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Sample records for gravitational radiation reaction

  1. Gravitational Radiation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    We give a short personally-biased review on the recent progress in our understanding of gravitational radiation reaction acting on a point particle orbiting a black hole. The main motivation of this study is to obtain sufficiently precise gravitational waveforms from inspiraling binary compact stars with a large mass ratio. For this purpose, various new concepts and techniques have been developed to compute the orbital evolution taking into account the gravitational self-force. Combining these ideas with a few supplementary new ideas, we try to outline a path to our goal here.

  2. The approximation of radiative effects in relativistic gravity - Gravitational radiation reaction and energy loss in nearly Newtonian systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Will, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    An argument is presented to determine the accuracy with which a solution of Einstein's field equations of gravitation must be approximated in order to describe the dominant effects of gravitational radiation emission from weak-field systems. Several previous calculations are compared in the light of this argument, and some apparent discrepancies among them are resolved. The majority of these calculations support the 'quadrupole formulae' for gravitational radiation energy loss and radiation reaction.

  3. Radiation reaction and gravitational waves in the effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Galley, Chad R.; Tiglio, Manuel

    2009-06-15

    We compute the contribution to the Lagrangian from the leading order (2.5 post-Newtonian) radiation reaction and the quadrupolar gravitational waves emitted from a binary system using the effective field theory (EFT) approach of Goldberger and Rothstein. We use an initial value formulation of the underlying (quantum) framework to implement retarded boundary conditions and describe these real-time dissipative processes. We also demonstrate why the usual scattering formalism of quantum field theory inadequately accounts for these. The methods discussed here should be useful for deriving real-time quantities (including radiation reaction forces and gravitational wave emission) and hereditary terms in the post-Newtonian approximation (including memory, tail and other causal, history-dependent integrals) within the EFT approach. We also provide a consistent formulation of the radiation sector in the equivalent effective field theory approach of Kol and Smolkin.

  4. Gravitational Lens Amplification of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander F.; Baryshev, Yuri V.

    In a recent paper by Wang, Turner and Stebbins (1996) an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the geometrical optics approximation model for gravitational lensing and thus they gave overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al. concluced. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form template, especially gravitational wave template of periodic sources and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector like LISA.

  5. Influence of gravitational lensing on gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander F.

    In a paper by [Wang, Y., Stebbins, A., Turner, E.L. Gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2875 2878, 1996] an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the geometrical optics approximation model for gravitational lensing and thus they gave an overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that a more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as [Wang, Y., Stebbins, A., Turner, E.L. Gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2875 2878, 1996] concluded.

  6. Tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction: Time nonlocality and renormalization group evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.; Ross, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at the fourth post-Newtonian order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is nonlocal in time and features both a dissipative and a "conservative" term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet (UV) divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared (IR) singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit—shrinking the binary to a point—which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential and total mass/energy, and find agreement with the results obtained imposing the conservation of the (pseudo) stress-energy tensor in the radiation theory. While the calculation of the leading tail contribution to the effective action involves only one diagram, five are needed for the one-point function. This suggests logarithmic corrections may be easier to incorporate in this fashion. We conclude with a few remarks on the nature of these IR/UV singularities, the (lack of) ambiguities recently discussed in the literature, and the completeness of the analytic post-Newtonian framework.

  7. Influence of gravitational lensing on gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A.

    In a paper by Wang, Turner and Stebbins (PRL, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) p.2875) an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the incorrect model for this case and thus they gave overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al. concluded. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form template, especially gravitational wave template of periodic sources and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector like LISA. Recently, the Galactic center was considered by Ruffa (ApJ, 1999) as a gravitational lens that focuses a gravitational wave energy to the Earth. The author used the wave optic approximation to solve this problem and concluded that amplification due to the gravitational lens focusing could be very huge. The conclusion is based on the perfect location of the gravitational wave source, namely the source lies very close to the line passing through the Earth and the gravitational lens (the Galactic Center), therefore the probability of the huge magnification of gravitational wave sources is negligible.

  8. Linked Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Amy; Swearngin, Joseph; Wickes, Alexander; Willem Dalhuisen, Jan; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The electromagnetic knot is a topologically nontrivial solution to the vacuum Maxwell equations with the property that any two field lines belonging to either the electric, magnetic, or Poynting vector fields are closed and linked exactly once [1]. The relationship between the vacuum Maxwell and linearized Einstein equations, as expressed in the form of the spin-N massless field equations, suggests that gravitational radiation possesses analogous topologically nontrivial field configurations. Using twistor methods we find the analogous spin-2 solutions of Petrov types N, D, and III. Aided by the concept of tendex and vortex lines as recently developed for the physical interpretation of solutions in general relativity [2], we investigate the physical properties of these knotted gravitational fields by characterizing the topology of their associated tendex and vortex lines.[4pt] [1] Ranada, A. F. and Trueba, J. L., Mod. Nonlinear Opt. III, 119, 197 (2002).[2] Nichols, D. A., et al., Phys. Rev. D, 84 (2011).

  9. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  10. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  11. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  12. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  13. Influence of Gravitational Lensing on Sources of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. F.

    In a recent paper by Wang, Turner and Stebbins (1996) an influence of gravitational lensing on increasing an estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the incorrect model for this case and thus they gave overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We show also that if we would use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that more strong influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al. concluded. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form template, especially gravitational wave template of periodic sources and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector like LISA.

  14. Influence of gravitational lensing on sources of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander F.; Baryshev, Yuri V.

    2002-04-01

    In a recent paper by Wang et al (Wang Y, Stebbins A, and Turner E L 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 2875) the influence of gravitational lensing on increasing the estimated rate of gravitational radiation sources was considered. We show that the authors used the incorrect model for this case and thus they gave an overestimated rate of possible events for possible sources of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector. We also show that if we use a more correct model of gravitational lensing, one could conclude that stronger influence on increasing rate of estimated events of gravitational radiation for the advanced LIGO detector could give gravitational lenses of galactic masses but not gravitational lenses of stellar masses as Wang et al concluded. Moreover, binary gravitational lenses could give essential distortion of gravitational wave form templates, especially the gravitational wave template of periodic sources, and the effect could be significant for templates of quasi-periodic sources which could be detected by a future gravitational wave space detector such as LISA.

  15. Classifying self-gravitating radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan

    2017-02-01

    We study a static system of self-gravitating radiations confined in a sphere by using numerical and analytical calculations. Because of the scaling symmetry of radiations, most of the main properties of a solution can be represented as a segment of a solution curve on a plane of two-dimensional scale invariant variables. We define an "approximate horizon" (AH) from the analogy with an apparent horizon. Any solution curve contains a unique point that corresponds to the AH. A given solution is uniquely labeled by three parameters representing the solution curve, the size of the AH, and the sphere size, which are an alternative to the data at the outer boundary. Various geometrical properties including the existence of an AH and the behaviors around the center can be identified from the parameters. We additionally present an analytic solution of the radiations on the verge of forming a black hole. Analytic formulas for the central mass of the naked singularity are given.

  16. Gravitational radiation from extreme Kerr black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Nakamura, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational radiation induced by a test particle falling into an extreme Kerr black hole was investigated analytically. Assuming the radiation is dominated by the infinite sequence of quasi-normal modes which has the limiting frequency m/(2M), where m is an azimuthal eigenvalue and M is the mass of the black hole, it was found that the radiated energy diverges logarithmically in time. Then the back reaction to the black hole was evaluated by appealing to the energy and angular momentum conservation laws. It was found that the radiation has a tendency to increase the ratio of the angular momentum to mass of the black hole, which is completely different from non-extreme case, while the contribution of the test particle is to decrease it.

  17. Gravitational Stokes parameters. [for electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anile, A. M.; Breuer, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electromagnetic and gravitational Stokes parameters are defined in the general theory of relativity. The general-relativistic equation of radiative transfer for polarized radiation is then derived in terms of the Stokes parameters for both high-frequency electromagnetic and gravitational waves. The concept of Stokes parameters is generalized for the most general class of metric theories of gravity, where six (instead of two) independent states of polarization are present.

  18. Multipole expansions of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Kip S.

    1980-04-01

    This paper brings together, into a single unified notation, the multipole formalisms for gravitational radiation which various people have constructed. It also extends the results of previous workers. More specifically: Part One of this paper reviews the various scalar, vector, and tensor spherical harmonics used in the general relativity literature-including the Regge-Wheeler harmonics, the symmetric, trace-free ("STF") tensors of Sachs and Pirani, the Newman-Penrose spin-weighted harmonics, and the Mathews-Zerilli Clebsch-Gordan-coupled harmonics-which include "pure-orbital" harmonics and "pure-spin" harmonics. The relationships between the various harmonics are presented. Part One then turns attention to gravitational radiation. The concept of "local wave zone" is introduced to facilitate a clean separation of "wave generation" from "wave propagation." The generic radiation field in the local wave zone is decomposed into multipole components. The energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum in the waves are expressed as infinite sums of multipole contributions. Attention is then restricted to sources that admit a nonsingular, spacetime-covering de Donder coordinate system. (This excludes black holes.) In such a coordinate system the multipole moments of the radiation field are expressed as volume integrals over the source. For slow-motion systems, these source integrals are re-expressed as infinite power series in Lλ/≡(size of source)(reduced wavelength of waves). The slow-motion source integrals are then specialized to systems with weak internal gravity to yield (i) the standard Newtonian formulas for the multipole moments, (ii) the post-Newtonian formulas of Epstein and Wagoner, and (iii) post-post-Newtonian formulas. Part Two of this paper derives a multipole-moment wave-generation formalism for slow-motion systems with arbitrarily strong internal gravity, including systems that cannot be covered by de Donder coordinates. In this formalism one calculates

  19. Gravitational radiation from the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hils, D.; Bender, P. L.; Webbink, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral flux of gravitational radiation incident on earth from the Galactic W UMa binaries, unevolved binaries, cataclysmic binaries, neutron star binaries, black hole-neutron star binaries, and close white dwarf binary (CWDB) systems is calculated. The peak values for the strain amplitude hv produced by the binaries are: log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.40 Hz for W UMa's; log hv = -16.5/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.50 Hz for unevolved binaries; log hv = -18.2/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.15 Hz for neutron star binaries; log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.7 Hz for black hole-neutron star binaries; log hv = -18.0 /sq rt Hz at log v = -4.10 Hz for cataclysmic binaries, and log hv = -27.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.0 Hz for CWDBs. The gravitational flux at ultralow frequencies is emitted mainly by unevolved binaries. The integrated flux incident on earth is about 2.4 x 10 to the -9th ergs/sq cm/s.

  20. Gravitational radiation from the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hils, D.; Bender, P.L.; Webbink, R.F. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-09-01

    The spectral flux of gravitational radiation incident on earth from the Galactic W UMa binaries, unevolved binaries, cataclysmic binaries, neutron star binaries, black hole-neutron star binaries, and close white dwarf binary (CWDB) systems is calculated. The peak values for the strain amplitude hv produced by the binaries are: log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.40 Hz for W UMa's; log hv = -16.5/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.50 Hz for unevolved binaries; log hv = -18.2/sq rt Hz at log v = -5.15 Hz for neutron star binaries; log hv = -17.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.7 Hz for black hole-neutron star binaries; log hv = -18.0 /sq rt Hz at log v = -4.10 Hz for cataclysmic binaries, and log hv = -27.0/sq rt Hz at log v = -4.0 Hz for CWDBs. The gravitational flux at ultralow frequencies is emitted mainly by unevolved binaries. The integrated flux incident on earth is about 2.4 x 10 to the -9th ergs/sq cm/s. 74 refs.

  1. Generation of Gravitational Waves with Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2006-01-20

    The problem of efficient generation of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) and pulses of Gravitational Radiation might find a reasonably simple solution by employing nuclear matter, especially isomers. A fissioning isomer not only rotates at extremely high frequency ({approx} 3.03x1024 s-1), but is also highly deformed in the first stages of fission (the nucleus is rotating and made asymmetric 'before' fission). Thus one achieves significant impulsive forces (e.g., 3.67x108 N) acting over extremely short time spans (e.g., 3.3x10-22 s). Alternatively, a pulsed particle beam, which could include antimatter, could trigger nuclear reactions and build up a coherent GW as the particles move through a target mass. The usual difficulty with HFGWs generated by nuclear reactions is the small dimensions of their nuclear-reaction volumes, that is, the small moment of inertia and submicroscopic radii of gyration (e.g., 10-16 m) of the nuclear-mass system. Such a difficulty is overcome by utilizing clusters of nuclear material, whose nuclear reactions are in synchronization (through the use of a computer controlled logic system) and are at a large distance apart, e.g., meters, kilometers, etc. The effective radius of gyration of the overall nuclear mass system is enormous and if the quadrupole formalism holds even approximately, then significant HFGW is generated, for example up to 8.5x1010 W to 1.64x1025 W bursts for the transient asymmetrical spinning nucleus case. In this preliminary analysis, possible conceptual designs of reactors suitable for the generation of HFGWs are discussed as well as applications to space technology. In an optimized dual-beam design, GW amplitudes on the order of A {approx} 0.005 are theoretically achieved in the laboratory, which might have interesting general-relativity and nuclear-physics consequences.

  2. Gravitational radiation quadrupole formula is valid for gravitationally interacting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Will, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    An argument is presented for the validity of the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation energy loss in the far field of nearly Newtonian (e.g., binary stellar) systems. This argument differs from earlier ones in that it determines beforehand the formal accuracy of approximation required to describe gravitationally self-interacting systems, uses the corresponding approximate equation of motion explicitly, and evaluates the appropriate asymptotic quantities by matching along the correct space-time light cones.

  3. Post-Newtonian gravitational radiation and equations of motion via direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations. III. Radiation reaction for binary systems with spinning bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Will, Clifford M.

    2005-04-15

    Using post-Newtonian equations of motion for fluid bodies that include radiation-reaction terms at 2.5 and 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order (O[(v/c){sup 5}] and O[(v/c){sup 7}] beyond Newtonian order), we derive the equations of motion for binary systems with spinning bodies. In particular we determine the effects of radiation reaction coupled to spin-orbit effects on the two-body equations of motion, and on the evolution of the spins. For a suitable definition of spin, we reproduce the standard equations of motion and spin-precession at the first post-Newtonian order. At 3.5 PN order, we determine the spin-orbit induced reaction effects on the orbital motion, but we find that radiation damping has no effect on either the magnitude or the direction of the spins. Using the equations of motion, we find that the loss of total energy and total angular momentum induced by spin-orbit effects precisely balances the radiative flux of those quantities calculated by Kidder et al. The equations of motion may be useful for evolving inspiraling orbits of compact spinning binaries.

  4. Types of biological reactions to the gravitation loads.

    PubMed

    Pestov, I D

    1997-07-01

    The nature of adaptation to gravitational loads is reviewed. Topics include an organism's antigravitation function, exposure to gravitational loads, types of physiological reactions, and results of adaptation.

  5. Gravitational radiation as a test of relativistic gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational radiation can be used to test theories of gravitation. When the waves are ultimately detected directly, their speed and polarization properties can be measured and compared with predictions of alternative theories. The multipole nature of gravitational radiation was already tested in the binary pulsar, where observations of the decay of the orbit verify the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation damping of general relativity and put strong constraints on dipole gravitational radiation predicted by many alternative theories.

  6. The generation of gravitational radiation by escaping supernova neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, R.

    1978-01-01

    Formulae for the gravitational radiation due to the anisotropic axisymmetric emission of neutrinos from a small source are derived. We find that a burst of neutrinos released anisotropically from a supernova will generate a burst of gravitational radiation that may be comparable in amplitude and energy to the gravitational radiation generated by the fluid motion in the collapse of the supernova core.

  7. The generation of gravitational radiation by escaping supernova neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, R.

    1978-01-01

    Formulae for the gravitational radiation due to the anisotropic axisymmetric emission of neutrinos from a small source are derived. We find that a burst of neutrinos released anisotropically from a supernova will generate a burst of gravitational radiation that may be comparable in amplitude and energy to the gravitational radiation generated by the fluid motion in the collapse of the supernova core.

  8. Resonant-mass detectors of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Price, John C.; Taber, Robert C.

    1987-07-01

    A network of second-generation low-temperature gravitational radiation detectors is nearing completion. These detectors, sensitive to mechanical strains of order 10 to the -18th, are possible because of a variety of technical innovations that have been made in cryogenics, low-noise superconducting instrumentation, and vibration isolation techniques. Another five orders of magnitude improvement in energy sensitivity of resonant-mass detectors is possible before the linear amplifier quantum limit is encountered.

  9. Gravitational radiation from massless particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, Andrei; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    We compute classical gravitational bremsstrahlung from the gravitational scattering of two massless particles at leading order in the (centre of mass) deflection angle θ ∼ 4G\\sqrt{s}/b=8{GE}/b\\ll 1. The calculation, although non-perturbative in the gravitational constant, is surprisingly simple and yields explicit formulae—in terms of multidimensional integrals—for the frequency and angular distribution of the radiation. In the range {b}-1\\lt ω \\lt {({GE})}-1, the GW spectrum behaves like {log}(1/{GE}ω ){{d}}ω , is confined to cones of angular sizes (around the deflected particle trajectories) ranging from O(θ ) to O(1/ω b), and exactly reproduces, at its lower end, a well-known zero-frequency limit. At ω \\gt {({GE})}-1 the radiation is confined to cones of angular size of order θ {({GE}ω )}-1/2 resulting in a scale-invariant ({{d}}ω /ω ) spectrum. The total efficiency in GW production is dominated by this ‘high frequency’ region and is formally logarithmically divergent in the UV. If the spectrum is cutoff at the limit of validity of our approximations (where a conjectured bound on GW power is also saturated), the fraction of incoming energy radiated away turns out to be \\tfrac{1}{2π }{θ }2{log}{θ }-2 at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  10. Hawking radiation via gravitational anomalies in nonspherical topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios; Skamagoulis, Petros

    2009-04-15

    We study the method of calculating Hawking radiation via gravitational anomalies in gravitational backgrounds of constant negative curvature. We apply the method to topological black holes and also to topological black holes conformally coupled to a scalar field.

  11. Enabling the Discovery of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational radiation was announced with the publication of the results of a physics experiment involving over a thousand participants. This was preceded by a century of theoretical work, involving a similarly large group of physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists. This huge effort was enabled by a substantial commitment of resources, both public and private, to develop the different strands of this complex research enterprise, and to build a community of scientists to carry it out. In the excitement following the discovery, the role of key enablers of this success has not always been adequately recognized in popular accounts. In this talk, I will try to call attention to a few of the key ingredients that proved crucial to enabling the successful discovery of gravitational waves, and the opening of a new field of science.

  12. Probing Black Holes With Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.

    2006-09-01

    Gravitational radiation can provide unique insights into the dynamics and evolution of black holes. Gravitational waveforms encode detailed information about the spacetime geometry, much as the sounds made by a musical instrument reflect the geometry of the instrument. The LISA gravitational wave observatory will be able to record black holes colliding out to the edge of the visible Universe, with an expected event rate of tens to thousands per year. LISA has unmatched capabilities for studying the role of black holes in galactic evolution, in particular, by studying the mergers of seed black holes at very high redshift, z > 5. Merger events at lower redshift will be detected at extremely high signal-to-noise, allowing for precision tests of the black hole paradigm. Below z=1 LISA will be able to record stellar remnants falling into supermassive black holes. These extreme mass ratio inspiral events will yield insights into the dynamics of galactic cusps, and the brighter events will provide incredibly precise tests of strong field, dynamical gravity.

  13. Gravitational radiative corrections from effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Ross, Andreas

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we construct an effective field theory (EFT) that describes long wavelength gravitational radiation from compact systems. To leading order, this EFT consists of the multipole expansion, which we describe in terms of a diffeomorphism invariant point particle Lagrangian. The EFT also systematically captures 'post-Minkowskian' corrections to the multipole expansion due to nonlinear terms in general relativity. Specifically, we compute long distance corrections from the coupling of the (mass) monopole moment to the quadrupole moment, including up to two mass insertions. Along the way, we encounter both logarithmic short distance (UV) and long wavelength (IR) divergences. We show that the UV divergences can be (1) absorbed into a renormalization of the multipole moments and (2) resummed via the renormalization group. The IR singularities are shown to cancel from properly defined physical observables. As a concrete example of the formalism, we use this EFT to reproduce a number of post-Newtonian corrections to the gravitational wave energy flux from nonrelativistic binaries, including long distance effects up to 3 post-Newtonian (v{sup 6}) order. Our results verify that the factorization of scales proposed in the NRGR framework of Goldberger and Rothstein is consistent up to order 3PN.

  14. Stochastic Microhertz Gravitational Radiation from Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A.

    2014-09-01

    High Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at S(f peak) = 5.2 × 10-52 Hz-1 at frequency f peak = 2.3 × 10-7 Hz. However, at low observing frequencies f < 3 × 10-4 Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to S near(f peak) = 4.1 × 10-27 Hz-1 because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance (vpropd -5) in the near zone than in the far zone (vpropd -1). Hence the Solar signal may prove relevant for pulsar timing arrays. Other individual sources and the universal background fall well below the projected sensitivities of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and next-generation pulsar timing arrays. Stellar convection sets a fundamental noise floor for more sensitive stochastic gravitational-wave experiments in the more distant future.

  15. Stochastic microhertz gravitational radiation from stellar convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A.

    2014-09-01

    High Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at S(f {sub peak}) = 5.2 × 10{sup –52} Hz{sup –1} at frequency f {sub peak} = 2.3 × 10{sup –7} Hz. However, at low observing frequencies f < 3 × 10{sup –4} Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to S {sub near}(f {sub peak}) = 4.1 × 10{sup –27} Hz{sup –1} because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance (∝d {sup –5}) in the near zone than in the far zone (∝d {sup –1}). Hence the Solar signal may prove relevant for pulsar timing arrays. Other individual sources and the universal background fall well below the projected sensitivities of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and next-generation pulsar timing arrays. Stellar convection sets a fundamental noise floor for more sensitive stochastic gravitational-wave experiments in the more distant future.

  16. Omnidirectional Gravitational Radiation Observatory: Proceedings of the First International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velloso, W. F.; Aguiar, O. D.; Magalhães, N. S.

    1997-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Introduction: The OMNI-1 Workshop and the beginning of the International Gravitational Radiation Observatory * Opening Talks * Gravitational radiation sources for Acoustic Detectors * The scientific and technological benefits of gravitational wave research * Operating Second and Third Generation Resonant-Mass Antennas * Performance of the ALLEGRO detector -- and what our experience tells us about spherical detectors * The Perth Niobium resonant mass antenna with microwave parametric transducer * The gravitational wave detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS * Gravitational Waves and Astrophysical Sources for the Next Generation Observatory * What is the velocity of gravitational waves? * Superstring Theory: how it change our ideas about the nature of Gravitation * Statistical approach to the G.W. emission from radio pulsars * Gravitational waves from precessing millisecond pulsars * The production rate of compact binary G.W. sources in elliptical galaxies * On the possibility to detect Gravitational Waves from precessing galactic neutron stars * Gravitational wave output of the head-on collision of two black holes * SN as a powerfull source of gravitational radiation * Long thick cosmic strings radiating gravitational waves and particles * Non-Parallel Electric and Magnetic Fields in a gravitational background, stationary G.W. and gravitons * Exact solutions of gravitational waves * Factorization method for linearized quantum gravity at tree-level. Graviton, photon, electron processes * Signal Detection with Resonant-Mass Antennas * Study of coalescing binaries with spherical gravitational waves detectors * Influence of transducer asymmetries on the isotropic response of a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Performances and preliminary results of the cosmic-ray detector associated with NAUTILUS * Possible transducer configurations for a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Detectability of

  17. Simulation of Merger of Two Black Holes and Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This movie shows a simulation of the merger of two black holes and the resulting emission of gravitational radiation. The colored fields represent a component of the curvature of space-time. The ou...

  18. Constraint on ghost-free bigravity from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Rampei; Tanaka, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yasuho

    2016-09-01

    We investigate gravitational Cherenkov radiation in a healthy branch of background solutions in the ghost-free bigravity model. In this model, because of the modification of dispersion relations, each polarization mode can possess subluminal phase velocities, and the gravitational Cherenkov radiation could be potentially emitted from a relativistic particle. In the present paper, we derive conditions for the process of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation to occur and estimate the energy emission rate for each polarization mode. We found that the gravitational Cherenkov radiation emitted even from an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray is sufficiently suppressed for the graviton's effective mass less than 100 eV, and the bigravity model with dark matter coupled to the hidden metric is therefore consistent with observations of high energy cosmic rays.

  19. Gravitational radiation from dual neutron star elliptical binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hils, Dieter

    1991-01-01

    General expressions are derived for the gravitational radiation incident on earth due to elliptical binary systems in the Galaxy. These results are applied to dual neutron star elliptical binaries. Calculations show that eccentric dual neutron star binaries lead to a moderate increase in gravitational flux density compared with circular systems for frequencies above approximately 0.0001 Hz. Tables of various quantities such as average gravitational luminosity, number of sources per unit bandwidth, energy spectral flux density, and gravitational wave strain density are given.

  20. Modeling Gravitational Radiation Waveforms from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. G.; Centrelia, J. M.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; VanMeter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from merging binary black hole systems is anticipated as a key source for gravitational wave observations. Ground-based instruments, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) may observe mergers of stellar-scale black holes, while the space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) observatory will be sensitive to mergers of massive galactic-center black holes over a broad range of mass scales. These cataclysmic events may emit an enormous amount of energy in a brief time. Gravitational waves from comparable mass mergers carry away a few percent of the system's mass-energy in just a few wave cycles, with peak gravitational wave luminosities on the order of 10^23 L_Sun. Optimal analysis and interpretation of merger observation data will depend on developing a detailed understanding, based on general relativistic modeling, of the radiation waveforms. We discuss recent progress in modeling radiation from equal mass mergers using numerical simulations of Einstein's gravitational field equations, known as numerical relativity. Our simulations utilize Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to allow high-resolution near the black holes while simultaneously keeping the outer boundary of the computational domain far from the black holes, and making it possible to read out gravitational radiation waveforms in the weak-field wave zone. We discuss the results from simulations beginning with the black holes orbiting near the system's innermost stable orbit, comparing the recent simulations with earlier "Lazarus" waveform estimates based on an approximate hybrid numerical/perturbative technique.

  1. Modeling Gravitational Radiation Waveforms from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. G.; Centrelia, J. M.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; VanMeter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from merging binary black hole systems is anticipated as a key source for gravitational wave observations. Ground-based instruments, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) may observe mergers of stellar-scale black holes, while the space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) observatory will be sensitive to mergers of massive galactic-center black holes over a broad range of mass scales. These cataclysmic events may emit an enormous amount of energy in a brief time. Gravitational waves from comparable mass mergers carry away a few percent of the system's mass-energy in just a few wave cycles, with peak gravitational wave luminosities on the order of 10^23 L_Sun. Optimal analysis and interpretation of merger observation data will depend on developing a detailed understanding, based on general relativistic modeling, of the radiation waveforms. We discuss recent progress in modeling radiation from equal mass mergers using numerical simulations of Einstein's gravitational field equations, known as numerical relativity. Our simulations utilize Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to allow high-resolution near the black holes while simultaneously keeping the outer boundary of the computational domain far from the black holes, and making it possible to read out gravitational radiation waveforms in the weak-field wave zone. We discuss the results from simulations beginning with the black holes orbiting near the system's innermost stable orbit, comparing the recent simulations with earlier "Lazarus" waveform estimates based on an approximate hybrid numerical/perturbative technique.

  2. Gravitational radiation observations on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, R. T.; Saulson, P. R.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hellings, R. W.; Bender, P. L.; Drever, R. W. P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the features of a laser-interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) which is planned for operation in the Unitied States, with special attention given to the benefits gained from an addition of a low-mass laser gravitational wave antenna on the moon to the earth-based antennas. It is pointed out that the addition of a moon-based antenna would improve the angular resolution for burst signals by a factor of about 50 (in the plane containing the source, the moon, and the earth), which would be of major importance in studies of gravitational wave sources.

  3. Gravitational radiation from collapsing magnetized dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Shijun; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2007-04-15

    In this article we study the influence of magnetic fields on the axial gravitational waves emitted during the collapse of a homogeneous dust sphere. We found that while the energy emitted depends weakly on the initial matter perturbations it has strong dependence on the strength and the distribution of the magnetic field perturbations. The gravitational wave output of such a collapse can be up to an order of magnitude larger or smaller calling for detailed numerical 3D studies of collapsing magnetized configurations.

  4. Hawking radiation from rotating black holes and gravitational anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Keiju; Soda, Jiro

    2006-08-15

    We study the Hawking radiation from Rotating black holes from the gravitational anomalies point of view. First, we show that the scalar field theory near the Kerr black hole horizon can be reduced to the 2-dimensional effective theory. Then, following Robinson and Wilczek, we derive the Hawking flux by requiring the cancellation of gravitational anomalies. We also apply this method to Hawking radiation from higher dimensional Myers-Perry black holes. In the appendix, we present the trace anomaly derivation of Hawking radiation to argue the validity of the boundary condition at the horizon.

  5. Electromagnetic radiation accompanying gravitational waves from black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, A.; Postnov, K.

    2017-09-01

    The transition of powerful gravitational waves, created by the coalescence of massive black hole binaries, into electromagnetic radiation in external magnetic fields is considered. In contrast to the previous calculations of the similar effect we study the realistic case of the gravitational radiation frequency below the plasma frequency of the surrounding medium. The gravitational waves propagating in the plasma constantly create electromagnetic radiation dragging it with them, despite the low frequency. The plasma heating by the unattenuated electromagnetic wave may be significant in hot rarefied plasma with strong magnetic field and can lead to a noticeable burst of electromagnetic radiation with higher frequency. The graviton-to-photon conversion effect in plasma is discussed in the context of possible electromagnetic counterparts of GW150914 and GW170104.

  6. Gravitational Radiation — In Celebration of Einstein's Annus Mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    Two of Einstein's 1905 papers were on special theory of relativity. Although general relativity was to come a decade later, it was special relativity that was responsible for the existence of wave-like phenomena in gravitation. A hundred years after the discovery of special relativity we are poised to detect gravitational waves and the detection might as well come from another inevitable and exotic prediction of relativity, namely black holes. With interferometric gravitational wave detectors taking data at unprecedented sensitivity levels and bandwidth, we are entering a new century in which our view of the Universe might be revolutionized yet again with the opening of the gravitational window. The current generation of interferometric and resonant mass detectors are only the beginning of a new era during which the gravitational window could be observed by deploying pulars and microwave background radiation.

  7. Gravitational radiation from magnetically funneled supernova fallback onto a magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Priymak, M. E-mail: m.priymak@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Protomagnetars spun up to millisecond rotation periods by supernova fallback are predicted to radiate gravitational waves via hydrodynamic instabilities for ∼10{sup 2} s before possibly collapsing to form a black hole. It is shown that magnetic funneling of the accretion flow (1) creates a magnetically confined polar mountain, which boosts the gravitational wave signal, and (2) 'buries' the magnetic dipole moment, delaying the propeller phase and assisting black hole formation.

  8. Modelling Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The final merger and coalescence of binary black holes is a key source of strong gravitational waves for the LISA mission. Observing these systems will allow us to probe the formation of cosmic structure to high redshifts and test general relativity directly in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in modeling black hole mergers using numerical relativity. This talk will survey these exciting developments, focusing on the gravitational waveforms and the recoil kicks produced from non-equal mass mergers.

  9. [Cardiovascular reactions to gravitational force in different directions].

    PubMed

    Xue, Y Y; Liu, G Y; Xie, B S; Cheng, X Y; Wang, Y C

    2000-04-01

    To observe the features of the cardiovascular reactions to gravitational forces along different axes of the body. Dogs were exposed to gravitational forces along axes of body on an animal centrifuge. It was found that when the direction of G force changed from +Gz to +Gx, the predominating effect on the cardiovascular system changed from the drop of eye level blood pressure to the increase of central venous pressure, and the reactions of the organism changed from a presson reflex of the arterial system to the inhibition of cardiac activities at higher G levels. The turning point was found to be at the back angle of 75 degrees with respect to the direction of the gravitational force. These findings provide an important reference for choosing the optimal seat back angle in a manned space vehicle.

  10. Constraints on Lorentz violation from gravitational Cerenkov radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Tasson, Jay D.

    2015-08-31

    Limits on gravitational Cerenkov radiation by cosmic rays are obtained and used to constrain coefficients for Lorentz violation in the gravity sector associated with operators of even mass dimensions, including orientation-dependent effects. We use existing data from cosmic-ray telescopes to obtain conservative two-sided constraints on 80 distinct Lorentz-violating operators of dimensions four, six, and eight, along with conservative one-sided constraints on three others. Existing limits on the nine minimal operators at dimension four are improved by factors of up to a billion, while 74 of our explicit limits represent stringent first constraints on nonminimal operators. As a result, prospects aremore » discussed for future analyses incorporating effects of Lorentz violation in the matter sector, the role of gravitational Cerenkov radiation by high-energy photons, data from gravitational-wave observatories, the tired-light effect, and electromagnetic Cerenkov radiation by gravitons.« less

  11. Gravitational radiation theory. M.A. Thesis - Rice Univ.; [survey of current research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of current research in the theory of gravitational radiation. The mathematical structure of gravitational radiation is stressed. Furthermore, the radiation problem is treated independently from other problems in gravitation. The development proceeds candidly through three points of view - scalar, rector, and tensor radiation theory - and the corresponding results are stated.

  12. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr. E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu

    2012-10-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier.

  13. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  14. Radiation reaction in quantum vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita

    2015-02-01

    Since the development of the radiating electron theory by P. A. M. Dirac in 1938 [P. A. M. Dirac, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 167, 148 (1938)], many authors have tried to reformulate this model, called the "radiation reaction". Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a stabilized model of the radiation reaction in quantum vacuum [K. Seto et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2014, 043A01 (2014)]. It led us to an updated Fletcher-Millikan charge-to-mass ratio including radiation. In this paper, I will discuss the generalization of our previous model and the new equation of motion with the radiation reaction in quantum vacuum via photon-photon scatterings and also introduce the new tensor d{E}^{μ ν α β }/dm, as the anisotropy of the charge-to-mass ratio.

  15. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  16. Radiation reaction reconsidered (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, Hartmut

    2017-05-01

    Starting from first principles the physics of radiation reaction for strong laser fields interacting with electrons and positrons is revisited. With the help of a Wigner formulation of QED a derivation of a system of molecular dynamical (MD) equations of motion with a new radiation reaction term and spin is given. The new equations obtained are delay equations which promise to be void of the problems encountered with the LAD theory.

  17. Millisecond pulsars with r-modes as steady gravitational radiators.

    PubMed

    Reisenegger, Andreas; Bonacić, Axel

    2003-11-14

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) probably achieve their fast rotation by mass transfer from their companion stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs). The lack of MSPs and LMXBs rotating near breakup has been attributed to the accretion torque being balanced, at fast rotation, by gravitational radiation, perhaps caused by an unstable oscillation mode. It has been argued that internal dissipation involving hyperons may cause LMXBs to evolve into a quasisteady state, with nearly constant rotation rate, temperature, and mode amplitude. We show that MSPs descending from these LMXBs spend a long time in a similar state, as extremely steady sources of gravitational waves and thermal x rays, while they spin down due to gravitational radiation and the standard magnetic torque. Observed MSP braking torques already place meaningful constraints on this scenario.

  18. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  19. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  20. Gravitational radiation from rotating monopole-string systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.; Dokuchaev, V.; Kachelriess, M.

    2005-02-15

    We study the gravitational radiation from a rotating monopole-antimonopole pair connected by a string. While at not too high frequencies the emitted gravitational spectrum is described asymptotically by P{sub n}{proportional_to}n{sup -1}, the spectrum is exponentially suppressed in the high-frequency limit, P{sub n}{proportional_to}exp(-n/n{sub cr}). Below n{sub cr}, the emitted spectrum of gravitational waves is very similar to the case of an oscillating monopole pair connected by a string, and we argue, therefore, that the spectrum found holds approximately for any moving monopole-string system. As an application, we discuss the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by monopole-antimonopole pairs connected by strings in the early Universe and gravitational wave bursts emitted at present by monopole-string networks. We confirm that advanced gravitational wave detectors have the potential to detect a signal for string tensions as small as G{mu}{approx}10{sup -13}.

  1. Hypermagnetic knots and gravitational radiation at intermediate frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-07-01

    The maximally gyrotropic configurations of the hypermagnetic field at the electroweak epoch can induce a stochastic background of relic gravitational waves with comoving frequencies ranging from the μHz to the kHz. Using two complementary approaches we construct a physical template family for the emission of the gravitational radiation produced by the hypermagnetic knots. The current constraints and the presumed sensitivities of the advanced wide-band interferometers (both terrestrial and space-borne) are combined to infer that the lack of observations at intermediate frequencies may invalidate the premise of baryogenesis models based (directly or indirectly) on the presence of gyrotropic configurations of the hypermagnetic field at the electroweak epoch. Over the intermediate frequency range the spectral energy density of the gravitational waves emitted by the hypermagnetic knots at the electroweak scale can exceed the inflationary signal even by nine orders of magnitude without affecting the standard bounds applicable on the stochastic backgrounds of gravitational radiation. The signal of hypermagnetic knots can be disambiguated, at least in principle, since the the produced gravitational waves are polarized.

  2. Inertia, gravitation, and radiation time delays

    SciTech Connect

    Graneau, P.

    1987-05-01

    This note explains how an instantaneous action-at-a-distance theory gives rise to time delays between a cause in one location and its effect at another. The key to this is a suitable law of induction which itself does not produce the time delay, but contains the cause in the form of a time derivative. The many-body solution process for an array of simultaneous induction equations then reveals retardation between cause and effect without the transport of energy at finite velocity. It is suggested that a suitable law of induction of inertia applied to an object in the solar system and the many-body universe may furnish the quantitative connection between inertia and Newtonian gravitation.

  3. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    2014-12-01

    To be observed and analyzed by the network of gravitational wave detectors on ground (LIGO, VIRGO, etc.) and by the future detectors in space ( eLISA, etc.), inspiralling compact binaries — binary star systems composed of neutron stars and/or black holes in their late stage of evolution — require high-accuracy templates predicted by general relativity theory. The gravitational waves emitted by these very relativistic systems can be accurately modelled using a high-order post-Newtonian gravitational wave generation formalism. In this article, we present the current state of the art on post-Newtonian methods as applied to the dynamics and gravitational radiation of general matter sources (including the radiation reaction back onto the source) and inspiralling compact binaries. We describe the post-Newtonian equations of motion of compact binaries and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, paying attention to the self-field regularizations at work in the calculations. Several notions of innermost circular orbits are discussed. We estimate the accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation and make a comparison with numerical computations of the gravitational self-force for compact binaries in the small mass ratio limit. The gravitational waveform and energy flux are obtained to high post-Newtonian order and the binary's orbital phase evolution is deduced from an energy balance argument. Some landmark results are given in the case of eccentric compact binaries — moving on quasi-elliptical orbits with non-negligible eccentricity. The spins of the two black holes play an important role in the definition of the gravitational wave templates. We investigate their imprint on the equations of motion and gravitational wave phasing up to high post-Newtonian order (restricting to spin-orbit effects which are linear in spins), and analyze the post-Newtonian spin precession equations as well as the induced precession of the orbital plane.

  4. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc

    2014-01-01

    To be observed and analyzed by the network of gravitational wave detectors on ground (LIGO, VIRGO, etc.) and by the future detectors in space (eLISA, etc.), inspiralling compact binaries - binary star systems composed of neutron stars and/or black holes in their late stage of evolution - require high-accuracy templates predicted by general relativity theory. The gravitational waves emitted by these very relativistic systems can be accurately modelled using a high-order post-Newtonian gravitational wave generation formalism. In this article, we present the current state of the art on post-Newtonian methods as applied to the dynamics and gravitational radiation of general matter sources (including the radiation reaction back onto the source) and inspiralling compact binaries. We describe the post-Newtonian equations of motion of compact binaries and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, paying attention to the self-field regularizations at work in the calculations. Several notions of innermost circular orbits are discussed. We estimate the accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation and make a comparison with numerical computations of the gravitational self-force for compact binaries in the small mass ratio limit. The gravitational waveform and energy flux are obtained to high post-Newtonian order and the binary's orbital phase evolution is deduced from an energy balance argument. Some landmark results are given in the case of eccentric compact binaries - moving on quasi-elliptical orbits with non-negligible eccentricity. The spins of the two black holes play an important role in the definition of the gravitational wave templates. We investigate their imprint on the equations of motion and gravitational wave phasing up to high post-Newtonian order (restricting to spin-orbit effects which are linear in spins), and analyze the post-Newtonian spin precession equations as well as the induced precession of the orbital plane.

  5. Persistent Gravitational Radiation from Glitching Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.; Douglass, J. A.; Simula, T. P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum mechanical simulations of neutron star rotational glitches, triggered by vortex avalanches in the superfluid stellar interior, reveal that vortices pin nonaxisymmetrically to the crust during the intervals between glitches. Hence a glitching neutron star emits a persistent current quadrupole gravitational wave signal at the star’s rotation frequency, whose interglitch amplitude is constant and determined by the avalanche history since birth. The signal can be detected in principle by coherent searches planned for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), whether or not a glitch occurs during the observation, if the power-law distribution of glitch sizes extends up to {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max}/{{Ω }}≳ {10}-6{η }-1{({{Δ }}φ )}-1{({{Ω }}/{10}3 {rad} {{{s}}}-1)}-3(D/1 {kpc}) in the targeted object, where {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} and {{Δ }}φ are the largest angular velocity jump and avalanche opening angle, respectively, to have occurred in a glitch since birth, Ω is the angular velocity at present, η is the crustal fraction of the moment of inertia, and D is the distance from the Earth. A major caveat concerning detectability is whether the nonaxisymmetries observed in existing simulations with ≲ {10}3 vortices extrapolate to realistic neutron stars with ≳ {10}15 vortices. The arguments for and against extrapolation are discussed critically in the context of avalanche dynamics in self-organized critical systems, but the issue cannot be resolved without larger simulations and tighter observational limits on η {{Δ }}φ {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} from future LIGO (non)detections and radio timing campaigns.

  6. Gravitational radiation and the ultimate speed in Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    In Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity the (local) speed of gravitational radiation is determined by the combined effects of cosmological boundary values and nearby concentrations of matter. It is possible for the speed of gravitational radiation to be less than the speed of light. It is here shown that the emission of gravitational radiation prevents particles of nonzero rest mass from exceeding the speed of gravitational radiation. Observations of relativistic particles place limits on the speed of gravitational radiation and the cosmological boundary values today, and observations of synchroton radiation from compact radio sources place limits on the cosmological boundary values in the past.

  7. Gravitational radiation and the ultimate speed in Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    In Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity the (local) speed of gravitational radiation is determined by the combined effects of cosmological boundary values and nearby concentrations of matter. It is possible for the speed of gravitational radiation to be less than the speed of light. It is here shown that the emission of gravitational radiation prevents particles of nonzero rest mass from exceeding the speed of gravitational radiation. Observations of relativistic particles place limits on the speed of gravitational radiation and the cosmological boundary values today, and observations of synchroton radiation from compact radio sources place limits on the cosmological boundary values in the past.

  8. Quasi-local energy in presence of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ning; Wang, Mu-Tao; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2016-07-01

    We discuss our recent work [P.-N. Chen, M.-T. Wang and S.-T. Yau, Quasi-local mass in the gravitational perturbations of black holes, to appear.] in which gravitational radiation was studied by evaluating the Wang-Yau quasi-local mass of surfaces of fixed size at the infinity of both axial and polar perturbations of the Schwarzschild spacetime, à la Chandrasekhar. [S. Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes, Oxford Classic Texts in the Physical Sciences (Oxford University Press, New York, 1998).

  9. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  10. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  11. Theory of post-Newtonian radiation and reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnholtz, Ofek; Hadar, Shahar; Kol, Barak

    2013-11-01

    We address issues with extant formulations of dissipative effects in the effective field theory (EFT) which describe the post-Newtonian (PN) inspiral of two gravitating bodies by (re)formulating several parts of the theory. Novel ingredients include gauge-invariant spherical fields in the radiation zone; a system zone that preserves time reversal such that its violation arises not from local odd propagation but rather from interaction with the radiation sector in a way that resembles the balayage method; two-way multipoles to perform zone matching within the EFT action; and a double-field radiation-reaction action that is the nonquantum version of the closed time path formalism and generalizes to any theory with directed propagators including theories that are defined by equations of motion rather than an action. This formulation unifies the treatment of outgoing radiation and its reaction force. We demonstrate the method in the scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational cases by economizing the following: the expression for the radiation source multipoles; the derivation of the leading outgoing radiation and associated reaction force such that it is maximally reduced to mere multiplication; and the derivation of the gravitational next-to-leading PN order. In fact we present a novel expression for the +1PN correction to all mass multipoles. We introduce useful definitions for multi-index summation, for the normalization of Bessel functions, and for the normalization of the gravitomagnetic vector potential.

  12. Force approach to radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-01

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  13. Force approach to radiation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  14. Thermal Stability Analysis for a Heliocentric Gravitational Radiation Detection Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W.; McElroy, P.; Miyake, R.; Bender, P.; Stebbins, R.; Supper, W.

    1994-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed for detailed studies of low-frequency gravitational radiation. The mission is currently a candidate for ESA's post-Horizon 2000 program. Thermal noise affects the measurement in at least two ways. Thermal variation of the length of the optical cavity to which the lasers are stabilized introduces phase variations in the interferometer signal, which have to be corrected for by using data from the two arms separately.

  15. Gravitational radiation from colliding clusters - Newtonian simulations in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, Christopher S.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.; Chernoff, David F.

