technique for simultaneous acquisition and compression of data that is sparse or can be made sparse in some domain. It is currently under intense development and has been profitably employed for industrial and medical applications. We here describe the use of this technique for the processing of astronomical data. We outline the procedure as applied to exoplanet gravitational microlensing and analyze measurement results and uncertainty values. We describe implications for on-spacecraft data processing for space observatories. Our findings suggest that application of these techniques may yield significant, enabling benefits especially for power and volume-limited space applications such as miniaturized or micro-constellation satellites.

  17. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Bassan, M.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciani, G.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; De Rosa, R.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; García Marín, A. F.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Guzmán, F.; Grado, A.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Madden, S.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Monsky, A.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Raïs, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sanjuán, J.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Stanga, R.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Tröbs, M.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wand, V.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zambotti, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2 ±0.1 fm s-2/√{Hz } , or (0.54 ±0.01 ) ×10-15 g/√{Hz } , with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8 ±0.3 ) fm /√{Hz } , about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f ≤0.5 mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12 fm s-2/√{Hz } down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  18. EDISON project and radiatively cooled infrared space observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Hawarden, Timothy G.; Bradshaw, Tom W.; Orlowska, Anna H.; Penny, Alan J.; Turner, R. F.; Rapp, Donald

    1993-11-01

    We describe the current design for Edison, the first large radiatively-cooled infrared space observatory, now under consideration by the European Space Agency. Without the large cryogen tanks, more of the spacecraft can be filled with light-collecting optics and, of course, the observatory has no built-in lifetime. Our proposal is for a telescope with a 1.7 m primary to be launched by an Atlas, Ariane 5, or Proton. The baseline orbit for the observatory is a 'halo' around L2, a location which allows additional radiating area to be placed anti-sunward. Models of the temperature behavior of the observatory indicate an equilibrium temperature via radiation alone of about 20 K. Use of near-future cryo-coolers may allow optical system temperatures as low as approximately 15 K. Consequently, Edison will be limited in sensitivity by the celestial thermal background at wavelengths shortward of about 60 micrometers and by celestial source confusion at longer wavelengths.

  19. Gravitational radiation from collapsing magnetized dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Shijun; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2007-04-15

    In this article we study the influence of magnetic fields on the axial gravitational waves emitted during the collapse of a homogeneous dust sphere. We found that while the energy emitted depends weakly on the initial matter perturbations it has strong dependence on the strength and the distribution of the magnetic field perturbations. The gravitational wave output of such a collapse can be up to an order of magnitude larger or smaller calling for detailed numerical 3D studies of collapsing magnetized configurations.

  20. Hawking radiation from rotating black holes and gravitational anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Keiju; Soda, Jiro

    2006-08-15

    We study the Hawking radiation from Rotating black holes from the gravitational anomalies point of view. First, we show that the scalar field theory near the Kerr black hole horizon can be reduced to the 2-dimensional effective theory. Then, following Robinson and Wilczek, we derive the Hawking flux by requiring the cancellation of gravitational anomalies. We also apply this method to Hawking radiation from higher dimensional Myers-Perry black holes. In the appendix, we present the trace anomaly derivation of Hawking radiation to argue the validity of the boundary condition at the horizon.

  1. Gravitational Radiation — In Celebration of Einstein's Annus Mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    Two of Einstein's 1905 papers were on special theory of relativity. Although general relativity was to come a decade later, it was special relativity that was responsible for the existence of wave-like phenomena in gravitation. A hundred years after the discovery of special relativity we are poised to detect gravitational waves and the detection might as well come from another inevitable and exotic prediction of relativity, namely black holes. With interferometric gravitational wave detectors taking data at unprecedented sensitivity levels and bandwidth, we are entering a new century in which our view of the Universe might be revolutionized yet again with the opening of the gravitational window. The current generation of interferometric and resonant mass detectors are only the beginning of a new era during which the gravitational window could be observed by deploying pulars and microwave background radiation.

  2. Modelling Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The final merger and coalescence of binary black holes is a key source of strong gravitational waves for the LISA mission. Observing these systems will allow us to probe the formation of cosmic structure to high redshifts and test general relativity directly in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in modeling black hole mergers using numerical relativity. This talk will survey these exciting developments, focusing on the gravitational waveforms and the recoil kicks produced from non-equal mass mergers.

  3. Gravitational radiation from magnetically funneled supernova fallback onto a magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Priymak, M. E-mail: m.priymak@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Protomagnetars spun up to millisecond rotation periods by supernova fallback are predicted to radiate gravitational waves via hydrodynamic instabilities for ∼10{sup 2} s before possibly collapsing to form a black hole. It is shown that magnetic funneling of the accretion flow (1) creates a magnetically confined polar mountain, which boosts the gravitational wave signal, and (2) 'buries' the magnetic dipole moment, delaying the propeller phase and assisting black hole formation.

  4. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    PubMed

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  5. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  6. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr. E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu

    2012-10-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier.

  7. Gravitational radiation theory. M.A. Thesis - Rice Univ.; [survey of current research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of current research in the theory of gravitational radiation. The mathematical structure of gravitational radiation is stressed. Furthermore, the radiation problem is treated independently from other problems in gravitation. The development proceeds candidly through three points of view - scalar, rector, and tensor radiation theory - and the corresponding results are stated.

  8. First long-term application of squeezed states of light in a gravitational-wave observatory.

    PubMed

    Grote, H; Danzmann, K; Dooley, K L; Schnabel, R; Slutsky, J; Vahlbruch, H

    2013-05-03

    We report on the first long-term application of squeezed vacuum states of light to improve the shot-noise-limited sensitivity of a gravitational-wave observatory. In particular, squeezed vacuum was applied to the German-British detector GEO 600 during a period of three months from June to August 2011, when GEO 600 was performing an observational run together with the French-Italian Virgo detector. In a second period, the squeezing application continued for about 11 months from November 2011 to October 2012. During this time, squeezed vacuum was applied for 90.2% (205.2 days total) of the time that science-quality data were acquired with GEO 600. A sensitivity increase from squeezed vacuum application was observed broadband above 400 Hz. The time average of gain in sensitivity was 26% (2.0 dB), determined in the frequency band from 3.7 to 4.0 kHz. This corresponds to a factor of 2 increase in the observed volume of the Universe for sources in the kHz region (e.g., supernovae, magnetars). We introduce three new techniques to enable the long-term application of squeezed light, and show that the glitch rate of the detector did not increase from squeezing application. Squeezed vacuum states of light have arrived as a permanent application, capable of increasing the astrophysical reach of gravitational-wave detectors.

  9. Status of a Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2015-08-01

    For over two decades, NASA has studied a flight project to build a gravitational-wave observatory, and partnered with the European Space Agency (ESA) to formulate and study such a mission. The spectacular science and the well-defined and well-studied Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission concept got high recommendations in the U.S. astrophysics decadal surveys of 2000 and 2010.In 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the “Gravitational Universe,” for the third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has begun negotiating a NASA role. The US research community has studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA.This talk will describe the current state of: mission concept studies, US participation in an ESA-led study, technology development, other relevant activities and preparation for the 2020 decadal survey.

  10. Edison and radiatively-cooled IR space observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A.; Hawarden, T. G.; Bally, J.; Burnell, S. J. Bell; Penny, A. J.; Rapp, D.

    1993-01-01

    Radiative cooling of IR space telescopes is an alternative to embedding within massive cryostats and should offer advantages for future missions, including longer life, larger aperture for a fixed spacecraft size, lower cost due to less complex engineering, and easier ground handling. Relatively simple analyses of conventional designs show that it is possible to achieve telescope temperatures in the range of 25 to 40 K at distances from the sun of about 1 AU. Lower temperatures may be possible with 'open' designs or distant orbits. At approximately 25 K, an observatory will be limited by the celestial thermal background in the near- and mid-IR and by the confusion limit in the far-IR. We outline here our concept for a moderate aperture (approximately 1.75 m; Ariane 4 or Atlas launch) international space observatory for the next decade.

  11. Millisecond pulsars with r-modes as steady gravitational radiators.

    PubMed

    Reisenegger, Andreas; Bonacić, Axel

    2003-11-14

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) probably achieve their fast rotation by mass transfer from their companion stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs). The lack of MSPs and LMXBs rotating near breakup has been attributed to the accretion torque being balanced, at fast rotation, by gravitational radiation, perhaps caused by an unstable oscillation mode. It has been argued that internal dissipation involving hyperons may cause LMXBs to evolve into a quasisteady state, with nearly constant rotation rate, temperature, and mode amplitude. We show that MSPs descending from these LMXBs spend a long time in a similar state, as extremely steady sources of gravitational waves and thermal x rays, while they spin down due to gravitational radiation and the standard magnetic torque. Observed MSP braking torques already place meaningful constraints on this scenario.

  12. Gravitational radiation from rotating monopole-string systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.; Dokuchaev, V.; Kachelriess, M.

    2005-02-15

    We study the gravitational radiation from a rotating monopole-antimonopole pair connected by a string. While at not too high frequencies the emitted gravitational spectrum is described asymptotically by P{sub n}{proportional_to}n{sup -1}, the spectrum is exponentially suppressed in the high-frequency limit, P{sub n}{proportional_to}exp(-n/n{sub cr}). Below n{sub cr}, the emitted spectrum of gravitational waves is very similar to the case of an oscillating monopole pair connected by a string, and we argue, therefore, that the spectrum found holds approximately for any moving monopole-string system. As an application, we discuss the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by monopole-antimonopole pairs connected by strings in the early Universe and gravitational wave bursts emitted at present by monopole-string networks. We confirm that advanced gravitational wave detectors have the potential to detect a signal for string tensions as small as G{mu}{approx}10{sup -13}.

  13. Gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries in circular orbits: limits from the North American nanohertz observatory for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J. A.; Demorest, P. B.; Deng, X.; Koop, M.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Garver-Daniels, N.; Lorimer, D. R.; Jenet, F.; Jones, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lommen, A. N.; Collaboration: NANOGrav Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    We perform a search for continuous gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries using robust frequentist and Bayesian techniques. We augment standard pulsar timing models with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency variable pulse shape terms. We apply our techniques to the Five Year Data Release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We find that there is no evidence for the presence of a detectable continuous gravitational wave; however, we can use these data to place the most constraining upper limits to date on the strength of such gravitational waves. Using the full 17 pulsar data set we place a 95% upper limit on the strain amplitude of h {sub 0} ≲ 3.0 × 10{sup –14} at a frequency of 10 nHz. Furthermore, we place 95% sky-averaged lower limits on the luminosity distance to such gravitational wave sources, finding that d{sub L} ≳ 425 Mpc for sources at a frequency of 10 nHz and chirp mass 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. We find that for gravitational wave sources near our best timed pulsars in the sky, the sensitivity of the pulsar timing array is increased by a factor of ∼four over the sky-averaged sensitivity. Finally we place limits on the coalescence rate of the most massive supermassive black hole binaries.

  14. Gravitational radiation and the ultimate speed in Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    In Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity the (local) speed of gravitational radiation is determined by the combined effects of cosmological boundary values and nearby concentrations of matter. It is possible for the speed of gravitational radiation to be less than the speed of light. It is here shown that the emission of gravitational radiation prevents particles of nonzero rest mass from exceeding the speed of gravitational radiation. Observations of relativistic particles place limits on the speed of gravitational radiation and the cosmological boundary values today, and observations of synchroton radiation from compact radio sources place limits on the cosmological boundary values in the past.

  15. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  16. Quasi-local energy in presence of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ning; Wang, Mu-Tao; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2016-07-01

    We discuss our recent work [P.-N. Chen, M.-T. Wang and S.-T. Yau, Quasi-local mass in the gravitational perturbations of black holes, to appear.] in which gravitational radiation was studied by evaluating the Wang-Yau quasi-local mass of surfaces of fixed size at the infinity of both axial and polar perturbations of the Schwarzschild spacetime, à la Chandrasekhar. [S. Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes, Oxford Classic Texts in the Physical Sciences (Oxford University Press, New York, 1998).

  17. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  18. Thermal Stability Analysis for a Heliocentric Gravitational Radiation Detection Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W.; McElroy, P.; Miyake, R.; Bender, P.; Stebbins, R.; Supper, W.

    1994-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed for detailed studies of low-frequency gravitational radiation. The mission is currently a candidate for ESA's post-Horizon 2000 program. Thermal noise affects the measurement in at least two ways. Thermal variation of the length of the optical cavity to which the lasers are stabilized introduces phase variations in the interferometer signal, which have to be corrected for by using data from the two arms separately.

  19. Influence of gravitation on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a general helicity-rotation coupling is demonstrated for electromagnetic waves propagating in the field of a slowly rotating body and in the Goedel universe. This coupling leads to differential focusing of circularly polarized radiation by a gravitational field which is detectable for a rapidly rotating collapsed body. The electromagnetic perturbations and their frequency spectrum are given for the Goedel universe. The spectrum of frequencies is bounded from below by the characteristic rotation frequency of the Goedel universe. If the universe were rotating, the differential focusing effect would be extremely small due to the present upper limit on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  20. Hawking radiation of a vector field and gravitational anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Keiju; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2007-10-15

    Recently, the relation between Hawking radiation and gravitational anomalies has been used to estimate the flux of Hawking radiation for a large class of black objects. In this paper, we extend the formalism, originally proposed by Robinson and Wilczek, to the Hawking radiation of vector particles (photons). It is explicitly shown, with the Hamiltonian formalism, that the theory of an electromagnetic field on d-dimensional spherical black holes reduces to one of an infinite number of massive complex scalar fields on 2-dimensional spacetime, for which the usual anomaly-cancellation method is available. It is found that the total energy emitted from the horizon for the electromagnetic field is just (d-2) times that for a scalar field. The results support the picture that Hawking radiation can be regarded as an anomaly eliminator on horizons. Possible extensions and applications of the analysis are discussed.

  1. A Gravitational Aharonov-Bohm Effect, and Its Connection to Parametric Oscillators and Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.; Haun, Robert W.; Inan, Nader A.; Kang, Bong-Soo; Martinez, Luis A.; Minter, Stephen J.; Munoz, Gerardo A.; Singleton, Douglas A.

    A thought experiment is proposed to demonstrate the existence of a gravitational, vector Aharonov-Bohm effect. We begin the analysis starting from four Maxwell-like equations for weak gravitational fields interacting with slowly moving matter. A connection is made between the gravitational, vector Aharonov-Bohm effect and the principle of local gauge invariance for nonrelativistic quantum matter interacting with weak gravitational fields. The compensating vector fields that are necessitated by this local gauge principle are shown to be incorporated by the DeWitt minimal coupling rule. The nonrelativistic Hamiltonian for weak, time-independent fields interacting with quantum matter is then extended to time-dependent fields, and applied to the problem of the interaction of radiation with macroscopically coherent quantum systems, including the problem of gravitational radiation interacting with superconductors. But first we examine the interaction of EM radiation with superconductors in a parametric oscillator consisting of a superconducting wire placed at the center of a high Q superconducting cavity driven by pump microwaves. Some room-temperature data will be presented demonstrating the splitting of a single microwave cavity resonance into a spectral doublet due to the insertion of a central wire. This would represent an unseparated kind of parametric oscillator, in which the signal and idler waves would occupy the same volume of space. We then propose a separated parametric oscillator experiment, in which the signal and idler waves are generated in two disjoint regions of space, which are separated from each other by means of an impermeable superconducting membrane. We find that the threshold for parametric oscillation for EM microwave generation is much lower for the separated configuration than the unseparated one, which then leads to an observable dynamical Casimir effect. We speculate that a separated parametric oscillator for generating coherent GR microwaves

  2. Re-Examining Gravitational Tunneling Radiation when taking into account Quantum Gravity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, John; Prescott, Trevor; Blado, Gardo

    2015-03-01

    Although shown to theoretically exist, Hawking Radiation has yet to be detected. The paper entitled ``Gravitational Tunneling Radiation'' by Mario Rabinowitz proposed a possible explanation by considering the gravitational tunneling effects in the presence of other bodies in the vicinity of the black hole. Rabinowitz showed that the power radiated (through gravitational radiation) by a black hole,PR, is related to the power generated by Hawking Radiation, PSH by PR/T ~PSH where T is the gravitational tunneling probability. The presence of other bodies lowers the gravitational barrier which in turn increases the gravitational tunneling probability thereby decreasing the Hawking radiation, PSH. In this paper, we examine the modification of T in the presence of quantum gravity effects by incorporating the Generalized Uncertainty Principle.

  3. Cosmological constraints on cosmic-string gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, R. R.; Allen, B.

    1992-05-01

    The primordial nucleosynthesis and pulsar timing noise constraints on cosmic-string gravitational radiation are computed. The computation consists of a numerical integration of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Einstein equations which describe a universe containing radiation, dust, and a ``one-scale''-model cosmic-string component. The procedure takes into account the effects of the annihilations of massive particle species on the equation of state of the cosmological fluid. An expression for the power emitted per mode of oscillation by a cosmic-string loop, suggested by both analytic calculations and recent numerical simulations, is used. The results of the computation are spectra of the cosmic-string gravitational radiation at nucleosynthesis and at present. Comparison of these spectra with the observed bounds on pulsar timing noise, and the observed bound on the effective number of light neutrino species permitted by the model of nucleosynthesis, allows one to exclude a range of values of μ, the cosmic-string linear mass density, for certain values of α, the size of a newly formed loop as a fraction of the particle horizon radius. We find constraints to μ which are more restrictive than any previous limit.

  4. Escape of gravitational radiation from the field of massive bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Richard H.; Pullin, Jorge; Kundu, Prasun K.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a compact source of gravitational waves of frequency omega in or near a massive spherically symmetric distribution of matter or a black hole. Recent calculations have led to apparently contradictory results for the influence of the massive body on the propagation of the waves. We show here that the results are in fact consistent and in agreement with the 'standard' viewpoint in which the high-frequency compact source produces the radiation as if in a flat background, and the background curvature affects the propagation of these waves.

  5. Gravitational radiation damping in systems with compact components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James L.

    1987-10-01

    The radiation reaction force and balance equations are derived for slow-motion, gravitationally bound systems with compact components such as neutron stars and black holes. To obtain these results, use is made of the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann (EIH) procedure. As a consequence, all quantities involved in the derivation are finite and hence no renormalization is required. Furthermore, no laws of motion for the components need be assumed. Approximate expressions for the fields required to evaluate the EIH surface integrals are obtained using the methods of matched asymptotic expansions and multiple time scales. The results obtained are the same as those derived previously for systems with noncompact components.

  6. Mission and Instrument Design Trades for a Space-based Gravitational Wave Observatory to Maximize Science Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Baker, John; Stebbins, Robin; Thorpe, James; Larson, Shane; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    A space-based gravitational wave observatory is required to access the rich array of astrophysical sources expected at frequencies between 0.0001 and 0.1 Hz. The European Space Agency (ESA) chose the Gravitational Universe as the science theme of its L3 launch opportunity. A call for mission proposals will be released soon after the completion of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission. LPF is scheduled to start science operations in March 2016, and finish by the end of the year, so an optimized mission concept is needed now. There are a number of possible design choices for both the instrument and the mission. One of the goals for a good mission design is to maximize the science return while minimizing risk and keeping costs low. This presentation will review some of the main design choices for a LISA-like laser interferometry mission and the impact of these choices on cost, risk, and science return.

  7. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Barnard

    2008-01-01

    "We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source. applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the $\\ell = m$ modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model."

  8. Purely radiating and nonradiating scalar, electromagnetic and weak gravitational sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2000-03-01

    It has been known for some time that localized sources to the scalar wave equation and Maxwell's equations exist which do not radiate. Such sources, referred to as non-radiating (NR) sources, generate vanishing fields outside their spatial support which prevents them from interacting with nearby objects by means of their fields. Work on NR sources dates back to Sommerfeld, Herglotz, Hertz, Ehrenfest and Schott who studied these objects in connection with electron and atom models. NR sources have also appeared extensively in inverse source/scattering theories as members of the null space of the source-to-field mapping. In this presentation, we provide a new description of scalar, vector or tensor NR sources and of a complementary class of sources, namely, sources that lack a NR part, i.e., `purely radiating' sources. We show that the class of square-integrable localized purely radiating scalar, electromagnetic or weak gravitational sources is exactly the class of solutions - within the source's support - of the homogeneous form of the associated partial differential equation relating the sources to their fields, i.e., purely radiating sources are themselves fields. As a consequence of this result, NR sources are shown to be inseparable components of a broad class of physically relevant sources, thereby having a physical significance that transcends their use in wave-theoretic inversion models. Localized NR sources are characterized in connection with the concept of reciprocity as non-interactors. The role of NR sources in absorption of radiation and energy storage is addressed. The general theoretical results are illustrated with the aid of a one-dimensional (1D) electromagnetic example corresponding to a transmission line system (equivalently, a 1D plane wave system) with uniformly distributed sources/loads.

  9. Information content of gravitational radiation and the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Halpern, Illan; Koeller, Jason

    2016-09-01

    Known entropy bounds, and the generalized second law, were recently shown to imply bounds on the information arriving at future null infinity. We complete this derivation by including the contribution from gravitons. We test the bounds in classical settings with gravity and no matter. In Minkowski space, the bounds vanish on any subregion of the future boundary, independently of coordinate choices. More generally, the bounds vanish in regions where no gravitational radiation arrives. In regions that do contain Bondi news, the bounds are compatible with the presence of information, including the information stored in gravitational memory. All of our results are consistent with the equivalence principle, which states that empty Riemann-flat spacetime regions contain no classical information. We also discuss the possibility that Minkowski space has an infinite vacuum degeneracy labeled by a choice of Bondi coordinates (a classical parameter, if physical). We argue that this degeneracy cannot have any observational consequences if the equivalence principle holds. Our bounds are consistent with this conclusion.

  10. On the Green functions of gravitational radiation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giampiero

    2001-06-01

    Previous work in the literature has studied gravitational radiation in black hole collisions at the speed of light. In particular, it had been proved that the perturbative field equations may all be reduced to equations in only two independent variables, by virtue of a conformal symmetry at each order in perturbation theory. The Green function for the perturbative field equations is analysed here by studying the corresponding second-order hyperbolic operator with variable coefficients, instead of using the reduction method from the retarded flat-space Green function in four dimensions. After reduction to canonical form of this hyperbolic operator, the integral representation of the solution in terms of the Riemann function is obtained. The Riemann function solves a characteristic initial-value problem for which analytic formulae leading to the numerical solution are derived.

  11. Critical phenomena in the aspherical gravitational collapse of radiation fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Montero, Pedro J.

    2015-12-01

    We study critical phenomena in the gravitational collapse of a radiation fluid. We perform numerical simulations in both spherical symmetry and axisymmetry, and observe critical scaling in both supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of a black hole, and subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space. We identify the critical solution in spherically symmetric collapse, find evidence for its universality, and study the approach to this critical solution in the absence of spherical symmetry. For the cases that we consider, aspherical deviations from the spherically symmetric critical solution decay in damped oscillations in a manner that is consistent with the behavior found by Gundlach in perturbative calculations. Our simulations are performed with an unconstrained evolution code, implemented in spherical polar coordinates, and adopting "moving-puncture" coordinates.

  12. Arrival times of gravitational radiation peaks for binary inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-11-01

    Modeling of gravitational waves (GWs) from binary black hole inspiral brings together early post-Newtonian waveforms and late quasinormal ringing waveforms. Attempts to bridge the two limits without recourse to numerical relativity involve predicting the time of the peak GW amplitude. This prediction will require solving the question of why the peak of the "source," i.e., the peak of the binary angular velocity, does not correspond to the peak of the GW amplitude. We show here that this offset can be understood as due to the existence of two distinct components of the radiation: the "direct" radiation analogous to that in flat spacetime and "scattered" radiation associated with curved spacetime. The time dependence of these two components and of their relative phases determines the location of the peak amplitude. We use a highly simplified model to clarify the two-component nature of the source, then demonstrate that the explanation is valid also for an extreme mass-ratio binary inspiral.

  13. Gravitational radiation from compact binary systems: Gravitational waveforms and energy loss to second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.; Wiseman, Alan G.

    1996-10-01

    We derive the gravitational waveform and gravitational-wave energy flux generated by a binary star system of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), accurate through second post-Newtonian order (O[(v/c)4]=O[(Gm/rc2)2]) beyond the lowest-order quadrupole approximation. We cast the Einstein equations into the form of a flat-spacetime wave equation together with a harmonic gauge condition, and solve it formally as a retarded integral over the past null cone of the chosen field point. The part of this integral that involves the matter sources and the near-zone gravitational field is evaluated in terms of multipole moments using standard techniques; the remainder of the retarded integral, extending over the radiation zone, is evaluated in a novel way. The result is a manifestly convergent and finite procedure for calculating gravitational radiation to arbitrary orders in a post-Newtonian expansion. Through second post-Newtonian order, the radiation is also shown to propagate toward the observer along true null rays of the asymptotically Schwarzschild spacetime, despite having been derived using flat-spacetime wave equations. The method cures defects that plagued previous ``brute-force'' slow-motion approaches to the generation of gravitational radiation, and yields results that agree perfectly with those recently obtained by a mixed post-Minkowskian post-Newtonian method. We display explicit formulas for the gravitational waveform and the energy flux for two-body systems, both in arbitrary orbits and in circular orbits. In an appendix, we extend the formalism to bodies with finite spatial extent, and derive the spin corrections to the waveform and energy loss.

  14. [The use of a detector of the extremely weak radiation as a variometer of gravitation field].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, E S; Bondarenko, E G; Shapovalov, S N; Sokolovskiĭ, V V; Troshichev, O A

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that the detector of extremely weak radiation with selectively increased sensitivity to the nonelectromagnetic, including the gravitational component of the spectrum of active physical fields can be used as the basis for constructing a variometer of gravitational field of a new type.

  15. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (SGO) Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; McNamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a space-based gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return.

  16. Search for correlations between the University of Maryland and the University of Rome gravitational radiation antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, V.; Pizzella, G.; Lee, M.; Weber, J.

    1982-05-15

    Results are presented for analyses of the outputs of gravitational radiation antennas in Rome and in Maryland during July 1978. These data give evidence for an external background exciting both antennas.

  17. Axial dissipative dust as a source of gravitational radiation in f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Siddiqa, Aisha

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the source of gravitational radiation in the context of f(R) gravity by considering axially symmetric dissipative dust under geodesic condition. We evaluate scalars associated with electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl tensor for both non-spinning (at the center) and spinning (in the surrounding of the center) fluids of the configuration. For this purpose, we use the evolution as well as constraint equations for kinematical quantities and Weyl tensor. Finally, we investigate the existence of gravitational radiation through super-Poynting vector. It is found that the fluid is not gravitationally radiating in the non-spinning case but it is gravitationally radiating for the spinning case.

  18. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino follow-up of gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D’Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2016-12-30

    On September 14, 2015 the Advanced LIGO detectors observed their first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914. This was followed by a second GW event observed on December 26, 2015. Both events were inferred to have arisen from the merger of black holes in binary systems. Such a system may emit neutrinos if there are magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the two black holes. With the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory we can search for neutrinos with energy Eν above 100 PeV from point like sources across the sky with equatorial declination from about -65° to +60°, and, in particular, from a fraction of the 90% confidence-level inferred positions in the sky of GW150914 and GW151226. A targeted search for highly inclined extensive air showers, produced either by interactions of downward-going neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere or by the decays of tau leptons originating from tau-neutrino interactions in the Earth’s crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos), yielded no candidates in the Auger data collected within ±500 s around or 1 day after the coordinated universal time (UTC) of GW150914 and GW151226, as well as in the same search periods relative to the UTC time of the GW candidate event LVT151012. As a result, from the non-observation we constrain the amount of energy radiated in ultrahigh-energy neutrinos from such remarkable events.

  19. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino follow-up of gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    On September 14, 2015 the Advanced LIGO detectors observed their first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914. This was followed by a second GW event observed on December 26, 2015. Both events were inferred to have arisen from the merger of black holes in binary systems. Such a system may emit neutrinos if there are magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the two black holes. With the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory we can search for neutrinos with energy Eν above 100 PeV from pointlike sources across the sky with equatorial declination from about -6 5 ° to +6 0 ° , and, in particular, from a fraction of the 90% confidence-level inferred positions in the sky of GW150914 and GW151226. A targeted search for highly inclined extensive air showers, produced either by interactions of downward-going neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere or by the decays of tau leptons originating from tau-neutrino interactions in the Earth's crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos), yielded no candidates in the Auger data collected within ±500 s around or 1 day after the coordinated universal time (UTC) of GW150914 and GW151226, as well as in the same search periods relative to the UTC time of the GW candidate event LVT151012. From the nonobservation we constrain the amount of energy radiated in ultrahigh-energy neutrinos from such remarkable events.

  20. Mission Architecture Study Results for a Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (SGO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; SGO Mission Concept Development Team

    2013-01-01

    The low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of the gravitational wave spectrum has a rich collection of astrophysical sources, and the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) concept has been the key mission to cover this science for over twenty years. Although highly ranked in the 2010 Decadal Survey for the spectacular science return, tight budgets have forced NASA to consider a reformulation of the LISA mission concept at a lower cost point, even if at the expense of some of the science. We report the results of a mission architecture study that considered various options according to cost, risk, technical readiness, and the ability to address the Decadal-endorsed science goals.

  1. Gravitational radiation from ultra high energy cosmic rays in models with large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Ben; Drescher, Hans-Joachim; Bleicher, Marcus

    2006-06-01

    The effects of classical gravitational radiation in models with large extra dimensions are investigated for ultra high energy cosmic rays (CRs). The cross sections are implemented into a simulation package (SENECA) for high energy hadron induced CR air showers. We predict that gravitational radiation from quasi-elastic scattering could be observed at incident CR energies above 10 9 GeV for a setting with more than two extra dimensions. It is further shown that this gravitational energy loss can alter the energy reconstruction for CR energies ECR ⩾ 5 × 10 9 GeV.

  2. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, C. E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; ODell, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  3. Managing Radiation Degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Cameron, Robert A.; Morris, David C.; Virani, Shanil N.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X ray Observatory are sensitive to radiation damage particularly from low-energy protons scattering off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. In its highly elliptical orbit, Chandra passes through a spatially and temporally varying radiation environment, ranging from the radiation belts to the solar wind. Translating thc Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) out of the focal position during radiation-belt passages has prevented loss of scientific utility and eventually functionality. However, carefully managing the radiation damage during the remainder of the orbit, without unnecessarily sacrificing observing time, is essential to optimizing the scientific value of this exceptional observatory throughout its planned 10-year mission. In working toward this optimization, the Chandra team developed aid applied radiation-management strategies. These strategies include autonomous instrument safing triggered by the on-board radiation monitor, as well as monitoring, alerts, and intervention based upon real-time space-environment data from NOAA and NASA spacecraft. Furthermore, because Chandra often spends much of its orbit out of the solar wind (in the Earth's outer magnetosphere and magnetosheath), the team developed the Chandra Radiation Model to describe the complete low-energy-proton environment. Management of the radiation damage has thus far succeeded in limiting degradation of the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) to less than 4.4*10^-6 and 1.4*10^-6 per year for the front-illuminated and back-illuminated CCDs, respectively.

  4. On the gravitational, dilatonic, and axionic radiative damping of cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Damour, Thibault

    1999-07-01

    We study the radiation reaction on cosmic strings due to the emission of dilatonic, gravitational and axionic waves. After verifying the (on average) conservative nature of the time-symmetric self-interactions, we concentrate on the finite radiation damping force associated with the half-retarded minus half-advanced ``reactive'' fields. We reexamine a recent proposal of using a ``local back reaction approximation'' for the reactive fields. Using dimensional continuation as a convenient technical tool, we find, contrary to previous claims, that this proposal leads to antidamping in the case of the axionic field, and to zero (integrated) damping in the case of the gravitational field. One gets normal positive damping only in the case of the dilatonic field. We propose to use a suitably modified version of the local dilatonic radiation reaction as a substitute for the exact (nonlocal) gravitational radiation reaction. The incorporation of such a local approximation to gravitational radiation reaction should allow one to complete, in a computationally nonintensive way, string network simulations and to give better estimates of the amount and spectrum of gravitational radiation emitted by a cosmologically evolving network of massive strings.

  5. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  6. Astronomical polarization studies at radio and infrared wavelengths. Part 1: Gravitational deflection of polarized radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    The gravitational field is probed in a search for polarization dependence in the light bending. This involves searching for a splitting of a source image into orthogonal polarizations as the radiation passes through the solar gravitational field. This search was carried out using the techniques of very long and intermediate baseline interferometry, and by seeking a relative phase delay in orthogonal polarizations of microwaves passing through the solar gravitational field. In this last technique a change in the total polarization of the Helios 1 carrier wave was sought as the spacecraft passed behind the sun. No polarization splitting was detected.

  7. Prospects for detection of gravitational radiation by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports a calculation of the effect of gravitational radiation on the observed Doppler shift of a sinusoidal electromagnetic signal transmitted to, and coherently transponded from, distant spacecraft. It is found that the effect of plane gravitational waves on such observations is not intuitively immediate, and in fact depends sensitively on the spacecraft direction, which suggests the possibility of detecting such plane waves by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft. The need for broad band gravitational wave observations, the required stabilities of time keeping standards, and astrophysical sources expected in the Very Low Frequency band are briefly discussed.

  8. Performance test of pipe-shaped radiation shields for cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Akutsu, Tomotada; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important challenges in cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detectors is to reduce the undesirable thermal radiation coming through holes in the radiation shield, which are necessary for the laser beam to pass through. For this purpose, pipe-shaped radiation shields called duct shields are used. Here, we have manufactured duct shields for KAGRA in Japan, one of the cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detectors, and measured the thermal radiation coming through the duct shields. The measured result was found to be consistent with the calculation result that the duct shield can reduce the thermal radiation to less than 1%. This fact confirmed that the amount of thermal radiation coming through the duct shields was smaller than KAGRA’s requirement.

  9. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino follow-up of gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; ...

    2016-12-30

    On September 14, 2015 the Advanced LIGO detectors observed their first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914. This was followed by a second GW event observed on December 26, 2015. Both events were inferred to have arisen from the merger of black holes in binary systems. Such a system may emit neutrinos if there are magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the two black holes. With the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory we can search for neutrinos with energy Eν above 100 PeV from point like sources across the sky with equatorial declination from aboutmore » -65° to +60°, and, in particular, from a fraction of the 90% confidence-level inferred positions in the sky of GW150914 and GW151226. A targeted search for highly inclined extensive air showers, produced either by interactions of downward-going neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere or by the decays of tau leptons originating from tau-neutrino interactions in the Earth’s crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos), yielded no candidates in the Auger data collected within ±500 s around or 1 day after the coordinated universal time (UTC) of GW150914 and GW151226, as well as in the same search periods relative to the UTC time of the GW candidate event LVT151012. As a result, from the non-observation we constrain the amount of energy radiated in ultrahigh-energy neutrinos from such remarkable events.« less

  10. On gravitational wave-Cherenkov radiation from photons when passing through diffused dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shu-Xu

    2017-03-01

    Analogous to Cherenkov radiation, when a particle moves faster than the propagation velocity of gravitational wave in matter (v > cg), we expect gravitational wave-Cherenkov radiation (GWCR). In the situation that a photon travels across diffuse dark matters, the GWCR condition is always satisfied, photon will thence lose its energy all along the path. This effect has long been ignored in the practice of astrophysics and cosmology without justification with serious calculation. We study this effect for the first time, and shows that this energy loss time of the photon is far longer than the Hubble time and therefore justify the practice of ignoring this effect in the context of astrophysics.

  11. Constraints on general second-order scalar-tensor models from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rampei; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate that the general second-order scalar-tensor theories, which have attracted attention as possible modified gravity models to explain the late time cosmic acceleration, could be strongly constrained from the argument of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation. To this end, we consider the purely kinetic coupled gravity and the extended galileon model on a cosmological background. In these models, the propagation speed of tensor mode could be less than the speed of light, which puts very strong constraints from the gravitational Cherenkov radiation.

  12. INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE EFFECT FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, Pablo; Larson, Shane L.; Spergel, David; Yunes, Nicolas

    2010-05-20

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are messengers carrying valuable information about their sources. For sources at cosmological distances, the waves will also contain the imprint left by the intervening matter. The situation is in close analogy with cosmic microwave photons, for which the large-scale structures the photons traverse contribute to the observed temperature anisotropies, in a process known as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We derive the GW counterpart of this effect for waves propagating on a Friedman-Robertson-Walker background with scalar perturbations. We find that the phase, frequency, and amplitude of the GWs experience Sachs-Wolfe-type integrated effects, in addition to the magnification effects on the amplitude from gravitational lensing. We show that for supermassive black hole binaries, the integrated effects could account for measurable changes on the frequency, chirp mass, and luminosity distance of the binary, thus unveiling the presence of inhomogeneities, and potentially dark energy, in the universe.

  13. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  14. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc

    2014-01-01

    To be observed and analyzed by the network of gravitational wave detectors on ground (LIGO, VIRGO, etc.) and by the future detectors in space (eLISA, etc.), inspiralling compact binaries - binary star systems composed of neutron stars and/or black holes in their late stage of evolution - require high-accuracy templates predicted by general relativity theory. The gravitational waves emitted by these very relativistic systems can be accurately modelled using a high-order post-Newtonian gravitational wave generation formalism. In this article, we present the current state of the art on post-Newtonian methods as applied to the dynamics and gravitational radiation of general matter sources (including the radiation reaction back onto the source) and inspiralling compact binaries. We describe the post-Newtonian equations of motion of compact binaries and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, paying attention to the self-field regularizations at work in the calculations. Several notions of innermost circular orbits are discussed. We estimate the accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation and make a comparison with numerical computations of the gravitational self-force for compact binaries in the small mass ratio limit. The gravitational waveform and energy flux are obtained to high post-Newtonian order and the binary's orbital phase evolution is deduced from an energy balance argument. Some landmark results are given in the case of eccentric compact binaries - moving on quasi-elliptical orbits with non-negligible eccentricity. The spins of the two black holes play an important role in the definition of the gravitational wave templates. We investigate their imprint on the equations of motion and gravitational wave phasing up to high post-Newtonian order (restricting to spin-orbit effects which are linear in spins), and analyze the post-Newtonian spin precession equations as well as the induced precession of the orbital plane.

