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Sample records for gray scale ultrasonography

  1. Is a pediatrician performed gray scale ultrasonography with power Doppler study safe and effective for triaging acute non-perforated appendicitis for conservative management?

    PubMed

    Jimbo, Keisuke; Takeda, Masahiro; Miyata, Eri; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kyodo, Reiko; Orikasa, Hideki; Lane, Geoffrey J; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamataka, Atsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether acute non-perforated appendicitis (ANPA) can be safely triaged by a pediatrician for conservative management (CM) using gray-scale ultrasonography with power Doppler (GSPD). Seventy five cases of ANPA assessed by a pediatrician with GSPD (2013-2015) were reviewed. GSPD grading for ANPA was: I: slightly irregular wall/normal blood flow; II: irregular wall/increased blood flow; III: irregular wall/decreased blood flow; and IV: absence of wall/blood flow. Grades I/II were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics then encouraged to book for interval appendectomy (IA). Grades III/IV were reviewed for emergency appendectomy (EA) by a pediatric surgeon. GSPD grading was I (n=26), II (n=36), III (n=9), and IV (n=4). EA was required for 5 cases, one grade III, and four grade IV cases. One grade IV case was treated conservatively after surgical review but EA was unavoidable. Of the remaining 70 cases discharged well after a mean of 5.7days hospitalization, 25/70 had IA with chronic inflammation on histology, 6/70 had recurrence of ANPA treated successfully by EA, and 39/70 remain asymptomatic at least 10months after declining IA. Overall, GSPD triaging with CM was cheaper than surgery. GSPD performed by pediatricians appears to be safe/effective for triaging ANPA. Level III. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of gray-scale contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with contrast-enhanced computed tomography in different grading of blunt hepatic and splenic trauma: an animal experiment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Li, Wenxiu; Lv, Faqin; Zhang, Huiqin; Zhang, Lihai; Wang, Yuexiang; Li, Junlai; Yang, Li

    2009-04-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) for the detection of different grading of solid organ injuries in blunt abdominal trauma in animals. A self-made miniature tools were used as models to simulate a blunt hepatic or splenic trauma in 16 and 14 anesthetized dogs, respectively. Baseline ultrasound, CEUS and CECT were used to detect traumatic injuries of livers and spleens. The degree of injuries was determined by CEUS according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) scale and the results compared with injury scale based on CECT evaluation. CEUS showed 22 hepatic injury sites in 16 animals and 17 splenic injury sites in other 14 animals. According to AAST scale, 2 grade I, 4 grade II, 3 grade III, 5 grade IV and 2 grade V hepatic lesions were present in 16 animals; 2 grade I, 4 grade II, 6 grade III and 2 grade IV splenic lesions in 14 animals. On CECT scan, 21 hepatic and 17 splenic injuries were demonstrated. According to Becker CT scaling for hepatic injury, 1 grade I, 2 grade II, 4 grade III, 5 grade IV and 2 grade V hepatic injuries were present. On the basis of Buntain spleen scaling, 2 grade I, 5 grade II, 5 grade III, 2 grade IV splenic injuries were showed. After Spearman rank correlation analysis, the agreement of CEUS with CECT on the degree of hepatic and splenic injury is 93.3% and 92.9%, respectively. CT is currently considered as the reference method for grading blunt abdominal trauma, according to experiment results, CEUS grading showed high levels of concordance with CECT. CEUS can accurately determine the degree of injury and will play an important role in clinical application.

  3. Quantized-"Gray-Scale" Electronic Synapses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, James L.; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed array of programmable synaptic connections for electronic neural network applications offers multiple quantized levels of connection strength using only simple, two-terminal, binary microswitch devices. Subgrids in fine grid of programmable resistive connections connected externally in parallel to form coarser synaptic grid. By selection of pattern of connections in each subgrid, connection strength of synaptic node represented by that subgrid set at quantized "gray level". Device structures promise implementations of quantized-"gray-scale" synaptic arrays with very high density.

  4. Quantized-"Gray-Scale" Electronic Synapses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, James L.; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed array of programmable synaptic connections for electronic neural network applications offers multiple quantized levels of connection strength using only simple, two-terminal, binary microswitch devices. Subgrids in fine grid of programmable resistive connections connected externally in parallel to form coarser synaptic grid. By selection of pattern of connections in each subgrid, connection strength of synaptic node represented by that subgrid set at quantized "gray level". Device structures promise implementations of quantized-"gray-scale" synaptic arrays with very high density.

  5. Compression of gray-scale fingerprint images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Thomas

    1994-03-01

    The FBI has developed a specification for the compression of gray-scale fingerprint images to support paperless identification services within the criminal justice community. The algorithm is based on a scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by zero run encoding and Huffman encoding.

  6. Gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasound imaging findings of an ovarian inguinal hernia and torsion of the herniated ovary: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ramazan; Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Ozaydin, Ilkay; Aydin, Gulten

    2013-03-01

    Inguinal hernia is extremely rare among girls. The hernia sac may sometimes involve intestinal structures, but ovaries in the sac are uncommon. Early diagnosis of a possible ovarian torsion is essential because potential amenable benefits can be achieved with surgery. A baby girl was admitted to our pediatric emergency unit with the complaints of swelling and erythema of the left groin. Then gray-scale ultrasonography and color Doppler ultrasonography was performed immediately at the emergency radiology room. In our case, ovarian torsion was diagnosed by gray-scale ultrasonography and color Doppler ultrasonography. After the diagnosis of ovarian torsion, the patient underwent surgery. It is possible to diagnose inguinal emergencies by high-resolution ultrasonography and color Doppler ultrasonography.

  7. BRDF study of gray-scale Spectralon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.

    2008-08-01

    Satellite instruments operating in the reflective solar wavelength region often require accurate and precise determination of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of laboratory based diffusers used in their pre-flight calibrations. In this paper we present gray Spectralon BRDF measured using a monochromatic broadband source at ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared wavelengths. By comparing these results, we quantitatively examine the wavelength and geometrical scatter properties of gray-scale Spectralon. The Spectralon diffusers with specified hemispherical reflectances of 2%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, and 99% were measured using P and S incident polarized light over a range of incident and scatter angles. The measurements are compared, and the influence of material composition on the BRDF is described. The future application of gray-scale Spectralon in the calibration of spaceborne sensors is described. All data were obtained using the out-of-plane scatterometer located in NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's Diffuser Calibration Facility. The results are NIST traceable.

  8. Gray-scale photolithography using microfluidic photomasks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chihchen; Hirdes, Danny; Folch, Albert

    2003-01-01

    The ability to produce three-dimensional (3D) microstructures is of increasing importance in the miniaturization of mechanical or fluidic devices, optical elements, self-assembling components, and tissue-engineering scaffolds, among others. Traditional photolithography, the most widely used process for microdevice fabrication, is ill-suited for 3D fabrication, because it is based on the illumination of a photosensitive layer through a “photomask” (a transparent plate that contains opaque, unalterable solid-state features), which inevitably results in features of uniform height. We have devised photomasks in which the light-absorbing features are made of fluids. Unlike in conventional photomasks, the opacity of the photomask features can be tailored to an arbitrary number of gray-scale levels, and their spatial pattern can be reconfigured in the time scale of seconds. Here we demonstrate the inexpensive fabrication of photoresist patterns that contain features of multiple and/or smoothly varying heights. For a given microfluidic photomask, the developed photoresist pattern can be predicted as a function of the dye concentrations and photomask dimensions. For selected applications, microfluidic photomasks offer a low-cost alternative to present gray-scale photolithography approaches. PMID:12574512

  9. 8-Bit Gray Scale Images of Fingerprint Image Groups

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST 8-Bit Gray Scale Images of Fingerprint Image Groups (Web, free access)   The NIST database of fingerprint images contains 2000 8-bit gray scale fingerprint image pairs. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  10. Accuracy of gray-scale coding in lung sound mapping.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Atul C; Gat, Merav; Mann, Shlomit; Madison, J Mark

    2010-07-01

    Stethoscope evaluation of the lungs is widely accepted and practiced; however, there are some widely recognized, major limitations with its use. A safe device that helped solve these limitations by translating sound into objective, quantifiable images would have clinical utility. Translating lung sounds into quantifiable images in which regional differences or asymmetry in intensities of breath sounds are presented as gradients in gray-scale is not a trivial process. Healthy lungs and lung pathology are characterized by different patterns of regional breath sound distribution and, therefore, the accuracy of mapping gray-scale images must be ensured in a controlled systematic fashion prior to clinical use of such a technique. Vibration response imaging (VRI) maps lung sounds from 40 sensors to a two-dimensional gray-scale image. To assess mapping accuracy, a simulated lung sound map with uniform signals was compared to modified maps where sound signals were reduced (1-3db) at one sensor. Also, 8 readers evaluated the gray-scale images. The computer algorithm accurately displayed gray-scale coding changes in correct locations in 97% of images. There was 95+/-4% accuracy rate by readers to correctly identify gray-scale changes. In addition, quantitative data at different stages of signal processing were investigated in a LSM of a subject with asthma. Signal processing was 97% accurate overall in that the gray-scale values from which the image was derived corresponded with intensity values from recorded signals. These results suggest VRI accurately maps acoustic signals to a gray-scale image and that trained readers can detect small changes. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of varying gray scale levels for remote manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierschwale, John M.; Stuart, Mark A.; Sampaio, Carlos E.

    1991-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of variant monitor gray scale levels and workplace illumination levels on operators' ability to discriminate between different colors on a monochrome monitor. It was determined that 8-gray scale viewing resulted in significantly worse discrimination performance compared to 16- and 32-gray scale viewing and that there was only a negligible difference found between 16 and 32 shades of gray. Therefore, it is recommended that monitors used while performing remote manipulation tasks have 16 or above shades of gray since this evaluation has found levels lower than this to be unacceptable for color discrimination task. There was no significant performance difference found between a high and a low workplace illumination condition. Further analysis was conducted to determine which specific combinations of colors can be used in conjunction with each other to ensure errorfree color coding/brightness discrimination performance while viewing a monochrome monitor. It was found that 92 three-color combination and 9 four-color combinations could be used with 100 percent accuracy. The results can help to determine which gray scale levels should be provided on monochrome monitors as well as which colors to use to ensure the maximal performance of remotely-viewed color discrimination/coding tasks.

  12. Gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasonographic manifestations of papillary thyroid carcinoma: analysis of 51 cases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei-Hsin; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chou, Yi-Hong; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Cheng, Chang-Yen; Lee, Chen-Hsen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the specific ultrasonic characteristics of papillary thyroid carcinoma and to determine the relative frequency of various patterns of papillary carcinoma on gray-scale ultrasonography (US) and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU). We retrospectively reviewed US features in 51 patients with confirmed papillary thyroid carcinoma. The features were analyzed based on tumor size, echogenicity, echotexture, boundary, margin, shape, and calcification pattern on gray-scale US imaging, and on patterns of vascularity on CDU. We obtained the relative frequency of features and classified these features into three categories: common (> or =50% of lesions), less common (>10% but <50%), and uncommon (< or =10%). Individual differences and combinations of features were also analyzed. In total, 67 nodules were enrolled in our study. The sizes of 76% of nodular lesions were <20.0 mm. Common US features of papillary carcinoma included: a homogeneous hypoechoic solid picture; a poorly defined boundary; an irregular margin; the absence of halo; the absence of calcifications or microcalcifications; and mixed perinodular and intranodular blood flow patterns. Less common features included: a heterogeneous hypoechoic or very hypoechoic picture; microcalcifications; a well-defined boundary; a regular margin; a halo with uneven thickness or an incomplete halo; and a taller-than-wide shape. Uncommon features included: an isoechoic picture; solid with cystic components; coarse calcifications; mixed coarse calcifications and microcalcifications; "inferno"-type blood flow; and absence of blood flow. On average, each nodule had 4.9 US features considered common, 1.8 US features considered less common, and 0.4 US feature considered uncommon. Features such as predominantly cystic composition, hyperechoic texture, and hypoechoic halo with even thickness were never found in our study. The top two common manifestations of papillary carcinoma were solid

  13. Gray scale enhances display readability of bitmapped documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostberg, Olov; Disfors, Dennis; Feng, Yingduo

    1994-05-01

    Bitmapped images of high resolution, say 300 dpi rastered documents, stored in the memory of a PC are at best only borderline readable on the PC's display screen (say a 72 dpi VGA monitor). Results from a series of exploratory psycho-physical experiments, using the Adobe PhotoshopR software, show that the readability can be significantly enhanced by making use of the monitor's capability to display shades of gray. It is suggested that such a gray scale adaptation module should be bundled to all software products for electronic document management. In fact, fax modems are already available in which this principle is employed, hereby making it possible to read incoming fax documents directly on the screen.

  14. The feasibility and application of gray scale adjustment method in high temperature digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shen; Yao, Xue Feng; Su, Yun Quan; Liu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the basic principle and application of linear gray scale adjustment method are investigated in high temperature digital image correlation (DIC) technology. First, the simple linear gray scale adjustment method is proposed, which can adjust the gray scale value of the saturated pixels and diminish the correlation error caused by the saturated pixels. Then, both the simulated high temperature images and DIC correlation results before and after the gray scale adjustment are provided and analyzed to verify its effectiveness, in which the displacement error decreased from 0.1 pixels to 0.04 pixels after the linear gray scale adjustment for high temperature images. Finally, the linear gray scale adjustment method is used to extract the displacement with high accuracy in high temperature experiment of SiC specimen, and the displacement error decreased from 0.5 pixels to 0.1 pixels after the linear gray scale adjustment.

  15. Gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of malignant liver tumors of vascular origin

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Nora; Soudah, Bisharah; Gebel, Michael; Manns, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Malignant vascular tumors of the liver are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in patients with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) of the liver and hepatic angiosarcoma (HA) and to describe the clinical presentation. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all patients with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma or hemangiosarcoma of the liver from 1998 to 2011, who underwent ultrasound investigation. We describe the findings in gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasound and the clinical course of the disease of seven patients with EHE and five patients with HA. Results Ultrasound investigation in EHE showed mostly multiple hypoechoic irregular lesions close to the liver capsule and with a halo in some cases. Contrast enhancement revealed inhomogeneously and through all contrast phases vascularized tumors with a rim enhancement in 50%, with or without early wash out. All tumors had avascular parts. HA presented as multiple and irregular hypo-, iso- or hyperechoic lesions. After contrast enhancement, hypervascularization with individual patterns was evident in all patients. Of five, three had liquid parts. Patients with HA were significantly older (58 vs. 37 years, p = 0.014) and presented with lower thrombocyte counts (84 vs. 264, p = 0.0025) and with higher CEA levels (4.6 vs. 1.5, p = 0.03). Conclusion EHE and HA are inhomogeneous tumors, explaining the high inter-individual variability and heterogeneity in ultrasound examination. The presence of multifocal lesions, heterogeneity and undefined margins may differentiate EHE or HA from hemangioma. A biopsy is essential in the diagnosis of vascular tumors. PMID:25653860

  16. Relationship between Hounsfield unit in CT scan and gray scale in CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruddin, Noorshaida; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad; Yusof, Asilah; Aziz, Mohd Ezane

    2016-12-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging system which has advantages over computed tomography (CT). Recently, CBCT has become widely used for oral and maxillofacial imaging. In CT scan, Hounsfield Unit (HU) is proportional to the degree of x-ray attenuation by the tissue. In CBCT, the degree of x-ray attenuation is shown by gray scale (voxel value). The aim of the present (in vitro) study was to investigate the relationship between gray scale in CBCT and HU in CT scan. In this descriptive study, the anthropomorphic head phantom was scanned with CBCT and CT scanner. Gray scales and HUs were detected on images at the crown of the teeth, trabecular and cortical bone of mandible. The images were analyzed to obtain the gray scale value and HU value. The obtained value then used to investigate the relationship between CBCT gray scales and HUs. For the statistical analysis, t-test, Pearson's correlation and regression analysis were used. The differences between the gray scale of CBCT and HU of CT were statistically not significant, whereas the Pearson's correlation coefficients demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between gray scale of CBCT and HU of CT values. Considering the fact that gray scale in CBCT is important in pre assessment evaluation of bone density before implant treatments, it is recommended because of the lower dose and cost compared to CT scan.

  17. Machine-Print Database of Gray Scale and Binary Images (MPDB)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Machine-Print Database of Gray Scale and Binary Images (MPDB) (PC database for purchase)   The NIST machine-printed database (Special Database 8) contains gray scale and binary images of machine printed pages. There are a total of 3,063,168 characters in the set. A reference file is included for each page.

  18. Histogram and gray level co-occurrence matrix on gray-scale ultrasound images for diagnosing lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Gyung; Yoo, Jaeheung; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Hong, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hye Sun; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Han, Kyunghwa; Kwak, Jin Young

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether texture analysis using histogram and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) parameters can help clinicians diagnose lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT) and differentiate LT according to pathologic grade. The background thyroid pathology of 441 patients was classified into no evidence of LT, chronic LT (CLT), and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Histogram and GLCM parameters were extracted from the regions of interest on ultrasound. The diagnostic performances of the parameters for diagnosing and differentiating LT were calculated. Of the histogram and GLCM parameters, the mean on histogram had the highest Az (0.63) and VUS (0.303). As the degrees of LT increased, the mean decreased and the standard deviation and entropy increased. The mean on histogram from gray-scale ultrasound showed the best diagnostic performance as a single parameter in differentiating LT according to pathologic grade as well as in diagnosing LT.

  19. Fabrication of a curved microlens array using double gray-scale digital maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ningning; Zhang, Zhimin

    2017-03-01

    Digital maskless lithography is considered to be a high-efficiency and low-cost approach for the fabrication of microstructures, but is limited by the gray scale capability of spatial light modulators. In this work, a novel method of double gray-scale digital maskless lithography is presented for forming a curved microlens array. The target exposure dose profile of the curved microlens array is first split into two individual 3D energy profiles, and then each 3D energy profile can be respectively realized by a single gray-scale digital lithography. Two gray-scale digital masks obtained by projection calculation are superposed on the substrate so as to realize the exposure dose profile of the curved microlens array. Thus, the effective steps that are achieved through the photoresist response to the modulated UV exposure are doubled, so a smoother profile with a steep gradient can be formed by the precise modulation of double gray-scale masks. As a result of the double gray-scale method, a curved microlens array with 183 micro lenslets on a 1024 µm  ×  768 µm spherical surface has been successfully fabricated.

  20. Relationship between Hounsfield Unit in CT Scan and Gray Scale in CBCT.

    PubMed

    Razi, Tahmineh; Niknami, Mahdi; Alavi Ghazani, Fakhri

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging system which has many advantages over computed tomography (CT). In CT scan, Hounsfield Unit (HU) is proportional to the degree of x-ray attenuation by the tissue. In CBCT, the degree of x-ray attenuation is shown by gray scale (voxel value). The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between gray scale in CBCT) and Hounsfield Unit (HU) in CT scan. Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, the head of a sheep was scanned with 3 CBCT and one medical CT scanner. Gray scales and HUs were detected on images. Reconstructed data were analyzed to investigate relationship between CBCT gray scales and HUs. Results. A strong correlation between gray scales of CBCT and HUs of CT scan was determined. Conclusion. Considering the fact that gray scale in CBCT is the criteria in measurement of bone density before implant treatments, it is recommended because of the lower dose and cost compared to CT scan.

  1. Relationship between Hounsfield Unit in CT Scan and Gray Scale in CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Tahmineh; Niknami, Mahdi; Alavi Ghazani, Fakhri

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging system which has many advantages over computed tomography (CT). In CT scan, Hounsfield Unit (HU) is proportional to the degree of x-ray attenuation by the tissue. In CBCT, the degree of x-ray attenuation is shown by gray scale (voxel value). The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between gray scale in CBCT) and Hounsfield Unit (HU) in CT scan. Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, the head of a sheep was scanned with 3 CBCT and one medical CT scanner. Gray scales and HUs were detected on images. Reconstructed data were analyzed to investigate relationship between CBCT gray scales and HUs. Results. A strong correlation between gray scales of CBCT and HUs of CT scan was determined. Conclusion. Considering the fact that gray scale in CBCT is the criteria in measurement of bone density before implant treatments, it is recommended because of the lower dose and cost compared to CT scan. PMID:25093055

  2. Fast retrieval of calcification from sequential intravascular ultrasound gray-scale images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sun; Bing-Ru, Liu

    2016-08-12

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based tissue characterization is invaluable for the computer-aided diagnosis and interventional treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Although the analysis of raw backscattered signals allows more accurate plaque characterization than gray-scale images, its applications are limited due to its nature of electrocardiogram-gated acquisition. Images acquired by IVUS devices that do not allow the acquisition of raw signals cannot be characterized. To address these limitations, we developed a method for fast frame-by-frame retrieval and location of calcification according to the jump features of radial gray-level variation curves from sequential IVUS gray-scale images. The proposed method consists of three main steps: (1) radial gray-level variation curves are extracted from each filtered polar view, (2) sequential images are preliminarily queried according to the maximal slopes of radial gray-level variation curves, and finally, (3) key frames that include calcification are selected through checking the gray-level features of successive pixel columns in the preliminary results. Experimental results with clinically acquired in vivo data sets indicate key frames that include calcification can be retrieved with the advantages of simplicity, high efficiency, and accuracy. Recognition results correlate well with manual characterization results obtained by experienced physicians and through virtual histology.

  3. Binarization of Gray-Scaled Digital Images Via Fuzzy Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Klinko, Steve; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new fast-computational technique based on fuzzy entropy measure has been developed to find an optimal binary image threshold. In this method, the image pixel membership functions are dependent on the threshold value and reflect the distribution of pixel values in two classes; thus, this technique minimizes the classification error. This new method is compared with two of the best-known threshold selection techniques, Otsu and Huang-Wang. The performance of the proposed method supersedes the performance of Huang- Wang and Otsu methods when the image consists of textured background and poor printing quality. The three methods perform well but yield different binarization approaches if the background and foreground of the image have well-separated gray-level ranges.

  4. Binarization of Gray-Scaled Digital Images Via Fuzzy Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Klinko, Steve; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new fast-computational technique based on fuzzy entropy measure has been developed to find an optimal binary image threshold. In this method, the image pixel membership functions are dependent on the threshold value and reflect the distribution of pixel values in two classes; thus, this technique minimizes the classification error. This new method is compared with two of the best-known threshold selection techniques, Otsu and Huang-Wang. The performance of the proposed method supersedes the performance of Huang-Wang and Otsu methods when the image consists of textured background and poor printing quality. The three methods perform well but yield different binarization approaches if the background and foreground of the image have well-separated gray-level ranges.

  5. Binarization of Gray-Scaled Digital Images Via Fuzzy Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Klinko, Steve; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new fast-computational technique based on fuzzy entropy measure has been developed to find an optimal binary image threshold. In this method, the image pixel membership functions are dependent on the threshold value and reflect the distribution of pixel values in two classes; thus, this technique minimizes the classification error. This new method is compared with two of the best-known threshold selection techniques, Otsu and Huang-Wang. The performance of the proposed method supersedes the performance of Huang- Wang and Otsu methods when the image consists of textured background and poor printing quality. The three methods perform well but yield different binarization approaches if the background and foreground of the image have well-separated gray-level ranges.

  6. Fabrication and Modeling of the Gray-Scale Mask Based Aspheric Refraction Microlens Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gou-Jen; Wang, Shuh-Yi; Chin, Chi-Hsian

    In this research, the manufacturing processes of aspherical refraction microlens array by gray-scale mask if investigated. In the first part of this research, we emphasize on the gray-scale mask based microlens array fabrication processes through the UV-LIGA approach. Furthermore, a two-stage process-modeling scheme is proposed to reduce the time-consuming trail-and-error parameters tuning labor works. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach can well model the fabrication process and is capable of providing effective fabrication parameters once the diameter and height of a certain microlens is provided.

  7. Artifacts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Scalcione, Luke R; Gimber, Lana H; Lorenz, Eileen J; Witte, Russell S

    2014-02-01

    During the past 2 decades, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) has been increasingly utilized in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal trauma and diseases with results comparable with MR imaging. US has an advantage over other cross-sectional modalities in many circumstances due to its superior spatial resolution and ability to allow dynamic assessment. When performing musculoskeletal US, the examiner has to be knowledgeable in the complex anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and US imaging technique. Additionally, he or she must be familiar with several common imaging artifacts in musculoskeletal US that may be mistaken for pathology, as well as several artifacts that frequently accompany pathologic conditions. These artifacts may occur with both B-mode gray-scale and Doppler imaging. In this article, we discuss common artifacts seen in musculoskeletal US and techniques to avoid or minimize these artifacts during clinical US examinations. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Fabrication and modeling of the gray-scale mask-based aspheric refraction microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gou-Jen; Wang, Shuh-Yi; Chin, Chi-Hsian

    2002-04-01

    In this research, the manufacturing processes of non- spherical refraction microles array by gray-scale mask is investigated. Compared to the conventional multi-lithography fabricating method, the gray-scale mask approach requires only a single lithography action to fabricate a non- spherical refraction microlens array. In the firs part of this research, we emphasize the gray-scale mask based microlens array fabrication processes through the UV-LIGA approach. Furthermore, a two-stage process-modeling scheme is proposed to reduce the time-consuming trial-and-error parameters tuning labor works. At the first stage, a multi- layer feedforward neural-network is employed to model the relationships between the diameter and height of the microlens are obtained, the surface profile of this microlens can be predicted by an empirical equation. The empirical equation is derived through the regressing analysis method with data points sampled from the real microlens surface profile. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed two-stage scheme can precisely predict the surface profile of the gray-scale mask based microlens.

  9. Geometrical measures of the similarity of gray-scale images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoitov, Valery V.

    1995-08-01

    There are papers describing measures of correspondence or similarity between two binary images or their parts, but only two papers suggest a measure for a comparison of objects of two grey-scale images. However, there are numerous applications of a measure for grey-scale images as whole entities. A useful application is the comparison of different algorithms devoted to the same task (edge detection, thresholding, image enhancement, segmentation and image reconstruction). This paper proposes some results to define such a measure. They are based on two different representations of grey-scale images: as `surfaces' and as `stacks' or umbra. We study an adaptation of some known formulas used for binary images to grey-scale images, and present a geometrical variant of such a measurement. We study different measures of diversity, based on different digital metrics, direct calculations of distances, and digital functions adapted to grey-scale images. We show that the `stack' representation needs more calculation time and that measures based on the representation are not sensitive to small image shifts, but very sensitive to noise.

  10. Optimal Binarization of Gray-Scaled Digital Images via Fuzzy Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A. (Inventor); Klinko, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A technique for finding an optimal threshold for binarization of a gray scale image employs fuzzy reasoning. A triangular membership function is employed which is dependent on the degree to which the pixels in the image belong to either the foreground class or the background class. Use of a simplified linear fuzzy entropy factor function facilitates short execution times and use of membership values between 0.0 and 1.0 for improved accuracy. To improve accuracy further, the membership function employs lower and upper bound gray level limits that can vary from image to image and are selected to be equal to the minimum and the maximum gray levels, respectively, that are present in the image to be converted. To identify the optimal binarization threshold, an iterative process is employed in which different possible thresholds are tested and the one providing the minimum fuzzy entropy measure is selected.

  11. Low cost Video Scaler and Gray Scale Integrator.

    PubMed

    Pietras, B W; Bolanowski, S J

    1994-07-01

    A hybrid digital/analog device capable of making high-resolution linear and area measurements from a standard monochromatic video image is described. The device is capable of dynamic as well as static data acquisition when used in conjunction with standard NTSC video recording equipment. Digital output allows for computer interfacing. Linear dimensions are obtained by electronically superimposing two horizontal and two vertical scaling lines on a video monitor. Each linear dimension has an eight-bit resolution and is displayed on the front panel with seven segment LED's. Eight-bit, digital-to-analog converters are also used to provide analog outputs. A measurement of the temporal deformation pattern of the accessory capsule surrounding a mechanoreceptor (Pacinian corpuscles) in response to vibratory displacements is demonstrated. Area measurements are obtained via a window comparator, a 6-MHz clock, and a 16-bit digital-to-analog converter. Data is only valid within the zone set by the scaling lines, allowing data regions to be isolated from noise, etc. The 16-bit digital signal measuring the area of interest is then converted for analog output. The measurement of the consensual pupillary reflex in response to full-field illumination (Ganzfeld) is given as an example.

  12. Polymer microfluidic bioreactor fabrication by means of gray scale lithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Prokaryn, Piotr; Dobrowolski, Rafał; Malinowska, Anna; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Trojanowski, Damian; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a new method of polymer microfluidic bioreactor fabrication by means of a gray scale lithography technique. As a result of the gray scale lithography process the 3D model of the bioreactor is defined in photoresist. The obtained model serves as a sacrificial layer for the subsequent transfer of the 3D shape into the polymer material. The proposed method allows simultaneous definition of both the overall bioreactor geometry and the multi steps cell traps in a single photolithography step. Such microfluidic structure can be used for sorting cells based on their size. The developed solution significantly simplifies the production technology and reduces its costs in comparison to standard photolithography techniques.

  13. Gray-scale transform and evaluation for digital x-ray chest images on CRT monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Isao; Suzuki, Junji; Ono, Sadayasu; Kitamura, Masayuki; Ando, Yutaka

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, an experimental evaluation of a super high definition (SHD) imaging system for digital x-ray chest images is presented. The SHD imaging system is proposed as a platform for integrating conventional image media. We are involved in the use of SHD images in the total digitizing of medical records that include chest x-rays and pathological microscopic images, both which demand the highest level of quality among the various types of medical images. SHD images use progressive scanning and have a spatial resolution of 2000 by 2000 pixels or more and a temporal resolution (frame rate) of 60 frames/sec or more. For displaying medical x-ray images on a CRT, we derived gray scale transform characteristics based on radiologists' comments during the experiment, and elucidated the relationship between that gray scale transform and the linearization transform for maintaining the linear relationship with the luminance of film on a light box (luminance linear transform). We then carried out viewing experiments based on a five-stage evaluation. Nine radiologists participated in our experiment, and the ten cases evaluated included pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, and pneumonia. The experimental results indicated that conventional film images and those on super high definition CRT monitors have nearly the same quality. They also show that the gray scale transform for CRT images decided according to radiologists' comments agrees with the luminance linear transform in the high luminance region. And in the low luminance region, it was found that the gray scale transform had the characteristics of level expansion to increase the number of levels that can be expressed.

  14. A Parallel Algorithm for Connected Component Labelling of Gray-scale Images on Homogeneous Multicore Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknam, Mehdi; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Camorlinga, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    Connected component labelling is an essential step in image processing. We provide a parallel version of Suzuki's sequential connected component algorithm in order to speed up the labelling process. Also, we modify the algorithm to enable labelling gray-scale images. Due to the data dependencies in the algorithm we used a method similar to pipeline to exploit parallelism. The parallel algorithm method achieved a speedup of 2.5 for image size of 256 × 256 pixels using 4 processing threads.

  15. The FBI wavelet/scalar quantization standard for gray-scale fingerprint image compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M. ); Hopper, T. )

    1993-01-01

    The FBI has recently adopted a standard for the compression of digitized 8-bit gray-scale fingerprint images. The standard is based on scalar quantization of a 64-subband discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by Huffman coding. Novel features of the algorithm include the use of symmetric boundary conditions for transforming finite-length signals and a subband decomposition tailored for fingerprint images scanned at 500 dpi. The standard is intended for use in conjunction with ANSI/NBS-CLS 1-1993, American National Standard Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information, and the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

  16. The FBI wavelet/scalar quantization standard for gray-scale fingerprint image compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.; Hopper, T.

    1993-05-01

    The FBI has recently adopted a standard for the compression of digitized 8-bit gray-scale fingerprint images. The standard is based on scalar quantization of a 64-subband discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by Huffman coding. Novel features of the algorithm include the use of symmetric boundary conditions for transforming finite-length signals and a subband decomposition tailored for fingerprint images scanned at 500 dpi. The standard is intended for use in conjunction with ANSI/NBS-CLS 1-1993, American National Standard Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information, and the FBI`s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

  17. FBI wavelet/scalar quantization standard for gray-scale fingerprint image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Jonathan N.; Brislawn, Christopher M.; Hopper, Thomas

    1993-08-01

    The FBI has recently adopted a standard for the compression of digitized 8-bit gray-scale fingerprint images. The standard is based on scalar quantization of a 64-subband discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by Huffman coding. Novel features of the algorithm include the use of symmetric boundary conditions for transforming finite- length signals and a subband decomposition tailored for fingerprint images scanned at 500 dpi. The standard is intended for use in conjunction with ANSI/NBS-CLS 1-1993, American National Standard Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information, and the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

  18. QR code based noise-free optical encryption and decryption of a gray scale image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Shuming; Zou, Wenbin; Li, Xia

    2017-03-01

    In optical encryption systems, speckle noise is one major challenge in obtaining high quality decrypted images. This problem can be addressed by employing a QR code based noise-free scheme. Previous works have been conducted for optically encrypting a few characters or a short expression employing QR codes. This paper proposes a practical scheme for optically encrypting and decrypting a gray-scale image based on QR codes for the first time. The proposed scheme is compatible with common QR code generators and readers. Numerical simulation results reveal the proposed method can encrypt and decrypt an input image correctly.

  19. Comparison of radionuclide imaging and ultrasonography of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Elyaderani, M.K.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide liver scans and gray scale ultrasonography of the liver were compared in 456 patients with various abnormalities including normal variants, jaundice, abscesses, and metastatic diseases. In general the better resolution of sonography detected smaller and deeper focal lesions than nuclide scans, but nuclide studies were more informative in hepatocellular disorders. Nuclide studies frequently demonstrated lesions that could be further delineated by sonography as either cystic or solid. This ability was of particular significance in isolated liver lesions found during metastatic surveys.

  20. Comparison of radionuclide imaging and ultrasonography of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Elyaderani, M.K.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide liver scans and gray scale ultrasonography of the liver were compared in 456 patients with various abnormalities including normal variants, jaundice, abscesses, and metastatic diseases. In general the better resolution of sonography detected smaller and deeper focal lesions than nuclide scans, but nuclide studies were more informative in heptatocellular disorders. Nuclide studies frequently demonstrated lesions that could be further delineated by sonography as either cystic or solid. This ability was of particular significance in isolated liver lesions found during metastatic surveys.

  1. Mapping gray-scale image to 3D surface scanning data by ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Jones, Peter R. M.

    1997-03-01

    The extraction and location of feature points from range imaging is an important but difficult task in machine vision based measurement systems. There exist some feature points which are not able to be detected from pure geometric characteristics, particularly in those measurement tasks related to the human body. The Loughborough Anthropometric Shadow Scanner (LASS) is a whole body surface scanner based on structured light technique. Certain applications of LASS require accurate location of anthropometric landmarks from the scanned data. This is sometimes impossible from existing raw data because some landmarks do not appear in the scanned data. Identification of these landmarks has to resort to surface texture of the scanned object. Modifications to LASS were made to allow gray-scale images to be captured before or after the object was scanned. Two-dimensional gray-scale image must be mapped to the scanned data to acquire the 3D coordinates of a landmark. The method to map 2D images to the scanned data is based on the colinearity conditions and ray-tracing method. If the camera center and image coordinates are known, the corresponding object point must lie on a ray starting from the camera center and connecting to the image coordinate. By intersecting the ray with the scanned surface of the object, the 3D coordinates of a point can be solved. Experimentation has demonstrated the feasibility of the method.

  2. Extraction and analysis of the width, gray scale and radian in Chinese signature handwriting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohong

    2015-10-01

    Forensic handwriting examination is a relevant identification process in forensic science. This research obtained ideas from the process of features detection and analysis in forensic handwriting examination. A Chinese signature database was developed and comprised original signatures, freehand imitation forgeries, random forgeries and tracing imitation forgeries. The features of width, gray scale and radian combined with stroke orders were automatically extracted after image processing. A correlation coefficient was used to precisely characterize and express the similarities between signatures. To validate the differences between writers, a multivariate analysis of the variance was employed. The canonical discriminant analysis was performed between the original and non-original signatures; the cross-validation estimated the discriminating power of the width, gray scale and radian data. It is suggested that the extraction and analysis of these properties in Chinese signatures is reasonable. Meanwhile, forensic handwriting examination using the quantitative feature extraction and statistical analysis methods in this research could be performed with a satisfactory result in the discriminant analysis.

  3. Differentiating Transudative From Exudative Ascites Using Quantitative B-Mode Gray-Scale Ultrasound Histogram.

    PubMed

    Çekiç, Bulent; Toslak, Iclal Erdem; Şahintürk, Yasin; Cekin, Ayhan Hilmi; Koksel, Yasemin Kocabas; Koroglu, Mert; Demos, Terrence C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to differentiate exudative from transudative ascites using B-mode gray-scale ultrasound histogram analysis. Sixty-two consecutive patients with ascites were prospectively studied from June 2014 through June 2015. All underwent ultrasound (US) and paracentesis in the radiology department. Five patients were excluded (three with hemorrhage and two with peritoneal carcinomatosis). The remaining 57 patients were divided into those with exudative and transudative ascites according to results of paracentesis. Electronically recorded US images were transferred to a workstation, and gray-scale histograms were generated. The ascites-to-rectus abdominis muscle echogenicity ratio (ARAER) was obtained from ascites adjacent to the rectus abdominis muscle. ROC curves were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of this method in differentiating exudative from transudative ascites. ARAERs for exudative ascites were significantly higher than those for transudative ascites (p < 0.001). ROC was done to evaluate ARAERs for exudative ascites. The best cutoff value for ARAER histogram was 0.002. The sensitivity and specificity of ARAER were 87.5% and 79.2% (AUC = 0.843), respectively. ARAER is an easily applicable noninvasive quantitative sonographic method with high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating exudative from transudative ascites.

  4. Analysis of subgrid-scale vertical transport in convective boundary layers at gray-zone resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeyum Hailey; Hong, Song-You

    2013-04-01

    The gray zone of a physics process in numerical models is defined as the range of model resolution in which the process is partly resolved by model dynamics and partly parameterized. In this study, we examine the effects of grid size on resolved and parameterized vertical transport for horizontal grid scales including the gray zone. To assess how stability alters the dependency on grid size, four convective boundary layer (CBL)s with different surface heating and geostrophic winds are considered. For this purpose, reference data for grid-scale (GS) and subgrid-scale (SGS) fields are constructed for 50-4000 mesh sizes by filtering 25-m large-eddy simulations (LES) data. As wind shear becomes stronger, turbulent kinetic energy and the vertical transport of potential temperature and momentum are more resolved for a given grid spacing. A passive scalar with bottom-up diffusion behaves in a similar fashion. For a top-down diffusion scalar, the cospectral peak scale of the scalar flux is larger than the horizontal size of the thermals and increases in time. For the scalar, the entrainment ratio, in conjunction with the shear, influences the mesh-size dependency of GS and SGS transport. The total vertical transport of heat and the bottom-up scalar is decomposed into a non-local mixing owing to the coherent structures and remaining local mixing. The contribution of the resolved parts is larger when roll-like structures are present than when only thermals exist, for both non-local and local fluxes. The grid-size dependency of the non-local flux and its sensitivity to stability predominantly determines the dependency of total (non-local plus local) transport.

  5. Three-dimensional patterning and morphological control of porous nanomaterials by gray-scale direct imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Judson D.; Jiao, Yang; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for direct three-dimensional (3D) patterning of porous nanomaterials through the application of a premastered and reusable gray-scale stamp. Four classes of 3D nanostructures are demonstrated for the first time in porous media: gradient profiles, digital patterns, curves and lens shapes, and sharp features including v-grooves, nano-pits, and ‘cookie-cutter’ particles. Further, we demonstrate this technique enables morphological tuning and direct tailoring of nanomaterial properties, including porosity, average pore size, dielectric constant, and plasmonic response. This work opens a rapid and low-cost route for fabricating novel nanostructures and devices utilizing porous nanomaterials, with promising applications spanning diffractive and plasmonic sensing, holography, micro- and transformation optics, and drug delivery and imaging. PMID:23518798

  6. A survey of quality measures for gray-scale image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskicioglu, Ahmet M.; Fisher, Paul S.

    1993-01-01

    Although a variety of techniques are available today for gray-scale image compression, a complete evaluation of these techniques cannot be made as there is no single reliable objective criterion for measuring the error in compressed images. The traditional subjective criteria are burdensome, and usually inaccurate or inconsistent. On the other hand, being the most common objective criterion, the mean square error (MSE) does not have a good correlation with the viewer's response. It is now understood that in order to have a reliable quality measure, a representative model of the complex human visual system is required. In this paper, we survey and give a classification of the criteria for the evaluation of monochrome image quality.

  7. An improved gray lattice Boltzmann model for simulating fluid flow in multi-scale porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiujiang; Ma, Jingsheng

    2013-06-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for simulating fluid flow in porous media by allowing the aggregates of finer-scale pores and solids to be treated as 'equivalent media'. This model employs a partially bouncing-back scheme to mimic the resistance of each aggregate, represented as a gray node in the model, to the fluid flow. Like several other lattice Boltzmann models that take the same approach, which are collectively referred to as gray lattice Boltzmann (GLB) models in this paper, it introduces an extra model parameter, ns, which represents a volume fraction of fluid particles to be bounced back by the solid phase rather than the volume fraction of the solid phase at each gray node. The proposed model is shown to conserve the mass even for heterogeneous media, while this model and that model of Walsh et al. (2009) [1], referred to the WBS model thereafter, are shown analytically to recover Darcy-Brinkman's equations for homogenous and isotropic porous media where the effective viscosity and the permeability are related to ns and the relaxation parameter of LB model. The key differences between these two models along with others are analyzed while their implications are highlighted. An attempt is made to rectify the misconception about the model parameter ns being the volume fraction of the solid phase. Both models are then numerically verified against the analytical solutions for a set of homogenous porous models and compared each other for another two sets of heterogeneous porous models of practical importance. It is shown that the proposed model allows true no-slip boundary conditions to be incorporated with a significant effect on reducing errors that would otherwise heavily skew flow fields near solid walls. The proposed model is shown to be numerically more stable than the WBS model at solid walls and interfaces between two porous media. The causes to the instability in the latter case are examined. The link between these two GLB models and a

  8. Treatment of Simulated Shipboard Gray Water in a Lab-Scale Membrane Bioreactor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    orange juice , 15 mL chunky beef soup pureed 12 Table 2.3: Gray water testing results, actual gray water collected in 2004, actual shipboard gray... pH for the microbes needed. Since temperature affects microbial activity, the temperature was measured and recorded daily. The temperature in the...operated in continuous flow mode with an effective hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 34 days. The aerators, which were built into the membrane filter

  9. Large-scale motif discovery using DNA Gray code and equiprobable oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Ichinose, Natsuhiro; Yada, Tetsushi; Gotoh, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: How to find motifs from genome-scale functional sequences, such as all the promoters in a genome, is a challenging problem. Word-based methods count the occurrences of oligomers to detect excessively represented ones. This approach is known to be fast and accurate compared with other methods. However, two problems have hampered the application of such methods to large-scale data. One is the computational cost necessary for clustering similar oligomers, and the other is the bias in the frequency of fixed-length oligomers, which complicates the detection of significant words. Results: We introduce a method that uses a DNA Gray code and equiprobable oligomers, which solve the clustering problem and the oligomer bias, respectively. Our method can analyze 18 000 sequences of ~1 kbp long in 30 s. We also show that the accuracy of our method is superior to that of a leading method, especially for large-scale data and small fractions of motif-containing sequences. Availability: The online and stand-alone versions of the application, named Hegma, are available at our website: http://www.genome.ist.i.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~ichinose/hegma/ Contact: ichinose@i.kyoto-u.ac.jp; o.gotoh@i.kyoto-u.ac.jp PMID:22057160

  10. Large-scale motif discovery using DNA Gray code and equiprobable oligomers.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Natsuhiro; Yada, Tetsushi; Gotoh, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    How to find motifs from genome-scale functional sequences, such as all the promoters in a genome, is a challenging problem. Word-based methods count the occurrences of oligomers to detect excessively represented ones. This approach is known to be fast and accurate compared with other methods. However, two problems have hampered the application of such methods to large-scale data. One is the computational cost necessary for clustering similar oligomers, and the other is the bias in the frequency of fixed-length oligomers, which complicates the detection of significant words. We introduce a method that uses a DNA Gray code and equiprobable oligomers, which solve the clustering problem and the oligomer bias, respectively. Our method can analyze 18 000 sequences of ~1 kbp long in 30 s. We also show that the accuracy of our method is superior to that of a leading method, especially for large-scale data and small fractions of motif-containing sequences. The online and stand-alone versions of the application, named Hegma, are available at our website: http://www.genome.ist.i.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~ichinose/hegma/ ichinose@i.kyoto-u.ac.jp; o.gotoh@i.kyoto-u.ac.jp

  11. Gray-scale ultrasound: utility preoperatively and postoperatively in a patient with obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S H; Hayt, D B; Reynolds, B; Patel, H

    1977-09-01

    We present a case of obstructing calculi of the common bile duct diagnosed by ultrasonography. Postoperatively, a sterile abscess due to bile leakage at the distal common bile duct developed, and was also diagnosed by ultrasound Ultrasonography was useful in following the course of clearing of the bile collection. Preoperative ultrasound evaluation of the jaundiced patient should be followed by postoperative sonography, especially if complications occur.

  12. A stochastic scale-aware parameterization of shallow cumulus convection across the convective gray zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakradzija, Mirjana; Seifert, Axel; Dipankar, Anurag

    2016-06-01

    The parameterization of shallow cumuli across a range of model grid resolutions of kilometre-scales faces at least three major difficulties: (1) closure assumptions of conventional parameterization schemes are no longer valid, (2) stochastic fluctuations become substantial and increase with grid resolution, and (3) convective circulations that emerge on the model grids are under-resolved and grid-scale dependent. Here we develop a stochastic parameterization of shallow cumulus clouds to address the first two points, and we study how this stochastic parameterization interacts with the under-resolved convective circulations in a convective case over the ocean. We couple a stochastic model based on a canonical ensemble of shallow cumuli to the Eddy-Diffusivity Mass-Flux parameterization in the icosahedral nonhydrostatic (ICON) model. The moist-convective area fraction is perturbed by subsampling the distribution of subgrid convective states. These stochastic perturbations represent scale-dependent fluctuations around the quasi-equilibrium state of a shallow cumulus ensemble. The stochastic parameterization reproduces the average and higher order statistics of the shallow cumulus case adequately and converges to the reference statistics with increasing model resolution. The interaction of parameterizations with model dynamics, which is usually not considered when parameterizations are developed, causes a significant influence on convection in the gray zone. The stochastic parameterization interacts strongly with the model dynamics, which changes the regime and energetics of the convective flows compared to the deterministic simulations. As a result of this interaction, the emergence of convective circulations in combination with the stochastic parameterization can even be beneficial on the high-resolution model grids.

  13. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    In this work, gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features are proposed for false positive reduction (FPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast masses. Two main considerations are at the basis of this proposal. First, false positive (FP) marks surviving our previous CAD system seem to be characterized by specific texture properties that can be used to discriminate them from masses. Second, our previous CAD system achieves invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations by encoding regions of interest into ranklet images through the ranklet transform, an image transformation similar to the wavelet transform, yet dealing with pixels' ranks rather than with their gray-scale values. Therefore, the new FPR approach proposed herein defines a set of texture features which are calculated directly from the ranklet images corresponding to the regions of interest surviving our previous CAD system, hence, ranklet texture features; then, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used for discrimination. As a result of this approach, texture-based information is used to discriminate FP marks surviving our previous CAD system; at the same time, invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations of the new CAD system is guaranteed, as ranklet texture features are calculated from ranklet images that have this property themselves by construction. To emphasize the gray-scale invariance of both the previous and new CAD systems, training and testing are carried out without any in-between parameters' adjustment on mammograms having different gray-scale dynamics; in particular, training is carried out on analog digitized mammograms taken from a publicly available digital database, whereas testing is performed on full-field digital mammograms taken from an in-house database. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis of the two CAD systems demonstrates that the new approach achieves a higher reduction of FP marks

  14. The Suitability of Gray-Scale Electronic Readers for Dermatology Journals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Eun; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Kye, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid development of information and communication technology has replaced traditional books by electronic versions. Most print dermatology journals have been replaced with electronic journals (e-journals), which are readily used by clinicians and medical students. Objective The objectives of this study were to determine whether e-readers are appropriate for reading dermatology journals, to conduct an attitude study of both medical personnel and students, and to find a way of improving e-book use in the field of dermatology. Methods All articles in the Korean Journal of Dermatology published from January 2010 to December 2010 were utilized in this study. Dermatology house officers, student trainees in their fourth year of medical school, and interns at Korea University Medical Center participated in the study. After reading the articles with Kindle 2, their impressions and evaluations were recorded using a questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale. Results The results demonstrated that gray-scale e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals, especially for case reports compared to the original articles. Only three of the thirty-one respondents preferred e-readers to printed papers. The most common suggestions from respondents to encourage usage of e-books in the field of dermatology were the introduction of a color display, followed by the use of a touch screen system, a cheaper price, and ready-to-print capabilities. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrated that current e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals. However, they may be utilized in selected situations according to the type and topic of the papers. PMID:25473221

  15. The suitability of gray-scale electronic readers for dermatology journals.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Eun; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Kye, Young Chul; Ahn, Hyo Hyun

    2014-12-01

    The rapid development of information and communication technology has replaced traditional books by electronic versions. Most print dermatology journals have been replaced with electronic journals (e-journals), which are readily used by clinicians and medical students. The objectives of this study were to determine whether e-readers are appropriate for reading dermatology journals, to conduct an attitude study of both medical personnel and students, and to find a way of improving e-book use in the field of dermatology. All articles in the Korean Journal of Dermatology published from January 2010 to December 2010 were utilized in this study. Dermatology house officers, student trainees in their fourth year of medical school, and interns at Korea University Medical Center participated in the study. After reading the articles with Kindle 2, their impressions and evaluations were recorded using a questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale. The results demonstrated that gray-scale e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals, especially for case reports compared to the original articles. Only three of the thirty-one respondents preferred e-readers to printed papers. The most common suggestions from respondents to encourage usage of e-books in the field of dermatology were the introduction of a color display, followed by the use of a touch screen system, a cheaper price, and ready-to-print capabilities. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that current e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals. However, they may be utilized in selected situations according to the type and topic of the papers.

  16. Comparing differential tissue harmonic imaging with tissue harmonic and fundamental gray scale imaging of the liver.

    PubMed

    Chiou, See-Ying; Forsberg, Flemming; Fox, Traci B; Needleman, Laurence

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare fundamental gray scale sonography, tissue harmonic imaging (THI), and differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) for depicting normal and abnormal livers. The in vitro lateral resolution of DTHI, THI, and sonography was assessed in a phantom. Sagittal and transverse images of right and left hepatic lobes of 5 volunteers and 20 patients and images of 27 liver lesions were also acquired. Three independent blinded readers scored all randomized images for noise, detail resolution, image quality, and margin (for lesions) on a 7-point scale. Next, images from the same location obtained with all 3 modes were compared blindly side by side and rated by all readers. Contrast-to-noise ratios were calculated for the lesions, and the depth of penetration (centimeters) was determined for all images. In vitro, the lateral resolution of DTHI was significantly better than fundamental sonography (P = .009) and showed a trend toward significance versus THI (P = .06). In the far field, DTHI performed better than both modes (P < .04). In vivo, 450 images were scored, and for all parameters, DTHI and THI did better than sonography (P < .002). Differential tissue harmonic imaging scored significantly higher than THI with regard to detail resolution and image quality (P < .001). The average increase in penetration with THI and DTHI was around 0.6 cm relative to sonography (P < .0001). The contrast-to-noise ratio for DTHI showed a trend toward significance versus THI (P = .06). Side-by-side comparisons rated DTHI better than THI and sonography in 54% of the cases (P < .007). Tissue harmonic imaging and DTHI do better than fundamental sonography for hepatic imaging, with DTHI being rated the best of the 3 techniques.

  17. Characterization of photoresist and simulation of a developed resist profile for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Rak; Sierchio, Justin; Zaverton, Melissa; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2012-02-01

    We have characterized a photoresist used for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements in terms of Dill's and Mack's model parameters. The resist model parameters were employed for the simulations of developed resist profiles for sawtooth patterns executed by solving the Eikonal equation with the fast-marching method. The simulated results were shown to be in good agreement with empirical data.

  18. MIA - A free and open source software for gray scale medical image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gray scale images make the bulk of data in bio-medical image analysis, and hence, the main focus of many image processing tasks lies in the processing of these monochrome images. With ever improving acquisition devices, spatial and temporal image resolution increases, and data sets become very large. Various image processing frameworks exists that make the development of new algorithms easy by using high level programming languages or visual programming. These frameworks are also accessable to researchers that have no background or little in software development because they take care of otherwise complex tasks. Specifically, the management of working memory is taken care of automatically, usually at the price of requiring more it. As a result, processing large data sets with these tools becomes increasingly difficult on work station class computers. One alternative to using these high level processing tools is the development of new algorithms in a languages like C++, that gives the developer full control over how memory is handled, but the resulting workflow for the prototyping of new algorithms is rather time intensive, and also not appropriate for a researcher with little or no knowledge in software development. Another alternative is in using command line tools that run image processing tasks, use the hard disk to store intermediate results, and provide automation by using shell scripts. Although not as convenient as, e.g. visual programming, this approach is still accessable to researchers without a background in computer science. However, only few tools exist that provide this kind of processing interface, they are usually quite task specific, and don’t provide an clear approach when one wants to shape a new command line tool from a prototype shell script. Results The proposed framework, MIA, provides a combination of command line tools, plug-ins, and libraries that make it possible to run image processing tasks interactively in a command shell

  19. MIA - A free and open source software for gray scale medical image analysis.

    PubMed

    Wollny, Gert; Kellman, Peter; Ledesma-Carbayo, María-Jesus; Skinner, Matthew M; Hublin, Jean-Jaques; Hierl, Thomas

    2013-10-11

    Gray scale images make the bulk of data in bio-medical image analysis, and hence, the main focus of many image processing tasks lies in the processing of these monochrome images. With ever improving acquisition devices, spatial and temporal image resolution increases, and data sets become very large.Various image processing frameworks exists that make the development of new algorithms easy by using high level programming languages or visual programming. These frameworks are also accessable to researchers that have no background or little in software development because they take care of otherwise complex tasks. Specifically, the management of working memory is taken care of automatically, usually at the price of requiring more it. As a result, processing large data sets with these tools becomes increasingly difficult on work station class computers.One alternative to using these high level processing tools is the development of new algorithms in a languages like C++, that gives the developer full control over how memory is handled, but the resulting workflow for the prototyping of new algorithms is rather time intensive, and also not appropriate for a researcher with little or no knowledge in software development.Another alternative is in using command line tools that run image processing tasks, use the hard disk to store intermediate results, and provide automation by using shell scripts. Although not as convenient as, e.g. visual programming, this approach is still accessable to researchers without a background in computer science. However, only few tools exist that provide this kind of processing interface, they are usually quite task specific, and don't provide an clear approach when one wants to shape a new command line tool from a prototype shell script. The proposed framework, MIA, provides a combination of command line tools, plug-ins, and libraries that make it possible to run image processing tasks interactively in a command shell and to prototype by

  20. Intensity-Based Skeletonization of CryoEM Gray-Scale Images Using a True Segmentation-Free Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Kamal Al; Liu, Chunmei; Rwebangira, Mugizi; Burge, Legand; He, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy is an experimental technique that is able to produce 3D gray-scale images of protein molecules. In contrast to other experimental techniques, cryo-electron microscopy is capable of visualizing large molecular complexes such as viruses and ribosomes. At medium resolution, the positions of the atoms are not visible and the process cannot proceed. The medium-resolution images produced by cryo-electron microscopy are used to derive the atomic structure of the proteins in de novo modeling. The skeletons of the 3D gray-scale images are used to interpret important information that is helpful in de novo modeling. Unfortunately, not all features of the image can be captured using a single segmentation. In this paper, we present a segmentation-free approach to extract the gray-scale curve-like skeletons. The approach relies on a novel representation of the 3D image, where the image is modeled as a graph and a set of volume trees. A test containing 36 synthesized maps and one authentic map shows that our approach can improve the performance of the two tested tools used in de novo modeling. The improvements were 62 and 13 percent for Gorgon and DP-TOSS, respectively. PMID:24384713

  1. Arthrofibrosis associated with total knee arthroplasty: gray-scale and power Doppler sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Jens G; Munzinger, Urs K; Zanetti, Marco; Hodler, Juerg

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine gray-scale and power Doppler sonographic findings in patients with arthrofibrosis associated with total knee arthroplasty. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. From a consecutive cohort of more than 3000 mobilebearing total knee arthroplasties, 44 cases (1.5%) with arthrofibrosis were identified, of which 38 were recruited for a clinical and sonographic investigation. A control group of 38 patients with a well-functioning total knee arthroplasty was matched. Synovial hypertrophy, presence of neovascularity, patellar tendon thickness, and extent of effusion were assessed. Synovial membrane thickness was significantly (p < 0.001) increased in the arthrofibrosis group (medial, 3.4 mm; lateral, 3.0 mm; suprapatellar, 3.1 mm) when compared with the control group (medial, 2.0 mm; lateral, 2.0 mm; suprapatellar, 1.9 mm). When a cutoff of 3.0 mm was used, sonography had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 82% for detecting arthrofibrosis. Neovascularity (rated as grades 0-3) of the synovial membrane and Hoffa's fat pad was significantly (p

  2. Aging and large-scale functional networks: white matter integrity, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity in the resting state.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, L; Williams, M; Rich, A; Savage, G; Burianová, H

    2015-04-02

    Healthy aging is accompanied by neurobiological changes that affect the brain's functional organization and the individual's cognitive abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of global age-related differences in the cortical white and gray matter on neural activity in three key large-scale networks. We used functional-structural covariance network analysis to assess resting state activity in the default mode network (DMN), the fronto-parietal network (FPN), and the salience network (SN) of young and older adults. We further related this functional activity to measures of cortical thickness and volume derived from structural MRI, as well as to measures of white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], and radial diffusivity [RD]) derived from diffusion-weighted imaging. First, our results show that, in the direct comparison of resting state activity, young but not older adults reliably engage the SN and FPN in addition to the DMN, suggesting that older adults recruit these networks less consistently. Second, our results demonstrate that age-related decline in white matter integrity and gray matter volume is associated with activity in prefrontal nodes of the SN and FPN, possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms. We suggest that age-related differences in gray and white matter properties differentially affect the ability of the brain to engage and coordinate large-scale functional networks that are central to efficient cognitive functioning. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasonography of ovarian masses using a pattern recognition approach

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Il

    2015-01-01

    As a primary imaging modality, ultrasonography (US) can provide diagnostic information for evaluating ovarian masses. Using a pattern recognition approach through gray-scale transvaginal US, ovarian masses can be diagnosed with high specificity and sensitivity. Doppler US may allow ovarian masses to be diagnosed as benign or malignant with even greater confidence. In order to differentiate benign and malignant ovarian masses, it is necessary to categorize ovarian masses into unilocular cyst, unilocular solid cyst, multilocular cyst, multilocular solid cyst, and solid tumor, and then to detect typical US features that demonstrate malignancy based on pattern recognition approach. PMID:25797108

  4. Ultrasonography of ovarian masses using a pattern recognition approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Il

    2015-07-01

    As a primary imaging modality, ultrasonography (US) can provide diagnostic information for evaluating ovarian masses. Using a pattern recognition approach through gray-scale transvaginal US, ovarian masses can be diagnosed with high specificity and sensitivity. Doppler US may allow ovarian masses to be diagnosed as benign or malignant with even greater confidence. In order to differentiate benign and malignant ovarian masses, it is necessary to categorize ovarian masses into unilocular cyst, unilocular solid cyst, multilocular cyst, multilocular solid cyst, and solid tumor, and then to detect typical US features that demonstrate malignancy based on pattern recognition approach.