    1990-07-01

    Gravitational radiation from colliding star cluster is studied using a Newtonian N-body code. Fully three-dimensional cases, which cannot yet be treated reliably with existing hydrodynamic codes for fluid stars can be handled. Comparing colliding axisymmetric star cluster to colliding axisymmetric fluid stars provides information on the importance of shock waves in the generation of gravitational waves. Comparison of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric star cluster scenarios then provides information on the importance of asymmetry. Numerical results are compared with simple analytic models. Two important effects reduce the radiation from extended objects relative to one's expectation from simple point-mass models: phase incoherence (destructive interference) and collisionless dissipation (violent relaxation). Because of phase incoherence, the gravitational radiation from the head-on collision of two fluid stars can actually be less than the correspondig emission from colliding clusters, despite the absence of shocks in the collisionless case. The present calculations include head-on, free-fall collisions, nonaxisymmetric parabolic encounters, hyperbolic collisions, and the tidal disruption and merger of close binary clusters.

  16. Radiation Reaction and Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James

    2007-07-11

    In recent years high power high irradiance lasers of peta-watt order have been or are under construction. In addition, in the next 10 years lasers of unprecedented powers, exa-watt, could be built If lasers such as these are focused to very small spot sizes, extremely high laser irradiances will be achieved. When electrons interact with such a laser, they become highly relativistic over very short time and spatial scales. Usually the motion of an electron under the influence of electromagnetic fields is influenced to a small extent by radiation emission from acceleration. However, under such violent acceleration the amount of radiation emitted by electrons can become so large that significant damping of the electron motion by the emission of this radiation can occur. In this lecture note we will study this problem of radiation reaction by first showing how the equations of motion are obtained. Then, we will examine the problems with such equations and what approximations are made. We will specifically examine the effects of radiation reaction on the Thomson scattering of radiation from counter-streaming laser pulses and high energy electrons through the numerical integration of the equations of motion. We will briefly address the fundamental physics, which can be addressed by using such high irradiance lasers interacting with high energy electrons.

  17. Influence of gravitation on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a general helicity-rotation coupling is demonstrated for electromagnetic waves propagating in the field of a slowly rotating body and in the Goedel universe. This coupling leads to differential focusing of circularly polarized radiation by a gravitational field which is detectable for a rapidly rotating collapsed body. The electromagnetic perturbations and their frequency spectrum are given for the Goedel universe. The spectrum of frequencies is bounded from below by the characteristic rotation frequency of the Goedel universe. If the universe were rotating, the differential focusing effect would be extremely small due to the present upper limit on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  18. Influence of gravitation on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a general helicity-rotation coupling is demonstrated for electromagnetic waves propagating in the field of a slowly rotating body and in the Goedel universe. This coupling leads to differential focusing of circularly polarized radiation by a gravitational field which is detectable for a rapidly rotating collapsed body. The electromagnetic perturbations and their frequency spectrum are given for the Goedel universe. The spectrum of frequencies is bounded from below by the characteristic rotation frequency of the Goedel universe. If the universe were rotating, the differential focusing effect would be extremely small due to the present upper limit on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  19. An improved radiation metric. [for radiation pressure in strong gravitational fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    An improved radiation metric is obtained in which light rays make a small nonzero angle with the radius, thus representing a source of finite size. Kaufmann's previous solution is criticized. The stabilization of a scatterer near a source of gravitational field and radiation is slightly enhanced for sources of finite size.

  20. Hawking radiation of a vector field and gravitational anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Keiju; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2007-10-15

    Recently, the relation between Hawking radiation and gravitational anomalies has been used to estimate the flux of Hawking radiation for a large class of black objects. In this paper, we extend the formalism, originally proposed by Robinson and Wilczek, to the Hawking radiation of vector particles (photons). It is explicitly shown, with the Hamiltonian formalism, that the theory of an electromagnetic field on d-dimensional spherical black holes reduces to one of an infinite number of massive complex scalar fields on 2-dimensional spacetime, for which the usual anomaly-cancellation method is available. It is found that the total energy emitted from the horizon for the electromagnetic field is just (d-2) times that for a scalar field. The results support the picture that Hawking radiation can be regarded as an anomaly eliminator on horizons. Possible extensions and applications of the analysis are discussed.

  1. A Gravitational Aharonov-Bohm Effect, and Its Connection to Parametric Oscillators and Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.; Haun, Robert W.; Inan, Nader A.; Kang, Bong-Soo; Martinez, Luis A.; Minter, Stephen J.; Munoz, Gerardo A.; Singleton, Douglas A.

    A thought experiment is proposed to demonstrate the existence of a gravitational, vector Aharonov-Bohm effect. We begin the analysis starting from four Maxwell-like equations for weak gravitational fields interacting with slowly moving matter. A connection is made between the gravitational, vector Aharonov-Bohm effect and the principle of local gauge invariance for nonrelativistic quantum matter interacting with weak gravitational fields. The compensating vector fields that are necessitated by this local gauge principle are shown to be incorporated by the DeWitt minimal coupling rule. The nonrelativistic Hamiltonian for weak, time-independent fields interacting with quantum matter is then extended to time-dependent fields, and applied to the problem of the interaction of radiation with macroscopically coherent quantum systems, including the problem of gravitational radiation interacting with superconductors. But first we examine the interaction of EM radiation with superconductors in a parametric oscillator consisting of a superconducting wire placed at the center of a high Q superconducting cavity driven by pump microwaves. Some room-temperature data will be presented demonstrating the splitting of a single microwave cavity resonance into a spectral doublet due to the insertion of a central wire. This would represent an unseparated kind of parametric oscillator, in which the signal and idler waves would occupy the same volume of space. We then propose a separated parametric oscillator experiment, in which the signal and idler waves are generated in two disjoint regions of space, which are separated from each other by means of an impermeable superconducting membrane. We find that the threshold for parametric oscillation for EM microwave generation is much lower for the separated configuration than the unseparated one, which then leads to an observable dynamical Casimir effect. We speculate that a separated parametric oscillator for generating coherent GR microwaves

  2. Re-Examining Gravitational Tunneling Radiation when taking into account Quantum Gravity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, John; Prescott, Trevor; Blado, Gardo

    2015-03-01

    Although shown to theoretically exist, Hawking Radiation has yet to be detected. The paper entitled ``Gravitational Tunneling Radiation'' by Mario Rabinowitz proposed a possible explanation by considering the gravitational tunneling effects in the presence of other bodies in the vicinity of the black hole. Rabinowitz showed that the power radiated (through gravitational radiation) by a black hole,PR, is related to the power generated by Hawking Radiation, PSH by PR/T ~PSH where T is the gravitational tunneling probability. The presence of other bodies lowers the gravitational barrier which in turn increases the gravitational tunneling probability thereby decreasing the Hawking radiation, PSH. In this paper, we examine the modification of T in the presence of quantum gravity effects by incorporating the Generalized Uncertainty Principle.

  3. Cosmological constraints on cosmic-string gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, R. R.; Allen, B.

    1992-05-01

    The primordial nucleosynthesis and pulsar timing noise constraints on cosmic-string gravitational radiation are computed. The computation consists of a numerical integration of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Einstein equations which describe a universe containing radiation, dust, and a ``one-scale''-model cosmic-string component. The procedure takes into account the effects of the annihilations of massive particle species on the equation of state of the cosmological fluid. An expression for the power emitted per mode of oscillation by a cosmic-string loop, suggested by both analytic calculations and recent numerical simulations, is used. The results of the computation are spectra of the cosmic-string gravitational radiation at nucleosynthesis and at present. Comparison of these spectra with the observed bounds on pulsar timing noise, and the observed bound on the effective number of light neutrino species permitted by the model of nucleosynthesis, allows one to exclude a range of values of μ, the cosmic-string linear mass density, for certain values of α, the size of a newly formed loop as a fraction of the particle horizon radius. We find constraints to μ which are more restrictive than any previous limit.

  4. Escape of gravitational radiation from the field of massive bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Richard H.; Pullin, Jorge; Kundu, Prasun K.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a compact source of gravitational waves of frequency omega in or near a massive spherically symmetric distribution of matter or a black hole. Recent calculations have led to apparently contradictory results for the influence of the massive body on the propagation of the waves. We show here that the results are in fact consistent and in agreement with the 'standard' viewpoint in which the high-frequency compact source produces the radiation as if in a flat background, and the background curvature affects the propagation of these waves.

  5. Radiation reaction in binary systems in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Daniel John

    1997-09-01

    This thesis is concerned with current problems in, and historical aspects of, the problem of radiation reaction in stellar binary systems in general relativity. Part I addresses current issues in the orbital evolution due to gravitational radiation damping of compact binaries. A particular focus is on the inspiral of small bodies orbiting large black holes, employing a perturbation formalism. In addition, the merger, at the end of the insprial, of comparable mass compact binaries, such as neutron star binaries is also discussed. The emphasis of Part I is on providing detailed descriptions of sources and signals with a view to optimising signal analysis in gravitational wave detectors, whether ground- or space- based interferometers, or resonant mass detectors. Part II of the thesis examines the historical controversies surrounding the problem of gravitational waves, and gravitational radiation damping in stellar binaries. In particular, it focuses on debates in the mid 20th-century on whether binary star systems would really exhibit this type of damping and emit gravitational waves, and on the 'quadrupole formula controversy' of the 1970s and 1980s, on the question whether the standard formular describing energy loss due to emission of gravitational waves was correctly derived for such systems. The study shed light on the role of analogy in science, especially where its use is controversial, on the importance of style in physics and on the problem of identity in science, as the use of history as a rhetorical device in controversial debate is examined. The concept of the Theoretician's Regress is introduced to explain the difficulty encountered by relativists in closing debate in this controversy, which persisted in one forms or another for several decades.

  6. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-15

    Intensities of 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O'Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  7. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-01

    Intensities of 1022 W cm-2 have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O’Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  8. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, B. J.; Baker, J. G.; Boggs, W. D.; Centrella, J. M.; vanMeter, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source, applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the l = m modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  9. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Barnard

    2008-01-01

    "We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source. applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the $\\ell = m$ modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model."

  10. Estimating gravitational radiation from super-emitting compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Chad; Johnson, Matthew C.; Lehner, Luis

    2017-06-01

    Binary black hole mergers are among the most violent events in the Universe, leading to extreme warping of spacetime and copious emission of gravitational radiation. Even though black holes are the most compact objects they are not necessarily the most efficient emitters of gravitational radiation in binary systems. The final black hole resulting from a binary black hole merger retains a significant fraction of the premerger orbital energy and angular momentum. A nonvacuum system can in principle shed more of this energy than a black hole merger of equivalent mass. We study these super-emitters through a toy model that accounts for the possibility that the merger creates a compact object that retains a long-lived time-varying quadrupole moment. This toy model may capture the merger of (low mass) neutron stars, but it may also be used to consider more exotic compact binaries. We hope that this toy model can serve as a guide to more rigorous numerical investigations into these systems.

  11. Purely radiating and nonradiating scalar, electromagnetic and weak gravitational sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2000-03-01

    It has been known for some time that localized sources to the scalar wave equation and Maxwell's equations exist which do not radiate. Such sources, referred to as non-radiating (NR) sources, generate vanishing fields outside their spatial support which prevents them from interacting with nearby objects by means of their fields. Work on NR sources dates back to Sommerfeld, Herglotz, Hertz, Ehrenfest and Schott who studied these objects in connection with electron and atom models. NR sources have also appeared extensively in inverse source/scattering theories as members of the null space of the source-to-field mapping. In this presentation, we provide a new description of scalar, vector or tensor NR sources and of a complementary class of sources, namely, sources that lack a NR part, i.e., `purely radiating' sources. We show that the class of square-integrable localized purely radiating scalar, electromagnetic or weak gravitational sources is exactly the class of solutions - within the source's support - of the homogeneous form of the associated partial differential equation relating the sources to their fields, i.e., purely radiating sources are themselves fields. As a consequence of this result, NR sources are shown to be inseparable components of a broad class of physically relevant sources, thereby having a physical significance that transcends their use in wave-theoretic inversion models. Localized NR sources are characterized in connection with the concept of reciprocity as non-interactors. The role of NR sources in absorption of radiation and energy storage is addressed. The general theoretical results are illustrated with the aid of a one-dimensional (1D) electromagnetic example corresponding to a transmission line system (equivalently, a 1D plane wave system) with uniformly distributed sources/loads.

  12. Analytic Black Hole Perturbation Approach to Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2003-11-01

    We review the analytic methods used to perform the post-Newtonian expansion of gravitational waves induced by a particle orbiting a massive, compact body, based on black hole perturbation theory. There exist two different methods of performing the post-Newtonian expansion. Both are based on the Teukolsky equation. In one method, the Teukolsky equation is transformed into a Regge-Wheeler type equation that reduces to the standard Klein Gordon equation in the flat-space limit, while in the other method (which was introduced by Mano, Suzuki, and Takasugi relatively recently, the Teukolsky equation is used directly in its original form. The former's advantage is that it is intuitively easy to understand how various curved space effects come into play. However, it becomes increasingly complicated when one goes to higher and higher post-Newtonian orders. In contrast, the latter's advantage is that a systematic calculation to higher post-Newtonian orders can be implemented relatively easily, but otherwise, it is so mathematical that it is hard to understand the interplay of higher order terms. In this paper, we review both methods so that their pros and cons may be seen clearly. We also review some results of calculations of gravitational radiation emitted by a particle orbiting a black hole.

  13. Information content of gravitational radiation and the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Halpern, Illan; Koeller, Jason

    2016-09-01

    Known entropy bounds, and the generalized second law, were recently shown to imply bounds on the information arriving at future null infinity. We complete this derivation by including the contribution from gravitons. We test the bounds in classical settings with gravity and no matter. In Minkowski space, the bounds vanish on any subregion of the future boundary, independently of coordinate choices. More generally, the bounds vanish in regions where no gravitational radiation arrives. In regions that do contain Bondi news, the bounds are compatible with the presence of information, including the information stored in gravitational memory. All of our results are consistent with the equivalence principle, which states that empty Riemann-flat spacetime regions contain no classical information. We also discuss the possibility that Minkowski space has an infinite vacuum degeneracy labeled by a choice of Bondi coordinates (a classical parameter, if physical). We argue that this degeneracy cannot have any observational consequences if the equivalence principle holds. Our bounds are consistent with this conclusion.

  14. Gravitational radiation from crystalline color-superconducting hybrid stars

    SciTech Connect

    Knippel, Bettina; Sedrakian, Armen

    2009-04-15

    The interiors of high mass compact (neutron) stars may contain deconfined quark matter in a crystalline color-superconducting (CCS) state. On a basis of microscopic nuclear and quark matter equations of states we explore the internal structure of such stars in general relativity. We find that their stable sequence harbors CCS quark cores with masses M{sub core}{<=}(0.78-0.82)M{sub {center_dot}} and radii R{sub core}{<=}7 km. The CCS quark matter can support nonaxisymmetric deformations, because of its finite shear modulus, and can generate gravitational radiation at twice the rotation frequency of the star. Assuming that the CCS core is maximally strained we compute the maximal quadrupole moment it can sustain. The characteristic strain of gravitational wave emission h{sub 0} predicted by our models are compared to the upper limits obtained by the LIGO and GEO 600 detectors. The upper limits are consistent with the breaking strain of CCS matter {sigma}{<=}10{sup -4} and large pairing gaps {delta}{approx}50 MeV, or, alternatively, with {sigma}{approx}10{sup -3} and small pairing gaps {delta}{approx}15 MeV. An observationally determined value of the characteristic strain h{sub 0} can pin down the product {sigma}{delta}{sup 2}. On the theoretical side a better understanding of the breaking strain of CCS matter will be needed to predict reliably the level of the deformation of CCS quark core from first principles.

  15. Bursts of Gravitational Radiation from Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.; Morejón, D.

    2000-10-01

    Berezinsky, Hnatyk and Vilenkin showed that superconducting cosmic strings could be central engines for cosmological gamma-ray bursts and ultra-high energy cosmic rays. If such a mechanism proves efficient, a (LIGO, VIRGO, LISA, TIGAS) detectable cusp-triggered gravitational wave burst should be released simultaneously with the γ -rays surge. Since photo-meson interaction triggers ν -flashes from γ -bursts, its cosmological time-delay respect to both radiations may prove useful to put unprecedent tight bounds on the neutrino mass spectrum, whenever a detection in coincidence could be pursued. It may consistently prove or rule out the quoted model as the hidden mechanism, since a bursts matched evolution (time variability of spectra and duration) is expected.

  16. On the Green functions of gravitational radiation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giampiero

    2001-06-01

    Previous work in the literature has studied gravitational radiation in black hole collisions at the speed of light. In particular, it had been proved that the perturbative field equations may all be reduced to equations in only two independent variables, by virtue of a conformal symmetry at each order in perturbation theory. The Green function for the perturbative field equations is analysed here by studying the corresponding second-order hyperbolic operator with variable coefficients, instead of using the reduction method from the retarded flat-space Green function in four dimensions. After reduction to canonical form of this hyperbolic operator, the integral representation of the solution in terms of the Riemann function is obtained. The Riemann function solves a characteristic initial-value problem for which analytic formulae leading to the numerical solution are derived.

  17. Critical phenomena in the aspherical gravitational collapse of radiation fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Montero, Pedro J.

    2015-12-01

    We study critical phenomena in the gravitational collapse of a radiation fluid. We perform numerical simulations in both spherical symmetry and axisymmetry, and observe critical scaling in both supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of a black hole, and subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space. We identify the critical solution in spherically symmetric collapse, find evidence for its universality, and study the approach to this critical solution in the absence of spherical symmetry. For the cases that we consider, aspherical deviations from the spherically symmetric critical solution decay in damped oscillations in a manner that is consistent with the behavior found by Gundlach in perturbative calculations. Our simulations are performed with an unconstrained evolution code, implemented in spherical polar coordinates, and adopting "moving-puncture" coordinates.

  18. Arrival times of gravitational radiation peaks for binary inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-11-01

    Modeling of gravitational waves (GWs) from binary black hole inspiral brings together early post-Newtonian waveforms and late quasinormal ringing waveforms. Attempts to bridge the two limits without recourse to numerical relativity involve predicting the time of the peak GW amplitude. This prediction will require solving the question of why the peak of the "source," i.e., the peak of the binary angular velocity, does not correspond to the peak of the GW amplitude. We show here that this offset can be understood as due to the existence of two distinct components of the radiation: the "direct" radiation analogous to that in flat spacetime and "scattered" radiation associated with curved spacetime. The time dependence of these two components and of their relative phases determines the location of the peak amplitude. We use a highly simplified model to clarify the two-component nature of the source, then demonstrate that the explanation is valid also for an extreme mass-ratio binary inspiral.

  19. Gravitational radiation from compact binary systems: Gravitational waveforms and energy loss to second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.; Wiseman, Alan G.

    1996-10-01

    We derive the gravitational waveform and gravitational-wave energy flux generated by a binary star system of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), accurate through second post-Newtonian order (O[(v/c)4]=O[(Gm/rc2)2]) beyond the lowest-order quadrupole approximation. We cast the Einstein equations into the form of a flat-spacetime wave equation together with a harmonic gauge condition, and solve it formally as a retarded integral over the past null cone of the chosen field point. The part of this integral that involves the matter sources and the near-zone gravitational field is evaluated in terms of multipole moments using standard techniques; the remainder of the retarded integral, extending over the radiation zone, is evaluated in a novel way. The result is a manifestly convergent and finite procedure for calculating gravitational radiation to arbitrary orders in a post-Newtonian expansion. Through second post-Newtonian order, the radiation is also shown to propagate toward the observer along true null rays of the asymptotically Schwarzschild spacetime, despite having been derived using flat-spacetime wave equations. The method cures defects that plagued previous ``brute-force'' slow-motion approaches to the generation of gravitational radiation, and yields results that agree perfectly with those recently obtained by a mixed post-Minkowskian post-Newtonian method. We display explicit formulas for the gravitational waveform and the energy flux for two-body systems, both in arbitrary orbits and in circular orbits. In an appendix, we extend the formalism to bodies with finite spatial extent, and derive the spin corrections to the waveform and energy loss.

  20. Detecting radiation reaction at moderate laser intensities.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Thomas; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Bulanov, Stepan S; Rykovanov, Sergey; Schroeder, Carl B; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new method of detecting radiation reaction effects in the motion of particles subjected to laser pulses of moderate intensity and long duration. The effect becomes sizable for particles that gain almost no energy through the interaction with the laser pulse. Hence, there are regions of parameter space in which radiation reaction is actually the dominant influence on charged particle motion.

  1. [The use of a detector of the extremely weak radiation as a variometer of gravitation field].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, E S; Bondarenko, E G; Shapovalov, S N; Sokolovskiĭ, V V; Troshichev, O A

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that the detector of extremely weak radiation with selectively increased sensitivity to the nonelectromagnetic, including the gravitational component of the spectrum of active physical fields can be used as the basis for constructing a variometer of gravitational field of a new type.

  2. Gravitational self-force from radiation-gauge metric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam; Merlin, Cesar; Barack, Leor

    2014-01-01

    Calculations of the gravitational self-force (GSF) on a point mass in curved spacetime require as input the metric perturbation in a sufficiently regular gauge. A basic challenge in the program to compute the GSF for orbits around a Kerr black hole is that the standard procedure for reconstructing the metric perturbation is formulated in a class of “radiation” gauges, in which the particle singularity is nonisotropic and extends away from the particle’s location. Here we present two practical schemes for calculating the GSF using a radiation-gauge reconstructed metric as input. The schemes are based on a detailed analysis of the local structure of the particle singularity in the radiation gauges. We show that three types of radiation gauge exist: two containing a radial stringlike singularity emanating from the particle, either in one direction (“half-string” gauges) or both directions (“full-string” gauges); and a third type containing no strings but with a jump discontinuity (and possibly a delta function) across a surface intersecting the particle. Based on a flat-space example, we argue that the standard mode-by-mode reconstruction procedure yields the “regular half” of a half-string solution, or (equivalently) either of the regular halves of a no-string solution. For the half-string case, we formulate the GSF in a locally deformed radiation gauge that removes the string singularity near the particle. We derive a mode-sum formula for the GSF in this gauge, which is analogous to the standard Lorenz-gauge formula but requires a correction to the values of the regularization parameters. For the no-string case, we formulate the GSF directly, without a local deformation, and we derive a mode-sum formula that requires no correction to the regularization parameters but involves a certain averaging procedure. We explain the consistency of our results with Gralla’s invariance theorem for the regularization parameters, and we discuss the

  3. Search for correlations between the University of Maryland and the University of Rome gravitational radiation antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, V.; Pizzella, G.; Lee, M.; Weber, J.

    1982-05-15

    Results are presented for analyses of the outputs of gravitational radiation antennas in Rome and in Maryland during July 1978. These data give evidence for an external background exciting both antennas.

  4. Axial dissipative dust as a source of gravitational radiation in f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Siddiqa, Aisha

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the source of gravitational radiation in the context of f(R) gravity by considering axially symmetric dissipative dust under geodesic condition. We evaluate scalars associated with electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl tensor for both non-spinning (at the center) and spinning (in the surrounding of the center) fluids of the configuration. For this purpose, we use the evolution as well as constraint equations for kinematical quantities and Weyl tensor. Finally, we investigate the existence of gravitational radiation through super-Poynting vector. It is found that the fluid is not gravitationally radiating in the non-spinning case but it is gravitationally radiating for the spinning case.

  5. Gravitational radiation from ultra high energy cosmic rays in models with large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Ben; Drescher, Hans-Joachim; Bleicher, Marcus

    2006-06-01

    The effects of classical gravitational radiation in models with large extra dimensions are investigated for ultra high energy cosmic rays (CRs). The cross sections are implemented into a simulation package (SENECA) for high energy hadron induced CR air showers. We predict that gravitational radiation from quasi-elastic scattering could be observed at incident CR energies above 10 9 GeV for a setting with more than two extra dimensions. It is further shown that this gravitational energy loss can alter the energy reconstruction for CR energies ECR ⩾ 5 × 10 9 GeV.

  6. Gravitational energy and radiation of a charged black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, Luciano; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the energy configuration of a charged black hole in the teleparallel framework of general relativity. We obtain the energy–momentum tensor of the gravitational field in a stationary frame, and we calculate its contribution to the total energy of the system. We study the same gravitational field measured by an accelerated frame and we analyze how the energy–momentum tensor is transformed. We found that in the accelerated frame, a Poynting-like flux appears for the gravitational field but not for the electromagnetic field.

  7. Searching for Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Hole MACHOs in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan A.

    2007-05-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is one of a new generation of detectors of gravitational radiation. The existence of gravitational radiation was first predicted by Einstein in 1916, however gravitational waves have not yet been directly observed. One source of gravitation radiation is binary inspiral. Two compact bodies orbiting each other, such as a pair of black holes, lose energy to gravitational radiation. As the system loses energy the bodies spiral towards each other. This causes their orbital speed and the amount of gravitational radiation to increase, producing a characteristic ``chirp'' waveform in the LIGO sensitive band. In this thesis, matched filtering of LIGO science data is used to search for low mass binary systems in the halo of dark matter surrounding the Milky Way. Observations of gravitational microlensing events of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud suggest that some fraction of the dark matter in the halo may be in the form of Massive Astrophysical Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs). It has been proposed that low mass black holes formed in the early universe may be a component of the MACHO population; some fraction of these black hole MACHOs will be in binary systems and detectable by LIGO. The inspiral from a MACHO binary composed of two 0.5 solar mass black holes enters the LIGO sensitive band around 40 Hz. The chirp signal increases in amplitude and frequency, sweeping through the sensitive band to 4400 Hz in 140 seconds. By using evidence from microlensing events and theoretical predictions of the population an upper limit is placed on the rate of black hole MACHO inspirals in the galactic halo.

  8. Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes: Advances in the Perturbative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, C. O.

    2005-08-01

    After the work of Regge, Wheeler, Zerilli, Teukolsky and others in the 1970s, it became possible to accurately compute the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of two black holes (in the extreme-mass limit). It was soon evident that, to first perturbative order, a particle in a circular orbit would continue orbiting forever if the radiative corrections to the particle motion that make the orbit decay were not taken into account. When I entered the field in 1996, a quick search of the literature showed that this problem was still unsolved. A straightforward computation leads to infinities produced by the representation of the particle in terms of Dirac delta functions. Since 1938, when Dirac had solved the equivalent problem in electromagnetic theory, nobody had succeeded in regularizing this in a self-consistent manner. Fortunately, the solution was arrived at much sooner than we expected. In 1997, Mino, Sasaki and Tanaka, and Quinn and Wald published the equations of motion that a particle obeys after self-force corrections. This essentially gave birth to the field of radiation reaction/self-force computations. The aim of this programme is first to obtain the corrections to the geodesic motion of a particle in the background of a single black hole, and then to use this corrected trajectory to compute second-order perturbations of the gravitational field. This will give us the energy-momentum radiated to infinity and into the hole, as well as the waveforms that we will eventually be able to measure with ground- or space-based gravitational wave detectors. As mentioned, the programme as a whole will give us waveforms accurate to second perturbative order in the mass ratio of the black holes, i.e. Script O[(m/M)2]. This will be a good approximation for galactic binary black holes of the order of a few solar masses, in the right frequency range (few hundred Hertz) to be detected by ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO and VIRGO

  9. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  10. Core Collapse Supernovae Using CHIMERA: Gravitational Radiation from Non-Rotating Progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Chertkow, Merek A; Hix, William Raphael; Blondin, J. M.; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Yoshida, S.

    2011-01-01

    The CHIMERA code is a multi-dimensional multi-physics engine dedicated primarily to the simulation of core collapse supernova explosions. One of the most important aspects of these explosions is their capacity to produce gravitational radiation that is detectable by earth-based laser-interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO and VIRGO. We present here preliminary gravitational signatures of two-dimensional models with non-rotating progenitors. These simulations exhibit explosions, which are followed for more than half a second after stellar core bounce.

  11. Astronomical polarization studies at radio and infrared wavelengths. Part 1: Gravitational deflection of polarized radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    The gravitational field is probed in a search for polarization dependence in the light bending. This involves searching for a splitting of a source image into orthogonal polarizations as the radiation passes through the solar gravitational field. This search was carried out using the techniques of very long and intermediate baseline interferometry, and by seeking a relative phase delay in orthogonal polarizations of microwaves passing through the solar gravitational field. In this last technique a change in the total polarization of the Helios 1 carrier wave was sought as the spacecraft passed behind the sun. No polarization splitting was detected.

  12. Prospects for detection of gravitational radiation by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports a calculation of the effect of gravitational radiation on the observed Doppler shift of a sinusoidal electromagnetic signal transmitted to, and coherently transponded from, distant spacecraft. It is found that the effect of plane gravitational waves on such observations is not intuitively immediate, and in fact depends sensitively on the spacecraft direction, which suggests the possibility of detecting such plane waves by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft. The need for broad band gravitational wave observations, the required stabilities of time keeping standards, and astrophysical sources expected in the Very Low Frequency band are briefly discussed.

  13. Stochasticity effects in quantum radiation reaction.

    PubMed

    Neitz, N; Di Piazza, A

    2013-08-02

    When an ultrarelativistic electron beam collides with a sufficiently intense laser pulse, radiation-reaction effects can strongly alter the beam dynamics. In the realm of classical electrodynamics, radiation reaction has a beneficial effect on the electron beam as it tends to reduce its energy spread. Here we show that when quantum effects become important, radiation reaction induces the opposite effect; i.e., the energy distribution of the electron beam spreads out after interacting with the laser pulse. We identify the physical origin of this opposite tendency in the intrinsic stochasticity of photon emission, which becomes substantial in the quantum regime. Our numerical simulations indicate that the predicted effects of the stochasticity can be measured already with presently available lasers and electron accelerators.

  14. Performance test of pipe-shaped radiation shields for cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Akutsu, Tomotada; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important challenges in cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detectors is to reduce the undesirable thermal radiation coming through holes in the radiation shield, which are necessary for the laser beam to pass through. For this purpose, pipe-shaped radiation shields called duct shields are used. Here, we have manufactured duct shields for KAGRA in Japan, one of the cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detectors, and measured the thermal radiation coming through the duct shields. The measured result was found to be consistent with the calculation result that the duct shield can reduce the thermal radiation to less than 1%. This fact confirmed that the amount of thermal radiation coming through the duct shields was smaller than KAGRA’s requirement.

  15. On a basic conceptual confusion in gravitational radiation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Bonga, Béatrice

    2017-10-01

    In much of the literature on linearized gravitational waves two completely different notions are called transverse traceless modes and labelled habTT , often in different sections of the same reference, without realizing the underlying inconsistency. We compare and contrast the two notions and find that the difference persists even at leading asymptotic order near future null infinity \

  16. Detecting a Non-Gaussian Stochastic Background of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Éanna É.

    2002-12-01

    We derive a detection method for a stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by events where the ratio of the average time between events to the average duration of an event is large. Such a signal would sound something like popcorn popping. Our derivation is based on the somewhat unrealistic assumption that the duration of an event is smaller than the detector time resolution.

  17. Stabilization of radiation reaction with vacuum polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita; Zhang, Sen; Koga, James; Nagatomo, Hideo; Nakai, Mitsuo; Mima, Kunioki

    2014-04-01

    From the development of the electron theory by H. A. Lorentz in 1906, many authors have tried to reformulate this model. P. A. M. Dirac derived the relativistic-classical electron model in 1938, which is now called the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. But this model has the big difficulty of the runaway solution. Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. For simulations in this research field, it is desirable to stabilize this model of the radiation reaction. In this paper, we will discuss this ability for radiation reaction with the inclusion of vacuum polarization.

  18. Constraints on general second-order scalar-tensor models from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rampei; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate that the general second-order scalar-tensor theories, which have attracted attention as possible modified gravity models to explain the late time cosmic acceleration, could be strongly constrained from the argument of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation. To this end, we consider the purely kinetic coupled gravity and the extended galileon model on a cosmological background. In these models, the propagation speed of tensor mode could be less than the speed of light, which puts very strong constraints from the gravitational Cherenkov radiation.

  19. On gravitational wave-Cherenkov radiation from photons when passing through diffused dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shu-Xu

    2017-03-01

    Analogous to Cherenkov radiation, when a particle moves faster than the propagation velocity of gravitational wave in matter (v > cg), we expect gravitational wave-Cherenkov radiation (GWCR). In the situation that a photon travels across diffuse dark matters, the GWCR condition is always satisfied, photon will thence lose its energy all along the path. This effect has long been ignored in the practice of astrophysics and cosmology without justification with serious calculation. We study this effect for the first time, and shows that this energy loss time of the photon is far longer than the Hubble time and therefore justify the practice of ignoring this effect in the context of astrophysics.

  20. Anti-damping effect of radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Li, H.; Shen, Y. F.; Yuan, X. Z.; Zi, J.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-damping effect of radiation reaction, which means the radiation reaction does non-negative work on a radiating charge, is investigated at length by using the Lorentz-Dirac equation (LDE) for the motion of a point charge respectively acted on by (a) a pure electric field, (b) a pure magnetic field and (c) the fields of an electromagnetic wave. We found that the curvature of the charge's trajectory plays an important role in the radiation reaction force, and the anti-damping effect cannot take place for the real macroscopic motions of a point charge. The condition for this anti-damping effect to take place is that the gradient of the external force field must exceed a certain value over the region of magnitude of the classical radius of massive charges (~10-15 m). Our results are potentially helpful to lessen the controversy on LDE and justify it as the correct classical equation describing the radiating charge's motion. If this anti-damping effect of LDE were a real existing physical process, it could serve as a mechanism within the context of classical electrodynamics for the stability of hydrogen atoms. Using the picture of an electron in quantum electrodynamics, namely the negative bare charge surrounded by the polarized positive charges of vacuum, we can obtain a reasonable explanation for the energy transferred to the electron during the occurrence of the anti-damping effect, on which the venerable work of Wheeler and Feynman has thrown some light.

  1. INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE EFFECT FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, Pablo; Larson, Shane L.; Spergel, David; Yunes, Nicolas

    2010-05-20

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are messengers carrying valuable information about their sources. For sources at cosmological distances, the waves will also contain the imprint left by the intervening matter. The situation is in close analogy with cosmic microwave photons, for which the large-scale structures the photons traverse contribute to the observed temperature anisotropies, in a process known as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We derive the GW counterpart of this effect for waves propagating on a Friedman-Robertson-Walker background with scalar perturbations. We find that the phase, frequency, and amplitude of the GWs experience Sachs-Wolfe-type integrated effects, in addition to the magnification effects on the amplitude from gravitational lensing. We show that for supermassive black hole binaries, the integrated effects could account for measurable changes on the frequency, chirp mass, and luminosity distance of the binary, thus unveiling the presence of inhomogeneities, and potentially dark energy, in the universe.

  2. Gravitational radiation from binary systems in alternative metric theories of gravity - Dipole radiation and the binary pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    The generation of gravitational radiation in several currently viable metric theories of gravitation (Brans-Dicke, Rosen, Ni, and Lightman-Lee) is analyzed, and it is shown that these theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation from systems containing gravitationally bound objects. In the binary system PSR 1913 + 16, this radiation results in a secular change in the orbital period of the system with a nominal magnitude of 3 parts in 100,000 per year. The size of the effect is proportional to the reduced mass of the system, to the square of the difference in (self-gravitational energy)/(mass) between the two components of the system, and to a parameter, xi, whose value varies from theory to theory. In general relativity xi equals 0, in Rosen's (1973) theory xi equals -20/3, and in Ni's (1973) theory xi equals -400/3. The current upper limit on such a secular period change is one part in 1 million per year. It is shown that further observations of the binary system that tighten this limit and that establish the masses of the components and the identity of the companion may provide a crucial test of otherwise viable alternatives to general relativity.

  3. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  4. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  5. Radiation reaction in high-intensity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita

    2015-10-01

    Since the development of a radiating electron model by Dirac in 1938 [P. A. M. Dirac, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 167, 148 (1938)], many authors have tried to reformulate this model of the so-called "radiation reaction". Recently, this effect has become important in ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a way of stabilizing the radiation reaction by quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum fluctuation [K Seto et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2014, 043A01 (2014); K. Seto, Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. On the other hand, the modification of the radiated field by highly intense incoming laser fields should be taken into account when the laser intensity is higher than 10^{22} W/cm2, which could be achieved by next-generation ultra-short-pulse 10 PW lasers, like the ones under construction for the ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose a running charge-mass method for the description of the QED-based synchrotron radiation by high-intensity external fields with stabilization by the QED vacuum fluctuation as an extension from the model by Dirac.

  6. Bianchi type-I magnetized radiating cosmological model in self creation theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vimal Chand; Jain, Nikhil

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated Bianchi type-I cosmological model in the presence of magnetized field with disordered radiation in Barber's second self-creation theory of gravitation. To obtain exact solution we assume that the component of shear tensor is proportional to expansion ( θ). Some geometrical and physical properties of the model have also been discussed.

  7. Naked singularities in non-self-similar gravitational collapse of radiation shells

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, P.S.; Dwivedi, I.H. )

    1992-03-15

    Non-self-similar gravitational collapse of imploding radiation is shown to give rise to a strong curvature naked singularity. The conditions are specified for the singularity to be globally naked and the strength of the same is examined along nonspacelike curves and along all the families of nonspacelike geodesics terminating at the singularity in the past.

  8. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar-tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as ``Direct Integration of the Relaxed Einstein equations,'' appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, mixed black hole-neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter. In another, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity.

  9. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. N.

    2015-05-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO and eLISA will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present progress in the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar- tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as “direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations,” appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity. In another, mixed black hole- neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter.

  10. On quadrupole and octupole gravitational radiation in the ANK formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozameh, Carlos N.; Ortega, R. G.; Rojas, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    Following the approach of Adamo-Newman-Kozameh (ANK) we derive the equations of motion for the center of mass and intrinsic angular moment for isolated sources of gravitational waves in axially symmetric spacetimes. The original ANK formulation is generalized so that the angular momentum coincides with the Komar integral for a rotational Killing symmetry. This is done using the Winicour-Tamburino Linkages which yields the mass dipole-angular momentum tensor for the isolated sources. The ANK formalism then provides a complex worldline in a fiducial flat space to define the notions of center of mass and spin. The equations of motion are derived and then used to analyse a very simple astrophysical process where only quadrupole and octupole contributions are included. The results are then compared with those coming from the post newtonian approximation.

  11. Small-scale fluctuations in the microwave background radiation and multiple gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1988-08-01

    It is shown that multiple gravitational lensing of the microwave background radiation (MBR) by static compact objects significantly attenuates small-scale fluctuations in the MBR. Gravitational lensing, by altering trajectories of MBR photons reaching an observer, leads to (phase) mixing of photons from regions with different initial fluctuations. As a result of this diffusion process the original fluctuations are damped on scales up to several arcmin. An equation that describes this process and its general solution are given. It is concluded that the present upper limits on the amplitude of the MBR fluctuations on small scales cannot constrain theories of galaxy formation. 25 references.

  12. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  13. Jeans instability of self gravitating partially ionized Hall plasma with radiative heat loss functions and porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    The Jeans instability of partially ionized self gravitating plasma is discussed to investigate the effect of the Hall current, radiative heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, collision frequency of neutrals, porosity, finite electrical resistivity and viscosity for the formation of stars in HI and HII regions. The standard Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) set of equations is used for the present configuration with radiative heat-loss function and thermal conductivity. A general dispersion relation is obtained from perturbation equations using the normal mode analysis method. We find that the Jeans condition of self-gravitational instability is modified due to the presence of neutral particle, radiative heat-loss functions and thermal conductivity. Presence of Hall current, porosity and collision frequency have no effect on Jeans criterion.

  14. Pragmatic approach to gravitational radiation reaction in binary black holes

    PubMed

    Lousto

    2000-06-05

    We study the relativistic orbit of binary black holes in systems with small mass ratio. The trajectory of the smaller object (another black hole or a neutron star), represented as a particle, is determined by the geodesic equation on the perturbed massive black hole spacetime. Here we study perturbations around a Schwarzschild black hole using Moncrief's gauge invariant formalism. We decompose the perturbations into l multipoles to show that all l-metric coefficients are C0 at the location of the particle. Summing over l, to reconstruct the full metric, gives a formally divergent result. We succeed in bringing this sum to a Riemann's zeta-function regularization scheme and numerically compute the first-order geodesics.

  15. Radiating gravitational collapse with shearing motion and bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R.

    2001-03-01

    A model is proposed of a collapsing radiating star consisting of a shearing fluid with bulk viscosity undergoing radial heat flow with outgoing radiation. The pressure of the star, at the beginning of the collapse, is isotropic but due to the presence of the bulk viscosity the pressure becomes more and more anisotropic. The behavior of the density, pressure, mass, luminosity, the effective adiabatic index and the Kretschmann scalar is analyzed. Our work is compared to the case of a collapsing shearing fluid of a previous model, for a star with 6 Msun.

  16. The suppression of gravitational radiation from finite-size stars falling into black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugan, M. P.; Shapiro, S. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1982-06-01

    It is shown that the gravitational radiation emitted in a head-on collision between a finite-size star and a black hole can be substantially less than might be expected on the basis of results for point mass-black hole collisions. The suppression 'form factor' for gravitational radiation from a dust cloud freely falling from rest at infinity into a Schwarzschild black hole of much greater mass is calculated. It is found that whenever the infalling star is tidally disrupted by the black hole prior to capture, the energy outflow in gravitational radiation may be much less than that for an infalling point particle of the same mass. This severe suppression results from phase incoherence in the outgoing radiation. Analytic expressions are derived for the total wave energy and wave amplitude in terms of the point-mass results. Head-on, free-fall collisions of main sequence, white dwarf, and neutron stars with black holes of different masses are considered.

  17. Modeling the Spin Equilibrium of Neutron Stars in LMXBs Without Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the spin-equilibrium of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs. We demonstrate that, when combined with a naive spin-up torque, the observed data leads to inferred magnetic fields which are at variance with those of galactic millisecond radiopulsars. This indicates the need for either additional spin-down torques (eg. gravitational radiation) or an improved accretion model. We show that a simple consistent accretion model can be arrived at by accounting for radiation pressure in rapidly accreting systems (above a few percent of the Eddington accretion rate). In our model the inner disk region is thick and significantly sub-Keplerian, and the estimated equilibrium periods are such that the LMXB neutron stars have properties that accord well with the galactic millisecond radiopulsar sample. The implications for future gravitational-wave observations are also discussed briefly.

  18. The mass transfer rate in X1916-053 - It is driven by gravitational radiation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; Taam, R. E.; White, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    A 50-minute period for a binary system harboring an X-ray burster would allow several alternatives for the mass-giving secondary, including an H-shell burning-plus-He degenerate core composite model. The burst properties of X1916-053 are presently used to argue against the He degenerate as well as the He main sequence solutions and to estimate whether, for any of the other solutions, the mass transfer rate could be consistent with that expected from gravitational radiation (GR). Within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, the transfer rate for the composite model solution is consistent with gravitational radiation, but enhancement by other mechanisms should be investigated.

  19. Modeling the Spin Equilibrium of Neutron Stars in LMXBs Without Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the spin-equilibrium of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs. We demonstrate that, when combined with a naive spin-up torque, the observed data leads to inferred magnetic fields which are at variance with those of galactic millisecond radiopulsars. This indicates the need for either additional spin-down torques (eg. gravitational radiation) or an improved accretion model. We show that a simple consistent accretion model can be arrived at by accounting for radiation pressure in rapidly accreting systems (above a few percent of the Eddington accretion rate). In our model the inner disk region is thick and significantly sub-Keplerian, and the estimated equilibrium periods are such that the LMXB neutron stars have properties that accord well with the galactic millisecond radiopulsar sample. The implications for future gravitational-wave observations are also discussed briefly.

  20. Relativistic astrophysics. [studies of gravitational radiation in asymptotic de sitter space and post Newtonian approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    The coordinate independence of gravitational radiation and the parameterized post-Newtonian approximation from which it is extended are described. The general consistency of the field equations with Bianchi identities, gauge conditions, and the Newtonian limit of the perfect fluid equations of hydrodynamics are studied. A technique of modification is indicated for application to vector-metric or double metric theories, as well as to scalar-tensor theories.

  1. Radiation enhancement and temperature in the collapse regime of gravitational scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri

    2017-04-01

    We generalize the semiclassical treatment of graviton radiation to gravitational scattering at very large energies √{s }≫mP and finite scattering angles Θs, so as to approach the collapse regime of impact parameters b ≃bc˜R ≡2 G √{s } . Our basic tool is the extension of the recently proposed, unified form of radiation to the Amati Ciafaloni Veneziano (ACV) reduced-action model and to its resummed-eikonal exchange. By superimposing that radiation all over eikonal scattering, we are able to derive the corresponding (unitary) coherent-state operator. The resulting graviton spectrum, tuned on the gravitational radius R , fully agrees with previous calculations for small angles Θs≪1 but, for sizeable angles Θs(b )≤Θc=O (1 ) , acquires an exponential cutoff of the large ω R region, due to energy conservation, so as to emit a finite fraction of the total energy. In the approach-to-collapse regime of b →bc+, we find a radiation enhancement due to large tidal forces, so that the whole energy is radiated off, with a large multiplicity ⟨N ⟩˜G s ≫1 and a well-defined frequency cutoff of order R-1. The latter corresponds to the Hawking temperature for a black hole of mass notably smaller than √{s }.

  2. Reducing spurious gravitational radiation in binary-black-hole simulations by using conformally curved initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2009-06-01

    At early times in numerical evolutions of binary black holes, current simulations contain an initial burst of spurious gravitational radiation (also called 'junk radiation') which is not astrophysically realistic. The spurious radiation is a consequence of how the binary-black-hole initial data are constructed: the initial data are typically assumed to be conformally flat. In this paper, I adopt a curved conformal metric that is a superposition of two boosted, non-spinning black holes that are approximately 15 orbits from merger. I compare junk radiation of the superposed-boosted-Schwarzschild (SBS) initial data with the junk of corresponding conformally flat, maximally sliced (CFMS) initial data. The SBS junk is smaller in amplitude than the CFMS junk, with the junk's leading-order spectral modes typically being reduced by a factor of order 2 or more.

  3. Geodesic synchrotron radiation. [emission by freely falling particles in gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breuer, R. A.; Chrzanowksi, P. L.; Hughes, H. G., III; Misner, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the results and methods of computing the high-frequency radiation emitted by freely falling particles moving in circular geodesic orbits in a spherically symmetric gravitational field. The high-frequency radiation, to which the methods of this paper apply, is the principal part of radiated energy only in the case of a particle moving in a highly relativistic, and therefore unstable, circular geodesic. The geodesic synchrotron radiation emitted in this case shows excitation of high-frequency harmonics and a narrow angular distribution. A Green's-function solution of the scalar wave equation is obtained using WKB methods. For application to relativistic circular orbits, a parabolic WKB approximation is required and yields solutions in terms of parabolic cylinder functions.