  15. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    2014-12-01

    To be observed and analyzed by the network of gravitational wave detectors on ground (LIGO, VIRGO, etc.) and by the future detectors in space ( eLISA, etc.), inspiralling compact binaries — binary star systems composed of neutron stars and/or black holes in their late stage of evolution — require high-accuracy templates predicted by general relativity theory. The gravitational waves emitted by these very relativistic systems can be accurately modelled using a high-order post-Newtonian gravitational wave generation formalism. In this article, we present the current state of the art on post-Newtonian methods as applied to the dynamics and gravitational radiation of general matter sources (including the radiation reaction back onto the source) and inspiralling compact binaries. We describe the post-Newtonian equations of motion of compact binaries and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, paying attention to the self-field regularizations at work in the calculations. Several notions of innermost circular orbits are discussed. We estimate the accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation and make a comparison with numerical computations of the gravitational self-force for compact binaries in the small mass ratio limit. The gravitational waveform and energy flux are obtained to high post-Newtonian order and the binary's orbital phase evolution is deduced from an energy balance argument. Some landmark results are given in the case of eccentric compact binaries — moving on quasi-elliptical orbits with non-negligible eccentricity. The spins of the two black holes play an important role in the definition of the gravitational wave templates. We investigate their imprint on the equations of motion and gravitational wave phasing up to high post-Newtonian order (restricting to spin-orbit effects which are linear in spins), and analyze the post-Newtonian spin precession equations as well as the induced precession of the orbital plane.

  16. Managing Radiation Degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory--III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Blackwell, William C.; Bucher, Sabina L.; Chappell, Jon H.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Grant, Catherine E.; Juda, Michael; Martin, Eric R.; Minow, Joseph I.; Murray, Stephen S.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Shropshire, Daniel P.; Spitzbart, Bradley J.; Viens, Paul R.; Wolk, Scott J.; Schwartz, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program--involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing--has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 3.2x 10(exp -6) (2.3 percent) for the front-illuminated CCDs and 1.0x10(exp -6) (6.7 percent) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of the Chandra radiation-management program, emphasizing enhancements implemented since the previous papers.

  17. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  18. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. N.

    2015-05-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO and eLISA will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present progress in the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar- tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as “direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations,” appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity. In another, mixed black hole- neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter.

  19. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar-tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as ``Direct Integration of the Relaxed Einstein equations,'' appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, mixed black hole-neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter. In another, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity.

  20. Bianchi type-I magnetized radiating cosmological model in self creation theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vimal Chand; Jain, Nikhil

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated Bianchi type-I cosmological model in the presence of magnetized field with disordered radiation in Barber's second self-creation theory of gravitation. To obtain exact solution we assume that the component of shear tensor is proportional to expansion ( θ). Some geometrical and physical properties of the model have also been discussed.

  1. Naked singularities in non-self-similar gravitational collapse of radiation shells

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, P.S.; Dwivedi, I.H. )

    1992-03-15

    Non-self-similar gravitational collapse of imploding radiation is shown to give rise to a strong curvature naked singularity. The conditions are specified for the singularity to be globally naked and the strength of the same is examined along nonspacelike curves and along all the families of nonspacelike geodesics terminating at the singularity in the past.

  2. A Giant Leap Towards a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory: LISA Pathfinder, the LISA Test Package, and ST7-DRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James; McNamara, Paul; Ziemer, John; LPF Team, LTP Team, ST7-DRS Team

    2015-01-01

    The science case for a space-based gravitational wave instrument observing in the milliHertz band covers a wide area of topics in astrophysics and fundamental physics including galaxy formation and evolution, black hole growth, compact object demographics, gravitational physics, and cosmology. This strong science case is largely responsible for the high rankings received by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in major reviews in both the US and Europe. A key element of the development of LISA is the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) technology demonstrator mission, which will launch in the coming year. Led by ESA and a consortium of European national agencies and with a minority contribution from NASA, LPF will demonstrate several key technologies for the LISA concept. LPF includes two scientific payloads: the European LISA Technology Package (LTP) and the NASA-provided ST7-DRS. The mission will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, micro-Newton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. We will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, the LTP and ST7-DRS payloads, and their expected impact on the larger effort to realize a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  3. On quadrupole and octupole gravitational radiation in the ANK formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozameh, Carlos N.; Ortega, R. G.; Rojas, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    Following the approach of Adamo-Newman-Kozameh (ANK) we derive the equations of motion for the center of mass and intrinsic angular moment for isolated sources of gravitational waves in axially symmetric spacetimes. The original ANK formulation is generalized so that the angular momentum coincides with the Komar integral for a rotational Killing symmetry. This is done using the Winicour-Tamburino Linkages which yields the mass dipole-angular momentum tensor for the isolated sources. The ANK formalism then provides a complex worldline in a fiducial flat space to define the notions of center of mass and spin. The equations of motion are derived and then used to analyse a very simple astrophysical process where only quadrupole and octupole contributions are included. The results are then compared with those coming from the post newtonian approximation.

  4. Improving the Science Observing Efficiency of the Chandra X-ray Observatory via Chandra Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virani, Shanil; Schwartz, Daniel; Cameron, Robert; Plucinsky, Paul; ODell, Stephen; Minow, Joseph; Blackwell, William

    2003-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA' latest "Great Observatory", swas launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (approx. 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. Our earlier analysis demonstrated that our implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 model (a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field) does not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. This led to a change in our operating procedure whereby we "padded" the start and end times of transit by 10 kiloseconds (ks) so that ACIS, the primary science instrument on-board Chandra, would not be exposed to the "fringes" of the Van Allen belts on ingress and egress for any given transit. This additional 20 ks per orbit during which Chandra is unable to perform science observations sums to approximately 3 Ms of "lost" science time per year and therefore reduces the science observing efficiency of the Observatory. To address the need for a higher fidelity radiation model appropriate for the Chandra orbit, the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM) was developed. The CRM is an ion model for the outer magnetosphere and is based on data from the EPIC/ICS instrument on-board the Geotail satellite as well as data from the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on-board the Polar satellite. With the production and implementation of the CRM, we present the results of a study designed to investigate the science observing time that may be recovered by using the CRM as a function of the additional low

  5. Radiation reaction and gravitational waves in the effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Galley, Chad R.; Tiglio, Manuel

    2009-06-15

    We compute the contribution to the Lagrangian from the leading order (2.5 post-Newtonian) radiation reaction and the quadrupolar gravitational waves emitted from a binary system using the effective field theory (EFT) approach of Goldberger and Rothstein. We use an initial value formulation of the underlying (quantum) framework to implement retarded boundary conditions and describe these real-time dissipative processes. We also demonstrate why the usual scattering formalism of quantum field theory inadequately accounts for these. The methods discussed here should be useful for deriving real-time quantities (including radiation reaction forces and gravitational wave emission) and hereditary terms in the post-Newtonian approximation (including memory, tail and other causal, history-dependent integrals) within the EFT approach. We also provide a consistent formulation of the radiation sector in the equivalent effective field theory approach of Kol and Smolkin.

  6. Jeans instability of self gravitating partially ionized Hall plasma with radiative heat loss functions and porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    The Jeans instability of partially ionized self gravitating plasma is discussed to investigate the effect of the Hall current, radiative heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, collision frequency of neutrals, porosity, finite electrical resistivity and viscosity for the formation of stars in HI and HII regions. The standard Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) set of equations is used for the present configuration with radiative heat-loss function and thermal conductivity. A general dispersion relation is obtained from perturbation equations using the normal mode analysis method. We find that the Jeans condition of self-gravitational instability is modified due to the presence of neutral particle, radiative heat-loss functions and thermal conductivity. Presence of Hall current, porosity and collision frequency have no effect on Jeans criterion.

  7. Radiating gravitational collapse with shearing motion and bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R.

    2001-03-01

    A model is proposed of a collapsing radiating star consisting of a shearing fluid with bulk viscosity undergoing radial heat flow with outgoing radiation. The pressure of the star, at the beginning of the collapse, is isotropic but due to the presence of the bulk viscosity the pressure becomes more and more anisotropic. The behavior of the density, pressure, mass, luminosity, the effective adiabatic index and the Kretschmann scalar is analyzed. Our work is compared to the case of a collapsing shearing fluid of a previous model, for a star with 6 Msun.

  8. The suppression of gravitational radiation from finite-size stars falling into black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugan, M. P.; Shapiro, S. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1982-06-01

    It is shown that the gravitational radiation emitted in a head-on collision between a finite-size star and a black hole can be substantially less than might be expected on the basis of results for point mass-black hole collisions. The suppression 'form factor' for gravitational radiation from a dust cloud freely falling from rest at infinity into a Schwarzschild black hole of much greater mass is calculated. It is found that whenever the infalling star is tidally disrupted by the black hole prior to capture, the energy outflow in gravitational radiation may be much less than that for an infalling point particle of the same mass. This severe suppression results from phase incoherence in the outgoing radiation. Analytic expressions are derived for the total wave energy and wave amplitude in terms of the point-mass results. Head-on, free-fall collisions of main sequence, white dwarf, and neutron stars with black holes of different masses are considered.

  9. The mass transfer rate in X1916-053 - It is driven by gravitational radiation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; Taam, R. E.; White, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    A 50-minute period for a binary system harboring an X-ray burster would allow several alternatives for the mass-giving secondary, including an H-shell burning-plus-He degenerate core composite model. The burst properties of X1916-053 are presently used to argue against the He degenerate as well as the He main sequence solutions and to estimate whether, for any of the other solutions, the mass transfer rate could be consistent with that expected from gravitational radiation (GR). Within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, the transfer rate for the composite model solution is consistent with gravitational radiation, but enhancement by other mechanisms should be investigated.

  10. Modeling the Spin Equilibrium of Neutron Stars in LMXBs Without Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the spin-equilibrium of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs. We demonstrate that, when combined with a naive spin-up torque, the observed data leads to inferred magnetic fields which are at variance with those of galactic millisecond radiopulsars. This indicates the need for either additional spin-down torques (eg. gravitational radiation) or an improved accretion model. We show that a simple consistent accretion model can be arrived at by accounting for radiation pressure in rapidly accreting systems (above a few percent of the Eddington accretion rate). In our model the inner disk region is thick and significantly sub-Keplerian, and the estimated equilibrium periods are such that the LMXB neutron stars have properties that accord well with the galactic millisecond radiopulsar sample. The implications for future gravitational-wave observations are also discussed briefly.

  11. Relativistic astrophysics. [studies of gravitational radiation in asymptotic de sitter space and post Newtonian approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    The coordinate independence of gravitational radiation and the parameterized post-Newtonian approximation from which it is extended are described. The general consistency of the field equations with Bianchi identities, gauge conditions, and the Newtonian limit of the perfect fluid equations of hydrodynamics are studied. A technique of modification is indicated for application to vector-metric or double metric theories, as well as to scalar-tensor theories.

  12. On the gravitational field of a radiating, isothermal perfect gas cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers a static isotropic self-gravitating perfect gas in the presence of thermal radiation. The gravitational field is specified in terms of the radiation and gas pressures. Assuming that the thermodynamic internal energy is small compared with relativistic rest energy, it is shown that the gas pressure satisfies the Lane-Emden equation; the assumption of dominant intrinsic relativistic rest energy is satisfied by the hottest stars. Six-solutions of the Lane-Enden equation are obtained together with the corresponding gravitational fields. The basis for comparison is the singular solution I decaying like the inverse square of the radius, that is the leading term of the asymptotic solution V. Two semi-linear solutions are obtained using as variables nonlinear functions of the gas pressure, leading to nonlinear second-order differential equations that can be linearized; one solution II holds for small radius and leads to zero, finite or infinite central pressure, and the other solution III holds asymptomatically and exhibits pressure oscillations. The singular solution I for large radius is matched to a power series solution IV for small radius leading to a solution valid for all radii. The asymptotic solutions III and V: (i) coincide in their common domain of validity; (ii) can be truncated with good accuracy leading to the solution VI.

  13. DETECTION OF IMBHs WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OBSERVATORIES: A BIOGRAPHY OF A BINARY OF BLACK HOLES, FROM BIRTH TO DEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Santamaria, LucIa E-mail: Lucia.Santamaria@aei.mpg.d

    2010-10-20

    Even though the existence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs; black holes with masses ranging between 10{sup 2} M{sub sun} and 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}) has not yet been corroborated observationally, these objects are of high interest for astrophysics. Our understanding of the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes, as well as galaxy evolution modeling and cosmography would dramatically change if an IMBH were to be observed. From the point of view of traditional photon-based astronomy, which relies on the monitoring of innermost stellar kinematics, the direct detection of an IMBH seems to be rather far in the future. However, the prospect of the detection and characterization of an IMBH has good chances in lower frequency gravitational-wave (GW) astrophysics using ground-based detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), Virgo, and the future Einstein Telescope (ET). We present an analysis of the signal of a system of a binary of IMBHs based on a waveform model obtained with numerical relativity simulations coupled with post-Newtonian calculations at the highest available order. IMBH binaries with total masses between 200 and 20,000 M{sub sun} would produce significant signal-to-noise ratios in Advanced LIGO and Virgo and the ET. We have computed the expected event rate of IMBH binary coalescences for different configurations of the binary, finding interesting values that depend on the spin of the IMBHs. The prospects for IMBH detection and characterization with ground-based GW observatories would not only provide us with a robust test of general relativity, but would also corroborate the existence of these systems. Such detections should allow astrophysicists to probe the stellar environments of IMBHs and their formation processes.

  14. Gravitational time delay in orthogonally polarized radiation passing by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two parallel investigations into the degree, if any, to which orthogonally polarized rays are deflected differently on passing through the gravitational field of the sun were previously conducted. The first involved very long and intermediate length baseline radio interferometry. The second was initially based on observations of radiation transmitted by the Pioneer 6 spacecraft, on passing behind the sun in 1968. This work was extended by using Helios-A and Helios-B spacecraft. It was calculated that the differential deflection between orthogonally polarized components is less than one part in 10 to the 7th power of the total gravitational deflection, or less than about 10 to the -7th power arc sec, in total.

  15. Upper limits on the isotropic gravitational radiation background from pulsar timing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.; Downs, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    A pulsar and the earth may be thought of as end masses of a free-mass gravitational wave antenna in which the relative motion of the masses is monitored by observing the Doppler shift of the pulse arrival times. Using timing residuals from PSR 1133 + 16, 1237 + 25, 1604-00, and 2045-16, an upper limit to the spectrum of the isotropic gravitational radiation background has been derived in the frequency band 4 x 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -7th Hz. This limit is found to be S(E) = 10 to the 21st f-cubed ergs/cu cm Hz, where S(E) is the energy density spectrum and f is the frequency in Hz. This would limit the energy density at frequencies below 10 to the -8th Hz to be 0.00014 times the critical density.

  16. Coherent observations of gravitational radiation with LISA and gLISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinto, Massimo; de Araujo, José C. N.

    2016-10-01

    The geosynchronous Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (gLISA) is a space-based gravitational wave (GW) mission that, for the past 5 years, has been under joint study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Stanford University; the National Institute for Space Research (I.N.P.E., Brazil); and Space Systems Loral. If flown at the same time as the LISA mission, the two arrays will deliver a joint sensitivity that accounts for the best performance of both missions in their respective parts of the millihertz band. This simultaneous operation will result in an optimally combined sensitivity curve that is "white" from about 3 ×10-3 Hz to 1 Hz, making the two antennas capable of detecting, with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) with masses in the range (10 -1 08)M⊙ . Their ability of jointly tracking, with enhanced SNR, signals similar to that observed by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (aLIGO) on September 14, 2015 (the GW150914 event) will result in a larger number of observable small-mass binary black holes and an improved precision of the parameters characterizing these sources. Together, LISA, gLISA and aLIGO will cover, with good sensitivity, the (10-4-1 03) Hz frequency band.

  17. Semianalytical estimates of scattering thresholds and gravitational radiation in ultrarelativistic black hole encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Hinderer, Tanja; Lemos, Madalena; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2010-05-15

    Ultrarelativistic collisions of black holes are ideal gedanken experiments to study the nonlinearities of general relativity. In this paper we use semianalytical tools to better understand the nature of these collisions and the emitted gravitational radiation. We explain many features of the energy spectra extracted from numerical relativity simulations using two complementary semianalytical calculations. In the first calculation we estimate the radiation by a 'zero-frequency limit' analysis of the collision of two point particles with finite impact parameter. In the second calculation we replace one of the black holes by a point particle plunging with arbitrary energy and impact parameter into a Schwarzschild black hole, and we explore the multipolar structure of the radiation paying particular attention to the near-critical regime. We also use a geodesic analogy to provide qualitative estimates of the dependence of the scattering threshold on the black hole spin and on the dimensionality of the spacetime.

  18. Measurement Of Solar Radiation at New Delhi, High Altitude Observatory, Hanle and Maitri Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. L.; Arya, B. C.

    The measurement of solar radiation plays an important role in climate and environmental change studies. The enhanced UV-B radiations at the ground level has the potential to cause adverse biological and environmental impacts. The amount of UV-B radiation at ground level depends on various temporal, spatial and meteorological factors such as time of the day, season, altitude, clouds, surface albedo, ozone, aerosols, etc. The risks for the human health, plant, animals and material are growing because of high exposition of the solar radiation which is caused by ozone depletion and other anthropogenic activities. A limited measurements have been made at high altitudes and Antarctica which are very crucial to inhabitants of these locations. In view of the above, measurements of solar radiation along with other parameters were carried out at Leh (34°77' N, 77°36' E), 3311 meter above mean sea level as well as at Indian Astronomical Observatory , Leh / Hanle ( Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore), Hanle (Mount Saraswati), Jammu and Kashmir (India) (32°43' N, 77°34' E), 4467 meter above mean sea level during July 13-31, 1999, June 2000 and July 2003 in a campaign mode. These measurements are first of its kind at a unique location well deep inside the troposphere as it happens to be one of the highest observatory in the world. The regular measurements are also being carried out at NPL, New Delhi(280 65^' N, 770 21^' E) and Maitri, Antarctica(70.440 S, 11.450 E). Also the data were collected during our voyage to Antarctica to cover latitudinal distribution of these parameters from Goa, India (15.240 N, 73.420 E) to Maitri, Antarctica (70.440 S, 11.450 E) using a highly sophisticated and microprocessor based compact hand held sun photometer consisting of five filter channels at 300, 305, 312, 940 and 1020 nm to measure solar radiation at all the sites. The measurements were used to derive total column ozone, water vapour and aerosol optical depth etc. The solar

  19. Gravitational radiation from a spinning compact object around a supermassive Kerr black hole in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wenbiao

    2010-10-15

    The gravitational waves and energy radiation from a spinning compact object with stellar mass in a circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole are investigated in this paper. The effect of how the spin acts on energy and angular moment fluxes is discussed in detail. The calculation results indicate that the spin of a small body should be considered in waveform-template production for the upcoming gravitational wave detections. It is clear that when the direction of spin axes is the same as the orbitally angular momentum ('positive' spin), spin can decrease the energy fluxes which radiate to infinity. For antidirection spin ('negative'), the energy fluxes to infinity can be enlarged. And the relations between fluxes (both infinity and horizon) and spin look like quadratic functions. From frequency shift due to spin, we estimate the wave-phase accumulation during the inspiraling process of the particle. We find that the time of particle inspiral into the black hole is longer for positive spin and shorter for negative compared with the nonspinning particle. Especially, for extreme spin value, the energy radiation near the horizon of the extreme Kerr black hole is much more than that for the nonspinning one. And consequently, the maximum binging energy of the extreme spinning particle is much larger than that of the nonspinning particle.

  20. Tip-tilt mirror suspension: beam steering for advanced laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory sensing and control signals.

    PubMed

    Slagmolen, Bram J J; Mullavey, Adam J; Miller, John; McClelland, David E; Fritschel, Peter

    2011-12-01

    We describe the design of a small optic suspension system, referred to as the tip-tilt mirror suspension, used to isolate selected small optics for the interferometer sensing and control beams in the advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors. The suspended optics are isolated in all 6 degrees of freedom, with eigenmode frequencies between 1.3 Hz and 10 Hz. The suspended optic has voice-coil actuators which provide an angular range of ±4 mrad in the pitch and yaw degrees of freedom.

  1. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  2. Emerging Hawking-Like Radiation from Gravitational Bremsstrahlung Beyond the Planck Scale.

    PubMed

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-10-23

    We argue that, as a consequence of the graviton's spin-2, its bremsstrahlung in trans-Planckian-energy (E≫M(P)) gravitational scattering at small deflection angle can be nicely expressed in terms of helicity-transformation phases and their transfer within the scattering process. The resulting spectrum exhibits deeply sub-Planckian characteristic energies of order M(P)(2)/E≪M(P) (reminiscent of Hawking radiation), a suppressed fragmentation region, and a reduced rapidity plateau, in broad agreement with recent classical estimates.

  3. Upper limits on a stochastic background of gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, J; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Buonanno, A; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; DeBra, D; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandar, S; Díaz, M; Di Credico, A; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ehrens, P; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Frey, R E; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Goda, K; Goggin, L; González, G; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, L; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Khan, A; Kim, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Luna, M; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, K; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, A; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J; Smith, M R; Spjeld, O; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; van Putten, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-11-25

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of omega0 < 8.4 x 10(-4) in the 69-156 Hz band is approximately 10(5) times lower than the previous result in this frequency range.

  4. Scientific goals achievable with radiation monitor measurements on board gravitational wave interferometers in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, C.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Fabi, M.; Finetti, N.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.

    2012-06-01

    Cosmic rays and energetic solar particles constitute one of the most important sources of noise for future gravitational wave detectors in space. Radiation monitors were designed for the LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) mission. Similar devices were proposed to be placed on board LISA and ASTROD. These detectors are needed to monitor the flux of energetic particles penetrating mission spacecraft and inertial sensors. However, in addition to this primary use, radiation monitors on board space interferometers will carry out the first multipoint observation of solar energetic particles (SEPs) at small and large heliolongitude intervals and at very different distances from Earth with minor normalization errors. We illustrate the scientific goals that can be achieved in solar physics and space weather studies with these detectors. A comparison with present and future missions devoted to solar physics is presented.

  5. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  6. Linearized f(R) gravity: Gravitational radiation and Solar System tests

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Christopher P. L.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the linearized form of metric f(R)-gravity, assuming that f(R) is analytic about R=0 so it may be expanded as f(R)=R+a{sub 2}R{sup 2}/2+.... Gravitational radiation is modified, admitting an extra mode of oscillation, that of the Ricci scalar. We derive an effective energy-momentum tensor for the radiation. We also present weak-field metrics for simple sources. These are distinct from the equivalent Kerr (or Schwarzschild) forms. We apply the metrics to tests that could constrain f(R). We show that light deflection experiments cannot distinguish f(R)-gravity from general relativity as both have an effective post-Newtonian parameter {gamma}=1. We find that planetary precession rates are enhanced relative to general relativity; from the orbit of Mercury we derive the bound |a{sub 2}| < or approx. 1.2x10{sup 18} m{sup 2}. Gravitational-wave astronomy may be more useful: considering the phase of a gravitational waveform we estimate deviations from general relativity could be measurable for an extreme-mass-ratio inspiral about a 10{sup 6}M{sub {center_dot}} black hole if |a{sub 2}| > or approx. 10{sup 17}m{sup 2}, assuming that the weak-field metric of the black hole coincides with that of a point mass. However Eoet-Wash experiments provide the strictest bound |a{sub 2}| < or approx. 2x10{sup -9} m{sup 2}. Although the astronomical bounds are weaker, they are still of interest in the case that the effective form of f(R) is modified in different regions, perhaps through the chameleon mechanism. Assuming the laboratory bound is universal, we conclude that the propagating Ricci scalar mode cannot be excited by astrophysical sources.

  7. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (<5 Myr) of turbulent, 106 M⊙ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an initial mass function (IMF) with an efficiency of 20 per cent per free-fall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster particle formation efficiency by a few per cent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of cluster formation efficiencies of 37-71 per cent for the most unbound to the most bound model. The total number of clusters increases while the maximum mass cluster decreases with an increasing initial virial parameter, resulting in steeper mass distributions. The star formation rates in our cluster particles are initially consistent with observations but rise to higher values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  8. Dynamic Universe Model predicts frequency shifting in electromagnetic radiation near gravitating masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, Dynamic Universe Model studies the light rays and other electromagnetic radiation passing grazingly near any gravitating mass. This change in frequency will depend on relative direction of movement between mass and radiation. Change in frequency depends on relative direction between ray and the Gravitating mass. Here in this paper we will mathematically derive the results and show these predictions. Dynamic Universe Model uses a new type of Tensor. There are no differential or integral equations here. No singularities and body to body collisions in this model. Many papers were published in USA and CANADA. See Dynamic Universe Model Blog for further details and papers Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step Keywords: Dynamic Universe Model, Hubble Space telescope (HST), SITA simulations , singularity-free cosmology,

  9. Gravitational wave radiation by LIGO-type detectors and its reciprocity relation with the detector's fundamental quantum limited sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Belinda; Ma, Yiqiu; Miao, Haixing; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-01-01

    We relate the radiation of gravitational waves (GW) by a light interferometer with cavity arms (such as LIGO) to its quantum limited sensitivity as a detector of GW's, thereby demonstrating a reciprocity relation between the interferometer's function as a detector and emitter. We derive the pairwise interactions among the cavity optical field, the cavity end mirror, and the gravitational perturbation from the action principle. We quantize these degrees of freedom to calculate the GW's generated by a quantum object. We find that the rate of gravitational wave generation is related to the so-called quantum Cramer Rao bound of the detector, which is a general result from linear measurement theory that gives the fundamental limit to a detector's sensitivity. We show that increasing the maximal sensitivity for the interferometer also increases its GW radiation. This finding may point towards a new paradigm for improving detector sensitivity by maximizing GW radiator.

  10. Mergers of Non-spinning Black-hole Binaries: Gravitational Radiation Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; vanMeter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from black-hole binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our primary goal is to present relatively complete information about the waveforms, including all the leading multipolar components, to interested researchers. In our analysis, we pursue the simplest physical description of the dominant features in the radiation, providing an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This interpretation applies uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We emphasize strong relationships among the l = m modes that persist through the full wavetrain. Exploring the structure of the waveforms in more detail, we conduct detailed analytic fitting of the late-time frequency evolution, identifying a key quantitative feature shared by the l = m modes among all mass-ratios. We identify relationships, with a simple interpretation in terms of the implicit rotating source, among the evolution of frequency and amplitude, which hold for the late-time radiation. These detailed relationships provide sufficient information about the late-time radiation to yield a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modeling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  11. A historical fluence analysis of the radiation environment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and implications for continued radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePasquale, J. M.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Schwartz, D. A.

    2006-06-01

    Now in operation for over 6 years, the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has sampled a variety of space environments. Its highly elliptical orbit, with a 63.5 hr period, regularly takes the spacecraft through the Earth's radiation belts, the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath and into the solar wind. Additionally, the CXO has weathered several severe solar storms during its time in orbit. Given the vulnerability of Chandra's Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) to radiation damage from low energy protons, proper radiation management has been a prime concern of the Chandra team. A comprehensive approach utilizing scheduled radiation safing, in addition to both on-board autonomous radiation monitoring and manual intervention, has proved successful at managing further radiation damage. However, the future of autonomous radiation monitoring on-board the CXO faces a new challenge as the multi-layer insulation (MLI) on its radiation monitor, the Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument (EPHIN), continues to degrade, leading to elevated temperatures. Operating at higher temperatures, the data from some EPHIN channels can become noisy and unreliable for radiation monitoring. This paper explores the full implication of the loss of EPHIN to CXO radiation monitoring by evaluating the fluences the CXO experienced during 40 autonomous radiation safing events from 2000 through 2005 in various hypothetical scenarios which include the use of EPHIN in limited to no capacity as a radiation monitor. We also consider the possibility of replacing EPHIN with Chandra's High Resolution Camera (HRC) for radiation monitoring.

  12. Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes: Advances in the Perturbative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, C. O.

    2005-08-01

    After the work of Regge, Wheeler, Zerilli, Teukolsky and others in the 1970s, it became possible to accurately compute the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of two black holes (in the extreme-mass limit). It was soon evident that, to first perturbative order, a particle in a circular orbit would continue orbiting forever if the radiative corrections to the particle motion that make the orbit decay were not taken into account. When I entered the field in 1996, a quick search of the literature showed that this problem was still unsolved. A straightforward computation leads to infinities produced by the representation of the particle in terms of Dirac delta functions. Since 1938, when Dirac had solved the equivalent problem in electromagnetic theory, nobody had succeeded in regularizing this in a self-consistent manner. Fortunately, the solution was arrived at much sooner than we expected. In 1997, Mino, Sasaki and Tanaka, and Quinn and Wald published the equations of motion that a particle obeys after self-force corrections. This essentially gave birth to the field of radiation reaction/self-force computations. The aim of this programme is first to obtain the corrections to the geodesic motion of a particle in the background of a single black hole, and then to use this corrected trajectory to compute second-order perturbations of the gravitational field. This will give us the energy-momentum radiated to infinity and into the hole, as well as the waveforms that we will eventually be able to measure with ground- or space-based gravitational wave detectors. As mentioned, the programme as a whole will give us waveforms accurate to second perturbative order in the mass ratio of the black holes, i.e. Script O[(m/M)2]. This will be a good approximation for galactic binary black holes of the order of a few solar masses, in the right frequency range (few hundred Hertz) to be detected by ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO and VIRGO

  13. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  14. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  15. Gravitation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Muehlner, D. J.; Benford, R. L.; Owens, D. K.; Pierre, N. A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon measurements were made of the far infrared background radiation. The radiometer used and its calibration are discussed. An electromagnetically coupled broadband gravitational antenna is also considered. The proposed antenna design and noise sources in the antenna are reviewed. A comparison is made between interferometric broadband and resonant bar antennas for the detection of gravitational wave pulses.

  16. Quantum gravitational collapse and Hawking radiation in 2+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Vaz, Cenalo; Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.; Kiefer, Claus

    2007-12-15

    We develop the canonical theory of gravitational collapse in 2+1 dimensions with a negative cosmological constant and obtain exact solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation regularized on a lattice. We employ these solutions to derive the Hawking radiation from black holes formed in all models of dust collapse. We obtain an (approximate) Planck spectrum near the horizon characterized by the Hawking temperature T{sub H}=({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){radical}(G{lambda}M)/2{pi}, where M is the mass of a black hole that is presumed to form at the center of the collapsing matter cloud and -{lambda} is the cosmological constant. Our solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation are exact, so we are able to reliably compute the gray-body factors that result from going beyond the near-horizon region.

  17. Measurement of a high electrical quality factor in a niobium resonator for a gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical quality factors of a 10-g niobium resonator were measured at 4.4 K and were found to be 8.1 x 10 to the 6th, and 3.8 x 10 to the 6th, respectively. The value for the electrical quality factor is high enough for a system operating at 50 mK at a sensitivity level of one phonon. The resonator's low damping properties make it suitable for use as a transducer for a cryogenic three-mode gravitational radiation detector. A practical design is given for the mounting of the resonator on a 2400-kg aluminum-bar detector. Projections are made for the sensitivity of a 2400-kg bar instrumented as a three-mode system with this resonator inductively coupled to a SQUID.

  18. Bayesian inference on compact binary inspiral gravitational radiation signals in interferometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röver, Christian; Meyer, Renate; Christensen, Nelson

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a description of a Bayesian analysis framework for use with interferometric gravitational radiation data in search of binary neutron star inspiral signals. Five parameters are investigated, and the information extracted from the data is illustrated and quantified. The posterior integration is carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. Implementation details include the use of importance resampling for improved convergence and informative priors reflecting the conditions expected for realistic measurements. An example is presented from an application using realistic, albeit fictitious, data. We expect that these parameter estimation techniques will prove useful at the end of a binary inspiral detection pipeline for interferometric detectors like LIGO or Virgo.

  19. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  20. Hawking-like radiation and the density matrix for an infalling observer during gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Anshul; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-09-01

    We study time-dependent Hawking-like radiation as seen by an infalling observer during gravitational collapse of a thin shell. We calculate the occupation number of particles of which the frequencies are measured in the proper time of an infalling observer in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. We solve the equations for the whole process from the beginning of the collapse till the moment when the collapsing shell reaches zero radius. The radiation distribution is not thermal in the whole frequency regime, but it is approximately thermal for the wavelengths of the order of the Schwarzschild radius of the collapsing shell. After the Schwarzschild radius is crossed, the temperature increases without limits as the singularity is approached. We also calculate the density matrix associated with this radiation. It turns out that the off-diagonal correlation terms to the diagonal Hawking leading-order terms are very important. While the trace of the diagonal (Hawking) density matrix squared decreases during the evolution, the trace of the total density matrix squared remains unity at all times and all frequencies.

  1. Spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction of strain, news and gravitational radiation flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handmer, Casey J.; Szilágyi, Béla; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    We present a new approach for the Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) of gravitational radiation strain, news function, and the flux of the energy-momentum, supermomentum and angular momentum associated with the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs asymptotic symmetries. In CCE, a characteristic evolution code takes numerical data on an inner worldtube supplied by a Cauchy evolution code, and propagates it outwards to obtain the space-time metric in a neighborhood of null infinity. The metric is first determined in a scrambled form in terms of coordinates determined by the Cauchy formalism. In prior treatments, the waveform is first extracted from this metric and then transformed into an asymptotic inertial coordinate system. This procedure provides the physically proper description of the waveform and the radiated energy but it does not generalize to determine the flux of angular momentum or supermomentum. Here we formulate and implement a new approach which transforms the full metric into an asymptotic inertial frame and provides a uniform treatment of all the radiation fluxes associated with the asymptotic symmetries. Computations are performed and calibrated using the spectral Einstein code.

  2. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for more than three decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  3. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  4. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  5. Improving the Science Observing Efficiency of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory via the Chandra Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virani, Shanil; Schwartz, Daniel; Cameron, Robert; Plucinsky, Paul; O'Dell, Stephen; Munow, Joseph; Blackwell, William

    2003-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA's latest "Great Observatory", was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (N 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. Our earlier analysis demonstrated that our implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 model (a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field) does not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. This led to a change in our operating procedure whereby we "padded" the start and end times of transit by 10 kiloseconds (ks) so that ACIS, the primary science instrument on-board Chandra, would not be exposed to the "fringes" of the Van Allen belts on ingress and egress for any given transit. This additional 20 ks per orbit during which Chandra is unable to perform science observations sums to approximately 3 Ms of "lost" science time per year and therefore reduces the science observing efficiency of the Observatory. To address the need for a higher fidelity radiation model appropriate for the Chandra orbit, the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM) was developed. The CRM is an ion model for the outer magnetosphere and is based on data from the EPIC/ICS instrument on-board the Geotail satellite as well as data from the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on-board the Polar satellite. With the production and Implementation of the CRM, we present the results of a study designed to investigate the science observing time that may be recovered by using the CRM as a function of the additional low

  6. Tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction: Time nonlocality and renormalization group evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.; Ross, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at the fourth post-Newtonian order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is nonlocal in time and features both a dissipative and a "conservative" term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet (UV) divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared (IR) singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit—shrinking the binary to a point—which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential and total mass/energy, and find agreement with the results obtained imposing the conservation of the (pseudo) stress-energy tensor in the radiation theory. While the calculation of the leading tail contribution to the effective action involves only one diagram, five are needed for the one-point function. This suggests logarithmic corrections may be easier to incorporate in this fashion. We conclude with a few remarks on the nature of these IR/UV singularities, the (lack of) ambiguities recently discussed in the literature, and the completeness of the analytic post-Newtonian framework.

  7. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  8. Enhanced sensitivity of the LIGO gravitational wave detector by using squeezed states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bowers, J.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Buckland, K.; Brückner, F.; Buchler, B. C.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A. D.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H.-S.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Constancio Junior, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; Deleeuw, E.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Palma, I.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drasco, S.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engel, R.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B. F.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Finn, L. S.; Fisher, R. P.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Garcia, J.; Gehrels, N.; Gelencser, G.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heintze, M. C.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jang, Y. J.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D.; Kozameh, C.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Kucharczyk, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuper, B. J.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Leong, J. R.; Levine, B.; Lhuillier, V.; Lin, A. C.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; MacArthur, J.; MacDonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; MacLeod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Manca, G.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazzolo, G.; McAuley, K.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mokler, F.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Necula, V.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; O'Dell, J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Ou, J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Parkinson, W.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodriguez, L.; Rodruck, M.; Rollins, J. G.; Romie, J. H.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schuette, D.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stevens, D.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, P. J.; Veitch, J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verma, S.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Wiseman, A. G.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yum, H.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2013-08-01

    Nearly a century after Einstein first predicted the existence of gravitational waves, a global network of Earth-based gravitational wave observatories is seeking to directly detect this faint radiation using precision laser interferometry. Photon shot noise, due to the quantum nature of light, imposes a fundamental limit on the attometre-level sensitivity of the kilometre-scale Michelson interferometers deployed for this task. Here, we inject squeezed states to improve the performance of one of the detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) beyond the quantum noise limit, most notably in the frequency region down to 150 Hz, critically important for several astrophysical sources, with no deterioration of performance observed at any frequency. With the injection of squeezed states, this LIGO detector demonstrated the best broadband sensitivity to gravitational waves ever achieved, with important implications for observing the gravitational-wave Universe with unprecedented sensitivity.

