Science.gov

Sample records for gray-body interchange factor

  1. Effect of gray-body interchange factor and radiating temperature on the thermal response of the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.C.; Feldman, M.R.

    1992-02-01

    Some concerns and questions have been raised regarding the values of the DT-18 package surface emissivity, the emissivity of the B-1023 furnace used for thermal testing of DOE shipping packages, and the furnace radiating temperature that should be employed during thermal tests. In order for the thermal tests performed at the Y-12 Plan in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to comply with the regulations specified in 10 CFR 71, it must be shown that a specific amount of heat is added to the package during the test. Therefore, a method of thermal analytical modeling was developed to calculate the quantity of heat energy input to which a DT-18 package is exposed during hypothetical accident scenario testing. Parametric studies involving the gray-body interchange factor (which embodies both the package and furnace emissivities) and the furnace radiating temperature were then performed, and the effects of these two variables on the net total heat received by a DT-18 package were determined. Based on the analyses presented in this report, simple guidelines and recommendations are made to order to ensure that thermal testing in the B-1023 furnace complies with federal regulations. Data are presented which allow the determination of an appropriate furnace surface temperature (800--850{degrees}C) based on the value of the gray-body interchange factor. The second alternative to ensure regulatory compliance involves allowing the DT-18 package to remain in the 800{degrees}C furnace for an additional amount of time (determined from presented data) beyond the required 30-min period.

  2. Radiant-interchange Configuration Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D C :; Morgan, W R

    1952-01-01

    A study is presented of the geometric configuration factors required for computing radiant heat transfer between opaque surfaces separated by a nonabsorbing medium and various methods of determining the configuration factors are discussed. Configuration-factor solutions available in the literature have been checked and the more complicated equations are presented as families of curves. Cases for point, line, and finite-area sources are worked out over a wide range of geometric proportions. These cases include several new configurations involving rectangles, triangles, and cylinders of finite length which are integrated and tabulated. An analysis is presented, in which configuration factors are employed of the radiant heat transfer to the rotor blades of a typical gas turbine under different conditions of temperature and pressure. (author)

  3. Planetary Interchange of Bioactive Material: Probability Factors and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Benton C.

    2001-02-01

    It is now well-accepted that both lunar and martian materials are represented in the meteorite collections. Early suggestions that viable organisms might survive natural transport between planets have not yet been thoroughly examined. The concept of Planetary Interchange of Bioactive Material (PIBM) is potentially relevant to the conditions under which life originated. PIBM has been also invoked to infer that the potential danger to Earth from martian materials is non-existent, an inference with, however, many pitfalls. Numerous impediments to efficient transfer of viable organisms exist. In this work, the lethality of space radiation during long transients and the biasing of launched objects toward materials unlikely to host abundant organisms are examined and shown to reduce the likelihood of successful transfer by orders of magnitude. It is also shown that martian meteorites studied to date assuredly have been subjected to sterilizing levels of ionizing radiation in space. PIBM considerations apply to both the solar system locale(s) of the origin of life and to the applicability of planetary protection protocols to preserve the biospheres of planetary bodies, including our own.

  4. Factors That Influence Running Intensity in Interchange Players in Professional Rugby League.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Jace A; Thornton, Heidi R; Duthie, Grant M; Dascombe, Ben J

    2016-11-01

    Rugby league coaches adopt replacement strategies for their interchange players to maximize running intensity; however, it is important to understand the factors that may influence match performance. To assess the independent factors affecting running intensity sustained by interchange players during professional rugby league. Global positioning system (GPS) data were collected from all interchanged players (starters and nonstarters) in a professional rugby league squad across 24 matches of a National Rugby League season. A multilevel mixed-model approach was employed to establish the effect of various technical (attacking and defensive involvements), temporal (bout duration, time in possession, etc), and situational (season phase, recovery cycle, etc) factors on the relative distance covered and average metabolic power (Pmet) during competition. Significant effects were standardized using correlation coefficients, and the likelihood of the effect was described using magnitude-based inferences. Superior intermittent running ability resulted in very likely large increases in both relative distance and Pmet. As the length of a bout increased, both measures of running intensity exhibited a small decrease. There were at least likely small increases in running intensity for matches played after short recovery cycles and against strong opposition. During a bout, the number of collision-based involvements increased running intensity, whereas time in possession and ball time out of play decreased demands. These data demonstrate a complex interaction of individual- and match-based factors that require consideration when developing interchange strategies, and the manipulation of training loads during shorter recovery periods and against stronger opponents may be beneficial.

  5. Regulation of toxin and bacteriocin gene expression in Clostridium by interchangeable RNA polymerase sigma factors.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Bruno; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Matamouros, Susana; Mani, Nagraj; Popoff, Michel R; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2006-05-01

    The production of major extracellular toxins by pathogenic strains of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani and Clostridium difficile, and a bacteriocin by Clostridium perfringens is dependent on a related group of RNA polymerase sigma-factors. These sigma-factors (BotR, TetR, TcdR and UviA) were shown to be sufficiently similar that they could substitute for one another in in vitro DNA binding and run-off transcription experiments. In cells, however, the sigma-factors fell into two subclasses. BotR and TetR were able to direct transcription of their target genes in a fully reciprocal manner. Similarly, UviA and TcdR were fully interchangeable. Neither BotR nor TetR could substitute for UviA or TcdR, however, and neither UviA nor TcdR could direct transcription of the natural targets of BotR or TetR. The extent of functional interchangeability of the sigma-factors was attributed to the strong conservation of their subregion 4.2 sequences and the conserved -35 sequences of their target promoters, while restrictions on interchangeability were attributed to variations in their subregion 2.4 sequences and the target site -10 sequences. The four sigma-factors have been assigned to group 5 of the sigma(70) family and seem to have arisen from a common ancestral protein that may have co-evolved with the genes whose transcription they direct. A fifth Clostridiumsigma-factor, sigma(Y) of Clostridium acetobutylicum, resembles the TcdR family, but was not functionally interchangeable with members of this family.

  6. Interstate Highway Interchanges Reshape Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Henry E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Highway interchanges offer rural counties practically ready-made sites for development, but some interchanges offer better development opportunities than others. A study of a Kentucky interchange identified seven factors that make a difference in development, including traffic volume, distance to an urban area, ruggedness of terrain, and sale of…

  7. Interstate Highway Interchanges Reshape Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Henry E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Highway interchanges offer rural counties practically ready-made sites for development, but some interchanges offer better development opportunities than others. A study of a Kentucky interchange identified seven factors that make a difference in development, including traffic volume, distance to an urban area, ruggedness of terrain, and sale of…

  8. Using multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) to develop crash modification factors for urban freeway interchange influence areas.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Kirolos; Gan, Albert; Lu, Jinyan

    2013-06-01

    Crash modification factors (CMFs) are used to measure the safety impacts of changes in specific geometric characteristics. Their development has gained much interest following the adoption of CMFs by the recently released Highway Safety Manual (HSM) and SafetyAnalyst tool in the United States. This paper describes a study to develop CMFs for interchange influence areas on urban freeways in the state of Florida. Despite the very different traffic and geometric conditions that exist in interchange influence areas, most previous studies have not separated them from the rest of the freeway system in their analyses. In this study, a promising data mining method known as multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) was applied to develop CMFs for median width and inside and outside shoulder widths for "total" and "fatal and injury" (FI) crashes. In addition, CMFs were also developed for the two most frequent crash types, i.e., rear-end and sideswipe. MARS is characterized by its ability to accommodate the nonlinearity in crash predictors and to allow the impact of more than one geometric variable to be simultaneously considered. The methodology further implements crash predictions from the model to identify changes in geometric design features. Four years of crashes from 2007 to 2010 were used in the analysis and the results showed that MARS's prediction capability and goodness-of-fit statistics outperformed those of the negative binomial model. The influential variables identified included the outside and inside shoulder widths, median width, lane width, traffic volume, and shoulder type. It was deduced that a 2-ft increase in the outside and inside shoulders (from 10ft to 12ft) reduces FI crashes by 10% and 33%, respectively. Further, a 42-ft reduction in the median width (from 64ft to 22ft) increases the rear-end, total, and FI crashes by 473%, 263%, and 223%, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emissivity measurements of opaque gray bodies up to 2000 °C by a dual-frequency pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasetto, L.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.

    2008-11-01

    In the framework of the SPES project at LNL-INFN a method for emissivity measurements by a double-frequency pyrometer in the infrared region at high temperatures on opaque gray bodies of SiC and graphite is presented. The measurement method proposed in this work reveals a good fitting with literature values. Moreover, the effect of surface finishing on emissivity values has been investigated.