  5. Technique for gray-scale visual light and infrared image fusion based on non-subsampled shearlet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weiwei

    2014-03-01

    A novel image fusion technique based on NSST (non-subsampled shearlet transform) is presented, aiming at resolving the fusion problem of spatially gray-scale visual light and infrared images. NSST, as a new member of MGA (multi-scale geometric analysis) tools, possesses not only flexible direction features and optimal shift-invariance, but much better fusion performance and lower computational costs compared with several current popular MGA tools such as NSCT (non-subsampled contourlet transform). We specifically propose new rules for the fusion of low and high frequency sub-band coefficients of source images in the second step of the NSST-based image fusion algorithm. First, the source images are decomposed into different scales and directions using NSST. Then, the model of region average energy (RAE) is proposed and adopted to fuse the low frequency sub-band coefficients of the gray-scale visual light and infrared images. Third, the model of local directional contrast (LDC) is given and utilized to fuse the corresponding high frequency sub-band coefficients. Finally, the final fused image is obtained by using inverse NSST to all fused sub-images. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed technique, several current popular ones are compared over three different publicly available image sets using four evaluation metrics, and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique performs better in both subjective and objective qualities.

  6. Pediatric ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two leading experts explore the benefits and limitations of pediatric ultrasonography, explaining the latest techniques for optimal imaging of specific body regions: the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, extremities, and soft tissues. Numerous illustrations emphasize significant points and combine with the text to show specifically what to look for when imaging children.

  7. Aneurysms of the portal venous system. Gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasonographic findings with CT and MRI correlation.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, K C; Fitoz, S; Akyar, G; Aytaç, S; Erden, I

    1998-01-01

    Two cases of incidentally detected aneurysms involving the portal venous system are described with emphasis on gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasonographic (US) findings. Appearing on US as anechoic masses showing direct luminal continuity with the right portal vein and superior mesenteric vein, the lesions displayed spectral findings characteristic of portal venous system on color Doppler US. Dynamic helical computed tomography (CT) demonstrated simultaneous enhancement with the portal system, while the aneurysms were hypointense owing to flow void on T1-weighted spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) images.

  8. Robust Texture Analysis Using Multi-Resolution Gray-Scale Invariant Features for Breast Sonographic Tumor Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Min-Chun Yang; Woo Kyung Moon; Wang, Yu-Chiang Frank; Min Sun Bae; Chiun-Sheng Huang; Jeon-Hor Chen; Ruey-Feng Chang

    2013-12-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems in gray-scale breast ultrasound images have the potential to reduce unnecessary biopsy of breast masses. The purpose of our study is to develop a robust CAD system based on the texture analysis. First, gray-scale invariant features are extracted from ultrasound images via multi-resolution ranklet transform. Thus, one can apply linear support vector machines (SVMs) on the resulting gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)-based texture features for discriminating the benign and malignant masses. To verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed texture analysis, breast ultrasound images obtained from three different platforms are evaluated based on cross-platform training/testing and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) schemes. We compare our proposed features with those extracted by wavelet transform in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The AUC values derived from the area under the curve for the three databases via ranklet transform are 0.918 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.848 to 0.961), 0.943 (95% CI, 0.906 to 0.968), and 0.934 (95% CI, 0.883 to 0.961), respectively, while those via wavelet transform are 0.847 (95% CI, 0.762 to 0.910), 0.922 (95% CI, 0.878 to 0.958), and 0.867 (95% CI, 0.798 to 0.914), respectively. Experiments with cross-platform training/testing scheme between each database reveal that the diagnostic performance of our texture analysis using ranklet transform is less sensitive to the sonographic ultrasound platforms. Also, we adopt several co-occurrence statistics in terms of quantization levels and orientations (i.e., descriptor settings) for computing the co-occurrence matrices with 0.632+ bootstrap estimators to verify the use of the proposed texture analysis. These experiments suggest that the texture analysis using multi-resolution gray-scale invariant features via ranklet transform is useful for designing a robust CAD system.

  9. Content-based image retrieval using scale invariant feature transform and gray level co-occurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Prashant; Khare, Manish; Khare, Ashish

    2017-06-01

    The rapid growth of different types of images has posed a great challenge to the scientific fraternity. As the images are increasing everyday, it is becoming a challenging task to organize the images for efficient and easy access. The field of image retrieval attempts to solve this problem through various techniques. This paper proposes a novel technique of image retrieval by combining Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and Co-occurrence matrix. For construction of feature vector, SIFT descriptors of gray scale images are computed and normalized using z-score normalization followed by construction of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) of normalized SIFT keypoints. The constructed feature vector is matched with those of images in database to retrieve visually similar images. The proposed method is tested on Corel-1K dataset and the performance is measured in terms of precision and recall. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms some of the other state-of-the-art methods.

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of Vascularity Using 2-D Power Doppler Ultrasonography May Not Identify Malignancy of the Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Roh, Yun Ho; Kwak, Jin Young

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a quantitative vascular index in predicting thyroid malignancy. A total of 1309 thyroid nodules in 1257 patients (mean age: 50.2 y, range: 18-83 y) were included. The vascularity pattern and vascular index (VI) measured by quantification software for each nodule were obtained from 2-D power Doppler ultrasonography (US). Gray-scale US + vascularity pattern was compared with gray-scale US + VI with respect to diagnostic performance. Of the 1309 thyroid nodules, 927 (70.8%) were benign and 382 (29.2%) were malignant. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (Az) for gray-scale US (0.82) was significantly higher than that for US combined with vascularity pattern (0.77) or VI (0.70, all p < 0.001). Quantified VIs were higher in benign nodules, but did not improve the performance of 2-D US in diagnosing thyroid malignancy.

  11. A comparison of methods to evaluate gray scale response of tomosynthesis systems using a software breast phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Schiabel, Homero; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to be an effective imaging tool for breast cancer diagnosis as it provides three-dimensional images of the breast with minimal tissue overlap. The quality of the reconstructed image depends on many factors that can be assessed using uniform or realistic phantoms. In this paper, we created four models of phantoms using an anthropomorphic software breast phantom and compared four methods to evaluate the gray scale response in terms of the contrast, noise and detectability of adipose and glandular tissues binarized according to phantom ground truth. For each method, circular regions of interest (ROIs) were selected with various sizes, quantity and positions inside a square area in the phantom. We also estimated the percent density of the simulated breast and the capability of distinguishing both tissues by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results shows a sensitivity of the methods to the ROI size, placement and to the slices considered.

  12. Modified Sigmoid Function Based Gray Scale Image Contrast Enhancement Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Harish Kumar; Pal, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of an image enhancement is to improve eminence by maximizing the information content in the test image. Conventional contrast enhancement techniques either often fails to produce reasonable results for a broad variety of low-contrast and high contrast images, or cannot be automatically applied to different images, because they are parameters dependent. Hence this paper introduces a novel hybrid image enhancement approach by taking both the local and global information of an image. In the present work, sigmoid function is being modified on the basis of contrast of the images. The gray image enhancement problem is treated as nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints and solved by particle swarm optimization. The entropy and edge information is included in the objective function as quality measure of an image. The effectiveness of modified sigmoid function based enhancement over conventional methods namely linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization are better revealed by the enhanced images and further validated by statistical analysis of these images.

  13. Hürthle cell neoplasm: correlation of gray-scale and power Doppler sonographic findings with gross pathology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Kwon; Rho, Byung Hak; Woo, Seong-Ku

    2010-05-01

    To describe gray-scale and power Doppler (PD) sonographic (US) findings of Hürthle cell neoplasms (HCNs) of the thyroid gland, and to determine if there is any correlation between US and gross pathologic features. This retrospective study included 30 pathologically proven HCNs in 30 subjects who underwent preoperative gray-scale and PD US examinations. The size, shape, margin, echogenicity, echotexture, presence or absence of cystic change, calcifications and halo sign, and vascularity at PD US were evaluated. The longest diameter of HCNs ranged from 12 mm to 63 mm. The shape and margins of the mass were ovoid and smooth, respectively, in all cases. The echogenicity was hypoechoic, isoechoic, hyperechoic, or mixed in 43.3%, 33.3%, 10.0%, and 13.3%, respectively. The echotexture was heterogeneous in 73.3% and homogeneous in 26.7%. Cystic change was present in 56.7% and involved less than 25% of the volume of the mass in 50.0% and 26-50% of the volume in 6.7%. Coarse calcifications were present in 20.0%. Halo sign was present in all cases. The vascularity was combined peri- and intranodular in all cases: predominantly intranodular in 50.0%, predominantly perinodular in 46.7%, and of the "inferno" type in 3.3%. All HCNs were encapsulated on gross pathologic examination. Although many of the US features we observed were nonspecific, HCNs tend to have a halo sign and combined peri- and intranodular vascularity on US, which raises the possibility of an association. The US halo sign corresponds to tumor capsule ongross pathologic examination.

  14. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-Scale Glycemic Variability: A Link to Gray Matter Atrophy and Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xingran; Abduljalil, Amir; Manor, Brad D.; Peng, Chung-Kang; Novak, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerates brain aging and cognitive decline. Complex interactions between hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and brain aging remain unresolved. This study investigated the relationship between glycemic variability at multiple time scales, brain volumes and cognition in type 2 DM. Research Design and Methods Forty-three older adults with and 26 without type 2 DM completed 72-hour continuous glucose monitoring, cognitive tests and anatomical MRI. We described a new analysis of continuous glucose monitoring, termed Multi-Scale glycemic variability (Multi-Scale GV), to examine glycemic variability at multiple time scales. Specifically, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition was used to identify five unique ultradian glycemic variability cycles (GVC1–5) that modulate serum glucose with periods ranging from 0.5–12 hrs. Results Type 2 DM subjects demonstrated greater variability in GVC3–5 (period 2.0–12 hrs) than controls (P<0.0001), during the day as well as during the night. Multi-Scale GV was related to conventional markers of glycemic variability (e.g. standard deviation and mean glycemic excursions), but demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity to conventional markers, and was associated with worse long-term glycemic control (e.g. fasting glucose and HbA1c). Across all subjects, those with greater glycemic variability within higher frequency cycles (GVC1–3; 0.5–2.0 hrs) had less gray matter within the limbic system and temporo-parietal lobes (e.g. cingulum, insular, hippocampus), and exhibited worse cognitive performance. Specifically within those with type 2 DM, greater glycemic variability in GVC2–3 was associated with worse learning and memory scores. Greater variability in GVC5 was associated with longer DM duration and more depression. These relationships were independent of HbA1c and hypoglycemic episodes. Conclusions Type 2 DM is associated with dysregulation of glycemic variability over multiple

  16. Comparison between a new computer program and the reference software for gray-scale median analysis of atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Casella, Ivan Benaduce; Fukushima, Rodrigo Bono; Marques, Anita Battistini de Azevedo; Cury, Marcus Vinícius Martins; Presti, Calógero

    2015-03-01

    To compare a new dedicated software program and Adobe Photoshop for gray-scale median (GSM) analysis of B-mode images of carotid plaques. A series of 42 carotid plaques generating ≥50% diameter stenosis was evaluated by a single observer. The best segment for visualization of internal carotid artery plaque was identified on a single longitudinal view and images were recorded in JPEG format. Plaque analysis was performed by both programs. After normalization of image intensity (blood = 0, adventitial layer = 190), histograms were obtained after manual delineation of plaque. Results were compared with nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test and Kendall tau-b correlation analysis. GSM ranged from 00 to 100 with Adobe Photoshop and from 00 to 96 with IMTPC, with a high grade of similarity between image pairs, and a highly significant correlation (R = 0.94, p < .0001). IMTPC software appears suitable for the GSM analysis of carotid plaques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The role of elastosonography, gray-scale and colour flow Doppler sonography in prediction of malignancy in thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Idil Gunes; Kurt, Aydin; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Doğan, Mehmet; Hekimoglu, Baki; Hucumenoglu, Sema

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound is as a noninvasive method commonly used in the work-up of thyroid nodules. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of sonographic and elastosonographic parameters in the discrimination of malignancy. Patients and methods. 150 thyroid nodules were evaluated by gray-scale, Doppler and elastosonography. The cytological analysis revealed that 141 nodules were benign and 9 were malignant. Results Orientation of the nodule was the only sonographic parameter associated with malignancy (p = 0.003). In the strain ratio analysis the best cut-off point was 1.935 to discriminate malignancy (p = 0.000), with 100% sensitivity, 76% specificity, 100% negative predictive value, 78.5% positive predictive value and 78% accuracy rate. There was a statistically significant correlation between the elasticity score and malignancy (p = 0.001). Most of the benign nodules had score 2 and 3, none of them displayed score 5. On the other hand, none of the malignant nodules had score 1 and 2, most of them displaying score 5. Conclusions A change in the diagnostic algorithm of the thyroid nodules should be considered integrating the elastosonographic analysis. PMID:25435847

  18. Neurilemmoma of the glans penis: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dae Chul; Hwang, Sung Il; Jung, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2006-01-01

    Neurilemmoma of the glans penis is rare, and no imaging findings have been reported. A case of neurilemmoma of the glans penis is presented. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined small mass in the glans penis. The mass appeared hypoechoic on gray-scale US and hypervascular on color Doppler US. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensity of the mass on a T2-weighted image and strong enhancement on a contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image.

  19. A 1500-year record of climatic and environmental change in Elk Lake, Minnesota I: Varve thickness and gray-scale density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.; Anderson, R.; Platt, Bradbury J.; Anderson, D.

    2002-01-01

    The deepest part (29.5 m) of Elk Lake, Clearwater County, northwestern Minnesota, contains a complete Holocene section that is continuously varved. The varve components are predominantly autochthonous (CaCO3, organic matter, biogenic silica, and several iron and manganese minerals), but the varves do contain a minor detrital-clastic (aluminosilicate) component that is predominantly wind-borne (eolian) and provides an important record of atmospheric conditions. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and wavelet analysis of varve thickness recognized significant periodicities in the multicentennial and multidecadal bands that varied in power (i.e., variable significance) and position (i.e., variable period) within the periodic bands. Persistent periodicities of about 10, 22, 40, and 90 years, and, in particular, multicentennial periodicities in varve thickness and other proxy variables are similar to those in spectra of radiocarbon production, a proxy for past solar activity. This suggests that there may be a solar control, perhaps through geomagnetic effects on atmospheric circulation. Multicentennial and multidecadal periodicities also occur in wavelet spectra of relative gray-scale density. However, gray-scale density does not appear to correlate with any of the measured proxy variables, and at this point we do not know what controlled gray scale.

  20. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  1. Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.

    2008-01-01

    Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and

  2. Correlation between computerised findings and Newman's scaling on vascularity using power Doppler ultrasonography imaging and its predictive value in patients with plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Ho, H M; Ying, M; Fu, S N

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to correlate findings on small vessel vascularity between computerised findings and Newman's scaling using power Doppler ultrasonography (PDU) imaging and its predictive value in patients with plantar fasciitis. Methods PDU was performed on 44 patients (age range 30–66 years; mean age 48 years) with plantar fasciitis and 46 healthy subjects (age range 18–61 years; mean age 36 years). The vascularity was quantified using ultrasound images by a customised software program and graded by Newman's grading scale. Vascular index (VI) was calculated from the software program as the ratio of the number of colour pixels to the total number of pixels within a standardised selected area of proximal plantar fascia. The 46 healthy subjects were examined on 2 occasions 7–10 days apart, and 18 of them were assessed by 2 examiners. Statistical analyses were performed using intraclass correlation coefficient and linear regression analysis. Results Good correlation was found between the averaged VI ratios and Newman's qualitative scale (ρ = 0.70; p<0.001). Intratester and intertester reliability were 0.89 and 0.61, respectively. Furthermore, higher VI was correlated with less reduction in pain after physiotherapeutic intervention. Conclusions The computerised VI not only has a high level of concordance with the Newman grading scale but is also reliable in reflecting the vascularity of proximal plantar fascia, and can predict pain reduction after intervention. This index can be used to characterise the changes in vascularity of patients with plantar fasciitis, and it may also be helpful for evaluating treatment and monitoring the progress after intervention in future studies. PMID:22167513

  3. Dual lookup table algorithm: an enhanced method of displaying 16-bit gray-scale images on 8-bit RGB graphic systems.

    PubMed

    Gillespy, T; Rowberg, A H

    1994-02-01

    Most digital radiologic images have an extended contrast range of 9 to 13 bits, and are stored in memory and disk as 16-bit integers. Consequently, it is difficult to view such images on computers with 8-bit red-green-blue (RGB) graphic systems. Two approaches have traditionally been used: (1) perform a one-time conversion of the 16-bit image data to 8-bit gray-scale data, and then adjust the brightness and contrast of the image by manipulating the color palette (palette animation); and (2) use a software lookup table to interactively convert the 16-bit image data to 8-bit gray-scale values with different window width and window level parameters. The first method can adjust image appearance in real time, but some image features may not be visible because of the lack of access to the full contrast range of the image and any region of interest measurements may be inaccurate. The second method allows "windowing" and "leveling" through the full contrast range of the image, but there is a delay after each adjustment that some users may find objectionable. We describe a method that combines palette animation and the software lookup table conversion method that optimizes the changes in image contrast and brightness on computers with standard 8-bit RGB graphic hardware--the dual lookup table algorithm. This algorithm links changes in the window/level control to changes in image contrast and brightness via palette animation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. A new scoring model for characterization of adnexal masses based on two-dimensional gray-scale and colour Doppler sonographic features

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, A.M.; Zahran, K.M.; Nasr, A.; Kamel, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the most discriminating two-dimensional gray-scale and colour Doppler sonographic features that allow differentiation between malignant and benign adnexal masses, and to develop a scoring model that would enable more accurate diagnosis with those features. Methods: A cross sectional prospective study was conducted on patients scheduled for surgery due to presence of adnexal masses at Woman’s Health Center, Assiut University, Egypt between October 2012 and October 2013. All patients were evaluated by 2D ultrasound for morphological features of the masses combined with colour Doppler examination of their vessels. The final diagnosis, based on histopathological analysis, was used as a gold standard. Results: One hundred forty-six patients were recruited, 104 with benign masses, 42 with malignant masses. Features that allowed statistically significant discrimination of benignity from malignancy were; volume of mass, type of mass, presence and thickness of septae, presence and length of papillary projections, location of vessels at colour Doppler and colour score. A scoring model was formulated combining these features together; Assiut Scoring Model (ASM). The cut-off level with the highest accuracy in detection of malignancy, was ≥6, had a sensitivity of 93.5% and specificity of 92.2%. Conclusion: Our Scoring Model; a multiparameter scoring using four gray-scale ultrasound and two colour Doppler features, had shown a high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of malignancy in adnexal masses compared with previous scoring systems. PMID:25009729

  5. Infrared image gray adaptive adjusting enhancement algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zi-long; Liu, Yong; Chen, Ruo-wang

    2016-11-01

    In view of the histogram equalizing algorithm to enhance image in digital image processing, an Infrared Image Gray adaptive adjusting Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gray Redundancy Histogram-dealing Technique is proposed. The algorithm is based on the determination of the entire image gray value, enhanced or lowered the image's overall gray value by increasing appropriate gray points, and then use gray-level redundancy HE method to compress the gray-scale of the image. The algorithm can enhance image detail information. Through MATLAB simulation, this paper compares the algorithm with the histogram equalization method and the algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique , and verifies the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  6. Ultrasonography in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Whitson, Micah R; Mayo, Paul H

    2016-08-15

    Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) is a useful imaging technique for the emergency medicine (EM) physician. Because of its growing use in EM, this article will summarize the historical development, the scope of practice, and some evidence supporting the current applications of POCUS in the adult emergency department. Bedside ultrasonography in the emergency department shares clinical applications with critical care ultrasonography, including goal-directed echocardiography, echocardiography during cardiac arrest, thoracic ultrasonography, evaluation for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, screening abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonography in trauma, and guidance of procedures with ultrasonography. Some applications of POCUS unique to the emergency department include abdominal ultrasonography of the right upper quadrant and appendix, obstetric, testicular, soft tissue/musculoskeletal, and ocular ultrasonography. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of EM over the past two decades, and it is an important skill which positively influences patient outcomes.

  7. Mask-free construction of three-dimensional silicon structures by dry etching assisted gray-scale femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Qing; Yu, Lei; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2017-02-01

    A mask-free micro/nano fabrication method is proposed for constructing arbitrary gradient height structures on silicon, combining gray-scale femtosecond laser direct writing (GS-FsLDW) with subsequent dry etching. Arbitrary two-dimensional patterns with a gradient concentration of oxygen atoms can be fabricated on the surface of undoped silicon wafer by FsLDW in air. After dry etching, various three-dimensional (3D) gradient height silicon structures are fabricated by controlling the laser power, scanning step, etching time, and etching power. As an example, a well-defined 3D Fresnel zone plate was fabricated on silicon wafer, which shows excellent focusing and imaging properties. The combination of high precision from dry etching and 3D fabrication ability on non-planar substrates of FsLDW, may broaden its applications in microelectronics, micro-optics, and microelectromechanical systems.

  8. Ultrasound analysis of gray-scale median value of carotid plaques is a useful reference index for cerebro-cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ariyoshi, Kyoko; Okuya, Shigeru; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Matsunaga, Kimie; Nagao, Yuko; Nomiyama, Ryuta; Takeda, Komei; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Measurements of plaque echogenicity, the gray-scale median (GSM), were shown to correlate inversely with risk factors for cerebro-cardiovascular disease (CVD). The eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/arachidonic acid (AA) ratio is a potential predictor of CVD risk. In the present study, we assessed the usefulness of carotid plaque GSM values and EPA/AA ratios in atherosclerotic diabetics. Materials and Methods A total of 84 type 2 diabetics with carotid artery plaques were enrolled. On admission, platelet aggregation and lipid profiles, including EPA and AA, were examined. Using ultrasound, mean intima media thickness and plaque score were measured in carotid arteries. Plaque echogenicity was evaluated using computer-assisted quantification of GSM. The patients were then further observed for approximately 3 years. Results Gray-scale median was found to be a good marker of CVD events. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, GSM <32 and plaque score ≥5 were significantly associated with past history and onset of CVD during the follow-up period, the odds ratios being 7.730 (P = 0.014) and 4.601 (P = 0.046), respectively. EPA/AA showed a significant correlation with GSM (P = 0.012) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.039), and an inverse correlation with platelet aggregation (P = 0.046) and triglyceride (P = 0.020). Although most patients with CVD had both low GSM and low EPA/AA values, an association of EPA/AA with CVD events could not be statistically confirmed. Conclusions The present results suggest the GSM value to be useful as a reference index for CVD events in high-risk atherosclerotic diabetics. Associations of the EPA/AA ratio with known CVD risk factors warrant a larger and more extensive study to show the usefulness of this parameter. PMID:25621138

  9. Ultrasound analysis of gray-scale median value of carotid plaques is a useful reference index for cerebro-cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Kyoko; Okuya, Shigeru; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Matsunaga, Kimie; Nagao, Yuko; Nomiyama, Ryuta; Takeda, Komei; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of plaque echogenicity, the gray-scale median (GSM), were shown to correlate inversely with risk factors for cerebro-cardiovascular disease (CVD). The eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/arachidonic acid (AA) ratio is a potential predictor of CVD risk. In the present study, we assessed the usefulness of carotid plaque GSM values and EPA/AA ratios in atherosclerotic diabetics. A total of 84 type 2 diabetics with carotid artery plaques were enrolled. On admission, platelet aggregation and lipid profiles, including EPA and AA, were examined. Using ultrasound, mean intima media thickness and plaque score were measured in carotid arteries. Plaque echogenicity was evaluated using computer-assisted quantification of GSM. The patients were then further observed for approximately 3 years. Gray-scale median was found to be a good marker of CVD events. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, GSM <32 and plaque score ≥5 were significantly associated with past history and onset of CVD during the follow-up period, the odds ratios being 7.730 (P = 0.014) and 4.601 (P = 0.046), respectively. EPA/AA showed a significant correlation with GSM (P = 0.012) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.039), and an inverse correlation with platelet aggregation (P = 0.046) and triglyceride (P = 0.020). Although most patients with CVD had both low GSM and low EPA/AA values, an association of EPA/AA with CVD events could not be statistically confirmed. The present results suggest the GSM value to be useful as a reference index for CVD events in high-risk atherosclerotic diabetics. Associations of the EPA/AA ratio with known CVD risk factors warrant a larger and more extensive study to show the usefulness of this parameter.

  10. Assessment of age- and sex-related changes in baggy lower eyelids using a novel objective image analysis method: Orbital gray scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Seong-Jin; Kim, Hyung Su; Park, Jung Tae; Kim, Bo Ri; Youn, Sang Woong

    2017-09-26

    Baggy lower eyelids (BLEs) are a common aesthetic problem of aging. Valid and reliable assessment tools for BLEs are required to evaluate the current status and treatment outcome. Age- and sex-related changes in BLEs were assessed with the orbital gray scale (OGS), a novel objective image analysis method. We gathered frontal-view photographs of the faces of the patients who sought for correction of BLEs. Based on the clinical pattern, we classified the BLEs of the subjects into medial (M), medial and central (MC), and medial to lateral (MCL) types. Severity was evaluated using the OGS, a modified method of the linear gray scale analysis. The BLEs of 1034 subjects were classified. The most common types were MCL type in the men and MC type in the women, respectively. The M and MC types were common in the young subjects, whereas the MCL type was more common in the old subjects (P < .001). The measurements of OGS in 104 subjects showed positive correlation with age, a higher mean value in the men, and a trend toward higher values in the order of M, MC, and MCL types (P < .001 for central and lateral OGS scores). In a multiple linear regression analysis, central and lateral OGS values were significantly related with age, sex, and M-C-L classification type (P < .001). The M-C-L classification and OGS were significantly associated with both age and sex, proving that they could be potent objective assessment tools for BLEs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ultrasonography in ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Dastevska-Djosevska, Emilija

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, simple and effective diagnostic method which enables visualization and evaluation of intraocular injury degree in cloudy eye media. The basic aim of this investigation was to find out the frequency of various types of ocular injuries using ultrasonography and to make an analysis of their frequency in relation to gender and age. This retrospective study included 182 patients hospitalized at the Clinic of Ophthalmology in Skopje due to mechanical eye trauma. The patients underwent ultrasonography on the Alcon Ultrascan Imagining System apparatus and Sonomed EZ Scan AB 5500+. B scan technique was used primarily, while the A scan had a positive and correlative role. Ocular trauma was more present in males (85.2%) compared to females (14.8%). 49.5% of the patients had open, and 50.5% had closed globe injuries. The most represented age group in ocular injuries was the age ranged from 51 to 60 years. There was no significant difference between the type of mechanical injury and the age (Chi-Squares=5.52 p=0.47895025). Ultrasonography showed that the most frequent pathologic result, both in open and closed globe injuries, was vitreous hemorrhage. Ultrasonography has an irreplaceable role in the clinical evaluation and management of ocular trauma. It showed that the most frequent finding in ocular trauma was vitreous haemorrhage, and the male gender was more frequently exposed to ocular trauma.

  12. Forum on Alternate Assessment and "Gray Area" Assessment: A Report on the Pre-Conference Session at the National Conference on Large Scale Assessment (Snowbird, Utah, June 11-12, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Outcomes, Minneapolis, MN.

    This report discusses the outcomes of a June 11-12, 1999, forum that addressed alternative assessments and gray areas in large-scale assessments for students with disabilities. The forum included 161 representatives from 42 state departments of education, 3 large school districts, 1 territory, and the Department of Defense Dependent Schools. Five…

  13. The gray area: exploring attitudes toward infidelity and the development of the Perceptions of Dating Infidelity Scale.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karen; Mattingly, Brent A; Clark, Eddie M; Weidler, Daniel J; Bequette, Amanda W

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has distinguished between emotional versus sexual infidelity. Two studies examined the development of the Perceptions of Dating Infidelity Scale (PDIS) to assess attitudes toward specific behaviors that constitute these types of infidelity in romantic relationships. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated three factors to the scale: Ambiguous, Deceptive, and Explicit behaviors. In both studies, there were gender differences on ratings of the behaviors. The construct validity of the scale was assessed with measures of sociosexual orientation, guilt, and coping with unwanted sexual situations. It was found that the Ambiguous behaviors were positively correlated with avoidance of unwanted sexual situations, while the Deceptive and Explicit scales were positively correlated with guilt and avoidance and negatively associated with an unrestricted sociosexual orientation and acting on attractions toward friends.

  14. Penile Doppler ultrasonography revisited.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon; Lee, Joo Yong

    2017-06-10

    Penile Doppler ultrasonography is a high-performing, noninvasive or minimally-invasive imaging modality that allows the depiction of the normal anatomy and macroscopic pathologic changes in real time. Moreover, functional changes in penile blood flow, as seen in erectile dysfunction (ED), can be analyzed using color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS). This review article describes the normal sonographic anatomy of the penis, the sonographic technique for evaluating ED, the normal phases of erection, and the various causes of ED. Additionally, we describe the interpretation of different parameters and findings on penile CDUS for the diagnosis and classification of ED, priapism, and Peyronie disease.

  15. Vascular complications after adult living donor liver transplantation: Evaluation with ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been widely used to treat end-stage liver disease with improvement in surgical technology and the application of new immunosuppressants. Vascular complications after liver transplantation remain a major threat to the survival of recipients. LDLT recipients are more likely to develop vascular complications because of their complex vascular reconstruction and the slender vessels. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for the survival of graft and recipients. As a non-invasive, cost-effective and non-radioactive method with bedside availability, conventional gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography play important roles in identifying vascular complications in the early postoperative period and during the follow-up. Recently, with the detailed vascular tracing and perfusion visualization, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has significantly improved the diagnosis of postoperative vascular complications. This review focuses on the role of conventional gray-scale ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and CEUS for early diagnosis of vascular complications after adult LDLT. PMID:26819527

  16. Proliferation of prenatal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    You, John J.; Alter, David A.; Stukel, Therese A.; McDonald, Sarah D.; Laupacis, Andreas; Liu, Ying; Ray, Joel G.

    2010-01-01

    Background The extent to which temporal increases in the use of prenatal ultrasonography reflect changes in maternal risk is unknown. In this population-based study, we examined the use of prenatal ultrasonography from 1996 to 2006 in Ontario. Methods With fiscal year 1996/97 as the baseline, we evaluated the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the change in rates of ultrasonography for each subsequent year. The RR was adjusted for maternal age, income, rural residence, maternal comorbidities, receipt of genetics consultation or amniocentesis — all in the index pregnancy — and history of complications in a prior pregnancy. Results The study sample consisted of 1 399 389 singleton deliveries. The rate of prenatal ultrasonography increased from 2055 per 1000 pregnancies in 1996 to 3264 per 1000 in 2006 (adjusted RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.54–1.55). The rate increased among both women with low-risk pregnancies (adjusted RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.53–1.55) and those with high-risk pregnancies (adjusted RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.54–1.57). The proportion of pregnancies with at least four ultrasound examinations in the second or third trimesters rose from 6.4% in 1996 to 18.7% in 2006 (adjusted RR 2.68, 95% CI 2.61–2.74). Paradoxically, this increase was more pronounced among low-risk pregnancies (adjusted RR 2.92, 95% CI 2.83–3.01) than among high-risk pregnancies (adjusted RR 2.25, 95% CI 2.16–2.35). Interpretation Substantial increases in the use of prenatal ultrasonography over the past decade do not appear to reflect changes in maternal risk. Nearly one in five women now undergo four or more ultrasound examinations during the second and third trimesters. Efforts to promote more appropriate use of prenatal ultrasonography for singleton pregnancies appear warranted. PMID:20048009

  17. Ultrasonography of intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Nowitzki, Kristina M; Hoimes, Matthew L; Chen, Byron; Zheng, Larry Z; Kim, Young H

    2015-07-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is gaining popularity as a reversible form of contraception. Ultrasonography serves as first-line imaging for the evaluation of IUD position in patients with pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding, or absent retrieval strings. This review highlights the imaging of both properly positioned and malpositioned IUDs. The problems associated with malpositioned IUDs include expulsion, displacement, embedment, and perforation. Management considerations depend on the severity of the malposition and the presence or absence of symptoms. Three-dimensional ultrasonography has proven to be more sensitive in the evaluation of more subtle findings of malposition, particularly side-arm embedment. Familiarity with the ultrasonographic features of properly positioned and malpositioned IUDs is essential.

  18. Ultrasonography of intrauterine devices

    PubMed Central

    Nowitzki, Kristina M.; Hoimes, Matthew L.; Chen, Byron; Zheng, Larry Z.; Kim, Young H.

    2015-01-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is gaining popularity as a reversible form of contraception. Ultrasonography serves as first-line imaging for the evaluation of IUD position in patients with pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding, or absent retrieval strings. This review highlights the imaging of both properly positioned and malpositioned IUDs. The problems associated with malpositioned IUDs include expulsion, displacement, embedment, and perforation. Management considerations depend on the severity of the malposition and the presence or absence of symptoms. Three-dimensional ultrasonography has proven to be more sensitive in the evaluation of more subtle findings of malposition, particularly side-arm embedment. Familiarity with the ultrasonographic features of properly positioned and malpositioned IUDs is essential. PMID:25985959

  19. [Diagnosing pneumothorax with ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Lasarte Izcue, A; Navasa Melado, J M; Blanco Rodríguez, G; Fidalgo González, I; Parra Blanco, J A

    2014-01-01

    The ultrasonographic diagnosis of pneumothorax is based on the analysis of artifacts. It is possible to confirm or rule out pneumothorax by combining the following signs: lung sliding, the A and B lines, and the lung point. One fundamental advantage of lung ultrasonography is its easy access in any critical situation, especially in patients in the intensive care unit. For this reason, chest ultrasonography can be used as an alternative to plain-film X-rays and computed tomography in critical patients and in patients with normal plain films in whom pneumothorax is strongly suspected, as well as to evaluate the extent of the pneumothorax and monitor its evolution. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. [Carotid ultrasonography: evaluation of carotid ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Ryosui

    2007-02-01

    Carotid ultrasonography is a laboratory procedure showing how arteriosclerosis screening can diagnose carotid artery occlusion and high-grade stenosis. It is useful for inspection in general practice because of its non-invasiveness, development of sonography equipment, laboratory methods and the establishment of an evaluation method. We generally use a linear array probe of around 7-8MHz for carotid observation and combine the B mode method, color and power Doppler method, and pulsed Doppler method for inspection. At vessel analysis, the intima-media thickness, the property of plaque and stenotic ratio are evaluated. We observe the direction of bloodstream and presence of stricture by Doppler color flow imaging and measure flow velocity and the wave pattern by pulsed Doppler method and, with the B mode method, evaluate the extent or degree of stricture. This can be depicted well using a convex array probe and sector array probe when the mental change caused by disease is deep, and depiction is difficult by linear array probe.

  1. How reliable are gray matter disruptions in specific reading disability across multiple countries and languages? Insights from a large-scale voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Altarelli, Irene; Monzalvo Lopez, Ana Karla; van Ermingen-Marbach, Muna; Grande, Marion; Grabowska, Anna; Heim, Stefan; Ramus, Franck

    2015-05-01

    The neural basis of specific reading disability (SRD) remains only partly understood. A dozen studies have used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate gray matter volume (GMV) differences between SRD and control children, however, recent meta-analyses suggest that few regions are consistent across studies. We used data collected across three countries (France, Poland, and Germany) with the aim of both increasing sample size (236 SRD and controls) to obtain a clearer picture of group differences, and of further assessing the consistency of the findings across languages. VBM analysis reveals a significant group difference in a single cluster in the left thalamus. Furthermore, we observe correlations between reading accuracy and GMV in the left supramarginal gyrus and in the left cerebellum, in controls only. Most strikingly, we fail to replicate all the group differences in GMV reported in previous studies, despite the superior statistical power. The main limitation of this study is the heterogeneity of the sample drawn from different countries (i.e., speaking languages with varying orthographic transparencies) and selected based on different assessment batteries. Nevertheless, analyses within each country support the conclusions of the cross-linguistic analysis. Explanations for the discrepancy between the present and previous studies may include: (1) the limited suitability of VBM to reveal the subtle brain disruptions underlying SRD; (2) insufficient correction for multiple statistical tests and flexibility in data analysis, and (3) publication bias in favor of positive results. Thus the study echoes widespread concerns about the risk of false-positive results inherent to small-scale VBM studies.

  2. Gray marketing of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, P E; Walsh, M G

    1995-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketers in the European Union are constrained by regulated prices, opening up opportunities for gray marketers. The authors investigate the legal framework that regulates gray markets by summarizing and analyzing relevant European Court of Justice decisions that favor gray marketers and actually foster parallel trade. Before marketing managers can develop effective strategies in this marketplace, they must first understand the precedents of the legal system in which they will be operating.

  3. Reliability of assessment of upper trapezius morphology, its mechanical properties and blood flow in female patients with myofascial pain syndrome using ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Adigozali, Hakimeh; Shadmehr, Azadeh; Ebrahimi, Esmail; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Naderi, Farrokh

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the intra-rater reliability of upper trapezius morphology, its mechanical properties and intramuscular blood circulation in females with myofascial pain syndrome were assessed using ultrasonography. A total of 37 patients (31.05 ± 10 years old) participated in this study. Ultrasonography producer was set up in three stages: a) Gray-scale: to measure muscle thickness, size and area of trigger points; b) Ultrasound elastography: to measure muscle stiffness; and c) Doppler imaging: to assess blood flow indices. According to data analysis, all variables, except End Diastolic Velocity (EDV), had excellent reliability (>0.806). Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for EDV was 0.738, which was considered a poor to good reliability. The results of this study introduced a reliable method for developing details of upper trapezius features using muscular ultrasonography in female patients. These variables could be used for objective examination and provide guidelines for treatment plans in clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Complications of endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Cennamo, V; Ferrara, F; Pellicano, R; Polifemo, A M; Tarantino, I; Barresi, L; Morace, C; Consolo, P; D'Imperio, N

    2011-06-01

    Since its development in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has undergone a great deal of technological modifications. EUS has become an important tool in the evaluation of patients with various clinical disorders and is increasingly being utilized in many centers. EUS has been evolving over the years; EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) for cytological and/or histological diagnosis has become standard practice and a wide array of interventional and therapeutic procedures are performed under EUS guidance for diseases which otherwise would have needed surgery, with its associated morbidities. EUS shares the risks and complications of other endoscopic procedures. This article addresses the specific adverse effects and risks associated with EUS, EUS-FNA and interventional EUS, namely perforation, bleeding, pancreatitis and infection. Measures to help minimizing these risks will also be discussed.

  5. Henry Gray, plagiarist.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    The first edition of Anatomy Descriptive and Surgical (1858) was greeted with accolades, but also provoked serious controversy concerning Henry Gray's failure to acknowledge the work of earlier anatomists. A review in the Medical Times (1859) accused Gray of intellectual theft. The journal took the unusual step of substantiating its indictment by publishing twenty parallel texts from Gray and from a pre-existing textbook, Quain's Anatomy. At the recent "Vesalius Continuum" conference in Zakynthos, Greece (2014) Professor Brion Benninger disputed the theft by announcing from the floor the results of a computer analysis of both texts, which he reported exonerated Gray by revealing no evidence of plagiarism. The analysis has not been forthcoming, however, despite requests. Here the historian of Gray's Anatomy supplements the argument set out in the Medical Times 150 years ago with data suggesting unwelcome personality traits in Henry Gray, and demonstrating the utility of others' work to his professional advancement. Fair dealing in the world of anatomy and indeed the genuineness of the lustre of medical fame are important matters, but whether quantitative evidence has anything to add to the discussion concerning Gray's probity can be assessed only if Benninger makes public his computer analysis.

  6. [Tridimensional (3D) endoscopic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, M J; Muñoz Agel, F; Abad Belando, R

    2007-01-01

    A review and update on 3D endoscopic ultrasonography is included regarding all of this technique s aspects, technical details, and current indications. Images from our own clinical experience are presented.

  7. Color Doppler ultrasonography: diagnosis of ectopic thyroid gland in patients with congenital hypothyroidism caused by thyroid dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hisashi; Sato, Hirokazu; Noda, Hiromasa; Inomata, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Nozomu

    2003-11-01

    The etiology of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may play an important role in determining disease severity, outcome, and, therefore, its treatment schedule. Radionuclide imaging (RI) is currently the most precise diagnostic technique to establish the etiology of CH. Conventional ultrasound can identify an athyrotic condition at the normal neck position and has gained acceptance for the initial evaluation of CH; however, its ability in delineating ectopic thyroid is limited. We used color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) to assess blood flow and morphology in the detection of ectopic thyroid in 11 CH patients disclosed by neonatal screening; thyroid glands were undetectable at the normal location by gray-scale ultrasonography (GSU). The patients studied consisted of two infants for initial investigation and nine children for reevaluating the cause of CH. All of the patients underwent GSU, CDU, RI, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation. We set RI as the defining diagnostic test for detecting ectopic thyroid and compared the imaging of CDU with those of GSU and MRI. The results of RI showed 10 ectopic thyroids and one athyreosis. In the patients with ectopic thyroid, the sensitivity of CDU, GSU, and MRI for detecting ectopic thyroid was 90, 70, and 70%, respectively. We conclude that CDU is superior to GSU and MRI for detecting ectopic thyroid and that CDU may be adopted as the diagnostic tool for the initial investigation of suspected CH.

  8. Standards for scrotal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Tyloch, Janusz F.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a description of essential equipment requirements for scrotal ultrasonography, including current ultrasound techniques, as well as a review of the most common scrotal pathologies. Patient preparation for the examination as well as ultrasound methodology for the assessment of scrotal and inguinal canal structures are discussed. The standard for scrotal ultrasound examination includes a precise B-mode evaluation, including testicular volumetric assessment performed using automatic measurement options based on the formula of a rotating ellipsoid or three measurements perpendicular to one another. Also, criteria for morphological assessment of abnormalities within testicular or epididymal parenchyma, including a precise evaluation of lesion size, delineation, shape and vascular pattern obtained with Doppler US, have been proposed. Standard assessment further includes epididymal evaluation, including epididymal size in the case of enlargement. The paper additionally discusses the method of ultrasonographic examination and describes the most common pathologies occurring within scrotal structures, including a quantitative analysis of hydrocele and other abnormal fluid reservoirs. We have also presented criteria for the assessment of varicocele as well as color and spectral Doppler flows in scrotal pathologies. Furthermore, we have proposed key components of scrotal ultrasound documentation, so that the contained data could be used to establish appropriate diagnosis, allowing for both adequate clinical management and the reproducibility of subsequent US evaluations performed by either the same or a different examiner. The most common causes of diagnostic errors have also been discussed. PMID:28138410

  9. Ultrasonography of the hip.

    PubMed

    Nestorova, Rodina; Vlad, Violeta; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Porta, Francesco; Radunovic, Goran; Micu, Mihaela C; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2012-09-01

    A complete physical examination of the hip is often difficult due to its size and deep position. During the last two decades, ultrasonography (US) of the hip has been widely accepted as a useful diagnostic tool in patients with hip pain and /or limited range of motion. It is commonly used in both adults and children. This technique allows evaluation of different anatomical structures and their pathological changes, such as joint recess (joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy), changes within the bursae (bursitis), tendons and muscles (tendinopathy, ruptures, calcifications), as well as changes in the bony profile of the joint surfaces, ischial tuberosity, and greater trochanter (erosions, osteophytes, calcific deposits). US is very useful for guided procedures in hip joint and periarticular soft tissues under direct visualization. The needle aspiration of synovial fluid and steroid injections are commonly-applied activities in daily rheumatology practice. The relatively limited acoustic windows available to the US beam are the principal limitations to hip US. Therefore, conducting a detailed examination of some important structures together with the interpretation of Doppler signal (sometimes undetectable) is not easy, requiring good knowledge of the modality. The aim of this review is to analyze the current literature about US of the hip and to describe the most frequently-observed normal and pathological findings.

  10. Intraoperative endovascular ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eton, Darwin; Ahn, Samuel S.; Baker, J. D.; Pensabene, Joseph; Yeatman, Lawrence S.; Moore, Wesley S.

    1991-05-01

    The early experience using intra-operative endovascular ultrasonography (EU) is reported in eight patients undergoing lower extremity revasularization. In four patients, intra-operative EU successfully characterized inflow stenoses that were inadequately imaged with pre- operative arteriography. Two patients were found to have hemodynamically significant inflow stenoses, and were treated with intra-operative balloon angioplasty followed by repeat EU. The other two patients were found to have non-hemodynamically significant inflow stenoses requiring no treatment. Additional outflow procedures were required in all four patients. In the remaining four patients, EU was used to evaluate the completeness of TEC rotary atherectomy, of Hall oscillatory endarterectomy, of thrombectomy of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries, and of valve lysis during in situ saphenous vein grafting, respectively. In the latter case, the valve leaflets were not clearly seen. In the other cases, EU assisted the surgeon. Angioscopy and angiography were available for comparison. In one case, angioscopy failed because of inability to clear the field while inspecting retrograde the limb of an aorto-bi-femoral graft. EU however was possible. No complications of EU occurred. EU is a safe procedure indicated when characterization of a lesion is needed prior to an intervention or when evaluation of the intervention's success is desired. We did not find it useful in valve lysis for in-site grafting.

  11. Emergency medicine ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Michael Y.; Nussbaum, Chris; Lee, A. Curtis

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To survey program directors of family medicine–emergency medicine (CCFP[EM]) training programs regarding current and future emergency medicine ultrasonography (EMUS) training. DESIGN A Web-based survey using a modified Dillman method. Two academic emergency physicians reviewed the validity and reliability of the survey. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS Program directors of all 17 Canadian CCFP(EM) residency training programs in 2006. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Characteristics of EMUS training currently offered and program directors’ perceptions of needs for future EMUS training. RESULTS The survey, performed in 2006, had a response rate of 100% (17/17), although not all respondents answered all questions. At the time of the study, 82.4% of respondents’ programs used EMUS. Although all program directors recommended that residents attend introductory EMUS courses, only 71.4% (10/14) of programs offered such courses; 60.0% (9/15) of those were mandatory. In one-third of the programs, more than 75% of the attending staff used EMUS. A total of 76.5% of program directors thought that introductory courses in EMUS should be mandatory; 62.5% (10/16) believed that residents were able to acquire sufficient experience to use EMUS independently to make practice decisions before completion of their residency; and 88.2% believed that EMUS should be a part of the scope of practice for emergency medicine physicians. Only 58.8% believed that there should be questions about EMUS on the CCFP(EM) Certification examination. Open responses indicated that funding, resources, and standardization were issues that needed to be addressed. CONCLUSION Formal EMUS training for CCFP(EM) programs is being introduced in Canada. Quality assurance needs to be strengthened. Most program directors thought that an introductory course in EMUS should be mandatory. Fewer directors, however, believed EMUS should be on the CCFP(EM) Certification examination until further funding, resources

  12. Gray Areas of Assessment Systems. Synthesis Report 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Patricia; Quenemoen, Rachel; Olsen, Kenneth; Thurlow, Martha

    This paper discusses students with disabilities who do not fit into large-scale traditional assessment systems, seeks to clarify what is meant by "gray areas of assessment," delineates the primary issues that surround and contribute to gray areas, and provides suggestions for developing fully inclusive systems. It provides brief case studies of…

  13. [Chest ultrasonography in pleurapulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gallego Gómez, M P; García Benedito, P; Pereira Boo, D; Sánchez Pérez, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial diagnosis and follow-up of pleuropulmonary disease are normally done with plain chest films and the gold standard for chest disease is computed tomography, diverse studies have established the usefulness of chest ultrasonography in the diagnosis of different pleuropulmonary diseases like pleural effusion and lung consolidation, among others. In this article, we show the different ultrasonographic patterns for pleuropulmonary disease. The availability of ultrasonography in different areas (ICU, recovery areas) makes this technique especially important for critical patients because it obviates the need to transfer the patient. Moreover, ultrasonography is noninvasive and easy to repeat. On the other hand, it enables the direct visualization of pleuropulmonary disease that is necessary for interventional procedures. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Shades of Gray.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, John C.; Calibeo, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A university's financing choices cover many shades of gray. Some off-balance-sheet financing uses no debt capacity, while others represent or imply full financial commitment. Many others fall in between. The choices made by a number of institutions in financing facility expansions or improvements are discussed, and the Moody's Investors Service…

  15. The Graying Professoriat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    "The graying of the professoriat," a catchphrase that refers to the increase in the number of full-time faculty working beyond the traditional retirement age of 65, is sparking concern in colleges and universities. The trend is affecting four- and two-year schools and raising questions about the teaching effectiveness, productivity, and vitality…

  16. UNCF Gray's Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role of William H. Gray, president and chief executive officer of The College Fund/United Negro College Fund (UNCF) in negotiating the Gates Millennium Scholarships Program, a $1 billion grant from William H. Gates to fund scholarships for minority college and graduate students in science, engineering, math, and education. The UNCF…

  17. [Kidney obstruction: potential use of ultrasonography and Doppler color ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, M; Perrone, R; Rimondini, A

    2000-12-01

    Ultrasonography is the first imaging approach in evaluation of patients with urinary obstruction. Presence of hydronephrosis, urinomas and inflammatory complications can be assessed. Moreover, the level and the cause of obstruction are often identified. The major limits of ultrasonography are poor visibility of the lumbar portion of the urinary tract and lack of specificity in detection of pyelocaliectasis. These limits are partially overcome with Doppler studies. Several factors can bias diagnostic accuracy of colour Doppler ultrasonography in evaluating renal obstruction; in particular, partial or intermittent obstruction cause minimum hemodynamic changes in patients with renal colic. Sensitivity of colour Doppler ultrasonography to detect obstruction decreases following medical treatment with NSAID and increases following hydration and diuretics administration. Diuretic ultrasound, colour Doppler evaluation of ureteral jets and evaluation of the twinkling artefact of stones are useful imaging techniques as well. Tissue harmonic imaging is a new imaging technique available in most latest generation US equipments. Evaluation of the kidney and of the urinary tract improves using this technique due to artefact reduction and increased contrast resolution.

  18. Electrochemical conversion of micropollutants in gray water.

    PubMed

    Butkovskyi, Andrii; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W; Hernandez Leal, Lucia; van der Zande, Ton; Rijnaarts, Huub; Zeeman, Grietje

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical conversion of micropollutants in real gray water effluent was studied for the first time. Six compounds that are frequently found in personal care and household products, namely methylparaben, propylparaben, bisphenol A, triclosan, galaxolide, and 4- methylbenzilidene camphor (4-MBC), were analyzed in the effluent of the aerobic gray water treatment system in full operation. The effluent was used for lab-scale experiments with an electrochemical cell operated in batch mode. Three different anodes and five different cathodes have been tested. Among the anodes, Ru/Ir mixed metal oxide showed the best performance. Ag and Pt cathodes worked slightly better than Ti and mixed metal oxide cathodes. The compounds that contain a phenolic ring (parabens, bisphenol A, and triclosan) were completely transformed on this anode at a specific electric charge Q = 0.03 Ah/L. The compounds, which contain a benzene ring and multiple side methyl methyl groups (galaxolide, 4-MBC) required high energy input (Q ≤ 0.6 Ah/L) for transformation. Concentrations of adsorbable organohalogens (AOX) in the gray water effluent increased significantly upon treatment for all electrode combinations tested. Oxidation of gray water on mixed metal oxide anodes could not be recommended as a post-treatment step for gray water treatment according to the results of this study. Possible solutions to overcome disadvantages revealed within this study are proposed.

  19. Gray Matter Changes in Demyelinating Disease: Correlations with Clinical Scores.

    PubMed

    Onu, Mihaela; Aroceanu, Adina; Ferastraoaru, Victor; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2015-09-01

    Recent MR studies have shown that, in multiple sclerosis, selective regional, but not global gray matter atrophy occurs in multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to identify specific areas of gray matter volume changes and explore the relationship between atrophy and clinical motor outcomes. Nine patients with relapsing remitting MS and 9 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR acquisitions, a GE- Genesis- Signa, 1.5T MR system, was used. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM), subcortical structures segmentation (FIRST) and volumetric (SIENAx) FSL tools were used in the study. Group comparison showed atrophy for several gray matter regions. The most important volume reductions were found for subcortical deep gray matter areas. Correlations with clinical scores were checked and specific gray matter areas showed significant volume reductions associated with motor scores (9-hole peg time and 25-feet walk time) and EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale). We performed a voxelwise analysis of gray matter changes in MS and found a more prominent atrophy for the subcortical structures than for cortical gray matter. Using an additional analysis (FIRST and SIENAx segmentation/volumetry) we were able to confirm the VBM results and to quantify the degree of atrophy in specific structures. Specific gray matter regions which volume reductions correlate with 25-feet walk, 9-hole peg times and EDSS suggest that 25-feet walk time is the best predictor of disease progression in terms of gray matter reduction.

  20. Why Does Hair Turn Gray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Why Does Hair Turn Gray? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does Hair Turn Gray? Print A A A en español ¿ ... ever watched someone try to cover up gray hair by dyeing it? Or maybe you wonder why ...

  1. Why Does Hair Turn Gray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Does Hair Turn Gray? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does Hair Turn Gray? A A A en español ¿Por ... ever watched someone try to cover up gray hair by dyeing it? Or maybe you wonder why ...

  2. Comment on "An improved gray Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating fluid flow in multi-scale porous media": Intrinsic links between LBE Brinkman schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2016-02-01

    In this Comment on the recent work (Zhu and Ma, 2013) [11] by Zhu and Ma (ZM) we first show that all three local gray Lattice Boltzmann (GLB) schemes in the form (Zhu and Ma, 2013) [11]: GS (Chen and Zhu, 2008; Gao and Sharma, 1994) [1,4], WBS (Walsh et al., 2009) [12] and ZM, fail to get constant Darcy's velocity in series of porous blocks. This inconsistency is because of their incorrect definition of the macroscopic velocity in the presence of the heterogeneous momentum exchange, while the original WBS model (Walsh et al., 2009) [12] does this properly. We improve the GS and ZM schemes for this and other related deficiencies. Second, we show that the ;discontinuous velocity; they recover on the stratified interfaces with their WBS scheme is inherent, in different degrees, to all LBE Brinkman schemes, including ZM scheme. None of them guarantees the stress and the velocity continuity by their implicit interface conditions, even in the frame of the two-relaxation-times (TRT) collision operator where these two properties are assured in stratified Stokes flow, Ginzburg (2007) [5]. Third, the GLB schemes are presented in work (Zhu and Ma, 2013) [11] as the alternative ones to direct, Brinkman-force based (BF) schemes (Freed, 1998; Nie and Martys, 2007) [3,8]. Yet, we show that the BF-TRT scheme (Ginzburg, 2008) [6] gets the solutions of any of the improved GLB schemes for specific, viscosity-dependent choice of its one or two local relaxation rates. This provides the principal difference between the GLB and BF: while the BF may respect the linearity of the Stokes-Brinkman equation rigorously, the GLB-TRT cannot, unless it reduces to the BF via the inverse transform of the relaxation rates. Furthermore, we show that, in limited parameter space, ;gray; schemes may run one another. From the practical point of view, permeability values obtained with the GLB are viscosity-dependent, unlike with the BF. Finally, the GLB shares with the BF a so-called anisotropy (Ginzburg

  3. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Gray squirrel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  4. 4-Dimensionally Guided 3-Dimensional Color-Doppler Ultrasonography Quantifies Carotid Artery Stenosis With High Reproducibility and Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Macharzina, Roland Richard; Kocher, Sascha; Messé, Steven R; Rutkowski, Thomas; Hoffmann, Fabian; Vogt, Matthias; Vach, Werner; Fan, Nian; Rastan, Aljoscha; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Zeller, Thomas

    2017-07-13

    The purpose was to analyze the agreement and binary accuracy of the degree of internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS) as determined by 4-dimensionally (4D) real-time gray-scale guided 3-dimensional (3D) color-Doppler ultrasonography (3DC-US) (4D/3DC-US) compared with catheter angiography (CA) and duplex ultrasonography (DUS). This study hypothesized that 4D/3DC-US is noninferior to CA and DUS in grading ICAS in selected patients. Clinical stratification in patients with ICAS largely depends on a patient's symptomatic status and the degree of stenosis. Screening with 4D/3DC-US was prospectively performed in 93 study patients (with 122 ICASs), thus yielding 80 patients for analysis (with 103 ICASs) after excluding patients with insufficient image quality, previous revascularization, and contraindications to CA. The ultrasound examination (10 MHz) consisted of consensus conform DUS examination and independent real-time 4D-guided gray-scale views for orientation followed by static 3DC-US NASCET (North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial) percent stenosis quantification using off-line multiplanar rendering. Multiplanar selective CA of the same ICASs was quantified with dedicated software in a blinded fashion. Quantitative CA of 103 stenoses with a mean degree of 65 ± 17% was compared with 4D/3DC-US, with a resulting concordance correlation coefficient of 0.89 and a standard deviation of differences (SDD) of 8.1% at a bias of +1.7%. Binary 50% and 70% stenosis detection with 4D/3DC-US revealed a sensitivity of 97% and 87%, respectively, and a specificity of 92% and 84%, respectively. Interobserver SDD for CA of 52 stenoses (7.2%) did not differ from SDD for 4D/3DC-US and CA (p = 0.274). Accuracy of 50% stenosis detection by 4D/3DC-US was tendentially higher compared with DUS (96% vs. 91%). The 4D/3DC-US method provides reliable and accurate stenosis quantification and binary classification with good diagnostic accuracy compared with CA and DUS. Copyright

  5. Adrenal glands transabdominal ultrasonography - pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Chira, Romeo Ioan; Chira, Alexandra; Manzat-Saplacan, Roberta Maria; Nagy, Georgiana; Valea, Ana; Silaghi, Alina Cristina; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Valean, Simona

    2017-05-03

    Adrenal gland ultrasonography is one of the corner stones of the abdominal ultrasonography examination for many medical specialties. The adrenal areas can be easily overlooked though adrenal gland pathology is diverse. We present the normal aspects and various transabdominal ultrasonography findings of the adrenal glands, both common and rare. Even though ultrasound examination is operator and patient dependent, we consider the examination of the adrenal glands very important, due to relatively frequent incidental detection of an adrenal mass.