  9. Detection of gravitational radiation and oscillations of the sun via Doppler tracking of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The magnitude of Doppler signals produced by gravitational wave burst, continuous gravitational waves, and oscillations of the sun interacting with a spacecraft are considered. Expressions are worked out for the appropriate noise entering each measurement. The noise sources considered are the Doppler extractor, fluctuations in the solar wind and the troposphere, and fluctuations in the reference oscillator.

  10. Detecting a stochastic background of gravitational radiation: Signal processing strategies and sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bruce; Romano, Joseph D.

    1999-05-01

    We analyze the signal processing required for the optimal detection of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation using laser interferometric detectors. Starting with basic assumptions about the statistical properties of a stochastic gravity-wave background, we derive expressions for the optimal filter function and signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-correlation of the outputs of two gravity-wave detectors. Sensitivity levels required for detection are then calculated. Issues related to (i) calculating the signal-to-noise ratio for arbitrarily large stochastic backgrounds, (ii) performing the data analysis in the presence of nonstationary detector noise, (iii) combining data from multiple detector pairs to increase the sensitivity of a stochastic background search, (iv) correlating the outputs of 4 or more detectors, and (v) allowing for the possibility of correlated noise in the outputs of two detectors are discussed. We briefly describe a computer simulation that was used to ``experimentally'' verify the theoretical calculations derived in the paper, and which mimics the generation and detection of a simulated stochastic gravity-wave signal in the presence of simulated detector noise. Numerous graphs and tables of numerical data for the five major interferometers (LIGO-WA, LIGO-LA, VIRGO, GEO-600, and TAMA-300) are also given. This information consists of graphs of the noise power spectra, overlap reduction functions, and optimal filter functions; also included are tables of the signal-to-noise ratios and sensitivity levels for cross-correlation measurements between different detector pairs. The treatment given in this paper should be accessible to both theorists involved in data analysis and experimentalists involved in detector design and data acquisition.

  11. Gravitational radiation detection with spacecraft Doppler tracking - Limiting sensitivities and prospective missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Hellings, R. W.; Wahlquist, H. D.; Wolff, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The prospects of using spacecraft Doppler tracking, in NASA missions, for the detection of gravitational waves are examined. The sensitivity limits of such detection are characterized in terms of plasma scintillation, troposphere scintillation, receiver noise, MDA and ODA quantization error, and clock jitter. Current and possible future NASA missions that will involve gravitational wave experiments are briefly reviewed, including the Galileo, solar polar, Halley/Tempel-2, and solar probe missions.

  12. Mass-energy radiative transfer and momentum extraction by gravitational wave emission in the collision of two black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranha, R. F.; Soares, I. Damião; Tonini, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    We examine numerically the head-on collision of two boosted Schwarzschild black holes, in the realm of Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. Characteristic initial data for the system are constructed and the Robinson-Trautman equation is integrated for these data using a numerical code based on the Galerkin-collocation method. The initial data already have a common horizon so that the evolution covers the post-merger regime up to the final configuration, when the gravitational wave emission ceases. In the nonlinear regime gravitational waves are emitted, extracting mass and linear momentum from the system. The final configuration is a boosted Schwarzschild black hole with rest mass larger than the masses of the two individual initial black holes, and with a smaller final boost parameter characterizing the recoil velocity of the remnant. The efficiency Δ of the mass-energy extraction by gravitational waves is evaluated. The points (Δ,y), where y is the (normalized) rest mass of the remnant black hole, satisfy a nonextensive Tsallis distribution with entropic index q≃1/2 for y≲12. Beyond ỹ12 the experimental points deviate from the distribution function and the efficiency presents an absolute maximum for the case of equally massive individual colliding black holes; the remnant has no recoil in this case. By using the Bondi mass formula we also evaluate the total energy EW carried out by gravitational waves as well as the radiative corrections to the efficiency. EW increases monotonically with y and the experimental points (EW,y) also satisfy a nonextensive Tsallis distribution but with q≃2/3, up to ỹ14.2. Beyond this value the experimental points increase faster than the distribution function. For any initial infalling velocity v, the distribution of momentum of the remnant exhibits a maximum at α1=αm≃0.667, where α1 is related to the ratio of pre-merger rest masses, and has a one-to-one correspondence with y for fixed v. Two distinct regimes of

  13. Mass-energy radiative transfer and momentum extraction by gravitational wave emission in the collision of two black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Aranha, R. F.; Soares, I. Damiao; Tonini, E. V.

    2010-05-15

    We examine numerically the head-on collision of two boosted Schwarzschild black holes, in the realm of Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. Characteristic initial data for the system are constructed and the Robinson-Trautman equation is integrated for these data using a numerical code based on the Galerkin-collocation method. The initial data already have a common horizon so that the evolution covers the post-merger regime up to the final configuration, when the gravitational wave emission ceases. In the nonlinear regime gravitational waves are emitted, extracting mass and linear momentum from the system. The final configuration is a boosted Schwarzschild black hole with rest mass larger than the masses of the two individual initial black holes, and with a smaller final boost parameter characterizing the recoil velocity of the remnant. The efficiency {Delta} of the mass-energy extraction by gravitational waves is evaluated. The points ({Delta},y), where y is the (normalized) rest mass of the remnant black hole, satisfy a nonextensive Tsallis distribution with entropic index q{approx_equal}1/2 for y < or approx. 12. Beyond y{approx}12 the experimental points deviate from the distribution function and the efficiency presents an absolute maximum for the case of equally massive individual colliding black holes; the remnant has no recoil in this case. By using the Bondi mass formula we also evaluate the total energy E{sub W} carried out by gravitational waves as well as the radiative corrections to the efficiency. E{sub W} increases monotonically with y and the experimental points (E{sub W},y) also satisfy a nonextensive Tsallis distribution but with q{approx_equal}2/3, up to y{approx}14.2. Beyond this value the experimental points increase faster than the distribution function. For any initial infalling velocity v, the distribution of momentum of the remnant exhibits a maximum at {alpha}{sub 1}={alpha}{sub m{approx_equal}}0.667, where {alpha}{sub 1} is related to the ratio of

  14. Magnetogasdynamic spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes, in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to power law. The radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model and the heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law for heat conduction. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. It is shown that an increase of the gravitational parameter or the Alfven-Mach number or the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas decreases the compressibility of the gas in the flow-field behind the shock, and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is formed at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of a flare produced shock in the solar wind, central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion etc. The solutions obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  15. Gravitational Waves From Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, Tristano

    2016-10-01

    In this talk, I will present the first direct detections of gravitational waves from binary stellar-mass black hole mergers during the first observing run of the two detectors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, which opened the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, and then discuss prospects for observing gravitational waves from supermassive black holes with future detectors.

  16. Reconstruction of global solar radiation time series from 1933 to 2013 at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. D.; Cuevas, E.; García, O. E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Pallé, P.; Bustos, J. J.; Romero-Campos, P. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the reconstruction of the 80-year time series of daily global solar radiation (GSR) at the subtropical high-mountain Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) located in Tenerife (The Canary Islands, Spain). For this purpose, we combine GSR estimates from sunshine duration (SD) data using the Ångström-Prescott method over the 1933/1991 period, and GSR observations directly performed by pyranometers between 1992 and 2013. Since GSR measurements have been used as a reference, a strict quality control has been applied based on principles of physical limits and comparison with LibRadtran model. By comparing with high quality GSR measurements, the precision and consistency over time of GSR estimations from SD data have been successfully documented. We obtain an overall root mean square error (RMSE) of 9.2% and an agreement between the variances of GSR estimations and GSR measurements within 92%. Nonetheless, this agreement significantly increases when the GSR estimation is done considering different daily fractions of clear sky (FCS). In that case, RMSE is reduced by half, to about 4.5%, when considering percentages of FCS > 40% (~ 90% of days in the testing period). Furthermore, we prove that the GSR estimations can monitor the GSR anomalies in consistency with GSR measurements and, then, can be suitable for reconstructing solar radiation time series. The reconstructed IZO GSR time series between 1933 and 2013 confirms change points and periods of increases/decreases of solar radiation at Earth's surface observed at a global scale, such as the early brightening, dimming and brightening. This fact supports the consistency of the IZO GSR time series presented in this work, which may be a reference for solar radiation studies in the subtropical North Atlantic region.

  17. Simulating Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes Mergers as LISA Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the simulation of gravitational waves from Binary Massive Black Holes with LISA observations is shown. The topics include: 1) Massive Black Holes (MBHs); 2) MBH Binaries; 3) Gravitational Wavws from MBH Binaries; 4) Observing with LISA; 5) How LISA sees MBH binary mergers; 6) MBH binary inspirals to LISA; 7) Numerical Relativity Simulations; 8) Numerical Relativity Challenges; 9) Recent Successes; 10) Goddard Team; 11) Binary Black Hole Simulations at Goddard; 12) Goddard Recent Advances; 13) Baker, et al.:GSFC; 13) Starting Farther Out; 14) Comparing Initial Separation; 15) Now with AMR; and 16) Conclusion.

  18. Disc-protoplanet interaction. Influence of circumprimary radiative discs on self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyergyovits, M.; Eggl, S.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Theis, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Context. More than 60 planets have been discovered so far in systems that harbour two stars, some of which have binary semi-major axes as small as 20 au. It is well known that the formation of planets in such systems is strongly influenced by the stellar components, since the protoplanetary disc and the particles within are exposed to the gravitational influence of the binary. However, the question on how self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies affect the evolution of a radiative, circumprimary disc is still open. Aims: We present our 2D hydrodynamical GPU-CPU code and study the interaction of several thousands of self-gravitating particles with a viscous and radiative circumprimary disc within a binary star system. To our knowledge this program is the only one at the moment that is capable to handle this many particles and to calculate their influence on each other and on the disc. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a circumstellar disc assuming the binary system to be coplanar. Our grid-based staggered mesh code relies on ideas from ZEUS-2D, where we implemented the FARGO algorithm and an additional energy equation for the radiative cooling according to opacity tables. To treat particle motion we used a parallelised version of the precise Bulirsch - Stoer algorithm. Four models in total where computed taking into account (i) only N-body interaction; (ii) N-body and disc interaction; (iii) the influence of computational parameters (especially smoothing) on N-body interaction; and (iv) the influence of a quiet low-eccentricity disc while running model (ii). The impact velocities were measured at two different time intervals and were compared. Results: We show that the combination of disc- and N-body self-gravity can have a significant influence on the orbit evolution of roughly Moon sized protoplanets. Conclusions: Not only gas drag can alter the orbit of particles, but the gravitational influence of the disc can accomplish this as well. The results

  19. Gravitational wave luminosity and net momentum flux in head-on mergers of black holes: Radiative patterns and mode mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranha, Rafael Fernandes; Soares, Ivano Damião; Tonini, Eduardo Valentino

    2016-09-01

    We show that gravitational wave radiative patterns from a point test particle falling radially into a Schwarzschild black hole, as derived by Davis, Ruffini, Press and Price [M. Davis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 27, 1466 (1971).], are present in the nonlinear regime of head-on mergers of black holes. We use the Bondi-Sachs characteristic formulation and express the gravitational wave luminosity and the net momentum flux in terms of the news functions. We then evaluate the (-2 )-spin-weighted ℓ-multipole decomposition of these quantities via exact expressions valid in the nonlinear regime and defined at future null infinity. Our treatment is made in the realm of Robinson-Trautman dynamics, with characteristic initial data corresponding to the head-on merger of two black holes. We consider mass ratios in the range 0.01 ≤α ≤1 . We obtain the exponential decay with ℓ of the total energy contributed by each multipole ℓ, with an accurate linear correlation in the log-linear plot of the points up to α ≃0.7 . Above this mass ratio the contribution of the odd modes to the energy decreases faster than that of the even modes, leading to the breaking of the linear correlation; for α =1 the energy in all odd modes is zero. The dominant contribution to the total radiated energy comes from the quadrupole mode ℓ=2 corresponding, for instance, to about ≃84 % for small mass ratios up to ≃99.8 % for the limit case α =1 . The total rescaled radiated energy EWtotal/m0α2 decreases linearly with decreasing α , yielding for the point particle limit α →0 the value ≃0.0484 , about 5 times larger than the result of Davis et al. [1]. The mode decomposition of the net momentum flux and of the associated gravitational wave impulses results in an adjacent-even-odd mode-mixing pattern. We obtain that the impulses contributed by each (ℓ,ℓ+1 ) mixed mode also accurately satisfy the exponential decay with ℓ, for the whole mass ratio domain considered, 0.01 ≤α <1

  20. Bianchi VI cosmological models representing perfect fluid and radiation with electric-type free gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Banerjee, S. K.

    1992-11-01

    A homogeneous Bianchi type VIh cosmological model filled with perfect fluid, null electromagnetic field and streaming neutrinos is obtained for which the free gravitational field is of the electric type. The barotropic equation of statep = (γ-1)ɛ is imposed in the particular case of Bianchi VI0 string models. Various physical and kinematical properties of the models are discussed.

  1. Search for neutrino radiation from gravitational collapses of stars using the LSD detector under Mont Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Korol'Kova, E. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Korchagin, P. V.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Mal'Gin, A. S.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Ryasnyj, V. G.; Talochkin, V. P.

    1993-04-01

    An analysis of LSD data for the period from August 1985 to November 1991 does not reveal possible candidates for neutrino bursts from gravitational collapses of stars, except for the event of February 23, 1987, which may be related to SN 1987A. Upper bounds are obtained for neutrino fluxes from relict supernovae.

  2. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  3. Orbital Observatory GLAST - New Step in the Study of Cosmic Gamma Radiation: Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a overview of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now named Fermi Space Telescope. The new telescope is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2008. It contains the high energy gamma-ray telescope LAT (Large Area Telescope) and the GMB (GLAST Burst Monitor). The science objectives of GLAST cover almost every area of high energy astrophysics, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), including Extragalactic background light (EBL), Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), Pulsars, Diffuse gamma-radiation, EGRET unidentified sources, Solar physics, Origin of Cosmic Rays and, Dark Matter and New Physics. Also included in this overview is a discussion of the preparation to the analysis of the science data.

  4. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  5. COEXISTENCE OF GRAVITATIONALLY-BOUND AND RADIATION-DRIVEN C IV EMISSION LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyuan; Wang Tinggui; Zhou Hongyan; Liu Bo; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo

    2011-09-01

    There are mutually contradictory views in the literature of the kinematics and structure of high-ionization line (e.g., C IV) emitting regions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two kinds of broad emission line region (BELR) models have been proposed, outflow and gravitationally-bound BELR, which are supported, respectively, by blueshift of the C IV line and reverberation mapping observations. To reconcile these two apparently different models, we present a detailed comparison study between the C IV and Mg II lines using a sample of AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the kinematics of the C IV region is different from that of Mg II, which is thought to be controlled by gravity. A strong correlation is found between the blueshift and asymmetry of the C IV profile and the Eddington ratio. This provides strong observational support for the postulation that the outflow is driven by radiation pressure. In particular, we find robust evidence that the C IV line region is largely dominated by outflow at high Eddington ratios, while it is primarily gravitationally-bounded at low Eddington ratios. Our results indicate that these two emitting regions coexist in most AGNs. The emission strength from these two gases varies smoothly with Eddington ratio in opposite ways. This explanation naturally reconciles the apparently contradictory views proposed in previous studies. Finally, candidate models are discussed which can account for both the enhancement of outflow emission and suppression of normal BEL in AGNs with high Eddington ratios.

  6. Dipole gravitational radiation in Rosen's theory of gravity - Observable effects in the binary system PSR 1913+16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.; Eardley, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that Rosen's (1973) bimetric theory of gravity predicts the emission of dipole gravitational radiation from binary systems containing neutron stars, such as the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, which causes rapid changes in orbital period. The theory also predicts sizable corrections to masses inferred from orbital data and periastron-shift data. It is demonstrated that this prediction is inconsistent with the observed upper limit on period changes unless the system consists of two neutron stars whose masses differ by less than 0.3 solar mass, or a neutron star of mass less than 0.4 solar mass and a companion which must be a rapidly rotating white dwarf or a helium main-sequence star. Because Rosen's theory is in agreement with all solar-system experiments to date, this represents a feasible test of its viability.

  7. Measurements of solar radiation at Mauna Loa Observatory, 1978-1985, with emphasis on the effects of the eruption of El Chichon. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, E.G.; DeLuisi, J.J.; Austring, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Results from three different projects that involved either absolute or relative measurement of solar radiation at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory are reported. Included are measurements, in summary form, of broadband solar irradiance, spectral aerosol optical depth, and spectral diffuse-sky irradiance. Each data set includes the influence of the stratospheric debris from the eruption of El Chichon. Procedures that were used to acquire and finalize the observational records are documented.

  8. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0-1.1 M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of non-rotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  9. High-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning with the Large Observatory for x-ray Timing (LOFT) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Smith, David M.; Brandt, Søren; Briggs, Michael S.; Budz-Jørgensen, Carl; Campana, Riccardo; Carlson, Brant E.; Celestin, Sebastien; Connaughton, Valerie; Cummer, Steven A.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fullekrug, Martin; Fuschino, Fabio; Gjesteland, Thomas; Neubert, Torsten; Østgaard, Nikolai; Tavani, Marco

    2015-04-01

    We explore the possible contributions of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT) mission to the study of high-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning. LOFT is a mission dedicated to X-ray timing studies of astrophysical sources, characterised by a very large effective area of about 8.5 square meters at 8 keV. Although the main scientific target of the mission is the fundamental physics of matter under extreme conditions, the peculiar instrument concept allows significant contributions to a wide range of other science topics, including the cross-disciplinary field of high-energy atmospheric physics, at the crossroad between geophysics, space physics and astrophysics. In this field we foresee the following major contributions: detect ˜ 700 Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) per year, probing the TGF intensity distribution at low fluence values and providing an unbiased sample of bright events thanks to the intrinsic robustness against dead-time and pile-up; provide the largest TGF detection rate surface density above the equator, allowing for correlation studies with lightning activity on short time scales and small regional scales, to probe the TGF / lightning relationship; lower by a factor ˜ 5 the minimum detectable fluence for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs), an additional tool to probe TGF production mechanism and the lower edge of TGF intensity distribution; open up a discovery space for the detection of high-altitude electron beams and weak X-ray emissions associated to Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). LOFT has been studied as a candidate ESA M3 mission during an extensive assessment phase. The high level of readiness and maturity of the mission, as well as the clean and solid assessment of its unique science case, make LOFT a competitive mission with a compelling science case. For this reason, its development has been continued, aiming at new launch opportunities.

  10. Learning about Black-Hole Formation from Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    The first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) discovered gravitational waves from two binary black-hole mergers. Although astrophysical black holes are simple objects fully characterized by their masses and spins, key features of binary black-hole formation such as mass transfer, natal kicks, and common-envelope evolution can misalign black-hole spins with the orbital angular momentum of the binary. These misaligned spins will precess as gravitational-wave emission causes the black holes to inspiral to separations at which the waves are detectable by observatories like LIGO. Spin precession modulates the amplitude and frequency of the gravitational waves observed by LIGO, allowing it to not only test general relativity but also reveal the secrets of black-hole formation. This talk will briefly describe those elements of binary black-hole formation responsible for initial spin misalignments, how spin precession and radiation reaction in general relativity determine how spins evolve from formation until the black holes enter LIGO’s sensitivity band, and how spin-induced gravitational-wave modulation in band can be used as a diagnostic of black-hole formation.

  11. Gravitational radiation and angular momentum flux from a slowly rotating dynamical black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Huei; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2011-04-15

    A four-dimensional asymptotic expansion scheme is used to study the next-order effects of the nonlinearity near a spinning dynamical black hole. The angular-momentum flux and energy flux formula are then obtained by constructing the reference frame in terms of the compatible constant spinors and the compatibility of the coupling leading-order Newman-Penrose equations. By using the slow rotation and small-tide approximation for a spinning black hole, the horizon cross-section we chose is spherical symmetric. It turns out the flux formula is rather simple and can be compared with the known results. Directly from the energy flux formula of the slow-rotating dynamical horizon, we find that the physically reasonable condition on requiring the positivity of the gravitational energy flux yields that the shear will monotonically decrease with time. Thus a slow-rotating dynamical horizon will asymptotically approach an isolated horizon during late time.

  12. THE BENEFITS OF VLBI ASTROMETRY TO PULSAR TIMING ARRAY SEARCHES FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, D. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2013-11-10

    Precision astrometry is an integral component of successful pulsar timing campaigns. Astrometric parameters are commonly derived by fitting them as parameters of a timing model to a series of pulse times of arrival (TOAs). TOAs measured to microsecond precision over spans of several years can yield position measurements with sub-milliarcsecond precision. However, timing-based astrometry can become biased if a pulsar displays any red spin noise or a red signal produced by the stochastic gravitational wave background. We investigate how noise of different spectral types is absorbed by timing models, leading to significant estimation biases in the astrometric parameters. We find that commonly used techniques for fitting timing models in the presence of red noise (Cholesky whitening) prevent the absorption of noise into the timing model remarkably well if the time baseline of observations exceeds several years, but are inadequate for dealing with shorter pulsar data sets. Independent of timing, pulsar-optimized very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is capable of providing position estimates precise to the sub-milliarcsecond levels needed for high-precision timing. In order to make VLBI astrometric parameters useful in pulsar timing models, the transformation between the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and the dynamical solar system ephemeris used for pulsar timing must be constrained to within a few microarcseconds. We compute a transformation between the ICRF and pulsar timing frames and quantitatively discuss how the transformation will improve in coming years. We find that incorporating VLBI astrometry into the timing models of pulsars for which only a couple of years of timing data exist will lead to more realistic assessments of red spin noise and could enhance the amplitude of gravitational wave signatures in post-fit timing residuals by factors of 20 or more.

  13. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier’s law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under a gravitational field due to heavy nucleus at the origin (Roche Model). The unsteady model of Roche consists of a dusty gas distributed with spherical symmetry around a nucleus having large mass It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the heavy nucleus. The density of the ambient medium is taken to be constant. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effect surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable difference can be found in the distribution of flow variables. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters, the gravitational parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is found that the shock strength is increased with an increase in the value of gravitational parameter. Further, it is investigated that the presence of gravitational field increases the

  14. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION FROM HYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN A DIFFERENTIALLY ROTATING NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Peralta, C.

    2010-01-20

    The mean-square current quadrupole moment associated with vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number turbulence in a differentially rotating neutron star is calculated analytically, as are the amplitude and decoherence time of the resulting, stochastic gravitational wave signal. The calculation resolves the subtle question of whether the signal is dominated by the smallest or largest turbulent eddies: for the Kolmogorov-like power spectrum observed in superfluid spherical Couette simulations, the wave strain is controlled by the largest eddies, and the decoherence time approximately equals the maximum eddy turnover time. For a neutron star with spin frequency nu{sub s} and Rossby number Ro, at a distance d from Earth, the root mean square wave strain reaches h{sub rms} approx 3 x 10{sup -24} Ro{sup 3}(nu{sub s}/30 Hz){sup 3}(d/1 kpc){sup -1}. Ordinary rotation-powered pulsars (nu{sub s} approx< 30 Hz, Ro approx< 10{sup -4}) are too dim to be detected by the current generation of long-baseline interferometers. Millisecond pulsars are brighter; for example, an object born recently in a Galactic supernova or accreting near the Eddington rate can have nu{sub s} approx 1 kHz, Ro approx> 0.2, and hence h{sub rms} approx 10{sup -21}. A cross-correlation search can detect such a source in principle, because the signal decoheres over the timescale tau{sub c} approx 1 x 10{sup -3} Ro{sup -1}(nu{sub s}/30 Hz){sup -1} s, which is adequately sampled by existing long-baseline interferometers. Hence, hydrodynamic turbulence imposes a fundamental noise floor on gravitational wave observations of neutron stars, although its polluting effect may be muted by partial decoherence in the hectohertz band, where current continuous-wave searches are concentrated, for the highest frequency (and hence most powerful) sources. This outcome is contingent on the exact shape of the turbulent power spectrum, which is modified by buoyancy and anisotropic global structures, such as stratified

  15. Lidov–Kozai Cycles with Gravitational Radiation: Merging Black Holes in Isolated Triple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silsbee, Kedron; Tremaine, Scott

    2017-02-01

    We show that a black-hole binary with an external companion can undergo Lidov–Kozai cycles that cause a close pericenter passage, leading to a rapid merger due to gravitational-wave emission. This scenario occurs most often for systems in which the companion has a mass comparable to the reduced mass of the binary and the companion orbit has a semimajor axis within a factor of ∼10 of the binary semimajor axis. Using a simple population-synthesis model and three-body simulations, we estimate the rate of mergers in triple black-hole systems in the field to be about six per Gpc3 per year in the absence of natal kicks during black-hole formation. This value is within the low end of the 90% credible interval for the total black hole–black hole merger rate inferred from the current LIGO results. There are many uncertainties in these calculations, the largest of which is the unknown distribution of natal kicks. Even modest natal kicks of 40 km s‑1 will reduce the merger rate by a factor of 40. A few percent of these systems will have eccentricity greater than 0.999 when they first enter the frequency band detectable by aLIGO (above 10 Hz).

  16. Gravitational wave production by Hawking radiation from rotating primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruifeng; Kinney, William H.; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyze in detail a rarely discussed question of gravity wave production from evaporating primordial black holes. These black holes emit gravitons which are, at classical level, registered as gravity waves. We use the latest constraints on their abundance, and calculate the power emitted in gravitons at the time of their evaporation. We then solve the coupled system of equations that gives us the evolution of the frequency and amplitude of gravity waves during the expansion of the universe. The spectrum of gravitational waves that can be detected today depends on multiple factors: fraction of the total energy density which was occupied by primordial black holes, the epoch in which they were formed, and quantities like their mass and angular momentum. We conclude that very small primordial black holes which evaporate before the big-bang nucleosynthesis emit gravitons whose spectral energy fraction today can be as large as 10-7.5. On the other hand, those which are massive enough so that they still exist now can yield a signal as high as 10-6.5. However, typical frequencies of the gravity waves from primordial black holes are still too high to be observed with the current and near future gravity wave observations.

  17. Evidence for Orbital Decay of RX J1914.4+2456: Gravitational Radiation and the Nature of the X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RX J1914.4+2456 is a candidate double-degenerate binary (AM CVn) with a putative 569 s orbital period. If this identification is correct, then it has one of the shortest binary orbital periods known, and gravitational radiation should drive the orbital evolution and mass transfer if the binary is semi-detached. Here we report the results of a coherent timing study of the archival ROSAT data for RX J1914.4+2456. We performed a phase coherent timing analysis using all five ROSAT observations spanning a four-year period. We demonstrate that all the data can be phase connected, and we show that the 1.756 mHz orbital frequency is increasing at a rate of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -17) Hz/s consistent with the expected loss of angular momentum from the binary system via gravitational radiation. In addition to providing evidence for the emission of gravitational waves, our measurement of the orbital v(dot) constrains models for the X-ray emission and the nature of the secondary. If stable mass accretion drives the X-ray flux, then a positive v(dot) is inconsistent with a degenerate donor. A helium burning dwarf is compatible if indeed such systems can have periods as short as that of RX J1914.4+2456, an open theoretical question. Our measurement of a positive v(dot) is consistent with the unipolar induction model of Wu et al. which does not require accretion to drive the X-ray flux. We discuss how future timing measurements of RX J1914.4+2456 (and systems like it) with for example, Chandra and XMM-Newton, can provide a unique probe of the interaction between mass loss and gravitational radiation. We also discuss the importance of such measurements in the context of gravitational wave detection from space, such as is expected in the future with the LISA mission.

  18. Study the Effects of Charged Particle Radiation on Gravitational Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Space-flight charging of free floating masses poses an unusual problem-- how can one control charge on the object without exerting a significant force on it? One approach is to make contact to the object with a fine wire. However, for many precision applications no physical contact is permissible, so charge must be conveyed in, a more sophisticated manner. One method has already been developed: Gravitational Probe B (GP-B) uses an ultraviolet photo-emission system described in ref 1. This system meets the experiment requirements, yet poses a number of constraints, including high power dissipation (approximately 10 W peak, approximately 1 W average), low current output (approximately 10(exp -13) A), and potential reliability problems associated with fiber optics system and the UV source. The aim of the current research is to improve this situation and, if possible, develop a more rugged and lower power alternative, usable in a wide range of situations. An potential alternative to the UV electron source is a Spindt-type field emission cathode. These consist of an array of extremely sharp silicon tips mounted in a standard IC package with provision for biasing them relative to the case potential. They are attractive as electron sources for space applications due to their low power consumption (10(exp -5) W), high current levels (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -5) A), and the absence of mechanical switching. Unfortunately, existing cathodes require special handling to avoid contamination and gas absorption. These contaminants can cause severe current fluctuations and eventual destruction of the cathode tips. Another potential drawback is the absence of any data indicating the possibility of bipolar current flow. This capability is needed because of the large uncertainties in the net charge transfer from cosmic rays to a free floating mass in space. More recent devices reduce the current fluctuations and destructive arcing by mounting the tips on a resistive substrate rather than

  19. Gravitational wave background from reheating after hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Figueroa, Daniel G.; Sastre, Alfonso

    2008-02-15

    The reheating of the Universe after hybrid inflation proceeds through the nucleation and subsequent collision of large concentrations of energy density in the form of bubblelike structures moving at relativistic speeds. This generates a significant fraction of energy in the form of a stochastic background of gravitational waves, whose time evolution is determined by the successive stages of reheating: First, tachyonic preheating makes the amplitude of gravity waves grow exponentially fast. Second, bubble collisions add a new burst of gravitational radiation. Third, turbulent motions finally sets the end of gravitational waves production. From then on, these waves propagate unimpeded to us. We find that the fraction of energy density today in these primordial gravitational waves could be significant for grand unified theory (GUT)-scale models of inflation, although well beyond the frequency range sensitivity of gravitational wave observatories like LIGO, LISA, or BBO. However, low-scale models could still produce a detectable signal at frequencies accessible to BBO or DECIGO. For comparison, we have also computed the analogous gravitational wave background from some chaotic inflation models and obtained results similar to those found by other groups. The discovery of such a background would open a new observational window into the very early universe, where the details of the process of reheating, i.e. the big bang, could be explored. Moreover, it could also serve in the future as a new experimental tool for testing the inflationary paradigm.

  20. Gravitational waves from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  1. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  2. Carnegie Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Carnegie Observatories were founded in 1902 by George Ellery Hale. Their first facility was the MOUNT WILSON OBSERVATORY, located in the San Gabriel Mountains above Pasadena, California. Originally a solar observatory, it moved into stellar, galactic and extragalactic research with the construction of the 60 in (1.5 m), and 100 in (2.5 m) telescopes, each of which was the largest in the world...

  3. Gravitational radiation reaction in the binary pulsar and the quadrupole-formula controversy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, T.

    1983-09-01

    The orbital motion of a binary pulsar system is investigated analytically. The two-body problem is reduced to a one-body problem, which is solved while terms of the order c to the -5th are disregarded; then the full problem is solved to the order G cubed by the variation of arbitrary constants, an aproach based on earlier work by Bel et al. (1981), Damour and Deruelle (1981), and Damour (1982, 1983). The isolated Schwarzschild mass' of each compact object is employed, rather than the integral of a Newtonian density, and the derivation does not involve quadrupole moment, energy flux at infinity, balance equations, energy, angular momentum, or radiation-damping force. No acceleration of the system center of mass is found, and the quantitative calculations of the secular decrease in the periastron-return time are shown to agree with the 'quadrupole formula' and with the secular acceleration of the orbital motion of PSR 1913+16 observed by Taylor et al. (1979).

  4. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations as Tools for Testing General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2004-01-01

    We continued a project, to analyse the ways in which detection and study of gravitational waves could provide quantitative tests of general relativity, with particular emphasis on waves that would be detectable by space-based observatories, such as LISA. This work had three foci: 1) Tests of scalar-tensor theories of gravity that, could be done by analyzing gravitational waves from neutron stars inspiralling into massive black holes, as detectable by LISA; 2) Study of alternative theories of gravity in which the graviton could be massive, and of how gravitational-wave observations by space-based detectors, solar-system tests, and cosmological observations could constrain such theories; and 3) Study of gravitational-radiation back reaction of particles orbiting black holes in general relativity, with emphasis on the effects of spin.

  5. Effect of neutral collision and radiative heat-loss function on self-gravitational instability of viscous thermally conducting partially-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Soni, Ghanshyam D.; Chhajlani, Rajendra K.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of thermal instability and gravitational instability is investigated for a partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations. We use normal mode analysis method in this problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Effects of collisions with neutrals, radiative heat-loss function, viscosity, thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength, on the instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the effect of various physical parameters on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. The temperature-dependent heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field and neutral collision have stabilizing effect, while density-dependent heat-loss function has a destabilizing effect on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. With the help of Routh-Hurwitz's criterion, the stability of the system is discussed.

  6. Observatories: History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    An astronomical OBSERVATORY is a building, installation or institution dedicated to the systematic and regular observation of celestial objects for the purpose of understanding their physical nature, or for purposes of time reckoning and keeping the calendar. At a bona fide observatory such work constitutes a main activity, not just an incidental one. While the ancient Egyptians, Babylonians, Chi...

  7. Astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The layout and equipment of astronomical observatories, the oldest scientific institutions of human society are discussed. The example of leading observatories of the USSR allows the reader to familiarize himself with both their modern counterparts, as well as the goals and problems on which astronomers are presently working.

  8. Improving Arecibo Observatory's Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rooy, Paula; Whitlow, Dana; Seymour, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The Puerto-rican Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (PUPPI) is a key backend for time-domain observations at Arecibo Observatory. PUPPI enables pulsar timing used for gravitational wave studies, single pulse studies of pulsars, searches for new pulsars, and allows in depth studies of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs). Unfortunately, PUPPI is presently restricted to only certain Arecibo receivers due to its input frequency and bandwidth requirements. Here we present the design process, building, bench testing, and updates on the implementation of a one-channel breadboard of a new frequency mixer at the Arecibo Observatory. The function of the frequency mixer design is to translate a 1.1-1.9 GHz band to 0.8 - 1.6 GHz band, where PUPPI samples the data at the second Nyquist zone. When this seemingly simple device is fully implemented, it will allow for the further expansion of the abilities of PUPPI. Mainly it will expand PUPPI's frequency agility to higher frequencies from 4 to 10 GHz, by enabling it to work with many more of Arecibo's receivers. We hope this becomes particularly useful, now that a FRB has been detected at these higher frequencies. The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana, and the Universities Space Research Association. The Arecibo Observatory REU is funded under grant AST-1559849 to Universidad Metropolitana

  9. NASA'S Great Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Why are space observatories important? The answer concerns twinkling stars in the night sky. To reach telescopes on Earth, light from distant objects has to penetrate Earth's atmosphere. Although the sky may look clear, the gases that make up our atmosphere cause problems for astronomers. These gases absorb the majority of radiation emanating from celestial bodies so that it never reaches the astronomer's telescope. Radiation that does make it to the surface is distorted by pockets of warm and cool air, causing the twinkling effect. In spite of advanced computer enhancement, the images finally seen by astronomers are incomplete. NASA, in conjunction with other countries' space agencies, commercial companies, and the international community, has built observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory to find the answers to numerous questions about the universe. With the capabilities the Space Shuttle provides, scientist now have the means for deploying these observatories from the Shuttle's cargo bay directly into orbit.

  10. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of pure gravitational radiation. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Pascual; Ehlers, Jürgen; Sachs, Rainer K.

    2013-12-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Pascual Jordan, Juergen Ehlers and Rainer Sachs, first published in 1961 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was part 2 of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (Parts 1 and 4 of the series have already been reprinted, parts 3 and 5 will be printed as Golden Oldies in near future.) This second paper discusses the geometry of geodesic null congruences, the algebraic classification of the Weyl tensor by spinor methods, and applies these to a study of the propagation of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. It has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for republication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. The republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A. H. MacCallum and Wolfgang Kundt.

  11. Taosi Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Taosi observatory is the remains of a structure discovered at the later Neolithic Taosi site located in Xiangfen County, Shanxi Province, in north-central China. The structure is a walled enclosure on a raised platform. Only rammed-earth foundations of the structure remained. Archaeoastronomical studies suggest that this structure functioned as an astronomical observatory. Historical circumstantial evidence suggests that it was probably related to the legendary kingdom of Yao from the twenty-first century BC.

  12. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    PubMed

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Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; 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    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  13. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M. B.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Koranda, S.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwee, P.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J. H.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, G. H.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, H.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0 ×10-21. It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 σ . The source lies at a luminosity distance of 41 0-180+160 Mpc corresponding to a redshift z =0.0 9-0.04+0.03 . In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 3 6-4+5M⊙ and 2 9-4+4M⊙ , and the final black hole mass is 6 2-4+4M⊙ , with 3. 0-0.5+0.5M⊙ c2 radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  14. Dynamics of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmanov, Malik

    2000-11-01

    Dynamics of fields and mirrors in the new laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors is described. The dynamics of fields is formulated in terms of difference equations, which take into account the large delay due to the light transit time in the interferometer arm cavities. Solutions of these field equations are found in both transient and steady-state regimes. The solutions for fields in the transient regime can be used for the measurement of the parameters of Fabry-Perot cavities. The solutions for fields in the steady-state regime can be used for the analysis of noise performance of Fabry-Perot cavities. The dynamics of the mirrors is described in terms of two normal coordinates: the cavity length and its center of mass. Such dynamics is strongly affected by the radiation pressure of light circulating in the cavity. The forces of radiation pressure are nonlinear and nonconservative. These two effects introduce instabilities and give rise to a violation of conservation of energy for the motion of the suspended mirrors. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations of the dynamics are done with applications to the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The dynamics of signal recycling and power recycling interferometers is analyzed using the field equations. The response of the interferometers to the input laser field and motion of its mirrors is calculated. Several basic transfer functions are found. These correspond to either a single or a nested cavity. A nested cavity appears either in the dynamics of the differential mode in signal recycling interferometers or in the dynamics of the common mode of power recycling interferometers. The poles of transfer functions of these nested cavities are found. The response of the interferometers to gravitational waves is described: the analysis is done in the rest frame of a local observer which is a natural coordinate system of the detector. This response is given by the interferometer

  15. An antenna for laser gravitational-wave observations in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, J. E.; Bender, P. L.; Hall, J. L.; Hils, D.; Stebbins, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Progress during the past two years on a proposed Laser Gravitational-Wave Observatory in Space (LAGOS) is discussed. Calculated performance for a 10 to the 6th km sized antenna over the frequency range of 10 to the -5th to 1 Hz is given. The sensitivity from 0.001 to 0.1 Hz is expected to be 1 x 10 to the -21st/Hz exp 0.5. Noise sources such as accelerations of the drag-free test masses by random molecular impacts and by fluctuations in the net thermal radiation pressure will limit the sensitivity at lower frequencies. The scientific objectives are the observation of CW gravitational waves from large numbers of binary systems and the detection of pulses which may have been emitted during the period of galaxy formation.