  10. Multiband fiber optic radiometry for measuring the temperature and emissivity of gray bodies of low or high emissivity.

    PubMed

    Sade, Sharon; Katzir, Abraham

    2004-03-20

    Infrared fiber optic radiometry was used for noncontact thermometry of gray bodies whose temperature was close to room temperature (40-70 degrees C). We selected three gray bodies, one with high emissivity (epsilon = 0.97), one with medium emissivity (epsilon = 0.71), and one with low emissivity (epsilon = 0.025). We carried out optimization calculations and measurements for a multiband fiber optic radiometer that consisted of a silver halide (AgClBr) infrared-transmitting fiber, a dual-band cooled infrared detector, and a set of 18 narrowband infrared filters that covered the 2-14-microm spectral range. We determined the optimal spectral range, the optimal number of filters to be used, and the optimal chopping scheme. Using these optimal conditions, we performed measurements of the three gray bodies and obtained an accuracy of better than 1 degrees C for body temperature and for room temperature. An accuracy of 0.03 was obtained for body emissivity.

  11. Multiphase interchange inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesi, V.

    1991-08-01

    Phase interchange inequalities have been studied since the early work of Keller [J. Math. Phys. 5, 548 (1964)]. They constrain the effective conductivity of composite materials which are obtained from each other, for fixed configuration, by interchanging the position of the phases. Optimal results in this direction for the case of a two-phase composite are due to Keller in spatial dimension d=2 and to Avellaneda et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 63, 4989 (1988)] in dimension d=3. In this paper new inequalities in spatial dimension d=2 and d=3, which are valid when an arbitrary number of phases is present, are proven. When specialized to two-phase composites, they agree with those of Keller in d=2 and of Avellaneda et al. in d=3, respectively.

  12. Tether Technology Interchange Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, James K. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This is a compilation of 25 papers presented at a tether technical interchange meeting in Huntsville, AL, on September 9-10, 1997. After each presentation, a technical discussion was held to clarify and expand the salient points. A wide range of subjects was covered including tether dynamics, electrodynamics, space power generation, plasma physics, ionospheric physics, towing tethers, tethered reentry schemes, and future tether missions.

  13. Relationship between temperature-dependent emissivity and gray-body incidence detected with a quantum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija

    1998-11-01

    We evaluate the thermal contrast detected by a quantum detector in a focal plane of an infrared instrument. The detected thermal contrast is shown to consist of two terms. The term corresponding to the temperature dependence of emissivity, previously neglected, is evaluated and shown to be a significant contributing factor. For the case of a metal mirror as a source of stray light, ghost images, and narcissus, the error is estimated to be about 20%. The term in the detected contrast associated with radiative emission is shown to be proportional to temperature to the power of 2, rather than 3, published previously.

  14. Interchangeable spline reference guide

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, R.M.

    1994-05-01

    The WX-Division Integrated Software Tools (WIST) Team evolved from two previous committees, First was the W78 Solid Modeling Pilot Project`s Spline Subcommittee, which later evolved into the Vv`X-Division Spline Committee. The mission of the WIST team is to investigate current CAE engineering processes relating to complex geometry and to develop methods for improving those processes. Specifically, the WIST team is developing technology that allows the Division to use multiple spline representations. We are also updating the contour system (CONSYS) data base to take full advantage of the Division`s expanding electronic engineering process. Both of these efforts involve developing interfaces to commercial CAE systems and writing new software. The WIST team is comprised of members from V;X-11, -12 and 13. This {open_quotes}cross-functional{close_quotes} approach to software development is somewhat new in the Division so an effort is being made to formalize our processes and assure quality at each phase of development. Chapter one represents a theory manual and is one phase of the formal process. The theory manual is followed by a software requirements document, specification document, software verification and validation documents. The purpose of this guide is to present the theory underlying the interchangeable spline technology and application. Verification and validation test results are also presented for proof of principal.

  15. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchanges in low density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimin; Goel, Deepak; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-03-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations are usually derived under the assumption V{sub A}<interchange instabilities in 'line-tied' slab geometry as well as to centrifugally confined plasmas. It is found that interchange growth rates are reduced by a factor of 1+V{sub A}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}, corresponding to a larger effective mass resulting from the extra electromagnetic momentum. Line tying is unaffected.

  16. Third SEI Technical Interchange: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Given here are the proceedings of the 3rd Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) Technical Interchange. Topics covered include the First Lunar Outpost (FLO), the Lunar Resource Mapper, lunar rovers, lunar habitat concepts, lunar shelter construction analysis, thermoelectric nuclear power systems for SEI, cryogenic storage, a space network for lunar communications, the moon as a solar power satellite, and off-the-shelf avionics for future SEI missions.

  17. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Five contributors discuss the following topics: bringing comics to life through readers theatre, peer tutoring to improve word attack and comprehension skills, using storytelling to increase reading comprehension skills on Okinawa, beginning reading in Italy, and using remedial reading students as tutors for younger students. (FL)

  18. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Contains contributions dealing with the following: (1) teaching short vowels, diagraphs, and consonant blends; (2) affective planning in reading instruction; (3) phonics; (4) integrating reading and science instruction; (5) vocabulary; (6) story structure in children's book choices; (7) preventing summer reading loss; and (8) writing assignments…

  19. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Offers suggestions from six contributors regarding a variety of classroom activities, including the use of high interest-low vocabulary books with gifted and average readers, an exercise in sequencing, a Halloween project to improve students' grammar, a technique to improve students' dictionary skills, and methods for helping students write books.…

  20. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Offers suggestions from six contributors regarding a variety of classroom activities, including the use of high interest-low vocabulary books with gifted and average readers, an exercise in sequencing, a Halloween project to improve students' grammar, a technique to improve students' dictionary skills, and methods for helping students write books.…

  1. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Contains suggestions from six contributors, including the use of parents as an audience for beginning readers; outdoor activities to motivate readers; word order recognition exercise; a books-by-mail library service for rural students; using remedial students to read to younger children; and a language arts/social studies project. (FL)

  2. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions from eight contributors include the following: how to use pattern books with beginning readers, how to develop a locally relevant basic sight word list, how to use learning styles in individualizing instruction, and how to personalize handouts. (FL)

  3. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Contains contributions from three educators concerning the following: (1) child-made books in beginning reading, (2) ideas for celebrating a "reading week" as part of American Education Week, and (3) using doll families to teach phonics to beginning readers. (FL)

  4. Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Offers suggestions from eight contributors, including (1) activities for speedy readers, (2) conducting a "reading roundup," (3) improving children's math vocabulary, (4) teaching syllabication, (5) displaying student work, and (6) ideas for parents of beginning readers. (FL)

  5. Weakening of magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities by Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E. S.; Hassam, A. B.

    2008-02-15

    Alfven waves, made to propagate along an ambient magnetic field and polarized transverse to a gravitational field g, with wave amplitude stratified along g, are shown to reduce the growth rate of interchange instability by increasing the effective inertia by a factor of 1+(B{sub y}{sup '}/B{sub z}k{sub z}){sup 2}, where B{sub z} is the ambient magnetic field, k{sub z} is the wavenumber, and B{sub y}{sup '} is the wave amplitude shear. Appropriately placed Alfven wave power could thus be used to enhance the stability of interchange and ballooning modes in tokamaks and other interchange-limited magnetically confined plasmas.

  6. Renewable Generation Effect on Net Regional Energy Interchange: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul; Jenkin, Thomas; Margolis, Robert

    2015-07-30

    Using production-cost model (PLEXOS), we simulate the Western Interchange (WECC) at several levels of the yearly renewable energy (RE) generation, between 13% and 40% of the total load for the year. We look at the overall energy exchange between a region and the rest of the system (net interchange, NI), and find it useful to examine separately (i) (time-)variable and (ii) year-average components of the NI. Both contribute to inter-regional energy exchange, and are affected by wind and PV generation in the system. We find that net load variability (in relatively large portions of WECC) is the leading factor affecting the variable component of inter-regional energy exchange, and the effect is quantifiable: higher regional net load correlation with the rest of the WECC lowers net interchange variability. Further, as the power mix significantly varies between WECC regions, effects of ‘flexibility import’ (regions ‘borrow’ ramping capability) are also observed.