  6. Endoscopic ultrasonography: equipment and technique.

    PubMed

    Röesch, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    By definition, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) combines endoscopy and high-frequency ultrasound, incorporating a small ultrasonic transducer into the tip of endoscopes. For the upper gastrointestinal tract, mostly oblique-viewing endoscopes are used, although recently, forward viewing instruments have become available. For colorectal EUS, rigid probes for the rectum and a flexible forward-viewing echocolonoscope are available. EUS generates ultrasound either mechanically or electronically, depending on the type of instrument used. The electronic technique potentially allows the incorporation of (color) Doppler ultrasound, which allows for additional processing and postprocessing functions. This generally is considered the EUS technique of the future.

  7. Large-Scale Fusion of Gray Matter and Resting-State Functional MRI Reveals Common and Distinct Biological Markers across the Psychosis Spectrum in the B-SNIP Cohort.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Meda, Shashwath A; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Tamminga, Carol A; Sweeney, John A; Clementz, Brett A; Schretlen, David J; Calhoun, Vince D; Lui, Su; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether aberrant interactions between brain structure and function present similarly or differently across probands with psychotic illnesses [schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SAD), and bipolar I disorder with psychosis (BP)] and whether these deficits are shared with their first-degree non-psychotic relatives. A total of 1199 subjects were assessed, including 220 SZ, 147 SAD, 180 psychotic BP, 150 first-degree relatives of SZ, 126 SAD relatives, 134 BP relatives, and 242 healthy controls (1). All subjects underwent structural MRI (sMRI) and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) scanning. Joint-independent component analysis (jICA) was used to fuse sMRI gray matter and rs-fMRI amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations data to identify the relationship between the two modalities. jICA revealed two significantly fused components. The association between functional brain alteration in a prefrontal-striatal-thalamic-cerebellar network and structural abnormalities in the default mode network was found to be common across psychotic diagnoses and correlated with cognitive function, social function, and schizo-bipolar scale scores. The fused alteration in the temporal lobe was unique to SZ and SAD. The above effects were not seen in any relative group (including those with cluster-A personality). Using a multivariate-fused approach involving two widely used imaging markers, we demonstrate both shared and distinct biological traits across the psychosis spectrum. Furthermore, our results suggest that the above traits are psychosis biomarkers rather than endophenotypes.

  8. Regional gray matter correlates of vocational interests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have identified brain areas related to cognitive abilities and personality, respectively. In this exploratory study, we extend the application of modern neuroimaging techniques to another area of individual differences, vocational interests, and relate the results to an earlier study of cognitive abilities salient for vocations. Findings First, we examined the psychometric relationships between vocational interests and abilities in a large sample. The primary relationships between those domains were between Investigative (scientific) interests and general intelligence and between Realistic (“blue-collar”) interests and spatial ability. Then, using MRI and voxel-based morphometry, we investigated the relationships between regional gray matter volume and vocational interests. Specific clusters of gray matter were found to be correlated with Investigative and Realistic interests. Overlap analyses indicated some common brain areas between the correlates of Investigative interests and general intelligence and between the correlates of Realistic interests and spatial ability. Conclusions Two of six vocational-interest scales show substantial relationships with regional gray matter volume. The overlap between the brain correlates of these scales and cognitive-ability factors suggest there are relationships between individual differences in brain structure and vocations. PMID:22591829

  9. [Application of spatio-temporal image correlation in normal fetal heart ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Tao; Xiong, Yi; Zang, Ling

    2008-02-01

    To explore the clinical application of real-time three-dimensional ultrasonography in the routine scanning of normal fetal heart. A total of 110 volume datasets of normal fetal hearts in the second trimester were acquired by spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC). An off-line analysis of acquired volume datasets was performed to examine each segment of fetal heart with tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) and dynamic multi-planar mode (MP). The re-slice images of four-chamber view, ventricular outflow tract views, and the three vessels plane were viewed with TUI. The quality of images obtained from TUI was compared with the conventional 2D imaging mode. The volume datasets were displayed interactively with MP as a series of three-orthogonal planes. The dynamic loops of one cardiac cycle were preformed by navigating the pivot point and rotational axis and shifting each re-slice image plane inside the volume datasets. Satisfactory gray-scale volume acquisitions were accomplished in 110 cases. The average STIC scanning time of fetal heart was (55 +/- 15) s. An offline analysis showed that four standard planes of 2D routine screening for fetal hearts were easily obtained by TUI. The quality of the images derived from volume datasets were comparable to that directly obtained from 2D echocardiography. The visualization rate had no significant difference between TUI and routine 2D screening (P > 0.05). In MP mode, 39 cases with the starting plan of apical four-chamber view were obtained. Each segment of fetal heart was almost visualized off line, both in a frozen state and with heart in motion to fulfill sequential segmental analysis in fetal cardiac anatomy. The 72% - 100% main features of atria, ventricles, aorta, and the junction segments were viewed with MP by adjusting the three dimensional volume datasets, whose quality and contents met the expectations of off-line segmental analysis of normal fetal heart. A sagittal section of ventricular septum was obtained in

  10. Gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Barkovich, A J; Kuzniecky, R I

    2000-12-12

    Gray matter heterotopia are common malformations of cortical development. From a clinical perspective, affected patients are best divided into three groups: subependymal, subcortical, and band heterotopia (also called double cortex). Symptomatic women with subependymal heterotopia typically present with partial epilepsy during the second decade of life; development and neurologic examinations up to that point are typically normal. Symptoms in men with subependymal heterotopia vary, depending on whether they have the X-linked or autosomal form. Men with the X-linked form more commonly have associated CNS and visceral anomalies; their development is typically abnormal. Symptomatic men with the autosomal variety have clinical courses similar to symptomatic women. Both men and women with subcortical heterotopia typically have congenital fixed neurologic deficits and develop partial epilepsy during the second half of the first decade of life. The more extensive the subcortical heterotopia, the greater the deficit; bilateral heterotopia are almost invariably associated with severe developmental delay or mental retardation. In general, band heterotopia are seen exclusively in women; men with a mutation of the related gene (called XLIS or DCX) usually die in utero or have a much more severe brain anomaly. Symptoms in affected women vary from normal to severe developmental delay or mental retardation; the severity of the syndrome is related to the thickness of the band of arrested neurons. Nearly all affected patients that come to medical attention have epilepsy, with partial complex and atypical absence epilepsy being the most common syndromes. Some of the more severely affected patients develop attacks.

  11. [The role of intraoperative ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yoko; Okayama, Yukinari; Matsuo, Shuji

    2008-06-01

    Intraoperative ultrasonography (US) is able to visualize the inside of the viscera in real time, and is also both noninvasive and simple to perform without influence of the bone or alimentary canal gas disturbing the propagation of the ultrasound. US has recently been widely used for neurosurgery or abdominal surgery, 1) to check the position and size of the tumor, which can not be directly visualized, and to evaluate the relationship between the tumor and blood vessel or tissue, 2) to search for lesions not detected before surgery, 3) to search for residual tumor, 4) to carry out ultrasound-guided biopsy or puncture. For effective intraoperative US, thorough knowledge of the US instrument and the local anatomy is necessary. The medical technologists who routinely perform US are qualified to assist with intraoperative US.

  12. [Carotid duplex ultrasonography for neurosurgeons].

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Oka, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2011-12-01

    Carotid duplex ultrasonography (CDU) is one of the most well-known imaging methods for arteriosclerosis and ischemic stroke. For neurosurgeons, it is very important for the details of carotid plaque to be thoroughly investigated by CDU. Symptomatic carotid plaque is very fragile and easily changes morphologically, and so requires frequent CDU examination. Furthermore, after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS), restenosis is evaluated with CDU. CDU facilitates not only morphological imaging in the B mode, but also allows a flow study with color Doppler and duplex imaging. So, CDU can help assess the presence of proximal and intracranial artery lesions in spite of only having a cervical view, and the patency of the extracranial artery to intracranial artery bypass is revealed with CDU, which shows a rich velocity and low pulsatility index (PI) in duplex imaging. For the examiner, it is necessary to ponder on what duplex imaging means in examinations, and to summarize all imaging finding.

  13. Assessment of total placenta previa by magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography to detect placenta accreta and its variants.

    PubMed

    Peker, Nuri; Turan, Volkan; Ergenoglu, Mete; Yeniel, Ozgur; Sever, Ahmet; Kazandi, Mert; Zekioglu, Osman

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the importance of ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting placental adherence defects. Patients diagnozed with total placenta previa (n = 40) in whom hysterectomy was performed due to placental adherence defects (n = 20) or in whom the placenta detached spontaneously after a Cesarean delivery (n = 20) were included into the study between June 2008 and January 2011, at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Ege University (lzmir Turkey). Gray-scale US was used to check for any placental lacunae, sub-placental sonolucent spaces or a placental mass invading the vesicouterine plane and bladder Intra-placental lacunar turbulent blood flow and an increase in vascularization in the vesicouterine plane were evaluated with color Doppler mode. Subsequently all patients had MRI and the results were compared with the histopathologic examinations. The sensitivity of MRI for diagnosis of placental adherence defects before the operation was 95%, with a specificity of 95%. In the presence of at least one diagnostic criterion, the sensitivity and specificity of US were 87.5% and 100% respectively, while the sensitivity of color Doppler US was 62.5% with a specificity of 100%. Currently MRI appears to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of placenta accreta. None of the ultrasonographic criteria is solely sufficient to diagnose placental adherence defects, however they assist in the diagnostic process.

  14. Ultrasonography is useful to detect subclinical synovitis in SLE patients without musculoskeletal involvement before symptoms appear.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ho-Sung; Kim, Ki-Jo; Baek, In-Woon; Park, Yune-Jung; Kim, Wan-Uk; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon; Cho, Chul-Soo

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the frequency of the subclinical synovitis in hand or wrist joints of the SLE patients using ultrasonography (US) and to correlate them with clinical parameters. Forty-eight systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients without musculoskeletal (MS) involvement were enrolled and underwent clinical and laboratory examinations. Gray-scale and power Doppler (PD) US was performed for imaging the wrist, second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, and flexor tendons on non-dominant sides of the individuals. US synovitis index (USSI) and PD index were calculated as sum of the synovitis and PD semiquantitative scores, respectively, obtained from each joint. Subclinical synovitis was found by US in 28 (58.3%) out of 48 patients. US revealed synovitis of the wrist in 16 (33.3%) patients, of the second MCP joint in 14 (29.2%) and of the third MCP joint in 15 (31.3%). PD signals in three (6.3%) patients and tenosynovitis in two (4.2%) were also detected. USSI scores showed significant positive correlation with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels (r = 0.30, p < 0.05) or anti-dsDNA Ab titers (r = 0.34, p < 0.05). Within 6 months after US examination, new MS symptoms were developed in 11 (22.9%) patients. Older age at diagnosis (OR 1.283, 95% CI 1.029-1.601, p = 0.027) or higher USSI scores (OR 12.93, 95% CI 1.023-163.503, p = 0.048) were independently associated with development of new MS symptoms. Subclinical synovitis is common in SLE patients who do not suffer from MS symptoms. US is useful to detect joint abnormalities before symptoms appear in SLE patients.

  15. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guihua; Zou, Dazhong; Cai, Haiyun; Liu, Yajun

    2016-06-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a type of autoimmune thyroid disease with an increasing prevalence in past decades. Its diagnosisis mostly based on ultrasonography. Ultrasonography is a useful and essential tool to make this diagnosis based on the characteristics of the disease. In the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy is an effective method to distinguish Hashimoto's thyroiditis from other thyroid disorders. One exciting and recent advance is that non-invasive ultrasound-based methods have supplemented fine-needle aspiration to diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis under more complex conditions. In this review, we discuss the recent advantages of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  16. Structural gray and white matter changes in patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Küper, Michael; Rabe, K; Esser, S; Gizewski, E R; Husstedt, I W; Maschke, M; Obermann, M

    2011-06-01

    In this cross-sectional study we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based voxel based morphometry (VBM) in a sample of HIV positive patients to detect structural gray and white matter changes. Forty-eight HIV positive subjects with (n = 28) or without (n = 20) cognitive deficits (mean age 48.5 ± 9.6 years) and 48 age- and sex-matched HIV negative controls underwent MRI for VBM analyses. Clinical testing in HIV patients included the HIV dementia scale (HDS), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the grooved pegboard test. Comparing controls with HIV positive patients with cognitive dysfunction (n = 28) VBM showed gray matter decrease in the anterior cingulate and temporal cortices along with white matter reduction in the midbrain region. These changes were more prominent with increasing cognitive decline, when assigning HIV patients to three cognitive groups (not impaired, mildly impaired, overtly impaired) based on performance in the HIV dementia scale. Regression analysis including all HIV positive patients with available data revealed that prefrontal gray matter atrophy in HIV was associated with longer disease duration (n = 48), while motor dysfunction (n = 48) was associated with basal ganglia gray matter atrophy. Lower CD4 cell count (n = 47) correlated with decrease of occipital gray matter. Our results provide evidence for atrophy of nigro-striatal and fronto-striatal circuits in HIV. This pattern of atrophy is consistent with motor dysfunction and dysexecutive syndrome found in HIV patients with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

  17. Structural gray matter change early in male patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfang; Li, Hongjun; Gao, Quansheng; Yuan, Da; Zhao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize brain gray matter volumetric changes in HIV seropositive without neurocognitive impairment and seronegative men in Asia. We investigate 36 males with HIV seropositive (mean age 34.5±9.1 years) and 33 age- and gender-matched seronegative controls (mean age 31.4±7.6 years) in Asia. The cognitive competence of 36 males with HIV seropositive has no impaired based on performance in the international HIV dementia scale. High-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is performed on a 3.0 T MR system using a standard 32-channel birdcage head coil. Voxel-based morphometry is used to derive volumetric measurements at the level of the individual voxel (p < 0.001, none corrected for multiple comparisons). Compared to the control group, HIV seropositive male lower gray matter volumes are found in left inferior frontal gyrus triangular part and orbital part, left superior temporal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus and ant cingulum; significant increases gray matter volumes can be seen in Periaqueductal gray and gray around lateral ventricle. HIV infection can change the gray matter volume early without cognitive competence impaired and MR can recognize that changes.

  18. Gray scale x-ray mask

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela

    2006-03-07

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

  19. Role of Ultrasonography in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Oo, Win Min; Bo, Myat Thae

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound has become popular among rheumatologists as the first-choice imaging investigation for the evaluation and monitoring of osteoarthritis (OA). Because of recent improvement in technology, ultrasound has the ability to demonstrate and assess the minimal structural abnormalities, which involve the pathophysiology and progression of OA, such as articular cartilage, synovial tissue, bony cortex, and other soft tissue. Nowadays, ultrasonography is a promising technique for assessing soft tissue abnormalities such as joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy, Baker cyst, and other structural changes including the decrease in cartilage thickness, meniscus bulging, and formation of osteophyte. Ultrasonography not only possesses diagnostic potential in knee OA but also reveals long-term predictability for disease progress as imaging biomarker. Ultrasonography has also been proven as a useful tool in guiding therapeutic interventions and monitoring treatment effectiveness. This review addresses the utility, reliability, and potential utilization of ultrasonography as an imaging technique in knee OA.

  20. Sources of error in emergency ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Pinto, Fabio; Faggian, Angela; Rubini, Giuseppe; Caranci, Ferdinando; Macarini, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Brunese, Luca

    2013-07-15

    To evaluate the common sources of diagnostic errors in emergency ultrasonography. The authors performed a Medline search using PubMed (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) for original research and review publications examining the common sources of errors in diagnosis with specific reference to emergency ultrasonography. The search design utilized different association of the following terms : (1) emergency ultrasonography, (2) error, (3) malpractice and (4) medical negligence. This review was restricted to human studies and to English-language literature. Four authors reviewed all the titles and subsequent the abstract of 171 articles that appeared appropriate. Other articles were recognized by reviewing the reference lists of significant papers. Finally, the full text of 48 selected articles was reviewed. Several studies indicate that the etiology of error in emergency ultrasonography is multi-factorial. Common sources of error in emergency ultrasonography are: lack of attention to the clinical history and examination, lack of communication with the patient, lack of knowledge of the technical equipment, use of inappropriate probes, inadequate optimization of the images, failure of perception, lack of knowledge of the possible differential diagnoses, over-estimation of one's own skill, failure to suggest further ultrasound examinations or other imaging techniques. To reduce errors in interpretation of ultrasonographic findings, the sonographer needs to be aware of the limitations of ultrasonography in the emergency setting, and the similarities in the appearances of various physiological and pathological processes. Adequate clinical informations are essential. Diagnostic errors should be considered not as signs of failure, but as learning opportunities.

  1. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habitat.

  2. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  3. Diagnostic performance and reliability of ultrasonography for fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Teefey, Sharlene A; Middleton, William D; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Steger-May, Karen; Kim, H Mike; Wessell, Daniel; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2012-06-20

    Diagnostic evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality is important to determine indications for potential operative repair. Ultrasonography has developed into an accepted and useful tool for evaluating rotator cuff tendon tears; however, its use for evaluating rotator muscle quality has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance and observer reliability of ultrasonography in grading fatty degeneration of the posterior and superior rotator cuff muscles. The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography in eighty patients with shoulder pain. The degree of fatty degeneration on MRI was graded by four independent raters on the basis of the modified Goutallier grading system. Ultrasonographic evaluation of fatty degeneration was performed by one of three radiologists with use of a three-point scale. The two scoring systems were compared to determine the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of MRI grading by the four raters were determined. The interobserver reliability of ultrasonography among the three radiologists was determined in a separate group of thirty study subjects. The weighted Cohen kappa, percentage agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated. The accuracy of ultrasonography for the detection of fatty degeneration, as assessed on the basis of the percentage agreement with MRI, was 92.5% for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 87.5% for the teres minor. The sensitivity was 84.6% for the supraspinatus, 95.6% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The specificity was 96.3% for the supraspinatus, 91.2% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The agreement between MRI and ultrasonography was substantial for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (kappa = 0.78 and 0.71, respectively) and moderate for the teres

  4. Diagnostic Performance and Reliability of Ultrasonography for Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Lindley B.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Steger-May, Karen; Kim, H. Mike; Wessell, Daniel; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality is important to determine indications for potential operative repair. Ultrasonography has developed into an accepted and useful tool for evaluating rotator cuff tendon tears; however, its use for evaluating rotator muscle quality has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance and observer reliability of ultrasonography in grading fatty degeneration of the posterior and superior rotator cuff muscles. Methods: The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography in eighty patients with shoulder pain. The degree of fatty degeneration on MRI was graded by four independent raters on the basis of the modified Goutallier grading system. Ultrasonographic evaluation of fatty degeneration was performed by one of three radiologists with use of a three-point scale. The two scoring systems were compared to determine the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of MRI grading by the four raters were determined. The interobserver reliability of ultrasonography among the three radiologists was determined in a separate group of thirty study subjects. The weighted Cohen kappa, percentage agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated. Results: The accuracy of ultrasonography for the detection of fatty degeneration, as assessed on the basis of the percentage agreement with MRI, was 92.5% for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 87.5% for the teres minor. The sensitivity was 84.6% for the supraspinatus, 95.6% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The specificity was 96.3% for the supraspinatus, 91.2% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The agreement between MRI and ultrasonography was substantial for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (kappa = 0.78 and 0.71, respectively

  5. 19. GRAYS RIVER COVERED BRIDGE PLAN, DATED MAY 26, 1988 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. GRAYS RIVER COVERED BRIDGE PLAN, DATED MAY 26, 1988 (Engineering drawing of rehabilitated structure) - Grays River Covered Bridge, Worrel Road spanning Grays River, Grays River, Wahkiakum County, WA

  6. Ultrasonography of the hand, wrist, and elbow.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Marko; Fullerton, Brad

    2010-08-01

    High-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography of the hand, wrist and elbow has significant potential to improve the quality of diagnosis and care provided by neuromuscular and musculoskeletal specialists. In patients referred for weakness, pain and numbness of the hand, wrist or elbow, diagnostic ultrasonography can be an adjunct to electrodiagnosis and help in identifying ruptured tendons and treating conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome or trigger finger. Use of a small high-frequency (>10-15 MHz) transducer, an instrument with a blunt pointed tip to enhance sonopalpation and a model of the hand, wrist and elbow is advised to enhance visualization of small anatomical structures and complex bony contours. A range of conditions, including tendon and ligament ruptures, trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, intersection syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and osteoarthritis, is described along with detailed ultrasonography-guided injection techniques for carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger.

  7. Ultrasonography in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis: New aspects

    PubMed Central

    Dimcevski, Georg; Erchinger, Friedemann G; Havre, Roald; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2013-01-01

    The course and outcome is poor for most patients with pancreatic diseases. Advances in pancreatic imaging are important in the detection of pancreatic diseases at early stages. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool has made, virtually speaking a technical revolution in medical imaging in the new millennium. It has not only become the preferred method for first line imaging, but also, increasingly to clarify the interpretation of other imaging modalities to obtain efficient clinical decision. We review ultrasonography modalities, focusing on advanced pancreatic imaging and its potential to substantially improve diagnosis of pancreatic diseases at earlier stages. In the first section, we describe scanning techniques and examination protocols. Their consequences for image quality and the ability to obtain complete and detailed visualization of the pancreas are discussed. In the second section we outline ultrasonographic characteristics of pancreatic diseases with emphasis on chronic pancreatitis. Finally, new developments in ultrasonography of the pancreas such as contrast enhanced ultrasound and elastography are enlightened. PMID:24259955

  8. Ultrasonography of the scrotum in adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is the ideal noninvasive imaging modality for evaluation of scrotal abnormalities. It is capable of differentiating the most important etiologies of acute scrotal pain and swelling, including epididymitis and testicular torsion, and is the imaging modality of choice in acute scrotal trauma. In patients presenting with palpable abnormality or scrotal swelling, ultrasonography can detect, locate, and characterize both intratesticular and extratesticular masses and other abnormalities. A 12-17 MHz high frequency linear array transducer provides excellent anatomic detail of the testicles and surrounding structures. In addition, vascular perfusion can be easily assessed using color and spectral Doppler analysis. In most cases of scrotal disease, the combination of clinical history, physical examination, and information obtained with ultrasonography is sufficient for diagnostic decision-making. This review covers the normal scrotal anatomy as well as various testicular and scrotal lesions. PMID:26983766

  9. Comparison between 3-dimensional cranial ultrasonography and conventional 2-dimensional cranial ultrasonography in neonates: impact on reinterpretation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Jin; Choi, Young Hun; Cho, Hyun Hae; Lee, So Mi; Park, Ji Eun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One

    2017-05-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate impact of 3-dimensional cranial ultrasonography (3DUS) on reinterpretation of cranial ultrasonography images in neonates in comparison with 2-dimensional cranial ultrasonography (2DUS). We retrospectively enrolled 50 consecutive young infants who simultaneously underwent both 2DUS and 3DUS scanning from February to March 2015. Two pediatric radiologists independently reviewed both scans for overall image quality on a 5-point scale. Five features were evaluated in both scans: the presence of germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), ventriculomegaly (VM), abnormality of periventricular echogenicity (PVE), and focal parenchymal lesions (FL). The concordance rate between the two scanning modes was calculated. The confidence level for each finding on a 3-point scale and the scanning time were compared between the two scanning modes. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using kappa statistics. Both scans demonstrated similar overall image quality in terms of reinterpretation (range of mean values, 3.81 to 4.02). GMH, IVH, VM, and FL showed perfect concordance, while PVE showed a concordance rate of 91.4% between the two modes by both reviewers. 3DUS was associated with a higher diagnostic confidence in the evaluation of GMH, IVH, and FL than 2DUS (P<0.05) for both reviewers. For PVE, 3DUS received a significantly higher confidence score than 2DUS from one of the reviewers. The mean scanning time for 2DUS and 3DUS was 92.75 seconds and 36 seconds, respectively. Interobserver agreement for qualitative scoring was moderate to substantial. In reinterpretation, 3DUS showed very high concordance with 2DUS and a similar image quality. 3DUS also increased diagnostic confidence for several image findings and significantly decreased scan time.

  10. Ultrasonography of the shoulder with arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Bedi, Asheesh; Morag, Yoav; Jacobson, Jon A

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonography is a well-established and widely accepted modality for the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and injury to the biceps brachii tendon. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging have comparable sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing both full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. This article addresses the ultrasonographic diagnosis of abnormalities of the rotator cuff, rotator interval, and biceps brachii, with magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic correlation. Characteristic ultrasonographic findings as well as imaging pitfalls are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation among body height, intelligence, and brain gray matter volume in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Wu, Kai; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-16

    A significant positive correlation between height and intelligence has been demonstrated in children. Additionally, intelligence has been associated with the volume of gray matter in the brains of children. Based on these correlations, we analyzed the correlation among height, full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) and gray matter volume applying voxel-based morphometry using data from the brain magnetic resonance images of 160 healthy children aged 5-18 years of age. As a result, body height was significantly positively correlated with brain gray matter volume. Additionally, the regional gray matter volume of several regions such as the bilateral prefrontal cortices, temporoparietal region, and cerebellum was significantly positively correlated with body height and that the gray matter volume of several of these regions was also significantly positively correlated with full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) scores after adjusting for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Our results demonstrate that gray and white matter volume may mediate the correlation between body height and intelligence in healthy children. Additionally, the correlations among gray and white matter volume, height, and intelligence may be at least partially explained by the effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormones. Given the importance of the effect of environmental factors, especially nutrition, on height, IQ, and gray matter volume, the present results stress the importance of nutrition during childhood for the healthy maturation of body and brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostic vascular ultrasonography with the help of color Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrasonography and especially of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in the diagnosis of vascular pathologies before and after interventions has significantly increased over the past years due to the broader availability of modern ultrasound systems with CEUS capabilities and more trained user experience in this imaging modality. For the preinterventional and postinterventional work-up of carotid diseases, duplex ultrasound as well as CEUS have been established as the standard-of-care examination procedures for diagnosis, evaluation, and follow-up. In addition to its use for carotid arterial diseases, ultrasonography has also become the primary modality for the screening of vascular pathologies. This review describes the most common pathologies found in ultrasonography of the carotid arteries, the abdominal aorta, and the femoral arteries. PMID:27669962

  13. Use of ultrasonography to make management decisions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transrectal ultrasonography has been available for making management decisions since the mid 1980’s. This technology allows for the real-time visualization of internal structures (i.e. ovary and fetus) that are otherwise difficult to evaluate. The use of this technology in making reproductive manag...

  14. Real-time color B-scan ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Bronson, N R; Pickering, N C

    1975-09-01

    The development and early clinical results of a real-time color B-scan ultrasonoscope are described. This instrument uses color to display detailed echo amplitude information more quantitatively than is possible with gray scale. With real time, dynamic changes are seen during the examination. Conversion of the amplitude information into binary coded decimal code permits separation into ten color steps and also eliminates "blooming" of the cathode ray tube, as seen in black and white. Integrated circuitry is used, providing a portable, relatively inexpensive unit. Early clinical work in ophthalmology is illustrated.

  15. Ability of Ultrasonography in Detection of Different Extremity Bone Fractures; a Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Bozorgi, Farzad; Shayesteh Azar, Massoud; Montazer, Seyed Hossein; Chabra, Aroona; Heidari, Seyed Farshad; Khalilian, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Despite radiography being the gold standard in evaluation of orthopedic injuries, using bedside ultrasonography has several potential supremacies such as avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation, availability in pre-hospital settings, being extensively accessible, and ability to be used on the bedside. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of extremity bone fractures. Methods: This study is a case series study, which was prospectively conducted on multiple blunt trauma patients, who were 18 years old or older, had stable hemodynamic, Glasgow coma scale 15, and signs or symptoms of a possible extremity bone fracture. After initial assessment, ultrasonography of suspected bones was performed by a trained emergency medicine resident and prevalence of true positive and false negative findings were calculated compared to plain radiology. Results: 108 patients with the mean age of 44.6 ± 20.4 years were studied (67.6% male). Analysis was done on 158 sites of fracture, which were confirmed with plain radiography. 91 (57.6%) cases were suspected to have upper extremity fracture(s) and 67 (42.4%) to have lower ones. The most frequent site of injuries were forearm (36.7%) in upper limbs and leg (27.8%) in lower limbs. Prevalence of true positive and false negative cases for fractures detected by ultrasonography were 59 (64.8%) and 32 (35.52%) for upper and 49 (73.1%) and 18 (26.9%) for lower extremities, respectively. In addition, prevalence of true positive and false negative detected cases for intra-articular fractures were 24 (48%) and 26 (52%), respectively. Conclusion The present study shows the moderate sensitivity (68.3%) of ultrasonography in detection of different extremity bone fractures. Ultrasonography showed the best sensitivity in detection of femur (100%) and humerus (76.2%) fractures, respectively. It had low sensitivity in detection of in intra-articular fractures. PMID:28286822

  16. Ability of Ultrasonography in Detection of Different Extremity Bone Fractures; a Case Series Study.

    PubMed

    Bozorgi, Farzad; Shayesteh Azar, Massoud; Montazer, Seyed Hossein; Chabra, Aroona; Heidari, Seyed Farshad; Khalilian, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Despite radiography being the gold standard in evaluation of orthopedic injuries, using bedside ultrasonography has several potential supremacies such as avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation, availability in pre-hospital settings, being extensively accessible, and ability to be used on the bedside. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of extremity bone fractures. This study is a case series study, which was prospectively conducted on multiple blunt trauma patients, who were 18 years old or older, had stable hemodynamic, Glasgow coma scale 15, and signs or symptoms of a possible extremity bone fracture. After initial assessment, ultrasonography of suspected bones was performed by a trained emergency medicine resident and prevalence of true positive and false negative findings were calculated compared to plain radiology. 108 patients with the mean age of 44.6 ± 20.4 years were studied (67.6% male). Analysis was done on 158 sites of fracture, which were confirmed with plain radiography. 91 (57.6%) cases were suspected to have upper extremity fracture(s) and 67 (42.4%) to have lower ones. The most frequent site of injuries were forearm (36.7%) in upper limbs and leg (27.8%) in lower limbs. Prevalence of true positive and false negative cases for fractures detected by ultrasonography were 59 (64.8%) and 32 (35.52%) for upper and 49 (73.1%) and 18 (26.9%) for lower extremities, respectively. In addition, prevalence of true positive and false negative detected cases for intra-articular fractures were 24 (48%) and 26 (52%), respectively. The present study shows the moderate sensitivity (68.3%) of ultrasonography in detection of different extremity bone fractures. Ultrasonography showed the best sensitivity in detection of femur (100%) and humerus (76.2%) fractures, respectively. It had low sensitivity in detection of in intra-articular fractures.

  17. Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 07 -2 3 Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete Erin M. Williams, Stephen A. Akers, and Paul A. Reed...07-23 August 2007 Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete Erin M. Williams, Stephen A. Akers, and Paul A. Reed Geotechnical and...constitutive property behavior of a gray masonry concrete . A total of 38 mechanical property tests were successfully completed: two hydrostatic

  18. The strange case of Sir Henry Gray.

    PubMed

    Adam, A; Hutchison, J D; Scotland, T R

    2010-02-01

    Sir Henry Williamson Gray was a prominent Aberdeen surgeon who took up the post of Chief of Surgery at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal in 1923. In what subsequently became known as "The Sir Henry Williamson Gray Affair" in the annals of McGill University, his career was ruined and his reputation left in tatters. The authors examine the available evidence and conclude that Gray was treated unfairly. They hope they have helped restore his name and reputation.

  19. GrayStar: Web-based pedagogical stellar modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStar is a web-based pedagogical stellar model. It approximates stellar atmospheric and spectral line modeling in JavaScript with visualization in HTML. It is suitable for a wide range of education and public outreach levels depending on which optional plots and print-outs are turned on. All plots and renderings are pure basic HTML and the plotting module contains original HTML procedures for automatically scaling and graduating x- and y-axes.

  20. Focused Real-Time Ultrasonography for Nephrologists

    PubMed Central

    Kaptein, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose that renal consults are enhanced by incorporating a nephrology-focused ultrasound protocol including ultrasound evaluation of cardiac contractility, the presence or absence of pericardial effusion, inferior vena cava size and collapsibility to guide volume management, bladder volume to assess for obstruction or retention, and kidney size and structure to potentially gauge chronicity of renal disease or identify other structural abnormalities. The benefits of immediate and ongoing assessment of cardiac function and intravascular volume status (prerenal), possible urinary obstruction or retention (postrenal), and potential etiologies of acute kidney injury or chronic kidney disease far outweigh the limitations of bedside ultrasonography performed by nephrologists. The alternative is reliance on formal ultrasonography, which creates a disconnect between those who order, perform, and interpret studies, creates delays between when clinical questions are asked and answered, and may increase expense. Ultrasound-enhanced physical examination provides immediate information about our patients, which frequently alters our assessments and management plans. PMID:28261499

  1. Color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, S; Danesino, G M; Danesino, V; Castellani, S

    2010-09-01

    Alterations of the abdominal aorta are relatively common, particularly in older people. Technological advances in the fields of ultrasonography, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging have greatly increased the imaging options for the assessment of these lesions. Because it can be done rapidly and is also non-invasive, ultrasonography plays a major role in the exploration of the abdominal aorta, from its emergence from the diaphragm to its bifurcation. It is indicated for the diagnosis and follow-up of various aortic diseases, especially aneurysms. It can be used to define the shape, size, and location of these lesions, the absence or presence of thrombi and their characteristics. It is also useful for monitoring the evolution of the lesion and for postoperative follow-up. However, its value is limited in surgical planning and in emergency situations.

  2. Bedside ultrasonography in the ICU: part 2.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Yanick; Marik, Paul E

    2005-09-01

    This is the second of a two-part review on the application of bedside ultrasonography in the ICU. In this part, the following procedures will be covered: (1) echocardiography and cardiovascular diagnostics (second part); (2) the use of bedside ultrasound to facilitate central-line placement and to aid in the care of patients with pleural effusions and intra-abdominal fluid collections; (3) the role of hand-carried ultrasound in the ICU; and (4) the performance of bedside ultrasound by the intensivist. The safety and utility of bedside ultrasonography performed by adequately trained intensivists has now been well demonstrated. This technology, as a powerful adjunct to the physical examination, will become an indispensable tool in the management of critically ill patients.

  3. [Chest ultrasonography in pediatric critical care practice].

    PubMed

    Riu, B; Ruiz, J; Mari, A; Silva, S

    2013-12-01

    An increasingly amount of evidence suggests that lung ultrasonography constitutes a relevant complementary diagnostic tool for adults patient in acute respiratory failure. A comprehensive and standardized ultrasonographic semiology has been described, relying on accurate and reproducible data directly obtained at patient's bedside. Therefore, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary consolidation and interstitial lung disease can be diagnosed in a critical care environment with a similar level of performance than when reference diagnosis methods such as thoracic CT-scan are employed. Furthermore, lung ultrasonography seems to be able to contribute to an early therapeutic decision based on such online physiopathological data. Pioneers works in this field have suggested an attractive similarity between the ultrasonographic patterns described in adults and children. Nevertheless, the clinical usefulness of lung ultrasonographic approach in the pediatric critical care medicine still needs to be confirmed by specifically designed studies.

  4. Ultrasonography of the hip and lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Dentico, Richard; Halperin, Jonathan S

    2010-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonographic evaluation of the proximal lower limb includes the evaluation of the soft tissue structures, including tendons, ligaments, or muscles, and the bony structures of this region, include the hip, pubic symphysis, and sacroiliac joints. The evaluation of the hip or proximal lower limb region can be performed in an efficient and systematic manner. Ultrasonography of the lateral hip, intra-articular hip, medial thigh, and posterior thigh are discussed in the article.

  5. Vascular access: the impact of ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Saldanha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular punctures are often necessary in critically ill patients. They are secure, but not free of complications. Ultrasonography enhances safety of the procedure by decreasing puncture attempts, complications and costs. This study reviews important publications and the puncture technique using ultrasound, bringing part of the experience of the intensive care unit of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo (SP), Brazil, and discussing issues that should be considered in future studies. PMID:28076607

  6. Critical care ultrasonography in circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Koster, Geert; van der Horst, Iwan C C

    2017-08-01

    The objective was to define the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and the management of circulatory shock by critical appraisal of the literature. Assessment of any patient's hemodynamic profile based on clinical examination can be sufficient in several cases, but many times unclarities remain. Arterial catheters and central venous lines are commonly used in critically ill patients for practical reasons, and offer an opportunity for advanced hemodynamic monitoring. Critical care ultrasonography may add to the understanding of the hemodynamic profile at hand. Improvements in ultrasound techniques, for example, smaller devices and improved image quality, may reduce limitations and increase its value as a complementary tool. Critical care ultrasonography has great potential to guide decisions in the management of shock, but operators should be aware of limitations and pitfalls as well. Current evidence comes from cohort studies with heterogeneous design and outcomes. Use of ultrasonography for hemodynamic monitoring in critical care expands, probably because of absence of procedure-related adverse events. Easy applicability and the capacity of distinguishing different types of shock add to its increasing role, further supported by consensus statements promoting ultrasound as the preferred tool for diagnostics in circulatory shock.

  7. Ecology of the great gray owl.

    Treesearch

    Evelyn L. Bull; Mark G. Henjum

    1990-01-01

    Information is needed on the great gray owl to understand its ecology and to consider this species in land management decisions. From 1982 to 1988, we studied 24 pairs and 107 juvenile great gray owls in northeastern Oregon. Forty-nine nests were located; 16 were used more than once, so we observed 71 nesting attempts. Seventy-eight percent of these nesting attempts...

  8. William S. Gray: Teacher, Scholar, Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jennifer A., Ed.

    William S. Gray, first president of the International Reading Association, is the focus of this booklet. Sections are devoted to "The Person," which includes Gray's family background, early schooling and teaching jobs, and his further education at Illinois State University, the University of Chicago, and Teachers College (Columbia…

  9. The Effect of Illumination on Gray Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Pos, Osvaldo; Baratella, Linda; Sperandio, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the perceptual process of integration of luminance information in the production of the gray color of an object placed in an environment viewed from a window. The mean luminance of the object was varied for each mean luminance of the environment. Participants matched the gray color of the object with that of Munsell…

  10. DPIV Measurements on Dolphins: Examining Gray's Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legac, Paul; Fish, Frank; Williams, Terrie; Wei, Timothy

    2007-11-01

    In 1936 James Gray attempted to evaluate the strength of a dolphin by calculating the drag a dolphin must overcome while swimming and comparing that to the theoretical amount of thrust the dolphin can produce using its musculature. According to Gray, the muscles of a dolphin are not powerful enough to overcome the drag produced; this is now known as `Gray's Paradox'. To solve the problem, Gray surmised that the flow over the dolphin would need to stay laminar in order to reduce the drag. To examine `Gray's Paradox', DPIV has been modified to be used on a dolphin swimming in a tank of stationary water. Experiments of dolphins performing various swimming behaviors were performed at the Long Marine Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz. Vortices generated by the dolphins' tail motions were used to estimate thrust production. Data from two dolphins and multiple runs will be presented.

  11. Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) ecology and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, Judd A.

    1997-01-01

    The gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) is a petite member of the family Canidae in the order Carnivora with a long muzzle and pointed ears (Samuel and Nelson 1982). The coat of the gray fox is silver gray across the back with significant amounts of rufus along the sides. This characteristic is often confused by people who see the flash of red and assume that the fox is a red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The gray fox has a black tipped tail with a dorsal black stripe that differentiates this species from the kit fox (Vulpes macrotis). The red fox has a white tipped tail. The gray fox weighs between 3-5 kg, occasionally to 7 kg. TL 800-1125, T 275-443, HF 100-150. (Jameson and Peeters 1988).

  12. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic aid in bovine musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann

    2009-11-01

    In the last 15 years, ultrasonography of the bovine musculoskeletal system has become an established diagnostic method used routinely in many veterinary teaching hospitals worldwide. Ultrasonography is ideal for the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders because they are often associated with extensive soft tissue swelling and inflammatory exudation. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. Not only does ultrasonography improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis, added use of the machine helps recoup expenses.

  13. Gray whale sightings in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahara, Yuka; Fujiwara, Amane; Ito, Keizo; Miyashita, Kazushi; Mitani, Yoko

    2016-06-01

    Gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) are distributed within the productive neritic and estuarine waters of the North Pacific Ocean, the Bering Sea, and adjacent waters of the Arctic Ocean. They migrate to high-latitude feeding grounds each spring. Their main feeding grounds in the Arctic include the Chirikov Basin, the northeastern Chukchi Sea from Pt. Hope to Cape Lisburne and Pt. Lay to Pt. Barrow, and the northwestern Chukchi Sea along the Chukotka coast. Although sightings are rare in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, we observed three gray whales in two groups in this area in September 2014. A mud plume was observed near one of the whales, suggesting the animal had been feeding. In the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, large-scale monitoring of the distributions of marine mammals has been continuously conducted since 1979; however, there has been less monitoring in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Therefore, it is necessary to record opportunistic sightings, such as those described here.

  14. Ultrasonography of Extravaginal Testicular Torsion in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bombiński, Przemysław; Warchoł, Stanisław; Brzewski, Michał; Majkowska, Zofia; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Żerańska, Maria; Panek, Małgorzata; Drop, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Extravaginal testicular torsion (ETT), also called prenatal or perinatal, occurs prenatally and is present at birth or appears within the first month of life. It has different etiology than intravaginal torsion, which appears later in life. Testicular torsion must be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of acute scrotum and should be confirmed or ruled out at first diagnostic step. Ultrasonography is a basic imaging modality, however diagnostic pitfalls are still possible. There is still wide discussion concerning management of ETT, which varies from immediate orchiectomy to conservative treatment resulting in testicle atrophy. Material/Methods In this article we present ultrasonographic spectrum of ETT in neonates, which were diagnosed and treated in our hospital during the last 8 years (2008–2015), in correlation with clinical and intraoperative findings. Results Thirteen neonates with ETT were enrolled in the study – 11 patients with a single testicle affected and 2 patients with bilateral testicular torsion. Most common signs on clinical examination were: hardened and enlarged testicle and discoloration of the scrotum. Most common ultrasonographic signs were: abnormal size or echostructure of the affected testicle and absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography. In 3 patients ultrasound elastography was performed, which appeared very useful in testicle structure assessment. Conclusions Testicular torsion may concern boys even in the perinatal period. Ultrasonographic picture of acute scrotum in young boys may be confused. Coexistence of the abnormal size or echostructure of the torsed testicle with absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography appear as very specific but late ultrasonographic sings. Ultrasound elastography may be a very useful tool for visualisation of a very common clinical sign – hardening of the necrotic testicle. PMID:27757176

  15. Emerging technology in head and neck ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Holtel, Michael R

    2010-12-01

    Increased use of ultrasonography of the head and neck by clinicians has resulted from more compact, higher resolution ultrasound machines that can be more readily used in the office setting. Palm-sized machines are already used for vascular access and bladder assessment. As the resolution of these machines becomes adequate for head and neck assessment, ultrasonography is likely to become a routine adjunct to the office physical examination. Further techniques to reduce artifact beyond spatial compounding, second harmonics, and broadband inversion techniques are likely to be developed to improve ultrasound images. Manual palpation using the ultrasound transducer or "sound palpation," using sound to recreate vibration provides information on tissue "stiffness," which has been successfully used to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions in the head and neck (particularly thyroid nodules). Microbubble contrast-enhanced ultrasound provides improved resolution of ultrasound images. Three- and four-dimensional ultrasonography provides for more accurate diagnosis. The ability of microbubbles with ligands affixed to their outer surface to target specific tissue makes them excellent delivery vehicles. DNA plasmids, chemotherapy agents, and therapeutic drugs can be released at a specific anatomic site. The motion of microbubbles stimulated by ultrasound can be used to increase drug penetration through tissues and has been shown to be effective in breaking up clots in stroke patients (without increased risk). High-intensity focused ultrasound can be used to create coagulation necrosis without significant damage to adjacent tissue. It has been effectively used in neurosurgery and urology, but its effectiveness in the head and neck is still being determined. A prototype for surgical navigation with ultrasound has been developed for the head and neck, which allows real-time imaging of anatomic surgical changes. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Ultrasonography of the eye and orbit.

    PubMed

    Dudea, Sorin M

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is, quite often, the first imaging modality used in eye and orbit assessment. The indications of ophthalmic US cover a wide range of disease where direct clinical assessment is impossible or of little value. Doppler US enhances the ability to assess blood flow in the main arteries and veins. In order to take full advantage of all the possibilities US has to offer the examiner thorough knowledge of the examination technique and normal US anatomy of the eye and orbit is required. This paper reviews the basics of the examination technique and ultrasound anatomy of the eye and orbit.

  17. Diagnostic ultrasonography for peripheral vascular emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cook, Thomas; Nolting, Laura; Barr, Caleb; Hunt, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Over the past decade, emergency and critical care physicians have been empowered with the ability to use bedside ultrasonography to assist in the evaluation and management of a variety of emergent conditions. Today a single health care provider at the bedside with Duplex ultrasound technology can evaluate peripheral vascular calamities that once required significant time and a variety of health care personnel for the diagnosis. This article highlights peripheral thromboembolic disease, aneurysm, pseudoaneurysm, and arterial occlusion in the acute care setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of a Critical Care Ultrasonography Course.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Yonatan Y; Littauer, Ross; Narasimhan, Mangala; Mayo, Paul H; Koenig, Seth J

    2017-01-01

    Widespread use of critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) for the management of patients in the ICU requires an effective training program. The effectiveness of national and regional CCUS training courses is not known. This study describes a national-level, simulation-based, 3-day CCUS training program and evaluates its effectiveness. Five consecutive CCUS courses, with a total of 363 people, were studied. The 3-day CCUS training program consisted of didactic lectures, ultrasonography interpretation sessions, and hands-on modules with live models. Thoracic, vascular, and abdominal ultrasonography were taught in addition to goal-directed echocardiography. Learners rotated between hands-on training and interpretation sessions. The teacher-to-learner ratio was 1:3 during hands-on training. Interpretation sessions were composed of interactive small groups that reviewed normal and abnormal ultrasonography images. Learners completed a video-based examination before and after completion of the courses. Hands-on image acquisition skills were tested at the completion of the course. Average scores on the pretest and posttest were 57% and 90%, respectively (P < .001). The average score on the hands-on test was 86%. Learners aged 20 to 39 years compared with learners ≥ 40 years old scored better on the pretest (64% vs 51%; P < 0.001), posttest (91% vs 88%; P < .010), and hands-on test (90% vs 82%; P < .001). Learners demonstrated a significant improvement in written test scores that assessed cognitive and image interpretation abilities. In addition, they demonstrated acquisition of practical skills as evidenced by high scores during hands-on testing. Further studies are needed to determine if a simulation-based CCUS course will translate into effective clinical practice and to measure the durability of training. This 3-day course is an effective method to train large groups of critical care clinicians in the skills requisite for CCUS (image acquisition and image

  19. Ultrasonography of bovine urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Floeck, Martina

    2009-11-01

    Ultrasonography is a helpful diagnostic tool in cattle with urinary tract disorders. It can be used to diagnose pyelonephritis, urolithiasis, hydronephrosis, renal cysts, renal tumors, amyloidosis, cystitis, bladder paralysis, bladder rupture, bladder neoplasms, and, occasionally, nephrosis, glomerulonephritis, and embolic nephritis. This article describes the anatomy, scanning technique, indications, limitations, normal and pathologic sonographic appearance of the bovine urinary tract. References from horses and humans are included, especially when the sonographic findings in these species may complement the understanding of similar diseases reported in cattle.

  20. Usefulness of ultrasonography in assessment of laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, C-X; Zhao, H-X; Yan, F; Li, S-L; Zhang, S-M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in assessing laryngeal cancer. Methods: 72 patients with laryngeal carcinoma proven by surgery and pathology were enrolled. The pre-therapeutic ultrasonography and CT images were retrospectively evaluated, including tumour detection, localisation and invasion of intra- and extralaryngeal structures. A comparative assessment was made between the detection rate, correspondence rate of localisation and sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography and CT. The mobility of the larynx was observed on real-time ultrasonography and compared with laryngoscopy. Results: The detection rate of ultrasonography [63 (87.5%)/72] was lower than that of CT [72 (100.0%)/72] (p=0.006). The primary foci were accurately located in 59 (93.7%) of 63 lesions using ultrasonography compared with 70 (97.2%) of 72 lesions using CT (p=0.392). In the evaluation of invasion, the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography were similar to that of CT in most of the intra- and extralaryngeal structures (p=0.059–1.000). A higher specificity was obtained during the assessment of the paraglottic space involvement when using ultrasonography than CT (94.9% vs 66.7%, p=0.001). For vocal cord fixation, no statistical difference was found between ultrasonography and laryngoscopy (p=0.223). Conclusion: Ultrasonography could be used as a valuable supplementary imaging method to CT and laryngoscopy in the assessment of laryngeal carcinoma, even in male adults with some calcifications of the thyroid cartilage. Advances in knowledge: Our study demonstrates that ultrasonography, which has been used scarcely in the larynx, could supply useful information on the detection, localisation and intra- and extralaryngeal invasion of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:24004487

  1. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain. PMID:27679733

  2. [Carpal tunnel syndrome. The contribution of ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Pardal-Fernandez, J M

    2014-11-16

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent mononeuropathy. Its incidence is huge and the ensuing community health problems are therefore the cause of much concern. Such a situation has made it necessary to develop a key point in the management of the illness, that is, to find flexible, sensitive, specific and cost-effective diagnostic procedures. Today tools of proven worth are now available, especially electrophysiology, and quite recently we also have ultrasonography. Both of these techniques allow us to confirm and characterise neuropathies due to entrapment and indeed a large number of papers dealing with ultrasound imaging have been published in the literature over the last few years. It therefore comes as no surprise that many renowned authors have acknowledged the usefulness of this technique. Here, we review the pathophysiological and diagnostic aspects of carpal tunnel syndrome, with greater emphasis on how ultrasonography has contributed to the morphological evaluation of the entrapped nerve. This method has proved itself to have significant advantages not only due to its being readily available, inexpensive, fast and painless, but also, and above all, because of its high capacity to detect neural and perineural alterations. A critical review of the literature supports this thesis and shows its incorporation into routine daily evaluation to be highly recommendable.

  3. The contribution of ultrasonography to intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Defoort, P; Thiery, M

    1981-01-01

    Various methods of assessing the presence and position of the IUD device within the uterine cavity have been developed (barium sulfate in the IUD matrix, tail strings, uterine sounding, radiography), but all have distinct disadvantages (risk of infection, inadvertent displacing of IUD). Diagnostic ultrasound, or ultrasonography, is a non-invasive, rapid technic with no known biological side effects. It requires no patient preparation except a distended bladder, and it can be repeated at will. This paper reviews the possibilities and limitations of ultrasound, and discusses principles of echographic IUD detection. Ultrasonography can prove the presence and location of an IUD in utero in uncomplicated cases of missing threads. It reduces pregnancy rates significantly by establishing early displacement or expulsion of IUD. It is important that the echographer be aware of the clinical context, and if possible, the type of IUD he is looking for, especially in diagnosing partial penetration and breakage. In a small number of cases, there are situations in which the method will be unreliable, and anticipated success rates will be similar to those of blind clinical trials (e.g., significant number of misdiagnoses). These include: 1) the missing tail, where the uterus appears not to contain the IUD; and 2) incipient pregnancy. Radiographic studies are indicated for both situations.

  4. Real-time ultrasonography for location of IUDs.

    PubMed

    Reiertsen, O

    1981-04-01

    Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, non-ionizing and painless technique used to locate IUDs in the uterine cavity. This study evaluates the reliability and precision of real-time ultrasonography in locating IUDs. 151 IUD users (duration of use, 2 days to 108 months) were subjected to ultrasonography to detect and locate the IUD. Indications for ultrasonography are: 1) no visible IUD strings (61 patients); 2) pregnant after IUD insertion (7); 3) abnormal uterine pain or bleeding (50); and 4) control of IUD (33). 90% of the women used standard copper-bearing devices (Copper 7; Multiload; Gravigard). Ultrasonography detected the IUD in utero in 128 cases with no false positive results. It did not detect the IUD in 23 cases (expulsion occurred in 18 patients; IUD was removed in 2 cases due to IUD perforation; IUD was erroneously not detected in 3 cases (false negative)) Hysterography was performed in 57 women to confirm ultrasonographic findings. Ultrasonography diagnosed IUD in situ in 54 cases; it was confirmed by hysterography in 44 cases (81%). Hysterography diagnosed penetration of the uterine wall by the IUD; ultrasonography failed to detect all cases of penetration. Ultrasonography is reliable in detecting an IUD in utero but not within the uterine cavity. However, it helps in IUD management by increasing contraceptive efficiency through early diagnoses of expulsion and cervical location of the IUD.

  5. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Gray squirrel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1982-01-01

    The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)inhabits hardwood and mixed hardwood-coniferous forests (Uhlig 1955; Golley 1962). Although they may occur in a variety of forested habitat types, large, densely forested areas are preferred (Taylor 1974).

  6. Evidence for Separation across a Gray Band on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Sullivan, Robert J.

    1996-10-01

    Thynia Linea, a gray band on Europa, is found to be a ∼25 km wide and >900 km long region of lithospheric separation which has been infilled by relatively dark material. Roughly a dozen older features and the cuspate segments that form its outline appear to have been displaced across its width. Displacement azimuths indicate a best fit pole of opening near 79°S, 200°W. However, displacement magnitude decreases toward either end of the gray band, indicating that it is more akin to a “tear” in a nonrigid europan lithosphere. Opening was in response to NW-SE directed tensile stress, in accord with the stress predictions of nonsynchronous rotation. Observations of Thynia Linea are consistent with a laterally mobile brittle lithosphere, decoupled from ductile or liquid material below, as previously suggested to account for opening of wedge-shaped bands in Europa's antijovian region. Lithospheric separation and contemporaneous emplacement of new material offers a possible volcano-tectonic scenario for resurfacing Europa. If this process is ongoing, resurfacing can be accomplished on a time scale consistent with the satellite's surface age if one gray band or zone of wedge-shaped bands forms every ∼103-104yr and becomes unrecognizable with age. This would imply that features on Europa brighten with age, as through continuous deposition of frost onto the surface.

  7. Gray matter and white matter abnormalities in online game addiction.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chuan-Bo; Qian, Ruo-Bing; Fu, Xian-Ming; Lin, Bin; Han, Xiao-Peng; Niu, Chao-Shi; Wang, Ye-Han

    2013-08-01

    Online game addiction (OGA) has attracted greater attention as a serious public mental health issue. However, there are only a few brain magnetic resonance imaging studies on brain structure about OGA. In the current study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate the microstructural changes in OGA and assessed the relationship between these morphology changes and the Young's Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS) scores within the OGA group. Compared with healthy subjects, OGA individuals showed significant gray matter atrophy in the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula, and right supplementary motor area. According to TBSS analysis, OGA subjects had significantly reduced FA in the right genu of corpus callosum, bilateral frontal lobe white matter, and right external capsule. Gray matter volumes (GMV) of the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula and FA values of the right external capsule were significantly positively correlated with the YIAS scores in the OGA subjects. Our findings suggested that microstructure abnormalities of gray and white matter were present in OGA subjects. This finding may provide more insights into the understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms of OGA.