  16. Keele Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Albinson, James; Bagnall, Alan; Bryant, Lian; Caisley, Dave; Doody, Stephen; Johnson, Ian; Klimczak, Paul; Maddison, Ron; Robinson, StJohn; Stretch, Matthew; Webb, John

    2015-08-01

    Keele Observatory was founded by Dr. Ron Maddison in 1962, on the hill-top campus of Keele University in central England, hosting the 1876 Grubb 31cm refractor from Oxford Observatory. It since acquired a 61cm research reflector, a 15cm Halpha solar telescope and a range of other telescopes. Run by a group of volunteering engineers and students under directorship of a Keele astrophysicist, it is used for public outreach as well as research. About 4,000 people visit the observatory every year, including a large number of children. We present the facility, its history - including involvement in the 1919 Eddington solar eclipse expedition which proved Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity - and its ambitions to erect a radio telescope on its site.

  17. New gravitational memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasterski, Sabrina; Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    The conventional gravitational memory effect is a relative displacement in the position of two detectors induced by radiative energy flux. We find a new type of gravitational `spin memory' in which beams on clockwise and counterclockwise orbits acquire a relative delay induced by radiative angular momentum flux. It has recently been shown that the displacement memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of Weinberg's soft graviton theorem. Here we see that the spin memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of the recently-discovered subleading soft graviton theorem.

  18. The Gravitational Universe - ESA's L3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido; Ando, Masaki; Binetruy, Pierre; Bouyer, Philippe; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Cruise, Mike; Favata, Fabio; Gehler, Martin; Genzel, Reinhard; Jennrich, Oliver; Kasevich, Mark; Klipstein, Bill; Perryman, Michael; Safa, Frederic; Schutz, Bernard; Stebbins, Robin; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Following the advice of ESA's Senior Survey Committee (SSC) the Science Programme Committee (SPC) decided in November 2013 to select the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for their L3 mission. The Director of Science and Robotic Exploration (D/SRE) has established a Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) to advise on the scientific and technological approaches for a gravitational wave observatory with a planned launch date in 2034. Our team is comprised of scientists from Europe and the US as well as scientists and engineers from ESA and observers from NASA and JAXA. We meet about every ten weeks, evaluate the technical readiness of all necessary technologies, study the science impact of different mission designs, and will advise ESA on the required future technology development. We will report on our progress and plans forward to a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. For JAXA.

  19. Dudley Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Dudley Observatory, in Schenectady, New York, is a private foundation supporting research and education in astronomy, astrophysics and the history of astronomy. Chartered in 1852, it is the oldest organization in the US, outside academia and government, dedicated to the support of astronomical research. For more than a century it was a world leader in astrometry, with such achievements as pub...

  20. Gravitational lensing of gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kei Wong, Wang; Ng, Kwan Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational lensing phenomena are widespread in electromagnetic astrophysics, and in principle may also be uncovered with gravitational waves. We examine gravitational wave events lensed by elliptical galaxies in the limit of geometric optics, where we expect to see multiple signals from the same event with different arrival times and amplitudes. By using mass functions for compact binaries from population-synthesis simulations and a lensing probability calculated from Planck data, we estimate the rate of lensed signals for future gravitational wave missions.

  1. Sunphotometry of the 2006-2007 aerosol optical/radiative properties at the Himalayan Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (5079 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, G. P.; Angelini, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Verza, G. P.; Marinoni, A.; Barnaba, F.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of being located at the heart of the highest mountain range in the world, the Himalayan Nepal Climate Observatory (5079 m a.s.l.) at the Ev-K2-CNR Pyramid is shown to be affected by the advection of pollution aerosols from the populated regions of southern Nepal and the Indo-Gangetic plains. Such an impact is observed along most of the period April 2006-March 2007 addressed here, with a minimum in the monsoon season. Backtrajectory-analysis indicates long-range transport episodes occurring in this period to originate mainly in the West Asian deserts. At this high altitude site, the measured aerosol optical depth is observed to be: 1) about one order of magnitude lower than the one measured at Gandhi College (60 m a.s.l.), in the Indo-Gangetic basin, and 2) maximum during the monsoon period, due to the presence of elevated (cirrus-like) particle layers. Assessment of the aerosol radiative forcing results to be hampered by the persistent presence of these high altitude particle layers, which impede a continuous measurement of both the aerosol optical depth and its radiative properties from sky radiance inversions. Even though the retrieved absorption coefficients of pollution aerosols was rather large (single scattering albedo of the order of 0.6-0.9 were observed in the month of April 2006), the corresponding low optical depths (~0.03 at 500 nm) are expected to limit the relevant radiative forcings. Still, the high specific forcing of this aerosol and its capability of altering snow surface albedo provide good reason for continuous monitoring.

  2. Climatology of biologically-active ultraviolet radiation at the Brazilian Southern Space Observatory (29ºS, 53ºW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Rampelotto, Pabulo; Rigozo, Nivaor R.; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Kirsch Pinheiro, Damaris

    Despite of lower atmospheric ozone levels and the reported cases of higher solar UV compared to the northern hemisphere there are fewer sites undertaking long term monitoring of the spectral solar UV in the southern hemisphere. In this context, the aim of this work was to analyze the variations of the biologically-active ultraviolet radiation (BAUVR) for the DNA, Erythemal and SCUP-h (skin cancer) action spectra measured by Brewer Spectrophotometer at the Brazilian Southern Space Observatory (29.4S, 53.8W, 480m a.s.l) from 1996 to 2008. Diurnal and seasonal variations have been reported. The comparison for clear and cloudy sky days demonstrated that cloud is a major factor, both in the unpredictability and variability of the BAUVR throughout the day. For sunny summer days, when the solar zenith angle (SZA) varies from 7o to 77o , the DNA action spectra presented the higher sensitivity with the SZA variation. Erythemal and SCUP-h spectra presented a slight variation and the behaviors of both measures are similar. In terms of seasonal variations, the maximum values were observed for January and minimum values for June considering all biologically weighted radiation. The ratio MAX/MIN values demonstrated that the DNA weighted radiation presented the higher seasonal variation (8.3) in comparison with 5.6 for Erythema and 5.7 for SCUP-h. Therefore, the complete database here documented may be used to further improve and in the validation of satellite-derived BAUVR data.

  3. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  4. Detectable gravitational waves from very strong phase transitions in the general NMSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Stephan J.; Konstandin, Thomas; Nardini, Germano; Rues, Ingo E-mail: thomas.konstandin@desy.de E-mail: ingo.rues@desy.de

    2016-03-01

    We study the general NMSSM with an emphasis on the parameter regions with a very strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT). In the presence of heavy fields coupled to the Higgs sector, the analysis can be problematic due to the existence of sizable radiative corrections. In this paper we propose a subtraction scheme that helps to circumvent this problem. For simplicity we focus on a parameter region that is by construction hidden from the current collider searches. The analysis proves that (at least) in the identified parameter region the EWPT can be very strong and striking gravitational wave signals can be produced. The corresponding gravitational stochastic background can potentially be detected at the planned space-based gravitational wave observatory eLISA, depending on the specific experiment design that will be approved.

  5. OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The description, development history, test history, and orbital performance analysis of the OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory are presented. The OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory was the sixth flight model of a series of scientific spacecraft designed to provide a stable platform for experiments engaged in the collection of solar and celestial radiation data. The design objective was 180 days of orbital operation. The OSO-6 has telemetered an enormous amount of very useful experiment and housekeeping data to GSFC ground stations. Observatory operation during the two-year reporting period was very successful except for some experiment instrument problems.

  6. NANOGrav Constraints on Gravitational Wave Bursts with Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Christy, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Cornish, N. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Deng, X.; Dolch, T.; Ellis, J. A.; Ferdman, R. D.; Fonseca, E.; Garver-Daniels, N.; Jenet, F.; Jones, G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Koop, M.; Lam, M. T.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Levin, L.; Lommen, A. N.; Lorimer, D. R.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R. S.; Madison, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McWilliams, S. T.; Nice, D. J.; Palliyaguru, N.; Pennucci, T. T.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stinebring, D. R.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Vallisneri, M.; van Haasteren, R.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, W. W.; NANOGrav Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Among efforts to detect gravitational radiation, pulsar timing arrays are uniquely poised to detect “memory” signatures, permanent perturbations in spacetime from highly energetic astrophysical events such as mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) observes dozens of the most stable millisecond pulsars using the Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes in an effort to study, among other things, gravitational wave memory. We herein present the results of a search for gravitational wave bursts with memory (BWMs) using the first five years of NANOGrav observations. We develop original methods for dramatically speeding up searches for BWM signals. In the directions of the sky where our sensitivity to BWMs is best, we would detect mergers of binaries with reduced masses of {10}9 {M}⊙ out to distances of 30 Mpc; such massive mergers in the Virgo cluster would be marginally detectable. We find no evidence for BWMs. However, with our non-detection, we set upper limits on the rate at which BWMs of various amplitudes could have occurred during the time spanned by our data—e.g., BWMs with amplitudes greater than 10-13 must encounter the Earth at a rate less than 1.5 yr-1.

  7. Grand Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eric W.

    2002-01-01

    Various concepts have been recently presented for a 100 m class astronomical observatory. The science virtues of such an observatory are many: resolving planets orbiting around other stars, resolving the surface features of other stars, extending our temporal reach back toward the beginning (at and before stellar and galactic development), improving on the Next Generation Space Telescope, and other (perhaps as yet) undiscovered purposes. This observatory would be a general facility instrument with wide spectral range from at least the near ultraviolet to the mid infrared. The concept espoused here is based on a practical, modular design located in a place where temperatures remain (and instruments could operate) within several degrees of absolute zero with no shielding or cooling. This location is the bottom of a crater located near the north or south pole of the moon, most probably the South Polar Depression. In such a location the telescope would never see the sun or the earth, hence the profound cold and absence of stray light. The ideal nature of this location is elaborated herein. It is envisioned that this observatory would be assembled and maintained remotely through the use of expert robotic systems. A base station would be located above the crater rim with (at least occasional) direct line-of-sight access to the earth. Certainly it would be advantageous, but not absolutely essential, to have humans travel to the site to deal with unexpected contingencies. Further, observers and their teams could eventually travel there for extended observational campaigns. Educational activities, in general, could be furthered thru extended human presence. Even recreational visitors and long term habitation might follow.

  8. Design and performance of high laser power interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Katherine Laird

    A prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity, gravitational waves (GWs) are perturbations of the flat space-time Minkowski metric that travel at the speed of light. Indirectly measured by Hulse and Taylor in the 1970s through the energy they carried away from a binary pulsar system, gravitational waves have yet to be detected directly. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) is part of a global network of gravitational-wave detectors that seeks to detect directly gravitational waves and to study their sources. LIGO operates on the principle of measuring the gravitational wave's physical signature of a strain, or relative displacement of inertial masses. An extremely small effect whose biggest of expected transient signals on Earth is on the order of one part in 1023, gravitational-wave strain can only be measured by detectors so sensitive to displacement as to encounter the effects of quantum physics. To improve their sensitivities and to demonstrate advanced technologies, the LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA underwent an upgrade between fall 2007 and summer 2009 called Enhanced LIGO. This study focuses on the experimental challenges of one of the goals of the upgrade: operating at an increased laser power. I present the design and characterization of two of the interferometer subsystems that are critical for the path towards higher laser power: the Input Optics (IO) and the Angular Sensing and Control (ASC) subsystems. The IO required a new design so its optical components would not be susceptible to high power effects such as thermal lensing or thermal beam drift. The ASC required a new design in order to address static instabilities of the arm cavities caused by increased radiation pressure. In all, I demonstrate the capability of an interferometric GW detector to operate at several times the highest of laser powers previously used. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of

  9. Compatibility of different measurement techniques of global solar radiation and application for long-term observations at Izaña Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delia García, Rosa; Cuevas, Emilio; García, Omaira Elena; Ramos, Ramón; Romero-Campos, Pedro Miguel; de Ory, Fernado; Cachorro, Victoria Eugenia; de Frutos, Angel

    2017-03-01

    A 1-year inter-comparison of classical and modern radiation and sunshine duration (SD) instruments has been performed at Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) located in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) starting on 17 July 2014. We compare daily global solar radiation (GSRH) records measured with a Kipp & Zonen CM-21 pyranometer, taken in the framework of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network, with those measured with a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), a bimetallic pyranometer (PYR) and GSRH estimated from sunshine duration performed by a Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder (CS) and a Kipp & Zonen sunshine duration sensor (CSD). Given that the BSRN GSRH records passed strict quality controls (based on principles of physical limits and comparison with the LibRadtran model), they have been used as reference in the inter-comparison study. We obtain an overall root mean square error (RMSE) of ˜ 0.9 MJm-2 (4 %) for PYR and MFRSR GSRH, 1.9 (7 %) and 1.2 MJm-2 (5 %) for CS and CSD GSRH, respectively. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity (RH) and the solar zenith angle (SZA) have been shown to moderately affect the GSRH observations. As an application of the methodology developed in this work, we have re-evaluated the GSRH data time series obtained at IZO with two PYRs between 1977 and 1991. Their high consistency and temporal stability have been proved by comparing with GSRH estimates obtained from SD observations. These results demonstrate that (1) the continuous-basis inter-comparison of different GSRH techniques offers important diagnostics for identifying inconsistencies between GSRH data records, and (2) the GSRH measurements performed with classical and more simple instruments are consistent with more modern techniques and, thus, valid to recover GSRH data time series and complete worldwide distributed GSRH data. The inter-comparison and quality assessment of these different techniques have allowed us to obtain a complete and

  10. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of gravitational radiation fields. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang; Trümper, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Wolfgang Kundt and Manfred Trümper, first published in 1962 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was the last of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (All the other parts of the series have already been re-published as Golden Oldies.) This fifth contribution summarizes key points of the earlier papers and applies them, in particular results from papers II and IV in the series, in the context of the propagation of gravitational radiation when matter is present. The paper has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A.H. MacCallum and by a brief autobiography of Manfred Trümper.

  11. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.; Mroue, A.

    2013-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such “hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass and unequal mass non-spinning binaries. We also explore the possibility of using these hybrid waveforms as a detection template bank for Advanced LIGO. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  12. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.

    2012-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such "hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass non-spinning binaries. Preliminary research has also been done in the case of unequal-mass non-spinning binaries. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  13. The challenge of detecting gravitational radiation is creating a new chapter in quantum electronics: Quantum nondemolition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, V. B.; Vorontsov, Y. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Future gravitational wave antennas will be approximately 100 kilogram cylinders, whose end-to-end vibrations must be measured so accurately (10 to the -19th power centimeters) that they behave quantum mechanically. Moreover, the vibration amplitude must be measured over and over again without perturbing it (quantum nondemolition measurement). This contrasts with quantum chemistry, quantum optics, or atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics where measurements are usually made on an ensemble of identical objects, and care is not given to whether any single object is perturbed or destroyed by the measurement. Electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements are described as well as the theory underlying them.

  14. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post) sup 5/2 -Newtonian order: Late-time evolution and gravitational radiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The late-time evolution of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) is studied using the Damour-Derueele (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian equations of motion with relativistic corrections of all orders up to and including radiation reaction. Using the method of close orbital elements from celestial mechanics, the author evolves the orbits to separations of r {approx} 2 m, where m is the total mass, at which point the (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian approximation breaks down. With the orbits as input, he calculates the gravitational waveform and luminosity using a post-Newtonian formalism of Wagoner and Will. Results are obtained for systems containing various combinations of compact objects, for various values of the mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}, and forg various initial values of the orbital eccentricity.

  15. Gravitational waves from the cosmological QCD transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão Roque, V. R. C.; Roque, G. Lugones o.; Lugones, G.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the minimum fluctuations in the cosmological QCD phase transition that could be detectable by the eLISA/NGO gravitational wave observatory. To this end, we performed several hydrodynamical simulations using a state-of-the-art equation of state derived from lattice QCD simulations. Based on the fact that the viscosity per entropy density of the quark gluon plasma obtained from heavy-ion collision experiments at the RHIC and the LHC is extremely small, we considered a non-viscous fluid in our simulations. Several previous works about this transition considered a first order transition that generates turbulence which follows a Kolmogorov power law. We show that for the QCD crossover transition the turbulent spectrum must be very different because there is no viscosity and no source of continuous energy injection. As a consequence, a large amount of kinetic energy accumulates at the smallest scales. From the hydrodynamic simulations, we have obtained the spectrum of the gravitational radiation emitted by the motion of the fluid, finding that, if typical velocity and temperature fluctuations have an amplitude Δ v /c ≳ 10-2 and/or Δ T/T_c ≳ 10-3, they would be detected by eLISA/NGO at frequencies larger than ˜ 10-4 Hz.

  16. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  17. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  18. Probing the size of extra dimensions with gravitational wave astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Kent; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-04-15

    In the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model, it has been conjectured, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, that a brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale l cannot be static, and it is dual to a four-dimensional BH emitting Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on l by performing Fisher analyses. We found that the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and the Big Bang Observatory (DECIGO/BBO) can give a stronger constraint than the current tabletop result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 10{sup 5} BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we find that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure l down to l=0.33 {mu}m for a 5 yr observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the tabletop experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to l=1.5 {mu}m due to strong degeneracies between l and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on l from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 141601 (2010)]. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  19. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas.

  20. The solar terrestrial observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    The larger system of the earth environment is controlled externally by electromagnetic and particle energy from the sun. Recent studies have shown that the sun is a variable star with changes in its radiation which produce significant effects in the earth's climate and weather. The study of the solar-terrestrial system requires simultaneous, long-duration observations of the different elements or 'links' in the solar-terrestrial chain. Many investigations must be conducted in space from a vantage point above the earth's atmosphere where all of the sun's emissions can be observed free from atmospheric distortion, where the magnetospheric particles and fields can be measured directly, and where the atmosphere can be observed on a global scale. The extension of the Shuttle on-orbit capability in connection with the development of the power module will offer an important near-term step in an evolutionary process leading toward a permanent manned Solar Terrestrial Observatory capability in low-earth orbit. Attention is given to the required solar-terrestrial measurements, the operation of the Solar Terrestrial Observatory, and an evolutionary approach to the Solar Terrestrial Observatory.

  1. Electromagnetic Counterparts to Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; GROWTH Collaboration; iPTF/ZTF Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The direct detection of gravitational waves from merging black holes marks the dawn of a new era. I will present ongoing efforts and prospectsto identify and characterize the electromagnetic counterpart. Among the various models for electromagnetic emission from binary neutronstar mergers, free neutron decay gives the most luminous and fast-evolving optical counterpart. I will describe a co-ordinated global effort, the GROWTH (Global Relay of Observatories Watching Transients Happen) network working in tandem with the Zwicky Transient Facility.

  2. Gravitating Hopfions

    SciTech Connect

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    2015-12-15

    We construct solutions of the 3 + 1 dimensional Faddeev–Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat. They are characterized by a topological Hopf number. We investigate the dependence of the ADM masses of gravitating Hopfions on the gravitational coupling. When gravity is coupled to flat space solutions, a branch of gravitating Hopfion solutions arises and merges at a maximal value of the coupling constant with a second branch of solutions. This upper branch has no flat space limit. Instead, in the limit of a vanishing coupling constant, it connects to either the Bartnik–McKinnon or a generalized Bartnik–McKinnon solution. We further find that in the strong-coupling limit, there is no difference between the gravitating solitons of the Skyrme model and the Faddeev–Skyrme model.

  3. Gravitational induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Chicone, Carmen; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2008-11-01

    We study the linear post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity known as gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM); in particular, we examine the similarities and differences between GEM and electrodynamics. Notwithstanding some significant differences between them, we find that a special nonstationary metric in GEM can be employed to show explicitly that it is possible to introduce gravitational induction within GEM in close analogy with Faraday's law of induction and Lenz's law in electrodynamics. Some of the physical implications of gravitational induction are briefly discussed.

  4. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum. Keywords: Gravitational wave astrophysics; gravitational radiation; gravitational wave detectors; black holes.

  5. Astronomical observatories of the Soviet Union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Dmitrii Nikolaevich

    Various types of astronomical instruments are described, including optical telescopes, radio telescopes, and radiation detectors. Soviet ground-based astronomical observatories are described as well as those aboard satellites and space stations.

  6. Precision X-ray Timing of RX J0806.3+1527 with CHANDRA: Evidence for Gravitational Radiation from an Ultracompact Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohymayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    RX J0806.3+1527 is a candidate double degenerate binary with possibly the shortest known orbital period. The source shows an approximately equal to 100% X-ray intensity modulation at the putative orbital frequency of 3.11 mHz (321.5 s). If the system is a detached, ultracompact binary gravitational radiation should drive spin-up with a magnitude of nu(sup dot) approximately 10(exp -16) Hz per second. Efforts to constrain the X-ray frequency evolution to date have met with mixed success, principally due to the sparseness of earlier observations. Here we describe the results of the first phase coherent X-ray monitoring campaign on RX J0806.3+1527 with Chandra. We obtained a total of 70 ksec of exposure in 6 epochs logarithmically spaced over 320 days. With these data we conclusively show that the X-ray frequency is increasing at a rate of 3.77 plus or minus 0.8 x 10(exp -16) Hz per second. Using the ephemeris derived from the new data we are able to phase up all the earlier Chandra and ROSAT data and show they are consistent with a constant nu(sup dot) = 3.63 plus or minus 0.06 x 10(exp -16) Hz per second over the past decade. This value appears consistent with that recently derived by Israel et al. largely from monitoring of the optical modulation, and is in rough agreement with the solutions reported initially by Hakala et al., based on ground-based optical observations. The large and stable nu(sup dot) over a decade is consistent with gravitational radiation losses driving the evolution. An intermediate polar (IP) scenario where the observed X-ray period is the spin period of an accreting white dwarf appears less tenable because the observed nu(sup dot) requires an m(sup dot) approximately equal to 4 x 10 (exp -8) solar mass yr(sup -l), that is much larger than that inferred from the observed X-ray luminosity (although this depends on the uncertain distance and bolometric corrections), and it is difficult to drive such a high m(sup dot) in a binary system with

  7. Post-Newtonian gravitational radiation and equations of motion via direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations. IV. Radiation reaction for binary systems with spin-spin coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Will, Clifford M.

    2007-03-01

    Using post-Newtonian equations of motion for fluid bodies that include radiation-reaction terms at 2.5 and 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order (O[(v/c)5] and O[(v/c)7] beyond Newtonian order), we derive the equations of motion for binary systems with spinning bodies, including spin-spin effects. In particular we determine the effects of radiation-reaction coupled to spin-spin effects on the two-body equations of motion, and on the evolution of the spins. We find that radiation damping causes a 3.5PN order, spin-spin induced precession of the individual spins. This contrasts with the case of spin-orbit coupling, where we earlier found no effect on the spins at 3.5PN order. Employing the equations of motion and of spin precession, we verify that the loss of total energy and total angular momentum induced by spin-spin effects precisely balances the radiative flux of those quantities calculated by Kidder et al.

  8. Post-Newtonian gravitational radiation and equations of motion via direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations. III. Radiation reaction for binary systems with spinning bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2005-04-01

    Using post-Newtonian equations of motion for fluid bodies that include radiation-reaction terms at 2.5 and 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order (O[(v/c)5] and O[(v/c)7] beyond Newtonian order), we derive the equations of motion for binary systems with spinning bodies. In particular we determine the effects of radiation reaction coupled to spin-orbit effects on the two-body equations of motion, and on the evolution of the spins. For a suitable definition of spin, we reproduce the standard equations of motion and spin-precession at the first post-Newtonian order. At 3.5 PN order, we determine the spin-orbit induced reaction effects on the orbital motion, but we find that radiation damping has no effect on either the magnitude or the direction of the spins. Using the equations of motion, we find that the loss of total energy and total angular momentum induced by spin-orbit effects precisely balances the radiative flux of those quantities calculated by Kidder et al. The equations of motion may be useful for evolving inspiraling orbits of compact spinning binaries.

  9. On the gravitational redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2014-08-01

    The study of the gravitational redshift-a relative wavelength increase of ≈2×10-6 was predicted for solar radiation by Einstein in 1908-is still an important subject in modern physics. In a dispute whether or not atom interferometry experiments can be employed for gravitational redshift measurements, two research teams have recently disagreed on the physical cause of the shift. Regardless of any discussion on the interferometer aspect-we find that both groups of authors miss the important point that the ratio of gravitational to the electrostatic forces is generally very small. For instance, the ratio of the gravitational force acting on an electron in a hydrogen atom situated in the Sun’s photosphere to the electrostatic force between the proton and the electron in such an atom is approximately 3×10-21. A comparison of this ratio with the predicted and observed solar redshift indicates a discrepancy of many orders of magnitude. With Einstein’s early assumption that the frequencies of spectral lines depend only on the generating ions themselves as starting point, we show that a solution can be formulated based on a two-step process in analogy with Fermi’s treatment of the Doppler effect. It provides a sequence of physical processes in line with the conservation of energy and momentum resulting in the observed shift and does not employ a geometric description. The gravitational field affects the release of the photon and not the atomic transition. The control parameter is the speed of light. The atomic emission is then contrasted with the gravitational redshift of matter-antimatter annihilation events.

  10. Astrophysical meaning of the discovery of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves by the international collaboration LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory)/Virgo on the one hand is a triumphant confirmation of the general theory of relativity, and on the other confirms the general fundamental ideas on the nuclear evolution of baryon matter in the Universe concentrated in binary stars. LIGO/Virgo may turn out to be the first experiment in the history of physics to detect two physical entities, gravitational waves and black holes.

  11. Gravitational wave emission from the single-degenerate channel of Type Ia supernovae.

    PubMed

    Falta, David; Fisher, Robert; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-05-20

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore--like SNe II--potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation.

  12. Methodological Gravitism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaman, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the case of the exchange marriage system to delineate a model of methodological gravitism. Such a model is not a deviation from or alteration to the existing qualitative research approaches. I have adopted culturally specific methodology to investigate spouse selection in line with the Grounded Theory Method. This…

  13. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a

  14. The Milankovitch Orbital Elements and Their Application to the Long-term Orbit Evolution of Planetary Satellites Subject to Radiation and Gravitational Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron; Scheeres, D. J.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In his monumental work on the astronomical theory of paleoclimates, Milutin Milankovitch (1879-1958) reformulated the classical method of perturbation of elements using the two vectorial integrals of the unperturbed two-body problem--the angular momentum (areal) vector and the Laplace vector. The vectorial integrals describe the spatial orientation, geometrical shape, and size of the osculating Keplerian orbit, and, together with the sixth scalar integral that represents the motion in time, constitutes a complete set of orbital elements. These elements are particularly useful in finding the first-order long-period and secular variations by averaging over the fast variables of the system. The application of the Milankovitch elements to the determination of oblateness and tidal effects leads to the equations for perturbed elements in which the small numerical divisors, the eccentricity and the sine of the inclination, are not present (Musen, P., J. Geophys. Res., 66, 1961; Allan, R.R., and Cook, G.E., Proc. R. Soc. A, 280, 1964). Tremaine et al. (AJ, 137, 2009) used the Milankovitch elements to study the classical Laplace plane, a region of space where the secular evolution of orbits driven by the combined effects of these forces is zero, so that the orbits are ``frozen.'' This talk will reintroduce the Milankovitch elements, present a completely nonsingular form of them, and show their application to the long-term orbit evolution of irregular satellites, binary asteroids, and other planetary systems. We will also show how the Laplace plane equilibrium can be generalized to accommodate non-gravitational forces, such as solar radiation perturbations.

  15. Gravitational Physics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational physics research at ISPAE is connected with NASA's Relativity Mission (Gravity Probe B (GP-B)) which will perform a test of Einstein's General Relativity Theory. GP-B will measure the geodetic and motional effect predicted by General Relativity Theory with extremely stable and sensitive gyroscopes in an earth orbiting satellite. Both effects cause a very small precession of the gyroscope spin axis. The goal of the GP-B experiment is the measurement of the gyroscope precession with very high precision. GP-B is being developed by a team at Stanford University and is scheduled for launch in the year 2001. The related UAH research is a collaboration with Stanford University and MSFC. This research is focussed primarily on the error analysis and data reduction methods of the experiment but includes other topics concerned with experiment systems and their performance affecting the science measurements. The hydrogen maser is the most accurate and stable clock available. It will be used in future gravitational physics missions to measure relativistic effects such as the second order Doppler effect. The HMC experiment, currently under development at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), will test the performance and capability of the hydrogen maser clock for gravitational physics measurements. UAH in collaboration with the SAO science team will study methods to evaluate the behavior and performance of the HMC. The GP-B data analysis developed by the Stanford group involves complicated mathematical operations. This situation led to the idea to investigate alternate and possibly simpler mathematical procedures to extract the GP-B measurements form the data stream. Comparison of different methods would increase the confidence in the selected scheme.

  16. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  17. Gravitational Lensing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  18. Experimental gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; di Virgilio, Angela

    2016-06-01

    100 years after the invention of General Relativity (GR) and 110 years after the development of Special Relativity (SR) we have to state that until now no single experiment or observation allows any doubt about the validity of these theories within the accuracy of the available data. Tests of GR can be divided into three categories: (i) test of the foundations of GR, (ii) tests of the consequences of GR, and (iii) test of the interplay between GR and quantum mechanics. In the first category, we have tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle and the structure of the Newton axioms, in the second category we have effects like the gravitational redshift, light defection, gravitational time delay, the perihelion shift, the gravitomagnetic effects as the Lense-Thirring and Schiff effect, and gravitational waves. Tests of the effects of gravity on quantum systems are a first step towards experiments searching for a quantum gravity theory. In this paper, we also highlight practical applications in positioning, geodesy, and the International Atomic Time. After 100 years, GR can now definitely be regarded also as practical and applied science.

  19. LISA in the gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John; Cornish, Neil

    2015-04-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves in the second half of this decade by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays, and with the launch of LISA Pathfinder in the summer of this year, this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. Recently, NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner. Both agencies formed a committee to advise them on the scientific and technological approaches for a space based gravitational wave observatory. The leading mission design, Evolved LISA or eLISA, is a slightly de-scoped version of the earlier LISA design. This talk will describe activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group (GWSIG) under the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG), focusing on LISA technology development in both the U.S. and Europe, including the LISA Pathfinder mission.

  20. Private Observatories in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijsdijk, C.

    2016-12-01

    Descriptions of private observatories in South Africa, written by their owners. Positions, equipment descriptions and observing programmes are given. Included are: Klein Karoo Observatory (B. Monard), Cederberg Observatory (various), Centurion Planetary and Lunar Observatory (C. Foster), Le Marischel Observatory (L. Ferreira), Sterkastaaing Observatory (M. Streicher), Henley on Klip (B. Fraser), Archer Observatory (B. Dumas), Overbeek Observatory (A. Overbeek), Overberg Observatory (A. van Staden), St Cyprian's School Observatory, Fisherhaven Small Telescope Observatory (J. Retief), COSPAR 0433 (G. Roberts), COSPAR 0434 (I. Roberts), Weltevreden Karoo Observatory (D. Bullis), Winobs (M. Shafer)

  1. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  2. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Davidson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    SOFIA, (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) is a planned 2.5 meter telescope to be installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft and operated at altitudes from 41,000 to 46,000 feet. It will permit routine measurement of infrared radiation inaccessible from the ground-based sites, and observation of astronomical objects and transient events from anywhere in the world. The concept is based on 18 years of experience with NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), which SOFIA would replace.

  3. The Boulder magnetic observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Finn, Carol A.; Pedrie, Kolby L.; Blum, Cletus C.

    2015-08-14

    The Boulder magnetic observatory has, since 1963, been operated by the Geomagnetism Program of the U.S. Geological Survey in accordance with Bureau and national priorities. Data from the observatory are used for a wide variety of scientific purposes, both pure and applied. The observatory also supports developmental projects within the Geomagnetism Program and collaborative projects with allied geophysical agencies.

  4. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-10-03

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking’s area theorem.

  5. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-10-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking's area theorem.

  6. Optical telescope system-level design considerations for a space-based gravitational wave mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-07-01

    The study of the Universe through gravitational waves will yield a revolutionary new perspective on the Universe, which has been intensely studied using electromagnetic signals in many wavelength bands. A space-based gravitational wave observatory will enable access to a rich array of astrophysical sources in the measurement band from 0.1 to 100 mHz, and nicely complement observations from ground-based detectors as well as pulsar timing arrays by sampling a different range of compact object masses and astrophysical processes. The observatory measures gravitational radiation by precisely monitoring the tiny change in the proper distance between pairs of freely falling proof masses. These masses are separated by millions of kilometers and, using a laser heterodyne interferometric technique, the change in their proper separation is detected to ~ 10 pm over timescales of 1000 seconds, a fractional precision of better than one part in 1019. Optical telescopes are essential for the implementation of this precision displacement measurement. In this paper we describe some of the key system level design considerations for the telescope subsystem in a mission context. The reference mission for this purpose is taken to be the enhanced Laser Interferometry Space Antenna mission (eLISA), a strong candidate for the European Space Agency's Cosmic Visions L3 launch opportunity in 2034. We will review the flow-down of observatory level requirements to the telescope subsystem, particularly pertaining to the effects of telescope dimensional stability and scattered light suppression, two performance specifications which are somewhat different from the usual requirements for an image forming telescope.

  7. General Relativity and Gravitation, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bartlett, David F.; Wyss, Walker

    2005-10-01

    Part I. Classical Relativity and Gravitation Theory: 1. Global properties of exact solutions H. Friedrich; 2. Numerical relativity T. Nakamura; 3. How fast can a pulsar spin? J. L. Friedman; 4. Colliding waves in general relativity V. Ferrari; Part II. Relativistic Astrophysics, Early Universe, and Classical Cosmology: 5. Observations of cosmic microwave radiation R. B. Partridge; 6. Cosmic microwave background radiation (theory) M. Panek; 7. Inflation and quantum cosmology A. D. Linde; 8. Observations of lensing B. Fort; 9. Gravitational lenses: theory and interpretation R. Blandford; Part III. Experimental Gravitation and Gravitational Waves: 10. Solar system tests of GR: recent results and present plans I. Shapiro; 11. Laser interferometer detectors R. Weiss; 12. Resonant bar gravitational wave experiments G. Pizzella; 13. A non-inverse square law test E. Adelberger; Part IV. Quantum Gravity, Superstrings, Quantum Cosmology: 14. Cosmic strings B. Unruh; 15. String theory as a quantum theory of gravity G. Horowitz; 16. Progress in quantum cosmology J. B. Hartle; 17. Self-duality, quantum gravity, Wilson loops and all that A. V. Ashtekar; Part V. Summary Talk: 18. GR-12 Conference summary J. Ehlers II; Part VI. Reports on Workshops/Symposia: 19. Exact solutions and exact properties of Einstein equations V. Moncrieff; 20. Spinors, twistors and complex methods N. Woodhouse; 21. Alternative gravity theories M. Francaviglia; 22. Asymptotia, singularities and global structure B. G. Schmidt; 23. Radiative spacetimes and approximation methods T. Damour; 24. Algebraic computing M. MacCallum; 25. Numerical relativity J. Centrella; 26. Mathematical cosmology J. Wainwright; 27. The early universe M. Turner; 28. Relativistic astrophysics M. Abramowitz; 29. Astrophysical and observational cosmology B. Carr; 30. Solar system and pulsar tests of gravitation R. Hellings; 31. Earth-based gravitational experiments J. Faller; 32. Resonant bar and microwave gravitational wave

  8. Image of the Quasar 3C 273 Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This image is an observation of Quasar 3C 273 by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. It reveals the presence of a new source (upper left) with a red shift that indicates that it is about 10 billion light years away. Quasars are mysterious, bright, star-like objects apparently located at the very edge of the visible universe. Although no bigger than our solar system, they radiate as much visible light as a thousand galaxies. Quasars also emit radio signals and were previously recognized as x-ray sources. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2 was designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. The Terzan 2 Cluster Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The dramatic change in x-ray emission from the Terzan 2 cluster is shown in this series of 2.5-minute exposures taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory immediately before, during, and after the burst. Total exposure (20 minutes) of the object, including the outburst, is shown in the fourth photograph. These images represent the first observation of an x-ray burst in progress. The actual burst lasted 50 seconds. Among the rarest, and most bizarre, phenomena observed by x-ray astronomers are the so-called cosmic bursters (x-ray sources that suddenly and dramatically increase in intensity then subside). These sudden bursts of intense x-ray radiation apparently come from compact objects with a diameter smaller than 30 miles (48 kilometers). Yet, despite their minuscule size, a typical x-ray burster can release more x-ray energy in a single brief burst than our Sun does in an entire week. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO was designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  11. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2015-07-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at 0T > 16 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  12. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2015-07-16

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T>160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  13. Characterization of a Precision Pulsar Timing Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    We aim to construct a Galactic-scale detector comprised of an array of pulsars distributed across the sky in an effort to detect low-frequency (nanohertz) gravitational waves. Even without a detection, observations of pulsar timing arrays have allowed us to begin to place impactful astrophysical constraints on dynamical processes occurring during galaxy mergers. Understanding the detector is necessary for improving our sensitivity to gravitational waves and making a detection. Therefore, our goal is to characterize the entire propagation path through the pulsar timing array detector. To do so, we must understand: what intrinsic noise processes occur at the pulsar, what effects the interstellar medium has on pulsed radio emission, and what errors we introduce when measuring the incident electromagnetic radiation at our observatories.In this work, we observed of one of the most spin-stable objects known for 24 hours to understand the fundamental limits of precision pulsar timing. We investigated the effect of non-simultaneous, multi-frequency sampling of pulsar dispersion measures on timing and analyzed the cause of deterministic and stochastic temporal variations seen in dispersion measure time series. We analyzed errors in pulse arrival times and determined the white noise budget for pulsars on the timescale of a single observation. Finally, we measured the excess noise beyond the white noise model in pulsar timing residuals and incorporated our results into a global model over all pulsar populations to improve excess noise scaling relations.