  7. Geoscience terminology for data interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Workgroups formed by the Commission for the Management and Application of Geoscience Information (CGI), a Commission of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) have been developing vocabulary resources to promote geoscience information exchange. The Multilingual Thesaurus Working Group (MLT) was formed in 2003 to continue work of the Multhes working group of the 1990s. The Concept Definition Task Group was formed by the CGI Interoperability Working Group in 2007 to develop concept vocabularies for populating GeoSciML interchange documents. The CGI council has determined that it will be more efficient and effective to merge the efforts of these groups and has formed a new Geoscience Terminology Working Group (GTWG, http://www.cgi-iugs.org/tech_collaboration/geoscience_terminology_working_group.html). Each GTWG member will be expected to shepherd one or more vocabularies. There are currently 31 vocabularies in the CGI portfolio, developed for GeoSciML interchange documents (e.g. see http://resource.geosciml.org/ 201202/). Vocabulary development in both groups has been conducted first by gathering candidate terms in Excel spreadsheets because these are easy for text editing and review. When the vocabulary is mature, it is migrated into SKOS, an RDF application for encoding concepts with identifiers, definitions, source information, standard thesaurus type relationships, and language-localized labels. Currently there are 30 vocabularies still required for GeoSciML v3, and 38 proposed vocabularies for use with EarthResourceML (https://www.seegrid.csiro.au/wiki/CGIModel/EarthResourceML). In addition, a project to develop a lithogenetic map unit vocabulary to use for regional geologic map integration using OGC web map services is underway. Considerable work remains to be done to integrate multilingual geoscience terms developed by the MLT Working Group with existing CGI vocabularies to provide multilingual support, and to make the thesaurus compiled by the

  8. Data interchange across cores of multi-core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Ehab S.

    2015-12-01

    A novel device for data interchange among space-division multiplexed cores inside MCF is demonstrated using numerical simulations. The device allows complete exchange of all WDM data channels between MCF cores in propagation direction whether the channels have the same or different sets of wavelengths. This is crucial in future MCF optical networks where in-fiber data interchange over space-division multiplexed cores can allow for a simple and fast data swapping among cores without a need for space-division demultiplexing to single-mode single-core fibers. The data core-interchange (DCI) device consists of a graded refractive-index rectangular waveguide enclosing the two interchanged cores in addition to the cladding region in between them. Both finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and eigenmode expansion (EME) simulations are performed to verify the device operation and characterize its performance. The simulations demonstrate that the DCI has a very short-length with polarization independent operation, and high performance over the broadband wavelength range S, C, L, and U bands. Moreover, the device shows a high coupling-factor of -0.13 dB with small cross-talk, back-reflection, and return-loss of -26.3, -46.1, and -48.8 dB, respectively.

  9. Plan Execution Interchange Language (PLEXIL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara; Jonsson, Ari; Pasareanu, Corina; Simmons, Reid; Tso, Kam; Verma, Vandi

    2006-01-01

    Plan execution is a cornerstone of spacecraft operations, irrespective of whether the plans to be executed are generated on board the spacecraft or on the ground. Plan execution frameworks vary greatly, due to both different capabilities of the execution systems, and relations to associated decision-making frameworks. The latter dependency has made the reuse of execution and planning frameworks more difficult, and has all but precluded information sharing between different execution and decision-making systems. As a step in the direction of addressing some of these issues, a general plan execution language, called the Plan Execution Interchange Language (PLEXIL), is being developed. PLEXIL is capable of expressing concepts used by many high-level automated planners and hence provides an interface to multiple planners. PLEXIL includes a domain description that specifies command types, expansions, constraints, etc., as well as feedback to the higher-level decision-making capabilities. This document describes the grammar and semantics of PLEXIL. It includes a graphical depiction of this grammar and illustrative rover scenarios. It also outlines ongoing work on implementing a universal execution system, based on PLEXIL, using state-of-the-art rover functional interfaces and planners as test cases.

  10. VLBI Data Interchange Format (VDIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan; Kettenis, Mark; Phillips, Chris; Sekido, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    One important outcome of the 7th International e-VLBI Workshop in Shanghai in June 2008 was the creation of a task force to study and recommend a universal VLBI data format that is suitable for both on-the-wire e-VLBI data transfer, as well as direct disk storage. This task force, called the VLBI Data Interchange Format (VDIF) Task Force, is the first part of a two-part effort, the second of which will address standardization of e-VLBI data-transmission-protocols. The formation of the VDIF Task Force was prompted particularly by increased e-VLBI activity and the difficulties encountered when data arrive at a correlator in different formats from various instruments in various parts of the world. The task force created a streaming packetized data format that may be used for real-time and non-realtime e-VLBI, as well as direct disk storage. The data may contain multiple channels of time-sampled data with an arbitrary number of channels, arbitrary #bits/sample up to 32, and real or complex data; data rates in excess of 100 Gbps are supported. Each data packet is completely self-identifying via a short header, and data may be decoded without reference to any external information. The VDIF task force has completed its work, and the VDIF standard was ratified at the 2009 e-VLBI workshop in Madrid.

  11. Random Interchange of Magnetic Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic connectivity, the connection between two points along a magnetic field line, has a stochastic character associated with field lines random walking in space due to magnetic fluctuations, but connectivity can also change in time due to dynamical activity [1]. For fluctuations transverse to a strong mean field, this connectivity change be caused by stochastic interchange due to component reconnection. The process may be understood approximately by formulating a diffusion-like Fokker-Planck coefficient [2] that is asymptotically related to standard field line random walk. Quantitative estimates are provided, for transverse magnetic field models and anisotropic models such as reduced magnetohydrodynamics. In heliospheric applications, these estimates may be useful for understanding mixing between open and close field line regions near coronal hole boundaries, and large latitude excursions of connectivity associated with turbulence. [1] A. F. Rappazzo, W. H. Matthaeus, D. Ruffolo, S. Servidio & M. Velli, ApJL, 758, L14 (2012) [2] D. Ruffolo & W. Matthaeus, ApJ, 806, 233 (2015)

  12. Magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B. Liao, X.; Sun, C. K.; Ou, W.; Liu, D.; Gui, G.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-06-15

    The magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence and transport in the Z-pinch and dipole-like systems are explored with two-fluid global simulations. By comparing the transport levels in the systems with a different magnetic curvature, we show that the interchange-mode driven transport strongly depends on the magnetic geometry. For the system with large magnetic curvature, the pressure and density profiles are strongly peaked in a marginally stable state and the nonlinear evolution of interchange modes produces the global convective cells in the azimuthal direction, which lead to the low level of turbulent convective transport.

  13. Limit Interchange and L'Hopital's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecker, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional application of these two calculus staples is stretched here, somewhat recreationally, but also to raise solid questions about the role of limit interchange in analysis--without, however, delving any deeper than first-year Calculus.

  14. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  15. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-01

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  16. Limit Interchange and L'Hopital's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecker, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional application of these two calculus staples is stretched here, somewhat recreationally, but also to raise solid questions about the role of limit interchange in analysis--without, however, delving any deeper than first-year Calculus.

  17. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  18. Interchangeability of rotational elastographic instruments and reagents.

    PubMed

    Aleshnick, Maya; Orfeo, Thomas; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Viscoelastic measurements are frequently being used in clinical and research settings for a rapid assessment of the hemostatic processes of blood clot formation and degradation. These measurements are being performed on either of two instruments (TEG and ROTEM) using their proprietary reagents. Standardization between the instruments and the reagents has been lacking but is necessary to compare results across instruments. In this study, we perform a crossover analysis between the TEG and ROTEM instruments using proprietary reagents from each manufacturer. We tested three sets of reagents as follows: (1) in-tem and ex-tem (Tem International GmbH); (2) kaolin and RapidTEG (Haemonetics); (3) a well-characterized control recombinant tissue factor-phospholipid reagent. Blood was drawn from six healthy donors, and each reagent was run concurrently in the TEG and ROTEM instruments. The volume of commercial reagent and calcium used was adjusted for crossover measurements to maintain the same concentration of each reagent in the blood. The outputs of clot time, rate of clot formation, and maximum firmness of the clot of the ROTEM and the TEG tracings were evaluated. The in-tem and RapidTEG reagents showed no disparity between instruments for any parameter. Significant differences between the instruments were found in the α angle and maximum firmness of the clot for ex-tem and kaolin reagents as well as in the clot time and maximum firmness of the clot for the recombinant tissue factor-phospholipid reagent. Although significant differences were observed for some parameters, the magnitudes were small compared with the differences between tests or the normal range variation in parameter values observed for these tests. These findings indicate that the instruments are more interchangeable than previously reported.