  8. Risk Factors for Premature Hair Graying in Young Turkish Adults.

    PubMed

    Akin Belli, Asli; Etgu, Fatma; Ozbas Gok, Seyran; Kara, Bilge; Dogan, Gursoy

    2016-07-01

    Premature hair graying (PHG) is a common condition resulting in loss of self-esteem. Studies investigating PHG risk factors for both sexes with a large number of patients are scarce. We sought to investigate the socioclinical risk factors for PHG in young Turkish men and women and the differences between the sexes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,119 participants who answered a survey about PHG and some socioclinical characteristics between February and July 2015. The number of gray hairs, onset age of hair graying, and family history of PHG were asked about, as well as demographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, sports life, diet, medical history, educational status, occupation, marital status, monthly income, and Fitzpatrick skin type. Of 1,119 participants, 315 (28.1%) had PHG and 804 did not. Maternal and paternal PHG, alcohol consumption, presence of chronic disease, educational status, hair loss, perceived stress scale (PSS) score, age, and height were significantly higher in subjects with PHG. Rates of maternal and paternal PHG were high in women with PHG, and the rate of paternal PHG was high in men with PHG. According to the multivariate ordinal regression analysis, PSS score, age, hair loss, and family history of PHG were correlated with the severity of PHG. PHG is closely related to factors causing oxidative stress, such as emotional stress, alcohol consumption, and chronic diseases in genetically predisposed men and women. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Sonar Validation Study with Migrating Gray Whales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-14

    responses of migrating gray whales to the whalefinding sonar by using a theodolite on shore to observe and track individual whales as they migrate past the...coastal waters of California where gray whales migrate during the winter and spring. Observers on shore use a theodolite to track individual whales or...Commission on the research. We assembled a field team to man two shore stations with theodolites to track the whales. The field team started collecting

  10. Gray solitons on the surface of water.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Kimmoun, O; Branger, H; Kharif, C; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Akhmediev, N

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of surface gravity water waves can be described by the self-defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Recent observations of black solitons on the surface of water confirmed its validity for finite, below critical depth. The black soliton is a limiting case of a family of gray soliton solutions with finite amplitude depressions. Here, we report observations of gray solitons in water waves, thus, complementing our previous observations of black solitons.

  11. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Emergency physicians have used point-of-care ultrasonography since the 1990 s. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians have more recently adopted this technology. Point-of-care ultrasonography is used for various scenarios, particularly the evaluation of soft tissue infections or blunt abdominal trauma and procedural guidance. To date, there are no published statements from national organizations specifically for pediatric emergency physicians describing the incorporation of point-of-care ultrasonography into their practice. This document outlines how pediatric emergency departments may establish a formal point-of-care ultrasonography program. This task includes appointing leaders with expertise in point-of-care ultrasonography, effectively training and credentialing physicians in the department, and providing ongoing quality assurance reviews.

  12. The Graying of American Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Lindstedt, S. L. "Bud"

    1986-10-01

    We consider the distribution of scientific ages of professors in ten astronomy departments in the United States and find that the average astronomer is growing older at a rate of about 6 months per year at present. This aging will continue through the end of the 1990s, at which time we predict that the average professorial astronomer will be around 50 years old. The cause of this aging is the expansion of the profession that began in the late 1960s, an expansion that was not maintained for more than one decade. As a consequence, perhaps as many as one-third of all the professor-level astronomers in the country obtained doctorates between 1964 and 1970, inclusive. For comparison we briefly consider the distribution of ages of physicists and physiologists. The number of physiologists as a function of date of doctorate has been slightly increasing since around 1960; thus this profession has also been slowly getting older with time. The average age of physicists is significantly greater than that for astronomers. Because of the significant influence of social and political forces on university decisions, we find that the total budget for NASA has been a good predictor for the past demand for professorial astronomers, but the total NSF budget is not. We predict the future demand for astronomers in the U.S. and suggest, as a result of the expansion in the 1960s, that demand will increase significantly near the end of the 1990s, making employment easier to obtain and suitable job candidates, particularly postdoctoral associates, more difficult to find. We point out that because of greater average age, the physics community will have to find solutions to the problems of an elderly population before astronomers will. Furthermore, there may be a small increase in the demand for astronomers as large numbers of physicists retire in the early- to mid-1990s. Additional consequences of a graying astronomy are briefly considered.

  13. Patient satisfaction and quality of care at four diagnostic imaging procedures: mammography, double-contrast barium enema, abdominal ultrasonography and vaginal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Loken, K; Steine, S; Laerum, E

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure patient satisfaction and to investigate the practical implications of monitoring the quality of care at four radiology procedures. A survey was conducted immediately after the examinations in eight radiology departments: 550 patients attending for mammography, 110 for double-contrast barium enema (DCBE), 97 for abdominal ultrasonography and 90 for vaginal ultrasonography. Outcome measures were seven questionnaire scales: pain, emotional distress, information received, staff's punctuality and technical ability, facilities, and general satisfaction. Response rate was 87 %. Multivariate regression analysis showed significant differences between procedures on all scales (p < 0.001). Differences considered to be of practical importance, i. e. >/= 7 scale points, were detected on five of the scales. Mammography and DCBE caused the most pain, and vaginal US and DCBE caused the most distress. The US procedures entailed dissatisfaction with information about the procedures. The DCBE patients recorded dissatisfaction with the staff's lack of punctuality, and these and the mammography patients recorded dissatisfaction with the facilities. The findings indicate a potential for improving patients' experiences. Several aspects of care, i. e. pain management, attention to the patient's emotional concerns, explanation of procedures, punctuality and quality of the facilities, can be improved.

  14. Attentional Control and Intelligence: MRI Orbital Frontal Gray Matter and Neuropsychological Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Paul G.; Nakamura, Motoaki; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Levitt, James J.; Newell, Dominick T.; Shenton, Martha E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Attentional control is a key function of working memory that is hypothesized to play an important role in psychometric intelligence. To test the neuropsychological underpinnings of this hypothesis, we examined full-scale IQ, as measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III), and attentional control, as measured by Trails B response time and Wisconsin Card Sorting (WCS) test perseverative errors in 78 healthy participants, 25 of whom also had available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray matter volume studies of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) parcellated into three regions: gyrus rectus, middle orbital gyrus, and lateral orbital gyrus. Hierarchical regression indicated that Trails B response time specifically explained 15.13% to 19.18% of the variation in IQ and WCS perseverative errors accounted for an additional 8.12% to 11.29% of the variance. Full-scale IQ correlated very strongly with right middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume (r = 0.610, p = 0.002), as did Trails B response time with left middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume (r = −0.608, p = 0.003). Trails B response time and right middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume jointly accounted for approximately 32.95% to 54.82% of the variance in IQ scores. These results provided evidence of the unique contributions of attentional control and OFC gray matter to intelligence. PMID:26101457

  15. Attentional Control and Intelligence: MRI Orbital Frontal Gray Matter and Neuropsychological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Paul G; Nakamura, Motoaki; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Levitt, James J; Newell, Dominick T; Shenton, Martha E; McCarley, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Attentional control is a key function of working memory that is hypothesized to play an important role in psychometric intelligence. To test the neuropsychological underpinnings of this hypothesis, we examined full-scale IQ, as measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III), and attentional control, as measured by Trails B response time and Wisconsin Card Sorting (WCS) test perseverative errors in 78 healthy participants, 25 of whom also had available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray matter volume studies of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) parcellated into three regions: gyrus rectus, middle orbital gyrus, and lateral orbital gyrus. Hierarchical regression indicated that Trails B response time specifically explained 15.13% to 19.18% of the variation in IQ and WCS perseverative errors accounted for an additional 8.12% to 11.29% of the variance. Full-scale IQ correlated very strongly with right middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume (r = 0.610, p = 0.002), as did Trails B response time with left middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume (r = -0.608, p = 0.003). Trails B response time and right middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume jointly accounted for approximately 32.95% to 54.82% of the variance in IQ scores. These results provided evidence of the unique contributions of attentional control and OFC gray matter to intelligence.

  16. Fatty meal ultrasonography in chronic acalculous cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Donen, Anna; Kantor, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acalculous cholecystits typically presents with biliary symptoms, normal blood tests and unremarkable ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. However, cholescintigraphy may show reduced gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF). There are no reports on using ultrasound to measure GBEF in adults. Twenty-eight patients with the above presentation underwent ultrasound before and after ingestion of a standardized fatty meal. Consequently, GBEF was calculated. Seven patients had reduced GBEFs (<38%). Two of these patients underwent cholecystectomy and both were found to have chronic gallbladder inflammation. Three patients with normal GBEFs underwent cholecystectomy and were also found to have chronic gallbladder inflammation. There may be a role for fatty meal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis, but it should be used more widely in this patient cohort for its role to be established. It ideally needs to performed alongside cholescintigraphy for the comparison of accuracy. PMID:25409675

  17. Intraportal endovascular ultrasonography for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; Nakao, A; Takagi, H

    1998-01-01

    Intraportal endovascular ultrasonography (IPEUS) is a new diagnostic procedure for pancreatic cancer. In portal invasion, subtle invasion and compression are difficult to differentiate with conventional imaging techniques such as computed tomography and angiography. IPEUS is performed with an 8-French, 20-MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter. IPEUS provides high-resolution, real-time images perpendicular to the portal vein axis. With IPEUS, the portal vein wall is visualized as an echogenic band. A subtle portal invasion can be detected by observing this portal vein wall. Moreover, the segment II of the extrapancreatic nerve plexus is visualized as an echogenic area around the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). The extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion can be diagnosed as low echoic infiltration of the area around the IPDA. In the diagnosis of portal vein and extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion, IPEUS provides a good diagnostic value and important information for the staging of local extension of the pancreatic cancer.

  18. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  19. Interventional musculoskeletal ultrasonography: Precautions and contraindications.

    PubMed

    Draghi, F; Robotti, G; Jacob, D; Bianchi, S

    2010-09-01

    In recent years ultrasonography (US) has emerged as the imaging technique of choice for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures including those related to the musculoskeletal system. However, the absence of ionizing radiation and the elevated safety of the method must not lead us to forget that there are precautions and contraindications to keep in mind, which are crucial to the protection of both the patient and the physician.Among these precautions it is first of all essential to obtain the patient's accurate clinical history including current medication, particularly if it involves drugs influencing the blood clotting, and information related to possible allergies. The patient should furthermore receive detailed information concerning the procedure (sterile precautions as well as possible side-effects of the drugs which will be injected). In addition to this, there must be a close contact between the radiologist and the patient's general physician (GP) in order to obtain the best possible result of the procedure.

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of hypophosphatasia congenita using ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hypophosphatasia is a rare fatal skeletal dysplasia. Antenatal determinants of Epub ahead of print lethality include small thoracic circumference with pulmonary hypoplasia and severe micromelia. These features were present in the fetus of a 25-year-old female who came for an anomaly scan in her second trimester of pregnancy. Additional findings of generalized demineralization and osteochondral spurs led to the diagnosis of hypophosphatasia congenita. The pregnancy was terminated, and the findings were confirmed on autopsy. Common differential diagnoses with clues to diagnose the above mentioned condition have been discussed here. Early and accurate detection of this medical condition is important as no treatment has been established for this condition. Therefore, antenatal ultrasonography helps in diagnosing and decision making with respect to the current pregnancy and lays the foundation for the genetic counseling of the couple. PMID:25971898

  1. Transcutaneous ultrasonography of the avian urogenital tract.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, H; Krautwald-Junghanns, M E

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a survey of the diagnostic use of transcutaneous sonographic examination of the urogenital tract of pet birds. Possibilities and limitations in imaging normal and altered components of this organ system are discussed. Ultrasonographic examination of the avian urogenital tract was evaluated in 386 pet birds. Abnormal clinical signs were present in 289 birds; 97 birds were normal. Transcutaneous ultrasonography proved to be a useful, noninvasive, and fast diagnostic tool, especially in imaging laminated eggs and changes of the oviduct. Until now, these pathologic changes were not diagnosable in birds with other common noninvasive methods (e.g. radiography). The imaging of low-grade changes of the oviduct, disorders of the kidney without enlargement of the organ, as well as roughening of the egg shell proved to be difficult. Sonographic imaging of neither the normal kidney nor the inactive gonads was possible.

  2. [Endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) for the internist].

    PubMed

    Stern, J-B; Wyplosz, B; Girard, P; Validire, P; Escaut, L; Caliandro, R

    2016-11-01

    Endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) is a recent mini-invasive technique allowing transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of mediastinal lymph nodes as well as peribronchial lesions. EBUS was initially developed for lung cancer mediastinal staging. Over the years, indications for EBUS have been progressively extended to the scope of inflammatory disorders, mediastinal lymphomas, and infectious diseases. Particularly in immunosuppressed patients, including HIV-infected patients, EBUS allows the diagnosis of several diseases that involve the mediastinum, avoiding invasive surgical explorations such as mediastinoscopy or thoracoscopy. This review aims at discussing the technical aspects, and specifies indications, results, and limits of EBUS for the internist. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Kamata, Ken; El-Masry, Muhammad; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are highly diverse, as they can be solid or cystic, and benign or malignant. Since their imaging features overlap considerably, it is often difficult to characterize these tumors. In addition, small pancreatic tumors, especially those less than 2 cm in diameter, are difficult to detect and diagnose. For characterizing pancreatic tumors and detecting small pancreatic tumors, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most sensitive of the imaging procedures currently available. This technique also provides good results in terms of the preoperative staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has also proved to be a safe and useful method for tissue sampling of pancreatic tumors. Despite these advantages, however, it is still difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant, solid or cystic pancreatic tumors, malignant neoplasms, and chronic pancreatitis using EUS, even when EUS-FNA is performed. Recently, contrast-enhanced EUS with Doppler mode (CE-EUS) employing ultrasound contrast agents, which indicate vascularization in pancreatic lesions, has been found to be useful in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, especially small pancreatic tumors. However, Doppler ultrasonography with contrast-enhancement has several limitations, including blooming artifacts, poor spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to slow flow. Consequently, an echoendoscope was developed recently that has a broad-band transducer and an imaging mode that was designed specifically for contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CEH-EUS) with a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent. The CEH-EUS technique is expected to improve the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease in the future. This review describes the EUS appearances of common solid and cystic pancreatic masses, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA, and the relative efficacies and advantages of CE-EUS and CEH-EUS along with their relative advantages and their complementary roles

  4. [Evaluation of the learning curve of residents in localizing a phantom target with ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Dessieux, T; Estebe, J-P; Bloc, S; Mercadal, L; Ecoffey, C

    2008-10-01

    Few information are available regarding the learning curve in ultrasonography and even less for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. This study aimed to evaluate in a training program the learning curve on a phantom of 12 residents novice in ultrasonography. Twelve trainees inexperienced in ultrasonography were given introductory training consisting of didactic formation on the various components of the portable ultrasound machine (i.e. on/off button, gain, depth, resolution, and image storage). Then, students performed three trials, in two sets of increased difficulty, at executing these predefined tasks: adjustments of the machine, then localization of a small plastic piece introduced into roasting pork (3 cm below the surface). At the end of the evaluation, the residents were asked to insert a 22 G needle into an exact predetermined target (i.e. point of fascia intersection). The progression of the needle was continuously controlled by ultrasound visualization using injection of a small volume of water (needle perpendicular to the longitudinal plane of the ultrasound beam). Two groups of two different examiners evaluated for each three trials the skill of the residents (quality, time to perform the machine adjustments, to localize the plastic target, and to hydrolocalize, and volume used for hydrolocalization). After each trial, residents evaluated their performance using a difficulty scale (0: easy to 10: difficult). All residents performed the adjustments from the last trial of each set, with a learning curve observed in terms of duration. Localization of the plastic piece was achieved by all residents at the 6th trial, with a shorter duration of localization. Hydrolocalization was achieved after the 4th trial by all subjects. Difficulty scale was correlated to the number of trials. All these results were independent of the experience of residents in regional anesthesia. Four trials were necessary to adjust correctly the machine, to localize a target, and to

  5. Discovery of the gray phenotype and white-gray-opaque tristable phenotypic transitions in Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huizhen; Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Tao, Li; Du, Han; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-04-02

    Candida dubliniensis is closely related to Candida albicans, a major causative agent of candidiasis, and is primarily associated with oral colonization and infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. Despite the high similarity of genomic and phenotypic features between the 2 species, C. dubliniensis is much less virulent and less prevalent than C. albicans. The ability to change morphological phenotypes is a striking feature of Candida species and is linked to virulence. In this study, we report a novel phenotype, the gray phenotype, in C. dubliniensis. Together with the previously reported white and opaque cell types, the gray phenotype forms a tristable phenotypic switching system in C. dubliniensis that is similar to the white-gray-opaque tristable switching system in C. albicans. Gray cells of C. dubliniensis are similar to their counterparts in C. albicans in terms of several biological aspects including cellular morphology, mating competence, and genetic regulatory mechanisms. However, the gray phenotypes of the 2 species have some distinguishing features. For example, the secreted aspartyl protease (Sap) activity is induced by bovine serum albumin (BSA) in gray cells of C. albicans, but not in gray cells of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the biological features and regulatory mechanisms of white-gray-opaque tristable transitions are largely conserved in the 2 pathogenic Candida species.

  6. Discovery of the gray phenotype and white-gray-opaque tristable phenotypic transitions in Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Huizhen; Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Tao, Li; Du, Han; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACt Candida dubliniensis is closely related to Candida albicans, a major causative agent of candidiasis, and is primarily associated with oral colonization and infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. Despite the high similarity of genomic and phenotypic features between the 2 species, C. dubliniensis is much less virulent and less prevalent than C. albicans. The ability to change morphological phenotypes is a striking feature of Candida species and is linked to virulence. In this study, we report a novel phenotype, the gray phenotype, in C. dubliniensis. Together with the previously reported white and opaque cell types, the gray phenotype forms a tristable phenotypic switching system in C. dubliniensis that is similar to the white-gray-opaque tristable switching system in C. albicans. Gray cells of C. dubliniensis are similar to their counterparts in C. albicans in terms of several biological aspects including cellular morphology, mating competence, and genetic regulatory mechanisms. However, the gray phenotypes of the 2 species have some distinguishing features. For example, the secreted aspartyl protease (Sap) activity is induced by bovine serum albumin (BSA) in gray cells of C. albicans, but not in gray cells of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the biological features and regulatory mechanisms of white-gray-opaque tristable transitions are largely conserved in the 2 pathogenic Candida species. PMID:26714067

  7. Cost Comparison of Conventional Gray Combined Sewer Overflow Control Infrastructure versus a Green/Gray Combination

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper outlines a life-cycle cost analysis comparing a green (rain gardens) and gray (tunnels) infrastructure combination to a gray-only option to control combined sewer overflow in the Turkey Creek Combined Sewer Overflow Basin, in Kansas City, MO. The plan area of this Bas...

  8. Cost Comparison of Conventional Gray Combined Sewer Overflow Control Infrastructure versus a Green/Gray Combination

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper outlines a life-cycle cost analysis comparing a green (rain gardens) and gray (tunnels) infrastructure combination to a gray-only option to control combined sewer overflow in the Turkey Creek Combined Sewer Overflow Basin, in Kansas City, MO. The plan area of this Bas...

  9. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients. A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume. Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = –0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001). The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  10. The additional benefit of ultrasonography to 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria when diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis in the absence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lanlan; Deng, Xuerong; Geng, Yan; Song, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhuoli

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the benefit of ultrasonography (US) contributing to 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) classification criteria in diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), when anti-citrullinated protein (CCP) antibody and radiographic erosions are absent. Ninety-four patients suffering from arthritis of at least one joint in hands, symptom duration of less than 2 years, normal radiographs at baseline, and negative anti-CCP had 22 joint US assessments and were followed prospectively for at least 12 months. Sensitivity and specificity for final RA diagnosis based on 1987 RA criteria were determined for ultrasound variables. Logistic regression models were then fitted to evaluate predictive ability over and above the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria. Twenty-nine of them were classified as RA patients and 65 had alternative diagnoses. There were significantly more joints with synovial hypertrophy, synovitis, and bone erosion detected by US in RA patients. The gray-scale (GS) variables positively correlated with acute phase reactants. The area under curve (AUC) values of GS and power Doppler (PD) were comparable, higher than bone erosion. However, regression analysis demonstrated that only PD involvement of joints, especially wrists, provided independently predictive data, with improved AUC values from 0.738 to 0.872 combined with 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria. PD scanning of hand joints, especially wrists, may provide independently assistance to 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria in the early diagnosis of RA in those patients who are negative for anti-CCP antibody.

  11. ROPS deficiency of gray-market tractors.

    PubMed

    Myers, M L; Purschwitz, M A

    2012-04-01

    Many used tractors that are imported from Japan are adding to the current national inventory in the U.S. and Canada of farm tractors that lack a rollover protective structure (ROPS). Gray-market tractors are built for use by the manufacturer for a certain country but are imported against the manufacture's wishes to a second country for use there, usually as a used tractor. Gray-market tractors may lack ROPS and seatbelts, depending on the date of manufacturer. The objective of this investigation is to describe the gray market for tractors imported from Japan into the U.S. and the policy implications regarding the hazards associated with these imports. Operator manuals and warning labels are typically not written in English. Foreign manufacturers that market tractors in the U.S. have established a variety of disincentives for the importation of gray-market tractors, including issuing warnings, not servicing or providing parts for these tractors, and banning their importation through actions by the U.S. International Trade Commission. Nonetheless, a U.S. market has developed that imports and provides services and parts for gray-market tractors, and some companies provide certified ROPS on the tractors that they sell. A product safety perspective and related policies are presented as an approach to ensuring that these imports are equipped with ROPS and seatbelts.

  12. Value of ultrasonography for detecting chronic injury of the lateral ligaments of the ankle joint compared with ultrasonography findings

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Cai, Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle ligament injury. Methods: A total of 120 ankles in 120 patients with a clinical suspicion of chronic ankle ligament injury were examined by ultrasonography by using a 5- to 17-MHz linear array transducer before surgery. The results of ultrasonography were compared with the operative findings. Results: There were 18 sprains and 24 partial and 52 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL); 26 sprains, 27 partial and 12 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); and 1 complete tear of the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) at arthroscopy and operation. Compared with operative findings, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography were 98.9%, 96.2% and 84.2%, respectively, for injury of the ATFL and 93.8%, 90.9% and 83.3%, respectively, for injury of the CFL. The PTFL tear was identified by ultrasonography. The accuracy of identification between acute-on-chronic and subacute–chronic patients did not differ. The accuracies of diagnosing three grades of ATFL injuries were almost the same as those of diagnosing CFL injuries. Conclusion: Ultrasonography provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain. Advances in knowledge: Intraoperative findings are the reference standard. We demonstrated that ultrasonography was highly sensitive and specific in detecting chronic lateral ligments injury of the ankle joint. PMID:24352708

  13. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R.; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase

    2008-02-04

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic

  14. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Christopher; Geist, David

    2007-04-01

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic

  15. Gray Matter Pathology in MS: Neuroimaging and Clinical Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Honce, Justin Morris

    2013-01-01

    It is abundantly clear that there is extensive gray matter pathology occurring in multiple sclerosis. While attention to gray matter pathology was initially limited to studies of autopsy specimens and biopsies, the development of new MRI techniques has allowed assessment of gray matter pathology in vivo. Current MRI techniques allow the direct visualization of gray matter demyelinating lesions, the quantification of diffuse damage to normal appearing gray matter, and the direct measurement of gray matter atrophy. Gray matter demyelination (both focal and diffuse) and gray matter atrophy are found in the very earliest stages of multiple sclerosis and are progressive over time. Accumulation of gray matter damage has substantial impact on the lives of multiple sclerosis patients; a growing body of the literature demonstrates correlations between gray matter pathology and various measures of both clinical disability and cognitive impairment. The effect of disease modifying therapies on the rate accumulation of gray matter pathology in MS has been investigated. This review focuses on the neuroimaging of gray matter pathology in MS, the effect of the accumulation of gray matter pathology on clinical and cognitive disability, and the effect of disease-modifying agents on various measures of gray matter damage. PMID:23878736

  16. A New Methodology of Viewing Extra-Axial Fluid and Cortical Abnormalities in Children with Autism via Transcranial Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Bradstreet, James Jeffrey; Pacini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are developmental conditions of uncertain etiology which have now affected more than 1% of the school-age population of children in many developed nations. Transcranial ultrasonography (TUS) via the temporal bone appeared to be a potential window of investigation to determine the presence of both cortical abnormalities and increased extra-axial fluid (EAF). Methods: TUS was accomplished using a linear probe (10–5 MHz). Parents volunteered ASD subjects (N = 23; males 18, females 5) for evaluations (mean = 7.46 years ± 3.97 years), and 15 neurotypical siblings were also examined (mean = 7.15 years ± 4.49 years). Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS2®) scores were obtained and the ASD score mean was 48.08 + 6.79 (Severe). Results: Comparisons of the extra-axial spaces indicated increases in the ASD subjects. For EAF we scored based on the gyral summit distances between the arachnoid membrane and the cortical pia layer (subarachnoid space): (1) <0.05 cm, (2) 0.05–0.07 cm, (3) 0.08–0.10 cm, (4) >0.10 cm. All of the neurotypical siblings scored 1, whereas the ASD mean score was 3.41 ± 0.67. We also defined cortical dysplasia as the following: hypoechoic lesions within the substance of the cortex, or disturbed layering within the gray matter. For cortical dysplasia we scored: (1) none observed, (2) rare hypoechogenic lesions and/or mildly atypical cortical layering patterns, (3) more common, but separated areas of cortical hypoechogenic lesions, (4) very common or confluent areas of cortical hypoechogenicity. Again all of the neurotypical siblings scored 1, while the ASD subjects’ mean score was 2.79 ± 0.93. Conclusion: TUS may be a useful screening technique for children at potential risk of ASDs which, if confirmed with repeated studies and high resolution MRI, provides rapid, non-invasive qualification of EAF, and cortical lesions. PMID:24459462

  17. Assessment of the utility of ultrasonography with high-frequency transducers in the diagnosis of posttraumatic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this paper was to assess the relevance of high-frequency ultrasound examination in qualifying patients for either surgical or conservative treatment of posttraumatic peripheral neuropathies. The study was conducted in a group of 47 patients aged 16–65 (mean age 33) who in 2009–2011 were referred to ultrasound examinations due to a clinical suspicion of posttraumatic peripheral neuropathies. The group included 30 females and 17 males. The patients examined presented with neuropathies of the following peripheral nerves: median, ulnar, common peroneal, digital, cutaneous in the deltoid area, mental, PIN and RSNR. In 21 patients, nerve injuries were partial, and in 24 – complete. In 2 cases, the nerve was entrapped between bony fragments. 17 of 21 patients with partial nerve injuries (80.95%) underwent an EMG examination. No functional tests were conducted in the cases of complete injuries when ultrasound imaging had confirmed the result of the clinical examination. All patients underwent the interview, physical examination and ultrasound examination. Ultrasound examinations were performed with Esaote MyLab 50 and MyLab 60 systems using high-frequency broadband linear transducers: 6–18 MHz. The nerves were evaluated in the gray-scale and in the power Doppler mode in longitudinal and transverse sections for localization, morphology and the grade of injury as well as for possible anatomic variants of the nerve trunk and pathologies of the adjacent tissues. Moreover, a dynamic examination was performed, and it was attempted to induce pain or paresthesia by palpation at the site of the visualized pathology. Additionally, the motor and sensory–motor nerves were assessed indirectly based on the images of the skeletal muscles innervated by these nerves. The analyses of the collected material were performed by means of descriptive statistics. The results of clinical and surgical verification were consistent with ultrasound findings in 100% of cases

  18. Assessment of the utility of ultrasonography with high-frequency transducers in the diagnosis of posttraumatic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta

    2015-03-01

    The primary aim of this paper was to assess the relevance of high-frequency ultrasound examination in qualifying patients for either surgical or conservative treatment of posttraumatic peripheral neuropathies. The study was conducted in a group of 47 patients aged 16-65 (mean age 33) who in 2009-2011 were referred to ultrasound examinations due to a clinical suspicion of posttraumatic peripheral neuropathies. The group included 30 females and 17 males. The patients examined presented with neuropathies of the following peripheral nerves: median, ulnar, common peroneal, digital, cutaneous in the deltoid area, mental, PIN and RSNR. In 21 patients, nerve injuries were partial, and in 24 - complete. In 2 cases, the nerve was entrapped between bony fragments. 17 of 21 patients with partial nerve injuries (80.95%) underwent an EMG examination. No functional tests were conducted in the cases of complete injuries when ultrasound imaging had confirmed the result of the clinical examination. All patients underwent the interview, physical examination and ultrasound examination. Ultrasound examinations were performed with Esaote MyLab 50 and MyLab 60 systems using high-frequency broadband linear transducers: 6-18 MHz. The nerves were evaluated in the gray-scale and in the power Doppler mode in longitudinal and transverse sections for localization, morphology and the grade of injury as well as for possible anatomic variants of the nerve trunk and pathologies of the adjacent tissues. Moreover, a dynamic examination was performed, and it was attempted to induce pain or paresthesia by palpation at the site of the visualized pathology. Additionally, the motor and sensory-motor nerves were assessed indirectly based on the images of the skeletal muscles innervated by these nerves. The analyses of the collected material were performed by means of descriptive statistics. The results of clinical and surgical verification were consistent with ultrasound findings in 100% of cases. The

  19. The comparisons between thermography and ultrasonography with physical examination for wrist joint assessment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Sungkarat, Witaya; Chitrapazt, Niyata; Fuangfa, Praman; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to assess infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonography (US) for detecting wrist arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Although IRT could help us detecting joint inflammation, IRT studies in JIA patients with wrist arthritis are still limited. Currently, no validated US criteria exist for detecting arthritis, and the most useful parameters between Gray-scale ultrasound (GSUS) or Power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) remain unclear. Therefore, this study focused on detecting wrist arthritis in varying degrees using IRT and US compared with physical examination. Of 46 JIA patients, 16 had previous wrist arthritis but currently inactive, 30 still had wrist arthritis, and the median ages (IQR) were 7.7 (4.3) and 10.2 (4.8) years respectively. Fifteen healthy participants were included, with a median age (IQR) of 9.2 (2.0) years. Using IRT, mean temperature (Tmean) and maximum temperature (Tmax) at skin surface in the region of interest (ROI) in the arthritis group were higher than in the inactive group and the healthy controls with p < 0.05. When patients with arthritis were subgroup analyzed by disease severity based on physical examination, the moderate to severe arthritis had Tmean and Tmax higher than the mild arthritis group with statistical significance. The Heat Distribution Index (HDI), two standard deviations of all pixel temperature values in the ROI, in the moderate to severe arthritis group was higher than in the healthy controls (p = 0.027). The receiver operating characteristic analysis in arthritis detection revealed diagnostic sensitivity of 85.7% and 71.4% and specificity of 80.0% and 93.3% at a cut-off points of Tmean ≥ 31.0 C and Tmax ≥ 32.3 C respectively. For US, GSUS and PDUS are useful in detecting arthritis, providing high sensitivity (83.3%) and specificity (81.3%). Our study demonstrated that both IRT and US were applicable tools for detecting wrist arthritis.

  20. Salt Bath Oxinitriding of Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Teimouri, M.; Aliofkhazraee, M.; Mousavi Khoee, S. M.

    Salt bath oxinitriding is a duplex surface treatment developed to improve tribological and corrosion properties of ferrous materials. In this research, gray cast iron samples were nitrided at the temperature range of 480°C-580°C, and then oxidized in an oxidative salt bath. The phase composition of surface layer was identified by X-ray diffraction. Using a microhardness tester, hardness of nitrided gray cast iron was measured. Corrosion behavior of treated (nitrided and oxinitrided) samples was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization technique in 3.5% NaCl solution. XRD analyses indicate that the surface layer in nitrided and oxinitrided samples is composed of ɛ-iron nitride (Fe2-3N) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Results show that the corrosion resistance of gray cast iron can be improved up to 170%.

  1. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Skin flaking; Scaly skin; Papulosquamous disorders ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that can cause scales include: Eczema Fungal infections such as ringworm , tinea versicolor ...

  2. Relationship between atherosclerosis and knee osteoarthritis as graded by radiography and ultrasonography in females

    PubMed Central

    Ekim, Ayşe Aydemir; İnal, Esra Erkol; Kaya, Dilek Serin; Yılmazer, Şebnem; Kuzgun, Selen; Mumcu, Gamze; Yurdasiper, Alper; Musmul, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between atherosclerosis and knee osteoarthritis grade in women as assessed by both ultrasonography and radiography. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy women diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were classified into two groups according to cartilage grading/radiographic grading. Patients with Kellgren-Lawrence grades 1 and 2 were included in group 1, while those with Kellgren-Lawrence grades 3 and 4 were included in group 2. Patients with cartilage grades 1–3 were included in group 1, while those with cartilage grades 4–6 were included in group 2. Patients were clinically assessed using a visual analog scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index. Radiographic osteoarthritis grade was scored using the Kellgren and Lawrence grading system. Using ultrasonography, symptomatic knees were graded and evaluated for distal femoral cartilage thickness. Carotid intima-media thickness and serum lipid levels were measured to assess atherosclerosis. [Results] Carotid intima-media thickness measurements were higher in group 2 than in group 1 as determined by the Kellgren-Lawrence and cartilage grading systems. Carotid intima-media thickness measurements were positively correlated with both the ultrasonographic cartilage grade and Kellgren-Lawrence. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that osteoarthritis as assessed by ultrasonography was successful and comparable to assessment with radiography. We showed a correlation between atherosclerosis and ultrasonographic knee osteoarthritis grade. PMID:27942107

  3. Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Gastric Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial lesions occasionally found in the stomach of patients undergoing endoscopy may be either benign lesions or tumors with malignant potential. They may also appear due to extrinsic compression. Discrimination of gastric subepithelial lesions begins with meticulous endoscopic examination for size, shape, color, mobility, consistency, and appearance of the overlying mucosa. Accurate diagnosis can be achieved with endoscopic ultrasonography, which provides useful information on the exact size, layer-of-origin, and characteristic morphologic features to support a definitive diagnosis. Endoscopic ultrasonography also aids in the prediction of malignant potential, especially in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Features of subepithelial lesions identified on endoscopic ultrasonography can be used to determine whether further diagnostic procedures such as endoscopic resection, fine needle aspiration, or core biopsy are required. Endoscopic ultrasonography is a valuable tool for diagnosis and clinical decision making during follow-up of gastric subepithelial lesions. PMID:27744661

  4. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power – this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical. PMID:25082341

  5. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography delineates ankle symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Yukihiro; Tamura, Maasa; Kirino, Yohei; Sugiyama, Yumiko; Tsuchida, Naomi; Kunishita, Yosuke; Kishimoto, Daiga; Kamiyama, Reikou; Miura, Yasushi; Minegishi, Kaoru; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) of ankle joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Consecutive RA patients with or without ankle symptoms participated in the study. The US, clinical examination (CE), and patients' visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) for ankles were assessed. Prevalence of tibiotalar joint synovitis and tenosynovitis were assessed by grayscale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) US using a semi-quantitative grading (0-3). The positive US and CE findings were defined as GS score ≥2 and/or PD score ≥1, and joint swelling and/or tenderness, respectively. Multivariate analysis with the generalized linear mixed model was performed by assigning ankle pVAS as a dependent variable. Among a total of 120 ankles from 60 RA patients, positive ankle US findings were found in 21 (35.0%) patients. The concordance rate of CE and US was moderate (kappa 0.57). Of the 88 CE negative ankles, US detected positive findings in 9 (10.2%) joints. Multivariate analysis revealed that ankle US, clinical disease activity index, and foot Health Assessment Questionnaire, but not CE, was independently associated with ankle pVAS. US examination is useful to illustrate RA ankle involvement, especially for patients who complain ankle pain but lack CE findings.

  6. Detecting local twitch responses of myofascial trigger points in the lower-back muscles using ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Rha, Dong-wook; Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Jung, Jae Hwan; Kim, Young Uhk; Lee, Sang Chul

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the role of ultrasonography for detecting local twitch responses (LTRs) of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in deeply located lower-back muscles. Case-control study. Active MTrP was diagnosed in all patients based on the criteria proposed by Travell and Simons in their upper-trapezius or lower-back muscles. One investigator administered trigger point injections while observing LTRs on ultrasonography. The other investigator observed LTRs visually during the procedure. University rehabilitation hospital. Patients (n=41; mean age, 51.8 ± 11.8y) with MTrPs in the upper-trapezius muscles and patients (n=62; mean age, 56.8 ± 11.9y) with MTrPs in the erector spinae or quadratus lumborum were recruited from April 29 to October 31, 2010. Ultrasound-guided trigger point injection. LTR detection rate according to the depth of MTrPs; subjective pain intensity using a visual analog scale before and immediately after the trigger point injection. In upper-trapezius muscles, all LTRs were detected by means of both ultrasonographic and visual inspection. In the lower-back muscles, many LTRs were detected only on ultrasonography during the trigger point injection. For deep muscles, ultrasound helped identify LTRs that were not detected by using visual assessment. Pain was alleviated more significantly in the group with LTRs during trigger point injections compared with the group without LTRs. These findings suggest that ultrasonography was useful for detecting LTRs of MTrPs, especially for LTRs in the deep muscles. Ultrasound guidance may improve the therapeutic efficacy of trigger point injection for treating MTrPs in the deep muscles. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pre-operative ultrasonography and arteriovenous fistulae maturation.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Khalid; Clarke-Moloney, Mary; Walsh, Stewart R

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) are preferred for haemodialysis access, but maturation is unpredictable. Clinical examination alone is unreliable for AVF planning. Duplex ultrasonography may provide useful anatomical and physiological data to allow more accurate prediction of likely AVF success. Selective use of duplex ultrasonography appears to enhance AVF success rates, but there are insufficient data to recommend routine duplex screening of AVF candidates. Agreed vessel criteria are needed.

  8. Ultrasonography of the lower extremity veins: anatomy and basic approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kang, Chang Ho; Cho, Sung Bum

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography is an imaging modality widely used to evaluate venous diseases of the lower extremities. It is important to understand the normal venous anatomy of the lower extremities, which has deep, superficial, and perforating venous components, in order to determine the pathophysiology of venous disease. This review provides a basic description of the anatomy of the lower extremity veins and useful techniques for approaching each vein via ultrasonography. PMID:28260355

  9. Ultrasonography-histopathology correlation in major salivary glands lesions.

    PubMed

    Petrovan, Cecilia; Nekula, Diana Maria; Mocan, Simona Liliana; Voidăzan, Toader Septimiu; Coşarcă, Adina

    2015-01-01

    Major salivary glands display a various and complex pathology, showing different evolution and prognosis, depending on the histopathological form. The choice of an appropriate treatment plan for the best outcome, therefore the proper surgical approach, would imply preoperative knowledge of the histopathological diagnosis. However, any core-biopsy performed prior to surgery presents the risk of a false result and increases the difficulty of latter surgery. Therefore, some complementary examinations are used, among these, ultrasonography. The retrospective study (April 2010-March 2013) conducted in the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Emergency County Hospital, Tirgu Mures, Romania, aims to evaluate the relevance of the ultrasonography by itself in leading towards a proper preoperative assessment and diagnosis, and thus, in choosing the proper treatment plan. The study included 33 lesions of the major salivary glands, undergoing first ultrasonography, then curative surgery. Different characteristics (shape, dimension, consistency, vascularization, homogeneity, delimitation) were assessed on ultrasonography as well as on histopathology; finally, the correlation between those two examinations was evaluated, by comparing diagnoses. The results of our study are similar to others, showing that ultrasonography can diagnose preoperatively the majority lesions of major salivary glands. The conclusions of the study sustain the importance of ultrasonography as a routine examination in major salivary glands lesions.

  10. The role of orbital ultrasonography in distinguishing papilledema from pseudopapilledema

    PubMed Central

    Carter, S B; Pistilli, M; Livingston, K G; Gold, D R; Volpe, N J; Shindler, K S; Liu, G T; Tamhankar, M A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the sensitivity and specificity of orbital ultrasonography in distinguishing papilledema from pseudopapilledema in adult patients. Methods The records of all adult patients referred to the neuro-ophthalmology service who underwent orbital ultrasonography for the evaluation of suspected papilledema were reviewed. The details of history, ophthalmologic examination, and results of ancillary testing including orbital ultrasonography, MRI, and lumbar puncture were recorded. Results of orbital ultrasonography were correlated with the final diagnosis of papilledema or pseudopapilledema on the basis of the clinical impression of the neuro-ophthalmologist. Ultrasound was considered positive when the optic nerve sheath diameter was ≥3.3 mm along with a positive 30° test. Results The sensitivity of orbital ultrasonography for detection of papilledema was 90% (CI: 80.2–99.3%) and the specificity in detecting pseudopapilledema was 79% (CI: 67.7–90.7%). Conclusions Orbital ultrasonography is a rapid and noninvasive test that is highly sensitive, but less specific in differentiating papilledema from pseudopapilledema in adult patients, and can be useful in guiding further management of patients in whom the diagnosis is initially uncertain. PMID:25190532

  11. Training in endoscopic ultrasonography: An Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jennie Y Y; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Ho, Khek Yu

    2017-01-09

    Training of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in Asia faces two major challenges: (i) the ever-increasing demand for skills to handle a growing range of interventional EUS procedures; and (ii) a continual shortage of EUS training programs. As the therapeutic application of EUS continues to expand, the need to train more new endosonographers and upgrade skills of existing ones has become more critical than ever before. A formal fellowship to acquire EUS knowledge and skills in an advanced endoscopy center has always been perceived as the best way of training novices, but such opportunities remain limited in most Asian countries. To keep up with the pace of development in EUS, more short-term EUS programs have been conducted across Asia in recent years. Such programs are generally intensive and may combine didactic lectures, live-case demonstrations, and hands-on training on phantoms, or live animal models for teaching. Although not as rigorous as conventional full-time EUS fellowships, such short-term programs are not necessarily inferior in quality. With courses offered from basic to advanced levels, and at regular intervals, busy practising endoscopists have the flexibility to attend the course that best matches their individual levels of experience, learn at their own pace and acquire EUS knowledge and skills over as many courses as desired. This open-ended progressive learning model is more agile than established fixed-term learning models and is expected to adapt better to future needs.

  12. Vascular access: the impact of ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Saldanha de

    2016-01-01

    Vascular punctures are often necessary in critically ill patients. They are secure, but not free of complications. Ultrasonography enhances safety of the procedure by decreasing puncture attempts, complications and costs. This study reviews important publications and the puncture technique using ultrasound, bringing part of the experience of the intensive care unit of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo (SP), Brazil, and discussing issues that should be considered in future studies. RESUMO Punções vasculares são muitas vezes necessárias em pacientes gravemente enfermos. São seguras, mas não isentas de complicações. A ultrassonografia associada à técnica de punção gera diminuição do número de tentativas, de complicações e de custos. O presente artigo revisou importantes publicações sobre o tema, bem como técnicas de punções, trazendo parte da experiência do centro de terapia intensiva de adultos do Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, em São Paulo (SP) e discutindo tópicos que devem ser melhor explorados em estudos futuros.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasonography for gastric submucosal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Kourikou, Anastasia; Rösch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) are a rather frequent finding, occurring in about 0.36% of routine upper GI-endoscopies. EUS has emerged as a reliable investigative procedure for evaluation of these lesions. Diagnostic Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has the ability to differentiate intramural tumors from extraluminal compressions and can also show the layer of origin of gastric SMTs. Tumors can be further characterized by their layer of origin, echo pattern and margin. EUS-risk criteria of their malignant potential are presented, although the emergence of EUS-guided fne needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has opened new indications for transmural tissue diagnosis and expanded the possibilities of EUS in SMTs of the stomach. Tissue diagnosis should address whether the SMT is a Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) or another tumor type and evaluate the malignant potential of a given GIST. However, there seems to be a lack of data on the optimal strategy in SMTs suspected to be GISTs with a negative EUS-FNA tissue diagnosis. The current management strategies, as well as open questions regarding their treatment are also presented. PMID:21772939

  14. Striatum gray matter reduction in males with an overactive behavioral activation system.

    PubMed

    Barrós-Loscertales, A; Meseguer, V; Sanjuán, A; Belloch, V; Parcet, M A; Torrubia, R; Avila, C

    2006-10-01

    Using optimized voxel-based morphometry, we studied the relationship between gray matter volume in brain areas associated with reward and scores on a behavioral activation system measure (the Sensitivity to Reward scale) in a sample of 50 male undergraduates. Voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed a negative correlation between Sensitivity to Reward scores and gray matter volume in the dorsal striatum and prefrontal cortex. Results indicate that a reduced volume in the striatum might be associated with enhanced reward sensitivity and deficits in inhibitory control.

  15. Response to Biber, Gray, and Poonpon (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, WeiWei

    2013-01-01

    The recent "TESOL Quarterly" article by Biber, Gray, and Poonpon (2011) raises important considerations with respect to the use of syntactic complexity (SC) measures in second language (L2) studies. The article draws the field's attention to one particular measure--complexity of noun phrases (NP) (i.e., noun phrases with modifiers, such as…

  16. Gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus, bibliography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Setzler-Hamilton, E.; Oliver, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The report categorizes the research literature on gray whales according to major research topics, issues of concern to Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development, and geographic areas. The report has an extensive cross-index. Selected references are depicted on an accompanying poster.

  17. Chapter 17. Information needs: Great gray owls

    Treesearch

    Gregory D. Hayward

    1994-01-01

    Current understanding of great gray owl biology and ecology is based on studies of less than five populations. In an ideal world, a strong conservation strategy would require significant new information. However, current knowledge suggests that conservation of this forest owl should involve fewer conflicts than either the boreal or flammulated owl. The mix of forest...

  18. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Leckie, Regina L; Weinstein, Andrea M

    2014-09-01

    In this review, we explore the association among physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6 months-1 year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Government Publications and Gray Literature in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anameric, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates bibliographic control of government publications and gray literature in Turkey, in order to determine what further measures are needed to support researchers in both Turkey and abroad. It reports the circumstances surrounding the creation of "The Bibliography of Government Publications" prepared in 1971, and…

  20. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Leckie, Regina L.; Weinstein, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review we explore the association between physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6-months to 1-year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. PMID:24952993

  1. Norma Gray: Leading the Way for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Founded by Norma Gray in 1972 as an early-childhood demonstration center, River Valley Child Development Services now operates various programs related to young children in nine southern West Virginia counties and a statewide apprenticeship program for child-development specialists. Programs provide child care, after-school programs,…

  2. Response to Biber, Gray, and Poonpon (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, WeiWei

    2013-01-01

    The recent "TESOL Quarterly" article by Biber, Gray, and Poonpon (2011) raises important considerations with respect to the use of syntactic complexity (SC) measures in second language (L2) studies. The article draws the field's attention to one particular measure--complexity of noun phrases (NP) (i.e., noun phrases with modifiers, such as…

  3. Government Publications and Gray Literature in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anameric, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates bibliographic control of government publications and gray literature in Turkey, in order to determine what further measures are needed to support researchers in both Turkey and abroad. It reports the circumstances surrounding the creation of "The Bibliography of Government Publications" prepared in 1971, and…

  4. Norma Gray: Leading the Way for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Founded by Norma Gray in 1972 as an early-childhood demonstration center, River Valley Child Development Services now operates various programs related to young children in nine southern West Virginia counties and a statewide apprenticeship program for child-development specialists. Programs provide child care, after-school programs,…

  5. Return of the gray wolf to Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Nowak, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Five gray wolf (Canis lupus) specimens were examined from Wisconsin from 1975 through 1979; each had been killed by human beings, accidentally or intentionally. This confirms the presence of wolves in Wisconsin and supports the hypothesis that human-related mortality is the factor limiting the population.

  6. Gray matter volumes and cognitive ability in the epileptogenic brain malformation of periventricular nodular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Linsey M; Katzir, Tami; Liu, Tianming; Ly, Jenny; Corriveau, Kathleen; Barzillai, Mirit; Chu, Felicia; O'Connor, Margaret G; Hackney, David B; Chang, Bernard S

    2009-08-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is a brain malformation clinically characterized by the triad of epilepsy, normal intelligence, and dyslexia. We investigated the structure-function relationship between cerebral volumes and cognitive ability in this disorder by studying 12 subjects with PNH and 6 controls using volumetric analysis of high-resolution anatomical MRI and neuropsychological testing. Total cerebral volumes and specific brain compartment volumes (gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) in subjects with PNH were comparable to those in controls. There was a negative correlation between heterotopic gray matter volume and cortical gray matter volume. Cerebral and cortical volumes in PNH did not correlate with Full Scale IQ, unlike in normal individuals. Our findings support the idea that heterotopic nodules contain misplaced neurons that would normally have migrated to the cortex, and suggest that structural correlates of normal cognitive ability may be different in the setting of neuronal migration failure.

  7. Global and local development of gray and white matter volume in normal children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Marko; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Holland, Scott K

    2007-04-01

    Over the last decade, non-invasive, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging has allowed investigating normal brain development. However, much is still not known in this context, especially with regard to regional differences in brain morphology between genders. We conducted a large-scale study utilizing fully automated analysis-approaches, using high-resolution MR-imaging data from 200 normal children and aimed at providing reference data for future neuroimaging studies. Global and local aspects of normal development of gray and white matter volume were investigated as a function of age and gender while covarying for known nuisance variables. Global developmental patterns were apparent in both gray and white matter, with gray matter decreasing and white matter increasing significantly with age. Gray matter loss was most pronounced in the parietal lobes and least in the cingulate and in posterior temporal regions. White matter volume gains with age were almost uniform, with an accentuation of the pyramidal tract. Gender influences were detectable for both gray and white matter. Voxel-based analyses confirmed significant differences in brain morphology between genders, like a larger amygdala in boys or a larger caudate in girls. We could demonstrate profound influences of both age and gender on normal brain morphology, confirming and extending earlier studies. The knowledge of such influence allows for the consideration of age- and gender-effects in future pediatric neuroimaging studies and advances our understanding of normal and abnormal brain development.

  8. Externalizing personality traits, empathy, and gray matter volume in healthy young drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Judith; Dzemidzic, Mario; West, John; Oberlin, Brandon G.; Eiler, William J.A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Kareken, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Externalizing psychopathology has been linked to prefrontal abnormalities. While clinically diagnosed subjects show altered frontal gray matter, it is unknown if similar deficits relate to externalizing traits in non-clinical populations. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to retrospectively analyze the cerebral gray matter volume of 176 young adult social to heavy drinkers (mean age= 24.0 ± 2.9, male= 83.5%) from studies of alcoholism risk. We hypothesized that prefrontal gray matter volume and externalizing traits would be correlated. Externalizing personality trait components— Boredom Susceptibility-Impulsivity (BS/IMP) and Empathy/Low Antisocial Behaviors (EMP/LASB)— were tested for correlations with gray matter partial volume estimates (gmPVE). Significantly large clusters (pFWE < 0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected) of gmPVE correlated with EMP/LASB in dorsolateral and medial prefrontal regions, and in occipital cortex. BS/IMP did not correlate with gmPVE, but one scale of impulsivity (Eysenck I7) correlated positively with bilateral inferior frontal/orbitofrontal, and anterior insula gmPVE. In this large sample of community-dwelling young adults, antisocial behavior/low empathy corresponded with reduced prefrontal and occipital gray matter, while impulsivity correlated with increased inferior frontal and anterior insula cortical volume. These findings add to a literature indicating that externalizing personality features involve altered frontal architecture. PMID:26778367

  9. Comparison of gray matter volume and thickness for analysis of cortical changes in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kunchen; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2011-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two indices of concern in brain structure magnetic resonance imaging research. Gray matter volume reflects mixed-measurement information of cerebral cortex, while cortical thickness reflects only the information of distance between inner surface and outer surface of cerebral cortex. Using Scaled Subprofile Modeling based on Principal Component Analysis (SSM_PCA) and Pearson's Correlation Analysis, this study further provided quantitative comparisons and depicted both global relevance and local relevance to comprehensively investigate morphometrical abnormalities in cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and thirteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that factor scores from the first 8 principal components accounted for ~53.38% of the total variance for gray matter volume, and ~50.18% for cortical thickness. Factor scores from the fifth principal component showed significant correlation. In addition, gray matter voxel-based volume was closely related to cortical thickness alterations in most cortical cortex, especially, in some typical abnormal brain regions such as insula and the parahippocampal gyrus in AD. These findings suggest that these two measurements are effective indices for understanding the neuropathology in AD. Studies using both gray matter volume and cortical thickness can separate the causes of the discrepancy, provide complementary information and carry out a comprehensive description of the morphological changes of brain structure.

  10. Externalizing personality traits, empathy, and gray matter volume in healthy young drinkers.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Judith; Dzemidzic, Mario; West, John; Oberlin, Brandon G; Eiler, William J A; Saykin, Andrew J; Kareken, David A

    2016-02-28

    Externalizing psychopathology has been linked to prefrontal abnormalities. While clinically diagnosed subjects show altered frontal gray matter, it is unknown if similar deficits relate to externalizing traits in non-clinical populations. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to retrospectively analyze the cerebral gray matter volume of 176 young adult social to heavy drinkers (mean age=24.0±2.9, male=83.5%) from studies of alcoholism risk. We hypothesized that prefrontal gray matter volume and externalizing traits would be correlated. Externalizing personality trait components-Boredom Susceptibility-Impulsivity (BS/IMP) and Empathy/Low Antisocial Behaviors (EMP/LASB)-were tested for correlations with gray matter partial volume estimates (gmPVE). Significantly large clusters (pFWE<0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected) of gmPVE correlated with EMP/LASB in dorsolateral and medial prefrontal regions, and in occipital cortex. BS/IMP did not correlate with gmPVE, but one scale of impulsivity (Eysenck I7) correlated positively with bilateral inferior frontal/orbitofrontal, and anterior insula gmPVE. In this large sample of community-dwelling young adults, antisocial behavior/low empathy corresponded with reduced prefrontal and occipital gray matter, while impulsivity correlated with increased inferior frontal and anterior insula cortical volume. These findings add to a literature indicating that externalizing personality features involve altered frontal architecture.

  11. Generalizing the mean intercept length tensor for gray-level images.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Rodrigo; Borga, Magnus; Smedby, Örjan

    2012-07-01

    The mean intercept length tensor is the most used technique to estimate microstructure orientation and anisotropy of trabecular bone. This paper proposes an efficient extension of this technique to gray-scale images based on a closed formulation of the mean intercept length tensor and a generalization using different angular convolution kernels. First, the extended Gaussian image is computed for the binary or gray-scale image. Second, the intercepts are computed for all possible orientations through an angular convolution with the half-cosine function. Finally, the tensor is computed by means of the covariance matrix. The complexity of the method isO(n + m) in contrast with O(nm) of traditional implementations, where n is the number of voxels in the image and m is the number of orientations used in the computations. The method is generalized by applying other angular convolution kernels instead of the half-cosine function. As a result, the anisotropy of the tensor can be controlled while keeping the eigenvectors intact. The proposed extension to gray-scale yields accurate results for reliable computations of the extended Gaussian image and, unlike the traditional methodology, is not affected by artifacts generated by discretizations during the sampling of different orientations. Experiments show that the computations on both binary and gray-scale images are correlated, and that computations in gray-scale are more robust, enabling the use of the mean intercept length tensor to clinical examinations of trabecular bone. The use of kernels based on the von Mises-Fisher distribution is promising as the anisotropy can be adjusted with a parameter in order to improve its power to predict mechanical properties of trabecular bone. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Ultrasonography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Shinji; Yasuda, Seiei; Oida, Yasuhisa; Mukoyama, Sayuri; Nishi, Takayuki; Mukai, Masaya; Nakasaki, Hisao; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2003-04-01

    Acute appendicitis is usually encountered clinically as acute abdomen. Typical cases are easy to diagnose, but it can sometimes be very difficult to make a diagnosis in atypical cases. We retrospectively studied patients who underwent ultrasonography for right-sided lower abdominal pain suggesting acute appendicitis, and assessed the accuracy of ultrasonic diagnosis. The subjects were 202 patients (100 males and 102 females) aged 6-89 years (mean: 33.3 years). From the ultrasonic findings, appendicitis was classified as follows: 1) catarrhal: a clear layer structure of the appendiceal wall and mucosal edema; 2) phlegmonous: an ill-defined layer structure of the appendiceal wall, moderate enlargement of the apendix, and maximum transverse dimension of > or = 10 mm; and 3) gangrenous: unidentifiable layer structure of the appendiceal wall and marked enlargement to form a mass. The appendix was visualized in 142 of the 202 patients (70.3 %). When the appendix was detected, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasound for making a diagnosis of appendicitis were 97.6%, 82.0 %, 91.5 %, respectively. With regard to assessment of the severity of inflammation, ultrasonic and histologic findings were concordant in 61.2 % of the patients. However, ultrasound was shown to possibly underestimate the extent of inflammation. On the other hand, 11 of the 60 patients with an undetectable appendix (18.3 %) were clinically diagnosed as having appendicitis. The pathologic diagnosis was catarrhal appendicitis in 3 patients and phlegmonous appendicitis in 8 patients. In patients with an undetectable appendix, the possibility of catarrhal or phlegmonous appendicitis should be kept in mind.

  13. Ultrasonography - A viable tool for airway assessment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Preethi B; Punetha, Pankaj; Chalam, Kolli S

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Accurate prediction of the Cormack-Lehane (CL) grade preoperatively can help in better airway management of the patient during induction of anaesthesia. Our aim was to determine the utility of ultrasonography in predicting CL grade. Methods: We studied 100 patients undergoing general endotracheal anaesthesia. Mallampati (MP) class, thyromental distance (TMD) and sternomental distance (SMD) were noted. Ultrasound measurements of the anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the hyoid (ANS-Hyoid), anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the vocal cords (ANS-VC) and ratio of the depth of the pre-epiglottic space (Pre-E) to the distance from the epiglottis to the mid-point of the distance between the vocal cords (E-VC) were obtained. CL grade was noted during intubation. Chi-square test was employed to determine if there was any statistical difference in the measurements of patients with different CL grades. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were calculated for the various parameters. Results: The incidence of difficult intubation was 14%. An ANS-VC >0.23 cm had a sensitivity of 85.7% in predicting a CL Grade of 3 or 4, which was higher than that of MP class, TMD and SMD. However, the specificity, PPV and accuracy were lower than the physical parameters. The NPV was comparable. Conclusion: Ultrasound is a useful tool in airway assessment. ANS-VC >0.23 cm is a potential predictor of difficult intubation. ANS-Hyoid is not indicative of difficult intubation. The ratio Pre-E/E-VC has a low to moderate predictive value. PMID:27942053

  14. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyewon; Jee, Sungju; Park, Soo Ho; Ahn, Seung-Chan; Im, Juneho; Sohn, Min Kyun

    2016-12-01

    To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all p<0.05). EI demonstrated a significant positive correlation with latency of the median motor and sensory NCS in CTS patients (p<0.05). These findings suggest that quantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US.