  14. Gravitational correlation, black hole entropy, and information conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, DongShan; Cai, QingYu

    2017-04-01

    When two objects have gravitational interaction between them, they are no longer independent of each other. In fact, there exists gravitational correlation between these two objects. Inspired by Verlinde's paper, we first calculate the entropy change of a system when gravity does positive work on this system. Based on the concept of gravitational correlation entropy, we prove that the entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole originates from the gravitational correlations between the interior matters of the black hole. By analyzing the gravitational correlation entropies in the process of Hawking radiation in a general context, we prove that the reduced entropy of a black hole is exactly carried away by the radiation and the gravitational correlations between these radiating particles, and the entropy or information is conserved at all times during Hawking radiation. Finally, we attempt to give a unified description of the non-extensive black-hole entropy and the extensive entropy of ordinary matter.

  15. Gravitational Wave Detection: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The search for gravitational waves began at the Chapel Hill Conference in January 1957, and will reach a successful conclusion at a set of observatories around the globe about sixty years later. This talk will review the history of the early thought experiments, the program of resonant mass detectors (``Weber bars''), and the development of the large interferometric detectors like Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo that are, it is hoped, about to make the first detections of gravitational wave signals. I am pleased to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation for my research, most recently under NSF Grant PHY-1205835.

  16. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  17. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Rideout, C.; Vanlew, K.

    1998-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction is nearly completed and first light is planned for fall 1998. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. That telescope has been in use for the past four years by up to 50 schools per month. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have applied for an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  18. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Sackett, C.

    1999-05-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction of the building and dome has been completed, and first light is planned for spring 1999. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have received an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  19. Royal Observatory, Edinburgh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (ROE) comprises the UK Astronomy Technology Centre (ATC) of the PARTICLE PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY RESEARCH COUNCIL, and the University of Edinburgh's Institute for Astronomy....

  20. Environmental effects on lunar astronomical observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Wetzel, John P.

    1992-09-01

    The Moon offers a stable platform with excellent seeing conditions for astronomical observations. Some troublesome aspects of the lunar environment will need to be overcome to realize the full potential of the Moon as an observatory site. Mitigation of negative effects of vacuum, thermal radiation, dust, and micrometeorite impact is feasible with careful engineering and operational planning. Shields against impact, dust, and solar radiation need to be developed. Means of restoring degraded surfaces are probably essential for optical and thermal control surfaces deployed in long-lifetime lunar facilities. Precursor missions should be planned to validate and enhance the understanding of the lunar environment (e.g., dust behavior without and with human presence) and to determine environmental effects on surfaces and components. Precursor missions should generate data useful in establishing keepout zones around observatory facilities where rocket launches and landings, mining, and vehicular traffic could be detrimental to observatory operation.

  1. Environmental effects on lunar astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Wetzel, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The Moon offers a stable platform with excellent seeing conditions for astronomical observations. Some troublesome aspects of the lunar environment will need to be overcome to realize the full potential of the Moon as an observatory site. Mitigation of negative effects of vacuum, thermal radiation, dust, and micrometeorite impact is feasible with careful engineering and operational planning. Shields against impact, dust, and solar radiation need to be developed. Means of restoring degraded surfaces are probably essential for optical and thermal control surfaces deployed in long-lifetime lunar facilities. Precursor missions should be planned to validate and enhance the understanding of the lunar environment (e.g., dust behavior without and with human presence) and to determine environmental effects on surfaces and components. Precursor missions should generate data useful in establishing keepout zones around observatory facilities where rocket launches and landings, mining, and vehicular traffic could be detrimental to observatory operation.

  2. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Santamaria, L.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors.

  3. Gravitational Wave Experiments - Proceedings of the First Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, E.; Pizzella, G.; Ronga, F.

    1995-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Notes on Edoardo Amaldi's Life and Activity * PART I. INVITED LECTURES * Sources and Telescopes * Sources of Gravitational Radiation for Detectors of the 21st Century * Neutrino Telescopes * γ-Ray Bursts * Space Detectors * LISA — Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for Gravitational Wave Measurements * Search for Massive Coalescing Binaries with the Spacecraft ULYSSES * Interferometers * The LIGO Project: Progress and Prospects * The VIRGO Experiment: Status of the Art * GEO 600 — A 600-m Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Antenna * 300-m Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detector (TAMA300) in Japan * Resonant Detectors * Search for Continuous Gravitational Wave from Pulsars with Resonant Detector * Operation of the ALLEGRO Detector at LSU * Preliminary Results of the New Run of Measurements with the Resonant Antenna EXPLORER * Operation of the Perth Cryogenic Resonant-Bar Gravitational Wave Detector * The NAUTILUS Experiment * Status of the AURIGA Gravitational Wave Antenna and Perspectives for the Gravitational Waves Search with Ultracryogenic Resonant Detectors * Ultralow Temperature Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors: Current Status of the Stanford Program * Electromechanical Transducers and Bandwidth of Resonant-Mass Gravitational-Wave Detectors * Fully Numerical Data Analysis for Resonant Gravitational Wave Detectors: Optimal Filter and Available Information * PART II. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Sources and Telescopes * The Local Supernova Production * Periodic Gravitational Signals from Galactic Pulsars * On a Possibility of Scalar Gravitational Wave Detection from the Binary Pulsars PSR 1913+16 * Kazan Gravitational Wave Detector “Dulkyn”: General Concept and Prospects of Construction * Hierarchical Approach to the Theory of Detection of Periodic Gravitational Radiation * Application of Gravitational Antennae for Fundamental Geophysical Problems * On

  4. Gravitational memory, BMS supertranslations and soft theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The transit of a gravitating radiation pulse past arrays of detectors stationed near future null infinity in the vacuum is considered. It is shown that the relative positions and clock times of the detectors before and after the radiation transit differ by a BMS supertranslation. An explicit expression for the supertranslation in terms of moments of the radiation energy flux is given. The relative spatial displacement found for a pair of nearby detectors reproduces the well-known and potentially measurable gravitational memory effect. The displacement memory formula is shown to be equivalent to Weinberg's formula for soft graviton production.

  5. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  6. Gravitational wave emission from oscillating millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars undergoing r-mode oscillation emit gravitational radiation that might be detected on the Earth. For known millisecond pulsars the observed spin-down rate imposes an upper limit on the possible gravitational wave signal of these sources. Taking into account the physics of r-mode evolution, we show that only sources spinning at frequencies above a few hundred Hertz can be unstable to r-modes, and we derive a more stringent universal r-mode spin-down limit on their gravitational wave signal. We find that this refined bound limits the gravitational wave strain from millisecond pulsars to values below the detection sensitivity of next generation detectors. Young sources are therefore a more promising option for the detection of gravitational waves emitted by r-modes and to probe the interior composition of compact stars in the near future.

  7. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  8. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  9. INTERMAGNET and magnetic observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Chulliat, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic observatory is a specially designed ground-based facility that supports time-series measurement of the Earth’s magnetic field. Observatory data record a superposition of time-dependent signals related to a fantastic diversity of physical processes in the Earth’s core, mantle, lithosphere, ocean, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and, even, the Sun and solar wind.

  10. The Norwegian Naval Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Bjørn Ragnvald

    2007-07-01

    Archival material has revealed milestones and new details in the history of the Norwegian Naval Observatories. We have identified several of the instrument types used at different epochs. Observational results have been extracted from handwritten sources and an extensive literature search. These allow determination of an approximate location of the first naval observatory building (1842) at Fredriksvern. No physical remains exist today. A second observatory was established in 1854 at the new main naval base at Horten. Its location is evident on military maps and photographs. We describe its development until the Naval Observatory buildings, including archives and instruments, were completely demolished during an allied air bomb raid on 23 February 1945. The first director, C.T.H. Geelmuyden, maintained scientific standards at the the Observatory between 1842 and 1870, and collaborated with university astronomers to investigate, develop, and employ time-transfer by telegraphy. Their purpose was accurate longitude determination between observatories in Norway and abroad. The Naval Observatory issued telegraphic time signals twice weekly to a national network of sites, and as such served as the first national time-service in Norway. Later the Naval Observatory focused on the particular needs of the Navy and developed into an internal navigational service.

  11. Carter National Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Carter National Observatory is situated in the Botanic Gardens in Wellington, New Zealand. Opened in 1941, the observatory is equipped with a 41 cm Boller and Chivens, an historic 23 cm Cooke photo-visual refractor and a 36 seat Zeiss planetarium. The staff are involved in research, school and tertiary education programs....

  12. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 in orbit. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978. The HEAO-2 was originally identified as HEAO-B but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  13. Exploring Gravitational Waves in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; McLin, Kevin M.; Peruta, Carolyn; Simonnet, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    On September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) received the first confirmed gravitational wave signals. Now known as GW150914 (for the date on which the signals were received), the event represents the coalescence of two black holes that were previously in mutual orbit. LIGO’s exciting discovery provides direct evidence of what is arguably the last major unconfirmed prediction of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. The Education and Public Outreach group at Sonoma State University has created an educator's guide that provides a brief introduction to LIGO and to gravitational waves, along with two simple demonstration activities that can be done in the classroom to engage students in understanding LIGO’s discovery. Additional resources have also been provided to extend student explorations of Einstein’s Universe.

  14. Low-Frequency Gravitational-Wave Science with eLISA/ NGO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Aoudia, Sofiane; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J.; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N.; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T.; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Stebbins, Robin; Vallisneri, Michele

    2011-01-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  15. Connecting Compton and Gravitational Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Barry R.

    2017-01-01

    The study of Compton scattering—S + γ → S + γ—at MAMI and elsewhere has led to a relatively successful understanding of proton structure via its polarizabilities. The recent observation of gravitational radiation observed by LIGO has raised the need for a parallel understanding of gravitational Compton scattering—S + g → S + g—and we show here how it can be obtained from ordinary Compton scattering by use of the double copy theorem.

  16. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3).

  17. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns.

  18. Expected sources and data analysis on laser interferometric gravitational wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2001-10-01

    The direct detection of gravitational wave has been expected for physics in strong gravitational field, and for a new deep probe for astronomical objects. Recently, some projects of large-scale laser interferometric gravitational wave detector compete for the first detection of gravitational wave. Our project TAMA300 which is placed in NAOJ, achieved worlds best sensitivity and long stable operation as a realistic observatory. In this document, we will give a brief description of gravitational wave detection, expected sources, and TAMA's data analysis.

  19. Twin mirrors for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Sassolas, Benoît; Benoît, Quentin; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Franc, Janyce; Galimberti, Massimo; Lacoudre, Aline; Michel, Christophe; Montorio, Jean-Luc; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational-wave detectors such as Virgo and the laser interferometric gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) use a long-baseline Michelson interferometer with Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms to search for gravitational waves. The symmetry between the two Fabry-Perot cavities is crucial to reduce the interferometer's sensitivity to the laser amplitude and frequency noise. To this purpose, the transmittance of the mirrors in both cavities should be as close as possible. This paper describes the realization and the characterization of the first twin large low-loss mirrors with transmissions differing by less than 0.01%.

  20. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A. E.; VanLew, K.; Melsheimer, T.; Sackett, C.

    1999-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction of the dome and the remote control system has been completed, and the telescope is now on-line and operational over the Internet. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations have prioritized access to the telescope, and there are monthly opportunities for public viewing. In the future, the telescope will be open after midnight to world-wide use by schools following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. With funding from an IDEAS grant, we have begun teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  1. The Virtual Observatory: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    The concept of the Virtual Observatory arose more-or-less simultaneously in the United States and Europe circa 2000. Ten pages of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium: Panel Reports (National Academy Press, Washington, 2001), that is, the detailed recommendations of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the 2000 Decadal Survey in Astronomy, are dedicated to describing the motivation for, scientific value of, and major components required in implementing the National Virtual Observatory. European initiatives included the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory at the European Southern Observatory, the AstroGrid project in the United Kingdom, and the Euro-VO (sponsored by the European Union). Organizational/conceptual meetings were held in the US at the California Institute of Technology (Virtual Observatories of the Future, June 13-16, 2000) and at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany (Mining the Sky, July 31-August 4, 2000; Toward an International Virtual Observatory, June 10-14, 2002). The nascent US, UK, and European VO projects formed the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) at the June 2002 meeting in Garching, with yours truly as the first chair. The IVOA has grown to a membership of twenty-one national projects and programs on six continents, and has developed a broad suite of data access protocols and standards that have been widely implemented. Astronomers can now discover, access, and compare data from hundreds of telescopes and facilities, hosted at hundreds of organizations worldwide, stored in thousands of databases, all with a single query.

  2. Mirrors used in the LIGO interferometers for first detection of gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Pinard, L; Michel, C; Sassolas, B; Balzarini, L; Degallaix, J; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Forest, D; Granata, M; Lagrange, B; Straniero, N; Teillon, J; Cagnoli, G

    2017-02-01

    For the first time, direct detection of gravitational waves occurred in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) interferometers. These advanced detectors require large fused silica mirrors with optical and mechanical properties and have never been reached until now. This paper details the main achievements of these ion beam sputtering coatings.

  3. Gravitational wave production at the end of inflation.

    PubMed

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T; Lim, Eugene A

    2007-11-30

    We consider gravitational wave production due to parametric resonance at the end of inflation, or "preheating." This leads to large inhomogeneities that source a stochastic background of gravitational waves at scales inside the comoving Hubble horizon at the end of inflation. We confirm that the present amplitude of these gravitational waves need not depend on the inflationary energy scale. We analyze an explicit model where the inflationary energy scale is approximately 10{9} GeV, yielding a signal close to the sensitivity of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Big Bang Observer. This signal highlights the possibility of a new observational "window" into inflationary physics and provides significant motivation for searches for stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves in the Hz to GHz range, with an amplitude on the order of Omega_{gw}(k)h{2} approximately 10{-11}.

  4. Transient Astrophysics Observatory (TAO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; TAO Team

    2016-10-01

    The Transient Astrophysics Observatory (TAO) is a NASA MidEx mission concept (formerly known as Lobster) designed to provide simultaneous wide-field gamma-ray, X-ray, and near-infrared observations of the sky.

  5. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Orr, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Lava from Kilauea volcano flowing through a forest in the Royal Gardens subdivision, Hawai'i, in February 2008. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitors the volcanoes of Hawai'i and is located within Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. HVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Kilauea and HVO at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  6. Observatories and Telescopes of Modern Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leverington, David

    2016-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Optical Observatories: 1. Palomar Mountain Observatory; 2. The United States Optical Observatory; 3. From the Next Generation Telescope to Gemini and SOAR; 4. Competing primary mirror designs; 5. Active optics, adaptive optics and other technical innovations; 6. European Northern Observatory and Calar Alto; 7. European Southern Observatory; 8. Mauna Kea Observatory; 9. Australian optical observatories; 10. Mount Hopkins' Whipple Observatory and the MMT; 11. Apache Point Observatory; 12. Carnegie Southern Observatory (Las Campanas); 13. Mount Graham International Optical Observatory; 14. Modern optical interferometers; 15. Solar observatories; Part II. Radio Observatories: 16. Australian radio observatories; 17. Cambridge Mullard Radio Observatory; 18. Jodrell Bank; 19. Early radio observatories away from the Australian-British axis; 20. The American National Radio Astronomy Observatory; 21. Owens Valley and Mauna Kea; 22. Further North and Central American observatories; 23. Further European and Asian radio observatories; 24. ALMA and the South Pole; Name index; Optical observatory and telescope index; Radio observatory and telescope index; General index.

  7. Helicity-rotation-gravity coupling for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jairzinho; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2006-04-15

    The consequences of spin-rotation-gravity coupling are worked out for linear gravitational waves. The coupling of helicity of the wave with the rotation of a gravitational-wave antenna is investigated and the resulting modifications in the Doppler effect and aberration are pointed out for incident high-frequency gravitational radiation. Extending these results to the case of a gravitomagnetic field via the gravitational Larmor theorem, the rotation of linear polarization of gravitational radiation propagating in the field of a rotating mass is studied. It is shown that in this case the linear polarization state rotates by twice the Skrotskii angle as a consequence of the spin-2 character of linear gravitational waves.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW Gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Gravitational lensing has developed into one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of the dark universe. This review summarizes the theory of gravitational lensing, its main current applications and representative results achieved so far. It has two parts. In the first, starting from the equation of geodesic deviation, the equations of thin and extended gravitational lensing are derived. In the second, gravitational lensing by stars and planets, galaxies, galaxy clusters and large-scale structures is discussed and summarized.

  9. Detection of high-energy gamma radiation from quasar 3C 279 by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hunter, S. D.; Kwok, P. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Mattox, J. R.; Kanbach, G.; Nel, H. I.; Sreekumar, P.

    1992-01-01

    Intense gamma radiation has been observed from the direction of the quasar 3C 279 throughout the energy range from 30 MeV to over 5 GeV by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) during the period June 15-28, 1991. Its spectrum is well represented by a photon differential power-law exponent of 2.0 +/- 0.1, with a photon intensity above 100 MeV of (2.8 +/- 0.4) x 10 exp -6/sq cm s. For E is greater than 100 MeV, the 2-sigma upper limits were 1.0 x 10 exp -6/sq cm s in 1973 from the SAS 2 observations and 0.3 x 10 exp -6/sq cm s for the combined 1976, 1978, and 1980 COS B observations. Hence, there has been a large increase in high-energy gamma-ray intensity relative to the earlier times, as there has been in the radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray ranges. This source is the most distant and by far the most luminous gamma-ray source yet detected.

  10. Gravitation in Material Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium…

  11. Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadors, Grant David

    2014-09-01

    Gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) seek to observe ripples in space predicted by General Relativity. Black holes, neutron stars, supernovae, the Big Bang and other sources can radiate gravitational waves. Original contributions to the LIGO effort are presented in this thesis: feedforward filtering, directed binary neutron star searches for continuous waves, and scientific outreach and education, as well as advances in quantum optical squeezing. Feedforward filtering removes extraneous noise from servo-controlled instruments. Filtering of the last science run, S6, improves LIGO's astrophysical range (+4.14% H1, +3.60% L1: +12% volume) after subtracting noise from auxiliary length control channels. This thesis shows how filtering enhances the scientific sensitivity of LIGO's data set during and after S6. Techniques for non-stationarity and verifying calibration and integrity may apply to Advanced LIGO. Squeezing is planned for future interferometers to exceed the standard quantum limit on noise from electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations; this thesis discusses the integration of a prototype squeezer at LIGO Hanford Observatory and impact on astrophysical sensitivity. Continuous gravitational waves may be emitted by neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binary systems such as Scorpius X-1. The TwoSpect directed binary search is designed to detect these waves. TwoSpect is the most sensitive of 4 methods in simulated data, projecting an upper limit of 4.23e-25 in strain, given a year-long data set at an Advanced LIGO design sensitivity of 4e-24 Hz. (-1/2). TwoSpect is also used on real S6 data to set 95% confidence upper limits (40 Hz to 2040 Hz) on strain from Scorpius X-1. A millisecond pulsar, X-ray transient J1751-305, is similarly considered. Search enhancements for Advanced LIGO are proposed. Advanced LIGO and fellow interferometers should detect gravitational waves in the coming decade. Methods in these

  12. Creating Griffith Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Griffith Observatory has been the iconic symbol of the sky for southern California since it began its public mission on May 15, 1935. While the Observatory is widely known as being the gift of Col. Griffith J. Griffith (1850-1919), the story of how Griffith’s gift became reality involves many of the people better known for other contributions that made Los Angeles area an important center of astrophysics in the 20th century. Griffith began drawing up his plans for an observatory and science museum for the people of Los Angeles after looking at Saturn through the newly completed 60-inch reflector on Mt. Wilson. He realized the social impact that viewing the heavens could have if made freely available, and discussing the idea of a public observatory with Mt. Wilson Observatory’s founder, George Ellery Hale, and Director, Walter Adams. This resulted, in 1916, in a will specifying many of the features of Griffith Observatory, and establishing a committee managed trust fund to build it. Astronomy popularizer Mars Baumgardt convinced the committee at the Zeiss Planetarium projector would be appropriate for Griffith’s project after the planetarium was introduced in Germany in 1923. In 1930, the trust committee judged funds to be sufficient to start work on creating Griffith Observatory, and letters from the Committee requesting help in realizing the project were sent to Hale, Adams, Robert Millikan, and other area experts then engaged in creating the 200-inch telescope eventually destined for Palomar Mountain. A Scientific Advisory Committee, headed by Millikan, recommended that Caltech Physicist Edward Kurth be put in charge of building and exhibit design. Kurth, in turn, sought help from artist Russell Porter. The architecture firm of John C. Austin and Fredrick Ashley was selected to design the project, and they adopted the designs of Porter and Kurth. Philip Fox of the Adler Planetarium was enlisted to manage the completion of the Observatory and become its

  13. Swift Observatory Space Simulation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espiritu, Mellina; Choi, Michael K.; Scocik, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Observatory is a Middle-Class Explorer (MIDEX) mission that is a rapidly re-pointing spacecraft with immediate data distribution capability to the astronomical community. Its primary objectives are to characterize and determine the origin of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and to use the collected data on GRB phenomena in order to probe the universe and gain insight into the physics of black hole formation and early universe. The main components of the spacecraft are the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT), X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Optical Bench (OB) instruments coupled with the Swift spacecraft (S/C) bus. The Swift Observatory will be tested at the Space Environment Simulation (SES) chamber at the Goddard Space Flight Center from May to June 2004 in order to characterize its thermal behavior in a vacuum environment. In order to simulate the independent thermal zones required by the BAT, XRT, UVOT, and OB instruments, the spacecraft is mounted on a chariot structure capable of maintaining adiabatic interfaces and enclosed in a modified, four section MSX fixture in order to accommodate the strategic placement of seven cryopanels (on four circuits), four heater panels, and a radiation source burst simulator mechanism. There are additionally 55 heater circuits on the spacecraft. To mitigate possible migration of silicone contaminants from BAT to the XRT and UVOT instruments, a contamination enclosure is to be fabricated around the BAT at the uppermost section of the MSX fixture. This paper discuses the test requirements and implemented thermal vacuum test configuration for the Swift Observatory.

  14. Low frequency gravitational wave astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Shane

    The field of low-frequency gravitational wave astronomy is evolving as the design of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is in flux. Changing mission architectures naturally has an impact on the science goals and science capabilities in gravitational wave astronomy, requiring astrophysicists to pursue a deeper understanding on three fronts. (1) What astrophysical knowledge can be extracted from populations of sources based on their relative strengths in the data streams? (2) How are the science returns maximized as detector capabilities evolve? (3) How do evolving detector performance expectations alter the science that is possible with space- based gravitational wave detectors? This work proposes a series of investigations that address these questions along two broad avenues of inquiry. The first thrust of this effort is designed to examine how the population of ultra-compact galactic binaries can be better characterized by multi-messenger observations and statistical population analyses. While these investigations are astrophysical interesting in and of themselves, they are particularly relevant as detector designs evolve because the binaries are a limiting source of astrophysical noise that must be mitigated in order to maximize the science return for other sources, such as massive binary black hole inspirals and extreme mass ratio inspirals. The second thrust of this effort is geared toward characterization of the detector itself, since this ultimately fixes our ability to answer astrophysical questions. While many high-fidelity simulators exist for the original LISA mission architecture, the work proposed here will develop a new, flexible suite of prototyping tools analogous to the "Online Sensitivity Curve Generator" (which the PI authored). These tools will allow astrophysicists and data analysts alike to rapidly assess whether new proposed architectures for a space-based gravitational wave observatory will enhance or adversely impact the science

  15. Extragalactic sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, M. J.

    The prospects of detecting gravitational waves from galactic nuclei are shown to be bleak: although some 'scenarios', such as those involving black hole coalescence, would emit a pulse with about 0.1 efficiency, the predicted event rate is discouragingly low. If most of the 'unseen' mass in the universe were in the remnants of massive 'Population III' stars, then the overlapping bursts from the collapse of such objects in early epochs would yield a stochastic background that could amount to about 0.001 (or even more) of the critical cosmological density. Such a background may be above the detectability threshold for future experiments, and can be probed by studying the timing noise of pulsars, and the secular behavior of the binary pulsar. General constraints on stochastic backgrounds, including 'primordial' gravitational radiation, are summarized.

  16. Gravitational-wave Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver; Stebbins, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has indicated an interest in participating. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described. Note that all results are based on models, methods and assumptions used in NASA studies

  17. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This illustration is a schematic of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 and its experiments. It shows the focal plane instruments (at the right) plus the associated electronics for operating the telescope as it transmitted its observations to the ground. A fifth instrument, the Monitor Proportional Counter, is located near the front of the telescope. Four separate astronomical instruments are located at the focus of this telescope and they could be interchanged for different types of observations as the observatory pointed at interesting areas of the Sky. Two of these instruments produced images; a High Resolution Imaging Detector and an Imaging Proportional Counter. The other two instruments, the Solid State Spectrometer and the Crystal Spectrometer, measured the spectra of x-ray objects. A fifth instrument, the Monitor Proportional Counter, continuously viewed space independently to study a wider band of x-ray wavelengths and to examine the rapid time variations in the sources. The HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978. The HEAO-2 was originally identified as HEAO-B but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  18. From Measure Zero to Measure Hero: Periodic Kerr Orbits and Gravitational Wave Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Giz, Gabriel

    2011-12-01

    A direct observational detection of gravitational waves -- perhaps the most fundamental prediction of a theory of curved spacetime -- looms close at hand. Stellar mass compact objects spiraling into supermassive black holes have received particular attention as sources of gravitational waves detectable by space-based gravitational wave observatories. A well-established approach models such an extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRI) as an adiabatic progression through a series of Kerr geodesics. Thus, the direct detection of gravitational radiation from EMRIs and the extraction of astrophysical information from those waveforms require a thorough knowledge of the underlying geodesic dynamics. This dissertation adopts a dynamical systems approach to the study of Kerr orbits, beginning with equatorial orbits. We deduce a topological taxonomy of orbits that hinges on a correspondence between periodic orbits and rational numbers. The taxonomy defines the entire dynamics, including aperiodic motion, since every orbit is in or near the periodic set. A remarkable implication of this periodic orbit taxonomy is that the simple precessing ellipse familiar from planetary orbits is not allowed in the strong-field regime. Instead, eccentric orbits trace out precessions of multi-leaf clovers in the final stages of inspiral. Furthermore, for any black hole, there is some orbital angular momentum value in the strong-field regime below which zoom-whirl behavior becomes unavoidable. We then generalize the taxonomy to help identify nonequatorial orbits whose radial and polar frequencies are rationally related, or in resonance. The thesis culminates by describing how those resonant orbits can be leveraged for an order of magnitude or more reduction in the computational cost of adiabatic order EMRI trajectories, which are so prohibitively expensive that no such relativistically correct inspirals have been generated to date.

  19. LISA: Science and Prospects for Gravitational Wave Detection in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    Spaceborne gravitational wave observatories with million kilometer armlengths will probe gravitational waves with kilosecond periods. This part of the spectrum is populated by a diverse menagerie of high energy astrophysical systems that will give new insights into stellar evolution, the formation and evolution of super-massive black holes, and the growth of structure in the Universe. LISA is a laser interferometric observatory that will be sensitive to gravitational wave frequencies from about 10 microHertz to about 1 Hertz, providing gravitational wave observations of these phenomena that will enable population studies, detailed characterization of the structure and bulk motion of matter in these systems, as well as enabling new, detailed tests of physics in strong gravitational fields. The core LISA measurement has been demonstrated by the successful flight of LISA Pathfinder, paving the way for the start of LISA mission design and planning. In this talk, we will discuss the science that low-frequency gravitational wave observations will reveal and enable, as well as the current technology status and progress forward toward an eventual LISA flight.

  20. Toward a green observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Ueli; Ramírez, Christian; Vanderheyden, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    Many of the modern observatories are located at remote sites, far from larger cities and away from infrastructure like power grids, water supplies and roads. On-site power generation in island mode is often the only choice to provide electricity to an observatory. During the 2008 petrol price rally, conventional power generation has received special attention and alternatives are being studied now in many organisations to keep energy prices at bay. This paper shall outline the power generation at the ESO VLT/VLTI observatory at Paranal as it is now and a plan for a possible way out of the dependency on fossil fuels in the near future. A discussion of several alternatives including wind energy, solar energy and heat recovery from a conventional power plant shall be analysed and compared. Finally, a project is being proposed to equip the VLT/VLTI with a modern alternative energy supply, based on a novel concept: Solar cooling.

  1. Wendelstein Observatory control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigula, Jan M.; Gössl, Claus; Kodric, Mihael; Riffeser, Arno; Wegner, Michael; Schlichter, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    LMU Munchen operates an astrophysical observatory on Mt. Wendelstein1. The 2m Fraunhofer telescope2, 3 is equipped with a 0.5 x 0.5 square degree field-of-view wide field camera4 and a 3 channel optical/NIR camera5, 6. Two fiber coupled spectrographs7-9 and a wavefront sensor will be added in the near future. The observatory hosts a multitude of supporting hardware, i.e. allsky cameras, webcams, meteostation, air conditioning etc. All scientific hardware can be controlled through a single, central "Master Control Program" (MCP). At the last SPIE astronomy venue we presented the overall Wendelstein Observatory software concept10. Here we explain concept and implementation of the MCP as a multi-threaded Python daemon in the area of conflict between debuggability and Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY).

  2. Iranian National Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroshahi, H. G.; Danesh, A.; Molaeinezhad, A.

    2016-09-01

    The Iranian National Observatory is under construction at an altitude of 3600m at Gargash summit 300km southern Tehran. The site selection was concluded in 2007 and the site monitoring activities have begun since then, which indicates a high quality of the site with a median seeing of 0.7 arcsec through the year. One of the major observing facilities of the observatory is a 3.4m Alt-Az Ritchey-Chretien optical telescope which is currently under design. This f/11 telescope will be equipped with high resolution medium-wide field imaging cameras as well as medium and high resolution spectrographs. In this review, I will give an overview of astronomy research and education in Iran. Then I will go through the past and present activities of the Iranian National Observatory project including the site quality, telescope specifications and instrument capabilities.

  3. WFIRST Observatory Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    The WFIRST observatory will be a powerful and flexible wide-field near-infrared facility. The planned surveys will provide data applicable to an enormous variety of astrophysical science. This presentation will provide a description of the observatory and its performance characteristics. This will include a discussion of the point spread function, signal-to-noise budgets for representative observing scenarios and the corresponding limiting sensitivity. Emphasis will be given to providing prospective Guest Observers with information needed to begin thinking about new observing programs.

  4. Arecibo Observatory for All

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidro, Gloria M.; Pantoja, C. A.; Bartus, P.; La Rosa, C.

    2006-12-01

    We describe new materials available at Arecibo Observatory for visitors with visual impairments. These materials include a guide in Braille that describes the telescope, some basic terms used in radio astronomy and frequently asked questions. We have also designed a tactile model of the telescope. We are interested that blind visitors can participate of the excitement of the visit to the worlds largest radio telescope. We would like to thank the "Fundacion Comunitaria de Puerto Rico" for the scholarship that allowed GMI to work on this project. We would like to express our gratitude to the Arecibo Observatory/NAIC for their support.

  5. Long Valley Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Hill, David

    2008-01-01

    The ~300-year-old lava on Paoha Island in Mono Lake was produced by the most recent eruption in the Long Valley Caldera area in east-central California. The Long Valley Caldera was formed by a massive volcanic eruption 760,000 years ago. The region is monitored by the Long Valley Observatory (LVO), one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about the Long Valley Caldera region and LVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/lvo.

  6. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  7. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  8. Gravitational wave astronomy— astronomy of the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with inteferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or are being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front— the IndIGO project —, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves that one expects to detect by these detectors and some glimpse of the data analysis methods involved in extracting the very weak gravitational wave signals from detector noise.

  9. Gravitational wave astronomy - astronomy of the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, S. V.

    2011-03-01

    An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with inteferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front - the IndIGO project -, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves that one expects to detect by these detectors and some glimpse of the data analysis methods involved in extracting the very weak gravitational wave signals from detector noise.

  10. The Origin of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng Ming

    2012-10-01

    In the natural world, people have discovered four kinds of forces: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Although the gravitation has been discovered more than three hundred years, its mechanism of origin is unclear until today. While investigating the origin of gravitation, I do some experiments discover the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I do some experiments discover the light interference fringes are produced by the gravitation: my discovery demonstrate light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. Furthermore, applications of this discovery to other moving particles show a similar effect. In a word: the micro particle moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force. Then I do quantity experiment get a general formula: Reveal the essence of gravitational mass and the essence of electric charge; reveal the origin of gravitation and the essence of matter wave. Along this way, I unify the gravitation and electromagnetic force. Namely I find a natural law that from atomic world to star world play in moving track. See website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter

  11. Search for gravitational radiation from intermediate mass black hole binaries in data from the second LIGO-Virgo joint science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karlen, J.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Le Roux, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Luijten, E.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Milde, S.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Stops, D.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S. S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, K.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yang, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports on an unmodeled, all-sky search for gravitational waves from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). The search was performed on data from the second joint science run of the LIGO and Virgo detectors (July 2009-October 2010) and was sensitive to IMBHBs with a range up to ˜200 Mpc, averaged over the possible sky positions and inclinations of the binaries with respect to the line of sight. No significant candidate was found. Upper limits on the coalescence-rate density of nonspinning IMBHBs with total masses between 100 and 450 M⊙ and mass ratios between 0.25 and 1 were placed by combining this analysis with an analogous search performed on data from the first LIGO-Virgo joint science run (November 2005-October 2007). The most stringent limit was set for systems consisting of two 88 M⊙ black holes and is equal to 0.12 Mpc-3 Myr-1 at the 90% confidence level. This paper also presents the first estimate, for the case of an unmodeled analysis, of the impact on the search range of IMBHB spin configurations: the visible volume for IMBHBs with nonspinning components is roughly doubled for a population of IMBHBs with spins aligned with the binary's orbital angular momentum and uniformly distributed in the dimensionless spin parameter up to 0.8, whereas an analogous population with antialigned spins decreases the visible volume by ˜20%.

  12. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  13. Arecibo Observatory for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartus, P.; Isidro, G. M.; La Rosa, C.; Pantoja, C. A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe new materials available at the Arecibo Observatory for visitors with visual impairments. These materials include a guide in Braille that describes the telescope, explains some basic terms used in radio astronomy, and lists frequently asked questions. We have also designed a tactile model of the telescope. Our interest is in enabling…

  14. Observatory of Shiraz University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbar, G. H.; Bahrani, F.

    2016-12-01

    Here we write about the observatory of Shiraz University, which has the largest active telescope in Iran but now, because of problems like light pollution of the nearby city and exhaustion of its largest telescope we need a plan for modernization and automatization in a new place.

  15. La Plata Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Juan Carlos; Cora, Sofia A.

    La Plata, the current capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, was founded on 19 November 1882 by governor Dardo Rocha, and built on an innovative design giving emphasis to the quality of the public space, official and educational buildings. The Astronomical Observatory was one of the first inhabitants of the main park of the city; its construction started in 1883 including two telescopes that ranked among the largest in the southern hemisphere at that time and also several instruments devoted to positional astronomy (e.g. a meridian circle and a zenith telescope). A dedicated effort has being invested during the last 15 years in order to recover some of the original instrumentation (kept in a small museum) as well as the distinctive architectural values. In 1905, the Observatory, the School of Agriculture and the Museum of Natural Sciences (one of the most important museums in South America) became part of the backbone of La Plata National University, an institution with a strong and distinctive profile in exact and natural sciences. The First School for Astronomy and Related Sciences had been harboured by the Observatory since 1935, and became the current Faculty of Astronomical and Geophysical Sciences in 1983. This last institution carries PhD programs and also a number of teaching activities at different levels. These activities are the roots of a strong connection of the Observatory with the city.

  16. Armenian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Vast amount of information continuously accumulated in astronomy requires finding new solutions for its efficient storage, use and dissemination, as well as accomplishing new research projects. Virtual Observatories (VOs) have been created in a number of countries to set up a new environment for these tasks. Based on them, the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) was created in 2002, which unifies 19 VO projects, including Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO) founded in 2005. ArVO is a project of Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) aimed at construction of a modern system for data archiving, extraction, acquisition, reduction, use and publication. ArVO technical and research projects are presented, including the Global Spectroscopic Database, which is being built based on Digitized First Byurakan Survey (DFBS). Quick optical identification of radio, IR or X-ray sources will be possible by plotting their positions in the DFBS or other spectroscopic plate and matching all available data. Accomplishment of new projects by combining data is so important that the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) recently created World Data System (WDS) for unifying data coming from all science areas, and BAO has also joined it.