  19. On safety margin for drug interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiayin; Chow, Shein-Chung; Song, Fuyu

    2016-12-02

    As more and more generic (or biosimilar) drug products become available in the market place, it is a concern whether the approved generic (or biosimilar) drug products are safe and efficacious and hence can be used interchangeably. According to current regulation, most regulatory agencies such as the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indicate an approved generic (or biosimilar) drug product can serve as a substitute for the innovative drug product. Bioequivalence (biosimilarity) assessment for regulatory approval among generic copies (or biosimilars) of the innovative drug product are not required. In practice, approved generic (or biosimilar) drugs are commonly used interchangeably without any mechanism of safety monitoring. In this article, current bioequivalence (or biosimilarity) limit is adjusted according to the observed geometric mean ratio and corresponding variability for development of safety margins for monitoring of drug interchangeability by minimizing the relative change in response with and without the switching.

  20. Bioboxes: standardised containers for interchangeable bioinformatics software.

    PubMed

    Belmann, Peter; Dröge, Johannes; Bremges, Andreas; McHardy, Alice C; Sczyrba, Alexander; Barton, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Software is now both central and essential to modern biology, yet lack of availability, difficult installations, and complex user interfaces make software hard to obtain and use. Containerisation, as exemplified by the Docker platform, has the potential to solve the problems associated with sharing software. We propose bioboxes: containers with standardised interfaces to make bioinformatics software interchangeable.

  1. Focus on Nutrition. MCH Program Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This issue of the "MCH Program Interchange" describes selected materials and publications in maternal and child health (MCH) nutrition services and programs. The materials were developed by or are available from federal agencies, state and local public health agencies, and voluntary and professional organizations. The information is intended to…

  2. Electronic Data Interchange: Selected Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigand, Rolf T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes electronic data interchange (EDI) as the application-to-application exchange of business documents in a computer-readable format. Topics discussed include EDI in various industries, EDI in finance and banking, organizational impacts of EDI, future EDI markets and organizations, and implications for information resources management.…

  3. Interchange of Data Bases. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Rita G.; And Others

    This report describes the methods, developed by the American Institute of Physics in cooperation with Engineering Index, Inc., by which both organizations could reduce costs by eliminating duplication of keyboarding and indexing. The three sets of problems that confronted the interchange of their data bases (classification and indexing, formats,…

  4. Structural Equation Modeling with Interchangeable Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Joseph A.; Kenny, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) can be adapted in a relatively straightforward fashion to analyze data from interchangeable dyads (i.e., dyads in which the 2 members cannot be differentiated). The authors describe a general strategy for SEM model estimation, comparison, and fit assessment that can be used with either dyad-level or pairwise…

  5. Magnetic interchange instability of accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaisig, M.; Tajima, T.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the magnetic interchange or buoyancy instability of a differentially rotating disk threaded by an ordered vertical magnetic field is investigated. A 2D ideal fluid in the equatorial plane of a central mass in the corotating frame of reference is considered as a model for the disk. If the rotation rate of the disk is Keplerian, the disk is found to be stable. If the vertical magnetic field is sufficiently strong, and the field strength decreases with distance from the central object, and thus the rotation of the disk deviates from Keplerian, if is found that an instability develops. The magnetic flux and disk matter expand outward in certain ranges of azimuth, while disk matter with less magnetic flux moves inward over the remaining range of azimuth, showing a characteristic development of an interchange instability.

  6. A reference model for scientific information interchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, Lou; Sawyer, Don; Davis, Randy

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an Information Interchange Reference Model (IIRM) currently being developed by individuals participating in the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Panel 2, the Planetary Data Systems (PDS), and the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS). This is an ongoing research activity and is not an official position by these bodies. This reference model provides a framework for describing and assessing current and proposed methodologies for information interchange within and among the space agencies. It is hoped that this model will improve interoperability between the various methodologies. As such, this model attempts to address key information interchange issues as seen by the producers and users of space-related data and to put them into a coherent framework. Information is understood as the knowledge (e.g., the scientific content) represented by data. Therefore, concern is not primarily on mechanisms for transferring data from user to user (e.g., compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM), wide-area networks, optical tape, and so forth) but on how information is encoded as data and how the information content is maintained with minimal loss or distortion during transmittal. The model assumes open systems, which means that the protocols or methods used should be fully described and the descriptions publicly available. Ideally these protocols are promoted by recognized standards organizations using processes that permit involvement by those most likely to be affected, thereby enhancing the protocol's stability and the likelihood of wide support.

  7. "Streamer Blob" Outflow from Interchange Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Edmondson, J. K.; Li, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Given the recent observational results of interchange reconnection processes in the solar corona and theoretical development of the S-Web model for the slow solar wind, we present further analysis of the 3D MHD simulation of interchange reconnection by Edmondson et al. (2009). Specifically, we will analyze the observable properties of the dynamic streamer belt jump that corresponds to previously closed streamer belt flux opening up via interchange reconnection. We quantify the system's kinetic energy and open flux evolution in time and show that the material released from the reconnection region outflow is qualitatively similar to the transient slow solar wind features known as "streamer blobs". Our simulation results imply that the commonly accepted interpretation of streamer blobs as small-scale magnetic flux-ropes may not be universally applicable. Additionally, we examine the synthetic emission from the density evolution above the surface and show the correspondence between coronal "dimming" and the opening up of previously closed flux. We will discuss future improvements to the MHD simulations that include a solar wind outflow and more rigorous comparisons to observations. BJL and YL acknowledge support from NASA HGI NNX08AJ04G and JKE acknowledges support from the NASA Postdoctoral Program.

  8. Interchanging lexical information for a multilingual dictionary.

    PubMed

    Baud, R H; Nyström, M; Borin, L; Evans, R; Schulz, S; Zweigenbaum, P

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate the interchange of lexical information for multiple languages in the medical domain. To pave the way for the emergence of a generally available truly multilingual electronic dictionary in the medical domain. An interchange format has to be neutral relative to the target languages. It has to be consistent with current needs of lexicon authors, present and future. An active interaction between six potential authors aimed to determine a common denominator striking the right balance between richness of content and ease of use for lexicon providers. A simple list of relevant attributes has been established and published. The format has the potential for collecting relevant parts of a future multilingual dictionary. An XML version is available. This effort makes feasible the exchange of lexical information between research groups. Interchange files are made available in a public repository. This procedure opens the door to a true multilingual dictionary, in the awareness that the exchange of lexical information is (only) a necessary first step, before structuring the corresponding entries in different languages.

  9. Transport Bifurcation in Plasma Interchange Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Transport bifurcation and mean shear flow generation in plasma interchange turbulence are explored with self-consistent two-fluid simulations in a flux-driven system with both closed and open field line regions. The nonlinear evolution of interchange modes shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by the low and high mean flow shear. By increasing the input heat flux above a certain threshold, large-amplitude oscillations in the turbulent and mean flow energy are induced. Both clockwise and counter-clockwise types of oscillations are found before the transition to the second regime. The fluctuation energy is decisively transferred to the mean flows by large-amplitude Reynolds power as turbulent intensity increases. Consequently, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which strong mean shear flows are generated in the plasma edge. The peak of the spectrum shifts to higher wavenumbers as the large-scale turbulent eddies are suppressed by the mean shear flow. The transition back to the first regime is then triggered by decreasing the input heat flux to a level much lower than the threshold for the forward transition, showing strong hysteresis. During the back transition, the mean flow decreases as the energy transfer process is reversed. This transport bifurcation, based on a field-line-averaged 2D model, has also been reproduced in our recent 3D simulations of resistive interchange turbulence, in which the ion and electron temperatures are separated and the parallel current is involved. Supported by the MOST of China Grant No. 2013GB112006, US DOE Contract No. DE-FC02-08ER54966, US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734.

  10. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION AND CORONAL HOLE DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed fields, often referred to as 'interchange' reconnection, on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent three-dimensional topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully three-dimensional MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases, we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed fields. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary and find that the field remains well connected throughout this process. Our results, therefore, provide essential support for the quasi-steady models of the open field, because in these models the open and closed flux are assumed to remain topologically distinct as the photosphere evolves. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. On the other hand, the results argue against models in which open flux is assumed to diffusively penetrate deeply inside the closed field region under a helmet streamer. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations.

  11. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed fields, often referred to as interchange reconnection, on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent three-dimensional topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully three-dimensional MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases, we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed fields. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary and find that the field remains well connected throughout this process. Our results, therefore, provide essential support for the quasi-steady models of the open field, because in these models the open and closed flux are assumed to remain topologically distinct as the photosphere evolves. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. On the other hand, the results argue against models in which open flux is assumed to diffusively penetrate deeply inside the closed field region under a helmet streamer. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations.