  15. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Methods Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Results Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all p<0.05). EI demonstrated a significant positive correlation with latency of the median motor and sensory NCS in CTS patients (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings suggest that quantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US. PMID:28119835

  16. Application of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and ultrasonography scores in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao-Han; Yang, Shu-Ping; Shen, Hao-Lin; Lin, Li-Qing; Zhong, Rong; Wu, Rui-Ming; Lv, Guo-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate diagnostic value of ultrasonography scores (US) and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in evaluating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) activity. Methods: 39 patients with RA were included and the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, wrist, elbow and knee joints of them were examined by high frequency ultrasound. The severe joints and the related indexes (synovial thickness, synovial blood flow, joint effusion and bone erosion) were exposed. Then scores (0~3) were obtained and the sum was calculated. For 12 patients of the 39, 2.4 ml SonoVue was intravenously injected with observation of synovial enhancing. ROIs time-intensity curve (TIC) was obtained and the parameters including area under curve (AUC), peak intensity (PI) and time to peak (TTP) were analyzed. For 39 patients, the relationships among each parameters, ultrasonography scores, DAS28 scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP, RF, anti-CCP) were analyzed. Results: The US were significantly correlated with DAS28 Scores (r=0.823, P<0.01=. The correlation between US and CRP was better than that between DAS28 scores and CRP (rUS =0.692, rDAS28=0.526, P<0.01). The synovial thickness in US were correlated with DAS28 Scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP) (rDAS28=0.852, rESR=0.779, rCRP=0.587, P<0.01. The AUC and PI in CEUS were significantly correlated with US (rAUC=0.832, rPI=0.809, P<0.01=. The correlations among AUC, PI and ESR were better than that between US and ESR (rAUC=0.907, rPI=0.851, rUS=0.836, P<0.01=. The correlations among AUC, PI and CRP were better than that between US and CRP (rAUC=0.855, rPI=0.854, rUS=0.692, P<0.01. Conclusions: US was almost identical with DAS28 Scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP) in diagnosis of RA activity, while CEUS was almost identical with DAS28 Scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP). In diagnosis of RA, US may be better than DAS28 Scores, while CEUS better than US. Both of them were useful for

  17. Application of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and ultrasonography scores in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Han; Yang, Shu-Ping; Shen, Hao-Lin; Lin, Li-Qing; Zhong, Rong; Wu, Rui-Ming; Lv, Guo-Rong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic value of ultrasonography scores (US) and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in evaluating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) activity. 39 patients with RA were included and the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, wrist, elbow and knee joints of them were examined by high frequency ultrasound. The severe joints and the related indexes (synovial thickness, synovial blood flow, joint effusion and bone erosion) were exposed. Then scores (0~3) were obtained and the sum was calculated. For 12 patients of the 39, 2.4 ml SonoVue was intravenously injected with observation of synovial enhancing. ROIs time-intensity curve (TIC) was obtained and the parameters including area under curve (AUC), peak intensity (PI) and time to peak (TTP) were analyzed. For 39 patients, the relationships among each parameters, ultrasonography scores, DAS28 scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP, RF, anti-CCP) were analyzed. The US were significantly correlated with DAS28 Scores (r=0.823, P<0.01=. The correlation between US and CRP was better than that between DAS28 scores and CRP (rUS =0.692, rDAS28=0.526, P<0.01). The synovial thickness in US were correlated with DAS28 Scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP) (rDAS28=0.852, rESR=0.779, rCRP=0.587, P<0.01. The AUC and PI in CEUS were significantly correlated with US (rAUC=0.832, rPI=0.809, P<0.01=. The correlations among AUC, PI and ESR were better than that between US and ESR (rAUC=0.907, rPI=0.851, rUS=0.836, P<0.01=. The correlations among AUC, PI and CRP were better than that between US and CRP (rAUC=0.855, rPI=0.854, rUS=0.692, P<0.01. US was almost identical with DAS28 Scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP) in diagnosis of RA activity, while CEUS was almost identical with DAS28 Scores and biochemical examinations (ESR, CRP). In diagnosis of RA, US may be better than DAS28 Scores, while CEUS better than US. Both of them were useful for evaluation of RA activity.

  18. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography for clinical medial epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi-Young; Lee, Sung-Moon; Lee, Michael Y

    2008-04-01

    To assess the ultrasonographic findings and to evaluate the value of ultrasonography as a diagnostic method for detecting clinical medial epicondylitis. A prospective, single-blind study. An outpatient rehabilitation clinic in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty-one elbows from 18 patients with clinical medial epicondylitis and 25 elbows without medial epicondylitis were evaluated. Not applicable. The clinical diagnosis of medial epicondylitis was based on the patient's symptoms and clinical signs in a physical examination performed by a physiatrist. An experienced radiologist made the real-time ultrasonographic diagnosis based on the detection of at least one of the following abnormal findings: a focal hypoechoic or anechoic area, tendon nonvisualization, intratendinous calcifications, and cortical irregularity. Ultrasonography revealed positive findings in 20 of 21 elbows with medial epicondylitis and was negative in 23 of 25 without medial epicondylitis. Ultrasonography showed sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for clinical medial epicondylitis of 95.2%, 92%, 93.5%, 90.9%, and 95.8%, respectively. Tendinosis was observed in 15 elbows, and a partial-thickness tear, including 1 intrasubstance tear, was detected in 5 elbows. The most common ultrasonographic abnormality was a focal echogenic abnormality (15 hypoechoic, 5 anechoic) of the tendons. Our results indicate that ultrasonography is informative and accurate for the detection of clinical medial epicondylitis. Therefore, ultrasonography should be considered as an initial imaging method for evaluating medial epicondylitis.

  19. Is incest common in gray wolf packs?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Deborah E; Meier, Thomas J.; Geffen, Eli; Mech, L. David; Burch, John W.; Adams, Layne G.; Wayne, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    Wolf packs generally consist of a breeding pair and their maturing offspring that help provision and protect pack young. Because the reproductive tenure in wolves is often short, reproductively mature offspring might replace their parents, resulting in sibling or parent-offspring matings. To determine the extent of incestuous pairings, we measured relatedness based on variability in 20 microsatellite loci of mated pairs, parent-offspring pairs, and siblings in two populations of gray wolves. Our 16 sampled mated pairs had values of relatedness not overlapping those of known parent-offspring or sibling dyads, which is consistent with their being unrelated or distantly related. These results suggest that full siblings or a parent and its offspring rarely mate and that incest avoidance is an important constraint on gray wolf behavioral ecology.

  20. Modeling microstructure development in gray cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsch, David D.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.

    1994-05-01

    Recent years have seen increasing use of solidification process modeling as a tool to aid in the analysis and elimination of manufacturing defects in castings. Grain size and other microstructural features such as second-phase morphology and distribution are the primary factors in determining the mechanical properties in cast metals. In this work, a representation of nucleation and growth kinetics for gray cast irons, based on a statistical description of the microstructure, has been coupled with a commercial finite-element method code for transient heat-flow calculation to determine microstructure. Features predicted include eutectic cell size, fractions of gray and white iron, graphite morphology, percent pearlite, percent ferrite, and pearlite spacing. The predicted microstructure can then be used to determine the strength and fatigue properties using published correlations. The theoretical development and results of the finite-elementbased model will be discussed and compared with experimental results.

  1. Is incest common in gray wolf packs?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.; Meier, T.; Geffen, E.; Mech, L.D.; Burch, J.W.; Adams, L.G.; Wayne, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Wolf packs generally consist of a breeding pair and their maturing offspring that help provision and protect pack young. Because the reproductive tenure in wolves often is short, reproductively mature offspring might replace their parents, resulting in sibling or parent-offspring matings. To determine the extent of incestuous pairings, we measure relatedness based on variability in 20 microsatellite loci of mated pairs, parent-offspring pairs and siblings in two populations of gray wolves. Our 16 sampled mated pairs had values of relatedness not overlapping those of known parent-offspring or sibling dyads, which is consistent with their being unrelated or distantly related. These results suggest that full siblings or a parent and their offspring rarely mate and that incest avoidance is an important constraint on gray wolf behavioral ecology.

  2. 3D resolution gray-tone lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae

    2000-04-01

    With the conventional micro machining technologies: isotropic and anisotropic, dry and wet etching, a few shapes can be done. To overcome this limitation, both binary multi- tasking technique or direct EB writing were used, but an inexpensive one-step UV-lithographic method, using a so- called 'gray-tone reticle', seems to be the best choice to produce local intensity modulation during exposure process. Although, by using this method and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it is easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations, too. The maximum number of gray-levels, on projection reticle, achieved by e-beam writing, are only 200. Also, for very thick resists, the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. These are the reasons why the author prose da new approach to enhance the 3D resolution of gray-tone lithography applied for thick resist. By a high resolution, both for vertical direction, as well as for horizontal direction. Particular emphasis was put on the design, manufacturing and use of halftone transmission masks, required for UV- lithographic step in the fabrication process of mechanical, optical or electronics components. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3D structuring of thick resist in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1. Preliminary experimental results are presented for positive thick resists in SEM micrographs. A future optimization of the lithographic process opens interesting perspectives for application of this high 3D resolution structuring method in the fabrication process of different products, with imposed complex smooth profiles, such as: x-ray LiGA-masks, refractive optics and surface- relief DOEs.

  3. Causes and consequences of gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Watrin, Françoise; Manent, Jean-Bernard; Cardoso, Carlos; Represa, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiological bases of gray matter heterotopia and to appreciate their involvement in brain cortical development and functional consequences, namely epilepsy. The development of the cerebral cortex results from complex sequential processes including cell proliferation, cell migration, cortical organization, and formation of neuronal networks. Disruption of these steps yields different types of cortical malformations including gray matter heterotopia, characterized by the ectopic position of neurons along the ventricular walls or in the deep white matter. Cortical malformations are major causes of epilepsy, being responsible for up to 40% of drug-resistant epilepsy, and the cognitive level of affected patients varies from normal to severely impaired. This review reports data from human patients and animal models highlighting the genetic causes for these disorders affecting not only neuronal migration but also the proliferation of cortical progenitors. Therefore, gray matter heterotopias should not be considered as solely due to an abnormal neuronal migration and classifying them as such may be too restrictive. The review will also summarize literature data indicating that besides ectopic neurons, neighbor cortical areas also play a consistent role in epileptogenesis, supporting the notion that plastic changes secondary to the initial malformation are instrumental in the pathophysiology of epilepsy in affected patients.

  4. Diagnosis of aortic aneurysms by scintigraphy and ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Caille, G. ); Chatal, J.F.; Tellier, J.L.; Talmant, C.; Guihard, R. )

    1981-10-01

    Angioscintigraphy, performed on 50 patients suspected of aortic aneurysm and complemented by abdominal ultrasonography in 31 cases, disclosed: - Three cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm, 2 of which were confirmed by arteriography and surgery. It was impossible to perform surgery in the third case, no arteriography was done. Strict agreement with standard thoracic images had made the angioscintigraphic diagnosis seem correct. Twenty-seven cases of abdominal aortic aneurysms were confirmed by arteriography or surgery. Ultrasonography disclosed an abdominal aortic aneurysm in 26 cases, 20 of which were confirmed. The agreement of the two procedures in 10 unconfirmed cases led us to consider the diagnosis as correct. Angioscintigraphy appears to be a reliable procedure for detecting thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Ultrasonography is the simplest and least costly procedure for study of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  5. [The application of digestive endoscopic ultrasonography in the gallbladder pathology].

    PubMed

    Roseau, Gilles

    2004-08-28

    A WELL DEFINED PATHOLOGY: Bilary lithiasis and vesicular parietal abnormalities constitute the totality of the gallbladder pathology. The surgical experience and widely current use of digestive imaging, notably ultrasonography, have contributed to enlightening our knowledge of this pathology. POTENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC PROBLEMS: There is no particular problem in the diagnosis of gallbladder lithiasis and its treatment is currently codified. However the discovery of thickened gallbladder wall or polyps increases the fear of gallbladder cancer. A FUNDAMENTAL ROLE FOR ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY: Within the framework of screening for cancer, endoscopic ultrasonography, the performance of which in gallbladder pathology has rarely been studied, appears promising. Other than its role in the control of the extension of gallbladder cancers, it provides reliable characterisation of most of the polyps. Hence its place today is unavoidable in the therapeutic decision trees of such affections.

  6. Immersion ultrasonography: simultaneous A-scan and B-scan.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D J; Dallow, R L; Smith, M E

    1979-01-01

    In eyes with opaque media, ophthalmic ultrasound provides a unique source of information that can dramatically affect the course of patient management. In addition, when an ocular abnormality can be visualized, ultrasonography provides information that supplements and complements other diagnostic testing. It provides documentation and differentiation of abnormal states, such as vitreous hemorrhage and intraocular tumor, as well as differentiation of orbital tumors from inflammatory causes of exophthalmos. Additional capabilities of ultrasound are biometric determinations for calculation of intraocular lens implant powers and drug-effectiveness studies. Maximal information is derived from ultrasonography when A-scan and B-scan techniques are employed simultaneously. Flexibility of electronics, variable-frequency transducers, and the use of several different manual scanning patterns aid in detection and interpretation of results. The immersion system of ultrasonography provides these features optimally.

  7. Optical Pseudocolor Encoding Of Gray-Scale Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1990-01-01

    Optical encoding much faster than digital electronic encoding. In optical pseudocolor-encoding apparatus brightness modulation in image from television camera transformed into polarization modulation in LCTV, and then into pseudocolor modulation in image on projection screen. Advantageous for such purposes as thermography, inspection of circuit boards, mammography, and mapping.

  8. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to…

  9. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Leib, M S; Larson, M M; Grant, D C; Monroe, W E; Troy, G C; Panciera, D L; Rossmeisl, J H; Werre, S R

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is common in dogs and has many causes. Ultrasonographic descriptions of many gastrointestinal diseases have been published, but the diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea has not been investigated. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasound will be highest in dogs with GI neoplasia and lowest in those with inflammatory disorders. 87 pet dogs with chronic diarrhea. Prospective study in which medical records were reviewed and contribution of abdominal ultrasound toward making diagnosis was scored. In 57/87 (66%) of dogs, the same diagnosis would have been reached without ultrasonography. In 13/87 (15%) of dogs, the ultrasound examination was vital or beneficial to making the diagnosis. Univariable analysis identified that increased diagnostic utility was associated with weight loss (P = .0086), palpation of an abdominal or rectal mass (P = .0031), diseases that commonly have mass lesions visible on ultrasound examination (P < .0001), and a final diagnosis of GI neoplasia. Multivariable regression indicated that utility of abdominal ultrasonography would be 30 times more likely to be high in dogs in which an abdominal or rectal mass was palpated (odds ratio 30.5, 95% CI 5.5-169.6) (P < .0001) versus dogs without a palpable mass. In 15/87 (17%) of dogs, additional benefits of ultrasonography to case management, independent of the contribution to the diagnosis of diarrhea, were identified. Overall, the diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography was low in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Identification of factors associated with high diagnostic utility is an indication to perform abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Probabilities for profitable fungicide use against gray leaf spot in hybrid maize.

    PubMed

    Munkvold, G P; Martinson, C A; Shriver, J M; Dixon, P M

    2001-05-01

    ABSTRACT Gray leaf spot, caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis, causes considerable yield losses in hybrid maize grown in the north-central United States and elsewhere. Nonchemical management tactics have not adequately prevented these losses. The probability of profitably using fungicide application as a management tool for gray leaf spot was evaluated in 10 field experiments under conditions of natural inoculum in Iowa. Gray leaf spot severity in untreated control plots ranged from 2.6 to 72.8% for the ear leaf and from 3.0 to 7.7 (1 to 9 scale) for whole-plot ratings. In each experiment, fungicide applications with propiconazole or mancozeb significantly reduced gray leaf spot severity. Fungicide treatment significantly (P gray leaf spot severity and yield. We used a Bayesian inference method to calculate for each experiment the probability of achieving a positive net return with one or two propiconazole applications, based on the mean yields and standard deviations for treated and untreated plots, the price of grain, and the costs of the fungicide applications. For one application, the probability ranged from approximately 0.06 to more than 0.99, and exceeded 0.50 in six of nine scenarios (specific experiment/hybrid). The highest probabilities occurred in the 1995 experiments with the most susceptible hybrid. Probabilities were almost always higher for a single application of propiconazole than for two applications. These results indicate that a single application of propiconazole frequently can be profitable for gray leaf spot management in Iowa, but the probability of a profitable application is strongly influenced by hybrid susceptibility. The calculation of probabilities for positive net returns was more informative than mean separation in terms of assessing the economic success of the fungicide applications.

  11. Ultrasonography of hydronephrosis in the newborn: a practical review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Widespread use of fetal ultrasonography is accompanied by more frequent detection of antenatal hydronephrosis. Therefore, sonographic evaluation of neonates with a history of antenatal hydronephrosis is becoming more widespread. As an initial postnatal non-invasive imaging modality, ultrasonography is used to screen for persistence of hydronephrosis, determine the level and severity of obstruction, and contribute to appropriate diagnosis and treatment. This review aims to provide a practical overview of the sonographic evaluation of neonatal hydronephrosis and to describe the sonographic findings of conditions associated with hydronephrosis in the newborn. PMID:27156562

  12. Ultrasonography applications in diagnosis and management of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Ralf G

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasonography is an elegant tool for the detection of tenosynovitis, synovitis, and erosions very early in rheumatoid arthritis, and the presence of a power Doppler signal is one of the best predictors of joint damage. Although clinical scores remain the mainstay of disease activity assessment, ultrasonography has proved to be a remarkably robust tool for reliable assessment of changes in rheumatoid arthritis. There is no evidence to suggest that problems with operator dependence would be greater than with other imaging modalities or physical examination, if performed by trained providers.

  13. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  14. Morphometry of ovarian structures by transrectal ultrasonography in Serrana goats.

    PubMed

    Simões, J; Potes, J; Azevedo, J; Almeida, J C; Fontes, P; Baril, G; Mascarenhas, R

    2005-02-01

    The accuracy of transrectal real-time ultrasonography (RTU) scanning technique to detect ovarian structures (follicles and corpus luteum) of Serrana goats was compared to the data obtained by observation of ovarian sequential slices. This slicing technique (SLI) was considered as reference method. The laparoscopy and laparotomy techniques were also used for corpora lutea identification. For this purpose the ovaries of 14 females were observed, 7-8 days after ovulation, by transrectal ultrasonography followed by laparoscopic examination. Then ovaries were removed and studied by slicing. In the sliced sections of each ovary (n=28), follicles and corpus luteum (CL) were identified and counted. CL and follicular diameters were measured using a millimetre scale. The total number of follicles, counted by RTU, was significantly lower than that observed by SLI (P <0.01). This difference was mainly due to the under estimation of <2 mm follicles category. The correlation coefficient between category data obtained by RTU and SLI methods for the number of follicles > or =3 mm was high (r2=0.95, P <0.001), which highlights the use of UTR as a potential methodology to study the follicular dynamic of goats. There were no significant differences (P >0.05) between the average number (mean +/- S.D.) of corpus luteum identified per ovary by RTU (0.71 +/- 0.75), laparoscopy (0.58 +/- 0.71), laparotomy (0.67 +/- 0.76) or SLI (0.83 +/- 0.76) methods. The accuracy for the identification of ovulation, validated by CL detection on D7-D8 by SLI (100%), was 91.7%, 87.5% and 83.3% by RTU, laparotomy and laparoscopy, respectively. The negative predictive value of RTU, laparotomy and laparoscopy to verify the absence of a CL in the ovary was 81.8%, 75.0% and 69.2%, respectively. The specificity of all three methods for the CL identification was 100%. No significant differences (P >0.05) were found in the probability to detect the exact number of CL (0, 1 or 2) counted in each ovary between the

  15. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  16. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  17. Role of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of temporal arteritis.

    PubMed

    Ball, E L; Walsh, S R; Tang, T Y; Gohil, R; Clarke, J M F

    2010-12-01

    Temporal artery (TA) biopsy is the current standard for diagnosing temporal arteritis, but has limited sensitivity. Colour duplex ultrasonography is a newer, non-invasive method of diagnosing temporal arteritis. A systematic review was performed of trials comparing TA biopsy with duplex ultrasonography. Duplex results (halo sign, stenosis or vessel occlusion) were compared with either TA biospy findings or the American College of Rheumatology research criteria for diagnosing temporal arteritis. Trials were identified from MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library trials register. The performance of duplex ultrasonography was assessed with weighted independent sensitivity and specificity values, and summary receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were 17 eligible studies containing 998 patients. When the halo sign on duplex imaging was compared with TA biopsy, the sensitivity was 75 (95 per cent confidence interval 67 to 82) per cent and the specificity was 83 (78 to 88) per cent. There was no heterogeneity across the eligible studies. Duplex ultrasonography was relatively accurate for diagnosing temporal arteritis. It should become the first-line investigation, with biopsy reserved for patients with a negative scan. Copyright © 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Ultrasonography of the canine shoulder joint and its pathological changes.

    PubMed

    Piórek, A; Adamiak, Z

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to present and discuss the available data on canine shoulder joint ultrasonography. The paper presents the method of ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder joint area, describes the normal structure of the shoulder joint in dogs, and discusses the most frequently encountered shoulder joint pathologies.

  19. Usefulness of ultrasonography in the treatment of nasal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Hum; Joung, Ho-Hoon; Lee, Jun-Ho; Hong, Seok Min

    2009-12-01

    Ultrasonography has recently been used in assessment and diagnosis of maxillofacial trauma because it is easy and quick to perform, inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive. The aim of this study was to estimate ultrasonography as an intraoperative repositioning control of nasal bone fractures. We studied 32 patients with suspected nasal bone fracture. We performed preoperative computed tomography (CT) for evaluation of the type and extent of nasal bone fractures. We also took external photographs for evaluation of external deviation of the nose and nasal deformity. During surgery, we performed real-time ultrasonography-guided closed reduction using a 10 MHz linear transducer. After 1 year, we performed postoperative evaluation with CT and external photography. We classified patients into three groups according to their CT score. Patients were 23 males and 9 females aged 8-39 years. Clinical symptoms were pain, nasal swelling, nasal bleeding, and localized depression at the trauma site. In almost all patients, postoperative external photographs showed a symmetrical nasal dorsum without external deformity, and postoperative CT showed stabilization of bony fragments and good alignment of the nasal bone. Postoperatively, the CT score was 3 (excellent) in 25 patients, 2 (good) in 5 patients, and 1 (fair) in 2 patients. We suggest that ultrasonography is very useful for evaluating intraoperative repositioning of nasal bone fractures.

  20. [Intraoperative ultrasonography in the staging of pancreatic head neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Alberti, Antonino; Dattola, Pasquale; Littori, Francesca; Dattola, Arturo; Maccarone, Pietro; Basile, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Tumours of the head of the pancreas constitute the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. These tumours are characterised by low survival rates (5% at 5 years) and low surgical resectability rates (20-25%). Liver metastases, lymph-node and vascular involvement, and peritoneal metastases are, in our opinion, exclusion criteria for curative surgical resection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of intraoperative ultrasonography on the staging of such tumours. Over the period from 1990 to 2000 we introduced intraoperative ultrasonography in the staging of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 51 patients who at preoperative staging had been regarded as candidates for surgical therapy consisting in a pancreaticoduodenectomy. All patients had been staged by preoperative abdominal ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRI. Intraoperative ultrasound and colour-Doppler imaging (from 1997 on) revealed involvement of (i) the liver, (ii) the splenomesenteric vessels and (iii) the portal vein. Intraoperative ultrasonography yielded a diagnosis of occult liver metastases in 10 cases and signs of vascular involvement (absence of cleavage, partial and total thrombosis) in 12. One false-negative was registered. Intraoperative ultrasonography in our experience showed 98% sensitivity and specificity in the detection of vascular and lymph-node involvement. Its sensitivity in the detection of liver metastases was 100%. Intraoperative ultrasound is a procedure with a very high sensitivity in the operative staging of cancer of the head of the pancreas.

  1. Use of ultrasonography to make reproductive management decisions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transrectal ultrasonography has been available for making management decisions since the mid 1980’s. This technology allows for the real-time visualization of internal structures (i.e. ovary and fetus) that are otherwise difficult to evaluate. The use of this technology in making reproductive manag...

  2. Fusion of white and gray matter geometry: a framework for investigating brain development

    PubMed Central

    Savadjiev, Peter; Rathi, Yogesh; Bouix, Sylvain; Smith, Alex R.; Schultz, Robert T.; Verma, Ragini; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Current neuroimaging investigation of the white matter typically focuses on measurements derived from diffusion tensor imaging, such as fractional anisotropy (FA). In contrast, imaging studies of the gray matter oftentimes focus on morphological features such as cortical thickness, folding and surface curvature. As a result, it is not clear how to combine findings from these two types of approaches in order to obtain a consistent picture of morphological changes in both gray and white matter. In this paper, we propose a joint investigation of gray and white matter morphology by combining geometrical information from white and the gray matter. To achieve this, we first introduce a novel method for computing multi-scale white matter tract geometry. Its formulation is based on the differential geometry of curve sets and is easily incorporated into a continuous scale-space framework. We then incorporate this method into a novel framework for “fusing” white and gray matter geometrical information. Given a set of fiber tracts originating in a particular cortical region, the key idea is to compute two scalar fields that represent geometrical characteristics of the white matter and of the surface of the cortical region. A quantitative marker is created by combining the distributions of these scalar values using Mutual Information. This marker can be then used in the study of normal and pathological brain structure and development. We apply this framework to a study on autism spectrum disorder in children. Our preliminary results support the view that autism may be characterized by early brain overgrowth, followed by reduced or arrested growth [7]. PMID:25066750

  3. Fusion of white and gray matter geometry: a framework for investigating brain development.

    PubMed

    Savadjiev, Peter; Rathi, Yogesh; Bouix, Sylvain; Smith, Alex R; Schultz, Robert T; Verma, Ragini; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2014-12-01

    Current neuroimaging investigation of the white matter typically focuses on measurements derived from diffusion tensor imaging, such as fractional anisotropy (FA). In contrast, imaging studies of the gray matter oftentimes focus on morphological features such as cortical thickness, folding and surface curvature. As a result, it is not clear how to combine findings from these two types of approaches in order to obtain a consistent picture of morphological changes in both gray and white matter. In this paper, we propose a joint investigation of gray and white matter morphology by combining geometrical information from white and the gray matter. To achieve this, we first introduce a novel method for computing multi-scale white matter tract geometry. Its formulation is based on the differential geometry of curve sets and is easily incorporated into a continuous scale-space framework. We then incorporate this method into a novel framework for "fusing" white and gray matter geometrical information. Given a set of fiber tracts originating in a particular cortical region, the key idea is to compute two scalar fields that represent geometrical characteristics of the white matter and of the surface of the cortical region. A quantitative marker is created by combining the distributions of these scalar values using Mutual Information. This marker can be then used in the study of normal and pathological brain structure and development. We apply this framework to a study on autism spectrum disorder in children. Our preliminary results support the view that autism may be characterized by early brain overgrowth, followed by reduced or arrested growth (Courchesne, 2004). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Insular Gray Matter Volume and Objective Quality of Life in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Yoshizumi, Miho; Miyata, Jun; Ubukata, Shiho; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kawada, Ryosaku; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Sugihara, Genichi; Aso, Toshihiko; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of life has been recognized as an important outcome for schizophrenia treatment, although the fundamental determinants are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the association between brain structural abnormalities and objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Thirty-three schizophrenia patients and 42 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The Quality of Life Scale was used to measure objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Voxel-based morphometry was performed to identify regional brain alterations that correlate with Quality of Life Scale score in the patient group. Schizophrenia patients showed gray matter reductions in the frontal, temporal, limbic, and subcortical regions. We then performed voxel-based multiple regression analysis in these regions to identify any correlations between regional gray matter volume and Quality of Life Scale scores. We found that among four subcategories of the scale, the Instrumental Role category score correlated with gray matter volume in the right anterior insula in schizophrenia patients. In addition, this correlation was shown to be mediated by negative symptoms. Our findings suggest that the neural basis of objective quality of life might differ topographically from that of subjective QOL in schizophrenia. PMID:26544607

  5. Insular Gray Matter Volume and Objective Quality of Life in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Yoshizumi, Miho; Miyata, Jun; Ubukata, Shiho; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kawada, Ryosaku; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Sugihara, Genichi; Aso, Toshihiko; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of life has been recognized as an important outcome for schizophrenia treatment, although the fundamental determinants are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the association between brain structural abnormalities and objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Thirty-three schizophrenia patients and 42 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The Quality of Life Scale was used to measure objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Voxel-based morphometry was performed to identify regional brain alterations that correlate with Quality of Life Scale score in the patient group. Schizophrenia patients showed gray matter reductions in the frontal, temporal, limbic, and subcortical regions. We then performed voxel-based multiple regression analysis in these regions to identify any correlations between regional gray matter volume and Quality of Life Scale scores. We found that among four subcategories of the scale, the Instrumental Role category score correlated with gray matter volume in the right anterior insula in schizophrenia patients. In addition, this correlation was shown to be mediated by negative symptoms. Our findings suggest that the neural basis of objective quality of life might differ topographically from that of subjective QOL in schizophrenia.

  6. Exploring a Plume-Based Mass-Flux Scheme in the Boundary-Layer Gray Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, M.; Heus, T.; Neggers, R.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the behavior of plume-based mass flux parameterizations in the gray zone of boundary layer convection, to inform the development of scale-aware and scale-adaptive parameterizations. To this end, the Eddy Diffusivity Mass Flux scheme with multiple plumes, named ED(MF)n, is implemented in a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. This way, the LES is used as a non-hydrostatic larger-scale model, providing a convenient platform for investigating the behavior of parameterizations across the boundary-layer gray zone. First, as a feasibility study, a single plume is launched in every column of the LES in an offline, diagnostic way, without affecting the simulation. We find that the plumes are sensitive to the LES columns in which they rise, feeling the presence of LES clouds. A plume budget analysis shows that the plume termination height is mostly determined by the mixing term, and not so much by the buoyancy term. Then, the ED(MF)n is made interactive with the resolved flow, replacing the LES-subgrid scheme. The work performed by the scheme reduces with increasing LES resolution, due to the size-filtering applied in the ED(MF)n framework. An encouraging result is that the total specific humidity flux is conserved across the investigated range of LES resolutions, covering the gray zone between 10m (large-eddy resolving) and 10km (regional-scale). The sensitivity of the results to various model parameters is assessed.

  7. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, M Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-03-01

    The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm³ × 10³, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter tissue.

  8. Gray Extinction in the Orion Trapezium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Strobel, A.; Mulas, G.

    2016-12-01

    We estimated distances to several Orion Trapezium stars using our CaII-method and confirm the distance recommended by Menten et al. However, we found that in the case of HD 37020 both individual distances (based on the trigonometric VLBI parallax and/or CaII-method) differ from the spectrophotometric distance by a factor of 2.5. We interpret this fact as a result of presence of gray (neutral) extinction of about 1.8 mag in front of this star. The correctness of the applied spectral type/ luminosity class, Sp/L, (based on new original spectra from HARPS-N) and measurements of color indices is discussed.

  9. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, Mª Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm3 × 103, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter

  10. Information fusion for the Gray Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenstermacher, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) recently published a white paper describing the "Gray Zone", security challenges characterized by "ambiguity about the nature of the conflict, opacity of the parties involved…competitive interactions among and within state and non-state actors that fall between the traditional war and peace duality."1 Ambiguity and related uncertainty about actors, situations, relationships, and intent require new approaches to information collection, processing and fusion. General Votel, the current SOCOM commander, during a recent speech on "Operating in the Gray Zone" emphasized that it would be important to get left of the next crises and stated emphatically, "to do that we must understand the Human Domain."2 This understanding of the human domain must come from making meaning based on different perspectives, including the "emic" or first person/participant and "etic" or third person/observer perspectives. Much of the information currently collected and processed is etic. Incorporation and fusion with the emic perspective enables forecasting of behaviors/events and provides context for etic information (e.g., video).3 Gray zone challenges are perspective-dependent; for example, the conflict in Ukraine is interpreted quite differently by Russia, the US and Ukraine. Russia views it as war, necessitating aggressive action, the US views it as a security issue best dealt with by economic sanctions and diplomacy and the Ukraine views it as a threat to its sovereignty.4 General Otto in the Air Force ISR 2023 vision document stated that Air Force ISR is needed to anticipate strategic surprise.5 Anticipatory analysis enabling getting left of a crisis inherently requires a greater focus on information sources that elucidate the human environment as well as new methods that elucidate not only the "who's" and "what's", but the "how's and "why's," extracting features and/or patterns and subtle cues useful for forecasting behaviors and

  11. The diagnosis of neonatal pulmonary atelectasis using lung ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Shui-Wen; Liu, Fang; Li, Qiu-Ping; Kong, Xiang-Yong; Feng, Zhi-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasonography has been used for the diagnosis of many kinds of lung conditions, but few studies have investigated ultrasound for the diagnosis of neonatal pulmonary atelectasis (NAP). In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of lung ultrasonography for the diagnosis of NPA. From May 2012 to December 2013, 80 neonates with NPA and 50 neonates without lung disease were enrolled in this study. Each lung of every infant was divided into the anterior, lateral, and posterior regions by the anterior and posterior axillary lines. Each region was scanned carefully with the probe perpendicular or parallel to the ribs. The ultrasound findings were confirmed by chest radiograph (CXR) or CT scan. Sixty of the 80 patients with signs of NPA on lung ultrasound also had signs of NPA on CXR (termed focal-type atelectasis), and the other 20 patients had signs of NPA on chest CT scan while there were no abnormal findings on CXR (termed occult lung atelectasis). In patients with NPA, the main ultrasound findings were large areas of lung consolidation with clearly demarcated borders, air bronchograms, pleural line abnormalities, and absence of A-lines, as well as the presence of lung pulse and absence of lung sliding on real-time ultrasound. The sensitivity of lung ultrasonography for the diagnosis of NPA was 100%, whereas the sensitivity of CXR was 75%. Large areas of lung consolidation with clearly demarcated borders were only observed in patients with NPA. Lung ultrasonography is an accurate and reliable method for diagnosing NPA; most importantly, it can find those occult lung atelectasis that could not be detected on CXR. Routine lung ultrasonography is a useful method of diagnosing or excluding NPA in neonates.

  12. Assessing Ultrasonography as a Diagnostic Tool for Porcine Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Pray, Ian W.; Santivaňez, Saul J.; Ayvar, Viterbo; Gamboa, Ricardo; Muro, Claudio; Moyano, Luz Maria; Benavides, Victor; Garcia, Hector H.; O’Neal, Seth E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Taenia solium inflicts substantial neurologic disease and economic losses on rural communities in many developing nations. “Ring-strategy” is a control intervention that targets treatment of humans and pigs among clusters of households (rings) that surround pigs heavily infected with cysticerci. These pigs are typically identified by examining the animal’s tongue for cysts. However, as prevalence decreases in intervened communities, more sensitive methods may be needed to identify these animals and to maintain control pressure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ultrasonography as an alternative method to detect pigs heavily infected with T. solium cysts. Methodology/Principal Findings We purchased 152 pigs representing all seropositive animals villagers were willing to sell from eight communities (pop. 2085) in Piura, Peru, where T. solium is endemic. Tongue and ultrasound examinations of the fore and hind-limbs were performed in these animals, followed by necropsy with fine dissection as gold standard to determine cyst burden. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography with tongue examination for their ability to detect heavy infection (≥ 100 viable cysts) in pigs. Compared to tongue examination, ultrasonography was more sensitive (100% vs. 91%) but less specific (90% vs. 98%), although these differences were not statistically significant. The greater sensitivity of ultrasound resulted in detection of one additional heavily infected pig compared to tongue examination (11/11 vs. 10/11), but resulted in more false positives (14/141 vs. 3/141) due to poor specificity. Conclusions/Significance Ultrasonography was highly sensitive in detecting heavily infected pigs and may identify more rings for screening or treatment compared to tongue examination. However, the high false positive rate using ultrasound would result in substantial unnecessary treatment. If specificity can be improved with greater operator experience

  13. Assessing Ultrasonography as a Diagnostic Tool for Porcine Cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Flecker, Robert H; Pray, Ian W; Santivaňez, Saul J; Ayvar, Viterbo; Gamboa, Ricardo; Muro, Claudio; Moyano, Luz Maria; Benavides, Victor; Garcia, Hector H; O'Neal, Seth E

    2017-01-01

    Taenia solium inflicts substantial neurologic disease and economic losses on rural communities in many developing nations. "Ring-strategy" is a control intervention that targets treatment of humans and pigs among clusters of households (rings) that surround pigs heavily infected with cysticerci. These pigs are typically identified by examining the animal's tongue for cysts. However, as prevalence decreases in intervened communities, more sensitive methods may be needed to identify these animals and to maintain control pressure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ultrasonography as an alternative method to detect pigs heavily infected with T. solium cysts. We purchased 152 pigs representing all seropositive animals villagers were willing to sell from eight communities (pop. 2085) in Piura, Peru, where T. solium is endemic. Tongue and ultrasound examinations of the fore and hind-limbs were performed in these animals, followed by necropsy with fine dissection as gold standard to determine cyst burden. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography with tongue examination for their ability to detect heavy infection (≥ 100 viable cysts) in pigs. Compared to tongue examination, ultrasonography was more sensitive (100% vs. 91%) but less specific (90% vs. 98%), although these differences were not statistically significant. The greater sensitivity of ultrasound resulted in detection of one additional heavily infected pig compared to tongue examination (11/11 vs. 10/11), but resulted in more false positives (14/141 vs. 3/141) due to poor specificity. Ultrasonography was highly sensitive in detecting heavily infected pigs and may identify more rings for screening or treatment compared to tongue examination. However, the high false positive rate using ultrasound would result in substantial unnecessary treatment. If specificity can be improved with greater operator experience, ultrasonography may benefit ring interventions where control efforts have

  14. PET MRI Coregistration in Intractable Epilepsy and Gray Matter Heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Seniaray, Nikhil; Jain, Anuj

    2017-03-01

    A 25-year-old woman with intractable seizures underwent FDG PET/MRI for seizure focus localization. MRI demonstrated bilateral carpetlike nodular subependymal gray matter and asymmetrical focal dilatation in the right temporal horn. PET/MRI showed increased FDG within subependymal gray matter with significant hypometabolism in right anterior temporal lobe. EEG and ictal semiology confirmed the right temporal seizure origin. This case highlights the importance of identification of gray matter heterotopia on FDG PET/MRI.

  15. Relationships between IQ and regional cortical gray matter thickness in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Narr, Katherine L; Woods, Roger P; Thompson, Paul M; Szeszko, Philip; Robinson, Delbert; Dimtcheva, Teodora; Gurbani, Mala; Toga, Arthur W; Bilder, Robert M

    2007-09-01

    Prior studies show positive correlations between full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and cerebral gray matter measures. Few imaging studies have addressed whether general intelligence is related to regional variations in brain tissue and the associated influences of sex. Cortical thickness may more closely reflect cytoarchitectural characteristics than gray matter density or volume estimates. To identify possible localized relationships, we examined FSIQ associations with cortical thickness at high spatial resolution across the cortex in healthy young adult (age 17-44 years) men (n = 30) and women (n = 35). Positive relationships were found between FSIQ and intracranial gray and white matter but not cerebrospinal fluid volumes. Significant associations with cortical thickness were evident bilaterally in prefrontal (Brodmann's areas [BAs] 10/11, 47) and posterior temporal cortices (BA 36/37) and proximal regions. Sex influenced regional relationships; women showed correlations in prefrontal and temporal association cortices, whereas men exhibited correlations primarily in temporal-occipital association cortices. In healthy adults, greater intelligence is associated with larger intracranial gray matter and to a lesser extent with white matter. Variations in prefrontal and posterior temporal cortical thickness are particularly linked with intellectual ability. Sex moderates regional relationships that may index dimorphisms in cognitive abilities, overall processing strategies, or differences in structural organization.

  16. Magnetic resonance morphometry of the loss of gray matter volume in Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianguo; Wang, Juan; Tian, Weizhong; Ding, Hongbin; Wei, Qilin; Huang, Huanxin; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jinli; Gu, Hongmei; Tang, Lemin

    2013-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry can be used to quantitatively compare structural differences and func-tional changes of gray matter in subjects. In the present study, we compared gray matter images of 32 patients with Parkinson's disease and 25 healthy controls using voxel-based morphometry based on 3.0 T high-field magnetic resonance T1-weighted imaging and clinical neurological scale scores. Results showed that the scores in Mini-Mental State Examination and Montreal Cognitive Assessment were lower in patients compared with controls. In particular, the scores of visuospa-tial/executive function items in Montreal Cognitive Assessment were significantly reduced, but mean scores of non-motor symptoms significantly increased, in patients with Parkinson's disease. In dition, gray matter volume was significantly diminished in Parkinson's disease patients compared with normal controls, including bilateral temporal lobe, bilateral occipital lobe, bilateral parietal lobe, bilateral frontal lobe, bilateral insular lobe, bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, bilateral amygdale, right uncus, and right posterior lobe of the cerebellum. These findings indicate that voxel-based phometry can accurately and quantitatively assess the loss of gray matter volume in patients with Parkinson' disease, and provide essential neuroimaging evidence for multisystem pathological mechanisms involved in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25206566

  17. Gray-matter macrostructure in cognitively healthy older persons: Associations with age and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Fleischman, Debra A.; Leurgans, Sue; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Barnes, Lisa L.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Han, S. Duke; Bennett, David A.

    2013-01-01

    A deeper understanding of brain macrostructure and its associations with cognition in persons who are considered cognitively healthy is critical to the early detection of persons at risk of developing dementia. Few studies have examined the associations of all three gray-matter macrostructural brain indices (volume, thickness, surface area) with age and cognition, in the same persons who are over the age of 65 and do not have cognitive impairment. We performed automated morphometric reconstruction of total gray matter, cortical gray matter, subcortical gray matter and 84 individual regions in 186 participants (60% over the age of 80) without cognitive impairment. Morphometric measures were scaled and expressed as difference per decade of age and an adjusted score was created to identify those regions in which there was greater atrophy per decade of age compared to cortical or subcortical brain averages. The results showed that there is substantial total volume loss and cortical thinning in cognitively healthy older persons. Thinning was more widespread than volume loss, but volume loss, particularly in temporoparietal and hippocampal regions, was more strongly associated with cognition. PMID:23955313

  18. Multiwavelength pyrometer for gray and non-gray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L. P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting the temperature of gray and non-gray bodies in the presence of interfering radiation are presented. A gray body has a constant emissivity less than 1 and a non-gray body has an emissivity which varies with wavelength. The emissivity and reflectivity of the surface is determined over a range of wavelengths. Spectra are also measured of the extraneous interference radiation source and the surface of the object to be measured in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source. An auxiliary radiation source is used to determine the reflectivity of the surface and also the emissivity. The measured spectrum of the surfaces in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source is set equal to the emissivity of the surface multiplied by a Planck function containing a temperature term T plus the surface reflectivity multiplied by the spectrum of the extraneous interference radiation source. The equation is then solved for T to determine the temperature of the surface.

  19. The greenhouse effect in a gray planetary atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildt, R.

    1966-01-01

    Hopf analytical solution for values of ratio of gray absorption coefficients for insolating and escaping radiation /greenhouse parameter/ assumed constant at all depths, presenting temperature distribution graphs

  20. The greenhouse effect in a gray planetary atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildt, R.

    1966-01-01

    Hopf analytical solution for values of ratio of gray absorption coefficients for insolating and escaping radiation /greenhouse parameter/ assumed constant at all depths, presenting temperature distribution graphs

  1. Thyroid Ultrasonography in Differentiation between Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Pishdad, P; Pishdad, G R; Tavanaa, S; Pishdad, R; Jalli, R

    2017-03-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common causes of hyper and hypothyroidism, respectively. Differentiation of these 2 diseases, if the patient is euthyroid, may sometimes be extremely difficult on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of gray scale sonography in differentiation of Graves' disease from Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study included 149 patients divided into three groups, patients with Graves' disease (34 patients, mean age = 36.8 ± 10.17 years), Patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (62 patients, mean age = 33.4 ± 12.16 years) and control group (53 healthy people, mean age = 34.74 ± 16.87 years). Members of all groups were referred to a single radiologist for thyroid sonography for evaluation of thyroid echogenicity pattern. A total of 117 women and 32 men were examined by sonography. The most common sonographic pattern in Hashimoto and Graves' was homogenous hypo-echogenicity which was observed in 45.2% and 47.1% of cases, respectively. Peripheral hypo-echogenicity pattern was seen in 40.3% of Hashimoto's group with 100% specificity and 40.3% sensitivity. Central-hypoechogenic pattern was observed in 17.6% of Graves' group with 100% and 17.6% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Our findings indicate that sonography has high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It is therefore not possible to differentiate between these two diseases using sonography alone. Confirmation by laboratory data is also needed.

  2. Gray and white matter correlates of navigational ability in humans.

    PubMed

    Wegman, Joost; Fonteijn, Hubert M; van Ekert, Janneke; Tyborowska, Anna; Jansen, Clemens; Janzen, Gabriele

    2014-06-01

    Humans differ widely in their navigational abilities. Studies have shown that self-reports on navigational abilities are good predictors of performance on navigation tasks in real and virtual environments. The caudate nucleus and medial temporal lobe regions have been suggested to subserve different navigational strategies. The ability to use different strategies might underlie navigational ability differences. This study examines the anatomical correlates of self-reported navigational ability in both gray and white matter. Local gray matter volume was compared between a group (N = 134) of good and bad navigators using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), as well as regional volumes. To compare between good and bad navigators, we also measured white matter anatomy using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and looked at fractional anisotropy (FA) values. We observed a trend toward higher local GM volume in right anterior parahippocampal/rhinal cortex for good versus bad navigators. Good male navigators showed significantly higher local GM volume in right hippocampus than bad male navigators. Conversely, bad navigators showed increased FA values in the internal capsule, the white matter bundle closest to the caudate nucleus and a trend toward higher local GM volume in the caudate nucleus. Furthermore, caudate nucleus regional volume correlated negatively with navigational ability. These convergent findings across imaging modalities are in line with findings showing that the caudate nucleus and the medial temporal lobes are involved in different wayfinding strategies. Our study is the first to show a link between self-reported large-scale navigational abilities and different measures of brain anatomy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease

    PubMed Central

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease. PMID:26483582

  4. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease.

  5. Review of ultrasonography of malignant neck nodes: greyscale, Doppler, contrast enhancement and elastography

    PubMed Central

    Ying, M.; Bhatia, K.S.S.; Lee, Y.P.; Yuen, H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Assessment of neck lymph nodes is essential in patients with head and neck cancers for predicting the patient’s prognosis and selecting the appropriate treatment. Ultrasonography is a useful imaging tool in the assessment of neck lymph nodes. Greyscale ultrasonography assesses the size, distribution, and internal architecture of lymph nodes. Doppler ultrasonography evaluates the intranodal vascular pattern and resistance of lymph nodes. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography provides information on lymph node parenchymal perfusion. Elastography allows qualitative and quantitative assessment of lymph node stiffness. This article reviews the value of greyscale, Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography as well as elastography in the assessment of malignant nodes in the neck. PMID:24434158

  6. Ultrastructural studies of the gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    White, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder in which peripheral blood platelets are relatively large, vacuolated, and almost devoid of cytoplasmic granulation. In the present study we have evaluated the ultrastructure and cytochemistry of platelets from 2 patients with the GPS to determine precisely which organelles are missing from their cells. The findings indicate that gray platelets contain normal numbers of mitochondria, dense bodies, peroxisomes, and lysosomes but specifically lack alpha-granules. Preliminary studies of megakaryocytes from 1 of the 2 patients suggest that the defect in granule formation may lie at the level of the Golgi zone. Images Figure 15 Figure 16 Figures 17 and 18 Figures 19 and 20 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figures 5 and 6 Figures 7 and 8 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figures 13 and 14 Figures 21 and 22 Figures 23 through 26 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:453324

  7. Bringing CLARITY to Gray Matter Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rory D.; Kurth, Florian; Itoh, Noriko; Mongerson, Chandler R.L.; Wailes, Shannon H.; Peng, Mavis S.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy has been shown to be a strong correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its most commonly used animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relationship between gray mater atrophy and the spinal cord pathology often observed in EAE has never been established. Here EAE was induced in Thy1.1-YFP mice and their brains imaged using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The brains and spinal cords were subsequently optically cleared using Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel (CLARITY). Axons were followed 5 mm longitudinally in three dimensions in intact spinal cords revealing that 61% of the axons exhibited a mean of 22 axonal ovoids and 8% of the axons terminating in axonal end bulbs. In the cerebral cortex, we observed a decrease in the mean number of layer V pyramidal neurons and a decrease in the mean length of the apical dendrites of the remaining neurons, compared to healthy controls. MRI analysis demonstrated decreased cortical volumes in EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed a direct relationship between cortical volume loss and axonal end bulb number in the spinal cord, but not ovoid number. This is the first report of the use of CLARITY in an animal model of disease and the first report of the use of both CLARITY and MRI. PMID:25038439

  8. Gray component replacement using color mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Henry R.

    1994-05-01

    A new approach to the gray component replacement (GCR) has been developed. It employs the color mixing theory for modeling the spectral fit between the 3-color and 4-color prints. To achieve this goal, we first examine the accuracy of the models with respect to the experimental results by applying them to the prints made by a Canon Color Laser Copier-500 (CLC-500). An empirical halftone correction factor is used for improving the data fitting. Among the models tested, the halftone corrected Kubelka-Munk theory gives the closest fit, followed by the halftone corrected Beer-Bouguer law and the Yule-Neilsen approach. We then apply the halftone corrected BB law to GCR. The main feature of this GCR approach is based on the spectral measurements of the primary color step wedges and a software package implementing the color mixing model. The software determines the amount of the gray component to be removed, then adjusts each primary color until a good match of the peak wavelengths between the 3-color and 4-color spectra is obtained. Results indicate that the average (Delta) Eab between cmy and cmyk renditions of 64 color patches is 3.11 (Delta) Eab. Eighty-seven percent of the patches has (Delta) Eab less than 5 units. The advantage of this approach is its simplicity; there is no need for the black printer and under color addition. Because this approach is based on the spectral reproduction, it minimizes the metamerism.

  9. Extent of collateralization predicting symptomatic cerebral vasospasm among pediatric patients: correlations among angiography, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Moftakhar, Parham; Cooke, Daniel L; Fullerton, Heather J; Ko, Nerissa U; Amans, Matthew R; Narvid, Jared A; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; Halbach, Van V; Hetts, Steven W

    2015-03-01

    Although the development and prevalence of cerebral vasospasm (CV) has been extensively investigated in adults, little data exist on the development of CV in children. The authors hypothesized that even though children have highly vasoreactive arteries, because of a robust cerebral collateral blood flow, they rarely develop symptomatic CV. The authors retrospectively reviewed their university hospital's neurointerventional database for children (that is, patients ≤ 18 years) who were examined or treated for aneurysmal or traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) during the period 1990-2013. Images from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were analyzed for the extent of CV and collateralization of the cerebral circulation. Results from transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography were correlated with those from DSA. Cerebral vasospasm on TCD ultrasonography was defined according to criteria developed for adults. Clinical outcomes of CV were assessed with the pediatric modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Among 37 children (21 boys and 16 girls ranging in age from 8 months to 18 years) showing symptoms of an aneurysmal SAH (comprising 32 aneurysms and 5 traumatic pseudoaneurysms), 17 (46%) had CV confirmed by DSA; CV was mild in 21% of these children, moderate in 50%, and severe in 29%. Only 3 children exhibited symptomatic CV, all of whom had poor collateralization of cerebral vessels. Among the 14 asymptomatic children, 10 (71%) showed some degree of vessel collateralization. Among 16 children for whom TCD data were available that could be correlated with the DSA findings, 13 (81%) had CV according to TCD criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of TCD ultrasonography for diagnosing CV were 95% and 59%, respectively. The time to CV onset detected by TCD ultrasonography was 5 ± 3 days (range 2-10 days). Twenty-five (68%) of the children had good long-term outcomes (that is, had mRS scores of 0-2). Children have a relatively high incidence of angiographically detectable

  10. Optimal morphological hit-or-miss filtering of gray-level images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Edward R.

    1993-05-01

    The binary hit-or-miss transform is applied to filter digital gray-scale signals. This is accomplished by applying a union of hit-or-miss transforms to an observed signal's umbra and then taking the surface of the filtered umbra as the estimate of the ideal signal. The hit-or-miss union is constructed to provide the optimal mean-absolute-error filter for both the ideal signal and its umbra. The method is developed in detail for thinning hit-or-miss filters and applies at once to the dual thickening filters. It requires the output of the umbra filter to be an umbra, which in general is not true. A key aspect of the paper is the complete characterization of umbra-preserving union-of-hit-or-miss thinning and thickening filters. Taken together, the mean-absolute-error theory and the umbra-preservation characterization provide a full characterization of binary hit-or-miss filtering as applied to digital gray-scale signals. The theory is at once applicable to hit-or-miss filtering of digital gray-scale signals via the three- dimensional binary hit-or-miss transform.

  11. Decreased T1 contrast between gray matter and normal-appearing white matter in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    De Guio, F; Reyes, S; Duering, M; Pirpamer, L; Chabriat, H; Jouvent, E

    2014-01-01

    CADASIL is the most frequent hereditary small-vessel disease of the brain. The clinical impact of various MR imaging markers has been repeatedly studied in this disorder, but alterations of contrast between gray matter and normal-appearing white matter remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contrast alterations between gray matter and normal-appearing white matter on T1-weighted images in patients with CADASIL compared with healthy subjects. Contrast between gray matter and normal-appearing white matter was assessed by using histogram analyses of 3D T1 high-resolution MR imaging in 23 patients with CADASIL at the initial stage of the disease (Mini-Mental State Examination score > 24 and modified Rankin scale score ≤ 1; mean age, 53.5 ± 11.1 years) and 30 age- and sex-matched controls. T1 contrast between gray matter and normal-appearing white matter was significantly reduced in patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls (patients: 1.35 ± 0.08 versus controls: 1.43 ± 0.04, P < 10(-5)). This reduction was mainly driven by a signal decrease in normal-appearing white matter. Contrast loss was strongly related to the volume of white matter hyperintensities. Conventional 3D T1 imaging shows significant loss of contrast between gray matter and normal-appearing white matter in CADASIL. This probably reflects tissue changes in normal-appearing white matter outside signal abnormalities on T2 or FLAIR sequences. These contrast alterations should be taken into account for image interpretation and postprocessing.

  12. Gray and White Matter Contributions to Cognitive Frontostriatal Deficits in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Price, Catherine C; Tanner, Jared; Nguyen, Peter T; Schwab, Nadine A; Mitchell, Sandra; Slonena, Elizabeth; Brumback, Babette; Okun, Michael S; Mareci, Thomas H; Bowers, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    This prospective investigation examined: 1) processing speed and working memory relative to other cognitive domains in non-demented medically managed idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and 2) the predictive role of cortical/subcortical gray thickness/volume and white matter fractional anisotropy on processing speed and working memory. Participants completed a neuropsychological protocol, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, brain MRI, and fasting blood draw to rule out vascular contributors. Within group a priori anatomical contributors included bilateral frontal thickness, caudate nuclei volume, and prefrontal white matter fractional anisotropy. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 40; Hoehn & Yahr stages 1-3) and non-Parkinson's disease 'control' peers (n = 40) matched on demographics, general cognition, comorbidity, and imaging/blood vascular metrics. Cognitively, individuals with Parkinson's disease were significantly more impaired than controls on tests of processing speed, secondary deficits on working memory, with subtle impairments in memory, abstract reasoning, and visuoperceptual/spatial abilities. Anatomically, Parkinson's disease individuals were not statistically different in cortical gray thickness or subcortical gray volumes with the exception of the putamen. Tract Based Spatial Statistics showed reduced prefrontal fractional anisotropy for Parkinson's disease relative to controls. Within Parkinson's disease, prefrontal fractional anisotropy and caudate nucleus volume partially explained processing speed. For controls, only prefrontal white matter was a significant contributor to processing speed. There were no significant anatomical predictors of working memory for either group. Caudate nuclei volume and prefrontal fractional anisotropy, not frontal gray matter thickness, showed unique and combined significance for processing speed in Parkinson's disease. Findings underscore the relevance for examining gray-white matter interactions and also

  13. Gray and White Matter Contributions to Cognitive Frontostriatal Deficits in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Price, Catherine C.; Tanner, Jared; Nguyen, Peter T.; Schwab, Nadine A.; Mitchell, Sandra; Slonena, Elizabeth; Brumback, Babette; Okun, Michael S.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Bowers, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Objective This prospective investigation examined: 1) processing speed and working memory relative to other cognitive domains in non-demented medically managed idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, and 2) the predictive role of cortical/subcortical gray thickness/volume and white matter fractional anisotropy on processing speed and working memory. Methods Participants completed a neuropsychological protocol, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, brain MRI, and fasting blood draw to rule out vascular contributors. Within group a priori anatomical contributors included bilateral frontal thickness, caudate nuclei volume, and prefrontal white matter fractional anisotropy. Results Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (n = 40; Hoehn & Yahr stages 1–3) and non-Parkinson’s disease ‘control’ peers (n = 40) matched on demographics, general cognition, comorbidity, and imaging/blood vascular metrics. Cognitively, individuals with Parkinson’s disease were significantly more impaired than controls on tests of processing speed, secondary deficits on working memory, with subtle impairments in memory, abstract reasoning, and visuoperceptual/spatial abilities. Anatomically, Parkinson’s disease individuals were not statistically different in cortical gray thickness or subcortical gray volumes with the exception of the putamen. Tract Based Spatial Statistics showed reduced prefrontal fractional anisotropy for Parkinson’s disease relative to controls. Within Parkinson’s disease, prefrontal fractional anisotropy and caudate nucleus volume partially explained processing speed. For controls, only prefrontal white matter was a significant contributor to processing speed. There were no significant anatomical predictors of working memory for either group. Conclusions Caudate nuclei volume and prefrontal fractional anisotropy, not frontal gray matter thickness, showed unique and combined significance for processing speed in Parkinson’s disease. Findings underscore the

  14. A century of guayule: Comprehensive genetic characterization of the US national guayule (Parthenium argentatum A. Gray) germplasm collection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fragility of a single-source, geographically concentrated supply of natural rubber, a critical material of the modern economy, has brought guayule (Parthenium argentatum A. Gray) to the forefront as an alternative source of natural rubber. The improvement of guayule for commercial-scale producti...