  4. Patterns of Auxin Distribution during Gravitational Induction of Reaction Wood in Poplar and Pine1

    PubMed Central

    Hellgren, Jenny M.; Olofsson, Kjell; Sundberg, Björn

    2004-01-01

    Gravistimulation of tree stems affects wood development by unilaterally inducing wood with modified properties, called reaction wood. Commonly, it also stimulates cambial growth on the reaction wood side. Numerous experiments involving applications of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or IAA-transport inhibitors have suggested that reaction wood is induced by a redistribution of IAA around the stem. However, in planta proof for this model is lacking. Therefore, we have mapped endogenous IAA distribution across the cambial region tissues in both aspen (Populus tremula, denoted poplar) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) trees forming reaction wood, using tangential cryosectioning combined with sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Moreover, we have documented the kinetics of IAA during reaction wood induction in these species. Our analysis of endogenous IAA demonstrates that reaction wood is formed without any obvious alterations in IAA balance. This is in contrast to gravitropic responses in roots and shoots where a redistribution of IAA has been documented. It is also of interest that cambial growth on the tension wood side was stimulated without an increase in IAA. Taken together, our results suggest a role for signals other than IAA in the reaction wood response, or that the gravitational stimulus interacts with the IAA signal transduction pathway. PMID:15122024

  5. On the gravitational field of a radiating, isothermal perfect gas cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers a static isotropic self-gravitating perfect gas in the presence of thermal radiation. The gravitational field is specified in terms of the radiation and gas pressures. Assuming that the thermodynamic internal energy is small compared with relativistic rest energy, it is shown that the gas pressure satisfies the Lane-Emden equation; the assumption of dominant intrinsic relativistic rest energy is satisfied by the hottest stars. Six-solutions of the Lane-Enden equation are obtained together with the corresponding gravitational fields. The basis for comparison is the singular solution I decaying like the inverse square of the radius, that is the leading term of the asymptotic solution V. Two semi-linear solutions are obtained using as variables nonlinear functions of the gas pressure, leading to nonlinear second-order differential equations that can be linearized; one solution II holds for small radius and leads to zero, finite or infinite central pressure, and the other solution III holds asymptomatically and exhibits pressure oscillations. The singular solution I for large radius is matched to a power series solution IV for small radius leading to a solution valid for all radii. The asymptotic solutions III and V: (i) coincide in their common domain of validity; (ii) can be truncated with good accuracy leading to the solution VI.

  6. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc

    2002-01-01

    The article reviews the current status of a theoretical approach to the problem of the emission of gravitational waves by isolated systems in the context of general relativity. Part A of the article deals with general post-Newtonian sources. The exterior field of the source is investigated by means of a combination of analytic post-Minkowskian and multipolar approximations. The physical observables in the far-zone of the source are described by a specific set of radiative multipole moments. By matching the exterior solution to the metric of the post-Newtonian source in the near-zone we obtain the explicit expressions of the source multipole moments. The relationships between the radiative and source moments involve many nonlinear multipole interactions, among them those associated with the tails (and tails-of-tails of gravitational waves. Part B of the article is devoted to the application to compact binary systems. We present the equations of binary motion, and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) order beyond the Newtonian acceleration. The gravitational-wave energy flux, taking consistently into account the relativistic corrections in the binary moments as well as the various tail effects, is derived through 3.5PN order with respect to the quadrupole formalism. The binary's orbital phase, whose prior knowledge is crucial for searching and analyzing the signals from inspiralling compact binaries, is deduced from an energy balance argument.

  7. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the current status of a theoretical approach to the problem of the emission of gravitational waves by isolated systems in the context of general relativity. Part A of the article deals with general post-Newtonian sources. The exterior field of the source is investigated by means of a combination of analytic post-Minkowskian and multipolar approximations. The physical observables in the far-zone of the source are described by a specific set of radiative multipole moments. By matching the exterior solution to the metric of the post-Newtonian source in the near-zone we obtain the explicit expressions of the source multipole moments. The relationships between the radiative and source moments involve many nonlinear multipole interactions, among them those associated with the tails (and tails-of-tails) of gravitational waves. Part B of the article is devoted to the application to compact binary systems. We present the equations of binary motion, and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) order beyond the Newtonian acceleration. The gravitational-wave energy flux, taking consistently into account the relativistic corrections in the binary moments as well as the various tail effects, is derived through 3.5PN order with respect to the quadrupole formalism. The binary's orbital phase, whose prior knowledge is crucial for searching and analyzing the signals from inspiralling compact binaries, is deduced from an energy balance argument.

  8. Gravitational time delay in orthogonally polarized radiation passing by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two parallel investigations into the degree, if any, to which orthogonally polarized rays are deflected differently on passing through the gravitational field of the sun were previously conducted. The first involved very long and intermediate length baseline radio interferometry. The second was initially based on observations of radiation transmitted by the Pioneer 6 spacecraft, on passing behind the sun in 1968. This work was extended by using Helios-A and Helios-B spacecraft. It was calculated that the differential deflection between orthogonally polarized components is less than one part in 10 to the 7th power of the total gravitational deflection, or less than about 10 to the -7th power arc sec, in total.

  9. Gravitational radiation by point particle eccentric binary systems in the linearised characteristic formulation of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedeño Montaña, C. E.; de Araujo, J. C. N.

    2016-04-01

    We study a binary system composed of point particles of unequal masses in eccentric orbits in the linear regime of the characteristic formulation of general relativity, generalising a previous study found in the literature in which a system of equal masses in circular orbits is considered. We also show that the boundary conditions on the time-like world tubes generated by the orbits of the particles can be extended beyond circular orbits. Concerning the power lost by the emission of gravitational waves, it is directly obtained from the Bondi's News function. It is worth stressing that our results are completely consistent, because we obtain the same result for the power derived by Peters and Mathews, in a different approach, in their seminal paper of 1963. In addition, the present study constitutes a powerful tool to construct extraction schemes in the characteristic formalism to obtain the gravitational radiation produced by binary systems during the inspiralling phase.

  10. Upper limits on the isotropic gravitational radiation background from pulsar timing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.; Downs, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    A pulsar and the earth may be thought of as end masses of a free-mass gravitational wave antenna in which the relative motion of the masses is monitored by observing the Doppler shift of the pulse arrival times. Using timing residuals from PSR 1133 + 16, 1237 + 25, 1604-00, and 2045-16, an upper limit to the spectrum of the isotropic gravitational radiation background has been derived in the frequency band 4 x 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -7th Hz. This limit is found to be S(E) = 10 to the 21st f-cubed ergs/cu cm Hz, where S(E) is the energy density spectrum and f is the frequency in Hz. This would limit the energy density at frequencies below 10 to the -8th Hz to be 0.00014 times the critical density.

  11. Semianalytical estimates of scattering thresholds and gravitational radiation in ultrarelativistic black hole encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Hinderer, Tanja; Lemos, Madalena; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2010-05-15

    Ultrarelativistic collisions of black holes are ideal gedanken experiments to study the nonlinearities of general relativity. In this paper we use semianalytical tools to better understand the nature of these collisions and the emitted gravitational radiation. We explain many features of the energy spectra extracted from numerical relativity simulations using two complementary semianalytical calculations. In the first calculation we estimate the radiation by a 'zero-frequency limit' analysis of the collision of two point particles with finite impact parameter. In the second calculation we replace one of the black holes by a point particle plunging with arbitrary energy and impact parameter into a Schwarzschild black hole, and we explore the multipolar structure of the radiation paying particular attention to the near-critical regime. We also use a geodesic analogy to provide qualitative estimates of the dependence of the scattering threshold on the black hole spin and on the dimensionality of the spacetime.

  12. Experimental Developments Towards a Long-Baseline Laser Interferometric Gravitational Radiation Detector.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Graham Alexander

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Gravitational radiation is predicted as a consequence of Einstein's General theory of Relativity. Indirectly verified by observations of the binary pulsar PSR1913+16, gravitational waves have still to be observed directly. Currently one of the most promising techniques is the use of laser interferometry to sense the motions of suspended test masses. Of the two possible types of interferometer in use, some aspects of the development of one of these (an optical cavity interferometer) are extensively investigated. Following a brief introduction to the theory of gravitational radiation and a review of gravitational wave sources and detection techniques, a detailed description of the design and operation of the Glasgow prototype detector is given. The sensitivity of the interferometric detector can be impaired by many noise sources, and the thesis describes how progress in the reduction of two of these noise sources improves the sensitivity. Firstly, a report is given on how progress in test mass design and the isolation of mechanical noise have improved sensitivity. The second noise source considered is the effect of fluctuations in the frequency of the illuminating laser light, and consideration of the influence of this noise source forms a large part of the thesis. An argon laser was rebuilt, with a separate cavity resonator, to reduce the level of intrinsic frequency noise, along with other noise sources, and a new technique of stabilising the laser frequency was developed. This method, which uses the reflection locking r.f. sideband technique, does not require the use of an intra-cavity modulator, and thus enables the laser to operate with a higher power output. The effects of residual laser frequency noise in the interferometer can be reduced by optical interference or by a technique which measures, and electronically subtracts, the frequency fluctuations. Both of these techniques are

  13. Gravitational radiation from a spinning compact object around a supermassive Kerr black hole in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wenbiao

    2010-10-15

    The gravitational waves and energy radiation from a spinning compact object with stellar mass in a circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole are investigated in this paper. The effect of how the spin acts on energy and angular moment fluxes is discussed in detail. The calculation results indicate that the spin of a small body should be considered in waveform-template production for the upcoming gravitational wave detections. It is clear that when the direction of spin axes is the same as the orbitally angular momentum ('positive' spin), spin can decrease the energy fluxes which radiate to infinity. For antidirection spin ('negative'), the energy fluxes to infinity can be enlarged. And the relations between fluxes (both infinity and horizon) and spin look like quadratic functions. From frequency shift due to spin, we estimate the wave-phase accumulation during the inspiraling process of the particle. We find that the time of particle inspiral into the black hole is longer for positive spin and shorter for negative compared with the nonspinning particle. Especially, for extreme spin value, the energy radiation near the horizon of the extreme Kerr black hole is much more than that for the nonspinning one. And consequently, the maximum binging energy of the extreme spinning particle is much larger than that of the nonspinning particle.

  14. Emerging Hawking-Like Radiation from Gravitational Bremsstrahlung Beyond the Planck Scale.

    PubMed

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-10-23

    We argue that, as a consequence of the graviton's spin-2, its bremsstrahlung in trans-Planckian-energy (E≫M(P)) gravitational scattering at small deflection angle can be nicely expressed in terms of helicity-transformation phases and their transfer within the scattering process. The resulting spectrum exhibits deeply sub-Planckian characteristic energies of order M(P)(2)/E≪M(P) (reminiscent of Hawking radiation), a suppressed fragmentation region, and a reduced rapidity plateau, in broad agreement with recent classical estimates.

  15. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  16. Conservation laws and radiation in the scale covariant theory of gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Beesham, A.

    1988-04-01

    The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are derived in the scale covariant theory of gravitation. The entropy problem which exists in the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker models can be solved in the present context. Since the weak and strong energy conditions may be violated, a big bang singularity may be avoided, in contrast to general relativity. Since beta is shown to be constant during the radiation-dominated era, the difficulties in the theory associated with nucleosynthesis are avoided. 10 references.

  17. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  18. Scientific goals achievable with radiation monitor measurements on board gravitational wave interferometers in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, C.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Fabi, M.; Finetti, N.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.

    2012-06-01

    Cosmic rays and energetic solar particles constitute one of the most important sources of noise for future gravitational wave detectors in space. Radiation monitors were designed for the LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) mission. Similar devices were proposed to be placed on board LISA and ASTROD. These detectors are needed to monitor the flux of energetic particles penetrating mission spacecraft and inertial sensors. However, in addition to this primary use, radiation monitors on board space interferometers will carry out the first multipoint observation of solar energetic particles (SEPs) at small and large heliolongitude intervals and at very different distances from Earth with minor normalization errors. We illustrate the scientific goals that can be achieved in solar physics and space weather studies with these detectors. A comparison with present and future missions devoted to solar physics is presented.

  19. Linearized f(R) gravity: Gravitational radiation and Solar System tests

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Christopher P. L.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the linearized form of metric f(R)-gravity, assuming that f(R) is analytic about R=0 so it may be expanded as f(R)=R+a{sub 2}R{sup 2}/2+.... Gravitational radiation is modified, admitting an extra mode of oscillation, that of the Ricci scalar. We derive an effective energy-momentum tensor for the radiation. We also present weak-field metrics for simple sources. These are distinct from the equivalent Kerr (or Schwarzschild) forms. We apply the metrics to tests that could constrain f(R). We show that light deflection experiments cannot distinguish f(R)-gravity from general relativity as both have an effective post-Newtonian parameter {gamma}=1. We find that planetary precession rates are enhanced relative to general relativity; from the orbit of Mercury we derive the bound |a{sub 2}| < or approx. 1.2x10{sup 18} m{sup 2}. Gravitational-wave astronomy may be more useful: considering the phase of a gravitational waveform we estimate deviations from general relativity could be measurable for an extreme-mass-ratio inspiral about a 10{sup 6}M{sub {center_dot}} black hole if |a{sub 2}| > or approx. 10{sup 17}m{sup 2}, assuming that the weak-field metric of the black hole coincides with that of a point mass. However Eoet-Wash experiments provide the strictest bound |a{sub 2}| < or approx. 2x10{sup -9} m{sup 2}. Although the astronomical bounds are weaker, they are still of interest in the case that the effective form of f(R) is modified in different regions, perhaps through the chameleon mechanism. Assuming the laboratory bound is universal, we conclude that the propagating Ricci scalar mode cannot be excited by astrophysical sources.

  20. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  1. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (<5 Myr) of turbulent, 106 M⊙ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an initial mass function (IMF) with an efficiency of 20 per cent per free-fall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster particle formation efficiency by a few per cent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of cluster formation efficiencies of 37-71 per cent for the most unbound to the most bound model. The total number of clusters increases while the maximum mass cluster decreases with an increasing initial virial parameter, resulting in steeper mass distributions. The star formation rates in our cluster particles are initially consistent with observations but rise to higher values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  2. Dynamic Universe Model predicts frequency shifting in electromagnetic radiation near gravitating masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, Dynamic Universe Model studies the light rays and other electromagnetic radiation passing grazingly near any gravitating mass. This change in frequency will depend on relative direction of movement between mass and radiation. Change in frequency depends on relative direction between ray and the Gravitating mass. Here in this paper we will mathematically derive the results and show these predictions. Dynamic Universe Model uses a new type of Tensor. There are no differential or integral equations here. No singularities and body to body collisions in this model. Many papers were published in USA and CANADA. See Dynamic Universe Model Blog for further details and papers Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step Keywords: Dynamic Universe Model, Hubble Space telescope (HST), SITA simulations , singularity-free cosmology,

  3. Gravitational wave radiation by LIGO-type detectors and its reciprocity relation with the detector's fundamental quantum limited sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Belinda; Ma, Yiqiu; Miao, Haixing; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-01-01

    We relate the radiation of gravitational waves (GW) by a light interferometer with cavity arms (such as LIGO) to its quantum limited sensitivity as a detector of GW's, thereby demonstrating a reciprocity relation between the interferometer's function as a detector and emitter. We derive the pairwise interactions among the cavity optical field, the cavity end mirror, and the gravitational perturbation from the action principle. We quantize these degrees of freedom to calculate the GW's generated by a quantum object. We find that the rate of gravitational wave generation is related to the so-called quantum Cramer Rao bound of the detector, which is a general result from linear measurement theory that gives the fundamental limit to a detector's sensitivity. We show that increasing the maximal sensitivity for the interferometer also increases its GW radiation. This finding may point towards a new paradigm for improving detector sensitivity by maximizing GW radiator.

  4. Reaction of runaway electron distributions to radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Adam; Embréus, Ola; Hirvijoki, Eero; Pusztai, István; Decker, Joan; Newton, Sarah L.; Fülöp, Tünde

    2015-11-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by a charged particle in accelerated motion is associated with a reduction in its energy, accounted for by the inclusion of a radiation reaction force in the kinetic equation. For runaway electrons in plasmas, the dominant radiative processes are the emission of bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation. In this contribution, we investigate the impact of the associated radiation reaction forces on the runaway electron distribution, using both analytical and numerical studies, and discuss the corresponding change to the runaway electron growth rate, which can be substantial. We also report on the formation of non-monotonic features in the runaway electron tail as a consequence of the more complicated momentum-space dynamics in the presence of radiation reaction.

  5. Mergers of Non-spinning Black-hole Binaries: Gravitational Radiation Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; vanMeter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from black-hole binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our primary goal is to present relatively complete information about the waveforms, including all the leading multipolar components, to interested researchers. In our analysis, we pursue the simplest physical description of the dominant features in the radiation, providing an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This interpretation applies uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We emphasize strong relationships among the l = m modes that persist through the full wavetrain. Exploring the structure of the waveforms in more detail, we conduct detailed analytic fitting of the late-time frequency evolution, identifying a key quantitative feature shared by the l = m modes among all mass-ratios. We identify relationships, with a simple interpretation in terms of the implicit rotating source, among the evolution of frequency and amplitude, which hold for the late-time radiation. These detailed relationships provide sufficient information about the late-time radiation to yield a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modeling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  6. On the quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling self-gravitating gas clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Meerson, B.; Megged, E.; Tajima, T.

    1995-03-01

    Two model problems are considered, illustrating the dynamics of quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling, optically thin self-gravitating gas clouds. In the first problem, spherically symmetric flows in an unmagnetized plasma are considered. For a power-law dependence of the radiative loss function on the temperature, a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions is found. The authors concentrate on a constant-mass cloud, one of the cases, when the self-similarity indices are uniquely selected. In this case, the self-similar flow problem can be formally reduced to the classical Lane-Emden equation and therefore solved analytically. The cloud is shown to undergo radiative condensation, if the gas specific heat ratio {gamma} > 4/3. The condensation proceeds either gradually, or in the form of (quasihydrostatic) collapse. For {gamma} < 4/3, the cloud is shown to expand. The second problem addresses a magnetized plasma slab that undergoes quasihydrostatic radiative cooling and condensation. The problem is solved analytically, employing the Lagrangian mass coordinate.

  7. Gravitation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Muehlner, D. J.; Benford, R. L.; Owens, D. K.; Pierre, N. A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon measurements were made of the far infrared background radiation. The radiometer used and its calibration are discussed. An electromagnetically coupled broadband gravitational antenna is also considered. The proposed antenna design and noise sources in the antenna are reviewed. A comparison is made between interferometric broadband and resonant bar antennas for the detection of gravitational wave pulses.

  8. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peeples, W.J.; Wombolt, D.G.; El-Mahdi, A.M.; Turalba, C.I.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena.

  9. Gravitational-radiation losses from the pulsar-white-dwarf binary PSR J1141-6545

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Bailes, Matthew; Verbiest, Joris P. W.

    2008-06-15

    Pulsars in close binary systems with white dwarfs or other neutron stars make ideal laboratories for testing the predictions of gravitational radiation and self-gravitational effects. We report new timing measurements of the pulsar-white-dwarf binary PSR J1141-6545. The orbit is found to be decaying at a rate of 1.04{+-}0.06 times the general relativistic prediction and the Shapiro delay is consistent with the orbital inclination angle derived from scintillation measurements. The system provides a unique testbed for tensor-scalar theories of gravity. Our measurements place stringent constraints in the theory space, with a limit of {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}<2.1x10{sup -5} for weakly nonlinear coupling and an asymptotic limit of {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}<3.4x10{sup -6} for strongly nonlinear coupling (where {alpha}{sub 0} is the linear coupling strength of matter to an underlying scalar field), which is nearly 3 times smaller than the Cassini bound ({alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -5})

  10. AR Scorpii and possible gravitational wave radiation from pulsar white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Schramm, S.

    2017-06-01

    In view of the new recent observation and measurement of the rotating and highly magnetized white dwarf AR Scorpii, we determine bounds of its moment of inertia, magnetic fields and radius. Moreover, we investigate the possibility of fast rotating and/or magnetized white dwarfs to be sources of detectable gravitational wave (GW) emission. Numerical stellar models at different baryon masses are constructed. For each star configuration, we compute self-consistent relativistic solutions for white dwarfs endowed with poloidal magnetic fields by solving the Einstein-Maxwell field equations in a self-consistent way. The magnetic field supplies an anisotropic pressure, leading to the braking of the spherical symmetry of the star. In this case, we compute the quadrupole moment of the mass distribution. Next, we perform an estimate of the GW of such objects. Finally, we show that the new recent observation and measurement pulsar white dwarf AR Scorpii, as well as other stellar models, might generate GW radiation that lies in the bandwidth of the discussed next generation of space-based GW detectors DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO) and Big Bang Observer (BBO).

  11. Investigation of classical radiation reaction with aligned crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Piazza, A.; Wistisen, Tobias N.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2017-02-01

    Classical radiation reaction is the effect of the electromagnetic field emitted by an accelerated electric charge on the motion of the charge itself. The self-consistent underlying classical equation of motion including radiation-reaction effects, the Landau-Lifshitz equation, has never been tested experimentally, in spite of the first theoretical treatments of radiation reaction having been developed more than a century ago. Here we show that classical radiation reaction effects, in particular those due to the near electromagnetic field, as predicted by the Landau-Lifshitz equation, can be measured in principle using presently available facilities, in the energy emission spectrum of 30-GeV electrons crossing a 0.55-mm thick diamond crystal in the axial channeling regime. Our theoretical results indicate the feasibility of the suggested setup, e.g., at the CERN Secondary Beam Areas (SBA) beamlines.

  12. Measurement of a high electrical quality factor in a niobium resonator for a gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical quality factors of a 10-g niobium resonator were measured at 4.4 K and were found to be 8.1 x 10 to the 6th, and 3.8 x 10 to the 6th, respectively. The value for the electrical quality factor is high enough for a system operating at 50 mK at a sensitivity level of one phonon. The resonator's low damping properties make it suitable for use as a transducer for a cryogenic three-mode gravitational radiation detector. A practical design is given for the mounting of the resonator on a 2400-kg aluminum-bar detector. Projections are made for the sensitivity of a 2400-kg bar instrumented as a three-mode system with this resonator inductively coupled to a SQUID.

  13. Bursts of gravitational radiation from superconducting cosmic strings and the neutrino mass spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.; González, D. M.

    2001-02-01

    Berezinsky, Hnatyk and Vilenkin showed that superconducting cosmic strings could be central engines for cosmological gamma-ray bursts and for producing the neutrino component of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A consequence of this mechanism would be that a detectable cusp-triggered gravitational wave burst should be released simultaneously with the /γ-ray surge. If contemporary measurements of both /γ and /ν radiation could be made for any particular source, then the cosmological time-delay between them might be useful for putting unprecedentedly tight bounds on the neutrino mass spectrum. Such measurements could consistently verify or rule out the model, since strictly correlated behaviour is expected for the duration of the event and for the time variability of the spectra.

  14. Bursts of Gravitational Radiation from Superconducting Cosmic Strings and the Neutrino Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.; González, Danays Morejón

    2001-09-01

    Berezinsky, Hnatyk and Vilenkin showed that superconducting cosmic strings could be central engines for cosmological gamma-ray bursts and for producing the neutrino component of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A consequence of this mechanism would be that a detectable cusp-triggered gravitational wave burst should be released simultaneously with the γ-ray surge. If contemporary measurements of both γ and ν radiation could be made for any particular source, then the cosmological time-delay between them might be useful for putting unprecedently tight bounds on the neutrino mass spectrum. Such measurements could consistently verify or rule out the model, since strictly correlated behaviour is expected for the duration of the event and for the time variability of the spectra.

  15. Bayesian inference on compact binary inspiral gravitational radiation signals in interferometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röver, Christian; Meyer, Renate; Christensen, Nelson

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a description of a Bayesian analysis framework for use with interferometric gravitational radiation data in search of binary neutron star inspiral signals. Five parameters are investigated, and the information extracted from the data is illustrated and quantified. The posterior integration is carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. Implementation details include the use of importance resampling for improved convergence and informative priors reflecting the conditions expected for realistic measurements. An example is presented from an application using realistic, albeit fictitious, data. We expect that these parameter estimation techniques will prove useful at the end of a binary inspiral detection pipeline for interferometric detectors like LIGO or Virgo.

  16. Quantum gravitational collapse and Hawking radiation in 2+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Vaz, Cenalo; Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.; Kiefer, Claus

    2007-12-15

    We develop the canonical theory of gravitational collapse in 2+1 dimensions with a negative cosmological constant and obtain exact solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation regularized on a lattice. We employ these solutions to derive the Hawking radiation from black holes formed in all models of dust collapse. We obtain an (approximate) Planck spectrum near the horizon characterized by the Hawking temperature T{sub H}=({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){radical}(G{lambda}M)/2{pi}, where M is the mass of a black hole that is presumed to form at the center of the collapsing matter cloud and -{lambda} is the cosmological constant. Our solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation are exact, so we are able to reliably compute the gray-body factors that result from going beyond the near-horizon region.

  17. Measurement of a high electrical quality factor in a niobium resonator for a gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical quality factors of a 10-g niobium resonator were measured at 4.4 K and were found to be 8.1 x 10 to the 6th, and 3.8 x 10 to the 6th, respectively. The value for the electrical quality factor is high enough for a system operating at 50 mK at a sensitivity level of one phonon. The resonator's low damping properties make it suitable for use as a transducer for a cryogenic three-mode gravitational radiation detector. A practical design is given for the mounting of the resonator on a 2400-kg aluminum-bar detector. Projections are made for the sensitivity of a 2400-kg bar instrumented as a three-mode system with this resonator inductively coupled to a SQUID.

  18. Hawking-like radiation and the density matrix for an infalling observer during gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Anshul; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-09-01

    We study time-dependent Hawking-like radiation as seen by an infalling observer during gravitational collapse of a thin shell. We calculate the occupation number of particles of which the frequencies are measured in the proper time of an infalling observer in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. We solve the equations for the whole process from the beginning of the collapse till the moment when the collapsing shell reaches zero radius. The radiation distribution is not thermal in the whole frequency regime, but it is approximately thermal for the wavelengths of the order of the Schwarzschild radius of the collapsing shell. After the Schwarzschild radius is crossed, the temperature increases without limits as the singularity is approached. We also calculate the density matrix associated with this radiation. It turns out that the off-diagonal correlation terms to the diagonal Hawking leading-order terms are very important. While the trace of the diagonal (Hawking) density matrix squared decreases during the evolution, the trace of the total density matrix squared remains unity at all times and all frequencies.

  19. Spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction of strain, news and gravitational radiation flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handmer, Casey J.; Szilágyi, Béla; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    We present a new approach for the Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) of gravitational radiation strain, news function, and the flux of the energy-momentum, supermomentum and angular momentum associated with the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs asymptotic symmetries. In CCE, a characteristic evolution code takes numerical data on an inner worldtube supplied by a Cauchy evolution code, and propagates it outwards to obtain the space-time metric in a neighborhood of null infinity. The metric is first determined in a scrambled form in terms of coordinates determined by the Cauchy formalism. In prior treatments, the waveform is first extracted from this metric and then transformed into an asymptotic inertial coordinate system. This procedure provides the physically proper description of the waveform and the radiated energy but it does not generalize to determine the flux of angular momentum or supermomentum. Here we formulate and implement a new approach which transforms the full metric into an asymptotic inertial frame and provides a uniform treatment of all the radiation fluxes associated with the asymptotic symmetries. Computations are performed and calibrated using the spectral Einstein code.

  20. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  1. Acute and Chronic Cutaneous Reactions to Ionizing Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bray, Fleta N; Simmons, Brian J; Wolfson, Aaron H; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important treatment modality for a variety of malignant conditions. However, development of radiation-induced skin changes is a significant adverse effect of radiation therapy (RT). Cutaneous repercussions of RT vary considerably in severity, course, and prognosis. When they do occur, cutaneous changes to RT are commonly graded as acute, consequential-late, or chronic. Acute reactions can have severe sequelae that impact quality of life as well as cancer treatment. Thus, dermatologists should be informed about these adverse reactions, know how to assess their severity and be able to determine course of management. The majority of measures currently available to prevent these acute reactions are proper skin hygiene and topical steroids, which limit the severity and decrease symptoms. Once acute cutaneous reactions develop, they are treated according to their severity. Treatments are similar to those used in prevention, but incorporate wound care management that maintains a moist environment to hasten recovery. Chronic changes are a unique subset of adverse reactions to RT that may develop months to years following treatment. Chronic radiation dermatitis is often permanent, progressive, and potentially irreversible with substantial impact on quality of life. Here, we also review the etiology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of late-stage cutaneous reactions to radiotherapy, including chronic radiation dermatitis and radiation-induced fibrosis.

  2. Influence of Periodic and Quasi-periodic Gravitational Modulation on Convective Instability of Reaction Fronts in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allali, K.; Belhaq, M.

    This work gives an overview on the effect of vertical periodic and QP gravitational modulations on the convective instability of reaction fronts in porous media. The model consists of the heat equation, the equation for the depth of conversion and the equations of motion under the Darcy law. Attention is focused on two cases. The case of a periodic gravitational vibration with a modulated amplitude, and the case of quasi-periodic vibration having two incommensurate frequencies. In both cases the heating is acted from below such that the sense of reaction is opposite to the gravity sense. The convective instability threshold is obtained by reducing the original reaction-diffusion problem to a singular perturbation one using the matched asymptotic expansion. The obtained reduced problem is then solved numerically after performing the linear stability analysis of the steady-state solution for the interface. It is shown that in the case of the modulation of the periodic vibration amplitude, a destabilizing effect of reaction fronts can be gained for a frequency modulation equal to half the frequency of the vibration, whereas a stabilizing effect is observed when the frequency of the modulation is twice that of the vibration. In the case of a quasi-periodic gravitational vibration it is indicated that for appropriate values of amplitudes and frequencies ratio of the quasi-periodic excitation, a stabilizing effect of reaction fronts can be successfully achieved.

  3. Application of a New Method to Study the Spin Equilibrium of Aql X–1: The Possibility of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2017-09-01

    Accretion via disks can make neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) fast spinning, and some of these stars are detected as millisecond pulsars. Here we report a practical way to find out if a neutron star in a transient LMXB has reached the spin equilibrium by disk–magnetosphere interaction alone, and if not, to estimate this spin equilibrium frequency. These can be done using specific measurable source luminosities, such as the luminosity corresponding to the transition between the accretion and propeller phases, and the known stellar spin rate. Such a finding can be useful to test if the spin distribution of millisecond pulsars, as well as an observed upper cutoff of their spin rates, can be explained using disk–magnetosphere interaction alone, or additional spin-down mechanisms, such as gravitational radiation, are required. Applying our method, we find that the neutron star in the transient LMXB Aql X–1 has not yet reached the spin equilibrium by disk–magnetosphere interaction alone. We also perform numerical computations, with and without gravitational radiation, to study the spin evolution of Aql X–1 through a series of outbursts and to constrain its properties. While we find that the gravitational wave emission from Aql X–1 cannot be established with certainty, our numerical results show that the gravitational radiation from Aql X–1 is possible, with a 1.6× {10}37 g cm2 upper limit of the neutron star misaligned mass quadrupole moment.

  4. Radiation and radiation reaction in continuous focusing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    We show that the radiation damping rate of the transverse action of a particle in a straight, continuous focusing system is independent of the particle energy, and that no quantum excitation is induced. This absolute damping effect leads to the existence of a transverse ground state which the particle inevitably decays to, and yields the minimum beam emittance that one can ever attain, {gamma}{epsilon}{sub min} = {Dirac_h}/2mc, limited only by the uncertainty principle. Due to adiabatic invariance, the particle can be accelerated along the focusing channel in its ground state without any radiation energy loss. These findings may apply to bent systems provided that the focusing field dominates over the bending field.

  5. Nonelastic nuclear reactions and accompanying gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, R.; Rosner, H. R.; George, M. C.; Hayes, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Several aspects of nonelastic nuclear reactions which proceed through the formation of a compound nucleus are dealt with. The full statistical model and the partial statistical model are described and computer programs based on these models are presented along with operating instructions and input and output for sample problems. A theoretical development of the expression for the reaction cross section for the hybrid case which involves a combination of the continuum aspects of the full statistical model with the discrete level aspects of the partial statistical model is presented. Cross sections for level excitation and gamma production by neutron inelastic scattering from the nuclei Al-27, Fe-56, Si-28, and Pb-208 are calculated and compared with avaliable experimental data.

  6. Radiation reaction as a non-conservative force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aashish, Sandeep; Haque, Asrarul

    2016-09-01

    We study a system of a finite size charged particle interacting with a radiation field by exploiting Hamilton’s principle for a non-conservative system recently introduced by Galley [1]. This formulation leads to the equation of motion of the charged particle that turns out to be the same as that obtained by Jackson [2]. We show that the radiation reaction stems from the non-conservative part of the effective action for a charged particle. We notice that a charge interacting with a radiation field modeled as a heat bath affords a way to justify that the radiation reaction is a non-conservative force. The topic is suitable for graduate courses on advanced electrodynamics and classical theory of fields.

  7. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  8. Energy straggling and radiation reaction for magnetic bremsstrahlung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C. S.; White, D.

    1972-01-01

    Using the method of quantum electrodynamics, the energy distribution of particles and emitted photons is calculated for the case when increases in the average energy of the photon emitted by synchrotron radiation to values appreciable compared to the energy of the particle give rise to particle energy straggling and radiation spectrum broadening. The classical radiative reaction effects which may be tested in this type of experiment are outlined, and a detailed quantum mechanical calculation is presented. The significance of energy straggling in astrophysics is discussed briefly.

  9. Energy straggling and radiation reaction for magnetic bremsstrahlung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C. S.; White, D.

    1972-01-01

    Using the method of quantum electrodynamics, the energy distribution of particles and emitted photons is calculated for the case when increases in the average energy of the photon emitted by synchrotron radiation to values appreciable compared to the energy of the particle give rise to particle energy straggling and radiation spectrum broadening. The classical radiative reaction effects which may be tested in this type of experiment are outlined, and a detailed quantum mechanical calculation is presented. The significance of energy straggling in astrophysics is discussed briefly.

  10. Observable signatures of a black hole ejected by gravitational-radiation recoil in a galaxy merger.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham

    2007-07-27

    According to recent simulations, the coalescence of two spinning black holes (BHs) could lead to a BH remnant with recoil speeds of up to thousands of km s(-1). Here we examine the circumstances resulting from a gas-rich galaxy merger under which the ejected BH would carry an accretion disk and be observable. As the initial BH binary emits gravitational radiation and its orbit tightens, a hole is opened in the disk which delays the consumption of gas prior to the eventual BH ejection. The punctured disk remains bound to the ejected BH within the region where the gas orbital velocity is larger than the ejection speed. For a approximately 10(7) M[middle dot in circle] BH the ejected disk has a characteristic size of tens of thousands of Schwarzschild radii and an accretion lifetime of approximately 10(7) yr. During that time, the ejected BH could traverse a considerable distance and appear as an off-center quasar with a feedback trail along the path it left behind.

  11. Formation of close binary black holes merging due to gravitational-wave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutukov, A. V.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The conditions for the formation of close-binary black-hole systems merging over the Hubble time due to gravitational-wave radiation are considered in the framework of current ideas about the evolution of massive close-binary systems. The original systems whose mergers were detected by LIGO consisted of main-sequence stars with masses of 30-100 M ⊙. The preservation of the compactness of a binary black hole during the evolution of its components requires either the formation of a common envelope, probably also with a low initial abundance of metals, or the presence of a "kick"—a velocity obtained during a supernova explosion accompanied by the formation of a black hole. In principle, such a kick can explain the relatively low frequency of mergers of the components of close-binary stellar black holes, if the characteristic speed of the kick exceeds the orbital velocities of the system components during the supernova explosion. Another opportunity for the components of close-binary systems to approach each other is related to their possible motion in a dense molecular cloud.

  12. Pioneer 10 search for gravitational waves - Limits on a possible isotropic cosmic background of radiation in the microhertz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Mashhoon, B.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the response of the Doppler tracking system to a stochastic background of gravitational radiation is discussed. Using data acquired in 1981 by the Deep Space Network with the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, interesting upper limits are placed on the energy density of the background in three frequency bands extending from 7 x 10 to the -7th to 10 to the -4th Hz, a region that has been inaccessible previously by any technique.

  13. A semi-classical treatment of channeling radiation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Chen, P.; Ruth, R.D.

    1995-11-01

    Radiation reaction including damping and quantum excitation has been studied extensively in synchrotrons and storage rings, where the effect is mainly due to the bending field. Recent development in advanced acceleration concepts requires very strong transverse focusing to maintain beam stability, and novel ideas such as channeling acceleration utilize the superstrong microscopic focusing field existing in a crystal channel. Here, a semi-classical formalism is used to calculate the radiation reaction of a relativistic particle in a straight, continuous focusing system. Due to the absence of quantum excitation in such a focusing system, the radiation damping rate of the transverse action obtained using this formalism agrees exactly with the result from the classical Lorentz-Dirac radiation reaction equation. In the limit where the pitch angle of the particle is much smaller than the radiation opening angle, the transverse action damps exponentially with an energy-independent rate that is much faster than the energy decay rate. In the opposite limit, both the transverse action and the energy damp with power laws and their relative rates are comparable. The general time-dependence of the transverse action damping and the energy decay are obtained analytically from these rate equations.

  14. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  15. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  16. Radiation-reaction trapping of electrons in extreme laser fields.

    PubMed

    Ji, L L; Pukhov, A; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-04-11

    A radiation-reaction trapping (RRT) of electrons is revealed in the near-QED regime of laser-plasma interaction. Electrons quivering in laser pulse experience radiation reaction (RR) recoil force by radiating photons. When the laser field reaches the threshold, the RR force becomes significant enough to compensate for the expelling laser ponderomotive force. Then electrons are trapped inside the laser pulse instead of being scattered off transversely and form a dense plasma bunch. The mechanism is demonstrated both by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the QED photonic approach and numerical test-particle modeling based on the classical Landau-Lifshitz formula of RR force. Furthermore, the proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  17. Detection of gravitational radiation and oscillations of the sun via Doppler tracking of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The magnitude of Doppler signals produced by gravitational wave burst, continuous gravitational waves, and oscillations of the sun interacting with a spacecraft are considered. Expressions are worked out for the appropriate noise entering each measurement. The noise sources considered are the Doppler extractor, fluctuations in the solar wind and the troposphere, and fluctuations in the reference oscillator.

  18. The evolution of the gravitational radiation from stellar components of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Osminkin, E. YU.; Prokhorov, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution is discussed of gravitational waves spectra produced by binary stars, supernova explosions, and coalescences of binary compact stars in outer galaxies. These spectra are integrated over a simple model of the universe to give an estimate of the stochastic gravitational wave background due to astrophysical sources.

  19. Tracking the radiation reaction energy when charged bodies accelerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2015-08-01

    We consider radiation reaction and energy conservation in classical electromagnetism. We first treat the well-known problem of energy accounting during radiation from a uniformly accelerating particle. This gives rise to the following paradox: when the self-force vanishes, the system providing the applied force does only enough work to give the particle its kinetic energy—so where does the energy that is eventually radiated away come from? We answer this question using a modern treatment of radiation reaction and self-force, as it appears in the expression due to Eliezer and Ford and O'Connell. We clarify the influence of the Schott force, and we find that the radiated power is 2 q 2 a 0 . f 0 / ( 3 m c 3 ) , which differs from Larmor's formula. Finally, we present a simple and highly visual argument that enables one to track the radiated energy without the need to appeal to the far field in the distant future (the "wave zone").

  20. Radiation, adriamycin, and skin reactions: effects of radiation and drug fractionation, hyperthermia, and tetracycline. [X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Redpath, J.L.; Zabilansky, E.; Colman, M.

    1981-06-01

    The effect of adriamycin in combination with radiation on the skin reactions of mouse feet has been examined under a variety of experimental conditions including: (a) hyperthermic treatment of the foot immediately following adriamycin administration, with the former given either just before or just after x irradiation, and (b) fractionated treatments of drug and radiation in a variety of sequences over an 18-day period. In the case of the most severe hyperthermic treatment, no increased radiation reactions were observed in the presence of adriamycin. However, in the case of the less severe hyperthermic treatment a small but significant increase in skin reactions was observed. In the study of fractionated drug and radiation treatments, an enhancement of reaction in those animals receiving combined modality treatment over those receiving radiation alone was seen in those groups where the initiation of drug treatment succeeded the initiation of radiation treatment by 2 to 7 days. In addition, the effect of tetracycline administered in drinking water (80 ..mu..g/ml) on the foot skin reactions in mice treated with x rays alone and in combination with hyperthermia has been studied.

  1. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post) sup 5/2 -Newtonian order: Late-time evolution and gravitational radiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The late-time evolution of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) is studied using the Damour-Derueele (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian equations of motion with relativistic corrections of all orders up to and including radiation reaction. Using the method of close orbital elements from celestial mechanics, the author evolves the orbits to separations of r {approx} 2 m, where m is the total mass, at which point the (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian approximation breaks down. With the orbits as input, he calculates the gravitational waveform and luminosity using a post-Newtonian formalism of Wagoner and Will. Results are obtained for systems containing various combinations of compact objects, for various values of the mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}, and forg various initial values of the orbital eccentricity.

  2. Direct measurements of radiative capture reactions with DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Direct measurements of radiative proton and alpha capture reactions are crucial for understanding nucleosynthesis in a variety of astrophysical environments, including classical novae, supernovae, X-Ray bursts, and quiescent stellar burning. Often the most important reactions have very low cross sections or involve unstable targets, making laboratory measurements extremely challenging. The detector of recoils and gammas of nuclear reactions (DRAGON) at TRIUMF is a recoil mass separator designed to measure radiative capture reactions in inverse kinematics, with beam suppression factors as high as 1016. When combined with the intense radioactive beams available at the ISAC-I facility, DRAGON's capabilities are unique and world-leading. In this talk, I will give a brief technical overview of DRAGON before presenting results from recent experiments. Some highlights include the first-ever direct measurement of 38K(p , γ) 39Ca, a crucial reaction for determining the endpoint of nova nucleosynthesis, and measurements of 76Se(α , γ) 80Kr. The latter measurements determine the rate of the reverse reaction, 80Kr(γ , α) 76Se, an important waiting point in the synthesis of the p-nuclei. I will also discuss future (and ongoing) developments at DRAGON, including the commissioning of a new chamber for high-precision elastic scattering measurements and plans to determine the 330 keV resonance strength in 18F(p , γ) 19Ne via measurements of 15O(α , γ) 19Ne and 15O + α elastic scattering.

  3. Detecting a stochastic background of gravitational radiation: Signal processing strategies and sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bruce; Romano, Joseph D.

    1999-05-01

    We analyze the signal processing required for the optimal detection of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation using laser interferometric detectors. Starting with basic assumptions about the statistical properties of a stochastic gravity-wave background, we derive expressions for the optimal filter function and signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-correlation of the outputs of two gravity-wave detectors. Sensitivity levels required for detection are then calculated. Issues related to (i) calculating the signal-to-noise ratio for arbitrarily large stochastic backgrounds, (ii) performing the data analysis in the presence of nonstationary detector noise, (iii) combining data from multiple detector pairs to increase the sensitivity of a stochastic background search, (iv) correlating the outputs of 4 or more detectors, and (v) allowing for the possibility of correlated noise in the outputs of two detectors are discussed. We briefly describe a computer simulation that was used to ``experimentally'' verify the theoretical calculations derived in the paper, and which mimics the generation and detection of a simulated stochastic gravity-wave signal in the presence of simulated detector noise. Numerous graphs and tables of numerical data for the five major interferometers (LIGO-WA, LIGO-LA, VIRGO, GEO-600, and TAMA-300) are also given. This information consists of graphs of the noise power spectra, overlap reduction functions, and optimal filter functions; also included are tables of the signal-to-noise ratios and sensitivity levels for cross-correlation measurements between different detector pairs. The treatment given in this paper should be accessible to both theorists involved in data analysis and experimentalists involved in detector design and data acquisition.

  4. Gravitational-wave dynamics and black-hole dynamics: second quasi-spherical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2001-12-01

    Gravitational radiation with roughly spherical wavefronts, produced by roughly spherical black holes or other astrophysical objects, is described by an approximation scheme. The first quasi-spherical approximation, describing radiation propagation on a background, is generalized to include additional non-linear effects, due to the radiation itself. The gravitational radiation is locally defined and admits an energy tensor, satisfying all standard local energy conditions and entering the truncated Einstein equations as an effective energy tensor. This second quasi-spherical approximation thereby includes gravitational radiation reaction, such as the back-reaction on the black hole. With respect to a canonical flow of time, the combined energy-momentum of the matter and gravitational radiation is covariantly conserved. The corresponding Noether charge is a local gravitational mass-energy. Energy conservation is formulated as a local first law relating the gradient of the gravitational mass to work and energy-supply terms, including the energy flux of the gravitational radiation. Zeroth, first and second laws of black-hole dynamics are given, involving a dynamic surface gravity. Local gravitational-wave dynamics is described by a non-linear wave equation. In terms of a complex gravitational-radiation potential, the energy tensor has a scalar-field form and the wave equation is an Ernst equation, holding independently at each spherical angle. The strain to be measured by a distant detector is simply defined.

  5. Pioneer 10 search for gravitational waves - No evidence for coherent radiation from Geminga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Armstrong, J. W.; Estabrook, F. B.; Hellings, R. W.; Lau, E. K.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Attempts to identify a periodic gravitational wave signal from the binary Geminga in the reduced Doppler data from the Pioneer 10 spacecraft are reported. The study was performed to examine the possibility that the observed 160 min solar oscillation is driven by a gravitational wave from the binary, which has a period exactly one cycle different from the solar oscillation. Three 12 hr passes of Doppler data from Pioneer 10, now beyond the orbit of Neptune, were subjected to FFT analysis to detect a spectral gravitational wave signature. None was found. Least squares analysis of all low noise data from 1981 to characterize the amplitude and phase of a signal from Geminga also produced a null result. Finally, an upper bound was calculated for the polarization component of the potentially observable gravitational strain.