  12. Magnetic interchange instability in accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Spruit, Hendrik C.

    1995-05-01

    We investigate the stability of a disk to magnetic interchange in the disk plane, when a poloidal magentic field provides some radial support of the disk. The disk is assumed to be geometrically thin and may possess rotation and shear. We assume the unperturbed magnetic field vertically threads the disk and has a comparable radial component at the disk surface. We formulate the linear stability problem as an initial value problem in shearing coordinates and ignore any effects of winds. Shear stabilizes the interchange instability strongly compared to the uniformly rotating case studied previously and makes the growth algebraic rather than exponential. A second form of instability with long wavelengths is identified, whose growth appears to be transient. If the field strength is measured by the travel time tauA of an Alfven wave across the disk thickness, significant amplification for both forms of instability requires (tauA Omega)-2 greater than or approximately equal to L/H, where L is the radial length scale of the field gradient and H is the disk thickness. Field strengths such that 1 less than or approximately equal (tauA Omega)-2 less than or approximately equal L/H are stable to these instabilities as well as the instability recently investigated by Balbus & Hawley (1991). The results suggest that in dark environments in which the magnetic energy density is greater than the thermal energy density, disks are stable over a substantial range of parameter space, with radial advection of magnetic flux limited by the interchange instability possibly near the disk center. Such environments may be relevant for the production of magnetic winds or jets in young stars or active galactic nuclei.

  13. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed field, (often referred to as "interchange" reconnection), on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent 3D topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully 3D MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed field. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary, and find that the field remains well-connected throughout this process. Our results imply that open flux cannot penetrate deeply into the closed field region below a helmet streamer and, hence, support the quasi-steady models in which open and closed flux remain topologically distinct. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection Sun: coronal hole

  14. A drift model of interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E. S.; Power, O. A.

    2007-08-15

    A set of asymptotic equations is derived, describing the dynamics of the flute mode in a magnetized plasma with cold ions, under a 'local' approximation (i.e., near a particular point). The asymptotic set is then used to calculate the growth rate of interchange instability in the slab model. It is shown that, unlike the magnetohydrodynamic ordering, the drift one allows instability to occur for either sign of the pressure gradient (i.e., for both 'bad' and 'good' curvature of the magnetic field). It is also demonstrated that finite beta gives rise to an extra instability that does not exist in the small-beta limit.

  15. Interchangeable breech lock for glove boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonds, David Preston

    2015-11-24

    A breech lock for a glove box is provided that may be used to transfer one or more items into the glove box. The breech lock can be interchangeably installed in place of a plug, glove, or other device in a port or opening of a glove box. Features are provided to aid the removal of items from the breech lock by a gloved operator. The breech lock can be reused or, if needed, can be replaced with a plug, glove, or other device at the port or opening of the glove box.

  16. Nuclear Propulsion Technical Interchange Meeting, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Propulsion Technical Interchange Meeting (NP-TIM-92) was sponsored and hosted by the Nuclear Propulsion Office at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to review the work performed in fiscal year 1992 in the areas of nuclear thermal and nuclear electric propulsion technology development. These proceedings are a compilation of the presentations given at the meeting (many of the papers are presented in outline or viewgraph form). Volume 1 covers the introductory presentations and the system concepts and technology developments related to nuclear thermal propulsion.

  17. Biotic interchange between the Indian subcontinent and mainland Asia through time

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Sebastian; Morley, Robert J.; Plath, Martin; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Li, Jia-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Biotic interchange after the connection of previously independently evolving floras and faunas is thought to be one of the key factors that shaped global biodiversity as we see it today. However, it was not known how biotic interchange develops over longer time periods of several million years following the secondary contact of different biotas. Here we present a novel method to investigate the temporal dynamics of biotic interchange based on a phylogeographical meta-analysis by calculating the maximal number of observed dispersal events per million years given the temporal uncertainty of the underlying time-calibrated phylogenies. We show that biotic influx from mainland Asia onto the Indian subcontinent after Eocene continental collision was not a uniform process, but was subject to periods of acceleration, stagnancy and decrease. We discuss potential palaeoenvironmental causes for this fluctuation. PMID:27373955

  18. A Cross-Classified CFA-MTMM Model for Structurally Different and Nonindependent Interchangeable Methods.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tobias; Schultze, Martin; Jeon, Minjeong; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Praetorius, Anna-Katharina; Eid, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multirater (multimethod, multisource) studies are increasingly applied in psychology. Eid and colleagues (2008) proposed a multilevel confirmatory factor model for multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) data combining structurally different and multiple independent interchangeable methods (raters). In many studies, however, different interchangeable raters (e.g., peers, subordinates) are asked to rate different targets (students, supervisors), leading to violations of the independence assumption and to cross-classified data structures. In the present work, we extend the ML-CFA-MTMM model by Eid and colleagues (2008) to cross-classified multirater designs. The new C4 model (Cross-Classified CTC[M-1] Combination of Methods) accounts for nonindependent interchangeable raters and enables researchers to explicitly model the interaction between targets and raters as a latent variable. Using a real data application, it is shown how credibility intervals of model parameters and different variance components can be obtained using Bayesian estimation techniques.

  19. Analysis of genome rearrangement by block-interchanges.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chin Lung; Lin, Ying Chih; Huang, Yen Lin; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2007-01-01

    Block-interchanges are a new kind of genome rearrangements that affect the gene order in a chromosome by swapping two nonintersecting blocks of genes of any length. More recently, the study of such rearrangements is becoming increasingly important because of its applications in molecular evolution. Usually, this kind of study requires to solve a combinatorial problem, called the block-interchange distance problem, which is to find a minimum number of block-interchanges between two given gene orders of linear/circular chromosomes to transform one gene order into another. In this chapter, we shall introduce the basics of block-interchange rearrangements and permutation groups in algebra that are useful in analyses of genome rearrangements. In addition, we shall present a simple algorithm on the basis of permutation groups to efficiently solve the block-interchange distance problem, as well as ROBIN, a web server for the online analyses of block-interchange rearrangements.

  20. MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE INTERCHANGE AT THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic field measured by Voyager 1 prior to its heliocliff encounter on 2012.65 showed an unexpectedly complex transition from the primarily azimuthal inner-heliosheath field to the draped interstellar field tilted by some 20° to the nominal azimuthal direction. Most prominent were two regions of enhanced magnetic field strength depleted in energetic charged particles of heliospheric origin. These regions were interpreted as magnetic flux tubes connected to the outer heliosheath that provided a path for the particles to escape. Despite large increases in strength, the field’s direction did not change appreciably at the boundaries of these flux tubes. Rather, the field’s direction changed gradually over several months prior to the heliocliff crossing. It is shown theoretically that the heliopause, as a pressure equilibrium layer, can become unstable to interchange of magnetic fields between the inner and the outer heliosheaths. The curvature of magnetic field lines and the anti-sunward gradient in plasma kinetic pressure provide conditions favorable for an interchange. Magnetic shear between the heliosheath and the interstellar fields reduces the growth rates, but does not fully stabilize the heliopause against perturbations propagating in the latitudinal direction. The instability could create a transition layer permeated by magnetic flux tubes, oriented parallel to each other and alternately connected to the heliosheath or the interstellar regions.

  1. The Great American Biotic Interchange in birds

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Jason T.; Bermingham, Eldredge; Schluter, Dolph

    2009-01-01

    The sudden exchange of mammals over the land bridge between the previously isolated continents of North and South America is among the most celebrated events in the faunal history of the New World. This exchange resulted in the rapid merging of continental mammalian faunas that had evolved in almost complete isolation from each other for tens of millions of years. Yet, the wider importance of land bridge-mediated interchange to faunal mixing in other groups is poorly known because of the incompleteness of the fossil record. In particular, the ability of birds to fly may have rendered a land bridge unnecessary for faunal merging. Using molecular dating of the unique bird faunas of the two continents, we show that rates of interchange increased dramatically after land bridge completion in tropical forest-specializing groups, which rarely colonize oceanic islands and have poor dispersal abilities across water barriers, but not in groups comprised of habitat generalists. These results support the role of the land bridge in the merging of the tropical forest faunas of North and South America. In contrast to mammals, the direction of traffic across the land bridge in birds was primarily south to north. The event transformed the tropical avifauna of the New World. PMID:19996168

  2. The Great American Biotic Interchange in birds.

    PubMed

    Weir, Jason T; Bermingham, Eldredge; Schluter, Dolph

    2009-12-22

    The sudden exchange of mammals over the land bridge between the previously isolated continents of North and South America is among the most celebrated events in the faunal history of the New World. This exchange resulted in the rapid merging of continental mammalian faunas that had evolved in almost complete isolation from each other for tens of millions of years. Yet, the wider importance of land bridge-mediated interchange to faunal mixing in other groups is poorly known because of the incompleteness of the fossil record. In particular, the ability of birds to fly may have rendered a land bridge unnecessary for faunal merging. Using molecular dating of the unique bird faunas of the two continents, we show that rates of interchange increased dramatically after land bridge completion in tropical forest-specializing groups, which rarely colonize oceanic islands and have poor dispersal abilities across water barriers, but not in groups comprised of habitat generalists. These results support the role of the land bridge in the merging of the tropical forest faunas of North and South America. In contrast to mammals, the direction of traffic across the land bridge in birds was primarily south to north. The event transformed the tropical avifauna of the New World.