  15. Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) death by stick impalement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon; Schmidt, Lori; Mech, L. David

    2017-01-01

    Although Canis lupus L. (Gray Wolf) individuals are sometimes impaled by sticks, we could find no documentation of natural impalement by sticks as a cause of death for wild Wolves. Here we report on a wild Gray Wolf from northeastern Minnesota that died due to stick puncture of its thorax and abdomen.

  16. 33 CFR 80.1375 - Grays Harbor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grays Harbor, WA. 80.1375 Section 80.1375 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1375 Grays Harbor, WA. A line drawn...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1375 - Grays Harbor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grays Harbor, WA. 80.1375 Section 80.1375 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1375 Grays Harbor, WA. A line drawn...

  18. Prospects for Mexican gray wolf recovery in the Sky Islands

    Treesearch

    Michael J. Robinson

    2005-01-01

    [First paragraph] On November 1, 1917, the first Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) of many to follow was killed by the Federal government in Arizona. The female animal was one of a pair of the diminutive subspecies of the much more widely distributed gray wolf (Canis lupus). Typical of their kind, and of the arid and less...

  19. Chapter 14. Review of technical knowledge: Great gray owls

    Treesearch

    James R. Duncan; Patricia H. Hayward

    1994-01-01

    The great gray owl (Strix nebulosa) is the longest, but not heaviest, of the northern forest owls. Distributed holarctically across the boreal forests of North America and Eurasia, the great gray owl extends its range southward into the contiguous states by inhabiting forests other than the boreal type. The subalpine and montane forests of the...

  20. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation.more » Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.« less

  1. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  2. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  3. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Klein, R. I.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron-ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  4. [Ultrasonography in chronic inflammatory rheumatic and connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Mérot, O; Le Goff, B

    2014-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonography is now widely used by almost all rheumatologists thanks to an improvement in the quality of ultrasound unit and probe and to the systematic teaching of this imaging technique to the rheumatology fellows. Applications have broadened from the study of degenerative and mechanical diseases to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Ultrasound is more sensitive than clinical examination. Power Doppler allows the direct visualisation of inflammation within the tissues. Finally, it is a prognostic tool helping the physician in the management of the disease. This review will focus on the value and applications of ultrasonography in the 2 most frequent rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. We will also give some recent data on the usefulness of this imaging technique in the study of musculoskeletal manifestations associated with connective tissue disease.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasonography: Challenges and opportunities in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Furqaan

    2014-05-06

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has become a vital diagnostic modality for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pancreatic cysts and masses, anorectal pathology, subepithelial gastrointestinal lesions, and for the staging of many gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. Establishing a EUS program in a developing country presents many challenges. Doing so in Pakistan has led to the identification of the following challenges: initial investment, ongoing costs (particularly fine needle aspiration needle costs), awareness and cytopathology. Endoscopic ultrasonography has revolutionized aspects of the practice of gastroenterology and oncology in the West. This technique is becoming increasingly available in the developing world, where it poses unique challenges to its practice. These challenges include those relating to service initiation and maintenance costs, physician awareness, and on-site cytopathology access. If these issues are anticipated and addressed in ways appropriate to local circumstances, obstacles to the institution of EUS programs can be overcome.

  6. Diagnostic ultrasonography in cattle with abdominal fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the ultrasonographic findings in 14 cows with abdominal fat necrosis. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed the presence of heterogeneous hyperechoic masses and hyperechoic omentum with localized masses floating in a hypoechoic peritoneal fluid. A hyperechogenic rim was imaged around both kidneys. The intestines were coated with hyperechoic capsules and the intestinal lumens were constricted. Ultrasonographic examination of the pancreatic parenchyma showed an overall increased echogenicity which was homogenously distributed in 3 cases. A diagnosis of abdominal fat necrosis was made with ultrasound-guided biopsy of the echogenic masses, and thereafter at postmortem examination. Results from this study demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasonography as an imaging modality for antemortem diagnosis of abdominal lipomatosis in cattle. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first that illustrates ultrasonographic findings in cattle affected with abdominal lipomatosis.

  7. FNAC and transabdominal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of prostatomegaly.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Shenoi, U D; Raghuveer, C V

    1997-10-01

    Transrectal fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was performed in 100 cases of prostatomegaly detected by digital rectal examination (DRE). The cytologic findings were compared with histolgic findings of material obtained by transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) in 84 of the cases. In addition, pre-prostatectomy transabdominal ultrasonography was done in 55 of the cases and the findings were compared with cytologic and histologic diagnoses. The accuracy of diagnosis by FNAC for benign lesions and carcinoma of prostate was 98.33% and 81.81% respectively. The accuracy of transabdominal ultrasonography for benign lesions was 91.66% but that for carcinoma was only 38.46%. The technique of transrectal FNAC was found to be simple quick, economical and easy to repeat with high accuracy and was suitable for outpatients.

  8. Ultrasonography managed by internists: the stethoscope of 21st century?

    PubMed

    Beltrán, L M; García-Casasola, G

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasonography in the hands of the internist can answer important clinical questions quickly at the point of patient care. This technique "enhances" the senses of the physicians and improves their ability to solve the problems of the patient. Point of care ultrasonography performed by clinicians has shown good accuracy in the diagnosis of diverse cardiac, abdominal and vascular pathologic conditions. It may also be useful for evaluation of thyroid, osteoarticular and soft tissue diseases. Furthermore, the use of ultrasound to guide invasive procedures (placement of venous catheters, thoracentesis, paracentesis) reduces the risk of complications. We present 5 cases to illustrate the usefulness of this technique in clinical practice: (i) peripartum cardiomyopathy; (ii) subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis; (iii) asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm; (iv) tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii and supraspinatus, and (v) spontaneous soleus muscle hematoma.

  9. Pro musculoskeletal ultrasonography in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohrndorf, Sarah; Backhaus, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound has become a widely used imaging diagnostic tool both in the use of daily clinical practice and for clinical studies in monitoring treatment efficiency and predicting disease outcome. By US, detection of inflammatory soft tissue and erosive bone lesions is possible. Grey-scale and power Doppler ultrasound examination is more sensitive and more reliable than clinical examination. Furthermore, patients with unclear arthritic symptoms can be better diagnosed for arthritis by US than by clinical examination. This article gives an overview about the use of US in the diagnosis of early arthritis, especially early rheumatoid arthritis, its role as a prognostic assessor (structural damage), as a monitor for treatment response, as an detector of "real" remission, and a guide to injection procedure.

  10. Ultrasonography of the Tympanic Bullae and Larynx in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Véronique Bernier; Babkine, Marie; Francoz, David

    2016-03-01

    Diseases of the middle ear or the larynx are not numerous in cattle but their diagnosis can be challenging for veterinary practitioners in the field. This article presents the ultrasonography of these 2 anatomic structures in order to provide new diagnostic tools to veterinary practitioners in the field. Brief anatomic reminders are first reported. The scanning techniques and normal images are then described. Finally, abnormal images of specific conditions are presented.

  11. On-Farm Use of Ultrasonography for Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Ollivett, Theresa L; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) in young cattle has recently gained momentum as an accurate and practical tool for identifying the lung lesions associated with bovine respiratory disease. As cattle producers increasingly seek input from their veterinarians on respiratory health issues, bovine practitioners should consider adding TUS to their practice models. This article discusses the relevant literature regarding TUS in young cattle, current acceptable techniques, and practical on-farm applications.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management has been enhanced with the application of endoscopic ultrasound. The close proximity of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum permits detailed imaging with intraluminal ultrasonography and staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS directed fine needle aspiration and injection may be successfully employed with patients with pancreatic cancer. Expandable metal stents can palliate patients with obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary tract as well as the gastroduodenum. The efficacy of EUS in the management of pancreatic cancer is critically reviewed.

  13. [Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography. A randomized study of 3000 patients].

    PubMed

    García Roig, F; Hicks Gomez, J J

    1991-11-01

    From January through December, 1990 at Hospital de Ginecoobstetricia Tlatelolco, 3,000 pregnant women were subjected to ultrasonography at random using a real time, B mode apparatus with a 3.5 MHz lineal transducer. Fetal malformation were diagnosed, some of which would have passed undetected in the labor room with consequent delay of treatment and false raise of perinatal morbidity and mortality rates.

  14. Kienbock Disease: A Complicated Postsurgical Case Study Using Diagnostic Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Yochum, Alicia M.; Kettner, Norman W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a case of Kienbock disease (lunatomalacia) that was identified through diagnostic ultrasonography. Clinical Features A 27-year-old man presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic with a 3-year history of wrist pain. The history of chief concern consisted of lunatomalacia, diagnosed 2 years prior, with surgical intervention consisting of radial osteotomy and vascularized bone graft. Radiography and ultrasonography were performed upon presentation and at 2-year follow-up that demonstrated progressive collapse and fragmentation of his lunate with the development of progressive scapholunate advanced collapse of the wrist. Intervention and Outcome Conservative care included class IV cold laser and a splint worn during strenuous activity and while sleeping. The patient received minimal pain relief and continued to experience chronic left wrist pain. He is continuing conservative care and evaluating options for further surgical intervention. Conclusion This case demonstrates a patient with chronic wrist pain and progressive collapse of the lunate demonstrated on multiple imaging modalities after surgical intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating Kienbock disease using diagnostic ultrasonography. PMID:26257591

  15. Portable ultrasonography in mass casualty incidents: The CAVEAT examination

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Stanislaw Peter; Howard, James M; Pryor, John P; Bahner, David P; Whitmill, Melissa L; Dean, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonography used by practicing clinicians has been shown to be of utility in the evaluation of time-sensitive and critical illnesses in a range of environments, including pre-hospital triage, emergency department, and critical care settings. The increasing availability of light-weight, robust, user-friendly, and low-cost portable ultrasound equipment is particularly suited for use in the physically and temporally challenging environment of a multiple casualty incident (MCI). Currently established ultrasound applications used to identify potentially lethal thoracic or abdominal conditions offer a base upon which rapid, focused protocols using hand-carried emergency ultrasonography could be developed. Following a detailed review of the current use of portable ultrasonography in military and civilian MCI settings, we propose a protocol for sonographic evaluation of the chest, abdomen, vena cava, and extremities for acute triage. The protocol is two-tiered, based on the urgency and technical difficulty of the sonographic examination. In addition to utilization of well-established bedside abdominal and thoracic sonography applications, this protocol incorporates extremity assessment for long-bone fractures. Studies of the proposed protocol will need to be conducted to determine its utility in simulated and actual MCI settings. PMID:22474622

  16. [Thyroid ultrasonography--considerations and progress in routine diagnostic examinations].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kitaoka, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography is becoming increasingly important because it is easy to perform non-invasively and provides much more information than other imaging devices such as CT and MRI. It is possible to infer the causes of diffuse goiter and thyrotoxicosis by the internal echo level and blood flow analysis. The combination of B mode and color Doppler imaging is also useful for the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Malignant B mode findings include an irregular shape, indistinct border, hypo and inhomogeneous internal echo, and fine calcification. New diagnostic criteria for thyroid nodules and a flow chart for the selection of indications of aspiration biopsy cytology have been developed by the Japan Association of Breast and Thyroid Sonology. Recent improvements in thyroid ultrasonography include 3D imaging, contrast agents and tissue elasticity imaging. 3D ultrasonography and contrast agents have made it possible to display vascular structures more accurately. Tissue elasticity imaging is expected to play an important role in the diagnosis of thyroid carcinomas since it evaluates tissue stiffness objectively. Tissue elastography may be useful for the differentiation of follicular adenomas from follicular carcinomas, which is still one of the most difficult clinical challenges for all endocrinologists. It also provides detailed information on the efficacy of thyroid interventions. New combinations with tissue elastography and other imaging devices are under development.

  17. Usefulness of ultrasonography for the evaluation of cervical lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rahul; Sharma, Avinash Dutt; Khanna, Seema; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Ram C

    2011-02-28

    To evaluate the role of ultrasonography for differentiating cervical lymphadenopathy due to tuberculosis, metastasis and lymphoma. Ultrasonography of the neck nodes was carried out prior to FNAC in 192 patients using a 10 mHz linear transducer. The sonographic findings were then correlated with the definitive tissue diagnosis obtained by FNAC or lymph node biopsy. The most significant distinguishing feature was strong internal echoes seen in 84% of tubercular lymph nodes. This finding was found in only 11% of metastatic nodes and absent in lymphomatous nodes. The other findings such as L/S ratio, irregular margins, hypoechoic center, fusion tendency, peripheral halo and absent hilus were helpful in differentiating reactive from diseased nodes but showed considerable overlap in the 3 groups of tubercular, metastatic and lymphoma lymph nodes. Ultrasonography is noninvasive and can give useful clues in the diagnosis of cervical lymphadenopathy. It should be interpreted in conjunction with FNAC result. Ideally ultra-sonographic guided FNAC should be obtained from the sonographically most representative node. In FNAC indeterminate cases, sonographic features may obviate the need for an invasive lymph node biopsy.

  18. Endoanal ultrasonography in fecal incontinence: Current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence has a profound impact in a patient’s life, impairing quality of life and carrying a substantial economic burden due to health costs. It is an underdiagnosed condition because many affected patients are reluctant to report it and also clinicians are usually not alert to it. Patient evaluation with a detailed clinical history and examination is very important to indicate the type of injury that is present. Endoanal ultrasonography is currently the gold standard for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence and is a simple, well-tolerated and non-expensive technique. Most studies revealed 100% sensitivity in identifying sphincter defect. It is better than endoanal magnetic resonance imaging for internal anal sphincter defects, equivalent for the diagnosis of external anal sphincter defects, but with a lower capacity for assessment of atrophy of this sphincter. The most common cause of fecal incontinence is anal sphincter injury related to obstetric trauma. Only a small percentage of women are diagnosed with sphincter tears immediately after vaginal delivery, but endoanal ultrasonography shows that one third of these women have occult sphincter defects. Furthermore, in patients submitted to primary repair of these tears, ultrasound revealed a high frequency of persistent sphincter defects after surgery. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasonography is currently largely used and accepted for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence, improving diagnostic accuracy and our knowledge of physiologic and pathological sphincters alterations. Conversely, there is currently no evidence to support the use of elastography in fecal incontinence evaluation. PMID:26078826

  19. Evaluation of gallbladder volume and contraction index with three-dimensional ultrasonography in healthy dogs

    PubMed Central

    RAHMANI, Vahideh; MOLAZEM, Mohammad; JAMSHIDI, Shahram; VALI, Yasamin; HANIFEH, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography has been shown to be an accurate and appropriate tool for measurement of gallbladder volume in humans. Therefore, we applied this novel technique for the first time to study fasting and postprandial gallbladder volume in 10 healthy dogs and compared the results with those of 2-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography. Fasting gallbladder volumes determined by 3D ultrasonography were significantly higher than corresponding volumes determined by 2D ultrasonography (P<0.01). Additionally, gallbladder volumes were significantly decreased in the postprandial state compared with the fasting state using 3D ultrasonography (P<0.001), but 2D ultrasonography showed no significant difference (P=0.189). The Gallbladder contraction index was higher in 3D ultrasonography than 2D ultrasonography; however, it did not reach statistical significance (P=0.25). In conclusion, 3D ultrasonography was able to measure gallbladder volume in healthy dogs in this study. It is suggested that 3D ultrasonography can be used to accurately estimate gallbladder volume and contractility. PMID:25903917

  20. In Memory of William S. Gray: Remarks at the Reading Hall of Fame's Gray Centennial Program, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavrogenes, Nancy A., Ed.

    Four responses to speeches regarding William S. Gray presented at the May 9, 1985, Annual Convention of the International Reading Association (IRA) are presented in this paper. Gray--whose accomplishments include his association with the University of Chicago from 1912 (student) to his death in 1960 (Professor Emeritus); his pioneering work in the…

  1. Normal gray and white matter volume after weight restoration in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Luisa; Andrés, Susana; Calvo, Anna; Cullell, Clàudia; Moreno, Elena; Plana, M Teresa; Falcón, Carles; Bargalló, Núria; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether treated, weight-stabilized adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) present brain volume differences in comparison with healthy controls. Thirty-five adolescents with weight-recovered AN and 17 healthy controls were assessed by means of psychopathology scales and magnetic resonance imaging. Axial three-dimensional T1-weighted images were obtained in a 1.5 Tesla scanner and analyzed using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM). There were no significant differences between controls and weight-stabilized AN patients with regard to global volumes of either gray or white brain matter, or in the regional VBM study. Differences were not significant between patients with psychopharmacological treatment and without, between those with amenorrhea and without, as well as between patients with restrictive versus purgative AN. The present findings reveal no global or regional gray or white matter abnormalities in this sample of adolescents following weight restoration. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Quantitative muscle ultrasonography in the follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Habers, G Esther A; Van Brussel, Marco; Bhansing, Kavish J; Hoppenreijs, Esther P; Janssen, Anjo J W M; Van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Pillen, Sigrid

    2015-10-01

    We explored the use of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (QMUS) for follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Seven JDM patients were evaluated at diagnosis and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) and QMUS. Muscle thickness (MT) and quantitative muscle echo intensity (EI) were assessed with QMUS in 4 muscles. Six patients experienced a monocyclic course. At diagnosis EI was slightly increased, and MT was relatively normal. After start of treatment MT first decreased and EI increased, with normalization of EI within 6-12 months (n = 4). One patient had higher EIs at diagnosis and slower normalization, indicating fibrosis, despite early normalization of CMAS. One patient experienced a chronic course, with high EIs and atrophy during follow-up. QMUS can provide additional information for follow-up of JDM regarding disease severity and residual muscle damage, particularly after normalization of CMAS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Competency-based assessment in surgeon-performed head and neck ultrasonography: A validity study.

    PubMed

    Todsen, Tobias; Melchiors, Jacob; Charabi, Birgitte; Henriksen, Birthe; Ringsted, Charlotte; Konge, Lars; von Buchwald, Christian

    2017-09-04

    Head and neck ultrasonography (HNUS) increasingly is used as a point-of-care diagnostic tool by otolaryngologists. However, ultrasonography (US) is a very operator-dependent image modality. Hence, this study aimed to explore the diagnostic accuracy of surgeon-performed HNUS and to establish validity evidence for an objective structured assessment of ultrasound skills (OSAUS) used for competency-based assessment. A prospective experimental study. Six otolaryngologists and 11 US novices were included in a standardized test setup for which they had to perform focused HNUS of eight patients suspected for different head and neck lesions. Their diagnostic accuracy was calculated based on the US reports, and two blinded raters assessed the video-recorded US performance using the OSAUS scale. The otolaryngologists obtained a high diagnostic accuracy on 88% (range 63%-100%) compared to the US novices on 38% (range 0-63%); P < 0.001. The OSAUS score demonstrated good inter-case reliability (0.85) and inter-rater reliability (0.76), and significant discrimination between otolaryngologist and US novices; P < 0.001. A strong correlation between the OSAUS score and the diagnostic accuracy was found (Spearman's ρ, 0.85; P < P 0.001), and a pass/fail score was established at 2.8. Strong validity evidence supported the use of the OSAUS scale to assess HNUS competence with good reliability, significant discrimination between US competence levels, and a strong correlation of assessment score to diagnostic accuracy. An OSAUS pass/fail score was established and could be used for competence-based assessment in surgeon-performed HNUS. NA. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Evaluation of the Degree of Knee Joint Osteoarthritis in Patients with Early Gray Hair

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Behrooz; Ashraf, Alireza; Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Zarei, Fariba; Foruzi, Shima

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and one of the causes of pain and disability. The hair graying characteristic correlates strictly with chronological aging and take places to varying degrees in all individuals, disregarding gender or race. Aims: Comparison of the degrees of clinical and radiologic severity of the knee OA in individuals with early hair graying compared to ordinary individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients with knee OA and similar demographic characteristics were enrolled in this study. All patients were classified in to 3 age subgroups in each of the case and control groups (30-40 year, 41-50 year, 51-60 year). In the case group, the patients must had early hair graying, too. Knee OA were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading scale. Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) was applied to assess clinical severity of the knee OA. Results: The mean ± SD of WOMAC index in the case group was 60.7 ± 15.9 and in the control group was 55.3 ± 15.3 (P = 0.1). The mean rank of KL scale in case group was 35.3 and in the control group was 25.6 (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Even at the same age of OA onset, the rate of progression of radiological findings and the grade of joint destruction in individuals with early hair graying are greater than normal individuals. However, clinical and functional relevant remain unclear. PMID:24403769

  5. Estuarine studies in upper Grays Harbor, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beverage, Joseph P.; Swecker, Milton N.

    1969-01-01

    Improved management of the water resources of Grays Harbor, Wash., requires more data on the water quality of the harbor and a better understanding of the influences of industrial and domestic wastes on the local fisheries resources. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of these influences, the U.S. Geological Survey joined other agencies in a cooperative study of Grays Harbor. This report summarizes the Survey's study of circulation patterns, description of water-quality conditions, and characterization of bottom material in the upper harbor. Salt water was found to intrude at least as far as Montesano, 28.4 nautical miles from the mouth of the harbor. Longitudinal salinity distributions were used to compute dispersion (diffusivity) coefficients ranging from 842 to 3,520 square feet per second. These values were corroborated by half-tidal-cycle dye studies. The waters of the harbor were found to be well mixed after extended periods of low fresh-water flow but stratified at high flows. Salinity data were used lo define the cumulative 'mean age' of the harbor water, which may be used to approximate a mean 'flushing time.' Velocity-time curves for the upper harbor are distorted from simple harmonic functions owing to channel geometry and frictional effects. Surface and bottom velocity data were used to estimate net tidal 'separation' distance, neglecting vertical mixing. Net separation distances between top and bottom water ranged from 1.65 nautical miles when fresh-water inflow was 610 cubic feet per second to 13.4 miles when inflow was 15,900 cubic feet per second. The cumulative mean age from integration of the fresh-water velocity equation was about twice that obtained from the salinity distribution. Excursion distances obtained with dye over half-tidal cycles exceeded those estimated from longitudinal salinity distributions and those obtained by earlier investigators who used floats. Net tidal excursions were as much as twice those obtained with floats

  6. Efficacy of Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Evaluation of Undetermined Etiology of Common Bile Duct Dilatation on Abdominal Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Nejati, Naimeh; Farsinejad, Maryam; Kolahdoozan, Shadi

    2016-10-01

    BACKGROUND The cause of common bile duct (CBD) dilatation cannot be determined by imaging modalities in many patients. The aim of this study was to assess the value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in detecting the cause of CBD dilatation in patients in whom ultrasonography could not demonstrate the cause of dilation. METHODS Prospectively, 152 consecutive patients who were referred for evaluation of dilated CBD (diameter ≥7 mm) of undetermined origin by ultrasonography were included in this study. All the patients underwent EUS. Final diagnoses were determined by using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), surgical exploration, or follow-up for at least 10 months. Patients with choledocholithiasis were referred for ERCP and sphincterotomy, and patients with operable tumors were referred for surgery.Patients with inoperable tumors underwent biliary stenting with or without tchemoradiotherapy. RESULTS 152 patients (54% female) with dilated CBD were included. Mean (±SD) age of the patients was 60.4 (±17.3) years. The mean CBD diameter for all study group in transabdominal ultrasonography and EUS were 11.7 millimeter and 10.1 millimeter, respectively. Most of the patients with dilated CBD and abnormal liver function test (LFT) had an important finding in EUS and follow-up diagnosis including peri-ampullary tumors. Mean diameter of CBD in patients with and without abnormal LFT were 10.5 IU/L and 12.1 IU/L, respectively. Final diagnoses included choledocholithiasis in 32 (21.1%),passed CBD stone in 35 (23%), opium-induced CBD dilation in 14 (9.2%), post-cholecystectomy states in 20 (13.1%), ampullary adenoma/carcinoma in 15 (15.8%), cholangiocarcinoma in 14 (9.2%), and pancreatic head cancer in9 (5.9%) patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of EUS for patients with abnormal EUS were 89.5%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 91.2%, and 90.9%, respectively

  7. Efficacy of Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Evaluation of Undetermined Etiology of Common Bile Duct Dilatation on Abdominal Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Nejati, Naimeh; Farsinejad, Maryam; Kolahdoozan, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cause of common bile duct (CBD) dilatation cannot be determined by imaging modalities in many patients. The aim of this study was to assess the value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in detecting the cause of CBD dilatation in patients in whom ultrasonography could not demonstrate the cause of dilation. METHODS Prospectively, 152 consecutive patients who were referred for evaluation of dilated CBD (diameter ≥7 mm) of undetermined origin by ultrasonography were included in this study. All the patients underwent EUS. Final diagnoses were determined by using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), surgical exploration, or follow-up for at least 10 months. Patients with choledocholithiasis were referred for ERCP and sphincterotomy, and patients with operable tumors were referred for surgery.Patients with inoperable tumors underwent biliary stenting with or without tchemoradiotherapy. RESULTS 152 patients (54% female) with dilated CBD were included. Mean (±SD) age of the patients was 60.4 (±17.3) years. The mean CBD diameter for all study group in transabdominal ultrasonography and EUS were 11.7 millimeter and 10.1 millimeter, respectively. Most of the patients with dilated CBD and abnormal liver function test (LFT) had an important finding in EUS and follow-up diagnosis including peri-ampullary tumors. Mean diameter of CBD in patients with and without abnormal LFT were 10.5 IU/L and 12.1 IU/L, respectively. Final diagnoses included choledocholithiasis in 32 (21.1%),passed CBD stone in 35 (23%), opium-induced CBD dilation in 14 (9.2%), post-cholecystectomy states in 20 (13.1%), ampullary adenoma/carcinoma in 15 (15.8%), cholangiocarcinoma in 14 (9.2%), and pancreatic head cancer in9 (5.9%) patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of EUS for patients with abnormal EUS were 89.5%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 91.2%, and 90.9%, respectively

  8. Vessel-Generated Ballast Water: Gray Water Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    grams per square meter per day (gm/m2/day) than the gray water samples, however, trends for the other types of gray/seawater mixtures differed between...mass loss occurred in total grams ; however, the corrosion rate when normalized to g/m2/day were actually higher compared to the uncoated samples...States Environmental Protection Agency g/m2/day Grams per square meter per day GW Gray Water i Current density (mA/cm2) icorr Corrosion

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Marsh, L; Lim, K O; Sullivan, E V; Lane, B; Spielman, D

    1996-12-01

    We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine resonances representing metabolites containing N-acetyl (NA) groups (predominantly N-acetyl aspartate), choline, and creatine within a large left-hemispheric gray matter heterotopia (GMH) in a 35-year-old man with corpus callosum agenesis. In contrast to normal brain tissue, including gray matter regions, heterotopic gray matter was characterized by relatively increased choline and creatine resonances and a normal NA signal. These data suggest increased cellular activity or persistent immature neuronal tissue in GMH relative to unaffected tissue.

  10. Black and gray Helmholtz-Kerr soliton refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S.

    2011-01-15

    Refraction of black and gray solitons at boundaries separating different defocusing Kerr media is analyzed within a Helmholtz framework. A universal nonlinear Snell's law is derived that describes gray soliton refraction, in addition to capturing the behavior of bright and black Kerr solitons at interfaces. Key regimes, defined by beam and interface characteristics, are identified, and predictions are verified by full numerical simulations. The existence of a unique total nonrefraction angle for gray solitons is reported; both internal and external refraction at a single interface is shown possible (dependent only on incidence angle). This, in turn, leads to the proposal of positive or negative lensing operations on soliton arrays at planar boundaries.

  11. On Gray's paradox and efficiency measures for swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet; Patankar, Neelesh

    2010-11-01

    In 1936 Gray reported that the "drag" power of dolphins was substantially larger than the estimates of muscle power. We revisit this "paradox" in the context of undulatory swimming. We consider larval zebrafish as a model system. We question the basic premise of comparing drag power to muscle power. There are two reasons. First, we recognize that it may not be possible decompose the net force on an undulatory swimmer into drag and thrust. If it becomes possible, as we show in our case, the drag power, which represents the work done on the fluid due to motion in the swimming direction, is exactly balanced by the thrust power, which represents the work done by the fluid. Thus, the total power in the swimming direction, computed in this way, is zero. Second, we show that most of the muscle energy is dissipated in causing the lateral motion of the body - not in overcoming the "drag" in the swimming direction. This will be shown based on a power balance equation. Thus, we argue that efficiency measures, that relate the drag power to muscle power, or the Froude efficiency, are not recommended. Instead non-dimensional cost-of-transport could be a useful measure to compare efficiencies of organisms at different scales.

  12. Correlation Between Echodefecography and 3-Dimensional Vaginal Ultrasonography in the Detection of Perineal Descent in Women With Constipation Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Pinheiro Regadas, Francisco Sergio; Rodrigues, Lusmar V; da Silva Vilarinho, Adjra; Buchen, Guilherme; Borges, Livia Olinda; Veras, Lara B; da Cruz, Mariana Murad

    2016-12-01

    Defecography is an established method of evaluating dynamic anorectal dysfunction, but conventional defecography does not allow for visualization of anatomic structures. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of dynamic 3-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography for evaluating perineal descent in comparison with echodefecography (3-dimensional anorectal ultrasonography) and to study the relationship between perineal descent and symptoms and anatomic/functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor. This was a prospective study. The study was conducted at a large university tertiary care hospital. Consecutive female patients were eligible if they had pelvic floor dysfunction, obstructed defecation symptoms, and a score >6 on the Cleveland Clinic Florida Constipation Scale. Each patient underwent both echodefecography and dynamic 3-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography to evaluate posterior pelvic floor dysfunction. Normal perineal descent was defined on echodefecography as puborectalis muscle displacement ≤2.5 cm; excessive perineal descent was defined as displacement >2.5 cm. Of 61 women, 29 (48%) had normal perineal descent; 32 (52%) had excessive perineal descent. Endovaginal ultrasonography identified 27 of the 29 patients in the normal group as having anorectal junction displacement ≤1 cm (mean = 0.6 cm; range, 0.1-1.0 cm) and a mean anorectal junction position of 0.6 cm (range, 0-2.3 cm) above the symphysis pubis during the Valsalva maneuver and correctly identified 30 of the 32 patients in the excessive perineal descent group. The κ statistic showed almost perfect agreement (κ = 0.86) between the 2 methods for categorization into the normal and excessive perineal descent groups. Perineal descent was not related to fecal or urinary incontinence or anatomic and functional factors (sphincter defects, pubovisceral muscle defects, levator hiatus area, grade II or III rectocele, intussusception, or anismus). The study did not include a

  13. Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries: anatomy and scanning guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji Young

    2017-04-01

    Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries is a valuable technique, although it is less frequently indicated for peripheral arterial disease than for deep vein thrombosis or varicose veins. Ultrasonography can diagnose stenosis through the direct visualization of plaques and through the analysis of the Doppler waveforms in stenotic and poststenotic arteries. To perform Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries, the operator should be familiar with the arterial anatomy of the lower extremities, basic scanning techniques, and the parameters used in color and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography.

  14. Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries: anatomy and scanning guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries is a valuable technique, although it is less frequently indicated for peripheral arterial disease than for deep vein thrombosis or varicose veins. Ultrasonography can diagnose stenosis through the direct visualization of plaques and through the analysis of the Doppler waveforms in stenotic and poststenotic arteries. To perform Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries, the operator should be familiar with the arterial anatomy of the lower extremities, basic scanning techniques, and the parameters used in color and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:28219004

  15. Obituary: Albert Gray Mowbray, 1916-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Albert G. Mowbray was born on 23 June 1916. He was the son of Albert Henry Mowbray, a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley [UCB], and Elizabeth Gray Mowbray. He had one sister, Mary Elizabeth. Mowbray did undergraduate and graduate work at UCB. His 1943 PhD. dissertation had to do with the apparent sizes of globular clusters. Mowbray became an observing assistant at Lick Observatory in about 1942; later that year he went to the Perkins Observatory, operated for Ohio Wesleyan University by the Ohio State University [OSU]. Due to the wartime shortage of instructors, he also taught physics at OSU. In 1946 Mowbray joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. By 1948 he lived in Pasadena California, and was a volunteer observer at the Mount Wilson Observatory. Later, until 1956, he was employed by UCB professor Leland Cunningham, a solar-system dynamicist. Mowbray did computations and measured plates for Cunningham. Mowbray joined the physics faculty at San Jose State College (now California State University, San Jose) in 1957. In addition to the AAS, Mowbray was a member of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. He died in San Francisco, California, on 21 August 2002. The kind assistance of George Herbig, Virginia Trimble, and Elizabeth Roemer is acknowledged.

  16. Diterpene glycosides from Stevia phlebophylla A. Gray.

    PubMed

    Ceunen, Stijn; Wim, De Borggraeve; Compernolle, Frans; Mai, Anh Hung; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-09-20

    The rare Mexican species Stevia phlebophylla A. Gray was long considered to be the only known Stevia species, beside the well-known S. rebaudiana, containing the highly sweet diterpenoid steviol glycosides. We report a re-evaluation of this claim after phytochemically screening leaves obtained from two herbarium specimens of S. phlebophylla for the presence of steviol glycosides. Despite extensive MS analyses, no steviol glycosides could be unambiguously verified. Instead, the main chromatographic peak eluting at retention times similar to those of steviol glycosides was identified as a new compound, namely 16β-hydroxy-17-acetoxy-ent-kauran-19-oic acid-(6-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl) ester (1) on the basis of extensive NMR and MS data as well as the characterization of its acid hydrolysate. Seven more compounds were detected by ESIMS which are possibly structurally related to 1. It can therefore be concluded that S. phlebophylla is unlikely to contain significant amounts of steviol glycosides, if any. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Viscoelasticity of subcortical gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Curtis L; Schwarb, Hillary; D J McGarry, Matthew; Anderson, Aaron T; Huesmann, Graham R; Sutton, Bradley P; Cohen, Neal J

    2016-12-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties of the brain assessed with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) are sensitive measures of microstructural tissue health in neurodegenerative conditions. Recent efforts have targeted measurements localized to specific neuroanatomical regions differentially affected in disease. In this work, we present a method for measuring the viscoelasticity in subcortical gray matter (SGM) structures, including the amygdala, hippocampus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus. The method is based on incorporating high spatial resolution MRE imaging (1.6 mm isotropic voxels) with a mechanical inversion scheme designed to improve local measures in pre-defined regions (soft prior regularization [SPR]). We find that in 21 healthy, young volunteers SGM structures differ from each other in viscoelasticity, quantified as the shear stiffness and damping ratio, but also differ from the global viscoelasticity of the cerebrum. Through repeated examinations on a single volunteer, we estimate the uncertainty to be between 3 and 7% for each SGM measure. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the use of specific methodological considerations-higher spatial resolution and SPR-both decrease uncertainty and increase sensitivity of the SGM measures. The proposed method allows for reliable MRE measures of SGM viscoelasticity for future studies of neurodegenerative conditions. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4221-4233, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Potential ungulate prey for Gray Wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Francis J.; Mack, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Data were gathered for six ungulate species that reside in or near Yellowstone National Park. If gray wolves (Canis lupus) are reintroduced into the Yellowstone area, their avoidance of human activities or their management by human may determine their range. Therefore, the area of wolf occupation cannot be predicted now. We restricted our analysis to Yellowstone National Park and to the adjacent national forest wilderness areas. We included mostly ungulate herds that summer inside or adjacent to the park and that would probably be affected by wolves. Our wolf study area includes Yellowstone National Park and adjacent wilderness areas most likely to be occupied by wolves. We reviewed publications, park records, survey reports, and state fish and game surveys and reports for statistics on ungulate populations. These data [provide an overview of ungulate populations and harvests. Each ungulate herd is described in detail. We restricted our analysis to 1980-89, because population surveys were more complete during that period and because population estimates of most ungulate populations had increased by the 1980's. We feel the higher estimates of the 1980's reflect more up-to-date techniques and are most representative of the situation into which the wolves would be reintroduced.

  19. Differences in quantitative assessment of myocardial scar and gray zone by LGE-CMR imaging using established gray zone protocols.

    PubMed

    Mesubi, Olurotimi; Ego-Osuala, Kelechi; Jeudy, Jean; Purtilo, James; Synowski, Stephen; Abutaleb, Ameer; Niekoop, Michelle; Abdulghani, Mohammed; Asoglu, Ramazan; See, Vincent; Saliaris, Anastasios; Shorofsky, Stephen; Dickfeld, Timm

    2015-02-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging is the gold standard for myocardial scar evaluation. Heterogeneous areas of scar ('gray zone'), may serve as arrhythmogenic substrate. Various gray zone protocols have been correlated to clinical outcomes and ventricular tachycardia channels. This study assessed the quantitative differences in gray zone and scar core sizes as defined by previously validated signal intensity (SI) threshold algorithms. High quality LGE-CMR images performed in 41 cardiomyopathy patients [ischemic (33) or non-ischemic (8)] were analyzed using previously validated SI threshold methods [Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), n-standard deviation (NSD) and modified-FWHM]. Myocardial scar was defined as scar core and gray zone using SI thresholds based on these methods. Scar core, gray zone and total scar sizes were then computed and compared among these models. The median gray zone mass was 2-3 times larger with FWHM (15 g, IQR: 8-26 g) compared to NSD or modified-FWHM (5 g, IQR: 3-9 g; and 8 g. IQR: 6-12 g respectively, p < 0.001). Conversely, infarct core mass was 2.3 times larger with NSD (30 g, IQR: 17-53 g) versus FWHM and modified-FWHM (13 g, IQR: 7-23 g, p < 0.001). The gray zone extent (percentage of total scar that was gray zone) also varied significantly among the three methods, 51 % (IQR: 42-61 %), 17 % (IQR: 11-21 %) versus 38 % (IQR: 33-43 %) for FWHM, NSD and modified-FWHM respectively (p < 0.001). Considerable variability exists among the current methods for MRI defined gray zone and scar core. Infarct core and total myocardial scar mass also differ using these methods. Further evaluation of the most accurate quantification method is needed.

  20. The gray area between synapse structure and function-Gray's synapse types I and II revisited.

    PubMed

    Klemann, Cornelius J H M; Roubos, Eric W

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of ultrastructural parameters, the concept was formulated that asymmetric Type I and symmetric Type II synapses are excitatory and inhibitory, respectively. This "functional Gray synapses concept" received strong support from the demonstration of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in Type I synapses and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid in Type II synapses, and is still frequently used in modern literature. However, morphological and functional evidence has accumulated that the concept is less tenable. Typical features of synapses like shape and size of presynaptic vesicles and synaptic cleft and presence of a postsynaptic density (PsD) do not always fit the postulated (excitatory/inhibitory) function of Gray's synapses. Furthermore, synapse function depends on postsynaptic receptors and associated signal transduction mechanisms rather than on presynaptic morphology and neurotransmitter type. Moreover, the notion that many synapses are difficult to classify as either asymmetric or symmetric has cast doubt on the assumption that the presence of a PsD is a sign of excitatory synaptic transmission. In view of the morphological similarities of the PsD in asymmetric synapses with membrane junctional structures such as the zonula adherens and the desmosome, asymmetric synapses may play a role as links between the postsynaptic and presynaptic membrane, thus ensuring long-term maintenance of interneuronal communication. Symmetric synapses, on the other hand, might be sites of transient communication as takes place during development, learning, memory formation, and pathogenesis of brain disorders. Confirmation of this idea might help to return the functional Gray synapse concept its central place in neuroscience. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Ultrasonography survey and thyroid cancer in the Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Peter; Kaiser, Jan Christian; Ulanovsky, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the major health concerns after the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station (NPS). Currently, ultrasonography surveys are being performed for persons residing in the Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident with an age of up to 18 years. Here, the expected thyroid cancer prevalence in the Fukushima Prefecture is assessed based on an ultrasonography survey of Ukrainians, who were exposed at an age of up to 18 years to (131)I released during the Chernobyl NPS accident, and on differences in equipment and study protocol in the two surveys. Radiation risk of thyroid cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and preliminary estimates of thyroid dose due to the Fukushima accident were used for the prediction of baseline and radiation-related thyroid cancer risks. We estimate a prevalence of thyroid cancer of 0.027 % (95 % CI 0.010 %; 0.050 %) for the first screening campaign in the Fukushima Prefecture. Compared with the incidence rate in Japan in 2007, the ultrasonography survey is predicted to increase baseline thyroid cancer incidence by a factor of 7.4 (95 % CI 0.95; 17.3). Under the condition of continued screening, thyroid cancer during the first fifty years after the accident is predicted to be detected for about 2 % of the screened population. The prediction of radiation-related thyroid cancer in the most exposed fraction (a few ten thousand persons) of the screened population of the Fukushima Prefecture has a large uncertainty with the best estimates of the average risk of 0.1-0.3 %, depending on average dose.

  2. [Diagnostic validity of ultrasonography in carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Haddad-Garay, María; Tricas-Moreno, José M; Fanlo-Mazas, Pablo; Malo-Urries, Miguel; Estebanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Hidalgo-Garcia, César; Ruiz de Escudero-Zapico, Alazne

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonography has emerged as an alternative tool for diagnosing peripheral neuropathies, such as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Yet, data are still lacking as regards the diagnostic validity of the different ultrasonography measurements for detecting CTS in clinical settings. To determine the diagnostic validity of ultrasound measurements of the cross-sectional area of the median nerve in the wrist (CSA-M) and of the ratio of the area of the median nerve between the wrist and the forearm (R-WF) in the diagnosis of CTS, using electroneuromyography (ENG) as the reference technique. Ultrasound measurements were performed on 59 subjects (100 wrists) who were referred to have an ENG due to suspected CTS. The examiners that performed the ultrasonography scan did not know the results of the ENG. The cut-off points were later calculated by means of ROC curves for each of the measurements (CSA-M and R-WF) and their diagnostic validity was analysed. With a cut-off point of 9.15 mm2, CSA-M measurement obtained a sensitivity of 75.81%, a specificity of 74.29%, a positive likelihood ratio of 2.95 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.33. For the R-WF measurement and a cut-off point of 1.56, the values for sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were 70.97%, 71.43%, 2.48 and 0.4, respectively. Both the CSA-M and R-WF appear to be useful measures in the diagnosis of CTS, taking the ENG as a reference test.

  3. A New Soft Tissue Volume Measurement Strategy Using Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji Hye; Lee, Hae Hyun; Kim, Soo Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Various techniques are available for measuring the status of lymphedema. A modified imaging technique using ultrasonography was developed to measure the structure of soft tissue area in a cost-effective manner. The purpose of this study was to measure the reliability and the accuracy of this new method. Ultrasonography was performed on both arms of twenty healthy female participants. At 10 cm above (AE) and below (BE) the elbow crease, soft tissue thickness at medial, lateral, inferior, and superior locations were measured by two examiners with minimal unnecessary pressure. After measuring twice on 16 sites for each participant, the amount of soft tissue in the cross-sectional area (ΔCSA) was acquired by a designed formulation. The ΔCSA was also compared with volumetry data (Perometer®). Cronbach's alpha coefficient test was used for statistics. The intra-class and inter-class reliability measurements for all soft tissue areas were very strong (α=0.980 and 0.960, respectively; p<0.01). All AE and BE reliabilities showed very strong correlation and strong correlation of inter-BE measurement. All reliabilities of ΔCSA were very strong (≥0.950). All CCs (correlation coefficients) between ΔCSA, circumference, and volumetry were strong for AE and BE measurements, except for ΔCSA and circumference at BE. The strongest CC was between volumetry and circumference measurements. This study suggests that measuring the ΔCSA by ultrasonography could be an alternative way to measure the status of soft tissue indirectly with structural consideration. PMID:24521479

  4. Ultrasonography for nerve compression syndromes of the upper extremity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Ryu, Dae Shik; Kang, Chae Hoon; Jung, Seung Mun; Park, Man Soo; Shin, Dong-Rock

    2015-01-01

    Nerve compression syndromes commonly involve the nerves in the upper extremity. High-resolution ultrasonography (US) can satisfactorily assess these nerves and may detect the morphological changes of the nerves. US can also reveal the causes of nerve compression when structural abnormalities or space-occupying lesions are present. The most common US finding of compression neuropathy is nerve swelling proximal to the compression site. This article reviews the normal anatomic location and US appearances of the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Common nerve compression syndromes in the upper extremity and their US findings are also reviewed. PMID:25682987

  5. Arterial diameter measurement using high resolution ultrasonography: in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Brum, Javier; Bia, Daniel; Benech, Nicolas; Balay, Guillermo; Armentano, Ricardo L; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of pressure and diameter in blood vessels or vascular prosthesis is of great importance in cardiovascular research. Knowledge of diameter changes as response to intravascular pressure is the basis to estimate the biomechanical properties of blood vessel. In this work a new method to quantify arterial diameter based in high resolution ultrasonography is proposed. Measurements on an arterial phantom placed on a cardiovascular simulator were performed. The results were compared to sonomicrometry measurements considered as gold standard technique. The obtained results indicate that the new method ensure an optimal diameter quantification. This method presents two main advantages respect to sonomicrometry: is noninvasive and the vessel wall strain can be measured directly.

  6. [Seeing the sounds--chest and lung ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Daniel J; Shemesh, Iftach

    2014-10-01

    Chest ultrasonography was considered hampered and deficient but it is now taking a prominent role as a bedside tool for the diagnosis of lung ailments. Technological development has made it accurate, fast and reliable to the extent that it is gradually replacing the traditional chest X-ray and sometimes also the computed tomography scan. In this article we review and display in a few images the diagnostic possibilities of the thoracic ultrasound examination in a diverse range of maladies such as pneumonia, pulmonary congestion, pleural effusion and other conditions.

  7. Three-dimensional ultrasonography in hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sackmann, M; Pauletzki, J; Zwiebel, F M; Holl, J

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrasonographic images was used to visualize hepatobiliary and pancreatic lesions and stones, and to measure gallbladder emptying. The initial experience shows that these reconstructions may be of some help in the identification of the extension of tumors and the invasion into surrounding tissues. Stones and stone fragments in the pancreas and in the gallbladder as well as the wall of the gallbladder were visualized well. If further studies will reveal a benefit for the patient, three-dimensional ultrasonography may be added to the noninvasive methods used in the diagnosis of several hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases.

  8. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases.

  9. GrayStarServer: Stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStarServer is a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds.

  10. [Heterotopic gray matter: A rare cause of epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Aissa, A; Ben Lassoued, M; Alouini, R

    2013-03-01

    Various etiologic diagnoses are put forward for certain forms of infant epilepsy. We report four cases illustrating a rare cause: gray matter heterotopia. There were three girls and one boy, aged 3 months to 4 years at onset of seizures and 8 to 30 years at diagnosis of gray matter heterotopia. All patients sought healthcare because of repeated seizures. One patient also presented severe mental retardation. No consanguinity was noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the interposition of an ectopic ribbon of gray matter within the white matter in all cases. Ectopic gray matter formed bilateral subependymal nodules in one patient and bilateral nodules in the subcortical region suggestive of concentric laminar organization in another. The two other patients presented both of these forms. Other anomalies were associated: partial agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with colpocephaly causing cortical atrophy in one patient and hippocampal sclerosis in another.

  11. Can Video Game Playing Cost You Gray Matter?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a part of the brain that's linked to mental illness. On the other hand, the Canadian study suggests, ... anyone who plays video games will develop a mental illness. "But we know that those with less gray ...

  12. Trap-related injuries to gray wolves in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuehn, D.W.; Fuller, T.K.; Mech, L.D.; Paul, W.J.; Fritts, S.H.; Berg, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) captured in traps with toothed jaws offset 1.8 cm incurred fewer injuries than those captured in 3 other types of steel traps. Few wolves seriously damaged canine or carnassial teeth while in traps.

  13. Severe maxillary osteomyelitis in a Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Dental injuries to or abnormalities in functionally important teeth and associated bones in predators may significantly reduce the ability to kill and consume prey (Lazar et al. 2009). This impairment is likely exacerbated in coursing predators, such as Gray Wolves, that bite and hold onto fleeing and kicking prey with their teeth. Damage to carnassials (upper fourth premolar, P4, and lower first molar, M1) and associated bones in Gray Wolves may especially inhibit the consumption of prey because these teeth slice meat and crush bone. Here I report maxillary osteomyelitis involving the carnassials in a wild Gray Wolf from northeastern Minnesota of such severity that I hypothesize it ultimately caused the Gray Wolf to starve to death.

  14. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas; Vécsei, László; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation. PMID:24039694

  15. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas P.; Vecsei, Lazlo'; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-09-10

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation.

  16. The role of global and regional gray matter volume decrease in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Matthias; Lotze, Martin; Langner, Sönke; Dressel, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is associated with white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) pathology, and both processes contribute differently over the disease course. Total and regional GM volume loss can be imaged via voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Here, we retrospectively analyzed a group of 213 MS patients [163 relapsing remitting (RR) and 50 secondary progressive (SP)] using semi-automated white matter (WM) lesion mapping and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Our aim was to assess the association of increasing disability with decreasing total and regional GM volume. As expected, total GM volume and WM lesion load were associated with patients disability, measured with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). The more impaired the patients, the greater the statistical association to the total GM volume. Regional volume loss in the cerebellar gray matter was associated with increasing EDSS and WM lesion volume. Furthermore, SPMS patients had significantly more gray matter volume loss in the cerebellum and the hippocampus compared to RRMS patients. Our results confirm histopathological studies emphasizing the important role of the cerebellum and the hippocampus in MS patients' disability.

  17. Regional gray matter reduction correlates with subjective quality of life in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Shiho; Miyata, Jun; Yoshizumi, Miho; Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Murai, Toshiya

    2013-04-01

    Subjective quality of life (QOL) has been recognized as an important consideration in schizophrenia. Several symptoms and neurocognitive functions were shown to be correlated with subjective QOL; however its determinants are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the association between brain structural abnormalities and subjective QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Forty-five schizophrenia patients and 48 age, sex, and education-matched healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (SQLS) was used to rate subjective QOL. We performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate regional brain alterations. Relative to normal controls, schizophrenia patients exhibited gray matter reductions mainly in the frontal and temporal regions. Worse psychosocial subscale of SQLS was associated with gray matter (GM) reduction in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and worse motivation/energy subscale was associated with gray matter reduction in the left superior frontal sulcus, left parahippocampal gyrus, and the left inferior temporal gyrus. The correlation between DLPFC GM volume and psychosocial subscale of SQLS disappeared after controlling for severity of psychopathology, while the other correlations remained significant when controlled by demographic and clinical variables. Combining imaging techniques with psychosocial methods would help to elucidate those factors that are associated with QOL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Euler vector for search and retrieval of gray-tone images.

    PubMed

    Bishnu, Arijit; Bhattacharya, Bhargab B; Kundu, Malay K; Murthy, C A; Acharya, Tinku

    2005-08-01

    A new combinatorial characterization of a gray-tone image called Euler Vector is proposed. The Euler number of a binary image is a well-known topological feature, which remains invariant under translation, rotation, scaling, and rubber-sheet transformation of the image. The Euler vector comprises a 4-tuple, where each element is an integer representing the Euler number of the partial binary image formed by the gray-code representation of the four most significant bit planes of the gray-tone image. Computation of Euler vector requires only integer and Boolean operations. The Euler vector is experimentally observed to be robust against noise and compression. For efficient image indexing, storage and retrieval from an image database using this vector, a bucket searching technique based on a simple modification of Kd-tree, is employed successfully. The Euler vector can also be used to perform an efficient four-dimensional range query. The set of retrieved images are finally ranked on the basis of Mahalanobis distance measure. Experiments are performed on the COIL database and results are reported. The retrieval success can be improved significantly by augmentiong the Euler vector by a few additional simple shape features. Since Euler vector can be computed very fast, the proposed technique is likely to find many applications to content-based image retrieval.

  19. Analysis of karst aquifer spring flows with a gray system decomposition model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yonghong; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J; Wang, Yanrong; Zhao, Ying

    2007-01-01

    There are approximately 470,000 km(2) of karst aquifers that feed many large springs in North China. Turbulent flow often exists in these karst aquifers, which means that the classical ground water model based on Darcy's law cannot be applied here. Ground water data are rare for these aquifers. As a consequence, it is difficult to quantitatively investigate ground water flow in these karst systems. The purpose of this study is to develop a parsimonious model that predicts karst spring discharge using gray system theory. In this theory, a white color denotes a system that is completely characterized and a black color represents a system that is totally unknown. A gray system thus describes a complex system whose characteristics are only partially known or known with uncertainty. Using this theory, we investigated the karst spring discharge time series over different time scales. First, we identified three specific components of spring discharge: the long-term trend, periodic variation, and random fluctuation. We then used the gray system model to simulate the long-term trend and obtain periodic variation and random fluctuation components. Subsequently, we developed a predictive model for karst spring discharge. Application of the model to Liulin Springs, a representative example of karst springs in northern China, shows that the model performs well. The predicted results suggest that the Liulin Springs discharge will likely decrease over time, with small fluctuations.

  20. The ARGOS system used for tracking gray whales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mate, B. R.; Beaty, D.; Hoisington, C.; Kutz, R.; Mate, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of satellite whale tags used to track gray whales in the eastern north Pacific Ocean is summarized. Two gray whales were radio-tagged in San Ignacio Lagoon (Mexico) and tracked on their northbound migration. One of the transmitters was modified to record and relay depth-of-dive information at 15 sec intervals throughout the course of the dive. Technical elements of data acquisition and analysis are outlined. The major biological findings are discussed.

  1. Accelerated Gray and White Matter Deterioration With Age in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cropley, Vanessa L; Klauser, Paul; Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Bruggemann, Jason; Sundram, Suresh; Bousman, Chad; Pereira, Avril; Di Biase, Maria A; Weickert, Thomas W; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Pantelis, Christos; Zalesky, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Although brain changes in schizophrenia have been proposed to mirror those found with advancing age, the trajectory of gray matter and white matter changes during the disease course remains unclear. The authors sought to measure whether these changes in individuals with schizophrenia remain stable, are accelerated, or are diminished with age. Gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy were mapped in 326 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and in 197 healthy comparison subjects aged 20-65 years. Polynomial regression was used to model the influence of age on gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy at a whole-brain and voxel level. Between-group differences in gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy were regionally localized across the lifespan using permutation testing and cluster-based inference. Significant loss of gray matter volume was evident in schizophrenia, progressively worsening with age to a maximal loss of 8% in the seventh decade of life. The inferred rate of gray matter volume loss was significantly accelerated in schizophrenia up to middle age and plateaued thereafter. In contrast, significant reductions in fractional anisotropy emerged in schizophrenia only after age 35, and the rate of fractional anisotropy deterioration with age was constant and best modeled with a straight line. The slope of this line was 60% steeper in schizophrenia relative to comparison subjects, indicating a significantly faster rate of white matter deterioration with age. The rates of reduction of gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy were significantly faster in males than in females, but an interaction between sex and diagnosis was not evident. The findings suggest that schizophrenia is characterized by an initial, rapid rate of gray matter loss that slows in middle life, followed by the emergence of a deficit in white matter that progressively worsens with age at a constant rate.

  2. Perception Is Reality: Special Operations Forces In the Gray Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    holistic approach to the use of irregular warfare in the Gray Zone is proposed. Graham Allison and Morton Halperin’s bureaucratic politics model is...used to discern the factors that shape the perception of SOF. Two historical cases are viewed through the lens of the bureaucratic politics model to...Forces, Gray Zone, irregular warfare, U.S. policy, bureaucratic politics model , Somalia, Philippines, Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines (OEF-P

  3. The ARGOS system used for tracking gray whales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mate, B. R.; Beaty, D.; Hoisington, C.; Kutz, R.; Mate, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of satellite whale tags used to track gray whales in the eastern north Pacific Ocean is summarized. Two gray whales were radio-tagged in San Ignacio Lagoon (Mexico) and tracked on their northbound migration. One of the transmitters was modified to record and relay depth-of-dive information at 15 sec intervals throughout the course of the dive. Technical elements of data acquisition and analysis are outlined. The major biological findings are discussed.

  4. Gray wolves as climate change buffers in Yellowstone.

    PubMed

    Wilmers, Christopher C; Getz, Wayne M

    2005-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus) together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change.

  5. Gray Wolves as Climate Change Buffers in Yellowstone

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus) together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change. PMID:15757363

  6. Alcohol exposure in utero is associated with decreased gray matter volume in neonates.

    PubMed

    Donald, Kirsten A; Fouche, J P; Roos, Annerine; Koen, Nastassja; Howells, Fleur M; Riley, Edward P; Woods, Roger P; Zar, Heather J; Narr, Katherine L; Stein, Dan J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have indicated that prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with alterations in the structure of specific brain regions. However, the temporal specificity of such changes and their behavioral consequences are less known. Here we explore the brain structure of infants with in utero exposure to alcohol shortly after birth. T2 structural MRI images were acquired from 28 alcohol-exposed infants and 45 demographically matched healthy controls at 2-4 weeks of age on a 3T Siemens Allegra system as part of large birth cohort study, the Drakenstein Child Health Study (DCHS). Neonatal neurobehavior was assessed at this visit; early developmental outcome assessed on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III at 6 months of age. Volumes of gray matter regions were estimated based on the segmentations of the University of North Carolina neonatal atlas. Significantly decreased total gray matter volume was demonstrated for the alcohol-exposed cohort compared to healthy control infants (p < 0.001). Subcortical gray matter regions that were significantly different between groups after correcting for overall gray matter volume included left hippocampus, bilateral amygdala and left thalamus (p < 0.01). These findings persisted even when correcting for infant age, gender, ethnicity and maternal smoking status. Both early neurobehavioral and developmental adverse outcomes at 6 months across multiple domains were significantly associated with regional volumes primarily in the temporal and frontal lobes in infants with prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol exposure during the prenatal period has potentially enduring neurobiological consequences for exposed children. These findings suggest the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on brain growth is present very early in the first year of life, a period during which the most rapid growth and maturation occurs.