  6. Gravitational radiation detection with spacecraft Doppler tracking - Limiting sensitivities and prospective missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Hellings, R. W.; Wahlquist, H. D.; Wolff, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The prospects of using spacecraft Doppler tracking, in NASA missions, for the detection of gravitational waves are examined. The sensitivity limits of such detection are characterized in terms of plasma scintillation, troposphere scintillation, receiver noise, MDA and ODA quantization error, and clock jitter. Current and possible future NASA missions that will involve gravitational wave experiments are briefly reviewed, including the Galileo, solar polar, Halley/Tempel-2, and solar probe missions.

  7. Synchrotron radiation with radiation reaction. [relativistic electron motion in strong astrophysical magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Wasserman, Ira

    1991-01-01

    A rigorous discussion is presented of the classical motion of a relativistic electron in a magnetic field and the resulting electromagnetic radiation when radiation reaction is important. In particular, for an electron injected with initial energy gamma(0), a systematic perturbative solution to the Lorentz-Dirac equation of motion is developed for field strengths satisfying gamma(0) B much less than 6 x 10 to the 15th G. A particularly accurate solution to the electron orbital motion in this regime is found and it is demonstrated how lowest-order corrections can be calculated. It is shown that the total energy-loss rate corresponds to what would be found using the exact Larmor power formula without including radiation reaction. Provided that the particle energy and field strength satisfy the same contraint, it is explicitly demonstrated that the intuitive prescription for calculating the time-integrated radiation spectrum described above is correct.

  8. Mass-energy radiative transfer and momentum extraction by gravitational wave emission in the collision of two black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranha, R. F.; Soares, I. Damião; Tonini, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    We examine numerically the head-on collision of two boosted Schwarzschild black holes, in the realm of Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. Characteristic initial data for the system are constructed and the Robinson-Trautman equation is integrated for these data using a numerical code based on the Galerkin-collocation method. The initial data already have a common horizon so that the evolution covers the post-merger regime up to the final configuration, when the gravitational wave emission ceases. In the nonlinear regime gravitational waves are emitted, extracting mass and linear momentum from the system. The final configuration is a boosted Schwarzschild black hole with rest mass larger than the masses of the two individual initial black holes, and with a smaller final boost parameter characterizing the recoil velocity of the remnant. The efficiency Δ of the mass-energy extraction by gravitational waves is evaluated. The points (Δ,y), where y is the (normalized) rest mass of the remnant black hole, satisfy a nonextensive Tsallis distribution with entropic index q≃1/2 for y≲12. Beyond ỹ12 the experimental points deviate from the distribution function and the efficiency presents an absolute maximum for the case of equally massive individual colliding black holes; the remnant has no recoil in this case. By using the Bondi mass formula we also evaluate the total energy EW carried out by gravitational waves as well as the radiative corrections to the efficiency. EW increases monotonically with y and the experimental points (EW,y) also satisfy a nonextensive Tsallis distribution but with q≃2/3, up to ỹ14.2. Beyond this value the experimental points increase faster than the distribution function. For any initial infalling velocity v, the distribution of momentum of the remnant exhibits a maximum at α1=αm≃0.667, where α1 is related to the ratio of pre-merger rest masses, and has a one-to-one correspondence with y for fixed v. Two distinct regimes of

  9. Magnetogasdynamic spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes, in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to power law. The radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model and the heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law for heat conduction. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. It is shown that an increase of the gravitational parameter or the Alfven-Mach number or the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas decreases the compressibility of the gas in the flow-field behind the shock, and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is formed at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of a flare produced shock in the solar wind, central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion etc. The solutions obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  10. General tissue reactions and implications for radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, S; Hill, C

    2015-06-01

    Non-cancer effects and risks at low doses from ionising radiation are controversial topics within the field of radiation protection. These issues are discussed in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 118, 'ICRP statement on tissue reactions'. Both non-cancer effects and risks are expected to become increasingly important to the system of radiation protection. Before this can happen, several factors must be considered: thorough characterisation of the relationship between dose and risk; verification of the biological mechanisms for any noted excess risk; and adjustment of noted excess risks through the use of a detriment factor. It is difficult to differentiate the relatively small risks associated with radiation from other risk factors in the low-dose region of the dose-response curve. Several recent papers have indicated the possibility of a non-linear dose-response relationship for non-cancer effects. In addition, there are still many uncertainties associated with the biological mechanisms for non-cancer effects. Finally, it is essential to consider the incorporation of detriment into a well-defined system of radiological protection. Given the recent interest in non-cancer effects, it is essential to facilitate discussions in order to define dose limits more clearly within the existing system of radiation protection for both cancer and non-cancer effects.

  11. The secular effect of gravitational radiation damping on the periastron advance of binary stars in second order perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Sen

    2017-08-01

    The second order perturbation effect of gravitational radiation damping on the periastron advance of binary stars is studied. The second order analytic solution is obtained based on the first order theory in the 2014 article by Li. Theoretical results show that secular variation exists in the periastron advance of binary stars in the second order theory, but secular variation does not exist in the first order perturbation theory. Numerical results for two compact binary stars (PSR J0737-3039 and M33 X-7) are given, demonstrating the theoretical significance even though the effect is very small.

  12. Simulating Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes Mergers as LISA Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the simulation of gravitational waves from Binary Massive Black Holes with LISA observations is shown. The topics include: 1) Massive Black Holes (MBHs); 2) MBH Binaries; 3) Gravitational Wavws from MBH Binaries; 4) Observing with LISA; 5) How LISA sees MBH binary mergers; 6) MBH binary inspirals to LISA; 7) Numerical Relativity Simulations; 8) Numerical Relativity Challenges; 9) Recent Successes; 10) Goddard Team; 11) Binary Black Hole Simulations at Goddard; 12) Goddard Recent Advances; 13) Baker, et al.:GSFC; 13) Starting Farther Out; 14) Comparing Initial Separation; 15) Now with AMR; and 16) Conclusion.

  13. Caffeine ameliorates radiation-induced skin reactions in mice but does not influence tumour radiation response.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, S A; Mitra, A K; George, K C; Verma, N C

    2002-03-01

    Intramuscular administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg(-1) body weight to the gastrocnemius muscles of Swiss mice 5 min prior to local irradiation (35 Gy) of the leg delayed the progression of radiation-induced skin reactions in such animals. While 90% epilation with reddening of the skin was noted in animals treated with radiation alone, animals pretreated with caffeine suffered only partial hair loss with slight reddening of the skin on the 16th and 20th days post-irradiation. Beyond the 28th day, damage scores in irradiated feet for both the groups were similar (score 3) and remained unchanged until the 32nd day and then decreased and disappeared completely in both treatment groups by the 40th day after irradiation. In addition, the effect of caffeine on the radiation response of a mouse fibrosarcoma was investigated. Results showed that intratumoral administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg(-1) body weight 5 min prior to local exposure of tumours to 10 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays did not influence the response of tumours to radiation. The present study thus showed that although caffeine ameliorated radiation-induced skin reactions in the mouse leg, it did not affect the tumour radiation response, indicating its potential application in cancer radiotherapy.

  14. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  15. Disc-protoplanet interaction. Influence of circumprimary radiative discs on self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyergyovits, M.; Eggl, S.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Theis, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Context. More than 60 planets have been discovered so far in systems that harbour two stars, some of which have binary semi-major axes as small as 20 au. It is well known that the formation of planets in such systems is strongly influenced by the stellar components, since the protoplanetary disc and the particles within are exposed to the gravitational influence of the binary. However, the question on how self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies affect the evolution of a radiative, circumprimary disc is still open. Aims: We present our 2D hydrodynamical GPU-CPU code and study the interaction of several thousands of self-gravitating particles with a viscous and radiative circumprimary disc within a binary star system. To our knowledge this program is the only one at the moment that is capable to handle this many particles and to calculate their influence on each other and on the disc. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a circumstellar disc assuming the binary system to be coplanar. Our grid-based staggered mesh code relies on ideas from ZEUS-2D, where we implemented the FARGO algorithm and an additional energy equation for the radiative cooling according to opacity tables. To treat particle motion we used a parallelised version of the precise Bulirsch - Stoer algorithm. Four models in total where computed taking into account (i) only N-body interaction; (ii) N-body and disc interaction; (iii) the influence of computational parameters (especially smoothing) on N-body interaction; and (iv) the influence of a quiet low-eccentricity disc while running model (ii). The impact velocities were measured at two different time intervals and were compared. Results: We show that the combination of disc- and N-body self-gravity can have a significant influence on the orbit evolution of roughly Moon sized protoplanets. Conclusions: Not only gas drag can alter the orbit of particles, but the gravitational influence of the disc can accomplish this as well. The results

  16. Gravitational wave luminosity and net momentum flux in head-on mergers of black holes: Radiative patterns and mode mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranha, Rafael Fernandes; Soares, Ivano Damião; Tonini, Eduardo Valentino

    2016-09-01

    We show that gravitational wave radiative patterns from a point test particle falling radially into a Schwarzschild black hole, as derived by Davis, Ruffini, Press and Price [M. Davis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 27, 1466 (1971).], are present in the nonlinear regime of head-on mergers of black holes. We use the Bondi-Sachs characteristic formulation and express the gravitational wave luminosity and the net momentum flux in terms of the news functions. We then evaluate the (-2 )-spin-weighted ℓ-multipole decomposition of these quantities via exact expressions valid in the nonlinear regime and defined at future null infinity. Our treatment is made in the realm of Robinson-Trautman dynamics, with characteristic initial data corresponding to the head-on merger of two black holes. We consider mass ratios in the range 0.01 ≤α ≤1 . We obtain the exponential decay with ℓ of the total energy contributed by each multipole ℓ, with an accurate linear correlation in the log-linear plot of the points up to α ≃0.7 . Above this mass ratio the contribution of the odd modes to the energy decreases faster than that of the even modes, leading to the breaking of the linear correlation; for α =1 the energy in all odd modes is zero. The dominant contribution to the total radiated energy comes from the quadrupole mode ℓ=2 corresponding, for instance, to about ≃84 % for small mass ratios up to ≃99.8 % for the limit case α =1 . The total rescaled radiated energy EWtotal/m0α2 decreases linearly with decreasing α , yielding for the point particle limit α →0 the value ≃0.0484 , about 5 times larger than the result of Davis et al. [1]. The mode decomposition of the net momentum flux and of the associated gravitational wave impulses results in an adjacent-even-odd mode-mixing pattern. We obtain that the impulses contributed by each (ℓ,ℓ+1 ) mixed mode also accurately satisfy the exponential decay with ℓ, for the whole mass ratio domain considered, 0.01 ≤α <1

  17. Bianchi VI cosmological models representing perfect fluid and radiation with electric-type free gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Banerjee, S. K.

    1992-11-01

    A homogeneous Bianchi type VIh cosmological model filled with perfect fluid, null electromagnetic field and streaming neutrinos is obtained for which the free gravitational field is of the electric type. The barotropic equation of statep = (γ-1)ɛ is imposed in the particular case of Bianchi VI0 string models. Various physical and kinematical properties of the models are discussed.

  18. Search for neutrino radiation from gravitational collapses of stars using the LSD detector under Mont Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Korol'Kova, E. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Korchagin, P. V.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Mal'Gin, A. S.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Ryasnyj, V. G.; Talochkin, V. P.

    1993-04-01

    An analysis of LSD data for the period from August 1985 to November 1991 does not reveal possible candidates for neutrino bursts from gravitational collapses of stars, except for the event of February 23, 1987, which may be related to SN 1987A. Upper bounds are obtained for neutrino fluxes from relict supernovae.

  19. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã-ström, Jonatan; Bezrukov, Dmitry S.; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C+) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 11Π → X1Σ+ and rovibrational transitions on the X1Σ+ and a3Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit-Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius-Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10-250 K, the rate constant is about 10-21 cm3 s-1, rising toward 10-16 cm3 s-1 for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  20. Measuring the stochastic gravitational-radiation background with laser-interferometric antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nelson

    1992-12-01

    A study of the method of detecting a stochastic gravitation-wave background (SGWB) with laser-interferometric gravitational-wave antennas is presented. The SGWB can be measured by correlating the output of two or more detectors. The results in this paper can be applied to the planned new generation of kilometer length interferometers, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in the United States, or similar systems in other countries. Advanced detectors will be able to limit the gravity-wave background energy density per logarithmic interval at 100 Hz to 2×10-10 times the closure density of the Universe. A survey of potential sources indicates that a pair of antennas will be able to confirm or deny the existence of cosmic strings, or may detect the background produced by extragalactic neutron star binaries. Elements of the optimal interferometer design and orientation for detecting the SGWB, or any gravity wave, are given. In particular, the criteria for orienting a pair of antennas, the trade-off between sensitivity and bandwidth, and the effect of antenna separation on the correlation are presented. A procedure for obtaining the correlated signal from two interferometers is given. The statistical basis of the correlation experiment is presented. The cause and effect of correlated noise is examined. Filtering and data analysis issues are also discussed.

  1. Gravitational Radiation from Standing Accretion Shock Instability in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotake, Kei; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Yamada, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments in which we study how asphericities induced by the growth of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) produce gravitational waveforms in the postbounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. To obtain the neutrino-driven explosions, we parameterize the neutrino fluxes emitted from the central proto-neutron star and approximate the neutrino transfer by a light-bulb scheme. We find that the waveforms due to anisotropic neutrino emissions show a monotonic increase with time, whose amplitudes are up to 2 orders of magnitude larger than those from convective matter motions outside proto-neutron stars. We point out that the amplitudes begin to become larger when the growth of the SASI enters the nonlinear phase, in which the deformation of the shocks and the neutrino anisotropy become large. From the spectrum analysis of the waveforms, we find that the amplitudes from the neutrinos are dominant over those from the matter motions at frequencies below ~100 Hz, which should be within the detection limits of next-generation detectors such as LCGT and the advanced LIGO for a supernova at 10 kpc. As a contribution to the gravitational wave background, we show that the amplitudes from this source could be larger at frequencies above ~1 Hz than the primordial gravitational wave backgrounds but, unfortunately, invisible to the proposed space-based detectors.

  2. Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzina, Svetlana I.; Shilova, Irina A.; Mikhailov, Al'fa I.

    2011-09-01

    Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials were explored by 3-cm and 2-mm ESR spectroscopy. Background (intrinsic) singlet signals at g=2.003 from wood pulp and lignin and those arising during reaction of lignocellulose materials with acids and chlorine were attributed to radicals with conjugated CC bonds. The 2-mm ESR signal with 3D anisotropy of g-factor from o-semiquinone radical ions formed in reaction of lignin with NaOH was recorded for the first time. The singlet signals derived from cellulose γ-irradiated at 77 K and marked out during post-thermal reactions were assigned to radicals with conjugated bonds. In wetted cellulose, a triplet signal with αβH≅2.7 mT and imposed quadruplet structure (0.5-0.7 mT) from three γ-protons was detected at 300 K and attributed to С 4-radicals. The triplet signals derived from С 2- and С 3-radicals in pyranose cycles of cellulose exhibited higher values of αβH (3.0-3.2 mT) and lower thermal stability (up to 250 K). In radiolyzed cotton pulp, detected were ESR signals derived from formyl radicals formed upon rupture of the С 5С 6 bond in pyranose cycles. Heating up irradiated samples under О 2 was accompanied by formation of peroxide radicals. Photoinduced recombination of trapped electrons with С 1-radicals was found to proceed as a chain reaction with a kinetic length of about 25 units. Photolysis ( λ≥360 nm) of radiolyzed cellulose enhanced the disclosure of pyranose cycles and, as a result, the evolution of CO 2 by a factor of 2-2.5.

  3. Calculation of radiation reaction effect on orbital parameters in Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sago, Norichika; Fujita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the secular changes of the orbital parameters of a point particle orbiting a Kerr black hole, due to the gravitational radiation reaction. For this purpose, we use the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation in the first-order black hole perturbation theory, with the expansion with respect to the orbital eccentricity. In this work, the calculation is done up to the fourth post-Newtonian (4PN) order and to the sixth order of the eccentricity, including the effect of the absorption of gravitational waves by the black hole. We confirm that, in the Kerr case, the effect of the absorption appears at the 2.5PN order beyond the leading order in the secular change of the particle's energy and may induce a superradiance, as known previously for circular orbits. In addition, we find that the superradiance may be suppressed when the orbital plane inclines with respect to the equatorial plane of the central black hole. We also investigate the accuracy of the 4PN formulae by comparing to numerical results. If we require that the relative errors in the 4PN formulae are less than 10^{-5}, the parameter region to satisfy the condition will be p≳ 50 for e=0.1, p≳ 80 for e=0.4, and p≳ 120 for e = 0.7 almost irrespective of the inclination angle or the spin of the black hole, where p and e are the semi-latus rectum and the eccentricity of the orbit. The region can further be extended using an exponential resummation method to p≳ 40 for e=0.1, p≳ 60 for e=0.4, and p≳ 100 for e=0.7. Although we still need the higher-order calculations of the PN approximation and the expansion with respect to the orbital eccentricity to apply for data analysis of gravitational waves, the results in this paper would be an important improvement from the previous work at the 2.5PN order, especially for large-p regions.

  4. COEXISTENCE OF GRAVITATIONALLY-BOUND AND RADIATION-DRIVEN C IV EMISSION LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyuan; Wang Tinggui; Zhou Hongyan; Liu Bo; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo

    2011-09-01

    There are mutually contradictory views in the literature of the kinematics and structure of high-ionization line (e.g., C IV) emitting regions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two kinds of broad emission line region (BELR) models have been proposed, outflow and gravitationally-bound BELR, which are supported, respectively, by blueshift of the C IV line and reverberation mapping observations. To reconcile these two apparently different models, we present a detailed comparison study between the C IV and Mg II lines using a sample of AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the kinematics of the C IV region is different from that of Mg II, which is thought to be controlled by gravity. A strong correlation is found between the blueshift and asymmetry of the C IV profile and the Eddington ratio. This provides strong observational support for the postulation that the outflow is driven by radiation pressure. In particular, we find robust evidence that the C IV line region is largely dominated by outflow at high Eddington ratios, while it is primarily gravitationally-bounded at low Eddington ratios. Our results indicate that these two emitting regions coexist in most AGNs. The emission strength from these two gases varies smoothly with Eddington ratio in opposite ways. This explanation naturally reconciles the apparently contradictory views proposed in previous studies. Finally, candidate models are discussed which can account for both the enhancement of outflow emission and suppression of normal BEL in AGNs with high Eddington ratios.

  5. Using OJ287 observations to probe back reaction of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, Mauri J.; Dey, Lankeswar; Gopakumar, Achamveedu; Zola, Staszek; Sadakane, Kozo; Matsumoto, Katsura; Reichart, Dan; Caton, Daniel B.; Gazeas, Kosmas; Ciprini, Stefano; Jermak, Helen; Steele, Iain; Berdyugin, Andrei; Nilsson, Kari

    2017-06-01

    The presence of a supermassive binary black hole (BBH) central engine in OJ287 is revealed by impact flares which arise from the secondary impacting the accretion disk of the primary. These flares have been observed since 1913 from the study of old photographic plates and from recent observational campaigns, 9 events in total. In addition, the secondary induces flares by affecting the accretion rate of the primary. The records for the latter events start in 1900, and they have been observed for each of the 10 cycles since then. Because of orbital precession, the impact flares times do not follow any simple rule. However, since the BBH - accretion disk impact model was proposed in 1995, the optical flux behavior of OJ287 has become highly predictable. The latest predictions were given for the late 2015 - early 2017 season. These have now been verified. The impact flare started on 2015 November 25, during the Centenary of Einstein’s General Relativity, followed by induced accretion flares which peaked on 2016 March and 2016 October. The nine impact flares specify the two parameters of the standard accretion disk and the 6 parameters of the BBH orbit uniquely. The main remaining uncertainty has to do with the exact way the gravitational wave (GW) emission affects the orbit. The impact flare observations demand that the GW emission is a combination of the instantaneous and hereditary effects appearing at the Post Newtonian orders 2.5PN, 3.5PN and 4PN, and all of them have to be incorporated while modeling the dynamics of the central engine BBH in OJ287. Previously, only the standard 2.5PN “Newtonian” GW terms have been used. We develop a simplified way of incorporating the higher order General Relativistic effects and obtain revised estimates for various BBH parameters. The improved BBH dynamics makes specific predictions for the occurrences of the expected impact flares in future and thereby provide additional strong field tests of General Relativity.

  6. Dipole gravitational radiation in Rosen's theory of gravity - Observable effects in the binary system PSR 1913+16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.; Eardley, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that Rosen's (1973) bimetric theory of gravity predicts the emission of dipole gravitational radiation from binary systems containing neutron stars, such as the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, which causes rapid changes in orbital period. The theory also predicts sizable corrections to masses inferred from orbital data and periastron-shift data. It is demonstrated that this prediction is inconsistent with the observed upper limit on period changes unless the system consists of two neutron stars whose masses differ by less than 0.3 solar mass, or a neutron star of mass less than 0.4 solar mass and a companion which must be a rapidly rotating white dwarf or a helium main-sequence star. Because Rosen's theory is in agreement with all solar-system experiments to date, this represents a feasible test of its viability.

  7. Dipole gravitational radiation in Rosen's theory of gravity - Observable effects in the binary system PSR 1913+16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.; Eardley, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that Rosen's (1973) bimetric theory of gravity predicts the emission of dipole gravitational radiation from binary systems containing neutron stars, such as the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, which causes rapid changes in orbital period. The theory also predicts sizable corrections to masses inferred from orbital data and periastron-shift data. It is demonstrated that this prediction is inconsistent with the observed upper limit on period changes unless the system consists of two neutron stars whose masses differ by less than 0.3 solar mass, or a neutron star of mass less than 0.4 solar mass and a companion which must be a rapidly rotating white dwarf or a helium main-sequence star. Because Rosen's theory is in agreement with all solar-system experiments to date, this represents a feasible test of its viability.

  8. Gender difference in older adult's utilization of gravitational and ground reaction force in regulation of angular momentum during stair descent.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Kunal; Kim, Jemin; Casebolt, Jeffrey; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2015-06-01

    Angular momentum of the body is a highly controlled quantity signifying stability, therefore, it is essential to understand its regulation during stair descent. The purpose of this study was to investigate how older adults use gravity and ground reaction force to regulate the angular momentum of the body during stair descent. A total of 28 participants (12 male and 16 female; 68.5 years and 69.0 years of mean age respectively) performed stair descent from a level walk in a step-over-step manner at a self-selected speed over a custom made three-step staircase with embedded force plates. Kinematic and force data were used to calculate angular momentum, gravitational moment, and ground reaction force moment about the stance foot center of pressure. Women show a significantly greater change in normalized angular momentum (0.92Nms/Kgm; p=.004) as compared to men (0.45Nms/Kgm). Women produce higher normalized GRF (p=.031) during the double support phase. The angular momentum changes show largest backward regulation for Step 0 and forward regulation for Step 2. This greater difference in overall change in the angular momentum in women may explain their increased risk of fall over the stairs.

  9. Coherent observations of gravitational radiation with LISA and gLISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinto, Massimo; de Araujo, José C. N.

    2016-10-01

    The geosynchronous Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (gLISA) is a space-based gravitational wave (GW) mission that, for the past 5 years, has been under joint study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Stanford University; the National Institute for Space Research (I.N.P.E., Brazil); and Space Systems Loral. If flown at the same time as the LISA mission, the two arrays will deliver a joint sensitivity that accounts for the best performance of both missions in their respective parts of the millihertz band. This simultaneous operation will result in an optimally combined sensitivity curve that is "white" from about 3 ×10-3 Hz to 1 Hz, making the two antennas capable of detecting, with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) with masses in the range (10 -1 08)M⊙ . Their ability of jointly tracking, with enhanced SNR, signals similar to that observed by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (aLIGO) on September 14, 2015 (the GW150914 event) will result in a larger number of observable small-mass binary black holes and an improved precision of the parameters characterizing these sources. Together, LISA, gLISA and aLIGO will cover, with good sensitivity, the (10-4-1 03) Hz frequency band.

  10. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0-1.1 M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of non-rotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  11. Interplanetary phase scintillation and the search for very low frequency gravitational radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Woo, R.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of radio-wave phase scintillation are reported which used the Viking spacecraft having an earth-spacecraft link very similar to that which will be used in very low-frequency (VLF) gravitational-wave searches. The phase power-spectrum level varies by seven orders of magnitude as the sun-earth-spacecraft (elongation) angle changes from 1 to 175 deg. It is noteworthy that a broad minimum in the S-band (2.3 GHz) phase fluctuation occurs in the antisolar direction; the corresponding fractional frequency stability (square root Allan variance) is about 3 x 10 to the -14th for 1000-s integration times. A simultaneous two-frequency two-station observation indicates that the contribution to the phase fluctuation from the ionosphere is significant but dominated by the contribution from the interplanetary medium. Nondispersive tropospheric scintillation was not detected (upper limit to fractional frequency stability about 5 x 10 to the -14th). Evidently, even observations in the antisolar direction will require higher radio frequencies, phase scintillation calibration, and correlation techniques in the data processing, for detection of gravitational bursts at the anticipated strain amplitude levels of no more than 10 to the -15th.

  12. Radiation reaction at the level of the action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnholtz, Ofek; Hadar, Shahar; Kol, Barak

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight a recently proposed method for the treatment of classical radiative effects, in particular radiation reaction, via effective field theory methods. We emphasize important features of the method and in particular the doubling of fields. We apply the method to two simple systems: a mass-rope system and an electromagnetic charge-field system. For the mass-rope system in 1 + 1 dimensions we derive a double-field effective action for the mass which describes a damped harmonic oscillator. For the EM charge-field system, i.e. the system of an accelerating electric charge in 3 + 1 dimensions, we show a reduction to a 1 + 1 dimensions radial system of an electric dipole source coupled to an electric dipole field (analogous to the mass coupled to the rope). For this system we derive a double-field effective action and reproduce in an analogous way the leading part of the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac force.

  13. Influence of quasi-periodic gravitational modulation on convective instability of reaction fronts in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allali, Karam; Belhaq, Mohamed; El Karouni, Kamal

    2012-04-01

    The influence of a time-dependent gravity on the convective instability of reaction fronts in porous media is investigated in this paper. It is assumed that the time-dependent modulation is quasi-periodic with two frequencies σ1 and σ2 that are incommensurate with each other. The model consists of the heat equation, the equation for the depth of conversion and the equations of motion under the Darcy law. The convective threshold is approximated performing a linear stability analysis on a reduced singular perturbation problem using the matched asymptotic expansion method. The reduced interface problem is solved using numerical simulations. It is shown that if the reacting fluid is heated from below, a stabilizing effect of a reaction fronts in a porous medium can be gained for appropriate values of amplitudes and frequencies ratio σ={σ2}/{σ1} of the quasi-periodic vibration.

  14. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Öström, Jonatan Gustafsson, Magnus; Bezrukov, Dmitry S.; Nyman, Gunnar

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  15. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF(.).

    PubMed

    Öström, Jonatan; Bezrukov, Dmitry S; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C(+)) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1(1)Π → X(1)Σ(+) and rovibrational transitions on the X(1)Σ(+) and a(3)Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit-Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius-Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10-250 K, the rate constant is about 10(-21) cm(3) s(-1), rising toward 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) for a temperature of 30,000 K.

  16. Gravitational radiation and angular momentum flux from a slowly rotating dynamical black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Huei; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2011-04-15

    A four-dimensional asymptotic expansion scheme is used to study the next-order effects of the nonlinearity near a spinning dynamical black hole. The angular-momentum flux and energy flux formula are then obtained by constructing the reference frame in terms of the compatible constant spinors and the compatibility of the coupling leading-order Newman-Penrose equations. By using the slow rotation and small-tide approximation for a spinning black hole, the horizon cross-section we chose is spherical symmetric. It turns out the flux formula is rather simple and can be compared with the known results. Directly from the energy flux formula of the slow-rotating dynamical horizon, we find that the physically reasonable condition on requiring the positivity of the gravitational energy flux yields that the shear will monotonically decrease with time. Thus a slow-rotating dynamical horizon will asymptotically approach an isolated horizon during late time.

  17. THE BENEFITS OF VLBI ASTROMETRY TO PULSAR TIMING ARRAY SEARCHES FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, D. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2013-11-10

    Precision astrometry is an integral component of successful pulsar timing campaigns. Astrometric parameters are commonly derived by fitting them as parameters of a timing model to a series of pulse times of arrival (TOAs). TOAs measured to microsecond precision over spans of several years can yield position measurements with sub-milliarcsecond precision. However, timing-based astrometry can become biased if a pulsar displays any red spin noise or a red signal produced by the stochastic gravitational wave background. We investigate how noise of different spectral types is absorbed by timing models, leading to significant estimation biases in the astrometric parameters. We find that commonly used techniques for fitting timing models in the presence of red noise (Cholesky whitening) prevent the absorption of noise into the timing model remarkably well if the time baseline of observations exceeds several years, but are inadequate for dealing with shorter pulsar data sets. Independent of timing, pulsar-optimized very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is capable of providing position estimates precise to the sub-milliarcsecond levels needed for high-precision timing. In order to make VLBI astrometric parameters useful in pulsar timing models, the transformation between the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and the dynamical solar system ephemeris used for pulsar timing must be constrained to within a few microarcseconds. We compute a transformation between the ICRF and pulsar timing frames and quantitatively discuss how the transformation will improve in coming years. We find that incorporating VLBI astrometry into the timing models of pulsars for which only a couple of years of timing data exist will lead to more realistic assessments of red spin noise and could enhance the amplitude of gravitational wave signatures in post-fit timing residuals by factors of 20 or more.

  18. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier’s law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under a gravitational field due to heavy nucleus at the origin (Roche Model). The unsteady model of Roche consists of a dusty gas distributed with spherical symmetry around a nucleus having large mass It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the heavy nucleus. The density of the ambient medium is taken to be constant. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effect surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable difference can be found in the distribution of flow variables. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters, the gravitational parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is found that the shock strength is increased with an increase in the value of gravitational parameter. Further, it is investigated that the presence of gravitational field increases the

  19. Joint approach for reducing eccentricity and spurious gravitational radiation in binary black hole initial data construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Szilágyi, Béla

    2013-10-01

    At the beginning of binary black hole simulations, there is a pulse of spurious radiation (or junk radiation) resulting from the initial data not matching astrophysical quasi-equilibrium inspiral exactly. One traditionally waits for the junk radiation to exit the computational domain before taking physical readings, at the expense of throwing away a segment of the evolution, and with the hope that junk radiation exits cleanly. We argue that this hope does not necessarily pan out, as junk radiation could excite long-lived constraint violation. Another complication with the initial data is that they contain orbital eccentricity that needs to be removed, usually by evolving the early part of the inspiral multiple times with gradually improved input parameters. We show that this procedure is also adversely impacted by junk radiation. In this paper, we do not attempt to eliminate junk radiation directly, but instead tackle the much simpler problem of ameliorating its long-lasting effects. We report on the success of a method that achieves this goal by combining the removal of junk radiation and eccentricity into a single procedure. Namely, we periodically stop a low resolution simulation; take the numerically evolved metric data and overlay it with eccentricity adjustments; run it through an initial data solver (i.e. the solver receives as free data the numerical output of the previous iteration); restart the simulation; repeat until eccentricity becomes sufficiently low; and then launch the high resolution “production run” simulation. This approach has the following benefits: (1) We do not have to contend with the influence of junk radiation on eccentricity measurements for later iterations of the eccentricity reduction procedure. (2) We reenforce constraints every time the initial data solver is invoked, removing the constraint violation excited by junk radiation previously. (3) The wasted simulation segment associated with the junk radiation’s evolution is

  20. Recent developments in the measurement of space time curvature. [resonant capacitor displacement sensor and multistage suspension system for gravitational radiation antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    Development of a highly sensitive resonant capacitor displacement sensor and a multistage suspension system for a low-temperature gravitational radiation antenna is discussed; the antenna is suitable for studying gravitational collapses. The sensitivity limit of the device is assessed as a function of preamplifier noise. Experiments indicate that an electric field of about 160,000 v/cm may be applied to the resonator surface without a significant increase in Brownian noise. Use of the resonant capacitor sensor with very high Q antennae is also considered.

  1. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION FROM HYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN A DIFFERENTIALLY ROTATING NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Peralta, C.

    2010-01-20

    The mean-square current quadrupole moment associated with vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number turbulence in a differentially rotating neutron star is calculated analytically, as are the amplitude and decoherence time of the resulting, stochastic gravitational wave signal. The calculation resolves the subtle question of whether the signal is dominated by the smallest or largest turbulent eddies: for the Kolmogorov-like power spectrum observed in superfluid spherical Couette simulations, the wave strain is controlled by the largest eddies, and the decoherence time approximately equals the maximum eddy turnover time. For a neutron star with spin frequency nu{sub s} and Rossby number Ro, at a distance d from Earth, the root mean square wave strain reaches h{sub rms} approx 3 x 10{sup -24} Ro{sup 3}(nu{sub s}/30 Hz){sup 3}(d/1 kpc){sup -1}. Ordinary rotation-powered pulsars (nu{sub s} approx< 30 Hz, Ro approx< 10{sup -4}) are too dim to be detected by the current generation of long-baseline interferometers. Millisecond pulsars are brighter; for example, an object born recently in a Galactic supernova or accreting near the Eddington rate can have nu{sub s} approx 1 kHz, Ro approx> 0.2, and hence h{sub rms} approx 10{sup -21}. A cross-correlation search can detect such a source in principle, because the signal decoheres over the timescale tau{sub c} approx 1 x 10{sup -3} Ro{sup -1}(nu{sub s}/30 Hz){sup -1} s, which is adequately sampled by existing long-baseline interferometers. Hence, hydrodynamic turbulence imposes a fundamental noise floor on gravitational wave observations of neutron stars, although its polluting effect may be muted by partial decoherence in the hectohertz band, where current continuous-wave searches are concentrated, for the highest frequency (and hence most powerful) sources. This outcome is contingent on the exact shape of the turbulent power spectrum, which is modified by buoyancy and anisotropic global structures, such as stratified

  2. On microscopic theory of radiative nuclear reaction characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Achakovskiy, O. I.; Avdeenkov, A. V.; Goriely, S.

    2016-07-01

    A survey of some results in the modern microscopic theory of properties of nuclear reactions with gamma rays is given. First of all, we discuss the impact of Phonon Coupling (PC) on the Photon Strength Function (PSF) because it represents the most natural physical source of additional strength found for Sn isotopes in recent experiments that could not be explained within the standard HFB + QRPA approach. The self-consistent version of the Extended Theory of Finite Fermi Systems in the Quasiparticle Time Blocking Approximation is applied. It uses the HFB mean field and includes both the QRPA and PC effects on the basis of the SLy4 Skyrme force. With our microscopic E1 PSFs, the following properties have been calculated for many stable and unstable even-even semi-magic Sn and Ni isotopes as well as for double-magic 132Sn and 208Pb using the reaction codes EMPIRE and TALYS with several Nuclear Level Density (NLD) models: (1) the neutron capture cross sections; (2) the corresponding neutron capture gamma spectra; (3) the average radiative widths of neutron resonances. In all the properties considered, the PC contribution turned out to be significant, as compared with the standard QRPA one, and necessary to explain the available experimental data. The results with the phenomenological so-called generalized superfluid NLD model turned out to be worse, on the whole, than those obtained with the microscopic HFB + combinatorial NLD model. The very topical question about the M1 resonance contribution to PSFs is also discussed. Finally, we also discuss the modern microscopic NLD models based on the self-consistent HFB method and show their relevance to explain the experimental data as compared with the phenomenological models. The use of these self-consistent microscopic approaches is of particular relevance for nuclear astrophysics, but also for the study of double-magic nuclei.

  3. On microscopic theory of radiative nuclear reaction characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Achakovskiy, O. I. Avdeenkov, A. V.; Goriely, S.

    2016-07-15

    A survey of some results in the modern microscopic theory of properties of nuclear reactions with gamma rays is given. First of all, we discuss the impact of Phonon Coupling (PC) on the Photon Strength Function (PSF) because it represents the most natural physical source of additional strength found for Sn isotopes in recent experiments that could not be explained within the standard HFB + QRPA approach. The self-consistent version of the Extended Theory of Finite Fermi Systems in the Quasiparticle Time Blocking Approximation is applied. It uses the HFB mean field and includes both the QRPA and PC effects on the basis of the SLy4 Skyrme force. With our microscopic E1 PSFs, the following properties have been calculated for many stable and unstable even–even semi-magic Sn and Ni isotopes as well as for double-magic {sup 132}Sn and {sup 208}Pb using the reaction codes EMPIRE and TALYS with several Nuclear Level Density (NLD) models: (1) the neutron capture cross sections; (2) the corresponding neutron capture gamma spectra; (3) the average radiative widths of neutron resonances. In all the properties considered, the PC contribution turned out to be significant, as compared with the standard QRPA one, and necessary to explain the available experimental data. The results with the phenomenological so-called generalized superfluid NLD model turned out to be worse, on the whole, than those obtained with the microscopic HFB + combinatorial NLD model. The very topical question about the M1 resonance contribution to PSFs is also discussed.Finally, we also discuss the modern microscopic NLD models based on the self-consistent HFB method and show their relevance to explain the experimental data as compared with the phenomenological models. The use of these self-consistent microscopic approaches is of particular relevance for nuclear astrophysics, but also for the study of double-magic nuclei.

  4. Gravitational wave production by Hawking radiation from rotating primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruifeng; Kinney, William H.; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyze in detail a rarely discussed question of gravity wave production from evaporating primordial black holes. These black holes emit gravitons which are, at classical level, registered as gravity waves. We use the latest constraints on their abundance, and calculate the power emitted in gravitons at the time of their evaporation. We then solve the coupled system of equations that gives us the evolution of the frequency and amplitude of gravity waves during the expansion of the universe. The spectrum of gravitational waves that can be detected today depends on multiple factors: fraction of the total energy density which was occupied by primordial black holes, the epoch in which they were formed, and quantities like their mass and angular momentum. We conclude that very small primordial black holes which evaporate before the big-bang nucleosynthesis emit gravitons whose spectral energy fraction today can be as large as 10-7.5. On the other hand, those which are massive enough so that they still exist now can yield a signal as high as 10-6.5. However, typical frequencies of the gravity waves from primordial black holes are still too high to be observed with the current and near future gravity wave observations.

  5. Lidov–Kozai Cycles with Gravitational Radiation: Merging Black Holes in Isolated Triple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silsbee, Kedron; Tremaine, Scott

    2017-02-01

    We show that a black-hole binary with an external companion can undergo Lidov–Kozai cycles that cause a close pericenter passage, leading to a rapid merger due to gravitational-wave emission. This scenario occurs most often for systems in which the companion has a mass comparable to the reduced mass of the binary and the companion orbit has a semimajor axis within a factor of ∼10 of the binary semimajor axis. Using a simple population-synthesis model and three-body simulations, we estimate the rate of mergers in triple black-hole systems in the field to be about six per Gpc3 per year in the absence of natal kicks during black-hole formation. This value is within the low end of the 90% credible interval for the total black hole–black hole merger rate inferred from the current LIGO results. There are many uncertainties in these calculations, the largest of which is the unknown distribution of natal kicks. Even modest natal kicks of 40 km s‑1 will reduce the merger rate by a factor of 40. A few percent of these systems will have eccentricity greater than 0.999 when they first enter the frequency band detectable by aLIGO (above 10 Hz).

  6. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Silva, Hector; Berti, Emanuele; Sotani, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects such as neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories to test our understanding of the fundamental interactions in the regime of supranuclear densities, unachievable by terrestrial experiments. Despite recent progress, the description of matter (i.e., the equation of state) at such densities is still debatable. This translates into uncertainties in the bulk properties of neutron stars, masses and radii for instance. Here we will consider low-mass neutron stars. Such stars are expected to carry important information on nuclear matter near the nuclear saturation point. It has recently been shown that the masses and surface redshifts of low-mass neutron stars smoothly depend on simple functions of the central density and of a characteristic parameter η associated with the choice of equation of state. Here we extend these results to slowly-rotating and tidally deformed stars and obtain empirical relations for various quantities, such as the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love numbers, and rotational apsidal constants. We discuss how these relations might be used to constrain the equation of state by future observations in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra.

  7. Gravitational radiation from cosmic (super)strings: Bursts, stochastic background, and observational windows

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2005-03-15

    The gravitational wave (GW) signals emitted by a network of cosmic strings are reexamined in view of the possible formation of a network of cosmic superstrings at the end of brane inflation. The reconnection probability p of intersecting fundamental or Dirichlet strings might be much smaller than 1, and the properties of the resulting string network may differ significantly from those of ordinary strings (which have p=1). In addition, it has been recently suggested that the typical length of newly formed loops may differ by a factor {epsilon}<<1 from its standard estimate. Here, we analyze the effects of the two parameters p and {epsilon} on the GW signatures of strings. We consider both the GW bursts emitted from cusps of oscillating string loops, which have been suggested as candidate sources for the LIGO/VIRGO and LISA interferometers, and the stochastic GW background, which may be detectable by pulsar-timing observations. In both cases we find that previously obtained results are quite robust, at least when the loop sizes are not suppressed by many orders of magnitude relative to the standard scenario. We urge pulsar observers to reanalyze a recently obtained 17-yr combined data set to see whether the large scatter exhibited by a fraction of the data might be due to a transient GW burst activity of some sort, e.g., to a near cusp event.

  8. Classical and quantum radiation reaction in conformally flat spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, A.; Walker, P. J.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the physics of a charged scalar particle moving in conformally flat spacetime with the conformal factor depending only on time in the framework of quantum electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we show that the radiation-reaction force derived from QED agrees with the classical counterpart in the limit ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){yields}0 using the fact that to lowest order in ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) the charged scalar field theory with mass m in conformally flat spacetime with conformal factor {omega}(t), which we call Model B, is equivalent to that in flat spacetime with a time-dependent mass m{omega}(t), which we call Model A, at tree level in this limit. We also consider the one-loop QED corrections to these two models in the semiclassical approximation. We find nonzero one-loop corrections to the mass and Maxwell's equations in Model A at order ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup -1}. This does not mean, however, that the corresponding one-loop corrections in Model B are nonzero because the equivalence of these models through a conformal transformation breaks down at one loop. We find that the one-loop corrections vanish in the limit ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){yields}0 in Model B.

  9. Excess power statistic for detection of burst sources of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Warren G.; Brady, Patrick R.; Creighton, Jolien D.; Flanagan, Éanna É.

    2001-02-01

    We examine the properties of an excess power method to detect gravitational waves in interferometric detector data. This method is designed to detect short-duration (<~0.5 s) burst signals of unknown waveform, such as those from supernovae or black hole mergers. If only the bursts' duration and frequency band are known, the method is an optimal detection strategy in both Bayesian and frequentist senses. It consists of summing the data power over the known time interval and frequency band of the burst. If the detector noise is stationary and Gaussian, this sum is distributed as a χ2 (non-central χ2) deviate in the absence (presence) of a signal. One can use these distributions to compute frequentist detection thresholds for the measured power. We derive the method from Bayesian analyses and show how to compute Bayesian thresholds. More generically, when only upper and/or lower bounds on the bursts duration and frequency band are known, one must search for excess power in all concordant durations and bands. Two search schemes are presented and their computational efficiencies are compared. We find that given reasonable constraints on the effective duration and bandwidth of signals, the excess power search can be performed on a single workstation. Furthermore, the method can be almost as efficient as matched filtering when a large template bank is required: for Gaussian noise the excess power method can detect a source to a distance at least half of the distance detectable by matched filtering if the product of duration and bandwidth of the signals is <~100, and to a much greater fraction of the distance when the size of the matched filter bank is large. Finally, we derive generalizations of the method to a network of several interferometers under the assumption of Gaussian noise. However, further work is required to determine the efficiency of the method in the realistic context of a detector network with non-Gaussian noise.

  10. The role of MRI in the diagnosis of acute radiation reaction in breast cancer patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startseva, Zh A.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Usova, AV; Frolova, I. G.; Simonov, K. A.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A clinical case with acute radiation reaction of the left breast after organ-preserving surgery with 10 Gy IORT (24.8 Gy) conventional radiation therapy has been presented. Comprehensive MRI examination showed signs of radiation- induced damage to skin, soft tissues and vessels of the residual breast.

  11. Evidence for Orbital Decay of RX J1914.4+2456: Gravitational Radiation and the Nature of the X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RX J1914.4+2456 is a candidate double-degenerate binary (AM CVn) with a putative 569 s orbital period. If this identification is correct, then it has one of the shortest binary orbital periods known, and gravitational radiation should drive the orbital evolution and mass transfer if the binary is semi-detached. Here we report the results of a coherent timing study of the archival ROSAT data for RX J1914.4+2456. We performed a phase coherent timing analysis using all five ROSAT observations spanning a four-year period. We demonstrate that all the data can be phase connected, and we show that the 1.756 mHz orbital frequency is increasing at a rate of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -17) Hz/s consistent with the expected loss of angular momentum from the binary system via gravitational radiation. In addition to providing evidence for the emission of gravitational waves, our measurement of the orbital v(dot) constrains models for the X-ray emission and the nature of the secondary. If stable mass accretion drives the X-ray flux, then a positive v(dot) is inconsistent with a degenerate donor. A helium burning dwarf is compatible if indeed such systems can have periods as short as that of RX J1914.4+2456, an open theoretical question. Our measurement of a positive v(dot) is consistent with the unipolar induction model of Wu et al. which does not require accretion to drive the X-ray flux. We discuss how future timing measurements of RX J1914.4+2456 (and systems like it) with for example, Chandra and XMM-Newton, can provide a unique probe of the interaction between mass loss and gravitational radiation. We also discuss the importance of such measurements in the context of gravitational wave detection from space, such as is expected in the future with the LISA mission.