  3. Nonlinear parity mixtures controlling the propagation of interchange modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Ishizawa, A.

    2017-08-01

    The propagation velocity of a resistive interchange mode is numerically investigated based on a two-fluid model. It is newly found that the nonlinearity mixes the interchange parity and the tearing parity to produce magnetic islands and controls the propagation velocity of the instability in the poloidal direction. The parity of the interchange mode is conserved during the linear growing evolution. However, when the amplitude of the mode becomes large and nonlinear effects are dominant, the pure interchange mode does not satisfy the nonlinear two-fluid equation. Thus, the nonlinear energy transfer occurs from the interchange parity mode to the tearing parity mode, which is called the nonlinear parity mixtures, and the magnetic islands are produced by the interchange mode. The nonlinear magnetic island formation by the interchange mode plays a central role in controlling the interchange mode's propagation velocity, which is equal to the electron fluid velocity. This nonlinear process is essential in quantitatively reproducing the propagation velocity of the interchange mode, which is the same as the electron fluid velocity observed in the large helical device experiment. It is also found that one of the mechanisms of parity mixtures is a modulational instability.

  4. 76 FR 43393 - Debit Card Interchange Fees and Routing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...The Board is publishing a final rule, Regulation II, Debit Card Interchange Fees and Routing. This rule implements the provisions of Section 920 of the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, including standards for reasonable and proportional interchange transaction fees for electronic debit transactions, exemptions from the interchange transaction fee limitations, prohibitions on evasion and circumvention, prohibitions on payment card network exclusivity arrangements and routing restrictions for debit card transactions, and reporting requirements for debit card issuers and payment card networks. An interim final rule, with a request for comment, on standards for receiving a fraud-prevention adjustment to interchange transaction fees is published separately in the Federal Register.

  5. Line-tying of interchange modes in a hot electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gerver, M.J.; Lane, B.G.

    1986-07-01

    The dispersion relation of low-frequency (..omega..<<..omega../sub c/i) electrostatic flute-like interchange modes in a mirror cell with a fraction ..cap alpha.. of hot bi-Maxwellian electrons, with bulk line-tying to cold (nonemitting) end walls, has been solved using a slab model and the local approximation. In the absence of line-tying, hot-electron interchange modes are never completely stabilized (in contrast to the conventional theory (Phys. Fluids 9, 820 (1966); Phys. Fluids 19, 1255 (1976)), which assumes monoenergetic hot electrons and has little relevance to real plasmas). In the presence of line-tying, hot-electron interchange modes are more effectively stabilized than magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange modes, because (1) the line-tying is enhanced by a factor of (..omega../..nu../sub e/)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/ when the wave frequency ..omega.. is greater than the cold-electron collision frequency ..nu../sub e/; and (2) hot-electron interchange modes can be completely stabilized, rather than merely having their growth rates reduced, if there is a spread of hot-electron-curvature drift velocities. Predictions of the minimum ..cap alpha.. needed for instability and of the first azimuthal mode number m to go unstable, and of the scaling of these quantities with neutral gas pressure, are in good quantitative agreement with observations of hot-electron interchange instabilities in the Tara tendem mirror experiment (Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 30, 1581 (1985)), provided a correction is made for the fact that the modes in Tara are not flute-like, but should have higher amplitudes in the plug than in the central cell.

  6. Internet-based data interchange with XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, a complete concept for Internet Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) - a well-known buzzword in the area of logistics and supply chain management to enable the automation of the interactions between companies and their partners - using XML (eXtensible Markup Language) will be proposed. This approach is based on Internet and XML, because the implementation of traditional EDI (e.g. EDIFACT, ANSI X.12) is mostly too costly for small and medium sized enterprises, which want to integrate their suppliers and customers in a supply chain. The paper will also present the results of the implementation of a prototype for such a system, which has been developed for an industrial partner to improve the current situation of parts delivery. The main functions of this system are an early warning system to detect problems during the parts delivery process as early as possible, and a transport following system to pursue the transportation.

  7. Technical Report Interchange Through Synchronized OAI Caches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiaming; Maly, Kurt; Zubair, Mohammad; Tang, Rong; Padshah, Mohammad Imran; Roncaglia, George; Rocker, JoAnne; Nelson, Michael; vonOfenheim, William; Luce, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The Technical Report Interchange project is a cooperative experimental effort between NASA Langley Research Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Air Force Research Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory and Old Dominion University to allow for the integration of technical reports. This is accomplished using the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) and having each site cache the metadata from the other participating sites. Each site also implements additional software to ingest the OAI-PMH harvested metadata into their native digital library (DL). This allows the users at each site to see an increased technical report collection through the familiar DL interfaces and tale advantage of whatever valued added are provided by the native DL.

  8. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION IN A TURBULENT CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D.; Servidio, S.; Velli, M.

    2012-10-10

    Magnetic reconnection at the interface between coronal holes and loops, the so-called interchange reconnection, can release the hotter, denser plasma from magnetically confined regions into the heliosphere, contributing to the formation of the highly variable slow solar wind. The interchange process is often thought to develop at the apex of streamers or pseudo-streamers, near Y- and X-type neutral points, but slow streams with loop composition have been recently observed along fanlike open field lines adjacent to closed regions, far from the apex. However, coronal heating models, with magnetic field lines shuffled by convective motions, show that reconnection can occur continuously in unipolar magnetic field regions with no neutral points: photospheric motions induce a magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade in the coronal field that creates the necessary small scales, where a sheared magnetic field component orthogonal to the strong axial field is created locally and can reconnect. We propose that a similar mechanism operates near and around boundaries between open and closed regions inducing a continual stochastic rearrangement of connectivity. We examine a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model of a simplified interface region between open and closed corona threaded by a strong unipolar magnetic field. This boundary is not stationary, becomes fractal, and field lines change connectivity continuously, becoming alternatively open and closed. This model suggests that slow wind may originate everywhere along loop-coronal-hole boundary regions and can account naturally and simply for outflows at and adjacent to such boundaries and for the observed diffusion of slow wind around the heliospheric current sheet.

  9. Line-tying of interchange modes in a hot electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerver, M. J.; Lane, B. G.

    1986-07-01

    The dispersion relation of low-frequency (ω≪ωci) electrostatic flute-like interchange modes in a mirror cell with a fraction α of hot bi-Maxwellian electrons, with bulk line-tying to cold (nonemitting) end walls, has been solved using a slab model and the local approximation. In the absence of line-tying, hot-electron interchange modes are never completely stabilized (in contrast to the conventional theory [Phys. Fluids 9, 820 (1966); Phys. Fluids 19, 1255 (1976)], which assumes monoenergetic hot electrons and has little relevance to real plasmas). In the presence of line-tying, hot-electron interchange modes are more effectively stabilized than magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange modes, because (1) the line-tying is enhanced by a factor of (ω/νe)1/2 when the wave frequency ω is greater than the cold-electron collision frequency νe; and (2) hot-electron interchange modes can be completely stabilized, rather than merely having their growth rates reduced, if there is a spread of hot-electron-curvature drift velocities. Predictions of the minimum α needed for instability and of the first azimuthal mode number m to go unstable, and of the scaling of these quantities with neutral gas pressure, are in good quantitative agreement with observations of hot-electron interchange instabilities in the Tara tendem mirror experiment [Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 30, 1581 (1985)], provided a correction is made for the fact that the modes in Tara are not flute-like, but should have higher amplitudes in the plug than in the central cell. The theory may also explain observations in other experiments [Phys. Fluids 27, 1019 (1984); Phys. Fluids 19, 1203 (1976)]. Increasing the ion temperature Ti should have a modest stabilizing effect. In addition to the hot-electron interchange modes, there are also ion-driven interchange modes, which are unstable even in the absence of hot electrons, but generally have low growth rates, much less than MHD growth rates. Even these modes may be

  10. 49 CFR 376.31 - Interchange of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equipment to be interchanged. This written agreement shall set forth the specific points of interchange, how... commodities at the point where the physical exchange occurs. (c) Through bills of lading. The traffic... divisions of the joint rates or the proportions of such rates accruing to the carriers by the application...