  17. Strasbourg's "First" astronomical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André

    2011-08-01

    The turret lantern located at the top of the Strasbourg Hospital Gate is generally considered as the first astronomical observatory of the city, but such a qualification must be treated with caution. The thesis of this paper is that the idea of a tower-observatory was brought back by a local scholar, Julius Reichelt (1637-1717), after he made a trip to Northern Europe around 1666 and saw the "Rundetårn" (Round Tower) recently completed in Copenhagen. There, however, a terrace allowed (and still allows) the full viewing of the sky, and especially of the zenith area where the atmospheric transparency is best. However, there is no such terrace in Strasbourg around the Hospital Gate lantern. Reichelt had also visited Johannes Hevelius who was then developing advanced observational astronomy in Gdansk, but nothing of the kind followed in Strasbourg. Rather, the Hospital Gate observatory was built essentially for the prestige of the city and for the notoriety of the university, and the users of this observing post did not make any significant contributions to the progress of astronomical knowledge. We conclude that the Hospital Gate observatory was only used for rudimentary viewing of bright celestial objects or phenomena relatively low on the horizon.

  18. The IT Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Kai Iok Tong; Sousa, Antonio C. M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the IT Observatory, a service of the Macau Productivity and Technology center (CPTTM) that provides information on demand using information technology. The CPTTM is a nonprofit organization funded by the Macau government and private businesses to enhance the productivity of Macau businesses by introducing new technologies and new…

  19. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  20. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.

    1996-09-01

    A report is given on the status of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, presently under construction in the Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. Focus is upon the technical factors involving a measurement of the charged-current and neutral-current interactions of solar neutrinos on deuterium.

  1. Quantum Gravitational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Baessler, Stefan; Pignol, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    We report that one of the main goals for improving the accuracy of quantum gravitational spectroscopy with neutrons is searches for extra short-range fundamental forces. We discuss also any progress in all competing nonneutron methods as well as constraints at other characteristic distances. Among major methodical developments related to the phenomenon of gravitational quantum states are the detailed theoretical analysis and the planning experiments on observation of gravitational quantum states of antihydrogen atoms.

  2. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  3. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-01

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke’s discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  4. Gravitational waves from an early matter era

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David

    2009-04-15

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves due to the gravitational instability of primordial density perturbations in an early matter-dominated era which could be detectable by experiments such as laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) and laser interferometer space antenna (LISA). We use relativistic perturbation theory to give analytic estimates of the tensor perturbations generated at second order by linear density perturbations. We find that large enhancement factors with respect to the naive second-order estimate are possible due to the growth of density perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. However very large enhancement factors coincide with a breakdown of linear theory for density perturbations on small scales. To produce a primordial gravitational-wave background that would be detectable with LIGO or LISA from density perturbations in the linear regime requires primordial comoving curvature perturbations on small scales of order 0.02 for advanced LIGO or 0.005 for LISA; otherwise numerical calculations of the nonlinear evolution on sub-Hubble scales are required.

  5. Detecting Triple Systems with Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiron, Yohai; Kocsis, Bence; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has recently discovered gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by merging black hole binaries. We examine whether future GW detections may identify triple companions of merging binaries. Such a triple companion causes variations in the GW signal due to: (1) the varying path length along the line of sight during the orbit around the center of mass; (2) relativistic beaming, Doppler, and gravitational redshift; (3) the variation of the “light”-travel time in the gravitational field of the triple companion; and (4) secular variations of the orbital elements. We find that the prospects for detecting a triple companion are the highest for low-mass compact object binaries which spend the longest time in the LIGO frequency band. In particular, for merging neutron star binaries, LIGO may detect a white dwarf or M-dwarf perturber at a signal-to-noise ratio of 8, if it is within 0.4 {R}ȯ distance from the binary and the system is within a distance of 100 Mpc. Stellar mass (supermassive) black hole perturbers may be detected at a factor 5 × (103×) larger separations. Such pertubers in orbit around a merging binary emit GWs at frequencies above 1 mHz detectable by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna in coincidence.

  6. Gravitation in material media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-03-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium is herein derived on the basis of classical, Newtonian gravitational theory and by a general relativistic use of Archimedes' principle. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate students and those undergraduate students having prior experience with vector analysis and potential theory.

  7. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  8. Search for gravitational wave radiation associated with the pulsating tail of the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004 using LIGO

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chatterji, S.; Coyne, D.

    2007-09-15

    We have searched for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004. This event, originating from a Galactic neutron star, displayed exceptional energetics. Recent investigations of the x-ray light curve's pulsating tail revealed the presence of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) in the 30-2000 Hz frequency range, most of which coincides with the bandwidth of the LIGO detectors. These QPOs, with well-characterized frequencies, can plausibly be attributed to seismic modes of the neutron star which could emit GWs. Our search targeted potential quasimonochromatic GWs lasting for tens of seconds and emitted at the QPO frequencies. We have observed no candidate signals above a predetermined threshold, and our lowest upper limit was set by the 92.5 Hz QPO observed in the interval from 150 s to 260 s after the start of the flare. This bound corresponds to a (90% confidence) root-sum-squared amplitude h{sub rss-det}{sup 90%} = 4.5x10{sup -22} strain Hz{sup -1/2} on the GW waveform strength in the detectable polarization state reaching our Hanford (WA) 4 km detector. We illustrate the astrophysical significance of the result via an estimated characteristic energy in GW emission that we would expect to be able to detect. The above result corresponds to 7.7x10{sup 46} erg (=4.3x10{sup -8} M{sub {center_dot}}c{sup 2}), which is of the same order as the total (isotropic) energy emitted in the electromagnetic spectrum. This result provides a means to probe the energy reservoir of the source with the best upper limit on the GW waveform strength published and represents the first broadband asteroseismology measurement using a GW detector.

  9. Time Evolution of Pure Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyama, S. M.

    1981-03-01

    Numerical solutions to the Einstein equations in the case of pure gravitational waves are given. The system is assumed to be axially symmetric and non-rotating. The time symmetric initial data and the conformally flat initial data are obtained by solving the constraint equations at t=0. The time evolution of these initial data depends strongly on the initial amplitude of the gravitational waves. In the case of the low initial amplitude, waves only disperse to null infinity. By comparing the initial gravitational energy with the total energy loss through an r=constant surface, it is concluded that the Newman-Penrose method and the Gibbon-Hawking method are the most desirable for measuring the energy flux of gravitational radiation numerically. In the case that the initial ratio of the spatial extent of the gravitational waves to the Schwarzschild radius (M/2) is smaller than about 300, the waves collapse by themselves, leading to formation of a black hole. The analytic solutions of the linearized Einstein equations for the pure gravitational waves are also shown.

  10. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  11. NASA's Great Observatories: Paper Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational brief discusses observatory stations built by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for looking at the universe. This activity for grades 5-12 has students build paper models of the observatories and study their history, features, and functions. Templates for the observatories are included. (MVL)

  12. ESO's Two Observatories Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    On February 1, 2005, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has merged its two observatories, La Silla and Paranal, into one. This move will help Europe's prime organisation for astronomy to better manage its many and diverse projects by deploying available resources more efficiently where and when they are needed. The merged observatory will be known as the La Silla Paranal Observatory. Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General, comments the new development: "The merging, which was planned during the past year with the deep involvement of all the staff, has created unified maintenance and engineering (including software, mechanics, electronics and optics) departments across the two sites, further increasing the already very high efficiency of our telescopes. It is my great pleasure to commend the excellent work of Jorge Melnick, former director of the La Silla Observatory, and of Roberto Gilmozzi, the director of Paranal." ESO's headquarters are located in Garching, in the vicinity of Munich (Bavaria, Germany), and this intergovernmental organisation has established itself as a world-leader in astronomy. Created in 1962, ESO is now supported by eleven member states (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom). It operates major telescopes on two remote sites, all located in Chile: La Silla, about 600 km north of Santiago and at an altitude of 2400m; Paranal, a 2600m high mountain in the Atacama Desert 120 km south of the coastal city of Antofagasta. Most recently, ESO has started the construction of an observatory at Chajnantor, a 5000m high site, also in the Atacama Desert. La Silla, north of the town of La Serena, has been the bastion of the organization's facilities since 1964. It is the site of two of the most productive 4-m class telescopes in the world, the New Technology Telescope (NTT) - the first major telescope equipped with active optics - and the 3.6-m, which hosts HARPS

  13. Dark Energy and Dark Matter Phenomena and the Universe with Variable Gravitational Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2005-12-01

    Generation of high-frequency gravitational waves near the singularity is a crucial factor for understanding the origin and dynamics of the Universe. Emission of gravitational waves increases with a decreasing radius of collapsed object much faster than a gravitational force itself. Gravitationally unstable matter of the Universe will be completely converted into gravitational radiation during the Big Crunch. According to Misner, Thorne & Wheeler (Gravitation, 1977, p.959) plane gravitational waves have not gravitational mass or spacetime is flat everywhere outside the pulse. We can propose that the gravitational mass of the Universe is vanished after converting matter into gravitational waves. This hypothesis in the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation can solve the problem of singularity without contradiction with theorems by Penrose-Hawking; explain the acceleration of our Universe as the effect of a retarded gravitational potential (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2003, 35, #3) and the low quadrupole in fluctuations in CMB as result of blue-shift effect in a gravitational field. Proposed solution of dark energy problem free from coincidence problems. The hypothesis keeps best parts of Big Bang theory and inflation model without any unknown physical fields or new dimensions. According to this hypothesis a relic sea of high-frequency gravitational radiation in our Universe can be very dense. Interaction of relic gravitational waves with gravitational fields of galaxies and stars can create an additional dynamical effects like pressure of relic radiation that proportional to gravitational potential GM/(Rc2). This effect can be responsible for dark matter phenomena in galaxies and the Pioneer acceleration in the solar system (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2005, 37, #2).

  14. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  15. Calar Alto Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Calar Alto Observatory, or `Centro Astronomico Hispano-Aleman', is located at an altitude of 2168 m in the `Sierra de los Filabres', in southern Spain. Its construction on Calar Alto mountain began in 1973. It is operated jointly by the MAX-PLANCK-INSTITUT FÜR ASTRONOMIE in Heidelberg (MPIA), Germany, and the `Comision Nacional de Astronomia'. The MPIA provides four telescopes of diameters 3....

  16. Jodrell Bank Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Jodrell Bank Observatory is part of the University of Manchester and was founded by Bernard Lovell in December 1945. Its prime instrument, the 76 m, MK1 radio-telescope, was completed in 1957. It was given a major upgrade in 1971 and is now known as the Lovell Telescope. In its early years it pioneered the technique of long baseline interferometry which led to the discovery of quasars. A majo...

  17. Mount Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mount Wilson Observatory, located in the San Gabriel Mountains near Pasadena, California, was founded in 1904 by George Ellery Hale with financial support from Andrew Carnegie. In the 1920s and 1930s, working at the 2.5 m Hooker telescope, Edwin Hubble made two of the most important discoveries in the history of astronomy: first, that `nebulae' are actually island universes—galaxies—each with bil...

  18. Arecibo Observatory for All

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartus, P.; Isidro, G. M.; La Rosa, C.; Pantoja, C. A.

    We describe new materials available at the Arecibo Observatory for visitors with visual impairments. These materials include a guide in Braille that describes the telescope, explains some basic terms used in radio astronomy, and lists frequently asked questions. We have also designed a tactile model of the telescope. Our interest is in enabling blind visitors to participate in the excitement of visiting the world's largest radio telescope.

  19. Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory began operating in 1959, and joined the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL in 1970. It became part of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics in 1975. The site near Penticton, BC has a 26 m radio telescope, a seven-antenna synthesis telescope on a 600 m baseline and two telescopes dedicated to monitoring the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm. This part of the Institu...

  20. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Johanna

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  1. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; McKibben, Robert B.; Lopate, Clifford; Tranquille, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  2. Gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations with Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Armstrong, J. W.; Campbell, J. K.; Estabrook, F. B.; Krisher, T. P.; Lau, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    The gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations that are to be conducted during the cruise and Orbiter phases of the Galileo Mission cover four investigation categories: (1) the gravity fields of Jupiter and its four major satellites; (2) a search for gravitational radiation; (3) mathematical modeling of general relativistic effects on Doppler ranging data; and (4) improvements of the Jupiter ephemeris via Orbiter ranging. Also noted are two secondary objectives, involving a range fix during Venus flyby and the determination of the earth's mass on the bases of the two earth gravity assists used by the mission.

  3. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  4. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  5. Search for Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubono, K.

    The current status of the experimental search for gravitational waves is reviewed here. The emphasis is on the Japanese TAMA project. We started operation of the TAMA300 laser interferometric detector in 1999, and are now collecting and analyzing observational data to search for gravitational wave signals.

  6. Megalithic observatory Kokino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenev, Gj.

    2006-05-01

    In 2001, on the footpath of a mountain peak, near the village of Kokino, archeologist Jovica Stankovski discovered an archeological site from The Bronze Age. The site occupies a large area and is scaled in two levels. Several stone seats (thrones) are dominant in this site and they are pointing towards the east horizon. The high concentration of the movable archeological material found on the upper platform probably indicates its use in a function containing still unknown cult activities. Due to precise measurements and a detailed archaeoastronomical analysis of the site performed in the past three years by Gjore Cenev, physicist from the Planetarium in Skopje, it was shown that the site has characteristics of a sacred site, but also of a Megalithic Observatory. The markers found in this observatory point on the summer and winter solstices and spring and autumn equinoxes. It can be seen that on both sides of the solstice markers, that there are markers for establishing Moon's positions. The markers are crafted in such a way that for example on days when special rites were performed (harvest rites for example) the Sun filled a narrow space of the marker and special ray lighted the man sitting on only one of the thrones, which of course had a special meaning. According to the positions of the markers that are used for Sun marking, especially on the solstice days, it was calculated that this observatory dates from 1800 B.C.

  7. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  8. Extraction of gravitational waves in numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nigel T; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    A numerical-relativity calculation yields in general a solution of the Einstein equations including also a radiative part, which is in practice computed in a region of finite extent. Since gravitational radiation is properly defined only at null infinity and in an appropriate coordinate system, the accurate estimation of the emitted gravitational waves represents an old and non-trivial problem in numerical relativity. A number of methods have been developed over the years to "extract" the radiative part of the solution from a numerical simulation and these include: quadrupole formulas, gauge-invariant metric perturbations, Weyl scalars, and characteristic extraction. We review and discuss each method, in terms of both its theoretical background as well as its implementation. Finally, we provide a brief comparison of the various methods in terms of their inherent advantages and disadvantages.

  9. Extraction of gravitational waves in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Nigel T.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-12-01

    A numerical-relativity calculation yields in general a solution of the Einstein equations including also a radiative part, which is in practice computed in a region of finite extent. Since gravitational radiation is properly defined only at null infinity and in an appropriate coordinate system, the accurate estimation of the emitted gravitational waves represents an old and non-trivial problem in numerical relativity. A number of methods have been developed over the years to "extract" the radiative part of the solution from a numerical simulation and these include: quadrupole formulas, gauge-invariant metric perturbations, Weyl scalars, and characteristic extraction. We review and discuss each method, in terms of both its theoretical background as well as its implementation. Finally, we provide a brief comparison of the various methods in terms of their inherent advantages and disadvantages.

  10. Loop quantum cosmology gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-11-01

    Loop quantum cosmology is an appealing quantum completion of classical cosmology, which brings along various theoretical features which in many cases offer a remedy for or modify various classical cosmology aspects. In this paper we address the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism in the context of loop quantum cosmology. As we demonstrate, when loop quantum cosmology effects are taken into account in the resulting Friedmann equations for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, then even for a radiation-dominated Universe, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio from the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism is non-zero, in contrast to the Einstein-Hilbert case, in which case the baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We also discuss various other cases apart from the radiation domination case, and we discuss how the baryon-to-entropy ratio is affected from the parameters of the quantum theory. In addition, we use illustrative exact solutions of loop quantum cosmology and we investigate under which circumstances the baryon-to-entropy ratio can be compatible with the observational constraints.

  11. Space-Based Gravitational-wave Mission Concept Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a spacebased gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return, and in particular a family of mission concepts referred to as SGO (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory).

  12. Emission of gravitational waves by precession of slim accretion disks dynamically driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, W. D.; Sánchez, L. A.; Mosquera, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted from some astrophysical objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGN), micro-quasars (M-QSRs), and central engines of gamma-ray burst (GRBs), seems to have a similar physical origin: a powerful jet of plasma ejected from a localized system, presumably composed of an accretion disk encircling a compact object. This radiation is generally beamed in the polar directions and in some cases, it appears to have a spiral-like structure that could be explained if the central system itself precesses. In this work, we use the slim disk accretion model, presented by Popham et al. (1999), to studying the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by the precession of the accretion disk around a solar-mass Kerr black hole (KBH). For practical purposes, this model describes the central engine of a class of GRBs when some astrophysical constrains are fulfilled. The induced precession considered here is driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect, which results from the combination of viscous effects in such disks and the relativistic frame-dragging effect. We evaluate the feasibility of direct detection of the GWs computed for such a model and show that the precession of this kind of systems could be detected by gravitational wave observatories like DECIGO, ultimate-DECIGO, and BBO, with higher probability if such a class of sources are placed at distances less than 1 Mpc.

  13. Hawking radiation and covariant anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-15

    Generalizing the method of Wilczek and collaborators we provide a derivation of Hawking radiation from charged black holes using only covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies. The reliability and universality of the anomaly cancellation approach to Hawking radiation is also discussed.

  14. Trapping light by mimicking gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Sheng, Chong; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho; Nanjing Unversity Collaboration; Louisiana Tech University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    One of the most fascinating predictions of the theory of general relativity is the effect of gravitational lensing, the bending of light in close proximity to massive stellar objects. Recently, artificial optical materials have been proposed to study the various aspects of curved spacetimes, including light trapping and Hawking's radiation. However, the development of experiments 'toy' models that simulate gravitational lensing in curved spacetimes remains a challenge, especially for visible light. Here, by utilizing a microstructured optical waveguide around a microsphere, we propose to mimic curved spacetimes caused by gravity, with high precision. We experimentally demonstrate both far-field gravitational lensing effects and the critical phenomenon in close proximity to the photon sphere of astrophysical objects under hydrostatic equilibrium. The proposed microstructured waveguide can be used as an omnidirectional absorber, with potential light harvesting and microcavity applications. This work is published at Nature Photonics 2013, DOI: 10.1038/NPHOTON.2013.247.

  15. Trapping light by mimicking gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, C.; Liu, H.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, S. N.; Genov, D. A.

    2013-11-01

    One of the most fascinating predictions of the theory of general relativity is the effect of gravitational lensing, the bending of light in close proximity to massive stellar objects. Recently, artificial optical materials have been proposed to study the various aspects of curved spacetimes, including light trapping and Hawking radiation. However, the development of experimental `toy' models that simulate gravitational lensing in curved spacetimes remains a challenge, especially for visible light. Here, by utilizing a microstructured optical waveguide around a microsphere, we propose to mimic curved spacetimes caused by gravity, with high precision. We experimentally demonstrate both far-field gravitational lensing effects and the critical phenomenon in close proximity to the photon sphere of astrophysical objects under hydrostatic equilibrium. The proposed microstructured waveguide can be used as an omnidirectional absorber, with potential light harvesting and microcavity applications.

  16. Astronomical publications of Melbourne Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andropoulos, Jenny Ioanna

    2014-05-01

    During the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, four well-equipped government observatories were maintained in Australia - in Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. These institutions conducted astronomical observations, often in the course of providing a local time service, and they also collected and collated meteorological data. As well, some of these observatories were involved at times in geodetic surveying, geomagnetic recording, gravity measurements, seismology, tide recording and physical standards, so the term "observatory" was being used in a rather broad sense! Despite the international renown that once applied to Williamstown and Melbourne Observatories, relatively little has been written by modern-day scholars about astronomical activities at these observatories. This research is intended to rectify this situation to some extent by gathering, cataloguing and analysing the published astronomical output of the two Observatories to see what contributions they made to science and society. It also compares their contributions with those of Sydney, Adelaide and Perth Observatories. Overall, Williamstown and Melbourne Observatories produced a prodigious amount of material on astronomy in scientific and technical journals, in reports and in newspapers. The other observatories more or less did likewise, so no observatory of those studied markedly outperformed the others in the long term, especially when account is taken of their relative resourcing in staff and equipment.

  17. Portable coastal observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frye, Daniel; Butman, Bradford; Johnson, Mark; von der Heydt, Keith; Lerner, Steven

    2000-01-01

    Ocean observational science is in the midst of a paradigm shift from an expeditionary science centered on short research cruises and deployments of internally recording instruments to a sustained observational science where the ocean is monitored on a regular basis, much the way the atmosphere is monitored. While satellite remote sensing is one key way of meeting the challenge of real-time monitoring of large ocean regions, new technologies are required for in situ observations to measure conditions below the ocean surface and to measure ocean characteristics not observable from space. One method of making sustained observations in the coastal ocean is to install a fiber optic cable from shore to the area of interest. This approach has the advantage of providing power to offshore instruments and essentially unlimited bandwidth for data. The LEO-15 observatory offshore of New Jersey (yon Alt et al., 1997) and the planned Katama observatory offshore of Martha's Vineyard (Edson et al., 2000) use this approach. These sites, along with other cabled sites, will play an important role in coastal ocean science in the next decade. Cabled observatories, however, have two drawbacks that limit the number of sites that are likely to be installed. First, the cable and the cable installation are expensive and the shore station needed at the cable terminus is often in an environmentally sensitive area where competing interests must be resolved. Second, cabled sites are inherently limited geographically to sites within reach of the cable, so it is difficult to cover large areas of the coastal ocean.

  18. Towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    This chapter is meant to introduce the reader to the forthcoming network of second-generation interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, at a time when their construction is close to completion and there is the ambition to detect gravitational waves for the first time in the next few years and open the way to gravitational wave astronomy. The legacy of first-generation detectors is discussed before giving an overview of the technology challenges that have been faced to make advanced detectors possible. The various aspects outlined here are then discussed in more detail in the subsequent chapters of the book.

  19. NASA's Heliophysics System Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Steven

    2016-04-01

    NASA formulates and implements a national research program for understanding the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system and how these phenomena impact life and society. This research provides theory, data, and modeling development services to national and international space weather efforts utilizing a coordinated and complementary fleet of spacecraft, called the Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO), to understand the Sun and its interactions with Earth and the solar system, including space weather. This presentation will focus on NASA's role in space weather research and the contributions the agency continues to provide to the science of space weather, leveraging inter-agency and international collaborations for the benefit of society.

  20. The HAWC observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, Tyce; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a new very high energy water Cherenkov gamma ray telescope, now under construction at 4100 m altitude at Sierra Negra, Mexico. Due to its increased altitude, larger surface area and improved design, HAWC will be about 15 times more sensitive than its predecessor, Milagro. With its wide field of view and high duty factor, HAWC will be an excellent instrument for the studies of diffuse gamma ray emission, the high energy spectra of Galactic gamma ray sources, and transient emission from extragalactic objects such as GRBs and AGN, as well as surveying a large fraction of the VHE sky.

  1. On the possible gamma-ray burst-gravitational wave association in GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Bejger, M.; Charzyński, S.; Sukova, P.

    2017-02-01

    Data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor satellite observatory suggested that the recently discovered gravitational wave source, a pair of two coalescing black holes, was related to a gamma-ray burst. The observed high-energy electromagnetic radiation (above 50 keV) originated from a weak transient source and lasted for about 1 s. Its localization is consistent with the direction to GW150914. We speculate about the possible scenario for the formation of a gamma-ray burst accompanied by the gravitational-wave signal. Our model invokes a tight binary system consisting of a massive star and a black hole which leads to the triggering of a collapse of the star's nucleus, the formation of a second black hole, and finally to the binary black hole merger. For the most-likely configuration of the binary spin vectors with respect to the orbital angular momentum in the GW150914 event, the recoil speed (kick velocity) acquired by the final black hole through gravitational wave emission is of the order of a few hundred km/s and this might be sufficient to get it closer to the envelope of surrounding material and capture a small fraction of matter from the remnant of the host star. The gamma-ray burst is produced by the accretion of this remnant matter onto the final black hole. The moderate spin of the final black hole suggests that the gamma-ray burst jet is powered by weak neutrino emission rather than the Blandford-Znajek mechanism, and hence explains the low power available for the observed GRB signal.

  2. Gravitational mass attraction measurement for drag-free references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, Aaron J.

    Exciting new experiments in gravitational physics are among the proposed future space science missions around the world. Such future space science experiments include gravitational wave observatories, which require extraordinarily precise instruments for gravitational wave detection. In fact, future space-based gravitational wave observatories require the use of a drag free reference sensor, which is several orders of magnitude more precise than any drag free satellite launched to date. With the analysis methods and measurement techniques described in this work, there is one less challenge associated with achieving the high-precision drag-free satellite performance levels required by gravitational wave observatories. One disturbance critical to the drag-free performance is an acceleration from the mass attraction between the spacecraft and drag-free reference mass. A direct measurement of the gravitational mass attraction force is not easily performed. Historically for drag-free satellite design, the gravitational attraction properties were estimated by using idealized equations between a point mass and objects of regular geometric shape with homogeneous density. Stringent requirements are then placed on the density distribution and fabrication tolerances for the drag-free reference mass and satellite components in order to ensure that the allocated gravitational mass attraction disturbance budget is not exceeded due to the associated uncertainty in geometry and mass properties. Yet, the uncertainty associated with mass properties and geometry generate an unacceptable uncertainty in the mass attraction calculation, which make it difficult to meet the demanding drag-free performance requirements of future gravitational wave observatories. The density homogeneity and geometrical tolerances required to meet the overall drag-free performance can easily force the use of special materials or manufacturing processes, which are impractical or not feasible. The focus of

  3. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This discussion examines these gravitational patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. The focus is on recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by the space-based gravitational wave detector LISA.

  4. Space Detection of Gravitational Waves (lisa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. Neves; Buchman, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Danzmann, K.; Doles, R.; Fontana, G.; Hanso, J.; Hueller, M.; Sigurdsso, S.; Turneaure, J.; Ungarell, C.; Vecchi, A.; Vital, S.; Webe, W.

    2002-12-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed to observe gravitational waves from galactic and extra-galactic binary systems, including gravitational waves generated in the vicinity of the very massive black holes found in the centers of many galaxies. Acting as a giant Michelson interferometer the three spacecraft flying 5 million km apart will open the era of astronomy in the gravitational spectrum. We give an introduction to the mission and describe the status of selected experimental, theoretical, and planning LISA work, as reported at the Ninth Marcel Grossman Meeting in 2000 in Rome. We discuss the three areas of technology challenges facing the mission inertial sensors, micronewton thrusters, and picometer interferometry. We report on the progress in the development of free falling moving test-masses for LISA and for the related technology demonstration mission. We present simple formulas to evaluate the performance of the device as a function of the various design parameters, and we compare them with preliminary experimental results from a test prototype we are developing. Quantitative agreement is found. The gravitational radiation emitted during the final stages of coalescence of stellar mass compact objects with low massive black holes is a signal detectable by LISA. It will also provide the opportunity of measuring relativistic strong field effects. A brief discussion addresses the detection by LISA of gravitational waves generated by cataclysmic binary variables at frequencies below 1 mHz. Finally the prospects for cosmology work with LISA type antennas are being analyzed.

  5. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This booklet is devoted to NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory and is aimed at people interested in astronomy and BAO, pupils and students, BAO visitors and others. The booklet is made as a visiting card and presents concise and full information about BAO. A brief history of BAO, the biography of the great scientist Viktor Ambartsumian, brief biographies of 13 other deserved scientists formerly working at BAO (B.E. Markarian, G.A. Gurzadyan, L.V. Mirzoyan, M.A. Arakelian, et al.), information on BAO telescopes (2.6m, 1m Schmidt, etc.) and other scientific instruments, scientific library and photographic plate archive, Byurakan surveys (including the famous Markarian Survey included in the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register), all scientific meetings held in Byurakan, international scientific collaboration, data on full research staff of the Observatory, as well as former BAO researchers, who have moved to foreign institutions are given in the booklet. At the end, the list of the most important books published by Armenian astronomers and about them is given.

  6. Proposed Ultra-High Sensitivity High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Stephenson, Gary V.; Li, Fangyu

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the proposed improvement of a High-Frequency Relic Gravitational Wave (HFRGW) detector designed by Li, Baker, Fang, Stephenson and Chen in order to greatly improve its sensitivity. The improved detector is inspired by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory or LIGO, but is sensitive to the high-frequency end of the gravitational-wave spectrum. As described in prior papers it utilizes the Gertsenshtein effect, which introduces the conversion of gravitational waves to electromagnetic (EM) waves in the presence of a static magnetic field. Such a conversion, if it leads to photons moving in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the EM waves and the magnetic field, will allow for ultra-high sensitivity HFRGW detection. The use of sensitive microwave, single photon detectors such as a circuit QED and/or the Rydberg Atom Cavity Detector, or off-the-shelf detectors, could lead to such detection. When the EM-detection photons are focused at the microwave detectors by fractal-membrane reflectors sensitivity is also improved. Noise sources external to the HFRGW detector will be eliminated by placing a tight mosaic of superconducting tiles (e.g., YBCO) and/or fractal membranes on the interior surface of the detector's cryogenic containment vessel in order to provide a perfect Faraday cage. Internal thermal noise will be eliminated by means of a microwave absorbing (or reflecting) interior enclosure shaped to conform to a high-intensity continuous microwave Gaussian beam (GB), will reduce any background photon flux (BPF) noise radiated normal to the GB's axis. Such BPF will be further attenuated by a series of microwave absorbing baffles forming tunnels to the sensitive microwave detectors on each side of the GB and at right angles to the static magnetic field. A HFGW detector of bandwidth of 1 KHz to 10 KHz or less in the GHz band has been selected. It is concluded that the utilization of the new ultra-high-sensitivity microwave detectors

  7. Insights into the gravitational wave memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    A major breakthrough of General Relativity (GR) happened in 2015 with LIGO's first detection of gravitational waves. Typical sources for gravitational radiation are mergers of binary black holes, binary neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae. In these processes mass and momenta are radiated away in form of gravitational waves. GR predicts that these waves leave a footprint in the spacetime, that is they change the spacetime permanently, which results in a permanent displacement of test masses. This effect is called the memory. In this talk, I will explore the gravitational wave memory. We will see that there are two types of memory, one going back to Ya. B. Zel'dovich and A. G. Polnarev and one to D. Christodoulou. Then I will discuss recent work including my collaboration with D. Garfinkle, S.-T. Yau, P. Chen, focusing on how neutrinos or electromagnetic fields contribute to the memory effect, and work with D. Garfinkle and N. Yunes on cosmological memory. The author thanks NSF for support by grant DMS-1253149 to The University of Michigan.

  8. X ray timing observations and gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Wood, Kent S.

    1989-01-01

    Photon-rich x ray observations on bright compact galactic sources will make it possible to detect many fast processes that may occur in these systems on millisecond and submillisecond timescales. Many of these processes are of direct relevance to gravitational physics because they arise in regions of strong gravity near neutron stars and black holes where the dynamical timescales for compact objects of stellar mass are milliseconds. To date, such observations have been limited by the detector area and telemetry rates available. However, instruments such as the proposed X ray Large Array (XLA) would achieve collecting areas of about 100 sq m. This instrument has been described elsewhere (Wood and Michelson 1988) and was the subject of a recent prephase A feasibility study at Marshall Space Flight Center. Observations with an XLA class instrument will directly impact five primary areas of astrophysics research: the attempt to detect gravitational radiation, the study of black holes, the physics of mass accretion onto compact objects, the structure of neutron stars and nuclear matter, and the characterization of dark matter in the universe. Those observations are discussed that are most directly relevant to gravitational physics: the search for millisecond x ray pulsars that are potential sources of continuous gravitational radiation; and the use of x ray timing observations to probe the physical conditions in extreme relativistic regions of space near black holes, both stellar-sized and supermassive.

  9. Gravitational wave detection in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    Gravitational Wave (GW) detection in space is aimed at low frequency band (100nHz-100mHz) and middle frequency band (100mHz-10Hz). The science goals are the detection of GWs from (i) Supermassive Black Holes; (ii) Extreme-Mass-Ratio Black Hole Inspirals; (iii) Intermediate-Mass Black Holes; (iv) Galactic Compact Binaries and (v) Relic GW Background. In this paper, we present an overview on the sensitivity, orbit design, basic orbit configuration, angular resolution, orbit optimization, deployment, time-delay interferometry (TDI) and payload concept of the current proposed GW detectors in space under study. The detector proposals under study have arm length ranging from 1000km to 1.3 × 109km (8.6AU) including (a) Solar orbiting detectors — (ASTROD Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices (ASTROD-GW) optimized for GW detection), Big Bang Observer (BBO), DECi-hertz Interferometer GW Observatory (DECIGO), evolved LISA (e-LISA), Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), other LISA-type detectors such as ALIA, TAIJI etc. (in Earthlike solar orbits), and Super-ASTROD (in Jupiterlike solar orbits); and (b) Earth orbiting detectors — ASTROD-EM/LAGRANGE, GADFLI/GEOGRAWI/g-LISA, OMEGA and TIANQIN.

  10. Gravitational Lensing Illustration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulation of a gravitational lens moving against a background field of galaxy. The gravity of the mass of the foreground object warps space. This bends the light of background galaxies making them...

  11. Spacetime Symphony: APOD and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; Simonnet, Aurore; LIGO-Virgo Scientific Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In 1915, Albert Einstein published his General Theory of Relativity. In this theory, gravity is not a force, but a property of space and time in the presence of massive objects. A century later, on September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) received the first confirmed gravitational wave signals. Now known as GW150914, the event represents the coalescence of two distant black holes that were previously in mutual orbit. The LIGO-Virgo Scientific Collaboration planned a detailed social media strategy to publicize the February 11, 2016 press conference that announced this discovery. Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) was a major factor in disseminating the now iconic imagery that was developed, and the LVC worked closely with APOD to ensure that the secrecy would be maintained throughout the press embargo period. Due to the success of our efforts, we repeated the process for the AAS press conference that announced GW151226, the second confirmed gravitational wave event. We have also repurposed the APOD imagery for an online course for community college instructors, as well as in a poster that will be available through CPEPphysics.org (Contemporary Physics Education Project).

  12. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  13. Golden legacy from ESA's observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    'milestone number' of 1000 scientific papers was reached. Even now ISO's data archive remains a valuable source of new results. For example, some of the latest papers describe the detection of water in 'protostars', which are stars in the process of being born, and studies of numerous nearby galaxies. "Of course we were confident ISO was going to do very well, but its actual productivity has been far beyond our expectations. The publication rate does not even seem to have peaked yet! We expect many more results," Salama says. Note for editors ISO's data archive contains scientific data from about 30 000 observations. Astronomers from all over the world have downloaded almost eight times the equivalent of the entire scientific archive. As much as 35% of all ISO observations have already been published at least once in prestigious scientific journals. ESA is now preparing to continue its infrared investigation of the Universe. The next generation of infrared space observatories is already in the pipeline. ISO is to be followed by the NASA SIRTF observatory to be launched later this year. Then, in 2007, ESA will follow up the pioneering work of ISO with the Herschel Space Observatory, which will become the largest imaging telescope ever put into space. ISO The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was launched in 1995 and operated from November that year to May 1998, when it ran out of the coolant needed to keep its detectors working. At the time it was the most sensitive infrared satellite ever launched and made particularly important studies of the dusty regions of the Universe, where visible light telescopes can see nothing. ESA will reopen its examination of the infrared Universe when Herschel is launched in 2007. Herschel Herschel will be the largest space telescope when, in 2007, it is launched on an Ariane-5 rocket, together with ESA’s cosmology mission, Planck. Herschel’s 3.5-metre diameter mirror will collect longwave infrared radiation from some of the coolest and most

  14. The Gravitational-Wave Universe seen by Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingarelli, Chiara M. F.; International Pulsar Timing Array

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are a standard aspect of galaxy formation and evolution, and most (likely all) large galaxies contain supermassive black holes. As part of the merging process, the supermassive black holes should in-spiral together and eventually merge, generating a background of gravitational radiation in the nanohertz to microhertz regime. Processes in the early Universe such as relic gravitational waves and cosmic strings may also generate gravitational radiation in the same frequency band. An array of precisely timed pulsars spread across the sky can form a galactic-scale gravitational wave detector in the nanohertz band. I describe the current efforts to develop and extend the pulsar timing array concept, together with recent limits which have emerged from North American and international efforts to constrain astrophysical phenomena at the heart of supermassive black hole mergers.

  15. Dyadosphere formed in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, Remo; Xue Shesheng

    2008-10-10

    We first recall the concept of Dyadosphere (electron-positron-photon plasma around a formed black holes) and its motivation, and recall on (i) the Dirac process: annihilation of electron-positron pairs to photons; (ii) the Breit-Wheeler process: production of electron-positron pairs by photons with the energy larger than electron-positron mass threshold; the Sauter-Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian and rate for the process of electron-positron production in a constant electric field. We present a general formula for the pair-production rate in the semi-classical treatment of quantum mechanical tunneling. We also present in the Quantum Electro-Dynamics framework, the calculations of the Schwinger rate and effective Lagrangian for constant electromagnetic fields. We give a review on the electron-positron plasma oscillation in constant electric fields, and its interaction with photons leading to energy and number equipartition of photons, electrons and positrons. The possibility of creating an overcritical field in astrophysical condition is pointed out. We present the discussions and calculations on (i) energy extraction from gravitational collapse; (ii) the formation of Dyadosphere in gravitational collapsing process, and (iii) its hydrodynamical expansion in Reissner Nordstroem geometry. We calculate the spectrum and flux of photon radiation at the point of transparency, and make predictions for short Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  16. Gravitational Waves: Elusive Cosmic Messengers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest g ravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIG O, VIRGO, and GE0600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires t hat we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers ta ke place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate t hese waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to comp ute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could comple te even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situ ation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthro ughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applic ations in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysi cs.