  12. Study the Effects of Charged Particle Radiation on Gravitational Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Space-flight charging of free floating masses poses an unusual problem-- how can one control charge on the object without exerting a significant force on it? One approach is to make contact to the object with a fine wire. However, for many precision applications no physical contact is permissible, so charge must be conveyed in, a more sophisticated manner. One method has already been developed: Gravitational Probe B (GP-B) uses an ultraviolet photo-emission system described in ref 1. This system meets the experiment requirements, yet poses a number of constraints, including high power dissipation (approximately 10 W peak, approximately 1 W average), low current output (approximately 10(exp -13) A), and potential reliability problems associated with fiber optics system and the UV source. The aim of the current research is to improve this situation and, if possible, develop a more rugged and lower power alternative, usable in a wide range of situations. An potential alternative to the UV electron source is a Spindt-type field emission cathode. These consist of an array of extremely sharp silicon tips mounted in a standard IC package with provision for biasing them relative to the case potential. They are attractive as electron sources for space applications due to their low power consumption (10(exp -5) W), high current levels (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -5) A), and the absence of mechanical switching. Unfortunately, existing cathodes require special handling to avoid contamination and gas absorption. These contaminants can cause severe current fluctuations and eventual destruction of the cathode tips. Another potential drawback is the absence of any data indicating the possibility of bipolar current flow. This capability is needed because of the large uncertainties in the net charge transfer from cosmic rays to a free floating mass in space. More recent devices reduce the current fluctuations and destructive arcing by mounting the tips on a resistive substrate rather than

  13. Theory of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tiec, Alexandre; Novak, Jérôme

    The existence of gravitational radiation is a natural prediction of any relativistic description of the gravitational interaction. In this chapter, we focus on gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. First, we introduce those mathematical concepts that are necessary to properly formulate the physical theory, such as the notions of manifold, vector, tensor, metric, connection and curvature. Second, we motivate, formulate and then discuss Einstein's equation, which relates the geometry of spacetime to its matter content. Gravitational waves are later introduced as solutions of the linearized Einstein equation around flat spacetime. These waves are shown to propagate at the speed of light and to possess two polarization states. Gravitational waves can interact with matter, allowing for their direct detection by means of laser interferometers. Finally, Einstein's quadrupole formulas are derived and used to show that nonspherical compact objects moving at relativistic speeds are powerful gravitational wave sources.

  14. Kinetics of the. gamma. -radiation-initiated reaction of 2-propanol with tri- and hexafluoropropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Zamyslov, R.A.; Shostenko, A.G.; Dobrov, I.V.; Tarasova, N.P.

    1988-02-01

    The initiation of telomerization reactions by ionizing radiation provides good opportunities for studying the kinetics of free radical reactions. The fluoroalcohols and their derivatives prepared using fluoroolefins and aliphatic alcohols find wide practical application. The object of this exercise was to study the reactivity of trifluoropropylene and hexafluoropropylene with 2-propanol. The reaction products were analyzed gas chromatographically.

  15. Gravitational waves from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  16. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  17. Gravitational and radiative effects on the escape of helium from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    On the moon, and probably on Mercury and other similar regolith-covered bodies with tenuous atmosphere, the dominant gas is He-4. It arises as the radiogenic product of the decay of uranium and thorium within any planet, but its major source appears to be the alpha particle flux of the solar wind. The moon intercepts solar wind helium at an average rate of 1.1 times 10 to the 24th atom/sec, and loses it at the same rate. Some helium may escape directly as the result of the process of solar wind soil bombardment which may release previously trapped helium at superthermal speeds. Atmospheric models have been calculated with the total helium influx as source. Subsequent comparison of model and measured helium concentrations indicates that the fraction of helium escaping via the atmosphere may range from 20% to 100% of the solar wind influx. Of the escaping atmosphere, most of the helium (about 93%) becomes trapped in earth orbit, while about 5% gets trapped in satellite orbits about the moon. Owing to a 6 month lifetime for helium in solar radiation, the satellite atoms form a lunar corona that exceeds the lunar atmosphere in total abundance by a factor of 4 to 5.

  18. Effect of neutral collision and radiative heat-loss function on self-gravitational instability of viscous thermally conducting partially-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Soni, Ghanshyam D.; Chhajlani, Rajendra K.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of thermal instability and gravitational instability is investigated for a partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations. We use normal mode analysis method in this problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Effects of collisions with neutrals, radiative heat-loss function, viscosity, thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength, on the instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the effect of various physical parameters on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. The temperature-dependent heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field and neutral collision have stabilizing effect, while density-dependent heat-loss function has a destabilizing effect on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. With the help of Routh-Hurwitz's criterion, the stability of the system is discussed.

  19. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  20. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  1. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of pure gravitational radiation. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Pascual; Ehlers, Jürgen; Sachs, Rainer K.

    2013-12-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Pascual Jordan, Juergen Ehlers and Rainer Sachs, first published in 1961 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was part 2 of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (Parts 1 and 4 of the series have already been reprinted, parts 3 and 5 will be printed as Golden Oldies in near future.) This second paper discusses the geometry of geodesic null congruences, the algebraic classification of the Weyl tensor by spinor methods, and applies these to a study of the propagation of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. It has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for republication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. The republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A. H. MacCallum and Wolfgang Kundt.

  2. Massless fermions and (2+1)-dimensional gravitational effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Gon-tildei, M.A.; Valle, M.A.

    1986-07-15

    The three-dimensional gravitational effective action due to a massless fermion coupled to a weak gravitational field is calculated. Radiative corrections induce the parity-violating gravitational Chern-Simons term.

  3. Radiation from the reactions of NO + with Cl - and I -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Španěl, Patrik; Smith, David

    1996-08-01

    A study of the ion-ion recombination reactions of NO + with Cl - and I - has been carried out using our flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) apparatus at 300 K. These recombination reactions proceed by the transfer of an electron from the I - and Cl - ions to the NO + ions producing neutral, electronically excited NO molecules and ground state halogen atoms. For ground state reactant ions, only the two lowest electronic states of NO, i.e. the A 2Σ + and the B 2Π r states can be generated. This FALP study shows that only NO γ-bands are emitted by the thermalised NO +/Cl - plasma whereas both NO γ-bands and NO β-bands are emitted by the thermalised NO +/I - plasma. From these observations together with our measured values of the recombination coefficients for the reactions, and from a consideration of the reaction energetics, we conclude that electron transfer from both Cl - and I - to NO + most probably occurs at short distances on the repulsive potential wall and not at longer distances as is usually assumed for this type of reaction.

  4. Radiative corrections for (e,e{prime}p) reactions at GeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Ent; B. W. Filippone; N. C. R. Makins; R. G. Milner; T. G. O'Neill; D. A. Wasson

    2000-05-01

    A general framework for applying radiative corrections to (e,e{prime}p) coincidence reactions at GeV energies is presented, with special emphasis to higher-order Bremsstrahlung effects, radiation from the scattered hadron, and the validity of peaking approximations. The sensitivity to the assumptions made in practically applying radiative corrections to (e,e{prime}p) data is extensively discussed. The general framework is tested against experimental data of the {sup 1}H(e,e{prime}p) reaction at momentum transfer values larger than 1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, where radiative processes become a dominant source of uncertainty. The formulas presented here can easily be modified for any other electron-induced coincidence reaction.

  5. Gravitation in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, B.; Hartle, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The subject of this volume is the application of relativistic gravity to realistic astronomical phenomena. This volume is divided into two parts. The first is concerned with gravitation in localized systems (including topics such as black hole theory, gravitational radiation theory, and the Newton theory of many-body systems). The second is concerned with gravitation in cosmology (including aspects of inflation, the origin of inhomogeneities and the quantum process of creation of the universe itself. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 sections of this volume.

  6. [Adaptation reactions of rat blood exposed to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V N; Deriugina, A V

    2010-06-01

    It is carried out research of action low-intensive electromagnetic radiations--low-intensive laser radiation and radiations of the highest frequency on normal animals and at modelling the stress-reaction, caused by introduction of adrenaline. Absence of effects of system of blood is noted at action low-intensive electromagnetic radiations on normal an organism and them correction action on alteration an organism, shown in restoration of the broken parameters--leukocyte the blood count, electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes and phospholipide's structure of their membranes.

  7. An investigation of the reaction kinetics of luciferase and the effect of ionizing radiation on the reaction rate.

    PubMed

    Berovic, Nikolas; Parker, David J; Smith, Michael D

    2009-04-01

    The bioluminescence produced by luciferase, a firefly enzyme, requires three substrates: luciferin, ATP and oxygen. We find that ionizing radiation, in the form of a proton beam from a cyclotron, will eliminate dissolved oxygen prior to any damage to other substrates or to the protein. The dose constant for removal of oxygen is 70 +/- 20 Gy, a much smaller dose than required to cause damage to protein. Removal of oxygen, which is initially in excess, leads to a sigmoidal response of bioluminescence to radiation dose, consistent with a Michaelis-Menten relationship to substrate concentration. When excess oxygen is exhausted, the response becomes exponential. Following the irradiation, bioluminescence recovers due to a slow leak of oxygen into the solution. This may also explain previous observations on the response of bioluminescent bacteria to radiation. We have studied the dependence of the reaction rate on enzyme and substrate concentration and propose a model for the reaction pathway consistent with this data. The light output from unirradiated samples decreases significantly with time due to product inhibition. We observe that this inhibition rate changes dramatically immediately after a sample is exposed to the beam. This sudden change of the inhibition rate is unexplained but shows that enzyme regulatory function responds to ionizing radiation at a dose level less than 0.6 Gy.

  8. Nucleon radiative capture and the inverse reaction at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, I.

    1991-01-01

    The processes which can lead to the radiative capture of fast nucleons include direct transitions in the nuclear potential, transitions in which coherent multipole resonances are excited, transitions by nucleons which are excited in early intranuclear collisions, bremsstrahlung from nucleon-nucleon collisions and photon evaporation'' from a thermally equilibrated nucleus. Corresponding processes occur when an energetic photon ejects fast nucleons from a nucleus. As experimental information from capture and photoreactions has become more detailed, inconsistencies and uncertainties have appeared which reflect difficulties in identifying and separating the responsible processes. This has led to more sophisticated and more complicated theoretical treatments which in turn have promoted new and more demanding experiments. 38 refs. 10 figs.

  9. Target voltage response in reaction to laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkins, Richard M.

    1988-12-01

    The five microsecond, 15 joule, pulsed CO2 Laser was used to irradiate polished 2024 aluminum targets. The target voltage response (TVR) was measured with respect to the incident laser radiation and showed a pulse width on the order of 30 nanoseconds. The voltage was measured at values from 22 to 140 volts with resistances varying from one ohm to two mega-ohms. The TVR was correlated to the emission and blow-off of electrons from the target surface and the possible ignition of a Laser Supported Detonation wave. The TVR, laser pulse, and flash associated with target surface breakdown were time correlated and shown to happen within the first 170 nanoseconds of the five microsecond laser pulse. Currents up to 500 amps were observed when the resistance to ground was reduced to less than 1 ohm. Also, the magnitude of the TVR was shown to be a function of background gas pressure.

  10. New gravitational memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasterski, Sabrina; Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    The conventional gravitational memory effect is a relative displacement in the position of two detectors induced by radiative energy flux. We find a new type of gravitational `spin memory' in which beams on clockwise and counterclockwise orbits acquire a relative delay induced by radiative angular momentum flux. It has recently been shown that the displacement memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of Weinberg's soft graviton theorem. Here we see that the spin memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of the recently-discovered subleading soft graviton theorem.

  11. [Minimally invasive cytoselective radiation therapy using boron neutron capture reaction].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    The cell-killing effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction of two essentially nontoxic species, boron-10 ((10)B) and thermal neutrons, whose destructive effect is well observed in boron-loaded tissues. High accumulation and selective delivery of boron into tumor tissue are the most important requirements to achieve efficient neutron capture therapy of cancers. This review focuses on liposomal boron delivery system (BDS) as a recent promising approach that meet these requirements for BNCT. BDS involves two strategies: (1) encapsulation of boron in the aqueous core of liposomes and (2) accumulation of boron in the liposomal bilayer. In this review, recent development of liposomal boron delivery system is summarized.

  12. Radiation reaction from electromagnetic fields in the neighborhood of a point charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2017-03-01

    From the expression for the electromagnetic field in the neighborhood of a point charge, we determine the rate of electromagnetic momentum flow, calculated using the Maxwell stress tensor, across a surface surrounding the charge. From that we derive for a "point" charge the radiation reaction formula, which turns out to be proportional to the first time-derivative of the acceleration of the charge, identical to the expression for the self-force, hitherto obtained in the literature from the detailed mutual interaction between constituents of a small charged sphere. We then use relativistic transformations to arrive at a generalized formula for radiation reaction for a point charge undergoing relativistic motion.

  13. Equation of motion with radiation reaction in ultrarelativistic laser-electron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Keita; Nagatomo, Hideo; Mima, Kunioki; Koga, James

    2011-12-15

    The intensity of the ultra-short pulse lasers has reached 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} owing to the advancements of laser technology. When the motion of an electron becomes relativistic, bremsstrahlung accompanies it. The energy from this bremsstrahlung corresponds to the energy loss of the electron; therefore, the motion of the electron deviates from the case without radiation. The radiation behaves something like resistance. This effect called ''radiation reaction'' or ''radiation damping'' and the force converted from the radiation is named the ''radiation reaction force'' or the ''damping force''. The equation of motion with the reaction force is known as the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac (LAD) equation, but the solution of this equation is not physical due to the fact that it has a ''run-away'' solution. As one solution of this problem, we have derived a new equation which takes the place of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation. We will show the validity of this equation with a simple theoretical analysis.

  14. [Effects of sunscreening agents and reactions with ultraviolet radiation].

    PubMed

    Bredholt, K; Christensen, T; Hannevik, M; Johnsen, B; Seim, J; Reitan, J B

    1998-06-30

    The use of sunscreens is extensive. During the last few years there have been indications that UV radiation causes breakdown of the sunlight absorbing filters in the sunscreens, i.e. the sunscreens are not photostable. We describe briefly UV propagation in skin, the chemical and physical properties of sunscreens, and how these may react during UV irradiation. We have studied the stability of several sunscreens in vitro. The stability tests were performed by applying a thin film of the sunscreen preparation to the wall of a quartz window, irradiating it with a sun simulator, and measuring the absorbance with spectrophotometry before and during irradiation. The sunscreen agent studied most thoroughly was the UVB filter octyl methoxy cinnamate, but other UVA and UVB filters and some commercial products were also tested. Considerable breakdown of most filters was observed after doses of irradiation equivalent to moderate sun exposure. It can be questioned whether the breakdown products of sunscreens also possess other physical or biological properties. General practitioners should be able to advise their patients on sun protection and the proper use of sunscreens, considering the extensive use of sunscreens and the fact that sunbathing may be a health hazard.

  15. Gravitational lensing of gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kei Wong, Wang; Ng, Kwan Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational lensing phenomena are widespread in electromagnetic astrophysics, and in principle may also be uncovered with gravitational waves. We examine gravitational wave events lensed by elliptical galaxies in the limit of geometric optics, where we expect to see multiple signals from the same event with different arrival times and amplitudes. By using mass functions for compact binaries from population-synthesis simulations and a lensing probability calculated from Planck data, we estimate the rate of lensed signals for future gravitational wave missions.

  16. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  17. Modelling the effect of the radiation reaction force on the acceleration of ultra-thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.; Capdessus, R.; King, M.; Del Sorbo, D.; Ridgers, C. P.; McKenna, P.

    2017-05-01

    An investigation of the effects of the radiation reaction force on radiation pressure acceleration is presented. Through 1D(3V) PIC code simulations, it is found that radiation reaction causes a decrease in the target velocity during the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a solid density thin foil of varying thickness. This change in the target velocity can be related to the loss of backwards-directed electrons due to cooling and reflection in the laser field. The loss of this electron population changes the distribution of the emitted synchrotron radiation. We demonstrate that it is the emission of radiation which leads to the observed decrease in target velocity. Through a modification to the light sail equation of motion (which is used to describe radiation pressure acceleration in thin foils), which accounts for the conversion of laser energy to synchrotron radiation, we can describe this change in target velocity. This model can be tested in future experiments with ultra-high intensity lasers, and will lead to a better understanding of the process of relativistically induced transparency in the new intensity regime.

  18. The role of radiation reaction in Lienard-Wiechert description of FEL interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kimel, I.; Elias, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    The most common theoretical analysis of the FEL interaction is based on the set of equations consisting of Lorentz and wave equations. This approach explains most of FEL features and, in particular, works well to describe operation in the amplifier mode. In that approach however, there are some difficulties in describing operation in oscillator mode, as well as self amplified spontaneous emission. In particular, it is not possible to describe the start up stage since there is no wave to start with. It is clear that a different approach is required in such situations. That is why we have pursued the study of the FEL interaction in the framework of Lorentz plus Lienard-Wiechert equations. The Lienard-Wiechert Lorentz equation approach however, presents its own set of problems. Variation in energy of the electrons is given exclusively by the Lorentz equation. Thus, the energy lost due to the radiation process is not properly taken into account. This, of course, is a long standing problem in classical electrodynamics. In order to restore energy conservation radiation reaction has to be incorporated into the framework. The first question in that regard has to do with which form of the radiation reaction equations is the most convenient for computations in the FEL process. This has to do with the fact that historically, radiation reaction has been added in an ad hoc manner instead of being derived from the fundamental equations. Another problem discussed is how to take into account the radiation reaction in a collective manner in the interaction among electrons. Also discussed is the radiation reaction vis a vi the coherence properties of the FEL process.

  19. Considerations for the independent reaction times and step-by-step methods for radiation chemistry simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with the water molecules of the tissues mostly by ionizations and excitations, which result in the formation of the radiation track structure and the creation of radiolytic species such as H.,.OH, H2, H2O2, and e-aq. After their creation, these species diffuse and may chemically react with the neighboring species and with the molecules of the medium. Therefore radiation chemistry is of great importance in radiation biology. As the chemical species are not distributed homogeneously, the use of conventional models of homogeneous reactions cannot completely describe the reaction kinetics of the particles. Actually, many simulations of radiation chemistry are done using the Independent Reaction Time (IRT) method, which is a very fast technique to calculate radiochemical yields but which do not calculate the positions of the radiolytic species as a function of time. Step-by-step (SBS) methods, which are able to provide such information, have been used only sparsely because these are time-consuming in terms of calculation. Recent improvements in computer performance now allow the regular use of the SBS method in radiation chemistry. The SBS and IRT methods are both based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). In this paper, several sampling algorithms of the GFDE and for the IRT method are presented. We show that the IRT and SBS methods are exactly equivalent for 2-particles systems for diffusion and partially diffusion-controlled reactions between non-interacting particles. We also show that the results obtained with the SBS simulation method with periodic boundary conditions are in agreement with the predictions by classical reaction kinetics theory, which is an important step towards using this method for modelling of biochemical networks and metabolic pathways involved in oxidative stress. Finally, the first simulation results obtained with the code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) are presented.

  20. An instability of acoustic waves caused by radiation and the influence of chemical reactions on it

    SciTech Connect

    De Jagher, P.C. )

    1990-06-20

    In a gas which absorbs radiation an acoustic wave can be unstable. This instability is caused by the fact that the irradiant energy is absorbed preferentially in the high density region of the wave. If in the gas the chemical equilibrium AB {r reversible} A + B is maintained by photo dissociation balancing the reactions due to collisions, the instability increases. This is due to the density dependence of the reaction rate of the reverse reaction. It is argued that this process may explain the excitation or amplification of disturbances in the upper atmosphere.

  1. A study of immunological reactions in dogs exposed to prolonged chronic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantinova, I. V.; Grigoryev, Y. G.; Markelov, B. A.; Skryabin, A. S.; Zemskov, V. M.; Vasilyev, I. S.; Veysfeyler, Y. K.; Iokai, I.

    1974-01-01

    Immunomorphological studies on dog tissues exposed to long term gamma irradiation show that the number of cells containing antibodies increased and that the blast transformation reaction was activated. Prolonged radiation did not cause a reliable change in the synthesis of nucleic acids in spleen cells.

  2. Signatures of quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2015-09-15

    Electron dynamics in the collision of an electron beam with a high-intensity focused ultrashort laser pulse are investigated using three-dimensional QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and the results are compared with those calculated by classical Landau and Lifshitz PIC simulations. Significant differences are observed from the angular dependence of the electron energy distribution patterns for the two different approaches, because photon emission is no longer well approximated by a continuous process in the quantum radiation-dominated regime. The stochastic nature of photon emission results in strong signatures of quantum radiation-reaction effects under certain conditions. We show that the laser spot size and duration greatly influence these signatures due to the competition of QED effects and the ponderomotive force, which is well described in the classical approximation. The clearest signatures of quantum radiation reaction are found in the limit of large laser spots and few cycle pulse durations.

  3. Reaction formulation for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors and dielectric-coated cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N. N.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction concept is employed to formulate an integral equation for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors, and dielectric-coated conducting cylinders. The surface-current density on the conducting surface is expanded with subsectional bases. The dielectric layer is modeled with polarization currents radiating in free space. Maxwell's equation and the boundary conditions are employed to express the polarization-current distribution in terms of the surface-current density on the conducting surface. By enforcing reaction tests with an array of electric test sources, the moment method is employed to reduce the integral equation to a matrix equation. Inversion of the matrix equation yields the current distribution, and the scattered field is then obtained by integrating the current distribution. The theory, computer program and numerical results are presented for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors, and dielectric-coated conducting cylinders.

  4. Pattern formation driven by an acid-base neutralization reaction in aqueous media in a gravitational field.

    PubMed

    Zalts, A; El Hasi, C; Rubio, D; Ureña, A; D'Onofrio, A

    2008-01-01

    We report the hydrodynamic instabilities found in a simple exothermic neutralization reaction. Although the heavier aqueous NaOH solution was put below the lighter layer of aqueous HCl solution, fingering at the interface in a Hele-Shaw cell was observed. The reaction front, which propagates downward, becomes buoyantly unstable in the gravity field. The mixing zone length and wave number depend on the reactant concentrations. The mixing zone length increases and the wave number decreases when the reactant concentrations decrease.

  5. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of gravitational radiation fields. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang; Trümper, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Wolfgang Kundt and Manfred Trümper, first published in 1962 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was the last of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (All the other parts of the series have already been re-published as Golden Oldies.) This fifth contribution summarizes key points of the earlier papers and applies them, in particular results from papers II and IV in the series, in the context of the propagation of gravitational radiation when matter is present. The paper has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A.H. MacCallum and by a brief autobiography of Manfred Trümper.

  6. The challenge of detecting gravitational radiation is creating a new chapter in quantum electronics: Quantum nondemolition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, V. B.; Vorontsov, Y. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Future gravitational wave antennas will be approximately 100 kilogram cylinders, whose end-to-end vibrations must be measured so accurately (10 to the -19th power centimeters) that they behave quantum mechanically. Moreover, the vibration amplitude must be measured over and over again without perturbing it (quantum nondemolition measurement). This contrasts with quantum chemistry, quantum optics, or atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics where measurements are usually made on an ensemble of identical objects, and care is not given to whether any single object is perturbed or destroyed by the measurement. Electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements are described as well as the theory underlying them.

  7. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  8. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  9. A New Decay Path in the {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O Radiative Capture Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtin, S.; Lebhertz, D.; Haas, F.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Salsac, M.-D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Marley, P.; Lister, C. J.

    2009-03-04

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture reaction has been studied at energies close to the Coulomb barrier at Triumf (Vancouver) using the Dragon spectrometer and its associated BGO array. It has been observed that the {gamma} decay flux proceeds mainly via states around 10-11 MeV and via the direct feeding of the {sup 28}Si 3{sub 1}{sup -}(6879 keV) and 4{sub 2}{sup +}(6888 keV) deformed states. A discussion is presented about this selective feeding as well as perspectives for the use of novel detection systems for the study of light heavy-ion radiative capture reactions.

  10. Compatibility of Larmor's Formula with Radiation Reaction for an Accelerated Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the well-known disparity in classical electrodynamics between the power losses calculated from the radiation reaction and that from Larmor's formula, is succinctly understood when a proper distinction is made between quantities expressed in terms of a "real time" and those expressed in terms of a retarded time. It is explicitly shown that an accelerated charge, taken to be a sphere of vanishingly small radius r_o , experiences at any time a self-force proportional to the acceleration it had at a time r_o /c earlier, while the rate of work done on the charge is obtained by a scalar product of the self-force with the instantaneous (present) value of its velocity. Now if the retarded value of acceleration is expressed in terms of the present values of acceleration, then we get the rate of work done according to the radiation reaction equation, however if we instead express the present value of velocity in terms of its time-retarded value, then we get back the familiar Larmor's radiation formula. From this simple relation between the two we show that they differ because Larmor's formula, in contrast with the radiation reaction, is written not in terms of the real-time values of quantities specifying the charge motion but is instead expressed in terms of the time-retarded values. Moreover, it is explicitly shown that the difference in the two formulas for radiative power loss exactly matches the difference in the temporal rate of the change of energy in the self-fields between the retarded and real times. From this it becomes obvious that the ad hoc introduction of an acceleration-dependent energy term, usually referred to in the prevalent literature as Schott-term, in order to make the two formulas comply with each other, is redundant.

  11. Sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1989-01-01

    Sources of low frequency gravitational radiation are reviewed from an astrophysical point of view. Cosmological sources include the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei, the capture by such holes of neutron stars, the coalescence of orbiting pairs of giant black holes, and various means of producing a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the early universe. Sources local to our Galaxy include various kinds of close binaries and coalescing binaries. Gravitational wave astronomy can provide information that no other form of observing can supply; in particular, the positive identification of a cosmological background originating in the early universe would be an event as significant as was the detection of the cosmic microwave background.

  12. Plasma acceleration and cooling by strong laser field due to the action of radiation reaction force.

    PubMed

    Berezhiani, V I; Mahajan, S M; Yoshida, Z

    2008-12-01

    It is shown that for super intense laser pulses propagating in a hot plasma, the action of the radiation reaction force (appropriately incorporated into the equations of motion) causes strong bulk plasma motion with the kinetic energy raised even to relativistic values; the increase in bulk energy is accompanied by a corresponding cooling (intense cooling) of the plasma. The effects are demonstrated through explicit analytical calculations.

  13. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  14. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas.

  15. Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Lee Samuel

    2012-03-01

    If two black holes collide in a vacuum, can they be observed? Until recently, the answer would have to be "no." After all, how would we observe them? Black holes are "naked" mass: pure mass, simple mass, mass devoid of any matter whose interactions might lead to the emission of photons or neutrinos, or any electromagnetic fields that might accelerate cosmic rays or leave some other signature that we could observe in our most sensitive astronomical instruments. Still, black holes do have mass. As such, they interact—like all mass—gravitationally. And the influence of gravity, like all influences, propagates no faster than that universal speed we first came to know as the speed of light. The effort to detect that propagating influence, which we term as gravitational radiation or gravitational waves, was initiated just over 50 years ago with the pioneering work of Joe Weber [1] and has been the object of increasingly intense experimental effort ever since. Have we, as yet, detected gravitational waves? The answer is still "no." Nevertheless, the accumulation of the experimental efforts begun fifty years ago has brought us to the point where we can confidently say that gravitational waves will soon be detected and, with that first detection, the era of gravitational wave astronomy—the observational use of gravitational waves, emitted by heavenly bodies—will begin. Data analysis for gravitational wave astronomy is, today, in its infancy and its practitioners have much to learn from allied fields, including machine learning. Machine learning tools and techniques have not yet been applied in any extensive or substantial way to the study or analysis of gravitational wave data. It is fair to say that this owes principally to the fields relative youth and not to any intrinsic unsuitability of machine learning tools to the analysis problems the field faces. Indeed, the nature of many of the analysis problems faced by the field today cry-out for the application of

  16. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1: a consistent inflammatory marker of the cutaneous radiation reaction both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Müller, K; Köhn, F-M; Port, M; Abend, M; Molls, M; Ring, J; Meineke, V

    2006-10-01

    Radiation damage to skin is a key diagnostic and prognostic parameter for patients accidentally exposed to radiation. Moreover, skin is a target organ for crucial side-effects of routine radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of the cutaneous radiation reaction is in many respects still unknown. The acute inflammatory radiation reaction of skin has been shown to involve alterations in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, which are mediated by cellular adhesion molecules. To evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in human skin cells. Dermal monolayer cells, a three-dimensional skin model and skin biopsies were investigated for ICAM-1 expression after ionizing radiation using flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. ICAM-1 expression in monolayer cells pretreated with protein kinase inhibitors and dexamethasone prior to irradiation was analysed by flow cytometry. Using different sources of skin cells, we demonstrated a consistent upregulation of both ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression by ionizing radiation. Blocking experiments revealed that tumour necrosis factor-alpha, another ICAM-1 inducer, does not account for the effect of radiation. Radiation-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 expression was significantly attenuated by inhibitors to protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) ERK kinase, p38 MAP kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. The anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone suppressed the effect of radiation on ICAM-1 expression, suggesting its usefulness to treat the cutaneous radiation reaction. Our data suggest that ICAM-1 is a consistent inflammatory parameter of the cutaneous radiation reaction both in vitro and in vivo that might provide new therapeutic options for diagnosis and treatment of effects of radiation.

  17. Gravitating Hopfions

    SciTech Connect

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    2015-12-15

    We construct solutions of the 3 + 1 dimensional Faddeev–Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat. They are characterized by a topological Hopf number. We investigate the dependence of the ADM masses of gravitating Hopfions on the gravitational coupling. When gravity is coupled to flat space solutions, a branch of gravitating Hopfion solutions arises and merges at a maximal value of the coupling constant with a second branch of solutions. This upper branch has no flat space limit. Instead, in the limit of a vanishing coupling constant, it connects to either the Bartnik–McKinnon or a generalized Bartnik–McKinnon solution. We further find that in the strong-coupling limit, there is no difference between the gravitating solitons of the Skyrme model and the Faddeev–Skyrme model.

  18. Does gravitation reveal its secert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molsen, K.

    Molsen (1969) has considered the possibility that a hard particle radiation, which comes with uniform characteristics from all directions, travels through the universe that is known to man. The source of this radiation is related to an occurrence of cosmic primeval processes of still unknown characteristics. The considered radiation is so hard that it penetrates all known celestial bodies. It has been found that the gravitation-related laws of Newton can be derived exactly on the basis of the assumption of a radiation with the conceived properties. The present investigation is concerned with the fine structure of new gravitation and the conclusions which can be drawn in connection with a consideration of a shading effect, taking into account also a report by Saxl and Allen (1971) and a study by Allais (1959). Gravitational shading effects produced by Jupiter in the case of its satellites are also considered.

  19. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum. Keywords: Gravitational wave astrophysics; gravitational radiation; gravitational wave detectors; black holes.

  20. Gravitational induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Chicone, Carmen; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2008-11-01

    We study the linear post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity known as gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM); in particular, we examine the similarities and differences between GEM and electrodynamics. Notwithstanding some significant differences between them, we find that a special nonstationary metric in GEM can be employed to show explicitly that it is possible to introduce gravitational induction within GEM in close analogy with Faraday's law of induction and Lenz's law in electrodynamics. Some of the physical implications of gravitational induction are briefly discussed.

  1. All-optical radiation reaction in head-on laser electron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranic, Marija; Grismayer, Thomas; Martins, Joana L.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2016-10-01

    Radiation reaction (RR) accounts for the slowdown of a charged particle that occurs when a significant fraction of its kinetic energy is emitted as radiation. Here we show that this effect could be measured in an all-optical setup using a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam colliding with an intense laser pulse. We employ full-scale 3D PIC simulations to show that one can enter a radiation reaction dominated regime with a GeV electron beam and a 30 fs laser of I = 1021W/cm2. The electrons can lose up to 40% of their initial energy, which can be used as an experimental signature in the spectra. Our results indicate that modern laser facilities provide an exciting opportunity to explore classical RR and the near-future laser facilities can be employed to study the RR beyond classical description. By using higher laser intensities (1022-1023W/cm2) , quantum effects such as Compton scattering and Breit-Wheeler pair production become relevant. We have included these quantum effects in our PIC code OSIRIS through a Monte Carlo module, and performed a detailed numerical study of the transition from classical to quantum RR dominated regime. We identified the distinct features in the electron distribution function that could serve as signatures of quantum radiation reaction, and showed that large-scale infrastructures (e.g. NIF and ELI and next generation of PW-class lasers (e. g. CoReLS, Bella-i, Texas Petawatt, Apollon 10 PW) could be employed to test the physics in these extreme scenarios.

  2. Conservative, gravitational self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole in a radiation gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Abhay G.; Keidl, Tobias S.; Friedman, John L.; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Price, Larry R.

    2011-03-01

    This is the second of two companion papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge; more precisely, the method uses a radiation gauge for the radiative part of the metric perturbation, together with an arbitrarily chosen gauge for the parts of the perturbation associated with changes in black-hole mass and spin and with a shift in the center of mass. In a test of the method delineated in the first paper, we compute the conservative part of the self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. The gauge vector relating our radiation gauge to a Lorenz gauge is helically symmetric, implying that the quantity hαβuαuβ must have the same value for our radiation gauge as for a Lorenz gauge; and we confirm this numerically to one part in 1014. As outlined in the first paper, the perturbed metric is constructed from a Hertz potential that is in a term obtained algebraically from the retarded perturbed spin-2 Weyl scalar, ψ0ret. We use a mode-sum renormalization and find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in L=ℓ+1/2 to the large-L behavior of the expression for the self-force in terms of the retarded field hαβret; we similarly find the leading renormalization coefficients of hαβuαuβ and the related change in the angular velocity of the particle due to its self-force. We show numerically that the singular part of the self-force has the form fαS=⟨∇αρ-1⟩, the part of ∇αρ-1 that is axisymmetric about a radial line through the particle. This differs only by a constant from its form for a Lorenz gauge. It is because we do not use a radiation gauge to describe the change in black-hole mass that the singular part of the self-force has no singularity along a radial line through the particle and, at least in this example, is spherically symmetric to subleading order in ρ.

  3. Efficiency of ETV diagrams as diagnostic tools for long-term period variations. II. Non-conservative mass transfer, and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanouris, N.; Kalimeris, A.; Antonopoulou, E.; Rovithis-Livaniou, H.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The credibility of an eclipse timing variation (ETV) diagram analysis is investigated for various manifestations of the mass transfer and gravitational radiation processes in binary systems. The monotonicity of the period variations and the morphology of the respective ETV diagrams are thoroughly explored in both the direct impact and the accretion disk mode of mass transfer, accompanied by different types of mass and angular momentum losses (through a hot-spot emission from the gainer and via the L2/L3 points). Aims: Our primary objective concerns the traceability of each physical mechanism by means of an ETV diagram analysis. Also, possible critical mass ratio values are sought for those transfer modes that involve orbital angular momentum losses strong enough to dictate the secular period changes even when highly competitive mechanisms with the opposite direction act simultaneously. Methods: The dot{J-dot{P}} relation that governs the orbital evolution of a binary system is set to provide the exact solution for the period and the function expected to represent the subsequent eclipse timing variations. The angular momentum transport is parameterized through appropriate empirical relations, which are inferred from semi-analytical ballistic models. Then, we numerically determine the minimum temporal range over which a particular mechanism is rendered measurable, as well as the critical mass ratio values that signify monotonicity inversion in the period modulations. Results: Mass transfer rates comparable to or greater than 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are measurable for typical noise levels of the ETV diagrams, regardless of whether the process is conservative. However, the presence of a transient disk around the more massive component defines a critical mass ratio (qcr ≈ 0.83) above which the period turns out to decrease when still in the conservative regime, rendering the measurability of the anticipated variations a much more complicated task. The effects of

  4. Precision X-ray Timing of RX J0806.3+1527 with CHANDRA: Evidence for Gravitational Radiation from an Ultracompact Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohymayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    RX J0806.3+1527 is a candidate double degenerate binary with possibly the shortest known orbital period. The source shows an approximately equal to 100% X-ray intensity modulation at the putative orbital frequency of 3.11 mHz (321.5 s). If the system is a detached, ultracompact binary gravitational radiation should drive spin-up with a magnitude of nu(sup dot) approximately 10(exp -16) Hz per second. Efforts to constrain the X-ray frequency evolution to date have met with mixed success, principally due to the sparseness of earlier observations. Here we describe the results of the first phase coherent X-ray monitoring campaign on RX J0806.3+1527 with Chandra. We obtained a total of 70 ksec of exposure in 6 epochs logarithmically spaced over 320 days. With these data we conclusively show that the X-ray frequency is increasing at a rate of 3.77 plus or minus 0.8 x 10(exp -16) Hz per second. Using the ephemeris derived from the new data we are able to phase up all the earlier Chandra and ROSAT data and show they are consistent with a constant nu(sup dot) = 3.63 plus or minus 0.06 x 10(exp -16) Hz per second over the past decade. This value appears consistent with that recently derived by Israel et al. largely from monitoring of the optical modulation, and is in rough agreement with the solutions reported initially by Hakala et al., based on ground-based optical observations. The large and stable nu(sup dot) over a decade is consistent with gravitational radiation losses driving the evolution. An intermediate polar (IP) scenario where the observed X-ray period is the spin period of an accreting white dwarf appears less tenable because the observed nu(sup dot) requires an m(sup dot) approximately equal to 4 x 10 (exp -8) solar mass yr(sup -l), that is much larger than that inferred from the observed X-ray luminosity (although this depends on the uncertain distance and bolometric corrections), and it is difficult to drive such a high m(sup dot) in a binary system with

  5. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for more than three decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2003-2.

  6. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2011-1.

  7. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  8. Human epidermal stem cells: Role in adverse skin reactions and carcinogenesis from radiation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michèle T; Vulin, Adeline; Hendry, Jolyon H

    In human skin, keratinopoiesis is based on a functional hierarchy among keratinocytes, with rare slow-cycling stem cells responsible for the long-term maintenance of the tissue through their self-renewal potential, and more differentiated daughter progenitor cells actively cycling to permit epidermal renewal and turn-over every month. Skin is a radio-responsive tissue, developing all types of radiation damage and pathologies, including early tissue reactions such as dysplasia and denudation in epidermis, and later fibrosis in the dermis and acanthosis in epidermis, with the TGF-beta 1 pathway as a known master switch. Also there is a risk of basal cell carcinoma, which arises from epidermal keratinocytes, notably after oncogenic events in PTCH1 or TP53 genes. This review will cover the mechanisms of adverse human skin reactions and carcinogenesis after various types of exposures to ionizing radiation, with comparison with animal data when necessary, and will discuss the possible role of stem cells and their progeny in the development of these disorders. The main endpoints presented are basal cell intrinsic radiosensitivity, genomic stability, individual factors of risk, dose specific responses, major molecular pathways involved and the cellular origin of skin reactions and cancer. Although major advances have been obtained in recent years, the precise implications of epidermal stem cells and their progeny in these processes are not yet fully characterized. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A reaction-diffusion model for radiation-induced bystander effects.

    PubMed

    Olobatuyi, Oluwole; de Vries, Gerda; Hillen, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We develop and analyze a reaction-diffusion model to investigate the dynamics of the lifespan of a bystander signal emitted when cells are exposed to radiation. Experimental studies by Mothersill and Seymour 1997, using malignant epithelial cell lines, found that an emitted bystander signal can still cause bystander effects in cells even 60 h after its emission. Several other experiments have also shown that the signal can persist for months and even years. Also, bystander effects have been hypothesized as one of the factors responsible for the phenomenon of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR). Here, we confirm this hypothesis with a mathematical model, which we fit to Joiner's data on HRS/IRR in a T98G glioma cell line. Furthermore, we use phase plane analysis to understand the full dynamics of the signal's lifespan. We find that both single and multiple radiation exposure can lead to bystander signals that either persist temporarily or permanently. We also found that, in an heterogeneous environment, the size of the domain exposed to radiation and the number of radiation exposures can determine whether a signal will persist temporarily or permanently. Finally, we use sensitivity analysis to identify those cell parameters that affect the signal's lifespan and the signal-induced cell death the most.

  10. Electrons in strong electromagnetic fields: spin effects and radiation reaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauke, Heiko; Wen, Meng; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2017-05-01

    Various different classical models of electrons including their spin degree of freedom are commonly applied to describe the coupled dynamics of relativistic electron motion and spin precession in strong electromagnetic fields. The spin dynamics is usually governed by the Thomas-Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation [1, 2] in these models, while the electron's orbital motion follows the (modified) Lorentz force and a spin-dependent Stern-Gerlach force. Various classical models can lead to different or even contradicting predictions how the spin degree of freedom modifies the electron's orbital motion when the electron moves in strong electromagnetic fields. This discrepancy is rooted in the model-specific energy dependency of the spin induced relativistic Stern-Gerlach force acting on the electron. The Frenkel model [3, 4] and the classical Foldy-Wouthuysen model 5 are compared exemplarily against each other and against the quantum mechanical Dirac equation in order to identify parameter regimes where these classical models make different predictions [6, 7]. Our theoretical results allow for experimental tests of these models. In the setup of the longitudinal Stern-Gerlach effect, the Frenkel model and classical Foldy-Wouthuysen model lead in the relativistic limit to qualitatively different spin effects on the electron trajectory. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that in tightly focused beams in the near infrared the effect of the Stern-Gerlach force of the Frenkel model becomes sufficiently large to be potentially detectable in an experiment. Among the classical spin models, the Frenkel model is certainly prominent for its long history and its wide application. Our results, however, suggest that the classical Foldy-Wouthuysen model is superior as it is qualitatively in better agreement with the quantum mechanical Dirac equation. In ultra strong laser setups at parameter regimes where effects of the Stern-Gerlach force become relevant also radiation reaction effects are

  11. Comparison of the electron-spin force and radiation reaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Asenjo, Felipe A.; Hazeltine, Richard D.

    2015-02-01

    It is shown that the forces that originate from the electron-spin interacting with the electromagnetic field can play, along with the Lorentz force, a fundamentally important role in determining the electron motion in a high energy density plasma embedded in strong high-frequency radiation, a situation that pertains to both laser-produced and astrophysical systems. These forces, for instance, dominate the standard radiation reaction force as long as there is a `sufficiently' strong ambient magnetic field for affecting spin alignment. The inclusion of spin forces in any advanced modelling of electron dynamics pertaining to high energy density systems (for instance in particle-in-cell codes), therefore, is a must.

  12. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations as Tools for Testing General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2004-01-01

    We continued a project, to analyse the ways in which detection and study of gravitational waves could provide quantitative tests of general relativity, with particular emphasis on waves that would be detectable by space-based observatories, such as LISA. This work had three foci: 1) Tests of scalar-tensor theories of gravity that, could be done by analyzing gravitational waves from neutron stars inspiralling into massive black holes, as detectable by LISA; 2) Study of alternative theories of gravity in which the graviton could be massive, and of how gravitational-wave observations by space-based detectors, solar-system tests, and cosmological observations could constrain such theories; and 3) Study of gravitational-radiation back reaction of particles orbiting black holes in general relativity, with emphasis on the effects of spin.

  13. On the gravitational redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2014-08-01

    The study of the gravitational redshift-a relative wavelength increase of ≈2×10-6 was predicted for solar radiation by Einstein in 1908-is still an important subject in modern physics. In a dispute whether or not atom interferometry experiments can be employed for gravitational redshift measurements, two research teams have recently disagreed on the physical cause of the shift. Regardless of any discussion on the interferometer aspect-we find that both groups of authors miss the important point that the ratio of gravitational to the electrostatic forces is generally very small. For instance, the ratio of the gravitational force acting on an electron in a hydrogen atom situated in the Sun’s photosphere to the electrostatic force between the proton and the electron in such an atom is approximately 3×10-21. A comparison of this ratio with the predicted and observed solar redshift indicates a discrepancy of many orders of magnitude. With Einstein’s early assumption that the frequencies of spectral lines depend only on the generating ions themselves as starting point, we show that a solution can be formulated based on a two-step process in analogy with Fermi’s treatment of the Doppler effect. It provides a sequence of physical processes in line with the conservation of energy and momentum resulting in the observed shift and does not employ a geometric description. The gravitational field affects the release of the photon and not the atomic transition. The control parameter is the speed of light. The atomic emission is then contrasted with the gravitational redshift of matter-antimatter annihilation events.

  14. Learning about Black-Hole Formation from Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    The first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) discovered gravitational waves from two binary black-hole mergers. Although astrophysical black holes are simple objects fully characterized by their masses and spins, key features of binary black-hole formation such as mass transfer, natal kicks, and common-envelope evolution can misalign black-hole spins with the orbital angular momentum of the binary. These misaligned spins will precess as gravitational-wave emission causes the black holes to inspiral to separations at which the waves are detectable by observatories like LIGO. Spin precession modulates the amplitude and frequency of the gravitational waves observed by LIGO, allowing it to not only test general relativity but also reveal the secrets of black-hole formation. This talk will briefly describe those elements of binary black-hole formation responsible for initial spin misalignments, how spin precession and radiation reaction in general relativity determine how spins evolve from formation until the black holes enter LIGO’s sensitivity band, and how spin-induced gravitational-wave modulation in band can be used as a diagnostic of black-hole formation.

  15. Thermal neutron radiative capture cross-section of 186W(n, γ)187W reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, V. H.; Son, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    The thermal neutron radiative capture cross section for 186W(n, γ)187W reaction was measured by the activation method using the filtered neutron beam at the Dalat research reactor. An optimal composition of Si and Bi, in single crystal form, has been used as neutron filters to create the high-purity filtered neutron beam with Cadmium ratio of Rcd = 420 and peak energy En = 0.025 eV. The induced activities in the irradiated samples were measured by a high resolution HPGe digital gamma-ray spectrometer. The present result of cross section has been determined relatively to the reference value of the standard reaction 197Au(n, γ)198Au. The necessary correction factors for gamma-ray true coincidence summing, and thermal neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in this experiment by Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Second-order equation of motion for electromagnetic radiation back-reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matolcsi, T.; Fülöp, T.; Weiner, M.

    2017-09-01

    We take the viewpoint that the physically acceptable solutions of the Lorentz-Dirac equation for radiation back-reaction are actually determined by a second-order equation of motion, the self-force being given as a function of spacetime location and velocity. We propose three different methods to obtain this self-force function. For two example systems, we determine the second-order equation of motion exactly in the non-relativistic regime via each of these three methods, leading to the same result. We reveal that, for both systems considered, back-reaction induces a damping proportional to velocity and, in addition, it decreases the effect of the external force.