  11. 48 CFR 227.676 - Foreign patent interchange agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foreign patent interchange... SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Foreign License and Technical Assistance Agreements 227.676 Foreign patent interchange agreements. (a) Patent...

  12. 2. AERIAL VIEW OF INTERCHANGE OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW OF INTERCHANGE OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AND INTERSTATE I-5 INTERCHANGE. NOTE ARROYO SECO DRAINAGE INTO LOS ANGELES RIVER AT BOTTOM CENTER. - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Figueroa Street Viaduct, Spanning Los Angeles River, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. AERIAL VIEW OF FOURLEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW OF FOUR-LEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AND HIGHWAY 101, HOLLYWOOD FREEWAY. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY ON LOWER LEVEL FROM LOWER LEFT TO UPPER RIGHT. LOOKING NORTH - Four Level Interchange, Intersection of Arroyo Seco Parkway & Harbor, Hollywood, & Santa Ana Freeways (milepost 23.69), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. AERIAL VIEW OF FOURLEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW OF FOUR-LEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AND HIGHWAY 101, HOLLYWOOD FREEWAY. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY ON LOWER LEVEL AT CENTER. HIGHWAY 101 AT BOTTOM. CAESAR CHAVEZ AVENUE AT CENTER. LOOKING NE - Four Level Interchange, Intersection of Arroyo Seco Parkway & Harbor, Hollywood, & Santa Ana Freeways (milepost 23.69), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Novel Theory of Energetic-Ion-Induced Interchange Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of a kinetic energy principle, it is shown that the interchange mode in helical systems is excited by trapped energetic ions, where the ideal interchange mode is stable. The mode has a rotation frequency comparable to precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions. The theory explains how to apply the fishbone mode theory originally developed in tokamaks to helical systems.

  16. Coordinating shared care using electronic data interchange.

    PubMed

    Branger, P; van't Hooft, A; van der Wouden, H C

    1995-01-01

    Shared care is the situation in which physicians jointly treat the same patient. Shared care may occur with elderly patients suffering from several health problems, patients with chronic disorders such as diabetes, mellitus, obstructive pulmonary diseases, or cardiological disorders. For a number of health problems, including diabetes, shared care protocols have been developed involving division of tasks between health care providers from different disciplines [1]. Optimal communication is considered to be a vital aspect of shared care, both from medical and cost-effectiveness points of view, but at the same time communication forms the bottleneck as physicians often lack time to comply with the protocol [2]. At present, new technologies are emerging that hold the promise of improving communication between health care providers. One such technology is Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), defined as "the replacement of paper documents by standard electronic messages conveyed from one computer to another without manual intervention" [3]. In Europe, the ISO syntax standard EDIFACT has been adopted as the standard for defining EDI-messages [4]. In The Netherlands, coordination of the standardization of health care messages is performed by a national organization. At present, several standardized messages are available for a variety of purposes. One is a message for data exchange between physicians; in this message, however, only physician-patient- and hospital-identifying data are structured, and all medical data is transferred as free text. Consequently, using this message, the receiving system is unable to integrate the data into the computer-based patient record. In order to support shared care, a message is needed that can also transfer the structure of the data in a computer-based record in order to allow integration of records from multiple sources. Therefore, we developed a new message, called MEDEUR, that is designed for integrated patient data exchange between

  17. Study of extended MHD effects on interchange modes in spheromak equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    A study of extended MHD effects on linear interchange modes is performed using the NIMROD code [Sovinec & King JCP 2010]. A linear cylindrical equilibrium model is adapted from [Jardin NF 1982] to allow finite toroidal current at the edge. These equilibria are representative of SSPX discharges where currents are driven on the open field to keep the safety factor above 1/2 across the profile [McLean et al., POP 2006]. These spheromaks have weak magnetic shear, and interchange stability is an important consideration. The Suydam parameter, D, is scaled to study resistive and ideal interchange modes. The calculated MHD growth rate increases with D. The resistive interchange scaling γ ~η 1 / 3 is observed for D <1/4 . Calculations using the full extended MHD model are performed for a range of hall parameters Λ. This model includes gyro-viscosity, the hall term, equilibrium diamagnetic flows, and the cross-field diamagnetic heat flux. Two fluid effects in the full model are always destabilizing at large Λ. However, some cases exhibit a range of Λ where the growth rate for the full model is reduced relative to the MHD growth rate. Work supported by US DOE.

  18. Seven parameters describing anteroposterior jaw relationships: postpubertal prediction accuracy and interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Nakamura, S; Iwasaki, H; Kitazawa, S

    2000-06-01

    Seven parameters describing anteroposterior jaw relationships (the A-B plane angle, the angle of convexity, the ANB angle, the SN-AB angle, the Wits appraisal, the AF-BF distance, the APDI) were measured on pairs of prepubertal and postpubertal cephalograms of 44 normal occlusion subjects (20 males and 24 females). The mean ages at prepubertal and postpubertal stages were 10 years 5 months and 14 years 5 months in males and 8 years 10 months and 12 years 10 months in females, respectively. The purpose of this study was to compare prediction accuracy of future relationships by regression analysis and to evaluate interchangeability among the 7 parameters by correlation analysis. In the prepubertal assessment, the ANB angle and the angle of convexity showed better prediction accuracy for postpubertal jaw relationships. Higher interchangeability among the parameters was statistically substantiated between the SN-AB angle and the AF-BF distance, as well as among the ANB angle, the angle of convexity, and the A-B plane angle. The Wits appraisal and the APDI were less interchangeable with other parameters. The ANB angle, the Wits appraisal, and the APDI would complement each other for the geometrically distorting factors because of the low interchangeability due to their different geometric basis. The conjunctive use of the ANB angle, the Wits appraisal, and the APDI is recommended as a clinically appropriate method for assessment of jaw relationships in individuals.

  19. Relationship between interchange usage and risk of hamstring injuries in the Australian Football League.

    PubMed

    Orchard, John W; Driscoll, Tim; Seward, Hugh; Orchard, Jessica J

    2012-05-01

    To study risk factors for hamstring injury in the Australian Football League (AFL), in particular the effect of recent changes in match participation (increased use of the interchange bench) on hamstring injury. Analysis of hamstring match injury statistics extracted from an injury database combined with match participation statistics extracted from a player statistics database. 56,320 player matches in the AFL over the period 2003-2010 were analyzed, in which 416 hamstring injuries occurred. In a Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) analysis accounting for clustering of different teams, significant predictors of hamstring injuries were recent hamstring injury (RR 4.16, 95% CI 3.19-5.43), past history of ACL reconstruction (RR 1.69, 95% CI 1.09-2.60), past history of calf injury (RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.37-1.82), opposition team making 60 or more interchanges during the game (RR 1.38, 95% CI 1.12-1.68) and player having made 7 or more interchanges off the field in the last 3 weeks (protective RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.59-0.93). These findings suggest that regular interchanges protect individual players against hamstring injuries, but increase the risk of hamstring injury for opposition players. These findings can be explained by a model in which both fatigue and average match running speed are risk factors for hamstring injury. A player who returns to the ground after a rest on the interchange bench may himself have some short-term protection against hamstring injury because of the reduced fatigue, but his rested state may contribute to increased average running speed for his direct opponent, increasing the risk of injury for players on the opposition team. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 29267 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Interchangeable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ...--Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on April 21, 2011, pursuant to.... (``the Act''), Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. has filed written notifications... research project remains open, and Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. intends to...

  1. 75 FR 28294 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Interchangeable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ...--Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on April 15, 2010, pursuant to.... (``the Act''), Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. has filed written notifications... Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. intends to file additional written notifications...

  2. 76 FR 16820 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Interchangeable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ...--Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on February 24, 2011, pursuant... seq. (``the Act''), Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. has filed written... research project. Membership in this group research project remains open, and Interchangeable...

  3. 75 FR 54652 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Interchangeable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ...--Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on July 8, 2010, pursuant to.... (``the Act''), Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. has filed written notifications... research project remains open, and Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. intends to...

  4. 77 FR 9266 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Interchangeable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ...--Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on January 26, 2012, pursuant to.... (``the Act''), Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. has filed written notifications... research project. Membership in this group research project remains open, and Interchangeable...

  5. 78 FR 117 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Interchangeable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ...--Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on December 6, 2012, pursuant to.... (``the Act''), Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. has filed written notifications.... Membership in this group research project remains open, and Interchangeable Virtual Instruments...