  7. Cerebral Perfusion and Gray Matter Changes Associated With Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Kelly N H; McDonald, Brenna C; Wang, Yang; Smith, Dori J; West, John D; O'Neill, Darren P; Zanville, Noah R; Champion, Victoria L; Schneider, Bryan P; Saykin, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the longitudinal relationship between chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) symptoms (sx) and brain perfusion changes in patients with breast cancer. Interaction of CIPN-sx perfusion effects with known chemotherapy-associated gray matter density decrease was also assessed to elucidate the relationship between CIPN and previously reported cancer treatment-related brain structural changes. Patients with breast cancer treated with (n = 24) or without (n = 23) chemotherapy underwent clinical examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging at the following three time points: before treatment (baseline), 1 month after treatment completion, and 1 year after the 1-month assessment. CIPN-sx were evaluated with the self-reported Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group-Neurotoxicity four-item sensory-specific scale. Perfusion and gray matter density were assessed using voxel-based pulsed arterial spin labeling and morphometric analyses and tested for association with CIPN-sx in the patients who received chemotherapy. Patients who received chemotherapy reported significantly increased CIPN-sx from baseline to 1 month, with partial recovery by 1 year (P < .001). CIPN-sx increase from baseline to 1 month was significantly greater for patients who received chemotherapy compared with those who did not (P = .001). At 1 month, neuroimaging showed that for the group that received chemotherapy, CIPN-sx were positively associated with cerebral perfusion in the right superior frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus, regions associated with pain processing (P < .001). Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analysis in the group receiving chemotherapy indicated that CIPN-sx and associated perfusion changes from baseline to 1 month were also positively correlated with gray matter density change (P < .005). Peripheral neuropathy symptoms after systemic chemotherapy for breast cancer are associated with changes in cerebral perfusion and gray

  8. Cerebral Perfusion and Gray Matter Changes Associated With Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Kelly N.H.; McDonald, Brenna C.; Wang, Yang; Smith, Dori J.; West, John D.; O'Neill, Darren P.; Zanville, Noah R.; Champion, Victoria L.; Schneider, Bryan P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the longitudinal relationship between chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) symptoms (sx) and brain perfusion changes in patients with breast cancer. Interaction of CIPN-sx perfusion effects with known chemotherapy-associated gray matter density decrease was also assessed to elucidate the relationship between CIPN and previously reported cancer treatment–related brain structural changes. Methods Patients with breast cancer treated with (n = 24) or without (n = 23) chemotherapy underwent clinical examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging at the following three time points: before treatment (baseline), 1 month after treatment completion, and 1 year after the 1-month assessment. CIPN-sx were evaluated with the self-reported Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group–Neurotoxicity four-item sensory-specific scale. Perfusion and gray matter density were assessed using voxel-based pulsed arterial spin labeling and morphometric analyses and tested for association with CIPN-sx in the patients who received chemotherapy. Results Patients who received chemotherapy reported significantly increased CIPN-sx from baseline to 1 month, with partial recovery by 1 year (P < .001). CIPN-sx increase from baseline to 1 month was significantly greater for patients who received chemotherapy compared with those who did not (P = .001). At 1 month, neuroimaging showed that for the group that received chemotherapy, CIPN-sx were positively associated with cerebral perfusion in the right superior frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus, regions associated with pain processing (P < .001). Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analysis in the group receiving chemotherapy indicated that CIPN-sx and associated perfusion changes from baseline to 1 month were also positively correlated with gray matter density change (P < .005). Conclusion Peripheral neuropathy symptoms after systemic chemotherapy for breast cancer are associated with

  9. Improved Performance of Adjunctive Ultrasonography After Mammography Screening for Breast Cancer Among Chinese Females.

    PubMed

    Dong, Henglei; Huang, Yubei; Song, Fengju; Dai, Hongji; Liu, Peifang; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Peishan; Han, Jiali; Hao, Xishan; Chen, Kexin

    2017-08-15

    Until now, no studies have investigated whether women other than those with dense breasts are suitable for adjunctive ultrasonography after negative mammography, and investigated whether all women with negative mammography are suitable for adjunctive ultrasonography. Based on the Multi-modality Independent Screening Trial in China, a total of 31,918 women aged 45 to 65 years underwent both ultrasonography and mammography. Physicians performed ultrasonography and mammography separately and were blinded to each other's findings until their interpretations had been recorded. For both ultrasonography and mammography, suspicious results and those highly suggestive of a malignancy were confirmed by pathologic examination, whereas other results were confirmed by 1-year follow-up after initial screening. Based on Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) assessments, 84 (84.8%) of 99 cancers were identified on mammography (detection rate, 2.6/1000), and 61 (61.6%) of 99 cancers were identified on ultrasonography (detection rate, 1.9/1000). Integrated mammography with ultrasonography identified 94 (95.0%) of 99 cancers, with an increment of 11.9% in cancer detection rate (from 2.6/1000 to 2.9/1000) (P < .05). Moreover, among women with BIRADS 3, adjunctive ultrasonography detected no cancers. All 10 additional cancers detected by adjunctive ultrasonography were from women with BIRADS 0 to 2, at a cost of 207 women with false positives. Additionally, dense breasts and benign breast disease were significantly associated with positive ultrasonography after BIRADS 0 to 2 (all P values < .05). After negative mammography, adjunctive ultrasonography should only be recommended for BIRADS 0 to 2 but not BIRADS 3, especially for women with dense breasts or benign breast disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Past and present research on gray whale vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollervides, Francisco

    2002-05-01

    Eberhadt and Evans first recorded vocalizations of gray whales in 1967 in Laguna Ojo de Liebre, Mexico. Three and a half decades of bioacoustic research on gray whales has followed this groundbreaking work. Gray whales appear more vocal while at the southern breeding lagoons off Baja California and are least vocal at the northern feeding areas of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas. Ten different vocalizations have been identified on the breeding grounds, while only six different vocalizations have been recorded on the feeding grounds. Evans also conducted the first recordings of vocalizations of gray whales in captivity with his work on J.J. II in San Diego in 1974. Since then, the database of captive gray whale vocalizations has expanded with research on GiGi in 1997. From this review, an acoustic repertoire of at least 12 different types of vocalizations is suggested. Nevertheless, not all gray whale calls fall into obvious or distinct categories; thus, correlating specific behaviors with each vocalization type merits further study.

  11. 19 CFR 133.23 - Restrictions on importation of gray market articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restrictions on importation of gray market... Registered and/or Recorded Trademarks or Recorded Trade Names § 133.23 Restrictions on importation of gray market articles. (a) Restricted gray market articles defined. “Restricted gray market articles” are...

  12. 19 CFR 133.23 - Restrictions on importation of gray market articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Restrictions on importation of gray market... Registered and/or Recorded Trademarks or Recorded Trade Names § 133.23 Restrictions on importation of gray market articles. (a) Restricted gray market articles defined. “Restricted gray market articles” are...

  13. Use of intraoperative ultrasonography in canine spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Nanai, Beatrix; Lyman, Ronald; Bichsel, Pierre S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the intraoperative appearance of various spinal cord conditions, and to investigate how intraoperative ultrasonography assisted in modification of surgical and postoperative treatment plans. Intraoperative ultrasonography (B-mode, and power Doppler mode) was used in 25 dogs undergoing spinal surgery. The neurologic conditions included cervical spondylomyelopathy, intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion, IVD extrusion, spinal tumors, nerve sheath mass, granulomatous myelitis, and discospondylitis. All of these diagnoses were supported by histopathologic and/or cytologic evaluation. It was possible to visualize the spinal cord and the abnormal spinal tissue in all of the patients. Power Doppler imaging allowed assessment of the spinal cord microcirculation, and assisted in judgment of the degree of decompression. Ultrasound imaging directly impacted the surgical and the medical treatment plans in four patients. Owing to the intraoperative imaging, two hemilaminectomies were extended cranially and caudally, and additional disc spaces were fenestrated, one hemilaminectomy site was extended dorsally to retrieve the disc material from the opposite side, and one intramedullary cervical spinal cord lesion was discovered, aspirated, and consequently diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation, which altered the long-term medication protocol in that dog. This study suggests that intraoperative sonographic spinal cord imaging is a useful and viable technique.

  14. Electroencephalography and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in neonatal citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Chen, Yung-Jung; Niu, Dau-Ming; Hsu, Ju-Hui; Lee, Inn-Chi

    2014-11-01

    The authors present a case of citrullinemia with a genotype of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1), c.380 G>A (p.R127Q)/c.380 G>A (p.R127Q), in two alleles. A 3-day-old female infant presented with status epilepticus and coma. Laboratory data showed hyperammonemia and marked lactic acidosis in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid; electroencephalography showed severely suppressed cerebral activity and focal paroxysmal volleys of slow and sharp waves (< 1Hz) over the left hemisphere. Real-time transcranial Doppler ultrasonography showed a brain edema and high peaked systolic and low diastolic flows in basal, anterior, and middle cerebral arteries; however, immediately after a blood exchange transfusion, systolic flows were lower and diastolic flows were higher. The resistance indices were significantly different (means: 0.58 vs. 0.37; p=0.01). The patient was placed on diet therapy. After six blood exchange transfusions and peritoneal dialysis, her neurologic examination results and serum ammonia and lactate values were normal. The authors found that electroencephalography and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography were useful for the diagnosis and follow-up treatment of neonatal citrullinemia.

  15. Ultrasonography in pediatric rheumatology in Latin America. Expanding the frontiers.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Gutiérrez, Marwin; Roth, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    For the past two decades, musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSKUS) has developed exponentially and has become an essential tool in rheumatology practice. This development has been far more limited in pediatric rheumatology which is partially related to deficits in the evidence base. Many studies have shown that MSKUS is more sensitive than the clinical examination for detecting synovitis and enthesitis in adults. At the same time, there is a lack of studies demonstrating its validity, reliability, and reproducibility in pediatric rheumatology. In addition, clear definitions for the normal pediatric joint and enthesis as well as various findings in pathology associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA) have only started to emerge. Most of this work is being done through the Outcome Measurement in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) ultrasound pediatric task force but the Pan American League of Associations for Rheumatology (PANLAR) US Pediatric Task Force is also working on validating MSKUS in children. In addition, several MSKUS courses for pediatric rheumatologists have been offered in Latin American countries; these will not only complement the scientific work pediatric-specific ultrasonography training, but also represents an essential component for the successful implementation of this technique into daily practice as well.

  16. A comparison of gray and non-gray modeling approaches to radiative transfer in pool fire simulations.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Gautham

    2010-10-15

    Decoupled radiative heat transfer calculations of 30 cm-diameter toluene and heptane pool fires are performed employing the discrete ordinates method. The composition and temperature fields within the fires are created from detailed experimental measurements of soot volume fractions based on absorption and emission, temperature statistics and correlations found in the literature. The measured temperature variance data is utilized to compute the temperature self-correlation term for modeling turbulence-radiation interactions. In the toluene pool fire, the presence of cold soot near the fuel surface is found to suppress the average radiation feedback to the pool surface by 27%. The performances of four gray and three non-gray radiative property models for the gases are also compared. The average variations in radiative transfer predictions due to differences in the spectroscopic and experimental databases employed in the property model formulations are found to be between 10% and 20%. Clear differences between the gray and non-gray modeling strategies are seen when the mean beam length is computed based on traditionally employed geometric relations. Therefore, a correction to the mean beam length is proposed to improve the agreement between gray and non-gray modeling in simulations of open pool fires.

  17. Ultrasonography-Assisted Arthroscopic Proximal Iliotibial Band Release and Trochanteric Bursectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We describe arthroscopic iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy assisted by intraoperative ultrasonography for accurate placement of arthroscopic portals and to ensure adequate decompression of the peritrochanteric space. We have found ultrasonography for endoscopic iliotibial band release a useful tool to assist with localizing the site and length of decompression. PMID:24400195

  18. Ultrasonography-assisted arthroscopic proximal iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We describe arthroscopic iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy assisted by intraoperative ultrasonography for accurate placement of arthroscopic portals and to ensure adequate decompression of the peritrochanteric space. We have found ultrasonography for endoscopic iliotibial band release a useful tool to assist with localizing the site and length of decompression.

  19. Analysis of retrograde ejaculation using color Doppler ultrasonography before and after transurethral collagen injection.

    PubMed

    Nagai, A; Nasu, Y; Watanabe, M; Tsugawa, M; Iguchi, H; Kumon, H

    2004-10-01

    Transurethral bladder neck collagen injection therapy was performed in a patient with retrograde ejaculation. The phenomenon of retrograde ejaculation and its correction after the therapy were clearly demonstrated by color Doppler ultrasonography. To our knowledge this is the first report showing successful observation of retrograde ejaculation using color Doppler ultrasonography.

  20. Ultrasonography-guided de Quervain Injection: Accuracy and Anatomic Considerations in a Cadaver Model.

    PubMed

    Leversedge, Fraser J; Cotterell, Ilvy H; Nickel, Brian T; Crosmer, Megan; Richard, Marc; Angermeier, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Confirmation of pertinent anatomy and accurate needle placement for de Quervain injection may improve outcomes and limit complications. We evaluated the accuracy of the first extensor compartment in regard to the following: (1) anatomic assessment, (2) needle placement without imaging guidance, and (3) ultrasonography-guided injection with priority for the extensor pollicis brevis subcompartment. Anatomic assessment and ultrasonography-guided first extensor compartment injection was completed in 50 cadaver specimens. Initial needle placement was done without the guidance of ultrasonography; its final position was evaluated with ultrasonography. Then, using ultrasonography, 1 mL of India ink was injected into the extensor pollicis brevis compartment. Open evaluation confirmed pertinent anatomy and injection accuracy. A subcompartment of the first extensor compartment was identified in 27 of 50 wrists; 18 of 27 compartments were complete and 9 of 27 were incomplete, with ultrasonographic evaluation having an accuracy rate of 94%. Accurate needle placement occurred in 26 of 50 wrists (52%) when ultrasonography was not used, but only 2 of 27 needles (7%) were located within the extensor pollicis brevis subcompartment. Ultrasonography-guided injection was 100% accurate (50 out of 50) and extensor pollicis brevis injection was 96% accurate (26 of 27) when two compartments were present. Minimal extravasation was identified in 6 of 50 wrists (12%). Ultrasonography-guided de Quervain injection improves injection accuracy through the visualization of compartmental anatomy and needle placement and may improve clinical outcomes by minimizing complications associated with extra-compartmental injection.

  1. Screening ultrasonography of 2,204 patients with blunt abdominal trauma in the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jixiang; Huang, Jiwei; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Heqing; Prasoon, Pankaj; Xu, Yinglong; Bai, Yannan; Qiu, Jianguo; Zeng, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Abdominal injuries constitute a small proportion of all earthquake-related traumas; however, it often resulted in fatal hemorrhage. Ultrasonography has been described as an effective triage tool in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. We aimed to present an overview of the diagnostic accuracy of screening ultrasonography for patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to various hospitals during the Wenchuan earthquake in China. We retrospectively analyzed the patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent ultrasonography after admission to various hospitals. Ultrasonography findings were considered positive if evidence of free fluid or a parenchymal injury was identified. Ultrasonography findings were compared with the findings of computed tomography, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, repeated ultrasonography, cystography, operation, and/or the clinical course. Findings from 2,204 ultrasonographic examinations were evaluated. Findings of 199 ultrasonographic examinations (9.0%) were considered positive. Of the patients, 12 (0.5%) had a false-negative ultrasonographic findings; of this group, 3 (25%) required exploratory laparotomy. Ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 91.9%, specificity of 96.9%, and an accuracy of 96.6% for detection of abdominal injuries. Positive predictive value was 68.3%, and negative predictive value was 99.4%. Screening ultrasonography is highly reliable in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma after earthquake. It should be used as an initial diagnostic modality in the evaluation of most blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnostic study, level III.

  2. Fully-integrated framework for the segmentation and registration of the spinal cord white and gray matter.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Sara M; De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Le Troter, Arnaud; Nadeau, Sylvie; Stikov, Nikola; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-04-15

    The spinal cord white and gray matter can be affected by various pathologies such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or trauma. Being able to precisely segment the white and gray matter could help with MR image analysis and hence be useful in further understanding these pathologies, and helping with diagnosis/prognosis and drug development. Up to date, white/gray matter segmentation has mostly been done manually, which is time consuming, induces a bias related to the rater and prevents large-scale multi-center studies. Recently, few methods have been proposed to automatically segment the spinal cord white and gray matter. However, no single method exists that combines the following criteria: (i) fully automatic, (ii) works on various MRI contrasts, (iii) robust towards pathology and (iv) freely available and open source. In this study we propose a multi-atlas based method for the segmentation of the spinal cord white and gray matter that addresses the previous limitations. Moreover, to study the spinal cord morphology, atlas-based approaches are increasingly used. These approaches rely on the registration of a spinal cord template to an MR image, however the registration usually doesn't take into account the spinal cord internal structure and thus lacks accuracy. In this study, we propose a new template registration framework that integrates the white and gray matter segmentation to account for the specific gray matter shape of each individual subject. Validation of segmentation was performed in 24 healthy subjects using T2(*)-weighted images, in 8 healthy subjects using diffusion weighted images (exhibiting inverted white-to-gray matter contrast compared to T2*-weighted), and in 5 patients with spinal cord injury. The template registration was validated in 24 subjects using T2*-weighted data. Results of automatic segmentation on T2*-weighted images was in close correspondence with the manual segmentation (Dice coefficient in the white/gray matter

  3. Ultrasonography Performed by Primary Care Residents for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Raymond P; Ault, Mark; Greengold, Nancy L; Rosendahl, Thomas; Cossman, David

    2001-01-01

    A prospective pilot study was undertaken to assess a protocol to educate primary care residents in how to personally perform ultrasonography for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening. Resident exams were proctored by a primary care physician trained in ultrasonography and were scored on the level of competence in doing the examination. Patients had ultrasound performed by a resident, followed by repeat examination by the vascular lab. Primary care resident abdominal aortic imaging was achieved in 79 of 80 attempts. Four abdominal aortic aneurysms were identified. There were 75 normal examinations; resident ultrasonography results were consistent with the results of the vascular lab. Ten residents achieved an abdominal aortic ultrasound-independent competence level after an average of 3.4 proctored exams. The main outcome of this study is that a primary care resident, with minimal training in ultrasonography imaging, is able to rapidly learn the technique of ultrasonography imaging of the abdominal aorta. PMID:11903764

  4. The accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of superficial bladder tumors in patients presenting with hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Papadoliopoulos, Ioannis; Dahanis, Stefanos; Zafiropoulos, Grigoris; Polizois, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been proposed as the initial test for detection of bladder carcinomas in patients presenting with hematuria, but the accuracy of transabdominal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of superficial bladder carcinoma has not been assessed. We prospectively evaluated 173 patients presenting to the outpatient department with painless hematuria by transabdominal ultrasound and cystoscopy. The tolerability of cystoscopy was also assessed. Of 148 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 39 with bladder carcinoma were identified by cystoscopy as having bladder carcinoma, while 34 were identified by ultrasonography. For ultrasonography, the sensitivity (87.1%), specificity (98.1%), positive predictive value (94.4%) and negative predictive value (95.4%) were good but not as good as cystoscopy. While the tolerability of cystoscopy is relatively low, it is still superior to ultrasonography in the evaluation of the bladder as a possible source of hematuria. PMID:19318748

  5. The accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of superficial bladder tumors in patients presenting with hematuria.

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Papadoliopoulos, Ioannis; Dahanis, Stefano; Zafiropoulos, Grigoris; Polizois, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been proposed as the initial test for detection of bladder carcinomas in patients presenting with hematuria, but the accuracy of transabdominal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of superficial bladder carcinoma has not been assessed. We prospectively evaluated 173 patients presenting to the outpatient department with painless hematuria by transabdominal ultrasound and cystoscopy. The tolerability of cystoscopy was also assessed. Of 148 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 39 with bladder carcinoma were identified by cystoscopy as having bladder carcinoma, while 34 were identified by ultrasonography. For ultrasonography, the sensitivity (87.1%), specificity (98.1%), positive predictive value (94.4%) and negative predictive value (95.4%) were good but not as good as cystoscopy. While the tolerability of cystoscopy is relatively low, it is still superior to ultrasonography in the evaluation of the bladder as a possible source of hematuria.

  6. Medial frontal white and gray matter contributions to general intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Toshiyuki; Nestor, Paul G; Bouix, Sylvain; Saito, Yukiko; Hosokawa, Taiga; Kubicki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) are part of a wider neural network that plays an important role in general intelligence and executive function. We used structural brain imaging to quantify magnetic resonance gray matter volume and diffusion tensor white matter integrity of the mOFC-rACC network in 26 healthy participants who also completed neuropsychological tests of intellectual abilities and executive function. Stochastic tractography, the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging method for examining white matter connections between adjacent gray matter regions, was employed to assess the integrity of mOFC-rACC pathways. Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the integrity of white matter connections, was calculated. Results indicated that higher intelligence correlated with greater gray matter volumes for both mOFC and rACC, as well as with increased FA for left posterior mOFC-rACC connectivity. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that DTI-derived FA of left posterior mOFC-rACC uniquely accounted for 29%-34% of the variance in IQ, in comparison to 11%-16% uniquely explained by gray matter volume of the left rACC. Together, left rACC gray matter volume and white matter connectivity between left posterior mOFC and rACC accounted for up to 50% of the variance in general intelligence. This study is to our knowledge the first to examine white matter connectivity between OFC and ACC, two gray matter regions of interests that are very close in physical proximity, and underscores the important independent contributions of variations in rACC gray matter volume and mOFC-rACC white matter connectivity to individual differences in general intelligence.

  7. Brain Gray Matter Deficits in Patients with Chronic Primary Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Noh, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jeong-Sik; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Mi Rim; Hong, Seung Bong

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the structural changes in patients with chronic primary insomnia and the relationships with clinical features of insomnia. Statistical parametric mapping 8-based voxel-based morphometry was used to identify differences in regional gray and white matter between patients with chronic primary insomnia and normal controls. University hospital. Twenty-seven patients and 27 age/sex-matched controls. Regional differences were compared using two-sample t-tests with age, sex, and intracranial volume as covariates. The patients were a mean age of 52.3 y and had a mean history of insomnia of 7.6 y. Patients displayed cognitive deficits in attention, frontal/executive function, and nonverbal memory. Patients also displayed significantly reduced gray matter concentrations (GMCs) in dorsolateral prefrontal and pericentral cortices, superior temporal gyrus, and cerebellum and decreased gray matter volumes in medial frontal and middle temporal gyri compared with control patients with the cluster threshold ≥ 50 voxels at the level of uncorrected P < 0.001. Negative correlations were found between GMC of the prefrontal cortex and insomnia severity and the wakefulness after sleep onset, and between GMC of pericentral cortex and sleep latencies. None of the findings continued to be significant after correction for multiple comparisons. We found gray matter deficits in multiple brain regions including bilateral frontal lobes in patients with psychophysiologic insomnia. Gray matter deficit of the pericentral and lateral temporal areas may be associated with the difficulties in sleep initiation and maintenance. It is still unclear whether gray matter reductions are a preexisting abnormality or a consequence of insomnia. Joo EY; Noh HJ; Kim JS; Koo DL; Kim D; Hwang KJ; Kim JY; Kim ST; Kim MR; Hong SB. Brain gray matter deficits in patients with chronic primary insomnia. SLEEP 2013;36(7):999-1007.

  8. Brain Gray Matter Deficits in Patients with Chronic Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Noh, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jeong-Sik; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Mi Rim; Hong, Seung Bong

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the structural changes in patients with chronic primary insomnia and the relationships with clinical features of insomnia. Design: Statistical parametric mapping 8-based voxel-based morphometry was used to identify differences in regional gray and white matter between patients with chronic primary insomnia and normal controls. Setting: University hospital. Patients and Participants: Twenty-seven patients and 27 age/sex-matched controls. Interventions: Regional differences were compared using two-sample t-tests with age, sex, and intracranial volume as covariates. Measurements and Results: The patients were a mean age of 52.3 y and had a mean history of insomnia of 7.6 y. Patients displayed cognitive deficits in attention, frontal/executive function, and nonverbal memory. Patients also displayed significantly reduced gray matter concentrations (GMCs) in dorsolateral prefrontal and pericentral cortices, superior temporal gyrus, and cerebellum and decreased gray matter volumes in medial frontal and middle temporal gyri compared with control patients with the cluster threshold ≥ 50 voxels at the level of uncorrected P < 0.001. Negative correlations were found between GMC of the prefrontal cortex and insomnia severity and the wakefulness after sleep onset, and between GMC of pericentral cortex and sleep latencies. None of the findings continued to be significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: We found gray matter deficits in multiple brain regions including bilateral frontal lobes in patients with psychophysiologic insomnia. Gray matter deficit of the pericentral and lateral temporal areas may be associated with the difficulties in sleep initiation and maintenance. It is still unclear whether gray matter reductions are a preexisting abnormality or a consequence of insomnia. Citation: Joo EY; Noh HJ; Kim JS; Koo DL; Kim D; Hwang KJ; Kim JY; Kim ST; Kim MR; Hong SB. Brain gray matter deficits in patients with

  9. Medial Frontal White and Gray Matter Contributions to General Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Bouix, Sylvain; Kubicki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) are part of a wider neural network that plays an important role in general intelligence and executive function. We used structural brain imaging to quantify magnetic resonance gray matter volume and diffusion tensor white matter integrity of the mOFC-rACC network in 26 healthy participants who also completed neuropsychological tests of intellectual abilities and executive function. Stochastic tractography, the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging method for examining white matter connections between adjacent gray matter regions, was employed to assess the integrity of mOFC-rACC pathways. Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the integrity of white matter connections, was calculated. Results indicated that higher intelligence correlated with greater gray matter volumes for both mOFC and rACC, as well as with increased FA for left posterior mOFC-rACC connectivity. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that DTI-derived FA of left posterior mOFC-rACC uniquely accounted for 29%–34% of the variance in IQ, in comparison to 11%–16% uniquely explained by gray matter volume of the left rACC. Together, left rACC gray matter volume and white matter connectivity between left posterior mOFC and rACC accounted for up to 50% of the variance in general intelligence. This study is to our knowledge the first to examine white matter connectivity between OFC and ACC, two gray matter regions of interests that are very close in physical proximity, and underscores the important independent contributions of variations in rACC gray matter volume and mOFC-rACC white matter connectivity to individual differences in general intelligence. PMID:25551572

  10. Comparing ED(MF)n in the gray zone to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brast, Maren; Schemann, Vera; Moseley, Christopher; Crewell, Susanne; Neggers, Roel

    2017-04-01

    A new scale-adaptive shallow cumulus parameterization scheme is confronted with measurements made during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) at the Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE). The Eddy-Diffusivity Multiple Mass-Flux (or ED(MF)n) scheme is a bin-macrophysics scheme, in which subgrid transport and clouds are formulated in terms of discretized size densities. It is implemented into a large-eddy simulation (LES) model, replacing the original subgrid transport scheme. This way the ED(MF)n can be tested in an idealized setting, covering the boundary layer gray zone. The LES is driven with large-scale forcings derived from analyses of the weather prediction model COSMO-DE, resulting in a reasonably accurate simulation of the measured conditions. During the HOPE campaign the boundary layer was measured extensively, supplying a wealth of data that can be used to evaluate parameterizations. Both long-term averages and individual shallow cumulus days are investigated. The LES is run with and without ED(MF)n for various resolutions, and the modeled boundary layer is compared to the observations from HOPE. This allows investigating the question how well the scale-adaptive scheme reproduces simulated and observed meteorology across the gray zone.

  11. [Diagnosis and prognosis of preterm labor: physical examination and ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Goffinet, F; Kayem, G

    2002-11-01

    vaginal examination by ultrasonography. Ultrasonography could be used in association with clinical examination or in a second time if clinical examination is doubtful (NP 3). For these women, ultrasonography could reduce the number of hospitalizations, limiting treatment for some and, for others, increasing intensive interventions such as tocolysis, in utero transfer or corticsteroid treatment.

  12. Anatomic configuration of prostate obtained by noninvasive ultrasonography can predict clinical voiding parameters for determining BOO in men with LUTS.

    PubMed

    Doo, Chin Kyung; Uh, Hong Sun

    2009-02-01

    To determine whether the anatomic configuration of the prostate, including the intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP), as assessed by noninvasive ultrasonography, can predict the voiding parameters in men aged > or = 50 years who present with lower urinary tract symptoms. We assessed 157 consecutive men aged > or = 50 years who presented with lower urinary tract symptoms at their first visit. The initial evaluations included medical history, International Prostate Symptom Score and quality-of-life assessments, digital rectal examination, urinalysis, total serum prostate-specific antigen measurement, and free uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine volume assessments. Transabdominal ultrasonography was used to assess the IPP and prostate contour, and transrectal ultrasonography was used to obtain a classification of benign prostatic hyperplasia. A total of 9 patients, 4 (5.0%) with a type 1 and 5 (16.7%) with a type 3 prostate contour presented with acute urinary retention. All patients with acute urinary retention were classified as having IPP grade 3. The storage International Prostate Symptom Score differed significantly between patients with IPP grade 1 and those with IPP grade 2 or 3. The peak urinary flow rate was significantly reduced in patients with type 2 and 3 and those with IPP grade 3. The stratification of the patients into 3 groups according to prostate volume (< 30, 30-40, and > 40 cm(3)) showed that those with type 2 and 3 had a significantly lower peak urinary flow rate. The results of our study have shown that, in addition to IPP, patients with a type 2 or 3 prostate contour are more likely to have a decreased peak urinary flow rate and to present with acute urinary retention. However, larger scale studies are needed to confirm these results.

  13. Monitoring gray wolf populations using multiple survey methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ausband, David E.; Rich, Lindsey N.; Glenn, Elizabeth M.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Zager, Pete; Miller, David A.W.; Waits, Lisette P.; Ackerman, Bruce B.; Mack, Curt M.

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral patterns and large territories of large carnivores make them challenging to monitor. Occupancy modeling provides a framework for monitoring population dynamics and distribution of territorial carnivores. We combined data from hunter surveys, howling and sign surveys conducted at predicted wolf rendezvous sites, and locations of radiocollared wolves to model occupancy and estimate the number of gray wolf (Canis lupus) packs and individuals in Idaho during 2009 and 2010. We explicitly accounted for potential misidentification of occupied cells (i.e., false positives) using an extension of the multi-state occupancy framework. We found agreement between model predictions and distribution and estimates of number of wolf packs and individual wolves reported by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Nez Perce Tribe from intensive radiotelemetry-based monitoring. Estimates of individual wolves from occupancy models that excluded data from radiocollared wolves were within an average of 12.0% (SD = 6.0) of existing statewide minimum counts. Models using only hunter survey data generally estimated the lowest abundance, whereas models using all data generally provided the highest estimates of abundance, although only marginally higher. Precision across approaches ranged from 14% to 28% of mean estimates and models that used all data streams generally provided the most precise estimates. We demonstrated that an occupancy model based on different survey methods can yield estimates of the number and distribution of wolf packs and individual wolf abundance with reasonable measures of precision. Assumptions of the approach including that average territory size is known, average pack size is known, and territories do not overlap, must be evaluated periodically using independent field data to ensure occupancy estimates remain reliable. Use of multiple survey methods helps to ensure that occupancy estimates are robust to weaknesses or changes in any 1 survey method

  14. Longitudinal Study of Gray Matter Changes in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, X; Liang, P; Li, Y; Shi, L; Wang, D; Li, K

    2015-12-01

    The pathology of Parkinson disease leads to morphological brain volume changes. So far, the progressive gray matter volume change across time specific to patients with Parkinson disease compared controls remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of gray matter changes in patients with Parkinson disease and to explore the progressive gray matter volume change specific to patients with Parkinson disease with disease progression by using voxel-based morphometry analysis. Longitudinal cognitive assessment and structural MR imaging of 89 patients with Parkinson disease (62 men) and 55 healthy controls (33 men) were from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative data base, including the initial baseline and 12-month follow-up data. Two-way analysis of covariance was performed with covariates of age, sex, years of education, imaging data from multiple centers, and total intracranial volume by using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra tool from SPM8 software. Gray matter volume changes for patients with Parkinson disease were detected with decreased gray matter volume in the frontotemporoparietal areas and the bilateral caudate, with increased gray matter volume in the bilateral limbic/paralimbic areas, medial globus pallidus/putamen, and the right occipital cortex compared with healthy controls. Progressive gray matter volume decrease in the bilateral caudate was found for both patients with Parkinson disease and healthy controls, and this caudate volume was positively associated with cognitive ability for both groups. The progressive gray matter volume increase specific to the patients with Parkinson disease was identified close to the left ventral lateral nucleus of thalamus, and a positive relationship was found between the thalamic volume and the tremor scores in a subgroup with tremor-dominant patients with Parkinson disease. The observed progressive changes in gray matter volume in Parkinson disease may provide

  15. On 3-gauge transformations, 3-curvatures, and Gray-categories

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2014-04-15

    In the 3-gauge theory, a 3-connection is given by a 1-form A valued in the Lie algebra g, a 2-form B valued in the Lie algebra h, and a 3-form C valued in the Lie algebra l, where (g,h,l) constitutes a differential 2-crossed module. We give the 3-gauge transformations from one 3-connection to another, and show the transformation formulae of the 1-curvature 2-form, the 2-curvature 3-form, and the 3-curvature 4-form. The gauge configurations can be interpreted as smooth Gray-functors between two Gray 3-groupoids: the path 3-groupoid P{sub 3}(X) and the 3-gauge group G{sup L} associated to the 2-crossed module L, whose differential is (g,h,l). The derivatives of Gray-functors are 3-connections, and the derivatives of lax-natural transformations between two such Gray-functors are 3-gauge transformations. We give the 3-dimensional holonomy, the lattice version of the 3-curvature, whose derivative gives the 3-curvature 4-form. The covariance of 3-curvatures easily follows from this construction. This Gray-categorical construction explains why 3-gauge transformations and 3-curvatures have the given forms. The interchanging 3-arrows are responsible for the appearance of terms with the Peiffer commutator (, )

  16. Interventional ultrasonography of the chest: Techniques and indications

    PubMed Central

    Almolla, J.; Balconi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic ultrasonography can be used for diagnostic purposes as well as a guide for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. When the lesion or fluid collection has been located and the patient properly positioned, the angle of the needle is identified with respect to the transducer. The insertion tract should transgress the smallest possible area of aerated parenchyma. The needle can be introduced with a free-hand technique or with the aid of a needle guide. Correct planning of the procedure reduces intervention time and decreases the risk of complications. The main indications are superficial masses that require biopsy, pleural and parenchymal lesions formerly biopsied with CT or fluoroscopic guidance, and fluid collections that need to be drained. Ultrasound, thanks to its widespread use, simple execution, and low costs, represents a safe, manageable guide for thoracic interventions. PMID:23396954

  17. Emergency ultrasonography of the gastrointestinal tract of children.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is widely used to evaluate most body parts in pediatric patients because it is simple, noninvasive, easy to use, and applicable in a wide variety of clinical situations. US is the modality of choice for the initial evaluation of acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients because of their small body habitus and the presence of less fat tissue in the abdominal wall and peritoneal cavity. The most important factor in performing pediatric emergency US is the graded compression technique and selection of the proper transducer. The careful evaluation of bowel wall thickening combined with ancillary findings such as fluid collection, increased echogenicity of the mesenteric fat tissue, enlarged lymph nodes, hyperemic bowel changes, and abnormal bowel peristalsis can increase the diagnostic capability of US.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities: role of fetal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ermito, Santina; Dinatale, Angela; Carrara, Sabina; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Imbruglia, Laura; Recupero, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Fetal ultrasonografy is the most important tool to provide prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies. The detection of limb abnormalities may be a complex problem if the correct diagnostic approch is not established. A careful description of the abnormality using the rigth nomenclature is the first step. Looking for other associated abnormalities is the threshold to suspect chromosomal abnormalities or single gene disorder. According to the patogenic point of view, limb abnormalities may be the result of malformation, deformation, or disruption. The prenatal diagnosis and the management of limb abnormalities involve a multidisciplinary team of ostetrician, radiologist/sonologist, clinical geneticist, neonatologist, and orthopedic surgeons to provide the parents with the information regarding etiology of the disorder, prognosis, option related to the pregnancy and recurrence risk for future pregnancies. The aim of this review is to describe the importance of detailed fetal ultrasonography in prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities. PMID:22439035

  19. Ultrasonography in non-cirrhotic portal hypertension: correlation with splenoportography.

    PubMed

    Nagi, B; Khandelwal, N; Kochhar, R; Gupta, B B; Mehta, S; Singh, K; Mehta, S K

    1989-10-01

    Real time sonography followed by splenoportography was performed in 38 cases with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Eleven of these cases, in whom porto-systemic shunt surgery was done, were also evaluated by real time sonography post-operatively. The ultrasound findings correlated well in 37 cases (98%) with splenoportography. All the post-operative cases also revealed a patent portosystemic shunt on sonography. Ultrasonography, a valuable, non-invasive, initial investigation of portal hypertension, may thus be used as the only investigation to distinguish intra- from extra-hepatic obstruction and to evaluate patency of surgically created porto-systemic shunts. Invasive portography may be performed only if surgical treatment is anticipated.

  20. Ultrasonography for endotracheal tube position in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Jaeel, Pooja; Sheth, Mansi; Nguyen, Jimmy

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonography (US) has been shown to be effective for verifying endotracheal tube (ETT) position in adults but has been less studied in infants and children. We review the literature regarding US for ETT positioning in the pediatric population. A literature search was conducted using the Ovid and MEDLINE databases with search terms regarding US relating to ETT intubation and positioning in infants and children. Most studies in neonates and infants used the midsagittal suprasternal view. Studies reported >80% visualization of the ETT tip by US, and US interpretation of the ETT position correlated with the XR position in 73-100% of cases. Studies of older children used the suprasternal views, substernal views, and mid-axillary intercostal views. US appears comparable to XR and capnography in determining ETT position in this population.

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Białecki, Marcin; Białecka, Agnieszka; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Liebert, Ariel; Kłopocka, Maria; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    The chronic nature of Crohn's disease (CD) implicates necessity of multiple control assessments throughout patient's life. It is accepted that in patients with CD requiring disease monitoring, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and computed tomography enterography (CTE) are--apart from endoscopy--imaging studies of first choice. In practice, diagnostic imaging of patients with CD is troublesome, since MRE is an expensive and complicated study, and CTE exposes patients to high doses of ionizing radiation. Therefore, there is a need for new, both non-invasive and effective, methods of imaging in CD. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (CEUS) is a relatively new method using gas-filled microbubbles serving as contrast agent. It allows for detailed assessment of blood perfusion within intestine wall and peri-intestinal tissues, which enables detection and monitoring of inflammation and its qualitative assessment. The purpose of this paper is to describe CEUS examination technique and its clinical applications in patients with Crohn's disease.

  2. The role of intraductal ultrasonography in pancreatobiliary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Hu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) provides real-time, cross-sectional imaging of pancreatobiliary ducts and surrounding structures during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using a high-frequency ultrasound (US) transducer. Hence, IDUS has been considered a sensitive tool in the evaluation of suspicious choledocholithiasis and neoplasms, to help distinguish between benign and malignant bile duct strictures or wall thickness, and to assess tumor extension and invasion depth. With the rapid development and enriched choices of sensitive diagnostic modalities include but are not limited to endoscopic US, peroral cholangioscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy, it is needed to systematically assess the role of IDUS in the investigation of pancreatobiliary diseases. Some new developments and innovative use of IDUS techniques will be discussed in this paper with the review of literature. PMID:27803901

  3. [Acute dyspnea in the emergency room: from pathophysiology to ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Rosset-Zufferey, Sarah; Ramlawi, Majd

    2015-08-12

    Acute dyspnea is one of the leading clinical symptoms encountered in the emergency room. Its differential diagnosis is wide, ranging from noisy panic attacks to threatening acute heart failure. History taking and physical examination, even when exhaustive are of limited diagnostic value. Patient reported descriptions are fairly correlated to pathophysiology. Vital signs such as the respiratory rate and pulse oximetry carry prognostic significance. Ancillary tests like the chest x-ray lack sensitivity and specificity. The most astonishing adjunct to testing is the chest ultrasound. Its integration into the emergency physician's armamentarium considerably changed clinical management. Fast and accurate, ultrasonography has become the modern era stethoscope. This review discusses acute dyspnea through the main elements useful to diagnosis.

  4. Medical auditing of whole-breast screening ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung

    2017-07-01

    Since breast ultrasonography (US) has been used as an adjunctive screening modality in women with dense breasts, the need has arisen to evaluate and monitor its possible harm and benefits in comparison with other screening modalities such as mammography. Recently, the fifth edition of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System published by the American College of Radiology has suggested auditing methods for screening breast US. However, the method proposed therein is slightly different from how diagnostic performance was calculated in previous studies on screening breast US. In this article, the background and core aspects of medical audits of breast cancer screening will be reviewed to provide an introduction to the medical auditing of screening breast US, with the goal of helping radiologists to understand and identify potential ways to improve outcomes.

  5. The current status of three-dimensional ultrasonography in gynaecology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the most recent cross-sectional imaging modality to acquire three-dimensional (3D) capabilities. The reconstruction of volumetric US data for multiplanar display took a significantly longer time to develop in comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The current equipment for 3D-US is capable of producing high-resolution images in three different planes, including real-time surface-rendered images. The use of 3D-US in gynaecology was accelerated through the development of the endovaginal volume transducer, which allows the automated acquisition of volumetric US data. Although initially considered an adjunct to two-dimensional US, 3D-US is now the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of Müllerian duct anomalies and the location of intrauterine devices. PMID:26537304

  6. The current status of three-dimensional ultrasonography in gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chiou Li

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the most recent cross-sectional imaging modality to acquire three-dimensional (3D) capabilities. The reconstruction of volumetric US data for multiplanar display took a significantly longer time to develop in comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The current equipment for 3D-US is capable of producing high-resolution images in three different planes, including real-time surface-rendered images. The use of 3D-US in gynaecology was accelerated through the development of the endovaginal volume transducer, which allows the automated acquisition of volumetric US data. Although initially considered an adjunct to two-dimensional US, 3D-US is now the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of Müllerian duct anomalies and the location of intrauterine devices.

  7. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography and ultrasonography for tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The detection of ultrasound in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and ultrasonography (US) usually relies on ultrasonic transducers in contact with the biological tissue. This is a major drawback for important potential applications such as surgery and small animal imaging. Here we report the use of remote optical detection, as used in industrial laser-ultrasonics, to detect ultrasound in biological tissues. This strategy enables non-contact implementation of PAT and US without exceeding laser exposure safety limits. The method uses suitably shaped laser pulses and a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer in differential configuration to reach quantum-limited sensitivity. Endogenous and exogenous inclusions exhibiting optical and acoustic contrasts were detected ex vivo in chicken breast and calf brain specimens. Inclusions down to 0.5 mm in size were detected at depths well exceeding 1 cm. The method could significantly expand the scope of applications of PAT and US in biomedical imaging. PMID:22254164

  8. Is the image guidance of ultrasonography beneficial for neurosurgical routine?

    PubMed

    Miller, Dorothea; Heinze, Stefan; Tirakotai, Wuttipong; Bozinov, Oliver; Sürücü, Oguzkan; Benes, Ludwig; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Sure, Ulrich

    2007-06-01

    Intraoperative US has been widely used in neurosurgical procedures. However, images are often difficult to read. In the present study, we evaluate whether the image guidance of ultrasonography is helpful for the interpretation of US scans. Twenty-nine patients with tumor were operated on with the aid of intraoperative US from January to June 2005. Image-guided sonography was used in 13 cases and nonnavigated US technology in the remaining cases. We compared the 2 technologies retrospectively. Although image quality was good in most cases, orientation remained difficult in 8 of the 16 patients where conventional sonography was used. With the aid of image fusion for navigated sonography, the orientation was judged superior to nonnavigated US. In our experience, integration of the US into the navigation system facilitates anatomical understanding. Thus, we feel that this technology is beneficial for neurosurgical routine.

  9. [Ultrasonography as a tool in diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    do Amaral e Castro, Adham; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Sakuma, Alexandre Kaue; Barros, Wagner Haese

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the value of ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Two hundred patients (400 hands) were submitted to wrist US to measure median nerve area (MNA), questioning on paresthesia and pain in the median nerve territory, Tinel and Phalen maneuvers. An MNA > 9 mm(2) was considered diagnostic of CTS. Measurement of MNA by US was > 9 mm(2) in 27% of the hands. A good association with pain (p < 0.0001), paresthesia (p < 0.0001), Tinel test (p < 0.0001) and Phalen test (p < 0.0001) was found. According to the clinical criteria for classification of CTS from American Academy of Neurology the MNA by US had 64.8% of sensibility and 77.0% of specificity in this sample. Measurement of MNA by US performs well and can be used as first option for the investigation of patients with CTS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical auditing of whole-breast screening ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Since breast ultrasonography (US) has been used as an adjunctive screening modality in women with dense breasts, the need has arisen to evaluate and monitor its possible harm and benefits in comparison with other screening modalities such as mammography. Recently, the fifth edition of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System published by the American College of Radiology has suggested auditing methods for screening breast US. However, the method proposed therein is slightly different from how diagnostic performance was calculated in previous studies on screening breast US. In this article, the background and core aspects of medical audits of breast cancer screening will be reviewed to provide an introduction to the medical auditing of screening breast US, with the goal of helping radiologists to understand and identify potential ways to improve outcomes. PMID:28322034

  11. Basics, principles, techniques and modern methods in paediatric ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of paediatric Radiology. This review aims at revisiting basic US principles, to list specific needs throughout childhood, and to discuss the application of new and modern US methods. The various sections elude to basic US physics, technical requisites and tips for handling, diagnostically valuable applications of modern techniques, and how to properly address hazards, risks and limitations. In conclusion, US holds vast potential throughout childhood in almost all body regions and many childhood specific queries - helping to reduce the need for or to optimize more invasive or irradiating imaging. Make the most of US and offerings a dedicated paediatric US service throughout the day, the week and the year thus is and will stay a major task of Paediatric Radiology.

  12. Understanding abdominal ultrasonography in horses: which way is up?

    PubMed

    Henry Barton, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    The recent introduction of more affordable and portable ultrasound equipment makes it possible to perform transabdominal ultrasonography on equine patients in the field. Clipping the hair is not always necessary: intraabdominal structures can be quickly evaluated by soaking hair with isopropyl alcohol and using a 3.0- to 3.5-MHz curvilinear transducer. The ultrasonographer must be acquainted with the location and architecture of normal intraabdominal structures and simultaneously mindful of the depth of the viewing field, the tissue interface densities, the orientation of the transducer relative to the patient, and the image projected on the monitor. A clinician's working knowledge of these elements is the key to building confidence in distinguishing normal from abnormal ultrasonographic findings.

  13. Hysterosalpingography and ultrasonography findings of female genital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hardik Uresh; Sannananja, Bhagya; Baheti, Akshay Dwarka; Udare, Ashlesha Satish; Badhe, Padma Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Genital tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of female infertility in the world, especially in developing countries. Majority of infertility cases are due to involvement of the fallopian tubes (92%-100%), endometrial cavity (50%), and ovaries (10%-30%); cervical and vulvovaginal TB are uncommon. Genital TB has characteristic radiological appearances based on the stage of the disease process (acute inflammatory or chronic fibrotic) and the organ of involvement. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) and ultrasonography (US) remain the main imaging modalities used in the diagnosis of genital TB. HSG is the primary modality for evaluating uterine, fallopian tube, and peritubal involvement and also helps in evaluating tubal patency. US, on the other hand, allows simultaneous evaluation of ovarian and extrapelvic involvement.

  14. Adaptive sound speed correction for abdominal ultrasonography: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sungmin; Kang, Jeeun; Song, Tai-Kyung; Yoo, Yangmo

    2013-03-01

    Ultrasonography has been conducting a critical role in assessing abdominal disorders due to its noninvasive, real-time, low cost, and deep penetrating capabilities. However, for imaging obese patients with a thick fat layer, it is challenging to achieve appropriate image quality with a conventional beamforming (CON) method due to phase aberration caused by the difference between sound speeds (e.g., 1580 and 1450m/s for liver and fat, respectively). For this, various sound speed correction (SSC) methods that estimate the accumulated sound speed for a region-of interest (ROI) have been previously proposed. However, with the SSC methods, the improvement in image quality was limited only for a specific depth of ROI. In this paper, we present the adaptive sound speed correction (ASSC) method, which can enhance the image quality for whole depths by using estimated sound speeds from two different depths in the lower layer. Since these accumulated sound speeds contain the respective contributions of layers, an optimal sound speed for each depth can be estimated by solving contribution equations. To evaluate the proposed method, the phantom study was conducted with pre-beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data acquired with a SonixTouch research package (Ultrasonix Corp., Canada) with linear and convex probes from the gel pad-stacked tissue mimicking phantom (Parker Lab. Inc., USA and Model539, ATS, USA) whose sound speeds are 1610 and 1450m/s, respectively. From the study, compared to the CON and SSC methods, the ASSC method showed the improved spatial resolution and information entropy contrast (IEC) for convex and linear array transducers, respectively. These results indicate that the ASSC method can be applied for enhancing image quality when imaging obese patients in abdominal ultrasonography.

  15. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography in digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Itoh, Akihiro; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Itoh, Yuya; Nakamura, Yosuke; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Sumi, Hajime; Hayashi, Daijiro; Ohmiya, Naoki; Miyahara, Ryoji; Nakamura, Masanao; Funasaka, Kohei; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Katano, Yoshiaki; Goto, Hidemi

    2012-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography (CE-EUS) was introduced in the early 1990s. The concept of the injection of carbon dioxide microbubbles into the hepatic artery as a contrast material (enhanced ultrasonography) led to "endoscopic ultrasonographic angiography". After the arrival of the first-generation contrast agent, high-frequency (12 MHz) EUS brought about the enhancement of EUS images in the diagnosis of pancreatico-biliary diseases, upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, and submucosal tumors. The electronic scanning endosonoscope with both radial and linear probes enabled the use of high-end ultrasound machines and depicted the enhancement of both color/power Doppler flow-based imaging and harmonic-based imaging using second-generation contrast agents. Many reports have described the usefulness of the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases and other abdominal lesions. Quantitative evaluation of CE-EUS images was an objective method of diagnosis using the time-intensity curve (TIC), but it was limited to the region of interest. Recently developed Inflow Time Mapping™ can be generated from stored clips and used to display the pattern of signal enhancement with time after injection, offering temporal difference of contrast agents and improved tumor characterization. On the other hand, three-dimensional CE-EUS images added new information to the literature, but lacked positional information. Three-dimensional CE-EUS with accurate positional information is awaited. To date, most reports have been related to pancreatic lesions or lymph nodes. Hemodynamic analysis might be of use for diseases in other organs: upper GI cancer diagnosis, submucosal tumors, and biliary disorders, and it might also provide functional information. Studies of CE-EUS in diseases in many other organs will increase in the near future.

  16. B-scan ultrasonography following open globe repair

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, M T; Yiu, G; Hart, L; Andreoli, C M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the accuracy and predictive ability of B-scan ultrasonography in the post-repair assessment of an open globe injury. Methods In all, 965 open globe injuries treated at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary between 1 January 2000 and 1 June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 427 ultrasound reports on 210 patients were analyzed. Ultrasound reports were examined for the following characteristics: vitreous hemorrhage, vitreous tag, retinal tear, RD (including subcategories total RD, partial RD, closed funnel RD, open funnel RD, and chronic RD), vitreous traction, vitreous debris, serous choroidal detachment, hemorrhagic choroidal detachment, kissing choroidal detachment, dislocated crystalline lens, dislocated intraocular lens (IOL), disrupted crystalline lens, intraocular foreign body (IOFB), intraocular air, irregular posterior globe contour, disorganized posterior intraocular contents, posterior vitreous detachment, choroidal vs retinal detachment, vitreal membranes, and choroidal thickening. The main outcome measure was visual outcome at final follow-up. Results Among 427 B-scan reports, there were a total of 57 retinal detachments, 19 retinal tears, 18 vitreous traction, 59 serous choroidal detachments, 47 hemorrhagic choroidal detachments, and 10 kissing choroidal detachments. Of patients with multiple studies, 26% developed retinal detachments or retinal tears on subsequent scans. Ultrasound had 100% positive predictive value for diagnosing retinal detachment and IOFB. The diagnoses of retinal detachment, disorganized posterior contents, hemorrhagic choroidal detachment, kissing choroidal detachment, and irregular posterior contour were associated with worse visual acuity at final follow-up. Disorganized posterior contents correlated with particularly poor outcomes. Conclusions B-scan ultrasonography is a proven, cost-effective imaging modality in the management of an open globe injury. This tool can offer both diagnostic and

  17. B-scan ultrasonography following open globe repair.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, M T; Yiu, G; Hart, L; Andreoli, C M

    2014-04-01

    To examine the accuracy and predictive ability of B-scan ultrasonography in the post-repair assessment of an open globe injury. In all, 965 open globe injuries treated at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary between 1 January 2000 and 1 June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 427 ultrasound reports on 210 patients were analyzed. Ultrasound reports were examined for the following characteristics: vitreous hemorrhage, vitreous tag, retinal tear, RD (including subcategories total RD, partial RD, closed funnel RD, open funnel RD, and chronic RD), vitreous traction, vitreous debris, serous choroidal detachment, hemorrhagic choroidal detachment, kissing choroidal detachment, dislocated crystalline lens, dislocated intraocular lens (IOL), disrupted crystalline lens, intraocular foreign body (IOFB), intraocular air, irregular posterior globe contour, disorganized posterior intraocular contents, posterior vitreous detachment, choroidal vs retinal detachment, vitreal membranes, and choroidal thickening. The main outcome measure was visual outcome at final follow-up. Among 427 B-scan reports, there were a total of 57 retinal detachments, 19 retinal tears, 18 vitreous traction, 59 serous choroidal detachments, 47 hemorrhagic choroidal detachments, and 10 kissing choroidal detachments. Of patients with multiple studies, 26% developed retinal detachments or retinal tears on subsequent scans. Ultrasound had 100% positive predictive value for diagnosing retinal detachment and IOFB. The diagnoses of retinal detachment, disorganized posterior contents, hemorrhagic choroidal detachment, kissing choroidal detachment, and irregular posterior contour were associated with worse visual acuity at final follow-up. Disorganized posterior contents correlated with particularly poor outcomes. B-scan ultrasonography is a proven, cost-effective imaging modality in the management of an open globe injury. This tool can offer both diagnostic and prognostic information, useful for both

  18. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, Annual Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Kathleen E.

    2008-02-04

    The goal of this project is to enhance and restore the ecological integrity and ecosystem function of the Grays River watershed. The recommended restoration and enhancement efforts developed in this project should incorporate local community stakeholder interests and needs. The objectives of this project are (1) to perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessment; (2) to develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) to gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River sub-basin.

  19. Assessment of gray matter heterotopia by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Donkol, Ragab H; Moghazy, Khaled M; Abolenin, Alaeddin

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of different types of gray matter heterotopia. METHODS: Between June 2005 and December 2009, the medical records and MRI studies of patients with gray matter heterotopia were reviewed. The MRI morphologic findings of heterotopia were recorded along with the presence and type of associated cranial malformations. Available clinical and electrophysiological data were also recorded. RESULTS: 20 patients were included in the study. Their ages ranged from 9 mo to 39 years with a mean age of 15 years. All patients suffered from epileptic seizures. According to the location of heterotopia, patients were classified into three groups: subependymal (12), subcortical (5) and band (3) heterotopia. CONCLUSION: MRI was useful in diagnosing and differentiating between various types of gray matter heterotopia. The severity of clinical manifestations of heterotopia was related to the location and pattern of heterotopia. Determination of heterotopia type and its extent is useful for management planning and predicting prognosis. PMID:22468189

  20. Prefrontal gray matter volume mediates genetic risks for obesity.

    PubMed

    Opel, N; Redlich, R; Kaehler, C; Grotegerd, D; Dohm, K; Heindel, W; Kugel, H; Thalamuthu, A; Koutsouleris, N; Arolt, V; Teuber, A; Wersching, H; Baune, B T; Berger, K; Dannlowski, U

    2017-05-01

    Genetic and neuroimaging research has identified neurobiological correlates of obesity. However, evidence for an integrated model of genetic risk and brain structural alterations in the pathophysiology of obesity is still absent. Here we investigated the relationship between polygenic risk for obesity, gray matter structure and body mass index (BMI) by the use of univariate and multivariate analyses in two large, independent cohorts (n=330 and n=347). Higher BMI and higher polygenic risk for obesity were significantly associated with medial prefrontal gray matter decrease, and prefrontal gray matter was further shown to significantly mediate the effect of polygenic risk for obesity on BMI in both samples. Building on this, the successful individualized prediction of BMI by means of multivariate pattern classification algorithms trained on whole-brain imaging data and external validations in the second cohort points to potential clinical applications of this imaging trait marker.

  1. Radiative equilibrium in a rectangular enclosure bounded by gray walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modest, M. F.

    1975-01-01

    Two-dimensional temperature and heat-flux distributions are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gray medium at radiative equilibrium in a rectangular enclosure. The bounding walls are gray and diffuse with arbitrary surface-temperature distributions, and heat generation may take place inside the medium. As a first approximation, the problem is solved for optically thick systems (differential approximation). These results are subsequently improved by the introduction of a number of geometrical parameters to yield good accuracy for all optical thicknesses. As examples, two cases are discussed in detail: (1) uniform heat generation in a black enclosure, and (2) an enclosure with one gray surface at constant temperature. Comparison with some numerical solutions generated by Hottel's /Hottel and Cohen (1958) and Einstein (1963)/ zonal method shows excellent agreement.