  17. Radiative capture reaction for 17Ne formation within a full three-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, J.; Garrido, E.; de Diego, R.; Arias, J. M.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.

    2016-11-01

    Background: The breakout from the hot Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxigen (CNO) cycles can trigger the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. In this environment, a competition between 15O(α ,γ )19Ne and the two-proton capture reaction 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne is expected. Purpose: Determine the three-body radiative capture reaction rate for 17Ne formation including sequential and direct, resonant and nonresonant contributions on an equal footing. Method: Two different discretization methods have been applied to generate 17Ne states in a full three-body model: the analytical transformed harmonic oscillator method and the hyperspherical adiabatic expansion method. The binary p -15O interaction has been adjusted to reproduce the known spectrum of the unbound 16F nucleus. The dominant E 1 contributions to the 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne reaction rate have been calculated from the inverse photodissociation process. Results: Three-body calculations provide a reliable description of 17Ne states. The agreement with the available experimental data on 17Ne is discussed. It is shown that the 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne reaction rates computed within the two methods agree in a broad range of temperatures. The present calculations are compared with a previous theoretical estimation of the reaction rate. Conclusions: It is found that the full three-body model provides a reaction rate several orders of magnitude larger than the only previous estimation. The implications for the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts should be investigated.

  18. Momentum accumulation due to solar radiation torque, and reaction wheel sizing, with configuration optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hablani, Hari B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper has a two-fold objective: determination of yearly momentum accumulation due to solar radiation pressure, and optimum reaction wheel sizing. The first objective is confronted while determining propellant consumption by the attitude control system over a spacecraft's lifetime. This, however, cannot be obtained from the daily momentum accumulation and treating that constant throughout the year, because the orientation of the solar arrays relative to the spacecraft changes over a wide range in a year, particularly if the spacecraft has two arrays, one normal and the other off-normal to different extent at different times to the sun rays. The paper first develops commands for the arrays for tracking the sun, the arrays articulated to earth-pointing spacecraft with two rotational degrees of freedom, and spacecraft in an arbitrary circular orbit. After developing expressions for solar radiation torque due to one or both arrays, arranged symmetrically or asymmetrically relative to the spacecraft bus, momentum accumulation over an orbit and then over a year are determined. The remainder of the paper is concerned with designing reaction wheel configurations. Four-, six-, and three-wheel configurations are considered, and for given torque and momentum requirements, their cant angles with the roll/yaw plane are optimized for minimum power consumption. Finally, their momentum and torque capacities are determined for one-wheel failure scenario, and six configurations are compared and contrasted.

  19. Gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautman, Andrzej

    2017-07-01

    Historical remarks on early theoretical work on the subject. Very early on, Einstein introduced the notion of gravitational waves, but later became convinced that they did not exist as a physical phenomenon. Exact solutions of Einstein’s equations representing waves were found by a number of authors, contributing to their final acceptance as part of physics.

  20. Methodological Gravitism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaman, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the case of the exchange marriage system to delineate a model of methodological gravitism. Such a model is not a deviation from or alteration to the existing qualitative research approaches. I have adopted culturally specific methodology to investigate spouse selection in line with the Grounded Theory Method. This…

  1. Gravitational decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Großardt, André; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2017-10-01

    We discuss effects of loss of coherence in low energy quantum systems caused by or related to gravitation, referred to as gravitational decoherence. These effects, resulting from random metric fluctuations, for instance, promise to be accessible by relatively inexpensive table-top experiments, way before the scales where true quantum gravity effects become important. Therefore, they can provide a first experimental view on gravity in the quantum regime. We will survey models of decoherence induced both by classical and quantum gravitational fluctuations; it will be manifest that a clear understanding of gravitational decoherence is still lacking. Next we will review models where quantum theory is modified, under the assumption that gravity causes the collapse of the wave functions, when systems are large enough. These models challenge the quantum-gravity interplay, and can be tested experimentally. In the last part we have a look at the state of the art of experimental research. We will review efforts aiming at more and more accurate measurements of gravity (G and g) and ideas for measuring conventional and unconventional gravity effects on nonrelativistic quantum systems.

  2. Gravitational baryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Kribs, Graham D; Murayama, Hitoshi; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2004-11-12

    We show that a gravitational interaction between the derivative of the Ricci scalar curvature and the baryon-number current dynamically breaks CPT in an expanding Universe and, combined with baryon-number-violating interactions, can drive the Universe towards an equilibrium baryon asymmetry that is observationally acceptable.

  3. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a

  4. Ionizing radiation at low doses induces inflammatory reactions in human blood.

    PubMed

    Vicker, M G; Bultmann, H; Glade, U; Häfker, T

    1991-12-01

    Irradiation of whole blood with 137Cs gamma rays intensifies the oxidative burst. Oxidant production was used as an indicator of inflammatory cell reactions and was measured by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence after treatment with inflammatory activators including bacteria, the neutrophil taxin formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, the detergent saponin, and the tumor promoter phorbol ester. The irradiation response is dose-dependent up to about 100 microGy, is detectable within minutes, persists at least 1 h, and is transmitted intercellularly by a soluble mediator. The response is completely inhibited by Ca2+ sequestration in the presence of A23187 or by adenosine, indicating its Ca2+ dependency, and by the phospholipase A2 blocker p-bromphenacyl bromide. However, inhibition by the cyclooxygenase blocker aspirin is sporadic or absent. Blood taken after diagnostic examination of lungs with X rays also exhibited intensified chemiluminescence. These reactions implicate a role for specific amplifying mediator pathways, especially metabolites of the arachidonic acid cascade, in the response: "damage and repair" to cells or DNA plays little or no role. Our results provide evidence for a new mechanism of radiation action with possible consequences for the homeostasis of reactions involving inflammation and second messengers in human health and early development.

  5. Chemical reaction and radiation effects on MHD flow past an exponentially stretching sheet with heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Wahida Khalili, Noran; Aziz Samson, Abdul; Aziz, Ahmad Sukri Abdul; Ali, Zaileha Md

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the problem of MHD boundary layer flow past an exponentially stretching sheet with chemical reaction and radiation effects with heat sink is studied. The governing system of PDEs is transformed into a system of ODEs. Then, the system is solved numerically by using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth order (RKF45) method available in MAPLE 15 software. The numerical results obtained are presented graphically for the velocity, temperature and concentration. The effects of various parameters are studied and analyzed. The numerical values for local Nusselt number, skin friction coefficient and local Sherwood number are tabulated and discussed. The study shows that various parameters give significant effect on the profiles of the fluid flow. It is observed that the reaction rate parameter affected the concentration profiles significantly and the concentration thickness of boundary layer decreases when reaction rate parameter increases. The analysis found is validated by comparing with the results previous work done and it is found to be in good agreement.

  6. Broad-spectrum moisturizer effectively prevents molecular reactions to UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Seité, Sophie; Reinhold, Katja; Jaenicke, Thomas; Brenden, Heidi; Krutmann, Jean; Grether-Beck, Susanne

    2012-12-01

    The damaging effects of UVA radiation have been well-documented. UVA radiation is known to induce molecular, cellular, and clinical damage. Such harm may lead to photoaging, immune system depression, altered gene expression, or oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modulation, all of which are partly responsible for the development of skin cancer. In parallel to an increased understanding of the added damage caused by UVA radiation, progress has been made in sunscreen formulation. A variety of UVA filters are now available for formulators to combine with UVB filters to reach high-level photostable protection using a minimum concentration of active ingredients. The efficacy of products that contain these UV filter combinations usually is determined by noninvasive assessments, which cause either UVA-induced erythema or skin pigmentation. However, the biologic relevance of these end points for UVA radiation-induced skin damage is unknown. In our study, we confirm that the assessment of UVA radiation-induced gene expression in skin specimens obtained from UVA-irradiated human skin by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive, reliable, and robust method to prove the efficacy of 2 daily moisturizers containing broad-spectrum sunscreen. Specifically, we demonstrate in vivo that topical application of a daily moisturizer with broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents UVA radiation-induced transcriptional expression of genes that are directly linked to skin aging (ie, matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1]) and also reflect the skin's antioxidative stress defense response (ie, catalase [CAT], superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione peroxidase [GPx]). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protection against UV-induced skin damage provided by products with different sun protection factor (SPF) but the same UVA protection factor (UVA-PF) is similar, which emphasizes the importance of high UVA protection to maintain unaltered essential biologic functions. These data

  7. Radiation-Induced Chemical Reactions in Hydrogel of Hydroxypropyl Cellulose (HPC): A Pulse Radiolysis Study.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Ma, Jun; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Hiroki, Akihiro; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Mostafavi, Mehran; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2016-12-01

    We performed studies on pulse radiolysis of highly transparent and shape-stable hydrogels of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) that were prepared using a radiation-crosslinking technique. Several fundamental aspects of radiation-induced chemical reactions in the hydrogels were investigated. With radiation doses less than 1 kGy, degradation of the HPC matrix was not observed. The rate constants of the HPC composing the matrix, with two water decomposition radicals [hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and hydrated electron ([Formula: see text])] in the gels, were determined to be 4.5 × 10(9) and 1.8 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Direct ionization of HPC in the matrix slightly increased the initial yield of [Formula: see text], but the additionally produced amount of [Formula: see text] disappeared immediately within 200 ps, indicating fast recombination of [Formula: see text] with hole radicals on HPC or on surrounding hydration water molecules. Reactions of [Formula: see text] with nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitromethane (CH3NO2) were also examined. Decay of [Formula: see text] due to scavenging by N2O and CH3NO2 were both slower in hydrogels than in aqueous solutions, showing slower diffusions of the reactants in the gel matrix. The degree of decrease in the decay rate was more effective for N2O than for CH3NO2, revealing lower solubility of N2O in gel than in water. It is known that in viscous solvents, such as ethylene glycol, CH3NO2 exhibits a transient effect, which is a fast reaction over the contact distance of reactants and occurs without diffusions of reactants. However, such an effect was not observed in the hydrogel used in the current study. In addition, the initial yield of [Formula: see text], which is affected by the amount of the scavenged precursor of [Formula: see text], in hydrogel containing N2O was slightly higher than that in water containing N2O, and the same tendency was found for CH3NO2.

  8. The Milankovitch Orbital Elements and Their Application to the Long-term Orbit Evolution of Planetary Satellites Subject to Radiation and Gravitational Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron; Scheeres, D. J.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In his monumental work on the astronomical theory of paleoclimates, Milutin Milankovitch (1879-1958) reformulated the classical method of perturbation of elements using the two vectorial integrals of the unperturbed two-body problem--the angular momentum (areal) vector and the Laplace vector. The vectorial integrals describe the spatial orientation, geometrical shape, and size of the osculating Keplerian orbit, and, together with the sixth scalar integral that represents the motion in time, constitutes a complete set of orbital elements. These elements are particularly useful in finding the first-order long-period and secular variations by averaging over the fast variables of the system. The application of the Milankovitch elements to the determination of oblateness and tidal effects leads to the equations for perturbed elements in which the small numerical divisors, the eccentricity and the sine of the inclination, are not present (Musen, P., J. Geophys. Res., 66, 1961; Allan, R.R., and Cook, G.E., Proc. R. Soc. A, 280, 1964). Tremaine et al. (AJ, 137, 2009) used the Milankovitch elements to study the classical Laplace plane, a region of space where the secular evolution of orbits driven by the combined effects of these forces is zero, so that the orbits are ``frozen.'' This talk will reintroduce the Milankovitch elements, present a completely nonsingular form of them, and show their application to the long-term orbit evolution of irregular satellites, binary asteroids, and other planetary systems. We will also show how the Laplace plane equilibrium can be generalized to accommodate non-gravitational forces, such as solar radiation perturbations.

  9. Gravitational Lensing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  10. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  11. Experimental gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; di Virgilio, Angela

    2016-06-01

    100 years after the invention of General Relativity (GR) and 110 years after the development of Special Relativity (SR) we have to state that until now no single experiment or observation allows any doubt about the validity of these theories within the accuracy of the available data. Tests of GR can be divided into three categories: (i) test of the foundations of GR, (ii) tests of the consequences of GR, and (iii) test of the interplay between GR and quantum mechanics. In the first category, we have tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle and the structure of the Newton axioms, in the second category we have effects like the gravitational redshift, light defection, gravitational time delay, the perihelion shift, the gravitomagnetic effects as the Lense-Thirring and Schiff effect, and gravitational waves. Tests of the effects of gravity on quantum systems are a first step towards experiments searching for a quantum gravity theory. In this paper, we also highlight practical applications in positioning, geodesy, and the International Atomic Time. After 100 years, GR can now definitely be regarded also as practical and applied science.

  12. Radiation reaction on a classical charged particle: a modified form of the equation of motion.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, Guillermo García; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J

    2013-09-01

    We present and numerically solve a modified form of the equation of motion for a charged particle under the influence of an external force, taking into account the radiation reaction. This covariant equation is integro-differential, as Dirac-Röhrlich's, but has several technical improvements. First, the equation has the form of Newton's second law, with acceleration isolated on the left hand side and the force depending only on positions and velocities: Thus, the equation is linear in the highest derivative. Second, the total four-force is by construction perpendicular to the four-velocity. Third, if the external force vanishes for all future times, the total force and the acceleration automatically vanish at the present time. We show the advantages of this equation by solving it numerically for several examples of external force.

  13. Radiative flow of Carreau liquid in presence of Newtonian heating and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Ullah, Ikram; Ahmad, B.; Alsaedi, A.

    Objective of this article is to investigate the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer stretched flow of Carreau fluid in the presence of Newtonian heating. Sheet is presumed permeable. Analysis is studied in the presence of chemical reaction and thermal radiation. Mathematical formulation is established by using the boundary layer approximations. The resultant nonlinear flow analysis is computed for the convergent solutions. Interval of convergence via numerical data and plots are obtained and verified. Impact of numerous pertinent variables on the velocity, temperature and concentration is outlined. Numerical data for surface drag coefficient, surface heat transfer (local Nusselt number) and mass transfer (local Sherwood number) is executed and inspected. Comparison of skin friction coefficient in limiting case is made for the verification of current derived solutions.

  14. Non-thermal effects of a ceramics radiation on reversibility of lactate dehydrogenase reaction.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, M; Kasuya, Y; Watanabe, T

    1996-02-01

    Non-thermal effects of a ceramics radiation on reversibility of lactate dehydrogenase reaction have been investigated using the enzyme irradiated on cooling, and a pyruvate/NADH (system I) or a lactate/NAD+ (system II) as substrate. The Km for lactate in the system II using the irradiated enzyme tended to decrease just like balancing with the increase in Km for pyruvate in system I. The Vmax/Km for system II was increased 2.3-fold by the 18-h irradiated enzyme. Each enthalpy and entropy change in system II using the 18-h irradiation of the enzyme was decreased by 21 kJ mol-1, although that in system I was increased by 12 kJ mol-1. From a thermodynamic analysis, it was estimated that solvation of the active center of LDH was promoted and stabilized by the irradiation, and that it caused this regulation of the reversibility of LDH.

  15. Radiative flow of a tangent hyperbolic fluid with convective conditions and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sajid; Ahmad, Bashir; Waqas, Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    The objective of present paper is to examine the thermal radiation effects in the two-dimensional mixed convection flow of a tangent hyperbolic fluid near a stagnation point. The analysis is performed in the presence of heat generation/absorption and chemical reaction. Convective boundary conditions for heat and mass transfer are employed. The resulting partial differential equations are reduced into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate transformations. Series solutions of momentum, energy and concentration equations are computed. The characteristics of various physical parameters on the distributions of velocity, temperature and concentration are analyzed graphically. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and examined. It is observed that larger values of thermal and concentration Biot numbers enhance the temperature and concentration distributions.

  16. Radiation reaction on a classical charged particle: A modified form of the equation of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaine, Guillermo García; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2013-09-01

    We present and numerically solve a modified form of the equation of motion for a charged particle under the influence of an external force, taking into account the radiation reaction. This covariant equation is integro-differential, as Dirac-Röhrlich's, but has several technical improvements. First, the equation has the form of Newton's second law, with acceleration isolated on the left hand side and the force depending only on positions and velocities: Thus, the equation is linear in the highest derivative. Second, the total four-force is by construction perpendicular to the four-velocity. Third, if the external force vanishes for all future times, the total force and the acceleration automatically vanish at the present time. We show the advantages of this equation by solving it numerically for several examples of external force.

  17. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  18. Back-Reaction of Black Hole Radiation from Hamilton-Jacobi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chikun

    2013-10-01

    In the frame of Hamilton-Jacobi method, the back-reactions of the radiating particles together with the total entropy change of the whole system are investigated. The emission probability from this process is found to be equivalent to the null geodesic method. However its physical picture is more clear: the negative energy one of a virtual particle pair is absorbed by the black hole, resulting in the temperature, electric potential and angular velocity increase; then the black hole amount of heat, electric charge and angular momentum can spontaneously transfer to the positive energy particle; when obtaining enough energy, it can escape away to infinity, visible to distant observers. And this method can be applied to any sort of horizons and particles without a specific choice of (regular-across-the-horizon) coordinates.

  19. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in nonlinear radiative flow of Jeffrey fluid between two stretchable rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    This article addresses MHD Jeffrey fluid flow between two stretchable rotating disks. Momentum equation with magnetic field is presented. Energy equation is constructed in presence of heat source/sink and nonlinear radiation. Thermal stratification and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are accounted. The related systems have been solved for convergent solutions. Velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are analyzed. The velocities (radial, axial, tangential) are increasing functions of Deborah number. Decline in axial velocity is noticed at lower disk for larger ratio of relaxation to retardation times constant. Thermal field is enhanced for temperature ratio parameter. Concentration has opposite behavior for larger homogeneous parameter and Schmidt number. Surface drag force decays for larger ratio of relaxation to retardation times at both disks. Heat transfer rate enhances for temperature ratio parameter.

  20. New results for reaction rate of the proton radiative capture on 3H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Afanasyeva, N. V.

    2017-07-01

    Calculations of the reaction rate of the proton radiative capture on 3H at temperatures from 0.01 T9 up to 5 T9, which are based on the theoretical results for the astrophysical S-factor and take into account the latest experimental data, were carried out. Theoretical results for the S-factor at energies from 1 keV up to 5 MeV were obtained in the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of orbital states according to Young tableaux. On the basis of used nuclear model of the interaction of p and 3H particles there was shown possibility of description the latest experimental data for the S-factor at the energy range from 50 keV up to 5 MeV.

  1. Radiation-Reaction Force on a Small Charged Body to Second Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxon, Jordan; Flanagan, Eanna

    2015-04-01

    In classical electrodynamics, an accelerating charge emits radiation and experiences a corresponding radiation reaction force, or self force. We extend to greater precision (higher order in perturbation theory) a previous rigorous derivation of the electromagnetic self force in flat spacetime by Gralla, Harte, and Wald. The method introduced by Gralla, Harte, and Wald computes the self-force from the Maxwell field equations and conservation of stress-energy, and does not require regularization of a singular point charge, as has been necessary in prior computations. For our higher order compuation, it becomes necessary to adopt an adjusted definition of the mass of the body to avoid including self-energy from the electromagnetic field sourced during the history of the body. We derive the evolution equations for the mass, spin, and center of mass position of an extended body through second order using our adjusted formalism. The final equations give an acceleration dependent evolution of the spin (self-torque), as well as a mixing between the extended body effects and the acceleration dependent effects on the overall body motion.

  2. Effectiveness of semi-permeable dressings to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Castro, M; Martín-Gil, B; Peña-García, I; López-Vallecillo, M; García-Puig, M E

    2017-04-18

    The aim of this systematic review is to assess the available evidence concerning the effectiveness of semi-permeable dressings, on the full range of skin reactions, related to radiation therapy in cancer patients, from local erythema to moist desquamation, including subjective symptoms such as pain, discomfort, itchiness, burning and the effect on daily life activities. The bibliographic search was carried out looking for Randomised Clinical Trials (RCTs) indexed in PubMed, Cinhal, Cochrane plus and Biblioteca Nacional de Salud, published in the English and Spanish language, between 2010 and 2015. Data extraction and evaluation of study quality was undertaken by peer reviewers using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP). Of 181 studies, nine full texts were assessed. Finally, six RCT were included in the final synthesis: three analysed the application of Mepilex(®) Lite in breast cancer and head & neck cancer; one evaluated the application of Mepitel(®) Film in breast cancer; and two assessed the use of silver nylon dressings in breast cancer and in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer. The results show that semi-permeable dressings are beneficial in the management of skin toxicity related to radiation therapy. However, rigorous trials showing stronger evidence are needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  4. Effects of Variable Thermal Conductivity and Non-linear Thermal Radiation Past an Eyring Powell Nanofluid Flow with Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramzan, M.; Bilal, M.; Kanwal, Shamsa; Chung, Jae Dong

    2017-06-01

    Present analysis discusses the boundary layer flow of Eyring Powell nanofluid past a constantly moving surface under the influence of nonlinear thermal radiation. Heat and mass transfer mechanisms are examined under the physically suitable convective boundary condition. Effects of variable thermal conductivity and chemical reaction are also considered. Series solutions of all involved distributions using Homotopy Analysis method (HAM) are obtained. Impacts of dominating embedded flow parameters are discussed through graphical illustrations. It is observed that thermal radiation parameter shows increasing tendency in relation to temperature profile. However, chemical reaction parameter exhibits decreasing behavior versus concentration distribution. Supported by the World Class 300 Project (No. S2367878) of the SMBA (Korea)

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of brain injury after nasopharyngeal cancer radiation in early delayed reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-S; Li, J-J; Zhang, J-H; Hong, L; Xing, Z-B; Wang, F; Li, C-Q

    2014-08-29

    This study aimed to investigate the value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging in assessing nasopharyngeal carcinoma radiotherapy during the early delayed reaction period. Eighty cases of nasopharyngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy within the same period underwent MRS imaging before or after radiotherapy. Of the 80 cases, 47 underwent MRS imaging on the 3rd, 4th, 6th, and 12th months after radiotherapy. The trends of the primary metabolite concentration at different time points were monitored and compared with the corresponding data after radiotherapy. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed. At the end of radiotherapy, the N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), choline (Cho)/Cr, and NAA/Cho ratios were reduced to the lowest levels after 3 months. However, increasing trends were observed from the 4th to the 12th month. On the 12th month, stable levels were reached with statistically significant differences (F = 316.02, 53.84, 286.68; P < 0.01). MRS reflected the radiation injury-repair process in the brain of a nasopharyngeal cancer patient during early delayed reaction. This non-invasive monitoring of changes in brain tissue metabolite concentrations provides valuable information for prognosis.

  6. Reaction rate theory of radiation exposure:Effects of dose rate on mutation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Masako; Nakamura, Issei; Manabe, Yuichiro

    2014-03-01

    We revisit the linear no threshold (LNT) hypothesis deduced from the prominent works done by H. J. Muller for the DNA mutation induced by the artificial radiation and by W. L. Russell and E. M. Kelly for that of mega-mouse experiments, developing a new kinetic reaction theory. While the existing theoretical models primarily rely on the dependence of the total dose D on the mutation frequency, the key ingredient in our theory is the dose rate d(t) that accounts for decrease in the mutation rate during the time course of the cellular reactions. The general form for the mutation frequency with the constant dose rate d is simply expressed as, dFm(t)/dt = A - BFm(t) , with A =a0 +a1(d +deff) and B =b0 +b1(d +deff) . We discuss the solution for a most likely case with B > 0 ; Fm(t) = [A/B -Fm(0) ] (1 -e-Bt) +Fm(0) with the control value Fm(0) . We show that all the data of mega-mouse experiments by Russel with different dose rates fall on the universal scaling function Φ(τ) ≡ [Fm(τ) -Fm(0) ]/[ A / B -Fm(0) ] = 1 - exp(- τ) with scaled time τ = Bt . The concept of such a scaling rule provides us with a strong tool to study different species in a unified manner.

  7. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids. 1. Anions.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W; Chemerisov, Sergey D; Wishart, James F

    2011-04-14

    Room temperature ionic liquids (IL) find increasing use for the replacement of organic solvents in practical applications, including their use in solar cells and electrolytes for metal deposition, and as extraction solvents for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The radiation stability of ILs is an important concern for some of these applications, as previous studies suggested extensive fragmentation of the constituent ions upon irradiation. In the present study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used to identify fragmentation pathways for constituent anions in ammonium, phosphonium, and imidazolium ILs. Many of these detrimental reactions are initiated by radiation-induced redox processes involving these anions. Scission of the oxidized anions is the main fragmentation pathway for the majority of the practically important anions; (internal) proton transfer involving the aliphatic arms of these anions is a competing reaction. For perfluorinated anions, fluoride loss following dissociative electron attachment to the anion can be even more prominent than this oxidative fragmentation. Bond scission in the anion was also observed for NO(3)(-) and B(CN)(4)(-) anions and indirectly implicated for BF(4)(-) and PF(6)(-) anions. Among small anions, CF(3)SO(3)(-) and N(CN)(2)(-) are the most stable. Among larger anions, the derivatives of benzoate and imide anions were found to be relatively stable. This stability is due to suppression of the oxidative fragmentation. For benzoates, this is a consequence of the extensive sharing of unpaired electron density by the π-system in the corresponding neutral radical; for the imides, this stability could be the consequence of N-N σ(2)σ(*1) bond formation involving the parent anion. While fragmentation does not occur for these "exceptional" anions, H atom addition and electron attachment are prominent. Among the typically used constituent anions, aliphatic carboxylates were found to be the least

  8. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids. I. Anions.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T.; Chemerisov, S.; Wishart, J.

    2011-04-14

    Room temperature ionic liquids (IL) find increasing use for the replacement of organic solvents in practical applications, including their use in solar cells and electrolytes for metal deposition, and as extraction solvents for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The radiation stability of ILs is an important concern for some of these applications, as previous studies suggested extensive fragmentation of the constituent ions upon irradiation. In the present study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used to identify fragmentation pathways for constituent anions in ammonium, phosphonium, and imidazolium ILs. Many of these detrimental reactions are initiated by radiation-induced redox processes involving these anions. Scission of the oxidized anions is the main fragmentation pathway for the majority of the practically important anions; (internal) proton transfer involving the aliphatic arms of these anions is a competing reaction. For perfluorinated anions, fluoride loss following dissociative electron attachment to the anion can be even more prominent than this oxidative fragmentation. Bond scission in the anion was also observed for NO{sub 3}{sup -} and B(CN){sub 4}{sup -} anions and indirectly implicated for BF{sub 4}{sup -} and PF{sub 6}{sup -} anions. Among small anions, CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup -} and N(CN){sub 2}{sup -} are the most stable. Among larger anions, the derivatives of benzoate and imide anions were found to be relatively stable. This stability is due to suppression of the oxidative fragmentation. For benzoates, this is a consequence of the extensive sharing of unpaired electron density by the {pi}-system in the corresponding neutral radical; for the imides, this stability could be the consequence of N-N {sigma}{sup 2}{sigma}*{sup 1} bond formation involving the parent anion. While fragmentation does not occur for these 'exceptional' anions, H atom addition and electron attachment are prominent. Among the typically used

  9. Sources of inner radiation zone energetic helium ions: cross-field transport versus in-situ nuclear reactions.

    PubMed

    Spjeldvik, W N; Pugacheva, G I; Gusev, A A; Martin, I M; Sobolevsky, N M

    1998-01-01

    Radial transport theory for inner radiation zone MeV He ions has been extended by combining radial diffusive transport, losses due to Coulomb friction and charge exchange reaction with local generation of 3He and 4He ions due to nuclear reactions taking place on the inner edge of the inner radiation zone. From interactions between high energy trapped protons and upper atmospheric constituents we have included a nuclear reaction yield helium flux source that was numerically derived from a nuclear reaction model originally developed at the Institute of Nuclear Researches of Moscow, Russia and implemented in the computer system at the University of Campinas, Brazil. Magnetospheric transport computations have been made covering the L-shell range L=1.0 to 1.6 and the resulting MeV He ion flux distributions show a strong influence of the local nuclear source mechanism on the inner zone energetic He ion content.

  10. Investigation of CaO-CO₂ reaction kinetics by in-situ XRD using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Biasin, A.; Segre, C. U.; Salviulo, G.; Zorzi, F.; Strumendo, M.

    2015-02-05

    In this work, in-situ synchrotron radiation x-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRPD), performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facilities of the Argonne National Laboratory, was applied to investigate the CaO–CO2 reaction. A set of CO2 absorption experiments were conducted in a high temperature reaction capillary with a controlled atmosphere (CO2 partial pressure of 1 bar), in the temperature range between 450 °C and 750 °C using CaO based sorbents obtained by calcination of commercial calcium carbonate. The evolution of the crystalline phases during CO2 uptake by the CaO solid sorbents was monitored for a carbonation time of 20 min as a function of the carbonation temperature and of the calcination conditions. The Rietveld refinement method was applied to estimate the calcium oxide conversion during the reaction progress and the average size of the initial (at the beginning of carbonation) calcium oxide crystallites. The measured average initial carbonation rate (in terms of conversion time derivative) of 0.280 s-1 (±13.2% standard deviation) is significantly higher than the values obtained by thermo-gravimetric analysis and reported thus far in the literature. Additionally, a dependence of the conversion versus time curves on the initial calcium oxide crystallite size was observed and a linear relationship between the initial CaO crystallite size and the calcium oxide final conversion was identified.

  11. Chiral primordial gravitational waves from a Lifshitz point.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Soda, Jiro

    2009-06-12

    We study primordial gravitational waves produced during inflation in quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point proposed by Horava. Assuming power-counting renormalizability, foliation-preserving diffeomorphism invariance, and the condition of detailed balance, we show that primordial gravitational waves are circularly polarized due to parity violation. The chirality of primordial gravitational waves is a quite robust prediction of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point which can be tested through observations of cosmic microwave background radiation and stochastic gravitational waves.

  12. Calculating the gravitational self-force in Schwarzschild spacetime.

    PubMed

    Barack, Leor; Mino, Yasushi; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ori, Amos; Sasaki, Misao

    2002-03-04

    We present a practical method for calculating the local gravitational self-force (often called "radiation-reaction force") for a pointlike particle orbiting a Schwarzschild black hole. This is an implementation of the method of mode-sum regularization, in which one first calculates the (finite) contribution to the force due to each individual multipole mode of the perturbation, and then applies a certain regularization procedure to the mode sum. Here we give the values of all the "regularization parameters" required for implementing this regularization procedure, for any geodesic orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime.

  13. General Relativity and Gravitation, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bartlett, David F.; Wyss, Walker

    2005-10-01

    Part I. Classical Relativity and Gravitation Theory: 1. Global properties of exact solutions H. Friedrich; 2. Numerical relativity T. Nakamura; 3. How fast can a pulsar spin? J. L. Friedman; 4. Colliding waves in general relativity V. Ferrari; Part II. Relativistic Astrophysics, Early Universe, and Classical Cosmology: 5. Observations of cosmic microwave radiation R. B. Partridge; 6. Cosmic microwave background radiation (theory) M. Panek; 7. Inflation and quantum cosmology A. D. Linde; 8. Observations of lensing B. Fort; 9. Gravitational lenses: theory and interpretation R. Blandford; Part III. Experimental Gravitation and Gravitational Waves: 10. Solar system tests of GR: recent results and present plans I. Shapiro; 11. Laser interferometer detectors R. Weiss; 12. Resonant bar gravitational wave experiments G. Pizzella; 13. A non-inverse square law test E. Adelberger; Part IV. Quantum Gravity, Superstrings, Quantum Cosmology: 14. Cosmic strings B. Unruh; 15. String theory as a quantum theory of gravity G. Horowitz; 16. Progress in quantum cosmology J. B. Hartle; 17. Self-duality, quantum gravity, Wilson loops and all that A. V. Ashtekar; Part V. Summary Talk: 18. GR-12 Conference summary J. Ehlers II; Part VI. Reports on Workshops/Symposia: 19. Exact solutions and exact properties of Einstein equations V. Moncrieff; 20. Spinors, twistors and complex methods N. Woodhouse; 21. Alternative gravity theories M. Francaviglia; 22. Asymptotia, singularities and global structure B. G. Schmidt; 23. Radiative spacetimes and approximation methods T. Damour; 24. Algebraic computing M. MacCallum; 25. Numerical relativity J. Centrella; 26. Mathematical cosmology J. Wainwright; 27. The early universe M. Turner; 28. Relativistic astrophysics M. Abramowitz; 29. Astrophysical and observational cosmology B. Carr; 30. Solar system and pulsar tests of gravitation R. Hellings; 31. Earth-based gravitational experiments J. Faller; 32. Resonant bar and microwave gravitational wave

  14. General Relativity and Gravitation, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bartlett, David F.; Wyss, Walker

    1990-11-01

    Part I. Classical Relativity and Gravitation Theory: 1. Global properties of exact solutions H. Friedrich; 2. Numerical relativity T. Nakamura; 3. How fast can a pulsar spin? J. L. Friedman; 4. Colliding waves in general relativity V. Ferrari; Part II. Relativistic Astrophysics, Early Universe, and Classical Cosmology: 5. Observations of cosmic microwave radiation R. B. Partridge; 6. Cosmic microwave background radiation (theory) M. Panek; 7. Inflation and quantum cosmology A. D. Linde; 8. Observations of lensing B. Fort; 9. Gravitational lenses: theory and interpretation R. Blandford; Part III. Experimental Gravitation and Gravitational Waves: 10. Solar system tests of GR: recent results and present plans I. Shapiro; 11. Laser interferometer detectors R. Weiss; 12. Resonant bar gravitational wave experiments G. Pizzella; 13. A non-inverse square law test E. Adelberger; Part IV. Quantum Gravity, Superstrings, Quantum Cosmology: 14. Cosmic strings B. Unruh; 15. String theory as a quantum theory of gravity G. Horowitz; 16. Progress in quantum cosmology J. B. Hartle; 17. Self-duality, quantum gravity, Wilson loops and all that A. V. Ashtekar; Part V. Summary Talk: 18. GR-12 Conference summary J. Ehlers II; Part VI. Reports on Workshops/Symposia: 19. Exact solutions and exact properties of Einstein equations V. Moncrieff; 20. Spinors, twistors and complex methods N. Woodhouse; 21. Alternative gravity theories M. Francaviglia; 22. Asymptotia, singularities and global structure B. G. Schmidt; 23. Radiative spacetimes and approximation methods T. Damour; 24. Algebraic computing M. MacCallum; 25. Numerical relativity J. Centrella; 26. Mathematical cosmology J. Wainwright; 27. The early universe M. Turner; 28. Relativistic astrophysics M. Abramowitz; 29. Astrophysical and observational cosmology B. Carr; 30. Solar system and pulsar tests of gravitation R. Hellings; 31. Earth-based gravitational experiments J. Faller; 32. Resonant bar and microwave gravitational wave

  15. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Guiding-centre transformation of the radiation-reaction force in a non-uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvijoki, E.; Decker, J.; Brizard, A. J.; Embréus, O.

    2015-10-01

    > In this paper, we present the guiding-centre transformation of the radiation-reaction force of a classical point charge travelling in a non-uniform magnetic field. The transformation is valid as long as the gyroradius of the charged particles is much smaller than the magnetic field non-uniformity length scale, so that the guiding-centre Lie-transform method is applicable. Elimination of the gyromotion time scale from the radiation-reaction force is obtained with the Poisson-bracket formalism originally introduced by Brizard (Phys. Plasmas, vol. 11, 2004, 4429-4438), where it was used to eliminate the fast gyromotion from the Fokker-Planck collision operator. The formalism presented here is applicable to the motion of charged particles in planetary magnetic fields as well as in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas, where the corresponding so-called synchrotron radiation can be detected. Applications of the guiding-centre radiation-reaction force include tracing of charged particle orbits in complex magnetic fields as well as the kinetic description of plasma when the loss of energy and momentum due to radiation plays an important role, e.g. for runaway-electron dynamics in tokamaks.

  17. Gravitational correlation, black hole entropy, and information conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, DongShan; Cai, QingYu

    2017-04-01

    When two objects have gravitational interaction between them, they are no longer independent of each other. In fact, there exists gravitational correlation between these two objects. Inspired by Verlinde's paper, we first calculate the entropy change of a system when gravity does positive work on this system. Based on the concept of gravitational correlation entropy, we prove that the entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole originates from the gravitational correlations between the interior matters of the black hole. By analyzing the gravitational correlation entropies in the process of Hawking radiation in a general context, we prove that the reduced entropy of a black hole is exactly carried away by the radiation and the gravitational correlations between these radiating particles, and the entropy or information is conserved at all times during Hawking radiation. Finally, we attempt to give a unified description of the non-extensive black-hole entropy and the extensive entropy of ordinary matter.

  18. Gravitational correlation, black hole entropy, and information conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, DongShan; Cai, QingYu

    2017-04-01

    When two objects have gravitational interaction between them, they are no longer independent of each other. In fact, there exists gravitational correlation between these two objects. Inspired by Verlinde's paper, we first calculate the entropy change of a system when gravity does positive work on this system. Based on the concept of gravitational correlation entropy, we prove that the entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole originates from the gravitational correlations between the interior matters of the black hole. By analyzing the gravitational correlation entropies in the process of Hawking radiation in a general context, we prove that the reduced entropy of a black hole is exactly carried away by the radiation and the gravitational correlations between these radiating particles, and the entropy or information is conserved at all times during Hawking radiation. Finally, we attempt to give a unified description of the non-extensive black-hole entropy and the extensive entropy of ordinary matter.

  19. Effect of cerium on photosynthetic pigments and photochemical reaction activity in soybean seedling under ultraviolet-B radiation stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Zhang, Guangsheng; Zhou, Qing

    2011-09-01

    Effects of cerium (Ce) on photosynthetic pigments and photochemical reaction activity in soybean (Glycine max L.) under ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation stress were studied under laboratory conditions. UV-B radiation caused the decrease in chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, Hill reaction activity, photophosphorylation rate and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity. Ce (III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate UV-B-induced inhibition to these photosynthetic parameters because values of these photosynthetic parameters in Ce (III) + UV-B treatment were obviously higher than those with UV-B treatment alone. Dynamic changes of the above photosynthetic parameters show that Ce (III) could slow down the decrease rate of these photosynthetic parameters during a 5-day UV-B radiation and quicken the restoration during recovery period. The final restoration degree of five parameters mentioned above in leaves exposed to low level of UV-B radiation (0.15 W m(2)) was higher than that exposed to high level (0.45 W m(2)). Correlating net photosynthetic rate with other four parameters, we found that the regulating mechanisms Ce (ΠΙ) on photosynthesis under various level of UV-B radiation were not the same. The protective effects of Ce (III) on photosynthesis in plants were influenced by the intensity of UV-B radiation.

  20. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  1. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    SciTech Connect

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-09-15

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  2. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured.

  3. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-09-01

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  4. Evidence for thermal reactions following exposure of Didinium to intermittent ultraviolet radiations.

    PubMed

    BENNETT, J; BRANDT, C L; FARMANFARMAIAN, A; GIESE, A C; SHEPARD, D C

    1956-11-20

    1. The nature of ultraviolet injury and its variation with the same dose given at different intensities and wave lengths have been investigated in the protozoan Didinium nasutum, using time to the fourth division as a measure of injury. 2. The injury has been found to consist of a "slowdown" of division rate, which always occurs, and a "stasis," usually at the second division after irradiation, which appears in varying degrees among more severely injured samples. 3. Injury was found to be almost independent of intensity at three wave lengths out of four studied over a wide range of intermediate and high intensities, but was found to rise sharply with lower intensity at all except the longest wave length. 4. Flashed UV of high intensity is much more effective than the same dose of continuous radiation at high intensity and shorter total time of treatment. It is also more effective than the same dose at low intensity and equal time of treatment, though only slightly so. 5. An increase of injury with rise of temperature and with increase of dark period clearly indicates that injury depends on thermochemical reactions following the absorption of UV in Didinium. 6. The most reasonable assumption is that a similar conclusion applies to other organisms as well, and that its general application may be useful in the investigation of UV effects on protoplasm.

  5. Radiation reaction in the interaction of ultraintense laser with matter and gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, J. F.; Teo, W. R.; Moritaka, Toseo; Takabe, H.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation reaction (RR) force plays an important role in gamma ray production in the interaction of ultraintense laser with relativistic counterpropagating electron at intensity 1022 W/cm2 and beyond. The relationship between emission spectrum and initial kinetic energy of electron at such intensities is yet to be clear experimentally. On the other hand, the energy from both the relativistic electron beam and laser pulse may be converted into the gamma rays. Therefore, the conversion efficiency of energy purely from laser pulse into gamma rays is of great interest. We present simulation results of an electron dynamics in strong laser field by taking into account the RR effects. We investigated how the RR effects influence the emission spectrum and photon number distribution for different laser condition. We showed that the peaks of emission spectra are suppressed if higher initial kinetic energy of electron interacts with long laser pulse duration. We then list the conversion efficiencies of laser pulse energy into gamma ray. We note that an electron with energy of 40 MeV would convert up to 80% of the total of electromagnetic work and initial kinetic energy of electron when interacting with 10 fs laser pulse at intensity 2 ×1023 W/cm2. For a bunch of electron with charge 1 nC would emit around 0.1 J of energy into gamma ray emission.

  6. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  7. The Radiation Reaction Effect on Electrons at Super-High Laser Intensities with Application to Ion Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, N. M.; Sokolov, I. V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Schlegel, T.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V. P.; Labaune, C.; Mourou, G. A.

    2009-07-25

    At super-high laser intensities the radiation back reaction on electrons becomes so significant that its influence on laser-plasma interaction cannot be neglected while simulating these processes with particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. We discuss a way of taking the radiation effect on electrons into account and extracting spatial and frequency distributions of the generated high-frequency radiation. We also examine ponderomotive acceleration of ions in the double layer created by strong laser pulses and we compare an analytical description with PIC simulations as well. We discuss: (1) non-stationary features found in simulations, (2) electron cooling effect due to radiation losses, and (3) the limits of the analytical model.

  8. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  9. Monitoring dynamic reactions of red blood cells to UHF electromagnetic waves radiation using a novel micro-imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ping; Yong, Junguang; Shen, Hongtao; Zheng, Xianrong

    2012-12-01

    Multiple state-of-the-art techniques, such as multi-dimensional micro-imaging, fast multi-channel micro-spetrophotometry, and dynamic micro-imaging analysis, were used to dynamically investigate various effects of cell under the 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Cell changes in shape, size, and parameters of Hb absorption spectrum under different power density electromagnetic waves radiation were presented in this article. Experimental results indicated that the isolated human red blood cells (RBCs) do not have obviously real-time responses to the ultra-low density (15 μW/cm(2), 31 μW/cm(2)) electromagnetic wave radiation when the radiation time is not more than 30 min; however, the cells do have significant reactions in shape, size, and the like, to the electromagnetic waves radiation with power densities of 1 mW/cm(2) and 5 mW/cm(2). The data also reveal the possible influences and statistical relationships among living human cell functions, radiation amount, and exposure time with high-frequency electromagnetic waves. The results of this study may be significant on protection of human being and other living organisms against possible radiation affections of the high-frequency electromagnetic waves.

  10. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D B; Travis, E L

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. To determine timing of application for best effect, gel was applied beginning on day -7, 0, or +7 relative to the day of irradiation (day 0) and continuing for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. The right inner thigh of each mouse was scored on a scale of 0 to 3.5 for severity of radiation reaction from the seventh to the 35th day after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED50 values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED50 values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED50 values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin

  11. Improving the accuracy of simulation of radiation-reaction effects with implicit Runge-Kutta-Nyström methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkina, N. V.; Fedotov, A. M.; Herzing, C.; Ruhl, H.

    2014-05-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz equation provides an efficient way to account for the effects of radiation reaction without acquiring the nonphysical solutions typical for the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation. We solve the Landau-Lifshitz equation in its covariant four-vector form in order to control both the energy and momentum of radiating particles. Our study reveals that implicit time-symmetric collocation methods of the Runge-Kutta-Nyström type are superior in accuracy and better at maintaining the mass-shell condition than their explicit counterparts. We carry out an extensive study of numerical accuracy by comparing the analytical and numerical solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. Finally, we present the results of the simulation of particle scattering by a focused laser pulse. Due to radiation reaction, particles are less capable of penetrating into the focal region compared to the case where radiation reaction is neglected. Our results are important for designing forthcoming experiments with high intensity laser fields.

  12. Improving the accuracy of simulation of radiation-reaction effects with implicit Runge-Kutta-Nyström methods.

    PubMed

    Elkina, N V; Fedotov, A M; Herzing, C; Ruhl, H

    2014-05-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz equation provides an efficient way to account for the effects of radiation reaction without acquiring the nonphysical solutions typical for the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation. We solve the Landau-Lifshitz equation in its covariant four-vector form in order to control both the energy and momentum of radiating particles. Our study reveals that implicit time-symmetric collocation methods of the Runge-Kutta-Nyström type are superior in accuracy and better at maintaining the mass-shell condition than their explicit counterparts. We carry out an extensive study of numerical accuracy by comparing the analytical and numerical solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. Finally, we present the results of the simulation of particle scattering by a focused laser pulse. Due to radiation reaction, particles are less capable of penetrating into the focal region compared to the case where radiation reaction is neglected. Our results are important for designing forthcoming experiments with high intensity laser fields.

  13. Hawking radiation of a high-dimensional rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhao; Lichun, Zhang; Huaifan, Li; Yueqin, Wu

    2010-01-01

    We extend the classical Damour-Ruffini method and discuss Hawking radiation spectrum of high-dimensional rotating black hole using Tortoise coordinate transformation defined by taking the reaction of the radiation to the spacetime into consideration. Under the condition that the energy and angular momentum are conservative, taking self-gravitation action into account, we derive Hawking radiation spectrums which satisfy unitary principle in quantum mechanics. It is shown that the process that the black hole radiates particles with energy ω is a continuous tunneling process. We provide a theoretical basis for further studying the physical mechanism of black-hole radiation.

  14. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; ...