  17. Black holes as gravitational atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Cenalo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, it was argued [A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1207.3123, A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1304.6483], via a delicate thought experiment, that it is not consistent to simultaneously require that (a) Hawking radiation is pure, (b) effective field theory is valid outside a stretched horizon and (c) infalling observers encounter nothing unusual as they cross the horizon. These are the three fundamental assumptions underlying Black Hole Complementarity and the authors proposed that the most conservative resolution of the paradox is that (c) is false and the infalling observer burns up at the horizon (the horizon acts as a "firewall"). However, the firewall violates the equivalence principle and breaks the CPT invariance of quantum gravity. This led Hawking to propose recently that gravitational collapse may not end up producing event horizons, although he did not give a mechanism for how this may happen. Here we will support Hawking's conclusion in a quantum gravitational model of dust collapse. We will show that continued collapse to a singularity can only be achieved by combining two independent and entire solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We interpret the paradox as simply forbidding such a combination. This leads naturally to a picture in which matter condenses on the apparent horizon during quantum collapse.

  18. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo A; Lasky, Paul D; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-11

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳10^{10}M_{⊙} can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  19. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.; Lasky, Paul D.; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳1010M⊙ can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  20. The path to a gravitational-wave detector in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Following the selection of the Gravitational Universe for the third large mission (L3) by ESA and NASA's interest in partnering with ESA, we are now about a dozen years away from the earliest possible launch of the first space-based observatory. The idea of such an observatory was first formulated about a dozen years after Gertsenshtein and Pustovoit in the USSR and later Weber and Weiss in the US voiced their ideas of using laser interferometer for ground-based gravitational wave observatories. The design of the L3 mission will likely follow the LISA design which was developed from the late 1990's until the original LISA project was terminated in 2011. The revised LISA mission will detect many mergers between massive and super-massive black holes out to large redshifts, will detect solar mass black holes years before they produce merger signals in ground-based observatories, will measure the distribution of compact galactic binaries and test general relativity in the strong relativistic regime with large signal to noise ratio. I will review the scientific motivation for LISA, present its status, and discuss the next steps towards its realization.

  1. LCOGT network observatory operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, Andrew; Hjelstrom, Annie; Boroson, Todd; Burleson, Ben; Conway, Patrick; De Vera, Jon; Elphick, Mark; Haworth, Brian; Rosing, Wayne; Saunders, Eric; Thomas, Doug; White, Gary; Willis, Mark; Walker, Zach

    2014-08-01

    We describe the operational capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network. We summarize our hardware and software for maintaining and monitoring network health. We focus on methodologies to utilize the automated system to monitor availability of sites, instruments and telescopes, to monitor performance, permit automatic recovery, and provide automatic error reporting. The same jTCS control system is used on telescopes of apertures 0.4m, 0.8m, 1m and 2m, and for multiple instruments on each. We describe our network operational model, including workloads, and illustrate our current tools, and operational performance indicators, including telemetry and metrics reporting from on-site reductions. The system was conceived and designed to establish effective, reliable autonomous operations, with automatic monitoring and recovery - minimizing human intervention while maintaining quality. We illustrate how far we have been able to achieve that.

  2. DSN Transient Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Monroe, R. M.; White, L. A.; Miro, C. Garcia; Levin, S. M.; Majid, W. A.; Soriano, M.

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) Transient Observatory (DTO) is a signal processing facility that can monitor up to four DSN downlink bands for astronomically interesting signals. The monitoring is done commensally with reception of deep space mission telemetry. The initial signal processing is done with two CASPERa ROACH1 boards, each handling one or two baseband signals. Each ROACH1 has a 10 GBe interface with a GPU-equipped Debian Linux workstation for additional processing. The initial science programs include monitoring Mars for electrostatic discharges, radio spectral lines, searches for fast radio bursts and pulsars and SETI. The facility will be available to the scientific community through a peer review process.

  3. Orbiting Carbon Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Human impact on the environment has produced measurable changes in the geological record since the late 1700s. Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 today may cause the global climate to depart for its natural behavior for many millenia. CO2 is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory goals are to help collect measurements of atmospheric CO2, answering questions such as why the atmospheric CO2 buildup varies annually, the roles of the oceans and land ecosystems in absorbing CO2, the roles of North American and Eurasian sinks and how these carbon sinks respond to climate change. The present carbon cycle, CO2 variability, and climate uncertainties due atmospheric CO2 uncertainties are highlighted in this presentation.

  4. On propagation of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain an equation for the propagation time of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe. The velocity of electromagnetic waves propagation depends on the velocity of the interstellar medium in the observer's frame of reference. Gravitational radiation interacts weakly with the substance, so electromagnetic and gravitational waves propagate from a remote astrophysical object to the terrestrial observer at different time. Gravitational waves registration enables the inverse problem solution - by the difference in arrival time of electromagnetic and gravitational-wave signal, we can determine the characteristics of the emitting area of the astrophysical object.

  5. Global geodetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Claude; Pearlman, Mike; Sarti, Pierguido

    2015-01-01

    Global geodetic observatories (GGO) play an increasingly important role both for scientific and societal applications, in particular for the maintenance and evolution of the reference frame and those applications that rely on the reference frame for their viability. The International Association of Geodesy (IAG), through the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), is fully involved in coordinating the development of these systems and ensuring their quality, perenniality and accessibility. This paper reviews the current role, basic concepts, and some of the critical issues associated with the GGOs, and advocates for their expansion to enhance co-location with other observing techniques (gravity, meteorology, etc). The historical perspective starts with the MERIT campaign, followed by the creation of international services (IERS, IGS, ILRS, IVS, IDS, etc). It provides a basic definition of observing systems and observatories and the build up of the international networks and the role of co-locations in geodesy and geosciences and multi-technique processing and data products. This paper gives special attention to the critical topic of local surveys and tie vectors among co-located systems in sites; the agreement of space geodetic solutions and the tie vectors now place one of the most significant limitations on the quality of integrated data products, most notably the ITRF. This topic focuses on survey techniques, extrapolation to instrument reference points, computation techniques, systematic biases, and alignment of the individual technique reference frames into ITRF. The paper also discusses the design, layout and implementation of network infrastructure, including the role of GGOS and the benefit that would be achieved with better standardization and international governance.

  6. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  7. Gauss-Bonnet gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this letter we study some variant forms of gravitational baryogenesis by using higher order terms containing the partial derivative of the Gauss-Bonnet scalar coupled to the baryonic current. This scenario extends the well known theory that uses a similar coupling between the Ricci scalar and the baryonic current. One appealing feature of the scenario we study is that the predicted baryon asymmetry during a radiation domination era is non-zero. We calculate the baryon to entropy ratio for the Gauss-Bonnet term and by using the observational constraints we investigate which are the allowed forms of the R + F (G) gravity controlling the evolution. Also we briefly discuss some alternative higher order terms that can generate a non-zero baryon asymmetry, even in the conformal invariance limit.

  8. Ancient "Observatories" - A Relevant Concept?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    It is quite common, when reading popular books on astronomy, to see a place referred to as "the oldest observatory in the world". In addition, numerous books on archaeoastronomy, of various levels of quality, frequently refer to the existence of "prehistoric" or "ancient" observatories when describing or citing monuments that were certainly not built with the primary purpose of observing the skies. Internet sources are also guilty of this practice. In this chapter, the different meanings of the word observatory will be analyzed, looking at how their significances can be easily confused or even interchanged. The proclaimed "ancient observatories" are a typical result of this situation. Finally, the relevance of the concept of the ancient observatory will be evaluated.

  9. Beyond concordance cosmology with magnification of gravitational-wave standard sirens.

    PubMed

    Camera, Stefano; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2013-04-12

    We show how future gravitational-wave detectors would be able to discriminate between the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmological model and up-to-date competing alternatives, e.g., dynamical dark energy (DE) models or modified gravity (MG) theories. Our method consists of using the weak-lensing magnification effect that affects a standard-siren signal because of its traveling through the Universe's large scale structure. As a demonstration, we present constraints on DE and MG from proposed gravitational-wave detectors, namely Einstein Telescope and DECI-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Big-Bang Observer.

  10. Beyond Concordance Cosmology with Magnification of Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, Stefano; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    We show how future gravitational-wave detectors would be able to discriminate between the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmological model and up-to-date competing alternatives, e.g., dynamical dark energy (DE) models or modified gravity (MG) theories. Our method consists of using the weak-lensing magnification effect that affects a standard-siren signal because of its traveling through the Universe’s large scale structure. As a demonstration, we present constraints on DE and MG from proposed gravitational-wave detectors, namely Einstein Telescope and DECI-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Big-Bang Observer.

  11. Astronomers Discover Six-Image Gravitational Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    -Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). "When we understand this system, we will have a much clearer picture of how galaxies are changed by being part of a bigger cluster of galaxies," he added. B1359+154 was discovered in 1999 by the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey, an international collaboration of astronomers who use radio telescopes to search the sky for gravitational lenses. Images made by the NSF's Very Large Array in New Mexico and by Britain's MERLIN radio telescope showed six objects suspected of being gravitational-lens images, but the results were inconclusive. Rusin and his team used the VLBA and HST in 1999 and 2000 to make more-detailed studies of B1359+154. The combination of data from the VLBA and HST convinced the astronomers that B1359+154 actually consists of six lensed images of a single background galaxy. The VLBA images were made from data collected during observations at a radio frequency of 1.7 GHz. "This is a great example of modern, multi-wavelength astronomy," said Rusin. "We need the radio telescopes to detect the gravitational lenses in the first place, then we need the visible-light information from Hubble to show us additional detail about the structure of the system." Armed with the combined VLBA and HST data about the positions and brightnesses of the six images of the background galaxy as well as the positions of the three intermediate galaxies, the astronomers did computer simulations to show how the gravitation of the three galaxies could produce the lens effect. They were able to design a computer model of the system that, in fact, produces the six images seen in B1359+154. "Our computer model certainly is not perfect, and we need to do more observations of this system to refine it, but we have clearly demonstrated that the three galaxies we see can produce a six-image lens system," said Martin Norbury, a graduate student at Jodrell Bank Observatory in Britain. "We think this work will give us an excellent tool for studying much-denser clusters of

  12. Gravitation, photons, clocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, L. B.; Selivanov, K. G.; Telegdi, V.

    1999-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the classical phenomenon of gravitational red shift, the decrease in the measured frequency of a photon moving away from a gravitating body (e.g., the Earth) of the two current interpretations, one is that at higher altitudes the frequency-measuring clocks (atoms or atomic nuclei) run faster, i.e., their characteristic frequencies are higher, while the photon frequency in a static gravitational field is independent of the altitude and so the photon only reddens relative to the clocks. The other approach is that the photon reddens because it loses the energy when overcoming the attraction of the gravitational field. This view, which is especially widespread in popular science literature, ascribes such notions as a "gravitational mass" and "potential energy" to the photon. Unfortunately, also scientific papers and serious books on the general theory of relativity often employ the second interpretation as a "graphic" illustration of mathematically immaculate results. The authors show that this approach is misleading and only serves to create confusion in a simple subject.

  13. Geographic and Annual Influences on Optical Follow-up of Gravitational Wave Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Varun; Bhalerao, Varun; Ravi, Aravind P.; Ghosh, Archisman; Bose, Sukanta

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effects of observatory location on the probability of discovering optical/infrared (OIR) counterparts of gravitational wave sources. We show that, for the LIGO–Virgo network, the odds of discovering OIR counterparts show some latitude dependence. A stronger effect is seen to arise from the timing of LIGO–Virgo observing runs during the year, with northern OIR observatories having a better chance of finding the counterparts in northern winters. Assuming identical technical capabilities, the tentative mid-2017 three-detector network observing run favors southern OIR observatories for the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts.

  14. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - Forces Unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    With Nuclear Quantum Gravitation, the Forces are plainly and coherently unified. This most certainly is the missing link in Newtonian Gravitation explaining clearly the internal workings based in the Atomic Nucleus. The gravitational force between two gravitating masses is because of alternating electromagnetic functions in nuclei in matter. The Cavendish Experiment - Demonstration clearly shows the Gravitational attraction between two masses, which is a force proportional to the Newtonian Mechanics. General Relativity fails this real, physical test. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 logical proofs and 21 more indications. It is Scientifically logical and is compatible with Quantum Mechanics and Newtonian Mechanics.

  15. Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory-Science Highlights for the First 8 Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the science highlights for the first 8 months of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory. Results from pulsars, flaring AGN, gamma ray bursts, diffuse radiation, LMC and electron spectrum are also presented.

  16. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewan, G. T.

    1992-04-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector is a 1000 ton heavy water (D2O) Cherenkov detector designed to study neutrinos from the sun and other astrophysical sources. The use of heavy water allows both electron neutrinos and all other types of neutrinos to be observed by three complementary reactions. The detector will be sensitive to the electron neutrino flux and energy spectrum shape and to the total neutrino flux irrespective of neutrino type. These measurements will provide information on both vacuum neutrino oscillations and matter-enhanced oscillations, the MSW effect. In the event of a supernova it will be very sensitive to muon and tau neutrinos as well as the electron neutrinos emitted in the initial burst, enabling sensitive mass measurements as well as providing details of the physics of stellar collapse. On behalf of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Collaboration : H.C . Evans, G.T . Ewan, H.W. Lee, J .R . Leslie, J .D. MacArthur, H .-B . Mak, A.B . McDonald, W. McLatchie, B.C . Robertson, B. Sur, P. Skensved (Queen's University) ; C.K . Hargrove, H. Mes, W.F. Davidson, D. Sinclair, 1 . Blevis, M. Shatkay (Centre for Research in Particle Physics) ; E.D. Earle, G.M. Milton, E. Bonvin, (Chalk River Laboratories); J .J . Simpson, P. Jagam, J . Law, J .-X . Wang (University of Guelph); E.D . Hallman, R.U. Haq (Laurentian University); A.L. Carter, D. Kessler, B.R . Hollebone (Carleton University); R. Schubank . C.E . Waltha m (University of British Columbia); R.T. Kouzes, M.M. Lowry, R.M. Key (Princeton University); E.W. Beier, W. Frati, M. Newcomer, R. Van Berg (University of Penn-sylvania), T.J . Bowles, P.J . Doe, S.R . Elliott, M.M. Fowler, R.G.H. Robertson, D.J . Vieira, J .B . Wilhelmy, J .F. Wilker-son, J .M. Wouters (Los Alamos National Laboratory) ; E. Norman, K. Lesko, A. Smith, R. Fulton, R. Stokstad (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), N.W. Tanner, N. JCIILY, P. Trent, J . Barton, D.L . Wark (University of Oxford).

  17. Circular polarization of primordial gravitational waves in string-inspired inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Masaki; Soda, Jiro; Kanno, Sugumi

    2008-01-15

    We study a mechanism to produce the circular polarization of primordial gravitational waves. The circular polarization is generated during the superinflation driven by the Gauss-Bonnet term in the string-inspired cosmology. The instability in the tensor mode caused by the Gauss-Bonnet term and the parity violation due to the gravitational Chern-Simons term are the essential ingredients of the mechanism. We also discuss detectability of the produced circular polarization of gravitational waves. It turns out that the simple model of single-field inflation contradicts cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose a two-field inflation model. In this two-field model, the circular polarization of gravitational waves is created in the frequency range designed by the big-bang observer (BBO) or the deci-hertz gravitational-wave observatory (DECIGO)

  18. Breeding gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesenborgs, J.; de Rijcke, S.; Dejonghe, H.; Bekaert, P.

    2011-03-01

    Gravitational lenses are a spectacular astrophysical phenomenon, a cosmic mirage caused by the gravitational deflection of light in which multiple images of a same background object can be seen. Their beauty is only exceeded by their usefulness, as the gravitational lens effect is a direct probe of the total mass of the deflecting object. Furthermore, since the image configuration arising from the gravitational lens effect depends on the exact gravitational potential of the deflector, it even holds the promise of learning about the distribution of the mass. In this presentation, a method for extracting the information encoded in the images and reconstructing the mass distribution is presented. Being a non-parametric method, it avoids making a priori assumptions about the shape of the mass distribution. At the core of the procedure lies a genetic algorithm, an optimization strategy inspired by Darwin's principle of ``survival of the fittest''. One only needs to specify a criterion to decide if one particular trial solution is deemed better than another, and the genetic algorithm will ``breed'' appropriate solutions to the problem. In a similar way, one can create a multi-objective genetic algorithm, capable of optimizing several fitness criteria at the same time. This provides a very flexible way to incorporate all the available information in the gravitational lens system: not only the positions and shapes of the multiple images are used, but also the so-called ``null space'', i.e. the area in which no such images can be seen. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated using simulated data, which allows one to compare the reconstruction to the true mass distribution.

  19. Relationship between Hawking Radiation and Gravitational Anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sean P.; Wilczek, Frank

    2005-07-01

    We show that in order to avoid a breakdown of general covariance at the quantum level the total flux in each outgoing partial wave of a quantum field in a black hole background must be equal to that of a (1+1)-dimensional blackbody at the Hawking temperature.

  20. Non-gravitational perturbations and satellite geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, A.; Nobill, A.M.; Farinella, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the basic ideas of the physics of non-gravitational perturbations and the mathematics required to compute their orbital effects. It conveys the relevance of the different problems that must be solved to achieve a given level of accuracy in orbit determination and in recovery of geophysically significant parameters. Selected Contents are: Orders of Magnitude of the Perturbing Forces, Tides and Apparent Forces, Tools from Celestial Mechanics, Solar Radiation Pressure-Direct Effects: Satellite-Solar Radiation Interaction, Long-Term Effects on Semi-Major Axis, Radiation Pressure-Indirect Effects: Earth-Reflected Radiation Pressure, Anisotropic Thermal Emission, Drag: Orbital Perturbations by a Drag-Like Force, and Charged Particle Drag.

  1. Klimovskaya: A new geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Sidorov, R. V.; Krasnoperov, R. I.; Grudnev, A. A.; Khokhlov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    In 2011 Geophysical Center RAS (GC RAS) began to deploy the Klimovskaya geomagnetic observatory in the south of Arkhangelsk region on the territory of the Institute of Physiology of Natural Adaptations, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPNA UB RAS). The construction works followed the complex of preparatory measures taken in order to confirm that the observatory can be constructed on this territory and to select the optimal configuration of observatory structures. The observatory equipping stages are described in detail, the technological and design solutions are described, and the first results of the registered data quality control are presented. It has been concluded that Klimovskaya observatory can be included in INTERMAGNET network. The observatory can be used to monitor and estimate geomagnetic activity, because it is located at high latitudes and provides data in a timely manner to the scientific community via the web-site of the Russian-Ukrainian Geomagnetic Data Center. The role of ground observatories such as Klimovskaya remains critical for long-term observations of secular variation and for complex monitoring of the geomagnetic field in combination with low-orbiting satellite data.

  2. The Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is the first Space Weather Mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. SDO's main goal is to understand, driving towards a predictive capability, those solar variations that influence life on Earth and humanity's technological systems. The past decade has seen an increasing emphasis on understanding the entire Sun, from the nuclear reactions at the core to the development and loss of magnetic loops in the corona. SDO's three science investigations (HMI, AIA, and EVE) will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. SDO will return full-disk Dopplergrams, full-disk vector magnetograms, full-disk images at nine EIUV wavelengths, and EUV spectral irradiances, all taken at a rapid cadence. This means you can 'observe the database' to study events, but we can also move forward in producing quantitative models of what the Sun is doing today. SDO is scheduled to launch in 2008 on an Atlas V rocket from the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite will fly in a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit about the longitude of New Mexico, where a dedicated Ka-band ground station will receive the 150 Mbps data flow. How SDO data will transform the study of the Sun and its affect on Space Weather studies will be discussed.

  3. 10 meter airborne observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Ritter, Joseph M.

    2008-07-01

    Inside an aircraft fuselage there is little room for the mass of all the instrumentation of a ground-based observatory much less a primary objective aperture at the scale of 10 meters. We have proposed a solution that uses a primary objective grating (POG) which matches the considerable length of the aircraft, approximately 10 meters, and conforms to aircraft aerodynamics. Light collected by the POG is diffracted at an angle of grazing exodus inside the aircraft where it is disambiguated by an optical train that fits within to the interior tunnel. Inside the aircraft, light is focused by a parabolic mirror onto a spectrograph slit. The design has a special benefit in that all objects in the field-of-view of the free spectral range of the POG can have their spectra taken as the aircraft changes orientation. We suggest flight planes that will improve integration times, angular resolution and spectral resolution to acquire targets of high stellar magnitudes or alternatively increase the number of sources acquired per flight at the cost of sensitivity.

  4. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Johanna; HAWC Collaboration; College of Idaho; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To increase the effective area and sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory to gamma-ray photons with energies higher than 10 TeV, we are building 350 smaller outrigger tanks around the main array of 300 existing tanks. HAWC detects cascades of charged particles (``extensive air showers'') created by TeV gamma rays hitting the atmosphere. Increasing the size of the array will improve the sensitivity of the array by a factor of 2 to 4 above 10 TeV, allowing for more accurate gamma-ray origin reconstruction and energy estimation. Building the outrigger array requires carefully calibrated equipment, including PMTs and high voltage signal cables of the correct length. Origin reconstruction relies on precise signal timing, so the signal cables' lengths were standardized so that the signal transit time varied by less than 5 ns. Energy estimation depends on accurate photon counts from each tank, so the PMTs were calibrated with a laser and filter wheels to give the PMTs a known amount of light.

  5. Gravitational-Wave Detection (ii). Current Gravitational Wave Detector Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2005-11-01

    The workshop session C1ii was focused on the results of recent operating detectors. 10 speakers presented the latest results of each experiments: ALLEGRO, GEO, LIGO, TAMA and VIRGO experiments. There were reports about searches for gravitational waves in analysis of observation data. The results are of no detection of gravitational waves, but observational upper-limits of gravitational waves are improved.

  6. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  7. Probing gravitational dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jing; He, Hong-Jian

    2015-03-27

    So far all evidences of dark matter (DM) come from astrophysical and cosmological observations, due to the gravitational interactions of DM. It is possible that the true DM particle in the universe joins gravitational interactions only, but nothing else. Such a Gravitational DM (GDM) may act as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), which is conceptually simple and attractive. In this work, we explore this direction by constructing the simplest scalar GDM particle χ{sub s}. It is a ℤ{sub 2} odd singlet under the standard model (SM) gauge group, and naturally joins the unique dimension-4 interaction with Ricci curvature, ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, where ξ{sub s} is the dimensionless nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that this gravitational interaction ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, together with Higgs-curvature nonminimal coupling term ξ{sub h}H{sup †}HR, induces effective couplings between χ{sub s}{sup 2} and SM fields, and can account for the observed DM thermal relic abundance. We analyze the annihilation cross sections of GDM particles and derive the viable parameter space for realizing the DM thermal relic density. We further study the direct/indirect detections and the collider signatures of such a scalar GDM. These turn out to be highly predictive and testable.

  8. Gravitational waves from technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Kouvaris, Chris

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the production and possible detection of gravitational waves stemming from the electroweak phase transition in the early universe in models of minimal walking technicolor. In particular we discuss the two possible scenarios in which one has only one electroweak phase transition and the case in which the technicolor dynamics allows for multiple phase transitions.

  9. Research on gravitational physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Dahl, A. O.

    1974-01-01

    The topic of gravitational plant physiology was studied through aspects of plant development (in ARABIDOPSIS) and of behavior (in HELIANTHUS) as these were affected by altered g experience. The effect of increased g levels on stem polarity (in COLEUS) was also examined.

  10. Locating gravitational potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2017-01-01

    Where does gravitational potential energy reside when a ball is in the air? The perfectly correct answer is that it is located in the ball-Earth system. Still, mechanical energy conservation problems are routinely solved by assigning a potential energy to the ball alone. Provided here is a proof that such an assignment introduces only an entirely undetectable error.

  11. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10(-5) - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  12. Gravitational ionization: a chaotic net in the Kepler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.; Retzloff, D. G.

    1997-03-01

    The long-term nonlinear dynamics of a Keplerian binary system under the combined influences of gravitational radiation damping and external tidal perturbations is analysed. Gravitational radiation reaction leads the binary system towards eventual collapse, while the external periodic perturbations could lead to the ionization of the system via Arnold diffusion. When these two opposing tendencies nearly balance each other, interesting chaotic behaviour occurs which is briefly studied in this paper. It is possible to show that periodic orbits can exist in this system for sufficiently small damping. Moreover, we employ the method of averaging to investigate the phenomenon of capture into resonance.

  13. Islamic Astronomical Instruments and Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, Tofigh

    This chapter is a brief survey of astronomical instruments being used and developed in Islamic territories from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries as well as a concise account of major observatories and observational programs in this period.

  14. The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George; Kessler, Martin F.

    1995-01-01

    ISO, scheduled to launch in 1995, will carry into orbit the most sophisticated infrared observatory of the decade. Overviews of the mission, instrument payload and scientific program are given, along with a comparison of the strengths of ISO and SOFIA.

  15. The Russian Virtual Observatory Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2005-12-01

    We describe the Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO), a prestigious international project sponsored by the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS). In 2001, the RAS Scientific Council on Astronomy included this project in a list of the most important international projects of the RAS. Its main goal to create and develop the RVO, intended to provide Russian astronomers with direct and effective access to worldwide astronomical data resources. The RVO is one component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO), a system in which vast astronomical archives and databases around the world, together with analysis tools and computational services, are linked together into an integrated facility. The IVO unites all important national and international projects to create virtual observatories, coordinated by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance. The RVO is one of the organizers and an important participant of the IVO Alliance.

  16. Haystack Observatory Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudoin, Chris; Corey, Brian; Niell, Arthur; Cappallo, Roger; Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Technology development at MIT Haystack Observatory were focused on four areas in 2012: VGOS developments at GGAO; Digital backend developments and workshop; RFI compatibility at VLBI stations; Mark 6 VLBI data system development.

  17. Status of the SOFIA Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    The SOFIA observatory has been in routine science operations since returning in January from a 6 month-long heavy maintenance period for the aircraft and the telescope assembly. These operations include a successful 6 week deployment to the Southern hemisphere. This presentation will provide an update to the current operational status of the SOFIA observatory, concentrating on the improvements and upgrades that have been implemented since the heavy maintenance period.

  18. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  19. Data Analysis Technologies to Reduce Risk in Future Gravitational-Wave Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, Tyson

    The existence of gravitational waves has at last been confirmed by the LIGO/Virgo discovery of a binary black hole merger, heralding the beginning of a new fields of research in observational astronomy, astrophysics, and relativity research. the LISA Pathfinder mission has begun collecting science data, paving the way for space-based gravitational wave measurement. Gravitational wave science will reach its full potential with a space-based observatory able to access mHz frequencies. The proposed work will investigate how develop crucial data analysis infrastructure for a future space mission. The three key themes of the proposal are (i) to incorporate lessons learned from LISA Pathfinder into our understanding of a GW observatories performance, (ii) develop data analysis mcethods for inter-spacecraft ranging critical to achieving the measurement precision needed for GW detection, and (iii) explore how known sources in the mHz band can be used as calibration sources.

  20. Sofia Observatory Performance and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temi, Pasquale; Miller, Walter; Dunham, Edward; McLean, Ian; Wolf, Jurgen; Becklin, Eric; Bida, Tom; Brewster, Rick; Casey, Sean; Collins, Peter; Jakob, Holger; Killebrew, Jana; Lampater, Ulrich; Mandushev, Georgi; Marcum, Pamela; Meyer, Allan; Pfueller, Enrico; Reinacher, Andreas; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Savage, Maureen; Teufel, Stefan; Wiedemann, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently concluded a set of engineering flights for Observatory performance evaluation. These in-flight opportunities have been viewed as a first comprehensive assessment of the Observatory's performance and will be used to address the development activity that is planned for 2012, as well as to identify additional Observatory upgrades. A series of 8 SOFIA Characterization And Integration (SCAI) flights have been conducted from June to December 2011. The HIPO science instrument in conjunction with the DSI Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC) have been used to evaluate pointing stability, including the image motion due to rigid-body and flexible-body telescope modes as well as possible aero-optical image motion. We report on recent improvements in pointing stability by using an Active Mass Damper system installed on Telescope Assembly. Measurements and characterization of the shear layer and cavity seeing, as well as image quality evaluation as a function of wavelength have been performed using the HIPO+FLITECAM Science Instrument configuration (FLIPO). A number of additional tests and measurements have targeted basic Observatory capabilities and requirements including, but not limited to, pointing accuracy, chopper evaluation and imager sensitivity. SCAI activities included in-flight partial Science Instrument commissioning prior to the use of the instruments as measuring engines. This paper reports on the data collected during the SCAI flights and presents current SOFIA Observatory performance and characterization.

  1. SOFIA observatory performance and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temi, Pasquale; Marcum, Pamela M.; Miller, Walter E.; Dunham, Edward W.; McLean, Ian S.; Wolf, Jurgen; Becklin, Eric E.; Bida, Thomas A.; Brewster, Rick; Casey, Sean C.; Collins, Peter L.; Horner, Scott D.; Jakob, Holger; Jensen, Stephen C.; Killebrew, Jana L.; Lampater, Ulrich; Mandushev, Georgi I.; Meyer, Allen W.; Pfueller, Enrico; Reinacher, Andreas; Rho, Jeonghee; Roellig, Thomas L.; Savage, Maureen L.; Smith, Erin C.; Teufel, Stefan; Wiedemann, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently concluded a set of engineering flights for Observatory performance evaluation. These in-flight opportunities have been viewed as a first comprehensive assessment of the Observatory's performance and will be used to address the development activity that is planned for 2012, as well as to identify additional Observatory upgrades. A series of 8 SOFIA Characterization And Integration flights have been conducted from June to December 2011. The HIPO science instrument in conjunction with the DSI Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC) have been used to evaluate pointing stability, including the image motion due to rigid-body and flexible-body telescope modes as well as possible aero-optical image motion. We report on recent improvements in pointing stability by using an Active Mass Damper system installed on Telescope Assembly. Measurements and characterization of the shear layer and cavity seeing, as well as image quality evaluation as a function of wavelength have been performed using the HIPO+FLITECAM Science Instrument conguration (FLIPO). A number of additional tests and measurements have targeted basic Observatory capabilities and requirements including, but not limited to, pointing accuracy, chopper evaluation and imager sensitivity. This paper reports on the data collected during these flights and presents current SOFIA Observatory performance and characterization.

  2. Self-gravitating branes again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofinas, Georgios; Irakleidou, Maria

    2014-03-01

    We raise on theoretical grounds the question of the physical relevance of Israel matching conditions and their generalizations to higher codimensions, the standard cornerstone of the braneworld and other membrane scenarios. Our reasoning is based on the incapability of the conventional matching conditions to accept the Nambu-Goto probe limit, the inconsistency of codimension-2 and -3 classical defects for D=4 and the probable inconsistency of high enough codimensional defects for any D since there is no high enough Lovelock density to support them. We propose alternative matching conditions which seem to overcome the previous puzzles. Instead of varying the brane-bulk action with respect to the bulk metric at the brane position, we vary with respect to the brane embedding fields so that the gravitational backreaction is included ("gravitating Nambu-Goto matching conditions"). Here, we consider in detail the case of a codimension-2 brane in 6-dim Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, prove its consistency for an axially symmetric cosmological configuration and show that the theory possesses richer structure compared to the standard theory. The cosmologies found have the Friedmann behavior and extra correction terms. For a radiation brane one solution avoids a cosmological singularity and undergoes accelerated expansion near the minimum scale factor. In the presence of an induced gravity term, there naturally appears in the theory the effective cosmological constant scale λ /(M64rc2), which for a brane tension λ ˜M64 (e.g. TeV4) and rc˜H0-1 gives the observed value of the cosmological constant.

  3. eLISA and the Gravitational Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-08-01

    The last century has seen enormous progress in our understanding of the Universe. We know the life cycles of stars, the structure of galaxies, the remnants of the big bang, and have a general understanding of how the Universe evolved. We have come remarkably far using electromagnetic radiation as our tool for observing the Universe. However, gravity is the engine behind many of the processes in the Universe, and much of its action is dark. Opening a gravitational window on the Universe will let us go further than any alternative. Gravity has its own messenger: Gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime. They travel essentially undisturbed and let us peer deep into the formation of the first seed black holes, exploring redshifts as large as z ~ 20, prior to the epoch of cosmic re-ionisation. Exquisite and unprecedented measurements of black hole masses and spins will make it possible to trace the history of black holes across all stages of galaxy evolution, and at the same time constrain any deviation from the Kerr metric of General Relativity. eLISA will be the first ever mission to study the entire Universe with gravitational waves. eLISA is an all-sky monitor and will offer a wide view of a dynamic cosmos using gravitational waves as new and unique messengers to unveil The Gravitational Universe. It provides the closest ever view of the early processes at TeV energies, has guaranteed sources in the form of verification binaries in the Milky Way, and can probe the entire Universe, from its smallest scales around singularities and black holes, all the way to cosmological dimensions.

  4. Superconducting Antenna Concept for Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulian, A.; Foreman, J.; Nikoghosyan, V.; Nussinov, S.; Sica, L.; Tollaksen, J.

    The most advanced contemporary efforts and concepts for registering gravitational waves are focused on measuring tiny deviations in large arm (kilometers in case of LIGO and thousands of kilometers in case of LISA) interferometers via photons. In this report we discuss a concept for the detection of gravitational waves using an antenna comprised of superconducting electrons (Cooper pairs) moving in an ionic lattice. The major challenge in this approach is that the tidal action of the gravitational waves is extremely weak compared with electromagnetic forces. Any motion caused by gravitational waves, which violates charge neutrality, will be impeded by Coulomb forces acting on the charge carriers (Coulomb blockade) in metals, as well as in superconductors. We discuss a design, which avoids the effects of Coulomb blockade. It exploits two different superconducting materials used in a form of thin wires -"spaghetti." The spaghetti will have a diameter comparable to the London penetration depth, and length of about 1-10 meters. To achieve competitive sensitivity, the antenna would require billions of spaghettis, which calls for a challenging manufacturing technology. If successfully materialized, the response of the antenna to the known highly periodic sources of gravitational radiation, such as the Pulsar in Crab Nebula will result in an output current, detectable by superconducting electronics. The antenna will require deep (0.3K) cryogenic cooling and magnetic shielding. This design may be a viable successor to LISA and LIGO concepts, having the prospect of higher sensitivity, much smaller size and directional selectivity. This concept of compact antenna may benefit also terrestrial gradiometry.

  5. Neutron interference in the gravitational field of a ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Robert D.; Mallett, Ronald L.

    2015-07-01

    The neutron split-beam interferometer has proven to be particularly useful in measuring Newtonian gravitational effects such as those studied by Colella, Overhauser, and Werner (COW). The development of the ring laser has led to numerous applications in many areas of physics including a recent general relativistic prediction of frame dragging in the gravitational field produced by the electromagnetic radiation in a ring laser. This paper introduces a new general technique based on a canonical transformation of the Dirac equation for the gravitational field of a general linearized spacetime. Using this technique it is shown that there is a phase shift in the interference of two neutron beams due to the frame-dragging nature of the gravitational field of a ring laser.

  6. Black Hole Kicks as New Gravitational Wave Observables.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as ∼500  km s^{-1}, which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  7. Pulsar timing arrays: closing in on low- frequency gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Just like electromagnetic radiation, gravitational waves come in a wide spectrum of frequencies. Different frequencies give us access to different physical information about our universe. By taking advantage of the phenomenal stability of the spin rate of millisecond pulsars, pulsar timing arrays will allow us to detect gravitational waves in the nanohertz band. The most likely source in this band is supermassive black hole binaries, formed when galaxies merge, and so the detection of these gravitational waves gives us a new tool to learn about the merger history of galaxies and the environment in galactic cores. I will discuss the exciting astrophysics we can learn using pulsar timing arrays, as well as the prospects and expected timeline for gravitational wave detection in this new frequency regime.

  8. Gravitation and modern cosmology - The cosmological constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichichi, Antonino; de Sabbata, Venzo; Sanchez, Norma

    An updated version of different approaches to the cosmological constant problem discussed at a symposium in honor of Peter Gabriel Bergmann's 75th birthday, that took place in Erice on 17-20 September 1990, is presented. Topics addressed include an effective action model for the cosmological constant revisited; torsion, quantum effects, and the problem of cosmological constant; variations of constants and exact solutions in multidimensional gravity; null surface canonical formalism; qualitative cosmology; and the gravitational field of an arbitrary axisymmetric mass with a magnetic dipole moment. Attention is also given to a simple model of the universe without singularities; string theory and quantization of gravity; and velocity of propagation of gravitational radiation, mass of the gravitation, range of the gravitational force, and the cosmological constant.

  9. Using Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Daniel E.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2005-08-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive binary black hole (BBH) in-spirals are potentially powerful standard sirens (the GW analog to standard candles; see work of B. Schutz). Because these systems are well modeled, the space-based GW observatory LISA will be able to measure the luminosity distance (but not the redshift) to some distant massive BBH systems with 1%-10% accuracy. This accuracy is largely limited by pointing error: GW sources are generally poorly localized on the sky. Localizing the binary independently (e.g., through association with an electromagnetic counterpart) greatly reduces this positional error. An electromagnetic counterpart may also allow determination of the event's redshift. In this case, BBH coalescence would constitute an extremely precise (better than 1%) standard candle visible to high redshift. In practice, gravitational lensing degrades this precision, although the candle remains precise enough to provide useful information about the distance-redshift relation. Even if very rare, these GW standard sirens would complement, and increase confidence in, other standard candles.

  10. Two 18th Century Observatories of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambleton, Robert

    A visit to the two major observatories of Ireland, Armagh Observatory in Northern Ireland, and Dunsink Observatory in Dublin. Mentioned are Herschel, Thomas Grubb, Thomas Jones transit instrument, Howard Grubb, Kew Observatory, John Arnold & Sons clocks, Birr Castle, and the Earl of Rosse.

  11. The Carl Sagan solar and stellar observatories as remote observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo-Morales, J.; Loera-Gonzalez, P.