  2. [Utility of muscle ultrasonography for the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Misawa, Sonoko

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is frequently challenging, because motor neuron involvement is usually focal at disease onset and many syndromes mimic ALS. Neurological examination and needle EMG are important in the diagnosis of ALS, and patients with early-stage ALS usually undergo several EMG examinations before the diagnosis is confirmed. Ultrasonography has recently been used for the non-invasive assessment of neuromuscular disorders. This review discusses the recent advances in ultrasonography for ALS diagnosis. Ultrasonography could help detect lower motor neuron involvement by evaluating muscle volume, echo intensity, and fasciculations. Previous reports have documented the diagnostic values of all these parameters. In particular, fasciculations are characteristic features of ALS that can be easily and reliably visualized using ultrasonography. Moreover, the combined use of ultrasonography and EMG to detect fasciculations could substantially increase the diagnostic sensitivity of Awaji criteria for ALS. Attempts to utilize ultrasonography for ALS diagnosis have started only recently, and the technique used is yet to be standardized. However, ultrasonography has a major advantage over EMG in that it is non-invasive. Further studies are needed to understand the use of ultrasound as a novel non-invasive tool for ALS diagnosis.

  3. Diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis and breast ultrasonography in women with dense breasts: a prospective comparison study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Hwa; Chang, Jung Min; Lee, Joongyub; Chu, A Jung; Seo, Mirinae; Gweon, Hye Mi; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Nariya; Bae, Min Sun; Shin, Sung Ui; Song, Sung Eun; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic performances of tomosynthesis and ultrasonography as adjunctives to digital mammography in women with dense breasts. A total of 778 women with dense breasts underwent digital mammography with tomosynthesis and ultrasonography for screening and diagnostic purposes. The findings of tomosynthesis and ultrasonography were evaluated independently. The primary endpoint was overall diagnostic accuracy determined by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Secondary endpoints included sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values. Of the 778 participants, 698 women (140 breast cancers) were included in the analysis. Based on the AUC findings, the non-inferiority of tomosynthesis to ultrasonography was established in the overall group as well as in all subgroups except for that comprising women with extremely dense breast composition. There were no significant differences in AUC between tomosynthesis and ultrasonography among asymptomatic participants and participants who underwent imaging for screening (0.912 vs. 0.934 [P = 0.403] and 0.987 vs. 0.950 [P = 0.270], respectively). Tomosynthesis exhibited lower sensitivity (91.4 vs. 96.4%; P = 0.039), and higher specificity (83.9 vs. 70.4%; P < 0.001) and positive predictive value (58.7 vs. 45.0%; P < 0.001) than ultrasonography. Tomosynthesis exhibits comparable performance to ultrasonography as an adjunct to mammography for diagnosis of breast cancer, except among women with extremely dense breasts.

  4. Comparison of ultrasonography with computed tomography in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Javadrashid, R; Khatoonabad, M; Shams, N; Esmaeili, F; Jabbari Khamnei, H

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare ultrasonography with CT in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures. 40 patients (9 female and 31 male) with mid-facial fractures, which were suspected nasal bone fractures, were included. All of the patients had mid-facial CT images. Ultrasonography with a 7.5 MHz transducer (Aloka 3500, Tokyo, Japan) was used to evaluate the nasal bone fractures. All of the sonograms were compared with CT findings for sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. A χ(2) test was applied to the data to assess statistical significance. CT diagnosed nasal bone fractures in 24 of the 40 patients (9 unilateral fractures and 15 bilateral fractures) while ultrasonography diagnosed the fractured bones in 23 patients (9 unilateral fractures and 14 bilateral fractures). Ultrasonography missed one fractured bone in a bilateral fractured case and a unilateral fracture was also missed (two false-negative results). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in assessing nasal bone fracture in comparison with CT were 94.9% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of ultrasonographic evaluation of the nasal bone fractures were 100% and 95.3%, respectively. The χ(2) test did not show any significant difference between CT and ultrasonography in diagnosis of nasal bone fractures (P = 0.819). Ultrasonography can be used as a first line of diagnostic imaging for evaluating nasal bone fractures, especially in children and pregnant women.

  5. Cognitive Implications of Deep Gray Matter Iron in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, E; Kmech, J A; Cobzas, D; Sun, H; Seres, P; Blevins, G; Wilman, A H

    2017-05-01

    Deep gray matter iron accumulation is increasingly recognized in association with multiple sclerosis and can be measured in vivo with MR imaging. The cognitive implications of this pathology are not well-understood, especially vis-à-vis deep gray matter atrophy. Our aim was to investigate the relationships between cognition and deep gray matter iron in MS by using 2 MR imaging-based iron-susceptibility measures. Forty patients with multiple sclerosis (relapsing-remitting, n = 16; progressive, n = 24) and 27 healthy controls were imaged at 4.7T by using the transverse relaxation rate and quantitative susceptibility mapping. The transverse relaxation rate and quantitative susceptibility mapping values and volumes (atrophy) of the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus were determined by multiatlas segmentation. Cognition was assessed with the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests. Relationships between cognition and deep gray matter iron were examined by hierarchic regressions. Compared with controls, patients showed reduced memory (P < .001) and processing speed (P = .02) and smaller putamen (P < .001), globus pallidus (P = .002), and thalamic volumes (P < .001). Quantitative susceptibility mapping values were increased in patients compared with controls in the putamen (P = .003) and globus pallidus (P = .003). In patients only, thalamus (P < .001) and putamen (P = .04) volumes were related to cognitive performance. After we controlled for volume effects, quantitative susceptibility mapping values in the globus pallidus (P = .03; trend for transverse relaxation rate, P = .10) were still related to cognition. Quantitative susceptibility mapping was more sensitive compared with the transverse relaxation rate in detecting deep gray matter iron accumulation in the current multiple sclerosis cohort. Atrophy and iron accumulation in deep gray matter both have negative but separable relationships to cognition in multiple sclerosis. © 2017 by

  6. Shoulder ultrasonography performed by orthopedic surgeons increases efficiency in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Hao; Chen, Poyu; Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Hsu, Kuo-Yao; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Yeung-Jen

    2017-04-20

    Rotator cuff tears are very common and their incidence increases with age. Shoulder ultrasonography has recently gained popularity in detecting rotator cuff tears because of its efficiency, cost-effectiveness, time-saving, and real-time nature of the procedure. Well-trained orthopedic surgeons may utilize shoulder ultrasonography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. The wait time of patients planned to have shoulder MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to rule in rotator cuff tears may decrease after orthopedic surgeon start doing shoulder ultrasonography as a screening tool for that. Patients with rotator cuff tears may be detected earlier by ultrasonography and have expedited surgical repair. The efficacy in determination of rotator cuff tears will also increase. Patients were retrospectively reviewed from January 2007 to December 2012. They were divided into 2 groups: Ultrasound (-) group and the Ultrasound (+) group. Age, gender, wait time from outpatient department (OPD) visit to MRI exam, MRI exam to operation (OP), and OPD visit to OP, patient number for MRI exam, and number of patients who finally had rotator cuff repair within two groups were compared. The wait time of OPD visit to OP and MRI to OP in patients who received shoulder ultrasonography was significantly less than that in patients did not receive shoulder ultrasonography screening. Only 23.8% of the patients with a suspected rotator cuff injury undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair before ultrasonography was applied as a screening tool. The percentage increased to 53.6% after orthopedic surgeon started using ultrasonography as a screening tool for rotator cuff tears. Office-based shoulder ultrasound examination can reduce the wait time for a shoulder MRI. The efficacy of determination of rotator cuff tears will also increase after the introduction of shoulder ultrasonography.

  7. Evaluation of Efficacy of Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Subjects with Myositis and Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Seema; Iyengar, Asha R; B V, Subash; Joshi, Revan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to determine if ultrasonography of masseter can be used to evaluate the outcome of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) such as myositis and myofascial pain. Methods Fifteen TMD subjects with myofascial pain/myositis who satisfied the RDC/McNeil criteria were included in the study. All the subjects were administered TENS therapy for a period of 6 days (30 minutes per session). The mouth opening (in millimeters) and severity of pain (visual analogue scale score) and ultrasonographic thickness of the masseter (in millimeters) in the region of trigger/tender areas was assessed in all the subjects both prior and post TENS therapy. A comparison of the pre-treatment and post-treatment values of the VAS score, mouth opening and masseter thickness was done with the help of a t-test. Results There was a significant reduction in the thickness of masseter muscle (P = 0.028) and VAS scores (P < 0.001) post TENS therapy. There was also a significant improvement in the mouth opening (P = 0.011) post TENS therapy. Conclusions In the present study, ultrasonography was found to be an effective measuring tool in the assessment of TENS therapy in subjects with myositis and myofascial pain. PMID:26839665

  8. Evaluation of Efficacy of Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Subjects with Myositis and Myofascial Pain.

    PubMed

    Patil, Seema; Iyengar, Asha R; Kotni, Ramya Madhuri; B V, Subash; Joshi, Revan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to determine if ultrasonography of masseter can be used to evaluate the outcome of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) such as myositis and myofascial pain. Fifteen TMD subjects with myofascial pain/myositis who satisfied the RDC/McNeil criteria were included in the study. All the subjects were administered TENS therapy for a period of 6 days (30 minutes per session). The mouth opening (in millimeters) and severity of pain (visual analogue scale score) and ultrasonographic thickness of the masseter (in millimeters) in the region of trigger/tender areas was assessed in all the subjects both prior and post TENS therapy. A comparison of the pre-treatment and post-treatment values of the VAS score, mouth opening and masseter thickness was done with the help of a t-test. There was a significant reduction in the thickness of masseter muscle (P = 0.028) and VAS scores (P < 0.001) post TENS therapy. There was also a significant improvement in the mouth opening (P = 0.011) post TENS therapy. In the present study, ultrasonography was found to be an effective measuring tool in the assessment of TENS therapy in subjects with myositis and myofascial pain.

  9. Validation of ultrasonography in detecting structural disease of the urogenital tract of the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus.

    PubMed

    Marschner, C; Flanagan, C; Higgins, D P; Krockenberger, M B

    2014-05-01

    A retrospective review of case records of ultrasonography and necropsy outcomes of 62 koalas was used to investigate the accuracy of ultrasonography in assessing koala urogenital tract structural disease at the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital. The results showed high concordance, supporting ultrasonography as an effective tool for evaluating structural disease of the koala urogenital tract, most commonly seen with chlamydiosis. The study also illustrates the advances benefiting animal welfare that can be made by wildlife carer groups through using a scientific, evidence-based approach.

  10. Feasibility of dynamic models of the interaction of potential oil spills with bowhead and gray whales in the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.; Bowles, A.E.; Anderson, E.L.; Leatherwood, S.; Spaulding, M.L.

    1984-08-01

    Feasibility and design considerations for developing computer models of migratory bow-head and gray whales and linking such models to oil spill models for application in Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf areas were evaluated. A summary of all relevant bowhead and gray whale distributional and migration data were summarized and presented at monthly intervals. The data were, for the most part, deemed sufficient to prepare whale migration simulation models. A variety of whale migration conceptual models were devised and ranking was achieved by means of a scaling-weighted protocol. Existing oil spill trajectory and fate models, as well as conceptual models, were similarly ranked.

  11. Gray-level transformations for interactive image enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C.; Fittes, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    A gray-level transformation method suitable for interactive image enhancement is presented. It is shown that the well-known histogram equalization technique is a special case of this method. Experimental results which illustrate the enhancement capabilities of the procedure are also described.

  12. Gray-level transformations for interactive image enhancement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C.; Fittes, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    A gray-level transformation method suitable for interactive image enhancement is presented. It is shown that the well-known histogram equalization technique is a special case of this method. Experimental results which establish the superiority of the procedure over histogram equalization are also described.

  13. Does Gray-Tailed Vole Activity Affect Soil Quality?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Voles are well-known crop pests, especially when peak populations are present, but their role in soil fertility and impacts on agricultural sustainability are not well understood. Five months after the abrupt disappearance of a peak in a gray-tailed vole (Microtus canicaudus) population, we examined...

  14. Gray squirrels reproduce in a 2-acre enclosure

    Treesearch

    H. Reed Sanderson; Larry A. Berry

    1973-01-01

    A 2-acre enclosure was built in a 40-year-old hardwood stand, and 5 to 19 gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) were confined in it during 3 years. Reproductive behavior of the squirrels was the same at all population densities, but densities above 12 may have reduced productivity. For 10 to 12 squirrels, behavior was about normal and productivity...

  15. A microbiologic study of the urban gray squirrel.

    PubMed

    White, F H; Hoff, G L; Bigler, W J; Buff, E

    1975-10-01

    Bacteriologic, virologic, and serologic examinations were conducted on 180 urban gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) during a 1-year period in a metropolitan area. Evidence was not found of infections with leptospires, enteric or other bacteria, rickettsial agents, Francisella tularensis, or arthropod-borne viruses. The squirrels were remarkably free of evidence of bacterial or viral infections of importance to man and lower animals.

  16. Public health and the urban gray squirrel: mycology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E; Hoff, G L; Bigler, W J; Jefferies, M B

    1975-10-01

    From 180 gray squirrels (Sciurus c. carolinesis), 942 isolates of fungi representing 19 genera were recovered upon culture of hair-skin scrapings and toenails. Of the isolates, 170 represented known human pathogens and 142, squirrel pathogens. A human infection of Trichophyton mentagrophytes was derived from handling the squirrels. Skin lesions of seven squirrels were attributable to T. mentagrophytes and Mucor sp.

  17. "The Little Gray Book": Pedagogy, Discourse and Rupture in 1937

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milewski, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    In 1937, the Ministry of Education in Ontario published a document entitled "Programme of Studies for Grades 1 to VI of Public and Separate Schools" that became known amongst teachers as the "little gray book". The curriculum and pedagogy in the document enunciated a rupture or mutation in pedagogical discourse that broke with…

  18. A Comment on Gray, Jesson, Goldstein, Hedger, and Rasbash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tymms, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Critiques John Gray and associates' article "A Multi-level Analysis of School Improvement" in the same "School Effectiveness and School Improvement" issue. Instead of distinguishing between stable and unstable components of school-effectiveness indices and between different effects, the authors identify schools' variances…

  19. Sequencing the Genome of the Heirloom Watermelon Cultivar Charleston Gray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genome of the watermelon cultivar Charleston Gray, a major heirloom which has been used in breeding programs of many watermelon cultivars, was sequenced. Our strategy involved a hybrid approach using the Illumina and 454/Titanium next-generation sequencing technologies. For Illumina, shotgun g...

  20. Ultraviolet damage on natural gray hair and its photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Gao, T; Bedell, A

    2001-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of natural gray hair obtained from the heads of individuals and as well as commercial samples were investigated. No statistically significant differences were observed in terms of their central maximum diameter, central cross-sectional area, central ellipticity, average tensile strength, and average extent of transverse swelling between gray and black hair. The correlation between the elongation and the contraction of the cross-sectional area of hair fibers during extension was established as a statistically linear function, with a coefficient of 0.758. The damage on natural gray hair from ultraviolet (UV) irradiation were assessed by measuring the following parameters: hair color, Young's modulus, stress-to-break, wet combing force, dynamic advancing contact angle, tryptophan damage, cuticle abrasion, and transverse swelling of hair fiber in 0.1 N NaOH solution. It has been found that gray hair undergoes more severe UV damage and needs more UV protection than dark brown hair. Experimental results indicate that the quaternized UV absorber, cinnamidopropyltrimonium chloride (CATC), delivered from a simple shampoo system, is more substantive on hair and more effective in protecting hair from UV damage than a conventional UV filter. CATC also provided an additional conditioning benefit on hair.

  1. Dance and music share gray matter structural correlates.

    PubMed

    Karpati, Falisha J; Giacosa, Chiara; Foster, Nicholas E V; Penhune, Virginia B; Hyde, Krista L

    2017-02-15

    Intensive practise of sensorimotor skills, such as music and dance, is associated with brain structural plasticity. While the neural correlates of music have been well-investigated, less is known about the neural correlates of dance. Additionally, the gray matter structural correlates of dance versus music training have not yet been directly compared. The objectives of the present study were to compare gray matter structure as measured by surface- and voxel-based morphometry between expert dancers, expert musicians and untrained controls, as well as to correlate gray matter structure with performance on dance- and music-related tasks. Dancers and musicians were found to have increased cortical thickness compared to controls in superior temporal regions. Gray matter structure in the superior temporal gyrus was also correlated with performance on dance imitation, rhythm synchronization and melody discrimination tasks. These results suggest that superior temporal regions are important in both dance- and music-related skills and may be affected similarly by both types of long-term intensive training. This work advances knowledge of the neural correlates of dance and music, as well as training-associated brain plasticity in general.

  2. Chapter 13. Current management situation: Great gray owls

    Treesearch

    Jon Verner

    1994-01-01

    The breeding range of great gray owls (Strix nebulosa) in the United States includes portions of Alaska, mountains in the western United States including portions of the Cascades and Sierra Nevada ranges and the northern Rockies, and portions of Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, and New York (see Chapter 14 and Map 3). The species is sometimes observed...

  3. INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. BRANDY MOLDING A RAIL CASTING (LAWLER NO. 1337, A 16' x 35' MOLD WITH A 5' COPE AND A 4' DRAG). DRAG IS FILLED WITH SAND. - Lawler Machine & Foundry Company, Molding Area, 760 North Forty-fourth Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Mentoring Graduate Students: The Good, Bad, and Gray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, Jeanne H.; Jolly-Ballantine, John-Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Good mentoring of graduate students influences their perseverance and success to completion, whereas bad mentoring can result in negative outcomes, including delayed degree completion or non-completion. What the authors refer to as the gray zone is that which falls between good and bad mentoring. Examples are partial mentoring or changes in…

  5. William S. Gray and the Dick and Jane Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavrogenes, Nancy A.

    William S. Gray, Professor of Education and Dean of the College of Education at the University of Chicago, began work in 1929 on a major revision of the "Elson Readers," a popular basal series published by Scott, Foresman and Company. Organized around the daily life of two ordinary children, the "Dick and Jane" readers…

  6. Gray Matter Volume Changes in the Apathetic Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hongjie; Onoda, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    This study is to test the hypothesis that apathy in healthy participants is closely related to the prefrontal-basal-ganglia circuit and associated structural changes. We selected 36 healthy aged participants with (n = 18) or without apathy (n = 18) from our database. Participants underwent structural MRI scanning, providing data for voxel-based morphometric analysis to explore gray matter changes associated with apathy. Compared to the non-apathy group, the apathy group showed reduced gray matter volume of the right putamen, whereas volumes of the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and left inferior occipital gyrus showed increase. When depression scores were included in a regression model as a covariate, apathetic participants showed decreased gray matter volume in the right precentral gyrus compared to the non-apathetic participants. These findings suggest that apathy is associated with the gray matter volume in the prefrontal-basal-ganglia network, and may have a neuroanatomical basis distinct from depression in healthy elderly. PMID:26082708

  7. Surface hardening of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Yu. G.; Ovsyannikov, V. E.; Marfitsyn, V. V.; Frolov, V. A.

    2011-10-01

    The possibility of a simple method of chromizing of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron is studied theoretically and proved experimentally. A process for diffusion chromizing of parts from this iron is suggested. When followed by surface hardening the process yields a high-hardness surface layer with abrasive strength comparable to that of white chromium cast iron.

  8. TRICKY AND GRAY, TWO HORSES HELD BY UNIDENTIFIED AFRICANAMERICAN SOLDIERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRICKY AND GRAY, TWO HORSES HELD BY UNIDENTIFIED AFRICAN-AMERICAN SOLDIERS, POST IN 1939 (FORT HUACHUCA HISTORICAL MUSEUM, PHOTOGRAPH 1939.00.00.06, PHOTOGRAPHER UNIDENTIFIED, CREATED BY AND PROPERTY OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY) - Fort Huachuca, Cavalry Stables, Clarkson Road, Sierra Vista, Cochise County, AZ

  9. Modeling Disjunct Gray Wolf Populations in Semi-Wild Landscapes

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Haight; David J. Mladenoff; Adrian P. Wydeven

    1998-01-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) in parts of the United States and Europe live in networks of disjunct populations, many of which are close to human settlement. Because wolf management goals include sustaining disjunct populations, it is important to ask what types of areas and protections are needed for population survival. To predict the effects of different levels of human...

  10. Gray matter metabolism in acute and chronic hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kondziella, D; Eyjolfsson, E M; Saether, O; Sonnewald, U; Risa, O

    2009-03-17

    Although hydrocephalus is usually considered a disorder of periventricular white matter, disturbance of gray matter is probably also involved. However, so far gray matter metabolism has not been studied in experimental hydrocephalus using high resolution in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Therefore 15 rats were made hydrocephalic by injection of 0.1 ml kaolin into the cisterna magna, whereas 10 sham-operated rats served as controls. (1)H MRS and magnetic resonance imaging were performed longitudinally in acute hydrocephalus 2 and 4 weeks after kaolin treatment and in chronic hydrocephalus after 6 weeks. Volumes of interest included the gray matter regions cortex, thalamus and hippocampus. In hydrocephalic animals, (1)H MRS revealed decreased glutamate levels in all examined areas at all time points. Moreover, in acute hydrocephalus disturbances were noted in the hippocampus with decreased concentrations of N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, inositol and taurine, and in the cortex with decreased taurine levels. A clear lactate peak was detected in CSF spectra from hydrocephalic rats. In addition, T2-weighted images showed increase of free water in the hippocampus. It can be concluded that glutamate metabolism is deranged in gray matter in acute and chronic hydrocephalus in rats. If confirmed in humans, early detection of glutamatergic disturbances and lactate accumulation using in vivo(1)H MRS might serve as an indication for surgical treatment of hydrocephalus before irreversible neuronal damage develops.

  11. The occurrence of hepatozoon in the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Price, D.L.

    1955-01-01

    Hepatozoon sciuri (Coles, 1914) is reported from gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Washington, D.C. and Maryland. Blood smears stained with Giemsa's stain revealed a parasitemia in 16 to 71% of the squirrels examined. A technique for laking the red cells and concentrating the white cells in blood samples demonstrated this protozoon to be present in every squirrel so tested.

  12. Mentoring Graduate Students: The Good, Bad, and Gray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, Jeanne H.; Jolly-Ballantine, John-Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Good mentoring of graduate students influences their perseverance and success to completion, whereas bad mentoring can result in negative outcomes, including delayed degree completion or non-completion. What the authors refer to as the gray zone is that which falls between good and bad mentoring. Examples are partial mentoring or changes in…

  13. Masticatory muscles of the great-gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Tomo, Soichiro; Tomo, Ikuko; Townsend, Grant C; Hirata, Kazuaki

    2007-04-01

    The great-gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) belongs to the Diprotodontia suborder (herbivorous marsupials of Australia) of the order of marsupials. We dissected the masticatory muscles in the great-gray kangaroo and classified them based on their innervation. Three (two male and one female) adult great-gray kangaroos (M. giganteus), fixed with 10% formalin, were examined. The masseter muscle of the great-gray kangaroo was classified into four layers (superficial layers 1, 2, 3, and a deep layer), all innervated by masseteric nerves. Layer 1 of the masseter muscle was well developed and the deep layer inserted into the masseteric canal. The zygomaticomandibular muscle, which belongs to both the masseter and temporalis muscles, was innervated by both the masseteric nerve and posterior deep temporal nerve, and the temporalis muscle was innervated by the anterior and posterior deep temporal nerves. The medial pterygoid muscle, which was innervated by the medial pterygoid nerve, was divided into superficial and deep portions. The lateral pterygoid muscle was divided into superior and inferior heads by the buccal nerve. We propose that the relationship of the masticatory muscles in the kangaroo has evolved by passive anterior invasion of the deep layer of the masseter by the medial pterygoid muscle via the masseteric canal, associated with the development of an anteroposterior mode of mastication.

  14. Neural response to reward anticipation is modulated by Gray's impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Plichta, Michael M; Heinzel, Sebastian; Polak, Thomas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Breuer, Felix; Jakob, Peter M; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-07-15

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), Gray's dimension of impulsivity, reflecting human trait reward sensitivity, determines the extent to which stimuli activate the Behavioural Approach System (BAS). The potential neural underpinnings of the BAS, however, remain poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the association between Gray's impulsivity as defined by the RST and event-related fMRI BOLD-response to anticipation of reward in twenty healthy human subjects in brain regions previously associated with reward processing. Anticipation of reward during a Monetary Incentive Delay Task elicited activation in key components of the human reward circuitry such as the ventral striatum, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. Interindividual differences in Gray's impulsivity accounted for a significant amount of variance of the reward-related BOLD-response in the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex. Specifically, higher trait reward sensitivity was associated with increased activation in response to cues indicating potential reward. Extending previous evidence, here we show that variance in functional brain activation during anticipation of reward is attributed to interindividual differences regarding Gray's dimension of impulsivity. Thus, trait reward sensitivity contributes to the modulation of responsiveness in major components of the human reward system which thereby display a core property of the BAS. Generally, fostering our understanding of the neural underpinnings of the association of reward-related interindividual differences in affective traits might aid researchers in quest for custom-tailored treatments of psychiatric disorders, further disentangling the complex relationship between personality traits, emotion, and health.

  15. Life-cycle Economic and Environmental Effects of Green, Gray and Hybrid Stormwater Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes-Draut, J. R.; Taptich, M. N.; Horvath, A.

    2016-12-01

    Cities throughout the U.S. are seeking efficient ways to manage stormwater for many reasons, including flood control, pollution management, water supply augmentation and to prepare for a changing climate. Traditionally, cities have relied primarily on gray infrastructure, namely sewers, storage and treatment facilities. In these systems, urban runoff, its volume increasing as impervious surfaces expand, is channeled to a wastewater plant where it is mixed with raw sewage prior to treatment or it is discharged, generally untreated, to local water bodies. These facilities are inflexible and expensive to build and maintain. Many systems are deteriorating and/or approaching, if not exceeding, their design capacity. Increasingly, more innovative approaches that integrate stormwater management into the natural environment and that make sense at both local and regional scales are sought. Identifying the best stormwater solution will require evaluating the life-cycle economic costs associated with these alternatives, including costs associated with construction, operation, and maintenance including regulatory and permitting costs, financing, as well as other indirect costs (e.g., avoided wastewater processing or system capacity expansion, increased property value) and non-economic co-benefits (i.e, aesthetics, habitat provision). Beyond conventional life-cycle costing, applying life-cycle assessment (LCA) will contribute to more holistic and sustainable decision-making. LCA can be used to quantitatively track energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental effects associated with constructing, operating, and maintaining green and gray infrastructure, including supply chain contributions. We will present the current state of knowledge for implementing life-cycle costing and LCA into stormwater management decisions for green, gray and hybrid infrastructure.

  16. Patterns of focal gray matter atrophy are associated with bradykinesia and gait disturbances in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rosano, Caterina; Bennett, David A; Newman, Anne B; Venkatraman, Vijay; Yaffe, Kristine; Harris, Tamara; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Aizenstein, Howard J

    2012-09-01

    Identify the neuroimaging correlates of parkinsonian signs in older adults living in the community. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 307 adults (82.9 years, 55% women, 39% blacks) concurrently with the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating scale-motor part. Magnetic resonance imaging measures included volume of whole-brain white matter hyperintensities and of gray matter for primary sensorimotor, supplementary motor, medial temporal areas, cerebellum, prefronto-parietal cortex, and basal ganglia. About 25% of the participants had bradykinesia, 26% had gait disturbances, and 12% had tremor. Compared with those without, adults with any one of these signs were older, walked more slowly, had worse scores on tests of cognition, mood and processing speed, and higher white matter hyperintensities volume (all p ≤ .002). Gray matter volume of primary sensorimotor area was associated with bradykinesia (standardized odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.46 [0.31, 0.68], p < .0001), and gray matter volume of medial temporal area was associated with gait disturbances (0.56 [0.42, 0.83], p < .0001), independent of white matter hyperintensities volume and age. Further adjustment for measures of muscle strength, cardiovascular health factors, cognition, processing speed, and mood or for gait speed did not substantially change these results. Atrophy within primary sensorimotor and medial temporal areas might be important for development of bradykinesia and of gait disturbances in community-dwelling elderly adults. The pathways underlying these associations may not include changes in white matter hyperintensities volume, cognition, information processing speed, mood, or gait speed.

  17. The Effect of Climate Variability on Gray Whales (Eschrichtius robustus) within Their Wintering Areas

    PubMed Central

    Salvadeo, Christian J.; Gómez-Gallardo U., Alejandro; Nájera-Caballero, Mauricio; Urbán-Ramirez, Jorge; Lluch-Belda, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The environmental conditions of the breeding and feeding grounds of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) fluctuates at inter-annual scales in response to regional and basin climate patterns. Thus, the goals of this study were to assess if there are any relationships between summer sea ice on their feeding ground and counts of gray whale mother-calf (MC) pairs at Ojo de Liebre Lagoon (OLL); and if El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences the winter distribution of gray whales MC pairs in the three primary breeding lagoons of OLL, San Ignacio Lagoon (SIL) and Santo Domingo Channel north of Bahia Magdalena (SDCh). Maximum February counts of MC pairs were compared with the length of the open-water season at the Bering Sea during the previous year. Then, an ENSO index and sea surface temperature anomalies outside the primary lagoons was compared with the maximum February counts of MC pairs at these lagoons. Results showed that maximum counts of MC pairs in OLL correlates with sea ice conditions in their feeding grounds from the previous feeding season, and this relationship can be attributed to changes in nutritive condition of females. ENSO-related variability influences distribution of MC pairs in the southern area of SDCh during the warm 1998 El Niño and cold 1999 La Niña. This supports the hypothesis that changes in the whales’ distribution related to sea temperature occurs to reduce thermal-stress and optimize energy utilization for newborn whales. Although this last conclusion should be considered in view of the limited data available from all the whales’ wintering locations in all the years considered. PMID:26309028

  18. Regional gray matter density associated with emotional intelligence: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-09-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to monitor one's own and others' emotions and the ability to use the gathered information to guide one's thinking and action. EI is thought to be important for social life making it a popular subject of research. However, despite the existence of previous functional imaging studies on EI, the relationship between regional gray matter morphology and EI has never been investigated. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and a questionnaire (Emotional Intelligence Scale) to measure EI to identify the gray matter correlates of each factor of individual EI (Intrapersonal factor, Interpersonal factor, Situation Management factor). We found significant negative relationships between the Intrapersonal factor and regional gray matter density (rGMD) (1-a) in an anatomical cluster that included the right anterior insula, (1-b) in the right cerebellum, (1-c) in an anatomical cluster that extends from the cuneus to the precuneus, (1-d) and in an anatomical cluster that extends from the medial prefrontal cortex to the left lateral fronto-polar cortex. We also found significant positive correlations between the Interpersonal factor and rGMD in the right superior temporal sulcus, and significant negative correlations between the Situation Management factor and rGMD in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that each factor of EI in healthy young people is related to the specific brain regions known to be involved in the networks of social cognition and self-related recognition, and in the somatic marker circuitry. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The Effect of Climate Variability on Gray Whales (Eschrichtius robustus) within Their Wintering Areas.

    PubMed

    Salvadeo, Christian J; Gómez-Gallardo U, Alejandro; Nájera-Caballero, Mauricio; Urbán-Ramirez, Jorge; Lluch-Belda, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The environmental conditions of the breeding and feeding grounds of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) fluctuates at inter-annual scales in response to regional and basin climate patterns. Thus, the goals of this study were to assess if there are any relationships between summer sea ice on their feeding ground and counts of gray whale mother-calf (MC) pairs at Ojo de Liebre Lagoon (OLL); and if El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences the winter distribution of gray whales MC pairs in the three primary breeding lagoons of OLL, San Ignacio Lagoon (SIL) and Santo Domingo Channel north of Bahia Magdalena (SDCh). Maximum February counts of MC pairs were compared with the length of the open-water season at the Bering Sea during the previous year. Then, an ENSO index and sea surface temperature anomalies outside the primary lagoons was compared with the maximum February counts of MC pairs at these lagoons. Results showed that maximum counts of MC pairs in OLL correlates with sea ice conditions in their feeding grounds from the previous feeding season, and this relationship can be attributed to changes in nutritive condition of females. ENSO-related variability influences distribution of MC pairs in the southern area of SDCh during the warm 1998 El Niño and cold 1999 La Niña. This supports the hypothesis that changes in the whales' distribution related to sea temperature occurs to reduce thermal-stress and optimize energy utilization for newborn whales. Although this last conclusion should be considered in view of the limited data available from all the whales' wintering locations in all the years considered.

  20. [Interventionist endoscopic ultrasonography. A retrospective analysis of 60 procedures].

    PubMed

    Varas, M J; Miquel, J M; Abad, R; Espinós, J C; Cañas, M A; Fabra, R; Bargalló, D

    2007-03-01

    interventionist endoscopic ultrasonography is increasingly used because of its growing indications. We present here our retrospective and initial experience (60 procedures) with endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) both for diagnosis (EUS-FNA) and therapy (EUS-guided tumorectomy and mucosectomy). in a group with 27 cases including 10 submucosal tumors (SMTs), 2 adenopathies, and 15 potential pancreatic tumors (8 pancreatic cancers), a sectorial EUS-FNA at 7.5 MHz was performed for diagnosis prior to therapy (mainly surgical). A pancreatic pseudocyst was drained. In 21 cases with 27 SMTs (10 patients with 13 carcinoids) a tumorectomy was carried out using the standard loop or assisted polypectomy technique with submucosal injection, and in a few cases (two) using elastic band ligation following a radial EUS at 7.5, 12, or 20 MHz. In 6 cases of superficial gastroesophageal cancer or gastric dysplasia an endoscopic mucosal resection (classic EMR) was performed after EUS or MPs at 7.5 and 20 MHz. Fifty-five patients with 60 lesions, 29 femaes and 26 males with a mean age of 60 years (30-88 years) were retrospectively analyzed. diagnostic precision (P), sensitivity (S), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for EUS-FNA was 85, 83, 100, 100, and 43%, respectively, when comparing results with specimen histology. P was higher for adenopathies (100%) and pancreatic tumors (87%) than for SMTs (80%). No complications arose, except for one episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (3.7%) that was endoscopically and satisfactorily treated in a gastric SMT. In the group with 21 patients (10 carcinoids with 13 tumors) 27 SMTs were endoscopically treated by tumorectomy with no perforation and only 2 UGIBs (7.4%), one of them self-limited, recorded. Endoscopic resection was complete in 92% of cases. No complications occurred with classic EMR, and all patients are still alive with no evidence of relapse, either local or metastatic

  1. 75 FR 17899 - Availability of Seats for the Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Gray's Reef National Marine... Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Georgia conservation and living...

  2. 75 FR 13534 - Grays Ferry Cogeneration Partnership; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grays Ferry Cogeneration Partnership; Supplemental Notice That Initial... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Grays Ferry Cogeneration Partnership application for...

  3. Identifying the variables associated with pain during transrectal ultrasonography of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Chen-Pang; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Hsieh, Meng-Chiao; Chen, Chien-Lun; Chang, Phei-Lang; Huang, Ying-Chen; Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate the degree of pain experienced by the patients receiving transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) of the prostate by applying a visual analog scale. We also identified the clinical parameters influencing pain during the TRUS examination. Materials and methods Records were obtained from a prospective database for male patients who received TRUS of prostate in the outpatient department of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, from January 2014 to June 2014. The patients underwent a detailed physical examination and medical history review. Immediately after the TRUS examination, the patients completed questionnaires based on a ten-point visual analog pain scale. The variables of interest were age, body mass index, prostate volume, prostate sagittal length, prostate-specific antigen, previous TRUS experience, external hemorrhoids, anal surgical history, prostate calcification, and image artifact caused by stool in the rectum. All variables were correlated to the visual analog scale by applying multivariate regression analysis. Results By using linear regression analysis, we identified the independent factors that affected the pain score during the TRUS examination. The patients who received the examination for the first time or had longer prostate sagittal lengths, external hemorrhoids, anal surgical history, or stool stored in the rectum experienced more pain during the TRUS examination. Furthermore, the pain was reduced when we provided the patients with a detailed explanation before the procedure and allowed them to observe the real-time images during the examination. Conclusion Although a TRUS examination is uncomfortable for patients, after having identified the factors affecting pain, physicians can assist patients in reducing pain during the procedure, thus providing higher quality examinations. PMID:26347225

  4. Comparison of Radiography and Ultrasonography for Diagnosis of Diaphragmatic Hernia in Bovines

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Hakim; Mohindroo, Jitender; Singh, Kiranjeet; Kumar, Ashwani; Raghunath, Mulinti

    2010-01-01

    The present study was conducted on 101 animals suffering from thoracoabdominal disorders; out of which twenty seven animals (twenty six buffaloes and one cow) were diagnosed with diaphragmatic hernia based on clinical signs, radiography, ultrasonography, and left flank laparorumenotomy. Radiography alone confirmed diaphragmatic hernia in 18 cases (66.67%) with a sac-like structure cranial to the diaphragm. In 15 animals the sac contained metallic densities while in three cases a sac-like structure with no metallic densities was present. Ultrasonography was helpful in confirming diaphragmatic hernia in 23 cases (85.18%) and ultrasonographically reticular motility was evident at the level of 4th/5th intercostal space in all the animals. B+M mode ultrasonography was used for the first time for diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia in bovines and the results suggested that ultrasonography was a reliable diagnostic modality for diaphragmatic hernia in bovines. PMID:20445795

  5. Follow-up evaluation with ultrasonography of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Man; Wang, Yue; Yue, Linxian; Chiu, Jack; He, Fanding; Wu, Xiaojing; Zang, Bin; Lu, Bin; Yao, Xiaoke; Jiang, Zirui

    2014-01-01

    Published data on earthquake-associated peripheral nerve injury is very limited. Ultrasonography has been proven to be efficient in the clinic to diagnose peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to assess the role of ultrasound in the evaluation of persistent peripheral nerve injuries 1 year after the Wenchuan earthquake. Thirty-four patients with persistent clinical symptoms and neurologic signs of impaired nerve function were evaluated with sonography prior to surgical repair. Among 34 patients, ultrasonography showed that 48 peripheral nerves were entrapped, and 11 peripheral nerves were disrupted. There was one case of misdiagnosis on ultrasonography. The concordance rate of ultrasonographic findings with those of surgical findings was 98%. A total of 48 involved nerves underwent neurolysis and the symptoms resolved. Only five nerves had scar tissue entrapment. Preoperative and postoperative clinical and ultrasonographic results were concordant, which verified that ultrasonography is useful for preoperative diagnosis and postoperative evaluation of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:25206859

  6. Expert consensus document: Echocardiography and lung ultrasonography for the assessment and management of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Price, Susanna; Platz, Elke; Cullen, Louise; Tavazzi, Guido; Christ, Michael; Cowie, Martin R; Maisel, Alan S; Masip, Josep; Miro, Oscar; McMurray, John J; Peacock, W Frank; Martin-Sanchez, F Javier; Di Somma, Salvatore; Bueno, Hector; Zeymer, Uwe; Mueller, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Echocardiography is increasingly recommended for the diagnosis and assessment of patients with severe cardiac disease, including acute heart failure. Although previously considered to be within the realm of cardiologists, the development of ultrasonography technology has led to the adoption of echocardiography by acute care clinicians across a range of specialties. Data from echocardiography and lung ultrasonography can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy, guide and monitor the response to interventions, and communicate important prognostic information in patients with acute heart failure. However, without the appropriate skills and a good understanding of ultrasonography, its wider application to the most acutely unwell patients can have substantial pitfalls. This Consensus Statement, prepared by the Acute Heart Failure Study Group of the ESC Acute Cardiovascular Care Association, reviews the existing and potential roles of echocardiography and lung ultrasonography in the assessment and management of patients with acute heart failure, highlighting the differences from established practice where relevant.

  7. The Pattern of Hair Dyeing in Koreans with Gray Hair

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Seong Jin; Shin, Hyoseung; Paik, Seung Hwan; Choi, Jae Woo; Lee, Jong Hee; Cho, Soyun

    2013-01-01

    Background Hair graying is considered as a part of normal ageing process. Nonetheless, this process raises a significant cosmetic concern, especially among ethnic Korean elderly whose baseline hair color is black. For this reason, Korean elderly dye their hair with frequency despite the risk of dermatologic problems such as allergic contact dermatitis. Objective In this study, the authors investigate the prevalence and pattern of hair dyeing and its relation with scalp diseases in Korea. Methods Six hundred twenty subjects (330 men and 290 women) with graying hair were given a questionnaire survery and underwent a physical examination. Results Of the 620 total, 272 subjects (43.9%) dyed their hair. Hair dyeing was significantly more frequent among women than among men (p<0.001). Subjects from 50 to 69 years of age showed higher prevalence of hair dyeing when compared to either younger or older groups. Subjective self-assessment of the extent of hair graying was associated with increased prevalence of hair dyeing, that is, individuals who feel graying has advanced by more than 20% of the overall hair were much more likely to dye their hair (p<0.001). Hair dyeing did not correlate with either alopecia or scalp disease. Conclusion Our survey has found that the prevalence of hair dyeing is higher among Korean women than men. People in their fifties and sixties and people with more than 20% extent of grayness were more likely to dye their hair than otherwise. Hair dyeing was not associated with any increase in the prevalence of scalp diseases. PMID:24371384

  8. Gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) parasite diversity in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Camacho, Norma; Pineda-López, Raúl Francisco; de Jesús Guerrero-Carrillo, María; Cantó-Alarcón, Germinal Jorge; Jones, Robert Wallace; Moreno-Pérez, Marco Antonio; Mosqueda-Gualito, Juan Joel; Zamora-Ledesma, Salvador; Camacho-Macías, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    Mexico has a long history of parasitological studies in communities of vertebrates. However, the mega diversity of the country makes fauna inventories an ongoing priority. Presently, there is little published on the parasite fauna of gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus Schereber, 1775) and this study provides new records of parasites for gray foxes in central Mexico. It is a continuation of a series of previous parasitological studies conducted with this carnivore in Mexico from 2003 to the present. A total of 24 foxes in the Parque Nacional El Cimatario (PANEC) were trapped, anaesthetized, and parasites recovered. The species found were Dirofilaria immitis, Ctenocephalides canis, C. felis, Euhoplopsillus glacialis affinis (first report for gray foxes in Mexico) Pulex simulants, and Ixodes sp. Three additional gray fox carcasses were necropsied and the parasites collected were adult nematodes Physaloptera praeputialis and Toxocara canis. The intensive study of the gray fox population selected for the 2013-2015 recent period allowed for a two-fold increase in the number of parasite species recorded for this carnivore since 2003 (nine to 18 parasite species), mainly recording parasitic arthropods, Dirofilaria immitis filariae and adult nematodes. The parasite species recorded are generalists that can survive in anthropic environments; which is characteristic of the present ecological scenario in central Mexico. The close proximity of the PANEC to the city of Santiago de Queretaro suggests possible parasite transmission between the foxes and domestic and feral dogs. Furthermore, packs of feral dogs in the PANEC might have altered habitat use by foxes, with possible impacts on transmission.

  9. Breeding biology of the blue-gray noddy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rauson, M.J.; Harrison, C.S.; Clapp, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Blue-gray Noddies, the smallest marine terns, are similar in many respects to all tropical terns in Hawaii: single-egg clutches are laid, growth and development take about 7 weeks, breeding is colonial. Its small size results in eggs that comprise over 27% of adult body weight, compared to 15-20% for most marine terns (Langham 1983). Blue-gray Noddies are widespread in the tropical Pacific, but populations are generally small. This may be the result of its inshore feeding habits and the fact that it is a resident species (Diamond 1978). However, populations in the Hawaiian Archipelago are probably limited by the availability of suitable nest sites in cliffs or rocky outcrops, not food supplies..... Food habits in Hawaii confirm the unique dependence of this species on sea-striders but consumption may be seasonal Blue-gray Noddies take the smallest prey of any seabird in Hawaii and may feed on a lower trophic level..... The Hawaiian population is apparently heavier and produces larger eggs than Blue-gray Noddies elsewhere in the Pacific. This conforms with the general proposition that Hawaiian seabirds are larger than those in the central Pacific (Harrison et al. 1983). The Hawaiian population also has a more predictable breeding season than those farther south.This may be due to a greater seasonality of food supply, but the factors that control the timing of breeding are not clear. There does not appear to be any competition for nest sites with other seabirds.....Our information on growth and development will enable future investigators to estimate the ages of chicks during brief visits to Blue-gray Noddy colonies. This will facilitate programs that are designed to monitor the basic health of seabird populations and to detect changes from baseline that may result from human activities or oceanographic conditions.

  10. Hepatic metastases of hemangiopericytoma: contrast-enhanced MRI, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and angiography findings

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Camillo; Benea, Giorgio; Kopf, Barbara; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2006-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare and characteristically hypervascular tumour. We report a case of hepatic metastases of hemangiopericytoma for which there was correlative imaging by ultrasonography, ultrasonography with second-generation contrast agent (BR1), computed tomography, gadolinium-enhanced, Gd-BOPTA-enhanced and ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance, and angiography. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which all these modalities were used in the diagnostic evaluation. PMID:16766270

  11. [Application of ultrasonography in central venous catheterization; access sites and procedure techniques].

    PubMed

    Czyzewska, Dorota; Ustymowicz, Andrzej; Klukowski, Mark

    2016-08-05

    Central venous catheterization is commonly performed in clinical practice. Traditional procedural technique is based on anatomical landmarks, but is associated with a high risk of failure and complications. To decrease their incidence European and American societies recommend application of ultrasonography. Preliminary ultrasonographic examination allows for assessment of local anatomical relations as well as vessel morphology (diameter, patency), while real-time ultrasonography increases chances of successful needle insertion. This paper presents the most common venous access sites and procedure techniques.

  12. Annular pancreas complicated by carcinoma of the bile duct: diagnosis by MR cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Y; Sugiyama, M; Sato, Y; Mine, Y; Yamato, T; Ishida, H; Takahashi, S

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that annular pancreas should be evaluated for coexisting malignant tumors. However, no cases have been reported in which magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography clearly demonstrated an annular pancreas complicated by bile duct carcinoma. We present a case that emphasizes the importance of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography in directly confirming a diagnosis of annular pancreas complicated by bile duct carcinoma.

  13. Learning curve of office-based ultrasonography for rotator cuff tendons tears.

    PubMed

    Ok, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Yang-Soo; Kim, Jung-Man; Yoo, Tae-Wook

    2013-07-01

    To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and MR arthrography (MRA) imaging in detecting of rotator cuff tears with arthroscopic finding used as the reference standard. The ultrasonography and MRA findings of 51 shoulders that underwent the arthroscopic surgery were prospectively analysed. Two orthopaedic doctors independently performed ultrasonography and interpreted the findings at the office. The tear size measured at ultrasonography and MRA was compared with the size measured at surgery using Pearson correlation coefficients (r). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and false-positive rate were calculated for a diagnosis of partial-and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The kappa coefficient was calculated to verify the inter-observer agreement. The sensitivity of ultrasonography and MRA for detecting partial-thickness tears was 45.5 and 72.7 %, and that for full-thickness tears was 80.0 and 100 %, respectively. The accuracy of ultrasonograpy and MRA for detecting partial-thickness tears was 45.1 and 88.2 %, and that for full-thickness tears was 82.4 and 98 %, respectively. Tear size measured based on ultrasonography examination showed a poor correlation with the size measured at arthroscopic surgery (r = 0.21; p < 0.05). However, tear size estimated by MRA showed a strong correlation (r = 0.75; p < 0.05). The kappa coefficient was 0.47 between the two independent examiners. The accuracy of office-based ultrasonography for beginner orthopaedic surgeons to detect full-thickness rotator cuff tears was comparable to that of MRA but was less accurate for detecting partial-thickness tears and torn size measurement. Inter-observer agreement on the interpretation was fair. These results highlight the importance of the correct technique and experience in operation of ultrasonography in shoulder joint. Diagnostic study, Level II.

  14. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Subcortical Gray Matter Structures in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sehatpour, Pejman; Long, Jun; Gui, Weihua; Qiao, Jianping; Javitt, Daniel C.; Wang, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    A failure of adaptive inference—misinterpreting available sensory information for appropriate perception and action—is at the heart of clinical manifestations of schizophrenia, implicating key subcortical structures in the brain including the hippocampus. We used high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) fractal geometry analysis to study subtle and potentially biologically relevant structural alterations (in the geometry of protrusions, gyri and indentations, sulci) in subcortical gray matter (GM) in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy individuals. In particular, we focus on utilizing Fractal Dimension (FD), a compact shape descriptor that can be computed using inputs with irregular (i.e., not necessarily smooth) surfaces in order to quantify complexity (of geometrical properties and configurations of structures across spatial scales) of subcortical GM in this disorder. Probabilistic (entropy-based) information FD was computed based on the box-counting approach for each of the seven subcortical structures, bilaterally, as well as the brainstem from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images in chronic patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 19) (age ranges: patients, 22.7–54.3 and healthy controls, 24.9–51.6 years old). We found a significant reduction of FD in the left hippocampus (median: 2.1460, range: 2.07–2.18 vs. median: 2.1730, range: 2.15–2.23, p<0.001; Cohen’s effect size, U3 = 0.8158 (95% Confidence Intervals, CIs: 0.6316, 1.0)), the right hippocampus (median: 2.1430, range: 2.05–2.19 vs. median: 2.1760, range: 2.12–2.21, p = 0.004; U3 = 0.8421 (CIs: 0.5263, 1)), as well as left thalamus (median: 2.4230, range: 2.40–2.44, p = 0.005; U3 = 0.7895 (CIs: 0.5789, 0.9473)) in schizophrenia patients, relative to healthy individuals. Our findings provide in-vivo quantitative evidence for reduced surface complexity of hippocampus, with reduced FD indicating a less complex, less regular GM

  15. Costs and effects of ultrasonography in the evaluation of palpable breast masses.

    PubMed

    Flobbe, Karin; Kessels, Alfons G H; Severens, Johan L; Beets, Geerard L; de Koning, Harry J; von Meyenfeld, Maarten F; van Engelshoven, Jos M A

    2004-01-01

    To study the costs and effects of incorporating ultrasonography in the triple assessment of palpable breast masses. A decision analytic model was designed to compare a conventional strategy of performing fine-needle aspiration cytology after clinical examination and mammography, with three different experimental strategies of preceding ultrasonography. Empirical data were used from a prospective study in 522 breasts in 492 patients with a palpable mass, including 93 malignancies. In strategy 1, cases with probably benign, suspect malignant, and malignant ultrasonography results were referred for fine-needle aspiration cytology; in strategy 2, benign cases were also referred for fine-needle aspiration cytology; and in strategy 3, ultrasonography was only performed in patients with benign results on clinical examination and mammography, whereas immediate fine-needle aspiration cytology was performed in patients with suspicious lesions. Outcome variables included the total costs and the expected number of life years. Sensitivity analysis was performed on all parameters in the model. All strategies reported a similar life expectancy of 31.0 years. Cost-minimization demonstrated that experimental strategy 3 was the least expensive strategy (3013 Euro). Experimental strategy 2 was the most costly one (3512 Euro). Compared with the conventional strategy of immediate fine-needle aspiration cytology (3087 Euro), both ultrasonography strategies 1 and -3 were preferred. Incorporating ultrasonography in the triple assessment of palpable breast masses can result in a reduction of the total costs for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

  16. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of renal scarring using DMSA scan as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Ima; Wheat, Deirdre; Gordon, Isky

    2004-02-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan is presently the technique of choice for assessing renal scars. Recent advances suggest that ultrasonography could replace DMSA scan for this purpose. This paper describes the experience of a tertiary pediatric referral hospital performing ultrasonography and DMSA scans in the assessment of renal scarring. Investigations were conducted 3-6 months after patients presented with urinary tract infection (UTI). Results were extracted from the radiology information system and recorded for analysis. All children with a UTI who had undergone DMSA and ultrasound examination on the same day between January 1995 and December 1999 were included; 930 kidneys were compared. DMSA scan was utilized as the reference method. When used to detect focal renal scarring, ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 5.2%, specificity of 98.3%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 50% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 75.8%. When used to detect diffuse renal scarring, ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 47.2%, specificity of 91.8%, PPV of 60.8% and NPV of 86.6%. Our results demonstrate that although ultrasonography has a good specificity for the detection of renal scarring compared with DMSA, it has low sensitivity, PPV and NPV. Ultrasonography cannot be substituted for DMSA scan in the evaluation of focal renal scarring.

  17. Evaluation of ultrasonography for measurement of skin thickness in Shar-Peis.

    PubMed

    Zanna, Giordana; Fondevila, Dolors; Ferrer, Lluis; Espada, Yvonne

    2012-02-01

    To determine whether high-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography is useful for assessment of skin thickness in Shar-Peis. 10 healthy Shar-Peis and 10 healthy Beagles used as controls. Ultrasonographic examination of the skin was performed on 4 cutaneous sites by use of a 13-MHz linear-array transducer, and the mean of 3 measurements was calculated. Ultrasonography results were compared with histologic findings of skin specimens stained with H&E, Alcian blue at a pH of 2.5, and Masson trichrome stains, with histometric measurements of skin thickness made by use of a microscope, and with measurements of skin thickness made by use of a plicometer. Ultrasonograpy results were also compared via age and sex of selected animals. A clear correlation was detected between ultrasonography results and results of histologic and histometric analysis in both groups. In Shar-Peis, no correlation was found between ultrasonography results and age and sex, whereas in Beagles, a weak positive correlation was found only between skin thickness in dorsal cervical and frontal (on the rostral margins of the supraorbital processes) regions and age. A positive overall correlation was found in Shar-Peis between measurements made via ultrasonography and plicometery. Ultrasonography was a useful tool to assess skin thickness, and in Shar-Peis, it might be considered a valid alternative to invasive methods such as histologic examination to objectively estimate the severity of hereditary cutaneous hyaluronosis.

  18. Bedside ultrasonography by emergency physicians for anterior talofibular ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Gün, Cem; Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Vandenberk, Nergiz; Karagöz, Arif; Sentürk, Güldehen Ozmen; Oyar, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to study the accuracy of emergency physician (EP) performed bedside ultrasonography (BUS) in patients with suspected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. Materials and Methods: After a 6-h training program, from January to December 2011, an EP used BUS to prospectively evaluate patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected ATFL injury. Then, patients underwent ankle X-ray and Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging. Outcome was determined by official radiology reports of the MR imaging. BUS and MR imaging results were compared using Chi-square testing. Results: Of the 65 enrolled patients, 30 patients were BUS positive. Of these, MR imaging results agreed with the BUS findings in 30 patients. In 35 cases, BUS was negative, and 33 of these were corroborated by MR imaging. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and negative likelihood ratio for BUS were 93.8%, 100%, 100%, 94.3%, and 0.06%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of BUS was not statistically different from MR imaging (K = 0.938, P = 0.001). Conclusion: BUS for the diagnosis of ATFL injury is another application of BUS in the ED. EPs can diagnose ATFL injury using BUS with a high degree of accuracy. PMID:23960377

  19. [Cardiovascular risk factors and carotid atherosclerosis detected by ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Brito, C; Rodríguez-Saldaña, J; Reynoso-Marenco, M T; Marmolejo-Henderson, R; Barinagarrementeria-Aldatz, F

    1999-01-01

    To assess the frequency of carotid atherosclerosis and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors in a general elderly population of Mexico City. B-mode ultrasonography was performed to investigate carotid atherosclerosis in 145 CUPA (a research project) participants, between July 1993 and January 1996. The outcome was then related to cardiovascular risk factors. Prevalence of ultrasound-detected carotid atherosclerosis was 64.8%. Intimal-medial thickening was detected in 64 subjects (44.1%) and carotid plaques in 82 (56.5%); Fifty-two subjects had both intimal-medial thickening and plaques. However, only 8 subjects had carotid plaques with severe stenosis (5.5%). There were no significant differences in the prevalence of atherosclerotic lesions (male 61.9%, female 66.0%). Carotid atherosclerosis was significantly associated with age (p < 0.0001), high blood pressure (p < 0.001), isolated systolic hypertension (p = 0.01), hypercholesterolemia (p = 0.04), and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.06). Prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis increased progressively with the number of vascular risk factors. There was a high prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis in this general elderly population of Mexico City, and was almost equal to that reported in developed western countries. Age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes were the strongest predictors of atherosclerosis.

  20. Endosonography for Pancreatic Duct Dilatation without Definite Pathology on Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Yang, Chi-Chieh; Yeh, Yung-Hsiang

    2014-05-01

    Main pancreatic duct dilatation raises concerns about the possibility of pancreatobiliary malignancy. We evaluated the etiologic yield of endosonography (EUS) for main pancreatic duct dilatation without definite pathology on Ultrasonography (US). A retrospective review was conducted in 54 consecutive patients referred for EUS. No pathological finding (37.0%, 20/54), followed by periampullary cancer (35.2%, 19/54), was the most common finding. Elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P) and marked common bile duct (CBD) dilatation (≥ 12 mm) were the predictors of malignancy (p < 0.05). Among the 37 subjects with available ALK-P and CBD diameter, the probability of malignancy was 84.6% (11/13) for both elevated ALK-P and marked CBD dilatation, 16.7% (1/6) for isolated elevated ALK-P, 18.2% (2/11) for isolated marked CBD dilatation, and none (0/7) was for subjects with neither elevated ALK-P nor marked CBD dilatation, respectively. The overall accuracy of EUS for periampullary carcinomas was 94.7% (18/19) and for choledocholithiasis was 100% (7/7), respectively. EUS had a 100.0% (20/20) sensitivity and a 97.1% (33/34) specificity in the diagnosis of no pathological obstruction. EUS is accurate for main pancreatic duct dilatation without definite pathology on US, and the presence of concomitant elevated ALK-P and CBD dilatation highly suggests malignancy.