    2016-09-07

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focusmore » on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. As a result, higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.« less

  15. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-07

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. As a result, higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  16. Kinetic Study of Radiation-reaction-limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Unstable Force-free Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The “flares” are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. Higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  17. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-07

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. As a result, higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  18. Gravitational Wave Experiments - Proceedings of the First Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, E.; Pizzella, G.; Ronga, F.

    1995-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Notes on Edoardo Amaldi's Life and Activity * PART I. INVITED LECTURES * Sources and Telescopes * Sources of Gravitational Radiation for Detectors of the 21st Century * Neutrino Telescopes * γ-Ray Bursts * Space Detectors * LISA — Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for Gravitational Wave Measurements * Search for Massive Coalescing Binaries with the Spacecraft ULYSSES * Interferometers * The LIGO Project: Progress and Prospects * The VIRGO Experiment: Status of the Art * GEO 600 — A 600-m Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Antenna * 300-m Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detector (TAMA300) in Japan * Resonant Detectors * Search for Continuous Gravitational Wave from Pulsars with Resonant Detector * Operation of the ALLEGRO Detector at LSU * Preliminary Results of the New Run of Measurements with the Resonant Antenna EXPLORER * Operation of the Perth Cryogenic Resonant-Bar Gravitational Wave Detector * The NAUTILUS Experiment * Status of the AURIGA Gravitational Wave Antenna and Perspectives for the Gravitational Waves Search with Ultracryogenic Resonant Detectors * Ultralow Temperature Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors: Current Status of the Stanford Program * Electromechanical Transducers and Bandwidth of Resonant-Mass Gravitational-Wave Detectors * Fully Numerical Data Analysis for Resonant Gravitational Wave Detectors: Optimal Filter and Available Information * PART II. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Sources and Telescopes * The Local Supernova Production * Periodic Gravitational Signals from Galactic Pulsars * On a Possibility of Scalar Gravitational Wave Detection from the Binary Pulsars PSR 1913+16 * Kazan Gravitational Wave Detector “Dulkyn”: General Concept and Prospects of Construction * Hierarchical Approach to the Theory of Detection of Periodic Gravitational Radiation * Application of Gravitational Antennae for Fundamental Geophysical Problems * On

  19. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J.

    2011-04-14

    In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium

  20. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids. 2. Imidazolium cations.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W; Chemerisov, Sergey D; Hatcher, Jasmine L; Wishart, James F

    2011-04-14

    In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through "ionization of the ions": oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) σσ*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C(α)-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 ± 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (~0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium trifluorosulfonate). Gradual

  1. Estimates of nonequilibrium radiation for Venus entry. [generated by chemical reactions in shock layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, W. L.; Nealy, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The present investigation is an analysis of the radiation from the chemical nonequilibrium region in the shock layer about a vehicle during Venus entry. The radiation and the flow were assumed to be uncoupled. An inviscid, nonequilibrium flowfield was calculated and an effective electronic temperature was determined for the predominant radiating species. Species concentrations and electronic temperature were then input into a radiation transport code to calculate heating rates. The present results confirm earlier investigations which indicate that the radiation should be calculated using electronic temperatures for the radiating species. These temperatures are not related in a simple way to the local translational temperature. For the described mission, the nonequilibrium radiative heating rate is approximately twice the corresponding equilibrium value at peak heating.

  2. Gravitational memory, BMS supertranslations and soft theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The transit of a gravitating radiation pulse past arrays of detectors stationed near future null infinity in the vacuum is considered. It is shown that the relative positions and clock times of the detectors before and after the radiation transit differ by a BMS supertranslation. An explicit expression for the supertranslation in terms of moments of the radiation energy flux is given. The relative spatial displacement found for a pair of nearby detectors reproduces the well-known and potentially measurable gravitational memory effect. The displacement memory formula is shown to be equivalent to Weinberg's formula for soft graviton production.

  3. Gravitational wave emission from oscillating millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars undergoing r-mode oscillation emit gravitational radiation that might be detected on the Earth. For known millisecond pulsars the observed spin-down rate imposes an upper limit on the possible gravitational wave signal of these sources. Taking into account the physics of r-mode evolution, we show that only sources spinning at frequencies above a few hundred Hertz can be unstable to r-modes, and we derive a more stringent universal r-mode spin-down limit on their gravitational wave signal. We find that this refined bound limits the gravitational wave strain from millisecond pulsars to values below the detection sensitivity of next generation detectors. Young sources are therefore a more promising option for the detection of gravitational waves emitted by r-modes and to probe the interior composition of compact stars in the near future.

  4. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  5. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  6. On the evaluation of energy behavior of radiation fields generated by exoergic reactions in axi-symmetric emitters.

    PubMed

    Oner, F; Mamedov, B A; Timus, D M

    2010-01-01

    The analytical characterization of the spatial dependency of the mean energy particles produced in non-dispersive media by exoergic reactions having axial symmetry is important in the study of these nuclear reactions. The objective of this paper is to provide an efficient and reliable analytical procedure for the evaluation of energy behavior of particles around axi-symmetric radiation field emitter. We can evaluate high terms of energy expressions, which have been proposed in Timus (2005a). Test calculations show that the proposed algorithm in this work is the most efficient one in practical computations. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiative capture reactions with heavy beams: extending the capabilities of DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Anna; Fallis, Jennifer; Spyrou, Artemis; Laird, Alison M.; Ruiz, Chris; Buchmann, Lothar; Fulton, Brian R.; Hutcheon, Dave; Martin, Lars; Ottewell, Dave; Rojas, Alex

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the nucleosynthesis of stable proton-rich nuclei requires knowledge of the cross sections for both proton and alpha capture reactions. As some of the nucleosynthesis paths responsible for the production of these nuclei involve reactions on unstable isotopes, it is of particular importance to develop techniques to investigate these reactions. This requires radioactive beams and measurements in inverse kinematics, thus making recoil separators an ideal tool for direct measurements of proton and alpha capture reactions. Here, the application of the DRAGON recoil separator for measurements of capture reactions for heavy beams is presented. The performance of the separator was tested using the 58Ni(p,γ)59Cu reaction.

  8. Kinetic Study of Radiation-Reaction-Limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Force-Free Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Blandford, Roger D.; East, William E.; Zrake, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over short time scales. This might be due to prodigal dissipation in a highly magnetized outflow. In order to understand the generic behavior of relativistic plasma with high magnetization, we consider a class of prototypical force-free equilibria which are shown to be unstable to ideal modes (East et al 2015 PRL 115, 095002). Kinetic simulations are carried out to follow the evolution of the instability and to study the basic mechanisms of particle acceleration, especially in the radiation-reaction-limited regime. We find that the instability naturally produces current layers and these are sites for efficient particle acceleration. Detailed calculations of the gamma ray spectrum, the evolution of the particle distribution function and the dynamical consequences of radiation reaction will be presented.

  9. Bizarre (pseudomalignant) granulation-tissue reactions following ionizing-radiation exposure. A microscopic, immunohistochemical, and flow-cytometric study

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, N.; Askin, F.B.; Berthrong, M.; Hopkins, M.B.; Kute, T.E.; McGuirt, F.W.

    1987-04-15

    Two patients developed extremely bizarre (pseudomalignant) granulation-tissue reactions in the larynx and facial sinuses, following radiation therapy for carcinoma. Containing pleomorphic spindle cells and numerous (sometimes atypical) mitotic figures, both tumefactive lesions simulated high grade malignancies. While the pleomorphic cells contained vimentin immunoreactivity, they were nonreactive for low or high molecular weight keratin. Flowcytometric study of paraffin-embedded tissues revealed DNA indexes of 0.75 and 1.0. Neither recurred locally nor spread distantly after therapy. Their granulation-tissue growth pattern, and the presence of stromal and endothelial cells showing similar degrees of cytologic atypia were central to their recognition as benign. These findings show that severely atypical, sometimes aneuploid, granulation-tissue reactions can occur following radiation exposure. Care should be taken not to misinterpret these lesions as malignant.

  10. Problems of the Kinetics and Mechanism of Radiation-Chemical Reactions. (Second All-Union Conference on Radiation Chemistry)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-09-22

    solutions considerable attention was directed to an analysis of the biradical model which was developed by Dienes and Kennedy (1958) Basically, the...the H and OH radical needs a more precise re-statement. - 4 - Large difficulties, as noted albo in a nait by V. V. Voyevodskiy, have arisen in the...oxygen- saturated aqueous solution of potassium oxalate in the presence of a zinc oxide suspension. The radiation-chem- ical consumption-- G (K 2 C2 0 4

  11. Structural effects of 34Na in the 33Na(n ,γ )34Na radiative capture reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Shubhchintak, Chatterjee, R.

    2017-06-01

    Background: The path towards the production of r -process seed nuclei follows a course where the neutron rich light and medium mass nuclei play a crucial role. The neutron capture rates for these exotic nuclei could dominate over their α -capture rates, thereby enhancing their abundances at or near the drip line. Sodium isotopes especially should have a strong neutron capture flow to gain abundance at the drip line. In this context, study of 33Na(n ,γ )34Na and 33Na(α ,n )36Al reactions becomes indispensable. Purpose: In this paper, we calculate the radiative neutron capture cross section for the 33Na(n ,γ )34Na reaction involving deformation effects. Subsequently, the rate for this reaction is found and compared with that of the α -capture for the 33Na(α ,n )36Al reaction to determine the possible path flow for the abundances of sodium isotopes. Method: We use the entirely quantum mechanical theory of finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation upgraded to incorporate deformation effects, and calculate the Coulomb dissociation of 34Na as it undergoes elastic breakup on 208Pb when directed at a beam energy of 100 MeV/u. Using the principle of detailed balance to study the reverse photodisintegration reaction, we find the radiative neutron capture cross section with variation in one-neutron binding energy and quadrupole deformation of 34Na. The rate of this 33Na(n ,γ )34Na reaction is then compared with that of the α -capture by 33Na deduced from the Hauser-Feshbach theory. Results: The nonresonant one-neutron radiative capture cross section for 33Na(n ,γ )34Na is calculated and is found to increase with increasing deformation of 34Na. An analytic scrutiny of the capture cross section with neutron separation energy as a parameter is also done at different energy ranges. The calculated reaction rate is compared with the rate of the 33Na(α ,n )36Al reaction, and is found to be significantly higher below a temperature of T9=2 . Conclusion: At the

  12. Connecting Compton and Gravitational Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Barry R.

    2017-01-01

    The study of Compton scattering—S + γ → S + γ—at MAMI and elsewhere has led to a relatively successful understanding of proton structure via its polarizabilities. The recent observation of gravitational radiation observed by LIGO has raised the need for a parallel understanding of gravitational Compton scattering—S + g → S + g—and we show here how it can be obtained from ordinary Compton scattering by use of the double copy theorem.

  13. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3).

  14. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns.

  15. Chiral gravitational waves from chiral fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Sabancilar, Eray

    2017-07-01

    We report on a new mechanism that leads to the generation of primordial chiral gravitational waves, and hence, the violation of the parity symmetry in the Universe. We show that nonperturbative production of fermions with a definite helicity is accompanied by the generation of chiral gravitational waves. This is a generic and model-independent phenomenon that can occur during inflation, reheating and radiation eras, and can leave imprints in the cosmic microwave background polarization and may be observed in future ground- and space-based interferometers. We also discuss a specific model where chiral gravitational waves are generated via the production of light chiral fermions during pseudoscalar inflation.

  16. Some astrophysical consequences of a dynamical interpretation of gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Y.V.; Sokolov, V.V.

    1985-03-01

    In the framework of a dynamical (field-theoretical) interpretation of gravitation, it is shown that in the case of spherical collapse of a body to about R/sub g/ the energy radiated in the form of scalar gravitational waves may reach aboutMc/sup 2/. Instead of producing a black hole, the gravitational collapse will result in a powerful pulse (or train of pulses) of scalar gravitational radiation. This opens up new possibilities for interpreting supernova explosions and the high peculiar velocities of some O-B stars. Strong scalar radiation is also expected from the active nuclei of galaxies. The superluminal expansion observed in some compact extragalactic radio sources may be due to scalar radiation. The possibility of detecting scalar gravitational waves is discussed.

  17. Combustion at reduced gravitational conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Wang, L. S.; Joshi, N.; Pai, C. I.

    1980-01-01

    The theoretical structures needed for the predictive analyses and interpretations for flame propagation and extinction for clouds of porous particulates are presented. Related combustion theories of significance to reduced gravitational studies of combustible media are presented. Nonadiabatic boundaries are required for both autoignition theory and for extinction theory. Processes that were considered include, pyrolysis and vaporization of particulates, heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical kinetics, molecular transport of heat and mass, radiative coupling of the medium to its environment, and radiative coupling among particles and volume elements of the combustible medium.

  18. Gravitational Self-Force: Orbital Mechanics Beyond Geodesic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barack, Leor

    The question of motion in a gravitationally bound two-body system is a longstanding open problem of General Relativity. When the mass ratio η is small, the problem lends itself to a perturbative treatment, wherein corrections to the geodesic motion of the smaller object (due to radiation reaction, internal structure, etc.) are accounted for order by order in η, using the language of an effective gravitational self-force. The prospect for observing gravitational waves from compact objects inspiralling into massive black holes in the foreseeable future has in the past 15 years motivated a program to obtain a rigorous formulation of the self-force and compute it for astrophysically interesting systems. I will give a brief survey of this activity and its achievements so far, and will identify the challenges that lie ahead. As concrete examples, I will discuss recent calculations of certain conservative post-geodesic effects of the self-force, including the O(η ) correction to the precession rate of the periastron. I will highlight the way in which such calculations allow us to make a fruitful contact with other approaches to the two-body problem.

  19. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular and bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics using VUV synchrotron radiation as a product probe

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, David Andrew

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation describes the use of a new molecular beam apparatus designed to use tunable VUV synchrotron radiation for photoionization of the products from scattering experiments. The apparatus was built at the recently constructed Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a third generation 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The new apparatus is applied to investigations of the dynamics of unimolecular reactions, photodissociation experiments, and bimolecular reactions, crossed molecular beam experiments. The first chapter describes the new apparatus and the VUV radiation used for photoionization. This is followed by a number of examples of the many advantages provided by using VUV photoionization in comparison with the traditional technique of electron bombardment ionization. At the end of the chapter there is a discussion of the data analysis employed in these scattering experiments. The remaining four chapters are complete investigations of the dynamics of four chemical systems using the new apparatus and provide numerous additional examples of the advantages provided by VUV photoionizaiton of the products. Chapters 2-4 are photofragment translational spectroscopy studies of the photodissociation dynamics of dimethyl sulfoxide, acrylonitrile, and vinyl chloride following absorption at 193 mn. All of these systems have multiple dissociation channels and provide good examples of the ability of the new apparatus to unravel the complex UV photodissociation dynamics that can arise in small polyatomic molecules.

  20. Gravitational-wave astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, W. H.; Thorne, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    The significance of experimental evidence for gravitational waves is considered for astronomy. Properties, generation, and astrophysical sources of the waves are discussed. Gravitational wave receivers and antennas are described. A review of the Weber experiment is presented.

  1. Radiation reaction and the self-force for a point mass in general relativity.

    PubMed

    Detweiler, S

    2001-03-05

    A point particle of mass mu moving on a geodesic creates a perturbation h(mu), of the spacetime metric g(0), that diverges at the particle. Simple expressions are given for the singular mu/r part of h(mu) and its quadrupole distortion caused by the spacetime. Subtracting these from h(mu) leaves a remainder h(R) that is C1. The self-force on the particle from its own gravitational field corrects the world line at O(mu) to be a geodesic of g(0)+h(R). For the case that the particle is a small nonrotating black hole, an approximate solution to the Einstein equations is given with error of O(mu(2)) as mu-->0.

  2. Helicity-rotation-gravity coupling for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jairzinho; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2006-04-15

    The consequences of spin-rotation-gravity coupling are worked out for linear gravitational waves. The coupling of helicity of the wave with the rotation of a gravitational-wave antenna is investigated and the resulting modifications in the Doppler effect and aberration are pointed out for incident high-frequency gravitational radiation. Extending these results to the case of a gravitomagnetic field via the gravitational Larmor theorem, the rotation of linear polarization of gravitational radiation propagating in the field of a rotating mass is studied. It is shown that in this case the linear polarization state rotates by twice the Skrotskii angle as a consequence of the spin-2 character of linear gravitational waves.

  3. Fractional statistics from gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.M. ); Park, D.H. )

    1994-06-15

    We show that the solitons of the SO(3) nonlinear sigma model in 2+1 dimensions, when coupled to gravitation with the gravitational Chern-Simons interaction, become anyons in the absence of the Hopf term. In particular we calculate the fractional statistical factor of the gravitating anyons, and prove that the gravitational Chern-Simons term itself can be interpreted as the Hopf term of the topological current of [Pi][sub 2]([ital S][sup 2]).

  4. Introduction to gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperini, M.; De Sabbata, V.

    1986-01-01

    This book is divided into the following chapters: Contents: Geometry and Gravitation; The Formalism of General Relativity; Gravitational Field Equations; The Three Classical Tests of Einstein's Theory; Elements of Cosmology; Relativistic Cosmological Models; Non-Static Models of the Universe; Gravitational Waves; Dense and Collapsed Matter; The Einstein-Cartan Theory; The Strong Gravity Theory; Gauge Theory of Gravity; Supergravity; Gravitational Theory in the Language of Exterior Forms.

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW Gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Gravitational lensing has developed into one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of the dark universe. This review summarizes the theory of gravitational lensing, its main current applications and representative results achieved so far. It has two parts. In the first, starting from the equation of geodesic deviation, the equations of thin and extended gravitational lensing are derived. In the second, gravitational lensing by stars and planets, galaxies, galaxy clusters and large-scale structures is discussed and summarized.

  6. Quantum metrology for gravitational wave astronomy.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Roman; Mavalvala, Nergis; McClelland, David E; Lam, Ping K

    2010-11-16

    Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts that accelerating mass distributions produce gravitational radiation, analogous to electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charges. These gravitational waves (GWs) have not been directly detected to date, but are expected to open a new window to the Universe once the detectors, kilometre-scale laser interferometers measuring the distance between quasi-free-falling mirrors, have achieved adequate sensitivity. Recent advances in quantum metrology may now contribute to provide the required sensitivity boost. The so-called squeezed light is able to quantum entangle the high-power laser fields in the interferometer arms, and could have a key role in the realization of GW astronomy.

  7. Determination of minimal erythema dose and anomalous reactions to UVA radiation by skin phototype.

    PubMed

    Pérez Ferriols, A; Aguilera, J; Aguilera, P; de Argila, D; Barnadas, M A; de Cabo, X; Carrrascosa, J M; de Gálvez Aranda, M V; Gardeazábal, J; Giménez-Arnau, A; Lecha, M; Lorente, J; Martínez-Lozano, J A; Rodríguez Granados, M T; Sola, Y; Utrillas, M P

    2014-10-01

    Phototesting is a technique that assesses the skin's sensitivity to UV radiation by determining the smallest dose of radiation capable of inducing erythema (minimal erythema dose [MED]) and anomalous responses to UV-A radiation. No phototesting protocol guidelines have been published to date. This was a multicenter prospective cohort study in which 232 healthy volunteers were recruited at 9 hospitals. Phototests were carried out with solar simulators or fluorescent broadband UV-B lamps. Each individual received a total of 5 or 6 incremental doses of erythemal radiation and 4 doses of UV-A radiation. The results were read at 24hours. At hospitals where solar simulators were used, the mean (SD) MED values were 23 (8), 28 (4), 35 (4), and 51 (6) mJ/cm(2) for skin phototypes i to iv, respectively. At hospitals where broadband UV-B lamps were used, these values were 28 (5), 32 (3), and 34 (5) mJ/cm(2) for phototypes ii to iv, respectively. MED values lower than 7, 19, 27, and 38 mJ/cm(2) obtained with solar simulators were considered to indicate a pathologic response for phototypes I to IV, respectively. MED values lower than 18, 24, and 24mJ/cm(2) obtained with broadband UV-B lamps were considered to indicate a pathologic response for phototypes ii to iv, respectively. No anomalous responses were observed at UV-A radiation doses of up to 20J/cm(2). Results were homogeneous across centers, making it possible to standardize diagnostic phototesting for the various skin phototypes and establish threshold doses that define anomalous responses to UV radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  8. Gravitation in Material Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium…

  9. Gravitation in Material Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium…

  10. Vacuum Ultraviolet and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Effect of Hydrogenated Silicon Nitride Etching: Surface Reaction Enhancement and Damage Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Masanaga; Miyawaki, Yudai; Kondo, Yusuke; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Matsugai, Hiroyasu; Honda, Takayoshi; Minami, Masaki; Uesawa, Fumikatsu; Hori, Masaru; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2012-02-01

    Photon-enhanced etching of SiNx:H films caused by the interaction between vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)/ultraviolet (UV) radiation and radicals in the fluorocarbon plasma was investigated by a technique with a novel sample setup of the pallet for plasma evaluation. The simultaneous injection of UV radiation and radicals causes a dramatic etch rate enhancement of SiNx:H films. Only UV radiation causes the film shrinkage of SiNx:H films owing to hydrogen desorption from the film. Capacitance-voltage characteristics of SiNx:H/Si substrates were studied before and after UV radiation. The interface trap density increased monotonically upon irradiating the UV photons with a wavelength of 248 nm. The estimated effective interface trap generation probability is 4.74 ×10-7 eV-1·photon-1. Therefore, the monitoring of the VUV/UV spectra during plasma processing and the understanding of its impact on the surface reaction, film damage and electrical performance of underlying devices are indispensable to fabricate advanced devices.

  11. Design aspects of a laser gravitational wave detector in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, R.; Randall, J. L.; Bender, P. L.; Faller, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Certain optical and mechanical aspects of a proposed laser gravitational wave antenna in space are briefly discussed. The proposed concept consists of a free-mass antenna with the test masses separated by a distance of 1,000,000 km. A laser heterodyne technique is employed to measure the distance change between test masses resulting from gravitational wave interaction. The proposed scheme is considered to offer the necessary sensitivity to detect gravitational radiation from binary stars predicted by General Relativity Theory.

  12. Nonlinear thermal radiation and cubic autocatalysis chemical reaction effects on the flow of stretched nanofluid under rotational oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Sood, Shilpa; Sheikholeslami, Mohsen; Shehzad, Sabir Ali

    2017-11-01

    Combined effects of nonlinear thermal radiation and cubic autocatalysis chemical reaction on the three dimensional flow of stretched nanofluid along a rotating sheet have been investigated in this paper. The flow field is assumed to be suspended with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). Hamilton-Crosser model is applied to measure effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid. Rosseland approximation is employed to obtain the nonlinear radiative heat flux. For novelty and practical point of view, influence of fluctuating surface velocity and periodic surface temperature constraints are incorporated into the governing equations which in turn are made dimension free by employing suitable transformations. For numerical solutions, an explicit finite difference scheme has been proposed under the restrictions of derived stability conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of polarization observables and radiative effects for the reaction p-bar+p{yields}e{sup +}+e{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Merenkov, N. P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    2011-04-15

    The expressions for the differential cross section and polarization observables for the reaction p-bar+p{yields}e{sup +}+e{sup -} are given in terms of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the laboratory system, assuming the one-photon exchange. Radiative corrections due to the emission of virtual and real soft photons from the leptons are also calculated. Unlike in the center-of-mass system, they depend on the scattering angle. Polarization effects are derived in the case when the antiproton beam, the target, and the electron in the final state are polarized. Numerical estimations have been done for all observables, using models for the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the time-like region. The radiative corrections to the differential cross section are calculated as functions of the beam energy and electron angle.

  14. Optical Communication among Oscillatory Reactions and Photo-Excitable Systems: UV and Visible Radiation Can Synchronize Artificial Neuron Models.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Giubila, Maria Sole; Germani, Raimondo; Romani, Aldo; Nicoziani, Andrea; Spalletti, Anna; Heron, B Mark

    2017-06-19

    Neuromorphic engineering promises to have a revolutionary impact in our societies. A strategy to develop artificial neurons (ANs) is to use oscillatory and excitable chemical systems. Herein, we use UV and visible radiation as both excitatory and inhibitory signals for the communication among oscillatory reactions, such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky and the chemiluminescent Orban transformations, and photo-excitable photochromic and fluorescent species. We present the experimental results and the simulations regarding pairs of ANs communicating by either one or two optical signals, and triads of ANs arranged in both feed-forward and recurrent networks. We find that the ANs, powered chemically and/or by the energy of electromagnetic radiation, can give rise to the emergent properties of in-phase, out-of-phase, anti-phase synchronizations and phase-locking, dynamically mimicking the communication among real neurons. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Thermal and pulsed laser induced surface reactions in Ti/Si(001) interfaces studied by spectromicroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larciprete, R.; Danailov, M.; Barinov, A.; Gregoratti, L.; Kiskinova, M.

    2001-11-01

    Thin titanium silicide layers, produced by thermal or ultraviolet (UV) and visible pulsed laser annealing of Ti films deposited on Si substrates, have been studied by synchrotron radiation scanning photoemission spectroscopy (SR-SPEM) with lateral resolution of 0.12 μm. The evolution of the Ti 2p, Si 2p, and valence band spectra were used as fingerprints for the occurring morphological changes and interfacial reactions. For thermal processes the Ti films were deposited through a mask and by performing spectromicroscopy across the edge of the Ti patch the influence of the film thickness on the interface reaction was probed. The advancement of the interfacial reaction as a function of the annealing temperature was studied as well. The three components in the Si 2p spectra with chemical shift of -0.76, -0.50 and -0.18 eV, observed after thermal annealing at 650 and 850 °C were attributed to TiSi, C49 TiSi2, and C54 TiSi2, respectively. For the laser treated Ti/Si interfaces SPEM was successfully used to map the lateral distribution of these silicide phases formed within the laser irradiated region. In all cases the laser beams were focused and the photon density values were chosen to limit the temperature rise below the Si and Ti melting thresholds. We found that in the external region of the laser spots where the local temperature does not exceed 500 °C the dominating C49 TiSi2 phase coexists with some TiSi, whereas in the hottest central region the formation of C54 TiSi2 is favored. The similarity of the lateral distribution and the chemical phases formed within the laser spots obtained using UV and visible radiation confirmed that the local laser-induced temperature rise controls the interfacial processes, whereas the radiation wavelength plays a negligible role.

  16. The Radiative Strength Function Using the Neutron-Capture Reaction on 151,153Eu

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Alpizar-Vicente, A; Becker, J A; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T A; Clement, R; Esch, E; Folden, C M; Hatarik, R; Haight, R C; Hoffman, D C; Krticka, M; Macri, R A; Mitchell, G E; Nitsche, H; O'Donnell, J M; Parker, W; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Sheets, S A; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilk, P; Wouters, J M; Wu, C Y

    2005-10-04

    Radiative strength functions in {sup 152,154}Eu nuclei for {gamma}-ray energies below 6 MeV have been investigated. Neutron capture for incident neutron energies <1eV up to 100 keV has been measured for {sup 151,153}Eu targets. Properties of resonances in these two nuclei are examined. The measurements are compared to simulation of cascades performed with various models for the radiative strength function. Comparison between experimental data and simulation suggests an existence of the low-energy resonance in these two nuclei.

  17. Extragalactic sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, M. J.

    The prospects of detecting gravitational waves from galactic nuclei are shown to be bleak: although some 'scenarios', such as those involving black hole coalescence, would emit a pulse with about 0.1 efficiency, the predicted event rate is discouragingly low. If most of the 'unseen' mass in the universe were in the remnants of massive 'Population III' stars, then the overlapping bursts from the collapse of such objects in early epochs would yield a stochastic background that could amount to about 0.001 (or even more) of the critical cosmological density. Such a background may be above the detectability threshold for future experiments, and can be probed by studying the timing noise of pulsars, and the secular behavior of the binary pulsar. General constraints on stochastic backgrounds, including 'primordial' gravitational radiation, are summarized.

  18. Does Occupational Exposure of Shahid Dastghieb International Airport Workers to Radiofrequency Radiation Affect Their Short Term Memory and Reaction Time?

    PubMed Central

    Jarideh, S.; Taeb, S.; Pishva, S. M.; Haghani, M.; Sina, S.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.; Hosseini, M. A.; Nematollahi, S.; Shokrpour, N.; Hassan Shahi, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Airport workers are continuously exposed to different levels of radiofrequency microwave (RF/MW) radiation emitted by radar equipments. Radars are extensively used in military and aviation industries. Over the past several years, our lab has focused on the health effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as cellular phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, radars, dentistry cavitrons and MRI. The main goal of this study was to investigate if occupational exposure of Shahid Dastghieb international airport workers to radiofrequency radiation affects their short term memory and reaction time. Methods Thirty two airport workers involved in duties at control and approach tower (21 males and 11 females), with the age range of 27-67 years old (mean age of 37.38), participated voluntary in this study. On the other hand, 29 workers (13 males, and 16 females) whose offices were in the city with no exposure history to radar systems were also participated in this study as the control group. The employees’ reaction time and short term memory were analyzed using a standard visual reaction time (VRT) test software and the modified Wechsler memory scale test, respectively. Results The mean± SD values for the reaction times of the airport employees (N=32) and the control group (N=29) were 0.45±0.12 sec and 0.46±0.17 sec, respectively.  Moreover, in the four subset tests; i.e. paired words, forward digit span, backward digit span and word recognition, the following points were obtained for the airport employees and the control group, respectively: (i) pair words test: 28.00±13.13 and 32.07±11.65, (ii) forward digit span: 8.38±1.40 and 9.03±1.32, (iii) backward digit span: 5.54±1.87 and 6.31±1.46, and (iv) word recognition: 5.73±2.36 and 6.50±1.93. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The occupational exposure of the employees to the RF radiation in Shahid Dastghieb

  19. Does Occupational Exposure of Shahid Dastghieb International Airport Workers to Radiofrequency Radiation Affect Their Short Term Memory and Reaction Time?

    PubMed

    Jarideh, S; Taeb, S; Pishva, S M; Haghani, M; Sina, S; Mortazavi, S A R; Hosseini, M A; Nematollahi, S; Shokrpour, N; Hassan Shahi, M; Mortazavi, S M J

    2015-09-01

    Airport workers are continuously exposed to different levels of radiofrequency microwave (RF/MW) radiation emitted by radar equipments. Radars are extensively used in military and aviation industries. Over the past several years, our lab has focused on the health effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as cellular phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, radars, dentistry cavitrons and MRI. The main goal of this study was to investigate if occupational exposure of Shahid Dastghieb international airport workers to radiofrequency radiation affects their short term memory and reaction time. Thirty two airport workers involved in duties at control and approach tower (21 males and 11 females), with the age range of 27-67 years old (mean age of 37.38), participated voluntary in this study. On the other hand, 29 workers (13 males, and 16 females) whose offices were in the city with no exposure history to radar systems were also participated in this study as the control group. The employees' reaction time and short term memory were analyzed using a standard visual reaction time (VRT) test software and the modified Wechsler memory scale test, respectively. The mean± SD values for the reaction times of the airport employees (N=32) and the control group (N=29) were 0.45±0.12 sec and 0.46±0.17 sec, respectively.  Moreover, in the four subset tests; i.e. paired words, forward digit span, backward digit span and word recognition, the following points were obtained for the airport employees and the control group, respectively: (i) pair words test: 28.00±13.13 and 32.07±11.65, (ii) forward digit span: 8.38±1.40 and 9.03±1.32, (iii) backward digit span: 5.54±1.87 and 6.31±1.46, and (iv) word recognition: 5.73±2.36 and 6.50±1.93. These differences were not statistically significant. The occupational exposure of the employees to the RF radiation in Shahid Dastghieb international airport does not have any

  20. Interactions of Changing Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Climate with Light Induced Chemical Reactions in Aquatic Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet radiation that reach the surface of North American aquatic environments. Concurrent changes in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in changes in stratification and precipitation that ar...

  1. Interactions of Changing Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Climate with Light Induced Chemical Reactions in Aquatic Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet radiation that reach the surface of North American aquatic environments. Concurrent changes in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in changes in stratification and precipitation that ar...

  2. Relativistic theory of gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1985-06-01

    This paper constructs a relativistic theory of gravitation based on the special principle of relativity and the principle of geometrization. The gravitational field is regarded as a physical field in the spirit of Faraday and Maxwell, possessing energy, momentum, and spin 2 and 0. The source of the gravitational field is the total conserved energy momentum tensor of the matter and the gravitational field in Minkowski space. Conservation laws hold rigorously for the energy, momentum, and angular momentum of the matter and the gravitational field. The theory explains all the existing gravitational experiments. By virtue of the geometrization principle, the Riemann space has a field origin in the theory, arising as an effective force space through the action of the gravitational field on the matter.

  3. Multiscale analysis of the electromagnetic self-force in a weak gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, Adam; Poisson, Eric

    2008-02-15

    We examine the motion of a charged particle in a weak gravitational field. In addition to the Newtonian gravity exerted by a large central body, the particle is subjected to an electromagnetic self-force that contains both a conservative piece and a radiation-reaction piece. This toy problem shares many of the features of the strong-field gravitational self-force problem, and it is sufficiently simple that it can be solved exactly with numerical methods, and approximately with analytical methods. We submit the equations of motion to a multiscale analysis, and we examine the roles of the conservative and radiation-reaction pieces of the self-force. We show that the radiation-reaction force drives secular changes in the orbit's semilatus rectum and eccentricity, while the conservative force drives a secular regression of the periapsis and affects the orbital time function; neglect of the conservative term can hence give rise to an important phasing error. We next examine what might be required in the formulation of a reliable secular approximation for the orbital evolution; this would capture all secular changes in the orbit and discard all irrelevant oscillations. We conclude that such an approximation would be very difficult to formulate without prior knowledge of the exact solution.

  4. DELAYED EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON THE HUMAN CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. EARLY AND LATE DELAYED REACTIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    multiple sclerosis and are not associated with degenerative vascular changes. This patient probably represents an extreme of the early delayed reaction reported by Scholz in dogs. There is clinical evidence suggesting that some degree of damage of this type occurs more frequently than has been suspected. The other patient had the late delayed reaction in which there are marked degenerative vascular alternations and severe destruction of the white matter with little cortical involvement. This patient is an extreme example of the well-documented late delayed effects of

  5. Radiation reaction induced non-monotonic features in runaway electron distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvijoki, E.; Pusztai, I.; Decker, J.; Embréus, O.; Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2015-10-01

    > Runaway electrons, which are generated in a plasma where the induced electric field exceeds a certain critical value, can reach very high energies in the MeV range. For such energetic electrons, radiative losses will contribute significantly to the momentum space dynamics. Under certain conditions, due to radiative momentum losses, a non-monotonic feature - a `bump' - can form in the runaway electron tail, creating a potential for bump-on-tail-type instabilities to arise. Here, we study the conditions for the existence of the bump. We derive an analytical threshold condition for bump appearance and give an approximate expression for the minimum energy at which the bump can appear. Numerical calculations are performed to support the analytical derivations.

  6. Genomic bipyrimidine nucleotide frequency and microbial reactions to germicidal UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Douki, Thierry; Rettberg, Petra; Reitz, Günther; Cadet, Jean; Nicholson, Wayne L; Horneck, Gerda

    2010-07-01

    The role of the genomic bipyrimidine nucleotide frequency in pyrimidine dimer formation caused by germicidal UV radiation was studied in three microbial reference organisms (Escherichia coli K12, Deinococcus radiodurans R1, spores and cells of Bacillus subtilis 168). The sensitive HPLC tandem mass spectrometry assay was used to identify and quantify the different bipyrimidine photoproducts induced in the DNA of microorganisms by germicidal UV radiation. The yields of photoproducts per applied fluence were very similar among vegetative cells but twofold reduced in spores. This similarity in DNA photoreactivity greatly contrasted with the 11-fold range determined in the fluence causing a decimal reduction of survival. It was also found that the spectrum of UV-induced bipyrimidine lesions was species-specific and the formation rates of bi-thymine and bi-cytosine photoproducts correlated with the genomic frequencies of thymine and cytosine dinucleotides in the bacterial model systems.

  7. The Origin of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng Ming

    2012-10-01

    In the natural world, people have discovered four kinds of forces: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Although the gravitation has been discovered more than three hundred years, its mechanism of origin is unclear until today. While investigating the origin of gravitation, I do some experiments discover the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I do some experiments discover the light interference fringes are produced by the gravitation: my discovery demonstrate light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. Furthermore, applications of this discovery to other moving particles show a similar effect. In a word: the micro particle moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force. Then I do quantity experiment get a general formula: Reveal the essence of gravitational mass and the essence of electric charge; reveal the origin of gravitation and the essence of matter wave. Along this way, I unify the gravitation and electromagnetic force. Namely I find a natural law that from atomic world to star world play in moving track. See website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter

  8. Orbital circularisation of white dwarfs and the formation of gravitational radiation sources in star clusters containing an intermediate mass black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. B.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2007-12-01

    Aims:We consider how tight binaries consisting of a super-massive black hole of mass M = 103-104 M⊙ and a white dwarf in quasi-circular orbit can be formed in a globular cluster. We point out that a major fraction of white dwarfs tidally captured by the black hole may be destroyed by tidal inflation during ongoing tidal circularisation, and therefore the formation of tight binaries is inhibited. However some fraction may survive tidal circularisation through being spun up to high rotation rates. Then the rates of energy loss through gravitational wave emission induced by tidally excited pulsation modes and dissipation through non linear effects may compete with the rate of increase of pulsation energy due to dynamic tides. The semi-major axes of these white dwarfs are decreased by tidal interaction below a “critical” value where dynamic tides decrease in effectiveness because pulsation modes retain phase coherence between successive pericentre passages. Methods: We estimate the rate of formation of such circularising white dwarfs within a simple framework, modelling them as n = 1.5 polytropes and assuming that results obtained from the tidal theory for slow rotators can be extrapolated to fast rotators. Results: We estimate the total capture rate as N 2.5 × 10-8 {M}41.3r0.1-2.1 yr-1, where M4 = M/104 M⊙ and r0.1 is the radius of influence of the black hole expressed in units 0.1 pc. We find that the formation rate of tight pairs is approximately 10 times smaller than the total capture rate, for typical parameters of the problem. This result is used to estimate the probability of detection of gravitational waves coming from such tight binaries by LISA. Conclusions: We conclude that LISA may detect such binaries provided that the fraction of globular clusters containing black holes in the mass range of interest is substantial and that the dispersion velocity of the cluster stars near the radius of influence of the black hole exceeds 20 km s-1.

  9. Gravitation in pathogeny of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, V N

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this research is the study of changes of a systemic hemodynamics under passive orthostatic test for a healthy persons and an ill with Essential Hypertension (EH) and analysis of a possible role of the gravitational factor in a Pathogeny of this disease. For an ill with EH reduction of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output were reliably lower in an orthostatic position. Increasing of a Total peripheral vascular resistance was twice less for ill. Considerable differences in reaction of cardiovascular system to gravitational influence for an ill with Essential Hypertension are stipulated by changes in central regulation of circulation and in the structure of a vascular wall. It allows to assume influence of gravitation at early stages of a Pathogeny of the given disease. The detection of hyper reactivity of a cardiovascular system to influence of gravitation can indicate the first stage of the disease.

  10. Detecting high-frequency gravitational waves with optically levitated sensors.

    PubMed

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2013-02-15

    We propose a tunable resonant sensor to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range of 50-300 kHz using optically trapped and cooled dielectric microspheres or microdisks. The technique we describe can exceed the sensitivity of laser-based gravitational wave observatories in this frequency range, using an instrument of only a few percent of their size. Such a device extends the search volume for gravitational wave sources above 100 kHz by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude, and could detect monochromatic gravitational radiation from the annihilation of QCD axions in the cloud they form around stellar mass black holes within our galaxy due to the superradiance effect.

  11. Search for gravitational radiation from intermediate mass black hole binaries in data from the second LIGO-Virgo joint science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karlen, J.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Le Roux, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Luijten, E.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Milde, S.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Stops, D.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S. S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, K.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yang, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports on an unmodeled, all-sky search for gravitational waves from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). The search was performed on data from the second joint science run of the LIGO and Virgo detectors (July 2009-October 2010) and was sensitive to IMBHBs with a range up to ˜200 Mpc, averaged over the possible sky positions and inclinations of the binaries with respect to the line of sight. No significant candidate was found. Upper limits on the coalescence-rate density of nonspinning IMBHBs with total masses between 100 and 450 M⊙ and mass ratios between 0.25 and 1 were placed by combining this analysis with an analogous search performed on data from the first LIGO-Virgo joint science run (November 2005-October 2007). The most stringent limit was set for systems consisting of two 88 M⊙ black holes and is equal to 0.12 Mpc-3 Myr-1 at the 90% confidence level. This paper also presents the first estimate, for the case of an unmodeled analysis, of the impact on the search range of IMBHB spin configurations: the visible volume for IMBHBs with nonspinning components is roughly doubled for a population of IMBHBs with spins aligned with the binary's orbital angular momentum and uniformly distributed in the dimensionless spin parameter up to 0.8, whereas an analogous population with antialigned spins decreases the visible volume by ˜20%.

  12. Magnetic-distortion-induced Ellipticity and Gravitational Wave Radiation of Neutron Stars: Millisecond Magnetars in Short GRBs, Galactic Pulsars, and Magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Cao, Zhoujian; Zhang, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Neutron stars may sustain a non-axisymmetric deformation due to magnetic distortion and are potential sources of continuous gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based interferometric detectors. With decades of searches using available GW detectors, no evidence of a GW signal from any pulsar has been observed. Progressively stringent upper limits of ellipticity have been placed on Galactic pulsars. In this work, we use the ellipticity inferred from the putative millisecond magnetars in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) to estimate their detectability by current and future GW detectors. For ∼1 ms magnetars inferred from the SGRB data, the detection horizon is ∼30 Mpc and ∼600 Mpc for the advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Einstein Telescope (ET), respectively. Using the ellipticity of SGRB millisecond magnetars as calibration, we estimate the ellipticity and GW strain of Galactic pulsars and magnetars assuming that the ellipticity is magnetic-distortion-induced. We find that the results are consistent with the null detection results of Galactic pulsars and magnetars with the aLIGO O1. We further predict that the GW signals from these pulsars/magnetars may not be detectable by the currently designed aLIGO detector. The ET detector may be able to detect some relatively low-frequency signals (<50 Hz) from some of these pulsars. Limited by its design sensitivity, the eLISA detector seems to not be suitable for detecting the signals from Galactic pulsars and magnetars.

  13. A new gravitational wave generation algorithm for particle perturbations of the Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Enno; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Nagar, Alessandro; Zenginoğlu, Anıl

    2014-12-01

    We present a new approach to solve the 2+1 Teukolsky equation for gravitational perturbations of a Kerr black hole. Our approach relies on a new horizon penetrating, hyperboloidal foliation of Kerr spacetime and spatial compactification. In particular, we present a framework for waveform generation from point-particle perturbations. Extensive tests of a time domain implementation in the Teukode code are presented. The code can efficiently deliver waveforms at future null infinity. The accuracy and convergence of the waveforms’ phase and amplitude is demonstrated. As a first application of the method, we compute the gravitational waveforms from inspiraling and coalescing black-hole binaries in the large-mass-ratio limit. The smaller mass black hole is modeled as a point particle whose dynamics is driven by an effective-one-body-resummed analytical radiation reaction force. We compare the analytical, mechanical angular momentum loss (computed using two different prescriptions) to the gravitational wave angular momentum flux. We find that higher-order post-Newtonian corrections are needed to improve the consistency for rapidly spinning binaries. We characterize the multipolar waveform as a function of the black-hole spin. Close to merger, the subdominant multipolar amplitudes (notably the m = 0 ones) are enhanced for retrograde orbits with respect to prograde ones. We argue that this effect mirrors nonnegligible deviations from the circularity of the dynamics during the late-plunge and merger phase. For the first time, we compute the gravitational wave energy flux flowing into the black hole during the inspiral using a time-domain formalism proposed by Poisson. Finally, a self-consistent, iterative method to compute the gravitational wave fluxes at leading-order in the mass of the particle is developed. The method can be used alternatively to the analytical radiation reaction in cases where the analytical information is poor or not sufficient. Specifically, we apply

  14. The C12(O16,γSi28) radiative capture reaction at sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goasduff, A.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Amandruz, P.-A.; Davis, C.; Hager, U.; Ottewell, D.; Ruprecht, G.

    2014-01-01

    The heavy-ion radiative capture C12(O16,γSi28) was measured at the sub-Coulomb barrier bombarding energy Elab=15.7 MeV, which corresponds to the lowest important resonance observed in the C12+ O16 fusion excitation function. Thanks to combination of the bismuth germanate (BGO) γ-ray array and the 0∘ DRAGON electromagnetic spectrometer at TRIUMF, the γ-decay spectrum from the entrance channel down to the ground state of 28Si was measured. Comparisons of the experimental spectrum to γ spectrum extracted from Monte Carlo simulations of the complete setup suggest a Jπ=2+ spin-parity assignment to the entrance channel and yield the radiative capture cross section σRC=0.22±0.04μb. Combining this present spin assignment with previous data on radiative capture, a J (J+1) systematics was constructed, and it indicated a moment of inertia commensurate with the C12+O16 grazing angular momentum. Strong dipole transitions are observed from the entrance channel to T =1 states around 11.5 MeV and are found to result from enhanced M1IV transitions to states exhausting a large part of the M1 sum rule built on the ground state of 28Si. This specific decay was also reported at bombarding energies close to the Coulomb barrier in our previous study of the C12(C12,γ24Mg) heavy-ion radiative capture reaction. Similarities between both systems are investigated.

  15. Inflationary gravitational waves and the evolution of the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: moroi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of various phenomena which may have happened in the early universe on the spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves. The phenomena include phase transitions, entropy productions from non-relativistic matter, the production of dark radiation, and decoupling of dark matter/radiation from thermal bath. These events can create several characteristic signatures in the inflationary gravitational wave spectrum, which may be direct probes of the history of the early universe and the nature of high-energy physics.

  16. Investigation of {gamma} radiation from {sup 178}Hf in the respective (n, n Prime {gamma}) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Govor, L. I.; Demidov, A. M.; Kurkin, V. A. Mikhailov, I. V.