    In this work we summarize recent efforts made by the University of Sonora, with the goal of expanding the capability for remote operation of the Carl Sagan Solar and Stellar Observatories, as well as the first steps that have been taken in order to achieve autonomous robotic operation in the near future. The solar observatory was established in 2007 on the university campus by our late colleague A. Sánchez-Ibarra. It consists of four solar telescopes mounted on a single equatorial mount. On the other hand, the stellar observatory, which saw the first light on 16 February 2010, is located 21 km away from Hermosillo, Sonora at the site of the School of Agriculture of the University of Sonora. Both observatories can now be remotely controlled, and to some extent are able to operate autonomously. In this paper we discuss how this has been accomplished in terms of the use of software as well as the instruments under control. We also briefly discuss the main scientific and educational objectives, the future plans to improve the control software and to construct an autonomous observatory on a mountain site, as well as the opportunities for collaborations.

  12. Wired by Weber - The story of the first searcher and searches for gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2017-02-01

    Joseph Weber started thinking about possibilities for detecting gravitational waves or radiation in about 1955. He designed, built, and operated the first detectors, from 1965 until his death in 2000. This paper includes discussions of his life, earlier work on chemical kinetics and what is now called quantum electronics, his published papers, pioneering work on gravitational waves, and its aftermath, both scientific and personal.

  13. Overview of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (originally called the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - AXAF) is the X-Ray component of NASA's "Great Observatory" Program. Chandra is a NASA facility that provides scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to scientific proposals for its use. The Observatory is the product of the efforts of many organizations in the United States and Europe. The Great Observatories also include the Hubble Space Telescope for space-based observations of astronomical objects primarily in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the now defunct Compton Gamma- Ray Observatory that was designed to observe gamma-ray emission from astronomical objects, and the soon-to-be-launched Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (hereafter CXO) is sensitive to X-rays in the energy range from below 0.1 to above 10.0 keV corresponding to wavelengths from 12 to 0.12 nanometers. The relationship among the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, sorted by characteristic temperature and the corresponding wavelength, is illustrated. The German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen discovered what he thought was a new form of radiation in 1895. He called it X-radiation to summarize its properties. The radiation had the ability to pass through many materials that easily absorb visible light and to free electrons from atoms. We now know that X-rays are nothing more than light (electromagnetic radiation) but at high energies. Light has been given many names: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, X-ray and gamma radiation are all different forms. Radio waves are composed of low energy particles of light (photons). Optical photons - the only photons perceived by the human eye - are a million times more energetic than the typical radio photon, whereas the energies of X-ray photons range from hundreds to thousands of times higher than that of optical photons. Very low temperature systems

  14. Gravitational wave astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, L. S.

    Astronomers rely on a multiplicity of observational perspectives in order to infer the nature of the Universe. Progress in astronomy has historically been associated with new or improved observational perspectives. Gravitational wave detectors now under construction will provide us with a perspective on the Universe fundamentally different from any we have come to know. With this new perspective comes the hope of new insights and understanding, not just of exotic astrophysical processes, but of "bread-and-butter" astrophysics: e.g., stars and stellar evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, neutron star structure, and cosmology. In this report the author discusses briefly a small subset of the areas of conventional, "bread-and-butter" astrophysics where we can reasonably hope that gravitational wave observations will provide us with valuable new insights and understandings.

  15. Self-gravitating skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Canfora, Fabrizio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    A self-gravitating Skyrmion is an analytic and globally regular solution of the Einstein-Skyrme system with nonvanishing topological charge. The spacetime is the direct product R × S3 and the Skyrmion is the self-gravitating generalization of the static hedgehog solution of Manton and Ruback. This solution can be promoted to a dynamical one in which the spacetime is a cosmology of the Bianchi type-IX and, through an analytic continuation, it can also be turned into a transversable asymptotically AdS Lorentzian wormhole. The stress-energy of this wormhole satisfies physically realistic energy conditions and the only “exotic matter” required by it is a negative cosmological constant.

  16. Gravitational properties of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; Nieto, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Quantum gravity is at the forefront of modern particle physics, yet there are no direct tests, for antimatter, of even the principle of equivalence. We note that modern descriptions of gravity, such as fibre bundles and higher dimensional spacetimes, allow violations of the commonly stated form of the principle of equivalence, and of CPT. We review both indirect arguments and experimental tests of the expected gravitational properties of CPT-conjugate states. We conclude that a direct experimental test of the gravitational properties of antimatter, at the 1% (or better) level, would be of great value. We identify some experimental reasons which make the antiproton a prime candidate for this test, and we strongly urge that such an experiment be done at LEAR. 21 references.

  17. A gravitational puzzle.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Robert R

    2011-12-28

    The challenge to understand the physical origin of the cosmic acceleration is framed as a problem of gravitation. Specifically, does the relationship between stress-energy and space-time curvature differ on large scales from the predictions of general relativity. In this article, we describe efforts to model and test a generalized relationship between the matter and the metric using cosmological observations. Late-time tracers of large-scale structure, including the cosmic microwave background, weak gravitational lensing, and clustering are shown to provide good tests of the proposed solution. Current data are very close to proving a critical test, leaving only a small window in parameter space in the case that the generalized relationship is scale free above galactic scales.

  18. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  19. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  20. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2004-01-01

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose–Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate pv = -ρv and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness ℓ of fluid with equation of state p = +ρ, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order kBℓMc/, instead of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula, SBH = 4πkBGM2/c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  1. Undulator Gravitational Deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.

    2005-01-31

    This note estimates distortions imposed by gravity on LCLS undulator strong-backs. Because of the strongback's asymmetric cross section, gravitational forces cause both torsion as well as simple bending. The superposition of these two effects yields a 4.4 {micro}m maximum deflection and a 0.16 milli radian rotation of the undulator axis. The choice of titanium is compared to aluminum.

  2. Gravitational Repulsion of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2012-03-01

    Plasma redshift explains the cosmological redshift, the redshift of stars and galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, the cosmic X-ray background, the observed redshift relation for magnitude and surface-brightness for supernovae, the solar redshift, the transition zone for the solar corona, the high temperatures of the solar corona. Plasma redshift makes it clear that the optical solar lines are not gravitationally redshifted when observed on Earth. Instead their gravitational redshifts in the Sun are reversed, as the photons travel from the Sun to the Earth. This means that the photons are repelled and not attracted by the gravitational field. There is, therefore, no need for Einstein's Lambda for explaining the static Universe. When the matter concentrates and falls towards the center of galaxies, it becomes so hot that it disintegrates matter to reform primordial like matter. In this way the universe can renew itself forever. This is all based on conventional physics, using only more accurate physics and calculations than those usually used. There is no need for Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, nor Black Holes for explaining the everlasting Universe.

  3. Retarded gravitation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, C. K.

    2012-10-01

    We propose a Lorentz-covariant theory of gravity, and explain its theoretical origins in the problem of time in Newtonian physics. In this retarded gravitation theory (RGT), the gravitational force depends upon both retarded position and velocity, and the equations of motion are time-asymmetric retarded functional differential equations. We explicitly solve these equations, under simplifying assumptions, for various NASA spacecraft. This shows that the differences from Newtonian gravity, though tiny within the solar system, are just appropriate to explain the flyby anomaly as a ν/c effect due to earth's rotation. The differences can, however, be large in the case of a spiral galaxy, and we show that the combined velocity drag from a large number of co-rotating stars enormously speeds up a test particle. Thus, the non-Newtonian behaviour of rotation curves in a spiral galaxy may be explained as being due to velocity drag rather than dark matter. RGT can also be tested in the laboratory. It necessitates a reappraisal of current laboratory methods of determining the Newtonian gravitational constant G. Since RGT makes no speculative assumptions, its refutation would have serious implications across physics.

  4. Fermions and gravitational gyrotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfer, Adam D.

    2016-12-01

    In conventional general relativity without torsion, high-frequency gravitational waves couple to the chiral number density of spin one-half quanta: the polarization of the waves is rotated by 2 π N5ℓPl2, where N5 is the chiral column density and ℓPl is the Planck length. This means that if a primordial distribution of gravitational waves with E-E or B-B correlations passed through a chiral density of fermions in the very early Universe, an E-B correlation will be generated. This in turn will give rise to E-B and T-B correlations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Less obviously but more primitively, the condition Albrecht called "cosmic coherence" would be violated, changing the restrictions on the class of admissible cosmological gravitational waves. This altered class of waves would, generally speaking, probe earlier physics than do the conventional waves; their effects on the CMB would be most pronounced for low (≲100 ) multipoles. Rough estimates indicate that if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is less than about 10-2, it will be hard to constrain a spatially homogeneous primordial N5 by present data.

  5. GEOSCOPE Observatory Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, N.; Pardo, C.; Bonaime, S.; Stutzmann, E.; Maggi, A.

    2010-12-01

    The GEOSCOPE observatory consists of a global seismic network and a data center. The 31 GEOSCOPE stations are installed in 19 countries, across all continents and on islands throughout the oceans. They are equipped with three component very broadband seismometers (STS1 or STS2) and 24 or 26 bit digitizers, as required by the Federation of Seismic Digital Network (FDSN). In most stations, a pressure gauge and a thermometer are also installed. Currently, 23 stations send data in real or near real time to GEOSCOPE Data Center and tsunami warning centers. In 2009, two stations (SSB and PPTF) have been equipped with warpless base plates. Analysis of one year of data shows that the new installation decreases long period noise (20s to 1000s) by 10 db on horizontal components. SSB is now rated in the top ten long period stations for horizontal components according to the LDEO criteria. In 2010, Stations COYC, PEL and RER have been upgraded with Q330HR, Metrozet electronics and warpless base plates. They have been calibrated with the calibration table CT-EW1 and the software jSeisCal and Calex-EW. Aluminum jars are now installed instead of glass bells. A vacuum of 100 mbars is applied in the jars which improves thermal insulation of the seismometers and reduces moisture and long-term corrosion in the sensor. A new station RODM has just been installed in Rodrigues Island in Mauritius with standard Geoscope STS2 setup: STS2 seismometer on a granite base plate and covered by cooking pot and thermal insulation, it is connected to Q330HR digitizer, active lightning protection, Seiscomp PC and real-time internet connection. Continuous data of all stations are collected in real time or with a delay by the GEOSCOPE Data Center in Paris where they are validated, archived and made available to the international scientific community. Data are freely available to users by different interfaces according data types (see : http://geoscope.ipgp.fr) - Continuous data in real time coming

  6. Development of solar tower observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  7. Gravitational Wave Astronomy:The High Frequency Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Nils; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    As several large scale interferometers are beginning to take data at sensitivities where astrophysical sources are predicted, the direct detection of gravitational waves may well be imminent. This would (finally) open the long anticipated gravitational-wave window to our Universe, and should lead to a much improved understanding of the most violent processes imaginable; the formation of black holes and neutron stars following core collapse supernovae and the merger of compact objects at the end of binary inspiral. Over the next decade we can hope to learn much about the extreme physics associated with, in particular, neutron stars. This contribution is divided in two parts. The first part provides a text-book level introduction to gravitational radiation. The key concepts required for a discussion of gravitational-wave physics are introduced. In particular, the quadrupole formula is applied to the anticipated bread-and-butter source for detectors like LIGO, GEO600, EGO and TAMA300: inspiralling compact binaries. The second part provides a brief review of high frequency gravitational waves. In the frequency range above (say) 100 Hz, gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information concerning the various stages of collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the supranuclear equation of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational-wave signal. As the amount of exciting physics one may be able to study via the detections of gravitational waves from these sources is truly inspiring, there is strong motivation for the development of future generations of ground based detectors sensitive in the range from hundreds of Hz to several kHz.

  8. Observatory Bibliographies as Research Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Winkelman, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, observatory bibliographies were maintained to provide insight in how successful a observatory is as measured by its prominence in the (refereed) literature. When we set up the bibliographic database for the Chandra X-ray Observatory (http://cxc.harvard.edu/cgi-gen/cda/bibliography) as part of the Chandra Data Archive ((http://cxc.harvard.edu/cda/), very early in the mission, our objective was to make it primarily a useful tool for our user community. To achieve this we are: (1) casting a very wide net in collecting Chandra-related publications; (2) including for each literature reference in the database a wealth of metadata that is useful for the users; and (3) providing specific links between the articles and the datasets in the archive that they use. As a result our users are able to browse the literature and the data archive simultaneously. As an added bonus, the rich metadata content and data links have also allowed us to assemble more meaningful statistics about the scientific efficacy of the observatory. In all this we collaborate closely with the Astrophysics Data System (ADS). Among the plans for future enhancement are the inclusion of press releases and the Chandra image gallery, linking with ADS semantic searching tools, full-text metadata mining, and linking with other observatories' bibliographies. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC) and depends critically on the services provided by the ADS.

  9. The Exoplanet Microlensing Survey by the Proposed WFIRST Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the . coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing. measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory. with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  10. Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii Boundary Layer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. E.; Sharma, N. C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory is an atmospheric monitoring station on the North side of Mauna Loa Volcano (4169 m summit) located at an altitude of 3396 m. The bright sun, dark lava surface, and the seven percent grade of the mountain create a surface radiation wind that changes from upslope in the daytime to downslope after sunset. The radiation wind has a magnitude of 2.5-3.0 m/s. The off-island wind interacts with the mountain to create a barrier wind. The radiation wind dominates when the off-island winds are low and opposite is true when the off-island winds are strong. Temperature inversions form at sunset in the first 50 meters above the ground. Aerosol profiles, measured with a unique technique called CLidar or camera lidar, often increase and show a peak between 60 and 160 meters. The aerosol generally decreases to upper tropospheric values with a distinct change in the rate of decrease at 600 m above the ground. At night the region between the aerosol peak and 600 m is often flowing upslope, counter to the downslope surface flow. The source of the air in this counter flow region is not well understood, but appears to come from levels below the station altitude at least occasionally. This possibly would impact the interpretation of some of the air samples taken during this period.

  11. Distinguishing signal from noise: New techniques for gravitational wave data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Paul Thomas

    The principal problem of gravitational wave detection is distinguishing true gravitational wave signals from non-Gaussian noise artifacts. We describe two methods to deal with the problem of non-Gaussian noise in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO). Perturbed black holes (BH) are known to vibrate at determinable quasi-normal mode frequencies. These vibrational modes are strongly excited during the inspiral and merger of binary BH systems. We will develop a template based search for gravitational waves from black hole ringdowns: the final stage of binary merger. Past searches for gravitational waves developed ad hoc detection statistics in an attempt to separate the expected gravitational wave signals from noise. We show how using the output of a multi-variate statistical classifier trained to directly probe the high dimensional parameter space of gravitational waves can improve a search over more traditional means. We conclude by placing preliminary upper limits on the rate of ringdown producing binary BH mergers. LIGO data contains frequent, non-Gaussian, instrument artifacts or glitches. Current LIGO searches for un-modeled gravitational wave bursts are primarily limited by the presence of glitches in analyzed data. We describe the BayesWave algorithm, wherein we model gravitational wave signals and detector glitches simultaneously in the wavelet domain. Using bayesian model selection techniques and a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo, we are able determine whether data is consistent with the presence of gravitational waves, detector glitches, or both. We demonstrate BayesWave's utility as a data quality tool by fitting glitches non-Gaussian LIGO data. Finally, we discuss how BayesWave can be extended into a full-fledged search for gravitational wave bursts.

  12. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (Editor); Gehrels, Neil (Editor); Dennis, Brian (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  13. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  14. Gravitational waves emitted by a particle rotating around a Schwarzschild black hole: A semiclassical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernar, Rafael P.; Crispino, Luís C. B.; Higuchi, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the gravitational radiation emitted from a particle in circular motion around a Schwarzschild black hole using the framework of quantum field theory in curved spacetime at tree level. The gravitational perturbations are written in a gauge-invariant formalism for spherically symmetric spacetimes. We discuss the results, comparing them to the radiation emitted by a particle when it is assumed to be orbiting a massive object due to a Newtonian force in flat spacetime.

  15. Tools for Coordinated Planning Between Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Fishman, Mark; Grella, Vince; Kerbel, Uri; Maks, Lori; Misra, Dharitri; Pell, Vince; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the realization of NASA's era of great observatories, there are now more than three space-based telescopes operating in different wavebands. This situation provides astronomers with a unique opportunity to simultaneously observe with multiple observatories. Yet scheduling multiple observatories simultaneously is highly inefficient when compared to observations using only one single observatory. Thus, programs using multiple observatories are limited not due to scientific restrictions, but due to operational inefficiencies. At present, multi-observatory programs are conducted by submitting observing proposals separately to each concerned observatory. To assure that the proposed observations can be scheduled, each observatory's staff has to check that the observations are valid and meet all the constraints for their own observatory; in addition, they have to verify that the observations satisfy the constraints of the other observatories. Thus, coordinated observations require painstaking manual collaboration among the observatory staff at each observatory. Due to the lack of automated tools for coordinated observations, this process is time consuming, error-prone, and the outcome of the requests is not certain until the very end. To increase observatory operations efficiency, such manpower intensive processes need to undergo re-engineering. To overcome this critical deficiency, Goddard Space Flight Center's Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch is developing a prototype effort called the Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT). The main objective of the VOLT project is to provide visual tools to help automate the planning of coordinated observations by multiple astronomical observatories, as well as to increase the scheduling probability of all observations.

  16. The Classical and Quantum Aspects of the Detection of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factourovich, Maxim

    Detection of gravitational waves has been one of the major undertakings of science for the past several decades. The elusive phenomenon first emerged as a natural consequence of the A. Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, but for many years was beyond the reach of the existing technological capabilities. Today, a radical effort is underway to take the measurement technology to a new, unprecedented level of sensitivity, in order to give a definite answer to one of the most fundamental aspects of our understanding of the Universe. The currently accepted detection scheme utilizes interference of near-infrared light inside a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, and has achieved resolution on a scale of 10-21 as compared to the cavity length. At this scale, the signal becomes very sensitive to all kinds of unwanted inputs which include, but not limited to, the seismic activity, acoustic vibrations, thermal effects and radiation pressure noise. Moreover, the sensitivity requirements place it near the fundamental limit of quantum uncertainty which poses the ultimate barrier for lowering the detection threshold. Additionally, at the large kilometer-scale size of the installations, the signal propagation delays become significant enough to call for precise synchronization between the remote sensors and electronics within the main data collector. The need for this becomes even more evident considering a possibility of triangulation the otherwise non-directional signal, by unifying the data collected from different observatories spread around the globe. In this work, we first address the aspect of precise timing synchronization implemented in the US-based Advanced Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatories (LIGO) located at Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The developed Advanced LIGO Timing System allows for synchronization of virtually unlimited number of devices to an accuracy of better than 1 microsecond, regardless of the distances involved. The machinery uses

  17. Modeling Gravitational Waves to Test GR Dispersion and Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Isi, Maximilliano

    2017-01-01

    Given continued observation runs from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Scientific Collaboration, further gravitational wave (GW) events will provide added constraints on beyond-general relativity (b-GR) theories. One approach, independent of the GW generation mechanism at the source, is to look at modification to the GW dispersion and propagation, which can accumulate over vast distances. Generic modification of GW propagation can also, in certain b-GR theories, impact the polarization content of GWs. To this end, a comprehensive approach to testing the dispersion and polarization content is developed by modeling anisotropic deformations to the waveforms' phase, along with birefringence effects and corollary consequences for b-GR polarizations, i.e., breathing, vector, and longitudinal modes. Such an approach can be mapped to specific theories like Lorentz violation, amplitude birefringence in Chern-Simons, and provide hints at additional theories to be included. An overview of data analysis routines to be implemented will also be discussed.

  18. Bayesian analysis on gravitational waves and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xihao

    Attempts to detect gravitational waves using a pulsar timing array (PTA), i.e., a collection of pulsars in our Galaxy, have become more organized over the last several years. PTAs act to detect gravitational waves generated from very distant sources by observing the small and correlated effect the waves have on pulse arrival times at the Earth. In this thesis, I present advanced Bayesian analysis methods that can be used to search for gravitational waves in pulsar timing data. These methods were also applied to analyze a set of radial velocity (RV) data collected by the Hobby- Eberly Telescope on observing a K0 giant star. They confirmed the presence of two Jupiter mass planets around a K0 giant star and also characterized the stellar p-mode oscillation. The first part of the thesis investigates the effect of wavefront curvature on a pulsar's response to a gravitational wave. In it we show that we can assume the gravitational wave phasefront is planar across the array only if the source luminosity distance " 2piL2/lambda, where L is the pulsar distance to the Earth (˜ kpc) and lambda is the radiation wavelength (˜ pc) in the PTA waveband. Correspondingly, for a point gravitational wave source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, we should take into account the effect of wavefront curvature across the pulsar-Earth line of sight, which depends on the luminosity distance to the source, when evaluating the pulsar timing response. As a consequence, if a PTA can detect a gravitational wave from a source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, the effects of wavefront curvature on the response allows us to determine the source luminosity distance. The second and third parts of the thesis propose a new analysis method based on Bayesian nonparametric regression to search for gravitational wave bursts and a gravitational wave background in PTA data. Unlike the conventional Bayesian analysis that introduces a signal model with a fixed number of parameters, Bayesian nonparametric regression sets

  19. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  20. LISA and LISA Pathfinder: Gravitational Wave Observation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1 mHz--100 mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to fluctuations in the Earth gravitational field. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermassive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and cosmology backgrounds and bursts. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset of 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. A detailed description of the two missions and an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will be discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented.

  1. Chiral primordial gravitational waves from dilaton induced delayed chromonatural inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Ippei; Soda, Jiro; CLEO Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We study inflation driven by a dilaton and an axion, both of which are coupled to a SU(2) gauge field. We find that the inflation driven by the dilaton occurs in the early stage of inflation during which the gauge field grows due to the gauge-kinetic function. When the energy density of magnetic fields catches up with that of electric fields, chromonatural inflation takes over in the late stage of inflation, which we call delayed chromonatural inflation. Thus, the delayed chromonatural inflation driven by the axion and the gauge field is induced by the dilaton. The interesting outcome of the model is the generation of chiral primordial gravitational waves on small scales. Since the gauge field is inert in the early stage of inflation, it is viable in contrast to the conventional chromonatural inflation. We find the parameter region where chiral gravitational waves are generated in a frequency range higher than nHz, which are potentially detectable in future gravitational wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays such as DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO), evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), and Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  2. Primordial gravitational waves in running vacuum cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, D. A.; Lima, J. A. S.; Alves, M. E. S.; de Araujo, J. C. N.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological production of gravitational waves in a nonsingular flat cosmology powered by a "running vacuum" energy density described by ρΛ ≡ ρΛ(H), a phenomenological expression potentially linked with the renormalization group approach in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. The model can be interpreted as a particular case of the class recently discussed by Perico et al. (2013) [25] which is termed complete in the sense that the cosmic evolution occurs between two extreme de Sitter stages (early and late time de Sitter phases). The gravitational wave equation is derived and its time-dependent part numerically integrated since the primordial de Sitter stage. The generated spectrum of gravitons is also compared with the standard calculations where an abrupt transition, from the early de Sitter to the radiation phase, is usually assumed. It is found that the stochastic background of gravitons is very similar to the one predicted by the cosmic concordance model plus inflation except at higher frequencies (ν ≳ 100 kHz). This remarkable signature of a "running vacuum" cosmology combined with the proposed high frequency gravitational wave detectors and measurements of the CMB polarization (B-modes) may provide a new window to confront more conventional models of inflation.

  3. A gravitational diffusion model without dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Britten, Roy J.

    1998-01-01

    In this model, without dark matter, the flat rotation curves of galaxies and the mass-to-light ratios of clusters of galaxies are described quantitatively. The hypothesis is that the agent of gravitational force is propagated as if it were scattered with a mean free path of ≈5 kiloparsecs. As a result, the force between moderately distant masses, separated by more than the mean free path, diminishes as the inverse first power of the distance, following diffusion equations, and describes the flat rotation curves of galaxies. The force between masses separated by <1 kiloparsec diminishes as the inverse square of distance. The excess gravitational force (ratio of 1/r:1/r2) increases with the scale of structures from galaxies to clusters of galaxies. However, there is reduced force at great distances because of the ≈12 billion years that has been available for diffusion to occur. This model with a mean free path of ≈5 kiloparsecs predicts a maximum excess force of a few hundredfold for objects the size of galactic clusters a few megaparsecs in size. With only a single free parameter, the predicted curve for excess gravitational force vs. size of structures fits reasonably well with observations from those for dwarf galaxies through galactic clusters. Under the diffusion model, no matter is proposed in addition to the observed baryons plus radiation and thus the proposed density of the universe is only a few percent of that required for closure. PMID:9520368

  4. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-12-01

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, m, and gravitational, mg, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no confirmation for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear - current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits - 65 gravitational mass of relativistic electrons and positrons coming from the absence of the vacuum Cherenkov radiation at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and stability of photons at the Tevatron collider in presence of the annual variations of the solar gravitational potential. Our result clearly rules out the speculated antigravity. By considering the absolute potential of the Local Supercluster (LS), we also predict the bounds 1 - 4 ×10-7

  5. Cultural Heritage of Observatories and Instruments - From Classical Astronomy to Modern Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Until the middle of the 19th century positioal astronomy with meridian circles played the dominant role. Pulkovo Observatory, St. Petersburg, was the leading institution for this kind of research. The design of this observatory was a model for the construction of observatories in the 19th century. In addition, in Hamburg Observatory and in some other observatories near the coast, time keeping and teaching of navigation were important tasks for astronomers. Around 1860 astronomy underwent a revolution. Astronomers began to investigate the properties of celestial bodies with physical and chemical methods. In the context of “classical astronomy”, only the direction of star light was studied. In the 1860s quantity and quality of radiation were studied for the first time. This was the beginning of modern “astrophysics”, a notion coined in 1865 by the Leipzig astronomer Karl Friedrich Zöllner (1834-1882). It is remarkable that many amateurs started this new astrophysics in private observatories but not in the established observatories like Greenwich, Paris or Pulkovo. In Germany this development started in Bothkamp Observatory near Kiel, with Hermann Carl Vogel (1841-1907), strongly influenced by Zöllner. An important enterprise was the foundation of the Astrophysical Observatory in Potsdam, near Berlin, in 1874 as the first observatory in the world dedicated to astrophysics - a foundation that inspired others. Important innovations and discoveries were made in Potsdam. The new field of astrophysics caused, and was caused by, new instrumentation: spectrographs, instruments for astrophotography, photometers and solar physics instruments. In particular, the glass mirror reflecting telescope was recognised as a more important instrument than a large refractor; for the new observatory in Hamburg-Bergedorf a 1-m reflector, the fourth largest in the world, made by Zeiss of Jena, was acquired in 1911. Another change was made in the architecture, the idea of a park

  6. Mars gravitational field estimation error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, H. R.; Daniels, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    The error covariance matrices associated with a weighted least-squares differential correction process have been analyzed for accuracy in determining the gravitational coefficients through degree and order five in the Mars gravitational potential junction. The results are presented in terms of standard deviations for the assumed estimated parameters. The covariance matrices were calculated by assuming Doppler tracking data from a Mars orbiter, a priori statistics for the estimated parameters, and model error uncertainties for tracking-station locations, the Mars ephemeris, the astronomical unit, the Mars gravitational constant (G sub M), and the gravitational coefficients of degrees six and seven. Model errors were treated by using the concept of consider parameters.

  7. Laser Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observation: LISA and LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1mHz-100mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to the large ground motions of the Earth. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermasive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and possibly from as yet unimagined sources. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset oF 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such us spacecraft control with micro-newton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. An introduction to laser interferometric gravitational wave detection, ground-based observatories, and a detailed description of the two missions together with an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will bc discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented

  8. Limiting the effects of earthquakes on gravitational-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Michael; Earle, Paul; Harms, Jan; Biscans, Sebastien; Buchanan, Christopher; Coughlin, Eric; Donovan, Fred; Fee, Jeremy; Gabbard, Hunter; Guy, Michelle; Mukund, Nikhil; Perry, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are susceptible to ground shaking from high-magnitude teleseismic events, which can interrupt their operation in science mode and significantly reduce their duty cycle. It can take several hours for a detector to stabilize enough to return to its nominal state for scientific observations. The down time can be reduced if advance warning of impending shaking is received and the impact is suppressed in the isolation system with the goal of maintaining stable operation even at the expense of increased instrumental noise. Here, we describe an early warning system for modern gravitational-wave observatories. The system relies on near real-time earthquake alerts provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Preliminary low latency hypocenter and magnitude information is generally available in 5 to 20 min of a significant earthquake depending on its magnitude and location. The alerts are used to estimate arrival times and ground velocities at the gravitational-wave detectors. In general, 90% of the predictions for ground-motion amplitude are within a factor of 5 of measured values. The error in both arrival time and ground-motion prediction introduced by using preliminary, rather than final, hypocenter and magnitude information is minimal. By using a machine learning algorithm, we develop a prediction model that calculates the probability that a given earthquake will prevent a detector from taking data. Our initial results indicate that by using detector control configuration changes, we could prevent interruption of operation from 40 to 100 earthquake events in a 6-month time-period.

  9. A targeted LIGO-Virgo search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using low-threshold swift GRB triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harstad, Emelie D.

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short, intense ashes of 0.1-1 MeV electromagnetic radiation that are routinely observed by Earth orbiting satellites. The sources of GRBs are known to be extragalactic and located at cosmological distances. Due to the extremely high isotropic equivalent energies of GRBs, which are on the order of Eiso˜1054 erg, the gamma-ray emission is believed to be collimated, making them observable only when they are directed towards Earth. The favored progenitor models of GRBs are also believed to emit gravitational waves that would be observable by the current generation of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) and Virgo instruments operated near design sensitivity and collected more than a year of triple coincident data during the S5/VSR1 science run, which spanned the two year interval between November 2005 and October 2007. During this time, GRB detections were being made by the NASA/Goddard Swift Burst Alert Telescope at a rate of approximately 0.3 per day, producing a collection of triggers that has since been used in a coincident GRB-GW burst search with data from the LIGO-Virgo interferometer network. This dissertation describes the search for gravitational waves using the times and locations of 123 below-threshold potential GRB triggers from Swift over the same time period. Although most of the below-threshold triggers are likely false alarms, there is reason to believe that some are the result of actual faintly-observed GRB events. Recent GRB observations indicate that the local rate of low-luminosity GRBs is much higher than previously believed. This result, combined with the possibility of discovering a rare nearby GRB event accompanied by gravitational waves, is what motivates this search. The analysis results indicate no evidence for gravitational waves associated with any of the below-threshold triggers. A median distance lower limit of ˜16 Mpc was

  10. THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF GRAVITATIONALLY DARKENED CLASSICAL Be STAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, M. A.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Jones, C. E.

    2011-12-20

    The effect of gravitational darkening on models of the thermal structure of Be star disks is systematically studied for a wide range of Be star spectral types and rotation rates. Gravitational darkening causes a reduction of the stellar effective temperature toward the equator and a redirection of energy toward the poles. It is an important physical effect in these star-disk systems because the photoionizing radiation from the central B star is the main energy source for the disk. We have added gravitational darkening to the BEDISK code to produce circumstellar disk models that include both the variation in the effective temperature with latitude and the non-spherical shape of the star in the calculation of the stellar photoionizing radiation field. The effect of gravitational darkening on global measures of disk temperature is generally significant for rotation rates above 80% of critical rotation. For example, a B0V model rotating at 95% of critical has a density-averaged disk temperature Almost-Equal-To 2500 K cooler than its non-rotating counterpart. However, detailed differences in the temperature structure of disks surrounding rotating and non-rotating stars reveal a complex pattern of heating and cooling. Spherical gravitational darkening, an approximation that ignores the changing shape of the star, gives good results for disk temperatures for rotation rates less than Almost-Equal-To 80% of critical. However for the highest rotation rates, the distortion of the stellar surface caused by rotation becomes important.

  11. Planetary research at Lowell Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific goals include a better determination of the basic physical characteristics of cometary nuclei, a more complete understanding of the complex processes in the comae, a survey of abundances and gas/dust ratios in a large number of comets, and measurement of primordial (12)C/(13)C and (14)N/(15)N ratios. The program also includes the observation of Pluto-Charon mutual eclipses to derive dimensions. Reduction and analysis of extensive narrowband photometry of Comet Halley from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Perth Observatory, Lowell Observatory, and Mauna Kea Observatory were completed. It was shown that the 7.4-day periodicity in the activity of Comet Halley was present from late February through at least early June 1986, but there is no conclusive evidence of periodic variability in the preperihelion data. Greatly improved NH scalelengths and lifetimes were derived from the Halley data which lead to the conclusion that the abundance of NH in comets is much higher than previously believed. Simultaneous optical and thermal infrared observations were obtained of Comet P/Temple 2 using the MKO 2.2 m telescope and the NASA IRTF. Preliminary analysis of these observations shows that the comet's nucleus is highly elongated, very dark, and quite red.

  12. Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Lowell Observatory broke ground on its 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) in July 2005 and celebrated first light for the telescope in July 2012. In this overview to this special session, I will discuss the origin and development of the project, the telescope's general specifications and performance, its current operating status, and the initial instrument suite.

  13. ISS images for Observatory protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Zamorano, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    Light pollution is the main factor of degradation of the astronomical quality of the sky along the history. Astronomical observatories have been monitoring how the brightness of the sky varies using photometric measures of the night sky brightness mainly at zenith. Since the sky brightness depends in other factors such as sky glow, aerosols, solar activity and the presence of celestial objects, the continuous increase of light pollution in these enclaves is difficult to trace except when it is too late.Using models of light dispersion on the atmosphere one can determine which light pollution sources are increasing the sky brightness at the observatories. The input satellite data has been provided by DMSP/OLS and SNPP/VIIRS. Unfortunately their panchromatic bands (color blinded) are not useful to detect in which extension the increase is due to the dramatic change produced by the irruption of LED technology in outdoor lighting. The only instrument in the space that is able to distinguish between the various lighting technologies are the DSLR cameras used by the astronauts onboard the ISS.Current status for some astronomical observatories that have been imaged from the ISS is presented. We are planning to send an official request to NASA with a plan to get images for the most important astronomical observatories. We ask support for this proposal by the astronomical community and especially by the US-based researchers.

  14. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  15. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  16. The Instruments of Dudley Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gino, M. C.

    2002-12-01

    Dudley Observatory, founded in 1852, is the nation's oldest independent organization dedicated to astronomical research and education. While Dudley no longer operates a physical observatory, it is home to a number of historically important scientific instruments and telescopes. Dudley's first operating telescope, a Clark Comet-seeker, remains in Dudley's collection today. This 4-inch refractor provided the first discovery of a comet by a Dudley astronomer in 1857 and is one of only four telescopes of this size produced by Alvan Clark. Also in Dudley's collection is the Olcott Meridian Circle which was the primary working telescope at the observatory for over 75 years. This telescope, made by Pistor & Martins and which operated both at the Dudley Observatory in Albany, NY and the San Luis Observatory in Argentina, was used to conduct all of the observations for the Preliminary General Catalog of 6788 Stars (1908) and the General Catalog of 33,343 Stars (1937). The gem of Dudley's collection is the Pruyn Equatorial Telescope, built by the Warner and Swasey Company and equipped with a 12-inch lens made by John Brashear. It was installed in 1893 to conduct both research observations and public observing sessions. After remaining in storage for many decades, this historic telescope will soon resume its role after being refurbished and installed at the Arunah Hill Natural Science Center in Cummington, MA. While Dudley retains its interest in astronomical instruments it has also moved into the areas of space studies and astronomical education. The key projects in the areas of instrumentation and astronomical outreach, which include the instruments above as well as the Rising Star Internship and Space Campership educational programs, will be detailed in the remainder of this paper.

  17. Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Bénédicte; Mienert, Jürgen; Winther, Svein; Hageberg, Anne; Rune Godoe, Olav; Partners, Noon

    2010-05-01

    The Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON) is led by the University of Tromsø and collaborates with the Universities of Oslo and Bergen, UniResearch, Institute of Marine Research, Christian Michelsen Research and SINTEF. It is supported by the Research Council of Norway and oil and gas (O&G) industries like Statoil to develop science, technology and new educational programs. Main topics relate to ocean climate and environment as well as marine resources offshore Norway from the northern North Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean. NOON's vision is to bring Norway to the international forefront in using cable based ocean observatory technology for marine science and management, by establishing an infrastructure that enables real-time and long term monitoring of processes and interactions between hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere. This activity is in concert with the EU funded European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) roadmap and European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observation (EMSO) project to attract international leading research developments. NOON envisions developing towards a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC). Beside, the research community in Norway already possesses a considerable marine infrastructure that can expand towards an international focus for real-time multidisciplinary observations in times of rapid climate change. PIC The presently established cable-based fjord observatory, followed by the establishment of a cable-based ocean observatory network towards the Arctic from an O&G installation, will provide invaluable knowledge and experience necessary to make a successful larger cable-based observatory network at the Norwegian and Arctic margin (figure 1). Access to large quantities of real-time observation from the deep sea, including high definition video, could be used to provide the public and future recruits to science a fascinating insight into an almost unexplored part of the Earth beyond the Arctic Circle

  18. General Relativity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  19. Gravitating lepton bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Burinskii, A.

    2015-08-15

    The Kerr–Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution exhibits the external gravitational and electromagnetic field corresponding to that of the Dirac electron. For the large spin/mass ratio, a ≫ m, the BH loses horizons and acquires a naked singular ring creating two-sheeted topology. This space is regularized by the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking, leading to an extended particle that has a regular spinning core compatible with the external KN solution. We show that this core has much in common with the known MIT and SLAC bag models, but has the important advantage of being in accordance with the external gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the KN solution. A peculiar two-sheeted structure of Kerr’s gravity provides a framework for the implementation of the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking in configuration space in accordance with the concept of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. Similar to other bag models, the KN bag is flexible and pliant to deformations. For parameters of a spinning electron, the bag takes the shape of a thin rotating disk of the Compton radius, with a ring–string structure and a quark-like singular pole formed at the sharp edge of this disk, indicating that the considered lepton bag forms a single bag–string–quark system.

  20. SOFIA - Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.