    2012-12-15

    The spectra and angular distributions of gamma rays were measured in the reaction {sup 178}Hf(n, n Prime {gamma}) induced by a beam of fast reactor neutrons. Data onmultipole mixtures in gamma transitions and a lot of new information about gamma transitions of energy 1.5 to 3.0 MeV were obtained. A comparison of these results with information known from the respective (n, {gamma}) reaction made it possible to refine the schemes of deexcitation of {sup 178}Hf levels at energies above 1.5 MeV, to determine more precisely features of these levels, and to introduce new levels and rotation bands at excitation energies of about 2MeV.

  17. Investigation of γ radiation from 178Hf in the respective ( n, n'γ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govor, L. I.; Demidov, A. M.; Kurkin, V. A.; Mikhailov, I. V.

    2012-12-01

    The spectra and angular distributions of gamma rays were measured in the reaction 178Hf( n, n'γ) induced by a beam of fast reactor neutrons. Data onmultipole mixtures in gamma transitions and a lot of new information about gamma transitions of energy 1.5 to 3.0 MeV were obtained. A comparison of these results with information known from the respective ( n, γ) reaction made it possible to refine the schemes of deexcitation of 178Hf levels at energies above 1.5 MeV, to determine more precisely features of these levels, and to introduce new levels and rotation bands at excitation energies of about 2MeV.

  18. SU-D-304-07: Application of Proton Boron Fusion Reaction to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J; Yoon, D; Shin, H; Kim, M; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: we present the introduction of a therapy method using the proton boron fusion reaction. The purpose of this study is to verify the theoretical validity of proton boron fusion therapy using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: After boron is accumulated in the tumor region, the emitted from outside the body proton can react with the boron in the tumor region. An increase of the proton’s maximum dose level is caused by the boron and only the tumor cell is damaged more critically. In addition, a prompt gamma ray is emitted from the proton boron reaction point. Here we show that the effectiveness of the proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT) was verified using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: We found that a dramatic increase by more than half of the proton’s maximum dose level was induced by the boron in the tumor region. This increase occurred only when the proton’s maximum dose point was located within the boron uptake region (BUR). In addition, the 719 keV prompt gamma ray peak produced by the proton boron fusion reaction was positively detected. Conclusion: This therapy method features the advantages such as the application of Bragg-peak to the therapy, the accurate targeting of tumor, improved therapy effects, and the monitoring of the therapy region during treatment.

  19. Application of proton boron fusion reaction to radiation therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk

    2014-12-01

    Three alpha particles are emitted from the point of reaction between a proton and boron. The alpha particles are effective in inducing the death of a tumor cell. After boron is accumulated in the tumor region, the emitted from outside the body proton can react with the boron in the tumor region. An increase of the proton's maximum dose level is caused by the boron and only the tumor cell is damaged more critically. In addition, a prompt gamma ray is emitted from the proton boron reaction point. Here, we show that the effectiveness of the proton boron fusion therapy was verified using Monte Carlo simulations. We found that a dramatic increase by more than half of the proton's maximum dose level was induced by the boron in the tumor region. This increase occurred only when the proton's maximum dose point was located within the boron uptake region. In addition, the 719 keV prompt gamma ray peak produced by the proton boron fusion reaction was positively detected. This therapy method features the advantages such as the application of Bragg-peak to the therapy, the accurate targeting of tumor, improved therapy effects, and the monitoring of the therapy region during treatment.

  20. Application of proton boron fusion reaction to radiation therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk

    2014-12-01

    Three alpha particles are emitted from the point of reaction between a proton and boron. The alpha particles are effective in inducing the death of a tumor cell. After boron is accumulated in the tumor region, the emitted from outside the body proton can react with the boron in the tumor region. An increase of the proton's maximum dose level is caused by the boron and only the tumor cell is damaged more critically. In addition, a prompt gamma ray is emitted from the proton boron reaction point. Here, we show that the effectiveness of the proton boron fusion therapy was verified using Monte Carlo simulations. We found that a dramatic increase by more than half of the proton's maximum dose level was induced by the boron in the tumor region. This increase occurred only when the proton's maximum dose point was located within the boron uptake region. In addition, the 719 keV prompt gamma ray peak produced by the proton boron fusion reaction was positively detected. This therapy method features the advantages such as the application of Bragg-peak to the therapy, the accurate targeting of tumor, improved therapy effects, and the monitoring of the therapy region during treatment.

  1. Nuclear-Reaction-Based Radiation Source For Explosives-And SNM-Detection In Massive Cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Brandis, Michal; Dangendorf, Volker; Bromberger, Benjamin; Tittelmeier, Kai; Piel, Christian; Vartsky, David; Bar, Doron; Mardor, Israel; Mor, Ilan; Friedman, Eliahu; Goldberg, Mark B.

    2011-06-01

    An automatic, nuclear-reaction-based, few-view transmission radiography method and system concept is presented, that will simultaneously detect small, operationally-relevant quantities of chemical explosives and special nuclear materials (SNM) in objects up to the size of LD-3 aviation containers. Detection of all threat materials is performed via the {sup 11}B(d,n+{gamma}) reaction on thick, isotopically-enriched targets; SNM are primarily detected via Dual Discrete-Energy Radiography (DDER), using 15.11 MeV and 4.43 MeV {sup 12}C{gamma}-rays, whereas explosives are primarily detected via Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), employing the broad-energy neutron spectra produced in a thick {sup 11}B-target. To achieve a reasonable throughput of {approx}20 containers per hour, ns-pulsed deuteron beam of the order of 0.5 mA intensity at energies of 5-7 MeV is required. As a first step towards optimizing parameters and sensitivities of an operational system, the 0 deg. spectra and yields of both {gamma}-rays and neutrons in this reaction have been measured up to E{sub d} = 6.65 MeV.

  2. Quantum Gravitational Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Baessler, Stefan; ...

    2015-01-01

    We report that one of the main goals for improving the accuracy of quantum gravitational spectroscopy with neutrons is searches for extra short-range fundamental forces. We discuss also any progress in all competing nonneutron methods as well as constraints at other characteristic distances. Among major methodical developments related to the phenomenon of gravitational quantum states are the detailed theoretical analysis and the planning experiments on observation of gravitational quantum states of antihydrogen atoms.

  3. Gravitation Physics at BGPL

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, Paul E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco M.; Kalet, A. M.; Kleczewski, A. M.; Lingwood, J. K.; Mckenney, Kevin J.; Moore, Michael W.; Steffen, J. H.; Berg, Eric C.; Cross, William D.; Newman, Riley D.; Gephart, Roy E.

    2007-03-01

    We report progress on a program of gravitational physics experiments using cryogenic torsion pendula undergoing large-amplitude torsion oscillation. This program includes tests of the gravitational inverse square law and of the weak equivalence principle. Here we describe our ongoing search for inverse-square-law violation at a strength down to 10-5 of standard gravity. The low-vibration environment provided by the Battelle Gravitation Physics Laboratory (BGPL) is uniquely suited to this study.

  4. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-01

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke’s discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  5. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  6. Position annihilation radiation from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Borner, G. A.; Cohen, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Matter accreted on the surfaces of neutron stars consists of energetic particles of a few tens to a couple hundred MeV/nucleon, depending on the neutron star mass. In addition to heat, such particles produce nuclear reactions with the surface material. It is proposed that the recently observed 473 + or - 30 keV spectral feature from the galactic center is gravitationally red-shifted positron annihilation radiation produced at the surfaces of old neutron stars. The principal observational tests of the model would be the detection of nuclear gamma ray lines from the galactic center and red-shifted positron annihilation radiation from the galactic disk.

  7. Gravitation in material media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-03-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium is herein derived on the basis of classical, Newtonian gravitational theory and by a general relativistic use of Archimedes' principle. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate students and those undergraduate students having prior experience with vector analysis and potential theory.

  8. Time Evolution of Pure Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyama, S. M.

    1981-03-01

    Numerical solutions to the Einstein equations in the case of pure gravitational waves are given. The system is assumed to be axially symmetric and non-rotating. The time symmetric initial data and the conformally flat initial data are obtained by solving the constraint equations at t=0. The time evolution of these initial data depends strongly on the initial amplitude of the gravitational waves. In the case of the low initial amplitude, waves only disperse to null infinity. By comparing the initial gravitational energy with the total energy loss through an r=constant surface, it is concluded that the Newman-Penrose method and the Gibbon-Hawking method are the most desirable for measuring the energy flux of gravitational radiation numerically. In the case that the initial ratio of the spatial extent of the gravitational waves to the Schwarzschild radius (M/2) is smaller than about 300, the waves collapse by themselves, leading to formation of a black hole. The analytic solutions of the linearized Einstein equations for the pure gravitational waves are also shown.

  9. Search for gravitational wave radiation associated with the pulsating tail of the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004 using LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamat, S.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; de La Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tinto, M.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Webber, D.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2007-09-01

    We have searched for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004. This event, originating from a Galactic neutron star, displayed exceptional energetics. Recent investigations of the x-ray light curve’s pulsating tail revealed the presence of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) in the 30 2000 Hz frequency range, most of which coincides with the bandwidth of the LIGO detectors. These QPOs, with well-characterized frequencies, can plausibly be attributed to seismic modes of the neutron star which could emit GWs. Our search targeted potential quasimonochromatic GWs lasting for tens of seconds and emitted at the QPO frequencies. We have observed no candidate signals above a predetermined threshold, and our lowest upper limit was set by the 92.5 Hz QPO observed in the interval from 150 s to 260 s after the start of the flare. This bound corresponds to a (90% confidence) root-sum-squared amplitude hrss-det⁡90%=4.5×10-22strainHz-1/2 on the GW waveform strength in the detectable polarization state reaching our Hanford (WA) 4 km detector. We illustrate the astrophysical significance of the result via an estimated characteristic energy in GW emission that we would expect to be able to detect. The above result corresponds to 7.7×1046erg (=4.3×10-8M⊙c2), which is of the same order as the total (isotropic) energy emitted in the electromagnetic spectrum. This result provides a means to probe the energy reservoir of the source with the best upper limit on the GW waveform strength published and represents the first broadband asteroseismology measurement using a GW detector.

  10. Search for gravitational wave radiation associated with the pulsating tail of the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004 using LIGO

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chatterji, S.; Coyne, D.

    2007-09-15

    We have searched for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004. This event, originating from a Galactic neutron star, displayed exceptional energetics. Recent investigations of the x-ray light curve's pulsating tail revealed the presence of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) in the 30-2000 Hz frequency range, most of which coincides with the bandwidth of the LIGO detectors. These QPOs, with well-characterized frequencies, can plausibly be attributed to seismic modes of the neutron star which could emit GWs. Our search targeted potential quasimonochromatic GWs lasting for tens of seconds and emitted at the QPO frequencies. We have observed no candidate signals above a predetermined threshold, and our lowest upper limit was set by the 92.5 Hz QPO observed in the interval from 150 s to 260 s after the start of the flare. This bound corresponds to a (90% confidence) root-sum-squared amplitude h{sub rss-det}{sup 90%} = 4.5x10{sup -22} strain Hz{sup -1/2} on the GW waveform strength in the detectable polarization state reaching our Hanford (WA) 4 km detector. We illustrate the astrophysical significance of the result via an estimated characteristic energy in GW emission that we would expect to be able to detect. The above result corresponds to 7.7x10{sup 46} erg (=4.3x10{sup -8} M{sub {center_dot}}c{sup 2}), which is of the same order as the total (isotropic) energy emitted in the electromagnetic spectrum. This result provides a means to probe the energy reservoir of the source with the best upper limit on the GW waveform strength published and represents the first broadband asteroseismology measurement using a GW detector.

  11. Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  12. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  13. Upper limits on a stochastic background of gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, J; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Buonanno, A; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; DeBra, D; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandar, S; Díaz, M; Di Credico, A; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ehrens, P; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Frey, R E; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Goda, K; Goggin, L; González, G; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, L; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Khan, A; Kim, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Luna, M; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, K; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, A; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J; Smith, M R; Spjeld, O; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; van Putten, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-11-25

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of omega0 < 8.4 x 10(-4) in the 69-156 Hz band is approximately 10(5) times lower than the previous result in this frequency range.

  14. Interaction of gravitational waves with magnetic and electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Barrabes, C.; Hogan, P. A.

    2010-03-15

    The existence of large-scale magnetic fields in the universe has led to the observation that if gravitational waves propagating in a cosmological environment encounter even a small magnetic field then electromagnetic radiation is produced. To study this phenomenon in more detail we take it out of the cosmological context and at the same time simplify the gravitational radiation to impulsive waves. Specifically, to illustrate our findings, we describe the following three physical situations: (1) a cylindrical impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a magnetic field, (2) an axially symmetric impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with an electric field and (3) a 'spherical' impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a small magnetic field. In cases (1) and (3) electromagnetic radiation is produced behind the gravitational wave. In case (2) no electromagnetic radiation appears after the wave unless a current is established behind the wave breaking the Maxwell vacuum. In all three cases the presence of the magnetic or electric fields results in a modification of the amplitude of the incoming gravitational wave which is explicitly calculated using the Einstein-Maxwell vacuum field equations.

  15. Effects of magnetic, radiation and chemical reaction on unsteady heat and mass transfer flow of an oscillating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rubel; Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of magnetic, radiation and chemical reaction parameters on the unsteady heat and mass transfer boundary layer flow past an oscillating cylinder is considered. The dimensionless momentum, energy and concentration equations are solved numerically by using explicit finite difference method with the help of a computer programming language Compaq visual FORTRAN 6.6a. The obtained results of this study have been discussed for different values of well-known parameters with different time steps. The effect of these parameters on the velocity field, temperature field and concentration field, skin-friction, Nusselt number, streamlines and isotherms has been studied and results are presented by graphically represented by the tabular form quantitatively. The stability and convergence analysis of the solution parameters that have been used in the mathematical model have been tested.

  16. Dark Energy and Dark Matter Phenomena and the Universe with Variable Gravitational Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2005-12-01

    Generation of high-frequency gravitational waves near the singularity is a crucial factor for understanding the origin and dynamics of the Universe. Emission of gravitational waves increases with a decreasing radius of collapsed object much faster than a gravitational force itself. Gravitationally unstable matter of the Universe will be completely converted into gravitational radiation during the Big Crunch. According to Misner, Thorne & Wheeler (Gravitation, 1977, p.959) plane gravitational waves have not gravitational mass or spacetime is flat everywhere outside the pulse. We can propose that the gravitational mass of the Universe is vanished after converting matter into gravitational waves. This hypothesis in the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation can solve the problem of singularity without contradiction with theorems by Penrose-Hawking; explain the acceleration of our Universe as the effect of a retarded gravitational potential (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2003, 35, #3) and the low quadrupole in fluctuations in CMB as result of blue-shift effect in a gravitational field. Proposed solution of dark energy problem free from coincidence problems. The hypothesis keeps best parts of Big Bang theory and inflation model without any unknown physical fields or new dimensions. According to this hypothesis a relic sea of high-frequency gravitational radiation in our Universe can be very dense. Interaction of relic gravitational waves with gravitational fields of galaxies and stars can create an additional dynamical effects like pressure of relic radiation that proportional to gravitational potential GM/(Rc2). This effect can be responsible for dark matter phenomena in galaxies and the Pioneer acceleration in the solar system (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2005, 37, #2).

  17. MHD flow past a parabolic flow past an infinite isothermal vertical plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthucumaraswamy, R.; Sivakumar, P.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of MHD free convection flow with a parabolic starting motion of an infinite isothermal vertical plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction has been examined in detail in this paper. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The dimensionless governing coupled linear partial differential equations are solved using the Laplace transform technique. A parametric study is performed to illustrate the influence of the radiation parameter, magnetic parameter, chemical reaction parameter, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number, Schmidt number and time on the velocity, temperature, concentration. The results are discussed graphically and qualitatively. The numerical results reveal that the radiation induces a rise in both the velocity and temperature, and a decrease in the concentration. The model finds applications in solar energy collection systems, geophysics and astrophysics, aerospace and also in the design of high temperature chemical process systems.

  18. Evaluation of Reaction Rate Theory and Monte Carlo Methods for Application to Radiation-Induced Microstructural Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Golubov, Stanislav I; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2007-08-01

    The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory, Monte Carlo, or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales, and timescales from those characteristic of diffusion to long-term microstructural evolution (~s to years). Although the rate theory and Monte Carlo models can be used simulate the same phenomena, some of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. Models employing the rate theory have been extensively used to describe radiation-induced phenomena such as void swelling and irradiation creep. The primary approximations in such models are time- and spatial averaging of the radiation damage source term, and spatial averaging of the microstructure into an effective medium. Kinetic Monte Carlo models can account for these spatial and temporal correlations; their primary limitation is the computational burden which is related to the size of the simulation cell. A direct comparison of RT and object kinetic MC simulations has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to the evolution (both nucleation and growth) of radiation-induced defect structures. The primary limitations of the OKMC model are related to computational issues. Even with modern computers, the maximum simulation cell size and the maximum dose (typically much less than 1 dpa) that can be simulated are limited. In contrast, even very detailed RT models can simulate microstructural evolution for doses up 100 dpa or greater in clock times that are relatively short. Within the context of the effective medium, essentially any defect density can be simulated. Overall, the agreement between the two methods is best for irradiation conditions which produce a high density of defects (lower temperature and higher displacement rate), and for

  19. Gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations with Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Armstrong, J. W.; Campbell, J. K.; Estabrook, F. B.; Krisher, T. P.; Lau, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    The gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations that are to be conducted during the cruise and Orbiter phases of the Galileo Mission cover four investigation categories: (1) the gravity fields of Jupiter and its four major satellites; (2) a search for gravitational radiation; (3) mathematical modeling of general relativistic effects on Doppler ranging data; and (4) improvements of the Jupiter ephemeris via Orbiter ranging. Also noted are two secondary objectives, involving a range fix during Venus flyby and the determination of the earth's mass on the bases of the two earth gravity assists used by the mission.

  20. Gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations with Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Armstrong, J. W.; Campbell, J. K.; Estabrook, F. B.; Krisher, T. P.; Lau, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    The gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations that are to be conducted during the cruise and Orbiter phases of the Galileo Mission cover four investigation categories: (1) the gravity fields of Jupiter and its four major satellites; (2) a search for gravitational radiation; (3) mathematical modeling of general relativistic effects on Doppler ranging data; and (4) improvements of the Jupiter ephemeris via Orbiter ranging. Also noted are two secondary objectives, involving a range fix during Venus flyby and the determination of the earth's mass on the bases of the two earth gravity assists used by the mission.

  1. Classical electrodynamics with vacuum polarization: electron self-energy and radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinder, S. M.

    2001-04-01

    The region very close to an electron ( r ⪅ r0 = e2/ mc2 ≈ 2.8 × 10 -13 cm) is, according to quantum electrodynamics, a seething maelstrom of virtual electron-positron pairs flashing in and out of existence. To take account of this well-established physical reality, a phenomenological representation for vacuum polarization is introduced into the framework of classical electrodynamics. Such a model enables a consistent picture of classical point charges with finite electromagnetic self-energy. It is further conjectured that the reaction of a point charge to its own electromagnetic field is tantamount to interaction with its vacuum polarization charge or "aura." This leads to a modification of the Lorentz-Dirac equation for the force on an accelerating electron, a new differential-difference equation which avoids the pathologies of preacceleration and runaway solutions.

  2. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  3. Generalized theory of gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, J.W.

    1984-12-01

    The mathematical formulation of the nonsymmetric gravitation theory (NGT) as a geometrical structure is developed in a higher-dimensional space. The reduction of the geometrical scheme to a dynamical theory of gravitation in four-dimensional space-time is investigated and the basic physical laws of the theory are reviewed in detail.

  4. Gravitation and mass decrease

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, R.

    1982-08-01

    Consequences in physical theory of assuming the general relativistic time tranformation for the de Broglie frequencies of matter, v = E/h = mc/sup 2//h, are investigated in this paper. Experimentally it is known that electromagnetic waves from a source in a gravitational field are decreased in frequency, in accordance with the Einstein general relativity time transformation. An extension to de Broglie frequencies implies mass decreases in a gravitational field. Such a decrease gives an otherwise missing energy conservation for some processes; also, a physical alteration is then associated with change in gravitational potential. Further, the general relativity time transformation that is the source of gravitational action in the weak field (Newtonian) approximation than has a physical correlate in the proposed gravitational mass loss. Rotational motion and the associated equivalent gravitional-field mass loss are considered; an essential formal difference between metric (gravitational) mass loss and special relativity mass increase is discussed. For a spherical nonrotating mass collapsed to its Schwarzschild radius the postulated mass loss is found to give a 25% decrease in the mass acting as origin off an external gravitational field.

  5. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  6. Search for Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubono, K.

    The current status of the experimental search for gravitational waves is reviewed here. The emphasis is on the Japanese TAMA project. We started operation of the TAMA300 laser interferometric detector in 1999, and are now collecting and analyzing observational data to search for gravitational wave signals.

  7. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  8. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  9. Extraction of gravitational waves in numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nigel T; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    A numerical-relativity calculation yields in general a solution of the Einstein equations including also a radiative part, which is in practice computed in a region of finite extent. Since gravitational radiation is properly defined only at null infinity and in an appropriate coordinate system, the accurate estimation of the emitted gravitational waves represents an old and non-trivial problem in numerical relativity. A number of methods have been developed over the years to "extract" the radiative part of the solution from a numerical simulation and these include: quadrupole formulas, gauge-invariant metric perturbations, Weyl scalars, and characteristic extraction. We review and discuss each method, in terms of both its theoretical background as well as its implementation. Finally, we provide a brief comparison of the various methods in terms of their inherent advantages and disadvantages.

  10. Extraction of gravitational waves in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Nigel T.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-12-01

    A numerical-relativity calculation yields in general a solution of the Einstein equations including also a radiative part, which is in practice computed in a region of finite extent. Since gravitational radiation is properly defined only at null infinity and in an appropriate coordinate system, the accurate estimation of the emitted gravitational waves represents an old and non-trivial problem in numerical relativity. A number of methods have been developed over the years to "extract" the radiative part of the solution from a numerical simulation and these include: quadrupole formulas, gauge-invariant metric perturbations, Weyl scalars, and characteristic extraction. We review and discuss each method, in terms of both its theoretical background as well as its implementation. Finally, we provide a brief comparison of the various methods in terms of their inherent advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Loop quantum cosmology gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-11-01

    Loop quantum cosmology is an appealing quantum completion of classical cosmology, which brings along various theoretical features which in many cases offer a remedy for or modify various classical cosmology aspects. In this paper we address the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism in the context of loop quantum cosmology. As we demonstrate, when loop quantum cosmology effects are taken into account in the resulting Friedmann equations for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, then even for a radiation-dominated Universe, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio from the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism is non-zero, in contrast to the Einstein-Hilbert case, in which case the baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We also discuss various other cases apart from the radiation domination case, and we discuss how the baryon-to-entropy ratio is affected from the parameters of the quantum theory. In addition, we use illustrative exact solutions of loop quantum cosmology and we investigate under which circumstances the baryon-to-entropy ratio can be compatible with the observational constraints.

  12. MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer due to an exponentially shrinking sheet in a nanofluid with thermal radiation and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Rohana Abdul; Nazar, Roslinda

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a nanofluid with the influences of the chemical reaction and thermal radiation over an exponentially shrinking sheet is studied numerically. The model used for the nanofluid is called the Buongiorno model which incorporates the effects of the Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The governing dimensionless ordinary differential equations are solved using the bvp4c method. The effects of the magnetic field parameter, thermal radiation parameter and chemical reaction parameter on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles of the nanofluid over an exponentially permeable shrinking sheet are discussed and presented through graphs and tables.

  13. Subjective Reaction to Structurally Radiated Sound from Underground Railways: Field Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadillo, E. G.; Herreros, J.; Walker, J. G.

    1996-05-01

    Structurally radiated noise from underground railways is becoming a major problem for railways administrations, due to the increase in the number of tunnels in urban areas, and to the increase in train speeds, wheelset tonnage and operation frequency. As a result, the number of complaints from residents living above railway tunnels is also increasing. Several control measures have been proposed in the past 15 years, both for the track design and for the vehicle design. Nevertheless, these measures are expensive, and not always effective. While several standards have been proposed for vibration limits in the type of problem, there are few standards to define acceptable levels for this type of structure-borne sound. This paper presents field results obtained during 1994 and 1995 in the vicinity of underground railways, where measurements of vibration and low-frequency noise were obtained during train pass-bys. These results, together with measurements of environment noise due to other sources, are considered together with the responses to a questionnaire completed by the people by the people affected. This paper complements laboratory work carried out at the ISVR [1].

  14. Hawking radiation and covariant anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-15

    Generalizing the method of Wilczek and collaborators we provide a derivation of Hawking radiation from charged black holes using only covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies. The reliability and universality of the anomaly cancellation approach to Hawking radiation is also discussed.

  15. Reaction of lymphoid organs to laser radiation with different pulsation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapinosov, Ivan K.; Bugaeva, Irine O.; Kolokolov, George R.; Provozina, Helen J.

    1996-05-01

    Experimental studies were performed on 220 male rats of Wistar line to reveal optimal parameters of laser radiation causing positive changes in biotissues and to select methods of laser therapy. Irradiation of the ventral abdominal wall performed by arsenide-gallium injector (710 - 890 nm, exposure - 128 sec) in pulse rate: 3000 Hz, 1500 Hz, 80 Hz. Content of lymphoblasts, medium and small lymphocytes, plasmocytes, T-lymphocytes and T-helpers as well as the activity of chromatin and lysosomal enzymes were determined in the dynamics of thymus, spleen and lymph nodes. During irradiation with the rate of 3000 Hz prevailing inhibiting influence on the immumocytopoesis and functional activity of lymphocytes in all organs studied was state, the effect being manifested by the decrease in the number of all forms of lymphocytes particular on the 3rd-5th-7th day followed by normalization on the 15th- 21st-30th day. Irradiation with the rate of 1500 Hz produced stimulating effect on the immune organs accompanied by reliable excess of control indices of lymphocyte content particularly of poorly differentiated forms (blasts and medium ones), as well as by the increase of the number of plasmocytes, T-lymphocytes, T-helpers with maximum manifestation on the 7th day. On the 15th day there is a decrease, and on the 21st-30th day--there is normalization. Irradiation with the rate of 80 Hz produced the smallest but most marked effect, particularly on the number of lymphoblasts. Peculiarities in kinetics of cellular elements studied were revealed in different lymphoid organs and in different functional zones of these organs.

  16. Trapping light by mimicking gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Sheng, Chong; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho; Nanjing Unversity Collaboration; Louisiana Tech University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    One of the most fascinating predictions of the theory of general relativity is the effect of gravitational lensing, the bending of light in close proximity to massive stellar objects. Recently, artificial optical materials have been proposed to study the various aspects of curved spacetimes, including light trapping and Hawking's radiation. However, the development of experiments 'toy' models that simulate gravitational lensing in curved spacetimes remains a challenge, especially for visible light. Here, by utilizing a microstructured optical waveguide around a microsphere, we propose to mimic curved spacetimes caused by gravity, with high precision. We experimentally demonstrate both far-field gravitational lensing effects and the critical phenomenon in close proximity to the photon sphere of astrophysical objects under hydrostatic equilibrium. The proposed microstructured waveguide can be used as an omnidirectional absorber, with potential light harvesting and microcavity applications. This work is published at Nature Photonics 2013, DOI: 10.1038/NPHOTON.2013.247.

  17. Trapping light by mimicking gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, C.; Liu, H.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, S. N.; Genov, D. A.

    2013-11-01

    One of the most fascinating predictions of the theory of general relativity is the effect of gravitational lensing, the bending of light in close proximity to massive stellar objects. Recently, artificial optical materials have been proposed to study the various aspects of curved spacetimes, including light trapping and Hawking radiation. However, the development of experimental `toy' models that simulate gravitational lensing in curved spacetimes remains a challenge, especially for visible light. Here, by utilizing a microstructured optical waveguide around a microsphere, we propose to mimic curved spacetimes caused by gravity, with high precision. We experimentally demonstrate both far-field gravitational lensing effects and the critical phenomenon in close proximity to the photon sphere of astrophysical objects under hydrostatic equilibrium. The proposed microstructured waveguide can be used as an omnidirectional absorber, with potential light harvesting and microcavity applications.

  18. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  19. Towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    This chapter is meant to introduce the reader to the forthcoming network of second-generation interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, at a time when their construction is close to completion and there is the ambition to detect gravitational waves for the first time in the next few years and open the way to gravitational wave astronomy. The legacy of first-generation detectors is discussed before giving an overview of the technology challenges that have been faced to make advanced detectors possible. The various aspects outlined here are then discussed in more detail in the subsequent chapters of the book.

  20. Schiff's conjecture on gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Coley, A.

    1982-09-20

    Considered here is a class of theories of gravity characterized by a set of equations which represent the gravitational and electromagnetic structure of the theories in a spherically symmetric and static gravitational field. If one demands that the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and the principle of universality of gravitational red shift (UGR) be satisfied, it is found that the theories under investigation must be metric. This result lends support to the current version of Schiff's conjecture that WEP+UGR..-->..EEP, where EEP refers to the Einstein equivalence principle.

  1. Gravitation and vacuum field

    SciTech Connect

    Tevikyan, R.V.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents equations that describe particles with spins s = 0, 1/2, 1 completely and which also describe 2s + 2 limiting fields as E ..-->.. infinity. It is shown that the ordinary Hilbert-Einstein action for the gravitation field must be augmented by the action for the Bose vacuum field. This means that one must introduce in the gravitational equations a cosmological term proportional to the square of the strength of the Bose vacuum field. It is shown that the theory of gravitation describes three realities: matter, field, and vacuum field. A new form of matter--the vacuum field--is introduced into field theory.

  2. Effect of radiative transfer of heat released from combustion reaction on temperature distribution: A numerical study for a 2-D system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huai-Chun; Ai, Yu-Hua

    2006-09-01

    Both light and heat are produced during a chemical reaction in a combustion process, but traditionally all the energy released is taken as to be transformed into the internal energy of the combustion medium. So the temperature of the medium increases, and then the thermal radiation emitted from it increases too. Chemiluminescence is generated during a chemical reaction and independent of the temperature, and has been used widely for combustion diagnostics. It was assumed in this paper that the total energy released in a combustion reaction is divided into two parts, one part is a self-absorbed heat, and the other is a directly emitted heat. The former is absorbed immediately by the products, becomes the internal energy and then increases the temperature of the products as treated in the traditional way. The latter is emitted directly as radiation into the combustion domain and should be included in the radiation transfer equation (RTE) as a part of radiation source. For a simple, 2-D, gray, emitting absorbing, rectangular system, the numerical study showed that the temperatures in reaction zones depended on the fraction of the directly emitted energy, and the smaller the gas absorption coefficient was, the more strong the dependence appeared. Because the effect of the fraction of the directly emitted heat on the temperature distribution in the reacting zones for gas combustion is significant, it is required to conduct experimental measurements to determine the fraction of self-absorbed heat for different combustion processes.

  3. Influence of Double-Strand Break Repair on Radiation Therapy-Induced Acute Skin Reactions in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Sharan, Krishna; Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Curative radiation therapy (RT)-induced toxicity poses strong limitations for efficient RT and worsens the quality of life. The parameter that explains when and to what extent normal tissue toxicity in RT evolves would be of clinical relevance because of its predictive value and may provide an opportunity for personalized treatment approach. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand breaks and repair were analyzed by microscopic γ-H2AX foci analysis in peripheral lymphocytes from 38 healthy donors and 80 breast cancer patients before RT, a 2 Gy challenge dose of x-ray exposed in vitro. Results: The actual damage (AD) at 0.25, 3, and 6 hours and percentage residual damage (PRD) at 3 and 6 hours were used as parameters to measure cellular radiosensitivity and correlated with RT-induced acute skin reactions in patients stratified as non-overresponders (NOR) (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade <2) and overresponders (OR) (RTOG grade ≥2). The results indicated that the basal and induced (at 0.25 and 3 hours) γ-H2AX foci numbers were nonsignificant (P>.05) between healthy control donors and the NOR and OR groups, whereas it was significant between ORs and healthy donors at 6 hours (P<.001). There was a significantly higher PRD in OR versus NOR (P<.05), OR versus healthy donors (P<.001) and NOR versus healthy donors (P<.01), supported further by the trend analysis (r=.2392; P=.0326 at 6 hours). Conclusions: Our findings strongly suggest that the measurement of PRD by performing γ-H2AX foci analysis has the potential to be developed into a clinically useful predictive assay.

  4. Space Detection of Gravitational Waves (lisa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. Neves; Buchman, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Danzmann, K.; Doles, R.; Fontana, G.; Hanso, J.; Hueller, M.; Sigurdsso, S.; Turneaure, J.; Ungarell, C.; Vecchi, A.; Vital, S.; Webe, W.

    2002-12-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed to observe gravitational waves from galactic and extra-galactic binary systems, including gravitational waves generated in the vicinity of the very massive black holes found in the centers of many galaxies. Acting as a giant Michelson interferometer the three spacecraft flying 5 million km apart will open the era of astronomy in the gravitational spectrum. We give an introduction to the mission and describe the status of selected experimental, theoretical, and planning LISA work, as reported at the Ninth Marcel Grossman Meeting in 2000 in Rome. We discuss the three areas of technology challenges facing the mission inertial sensors, micronewton thrusters, and picometer interferometry. We report on the progress in the development of free falling moving test-masses for LISA and for the related technology demonstration mission. We present simple formulas to evaluate the performance of the device as a function of the various design parameters, and we compare them with preliminary experimental results from a test prototype we are developing. Quantitative agreement is found. The gravitational radiation emitted during the final stages of coalescence of stellar mass compact objects with low massive black holes is a signal detectable by LISA. It will also provide the opportunity of measuring relativistic strong field effects. A brief discussion addresses the detection by LISA of gravitational waves generated by cataclysmic binary variables at frequencies below 1 mHz. Finally the prospects for cosmology work with LISA type antennas are being analyzed.

  5. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This discussion examines these gravitational patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. The focus is on recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by the space-based gravitational wave detector LISA.

  6. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This discussion examines these gravitational patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. The focus is on recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by the space-based gravitational wave detector LISA.

  7. Radiation-induced stress response in peripheral blood of breast cancer patients differs between patients with severe acute skin reactions and patients with no side effects to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Skiöld, Sara; Naslund, Ingemar; Brehwens, Karl; Andersson, Arja; Wersall, Peter; Lidbrink, Elisabet; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Wojcik, Andrzej; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2013-08-30

    The aim of the study was to compare the radiation-induced oxidative stress response in blood samples from breast cancer patients that developed severe acute skin reactions during the radiotherapy, with the response in blood samples from patients with no side effects. Peripheral blood was collected from 12 breast cancer patients showing no early skin reactions after radiotherapy (RTOG grade 0) and from 14 breast cancer patients who developed acute severe skin reactions (RTOG grade 3-4). Whole blood was irradiated with 0, 5 and 2000mGy γ-radiation and serum was isolated. The biomarker for oxidative stress, 8-oxo-dG, was analyzed in the serum by a modified ELISA. While a significant radiation-induced increase of serum 8-oxo-dG levels was observed in serum of the RTOG 0 patients, no increase was seen in serum of the RTOG 3-4 patients. The radiation induced increase in serum 8-oxo-dG levels after 5mGy did not differ significantly from the increase observed for 2000mGy in the RTOG 3-4 cohort, thus no dose response relation was observed. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) value of 0.97 was obtained from the radiation-induced increase in 8-oxo-dG indicating that the assay could be used to identify patients with severe acute adverse reactions to radiotherapy. The results show that samples of whole blood from patients, classified as highly radiosensitive (RTOG 3-4) based on their skin reactions to radiotherapy, differ significantly in their oxidative stress response to ionizing radiation compared to samples of whole blood from patients with no skin reactions (RTOG 0). Extracellular 8-oxo-dG is primarily a biomarker of nucleotide damage and the results indicate that the patients with severe acute skin reactions differ in their cellular response to ionizing radiation at the level of induction of oxidative stress or at the level of repair or both. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Topics in gravitation and gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, T.K.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical studies presented here address three distinct topics. The first deals with quantum-mechanical effects of classical gravitational radiation. Specifically, the use of the interstellar medium itself as a remote quantum-mechanical detector of gravitational waves is investigated. This study is motivated by the presumed existence of atomic hydrogen in the vicinity of astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation. Space-time curvature produces uniquely identifiable shifts in atomic hydrogen energy levels. The oscillating level shifts induced by a passing gravitational wave could conceivably be detected spectroscopically. Accordingly the level shifts for both low-lying and highly excited states of single electron atoms immersed in gravitational radiation have been studied. The second two topics deal with the theory of quantized fields on curved space-times. In the first of these studies, a naive model of cosmological baryon synthesis is examined. The model incorporates a hard CP violation as well as a baryon (and lepton) non-conserving interaction and is thus capable of generating an excess of matter over antimatter. The time dependent background geometry of the early universe drives the interaction producing net excess of baryon/lepton pairs. In the final topic, the question of renormalizability of non-Abelian gauge fields theories in a general curved space-time is addressed. All modern theories of elementary particle physics are gauge theories and one would like to know if their perturbative expansions continue to be well defined (i.e. renormalizable) on curved backgrounds. In general, one is interested in knowing if field theories renormalizable in Minkowski space remain so in a general curved space-time.

  9. X ray timing observations and gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Wood, Kent S.

    1989-01-01

    Photon-rich x ray observations on bright compact galactic sources will make it possible to detect many fast processes that may occur in these systems on millisecond and submillisecond timescales. Many of these processes are of direct relevance to gravitational physics because they arise in regions of strong gravity near neutron stars and black holes where the dynamical timescales for compact objects of stellar mass are milliseconds. To date, such observations have been limited by the detector area and telemetry rates available. However, instruments such as the proposed X ray Large Array (XLA) would achieve collecting areas of about 100 sq m. This instrument has been described elsewhere (Wood and Michelson 1988) and was the subject of a recent prephase A feasibility study at Marshall Space Flight Center. Observations with an XLA class instrument will directly impact five primary areas of astrophysics research: the attempt to detect gravitational radiation, the study of black holes, the physics of mass accretion onto compact objects, the structure of neutron stars and nuclear matter, and the characterization of dark matter in the universe. Those observations are discussed that are most directly relevant to gravitational physics: the search for millisecond x ray pulsars that are potential sources of continuous gravitational radiation; and the use of x ray timing observations to probe the physical conditions in extreme relativistic regions of space near black holes, both stellar-sized and supermassive.

  10. Insights into the gravitational wave memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    A major breakthrough of General Relativity (GR) happened in 2015 with LIGO's first detection of gravitational waves. Typical sources for gravitational radiation are mergers of binary black holes, binary neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae. In these processes mass and momenta are radiated away in form of gravitational waves. GR predicts that these waves leave a footprint in the spacetime, that is they change the spacetime permanently, which results in a permanent displacement of test masses. This effect is called the memory. In this talk, I will explore the gravitational wave memory. We will see that there are two types of memory, one going back to Ya. B. Zel'dovich and A. G. Polnarev and one to D. Christodoulou. Then I will discuss recent work including my collaboration with D. Garfinkle, S.-T. Yau, P. Chen, focusing on how neutrinos or electromagnetic fields contribute to the memory effect, and work with D. Garfinkle and N. Yunes on cosmological memory. The author thanks NSF for support by grant DMS-1253149 to The University of Michigan.

  11. Detection of fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction using a 4H-SiC radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatko, Bohumir; Sagatova, Andrea; Sedlackova, Katarina; Necas, Vladimir; Dubecky, Frantisek; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    The particle detector based on a high purity epitaxial layer of 4H-SiC exhibits promising properties in detection of various types of ionizing radiation. Due to the wide band gap of 4H-SiC semiconductor material, the detector can reliably operate at room and also elevated temperatures. In this work we focused on detection of fast neutrons generated the by D-T (deuterium-tritium) nuclear reaction. The epitaxial layer with a thickness of 105 μm was used as a detection part. A circular Schottky contact of a Au/Ni double layer was evaporated on both sides of the detector material. The detector structure was characterized by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements, at first. The results show very low current density (<0.1 nA/cm2) at room temperature and good homogeneity of free carrier concentration in the investigated depth. The fabricated detectors were tested for detection of fast neutrons generated by the D-T reaction. The energies of detected fast neutrons varied from 16.0 MeV to 18.3 MeV according to the acceleration potential of deuterons, which increased from 600 kV up to 2 MV. Detection of fast neutrons in the SiC detector is caused by the elastic and inelastic scattering on the silicon or carbide component of the detector material. Another possibility that increases the detection efficiency is the use of a conversion layer. In our measurements, we glued a HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer on the detector Schottky contact to transform fast neutrons to protons. Hydrogen atoms contained in the conversion layer have a high probability of interaction with neutrons through elastic scattering. Secondary generated protons flying to the detector can be easily detected. The detection properties of detectors with and without the HDPE conversion layer were compared.

  12. Gravitational-wave joy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    seyithocuk; jjeherrera; eltodesukane; GrahamRounce; rloldershaw; Beaker, Dr; Sandhu, G. S.; Ophiuchi

    2016-03-01

    In reply to the news article on the LIGO collaboration's groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves, first predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, from two black holes colliding (pp5, 6-7 and http://ow.ly/Ylsyt).

  13. Gravitational Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; /SLAC

    2006-08-11

    It is often the case that naive introduction of the messenger sector to supersymmetry breaking models causes the supersymmetry restoration. We discuss a possibility of stabilizing the supersymmetry broken vacuum by the gravitational interaction.

  14. Gravitational waves: Stellar palaeontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; Farmer, Alison

    2017-07-01

    A third gravitational-wave signal has been detected with confidence, produced again by the merger of two black holes. The combined data from these detections help to reveal the histories of the stars that left these black holes behind.

  15. Gravitational Lensing Illustration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Simulation of a gravitational lens moving against a background field of galaxy. The gravity of the mass of the foreground object warps space. This bends the light of background galaxies making them...

  16. Flow and heat transfer of nanofluid over a stretching sheet with non-linear velocity in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madaki, A. G.; Roslan, R.; Kandasamy, R.; Chowdhury, M. S. H.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of Brownian motion, thermophoresis, chemical reaction, heat generation, magnetohydrodynamic and thermal radiation has been included in the model of nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a moving surface with variable thickness. The similarity transformation is used to transform the governing boundary layer equations into ordinary differential equations (ODE). Both optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) and Runge-Kutta fourth order method with shooting technique are employed to solve the resulting ODEs. For different values of the pertinent parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles have been studied and details are given in tables and graphs respectively. A comparison with the previous study is made, where an excellent agreement is achieved. The results demonstrate that the radiation parameter N increases, with the increase in both the temperature and the thermal boundary layer thickness respectively. While the nanoparticles concentration profiles increase with the influence of generative chemical reaction γ < 0, while it decreases with destructive chemical reaction γ > 0.

  17. Mass loss due to gravitational waves with Λ > 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Vee-Liem

    2017-07-01

    The theoretical basis for the energy carried away by gravitational waves that an isolated gravitating system emits was first formulated by Hermann Bondi during the ’60s. Recent findings from the observation of distant supernovae revealed that the rate of expansion of our universe is accelerating, which may be well explained by sticking a positive cosmological constant into the Einstein field equations for general relativity. By solving the Newman-Penrose equations (which are equivalent to the Einstein field equations), we generalize this notion of Bondi mass-energy and thereby provide a firm theoretical description of how an isolated gravitating system loses energy as it radiates gravitational waves, in a universe that expands at an accelerated rate. This is in line with the observational front of LIGO’s first announcement in February 2016 that gravitational waves from the merger of a binary black hole system have been detected.

  18. Gravitationally confined relativistic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayenas, C. G.; Fokas, A. S.; Grigoriou, D.

    2017-09-01

    Combining special relativity, the equivalence principle, and Newton’s universal gravitational law with gravitational rather than rest masses, one finds that gravitational interactions between relativistic neutrinos with kinetic energies above 50 MeV are very strong and can lead to the formation of gravitationally confined composite structures with the mass and other properties of hadrons. One may model such structures by considering three neutrinos moving symmetrically on a circular orbit under the influence of their gravitational attraction, and by assuming quantization of their angular momentum, as in the Bohr model of the H atom. The model contains no adjustable parameters and its solution, using a neutrino rest mass of 0.05 eV/c2, leads to composite state radii close to 1 fm and composite state masses close to 1 GeV/c2. Similar models of relativistic rotating electron - neutrino pairs give a mass of 81 GeV/c2, close to that of W bosons. This novel mechanism of generating mass suggests that the Higgs mass generation mechanism can be modeled as a latent gravitational field which gets activated by relativistic neutrinos.

  19. Relativistic theory of gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the present paper a relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) is unambiguously constructed on the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle. In this a gravitational field is treated as the Faraday--Maxwell spin-2 and spin-0 physical field possessing energy and momentum. The source of a gravitational field is the total conserved energy-momentum tensor of matter and of a gravitational field in Minkowski space. In the RTG the conservation laws are strictly fulfilled for the energy-moment and for the angular momentum of matter and a gravitational field. The theory explains the whole available set of experiments on gravity. By virtue of the geometrization principle, the Riemannian space in our theory is of field origin, since it appears as an effective force space due to the action of a gravitational field on matter. The RTG leads to an exceptionally strong prediction: The universe is not closed but just ''flat.'' This suggests that in the universe a ''missing mass'' should exist in a form of matter.

  20. Cherenkov radiation conversion and collection considerations for a gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostic for the NIF.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Hans W; Mack, Joseph M; Young, Carlton S; Malone, Robert M; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Horsfield, Colin J

    2008-10-01

    Bang time and reaction history measurements are fundamental components of diagnosing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and will be essential contributors to diagnosing attempts at ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of fusion interaction rate without being compromised by Doppler spreading. Gamma-based gas Cherenkov detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to optical Cherenkov photons for collection by fast recording systems have been developed and fielded at Omega. These systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns. Bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF system design requirements. A comprehensive, validated numerical study of candidate systems is providing essential information needed to make a down selection based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF logistics. This paper presents basic design considerations arising from the two-step conversion process from gamma rays to relativistic electrons to UV/visible Cherenkov radiation.