  6. The GuideLine Interchange Format

    PubMed Central

    Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Gennari, John H.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Jain, Nilesh L.; Tu, Samson W.; Oliver, Diane E.; Pattison-Gordon, Edward; Greenes, Robert A.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Barnett, G. Octo

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To allow exchange of clinical practice guidelines among institutions and computer-based applications. Design: The GuideLine Interchange Format (GLIF) specification consists of the GLIF model and the GLIF syntax. The GLIF model is an object-oriented representation that consists of a set of classes for guideline entities, attributes for those classes, and data types for the attribute values. The GLIF syntax specifies the format of the test file that contains the encoding. Methods: Researchers from the InterMed Collaboratory at Columbia University, Harvard University (Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital), and Stanford University analyzed four existing guideline systems to derive a set of requirements for guideline representation. The GLIF specification is a consensus representation developed through a brainstorming process. Four clinical guidelines were encoded in GLIF to assess its expressivity and to study the variability that occurs when two people from different sites encode the same guideline. Results: The encoders reported that GLIF was adequately expressive. A comparison of the encodings revealed substantial variability. Conclusion: GLIF was sufficient to model the guidelines for the four conditions that were examined. GLIF needs improvement in standard representation of medical concepts, criterion logic, temporal information, and uncertainty. PMID:9670133

  7. The Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC) Grant consists of two separate but related phases. The first phase of this grant was conducted under a separate Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) subcontract to FMW Composite Systems, Inc., of Bridgeport, West Virginia. FMW conducted early design and engineering associated with the future development of a stronger and lighter Space Shuttle carrier pallet. This improved pallet is intended to support the next and last planned Shuttle servicing mission for the on-orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The salient characteristics of this carrier are increased performance, together with significantly reduced mass. As the next servicing mission is the last planned upgrade mission for the HST, this lighter and stronger pallet will enable greater payload delivery to the HST, potentially increasing the servicing mission effectiveness and science lifetime of the telescope. The second phase of this grant, conducted by ISR, consisted of a data systems study to exploit further the potential of the HST servicing pallet for other space missions, specifically for application of semi-permanent placement of science payloads on the International Space Station (ISS). As in the case of the HST, a lightweight and more rigid pallet could be employed to increase science return for the ISS. A data systems study intended to complement the current ISS s Institutional data system holds the potential of increasing the science return for data efficiency, just as the lightweight pallet serves to increase payload mass efficiency.

  8. Work of IEEE P1157 Medical Data Interchange committee.

    PubMed

    Rutt, T E

    1989-01-01

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has been working for several years to develop medical system communication standards, under sponsorship of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS). The work of the IEEE P1157 Medical Data Interchange committee is surveyed in this paper. By 1990 the IEEE P1157 Medical Data Interchange committee plans to have a draft standard ready for ballot, with an initial focus on the interface transactions needed to support a patient care information system. Eventually, the IEEE P1157 Medical Data Interchange committee will develop standards with a wider scope, including the transfer of electronic medical records between different vendor systems.

  9. Advanced logic gates for ultrafast network interchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed N.

    1995-08-01

    By overcoming speed bottlenecks from electronic switching as well as optical/electronic conversions, all-optical logic gates can permit further exploitation of the nearly 40 THz of bandwidth available from optical fibers. We focus on the use of optical solitons and all-optical logic gates to implement ultrafast ``interchanges'' or switching nodes on packet networks with speeds of 100 Gbit/s or greater. For example, all-optical logic gates have been demonstrated with speeds up to 200 Gbit/s, and they may be used to decide whether to add or drop a data packet. The overall goal of our effort is to demonstrate the key enabling technologies and their combination for header processing in 100 Gbit/s, time-division-multiplexed, packed switched networks. Soliton-based fiber logic gates are studied with the goal of combining attractive features of soliton-dragging logic gates, nonlinear loop mirrors, and erbium-doped fiber amplifiers to design logic gates with optimum switching energy, contrast ratio, and timing sensitivity. First, the experimental and numerical work studies low-latency soliton logic gates based on frequency shifts associated with cross-phase modulation. In preliminary experiments, switching in 15 m long low-birefringent fibers has been demonstrated with a contrast ratio of 2.73:1. Using dispersion-shifted fiber in the gate should lower the switching energy and improve the contrast ratio. Next, the low-birefringent fiber can be cross-spliced and wrapped into a nonlinear optical loop mirror to take advantage of mechanisms from both soliton dragging and loop mirrors. The resulting device can have low switching energy and a timing window that results from a combination of soliton dragging and the loop mirror mechanisms.

  10. SGML as a message interchange format in healthcare.

    PubMed Central

    Dolin, R. H.; Alschuler, L.; Bray, T.; Mattison, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 1993, The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) studied several syntaxes for interchange formats in healthcare, but excluded SGML due to resource constraints. We sought to extend the CEN report and formally evaluate the use of SGML as a message interchange format. METHODS: We followed the methodology set forth by CEN, using their example scenarios and healthcare data model. General message descriptions based on this model set the functional requirements for the interchange format. These general requirements are then mapped into SGML to see how well they can be supported. RESULTS: Results follow the CEN format, enabling a direct comparison of SGML with ASN.1, ASTM E1238, EDIFACT, EUCLIDES, and ODA (those syntaxes studied by CEN). CONCLUSION: SGML compares favorably with other syntaxes investigated by CEN. None of the interchange formats support all functional requirements. Optimal and standard mechanisms of combining different formats through a modular approach to achieve greater overall functionality requires further study. PMID:9357703

  11. 119. AERIAL VIEW OF CLARA BARTON PARKWAY NEAR INTERCHANGE WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. AERIAL VIEW OF CLARA BARTON PARKWAY NEAR INTERCHANGE WITH MACARTHUR BLVD. JUST SOUTH OF GLEN ECHO LOOKING NORTHEAST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  12. 131. AERIAL VIEW OF OVERPASS AT INTERCHANGE WITH MACARTHUR BLVD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    131. AERIAL VIEW OF OVERPASS AT INTERCHANGE WITH MACARTHUR BLVD. AT CABIN JOHN LOOKING NORTHEAST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  13. Good Security Practices for Electronic Commerce, Including Electronic Data Interchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    FROM - TO) xx-xx-2002 to xx-xx-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Good Security Practices for Electronic Commerce , Including Electronic Data Interchange...Report 12/1/1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Good Security Practices for Electronic Commerce , Including Electronic Data Interchange 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...Maximum 200 Words) Electronic commerce (EC) is the use of documents in electronic form, rather than paper, for carrying out functions of business or

  14. Interchangeability of gas detection tubes and hand pumps.

    PubMed

    Haag, W R

    2001-01-01

    Users of gas detection tubes occasionally seek the convenience of using a single hand pump with different brands of tubes, to avoid the need to carry more than one pump. Several professional organizations recommend against such interchange. However, these recommendations appear to be based on a single study of pump designs that mostly are no longer in use. The present study was undertaken to determine if current hand pumps are interchangeable. Both piston-type and bellows-type hand pumps were evaluated by comparing pump flow profiles and test gas measurements with a variety of tubes. The results demonstrate that three piston hand pumps in common use (Sensidyne/Gastec GV/100, RAE Systems LP-1200, and Matheson-Kitagawa 8104-400A) are fully interchangeable. Two bellows pumps (Draeger Accuro and MSA Kwik-Draw) also are interchangeable with each other. Mixing of bellows and piston systems is often possible, but there are enough exceptions to conclude that such practice should be discouraged because it can give inaccurate readings. It is recommended that technical standards be adopted, such as total volume and an initial pump vacuum or a pump flow curve, to assess hand pump interchangeability. When two manufacturers' pumps meet the same standard and routine leak tests are conducted, interchangeability is scientifically valid and poses no risk to the end user while offering greater convenience.

  15. Graybody Factors and Infrared Divergences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul; Fabbri, Alessandro; Balbinot, Roberto; Parentani, Renaud

    2015-04-01

    A method of computing the gray-body factors for static spherically symmetric and BEC acoustic black holes using a Volterra integral equation is given. The results are used to investigate infrared divergences in the particle number, two-point function, point-split stress-energy tensor and density-density correlation function. Infrared divergences in the particle number and two-point function occur if the gray-body factor approaches a nonzero constant in the zero frequency limit, as happens for Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes and BEC acoustic black holes. However, no infrared divergences occur in the point-split stress-energy tensor or the density-density correlation function. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-0856050 and PHY-1308325.

  16. The formation of blobs from a pure interchange process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.; Sovinec, C. R.; Hegna, C. C.

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we focus on examining a pure interchange process in a shear-less slab configuration as a prototype mechanism for blob formation. We employ full magnetohydrodynamic simulations to demonstrate that the blob-like structures can emerge through the nonlinear development of a pure interchange instability originating from a pedestal-like transition region. In the early nonlinear stage, filamentary structures develop and extend in the direction of the effective gravity. The blob-like structures appear when the radially extending filaments break off and disconnect from the core plasma. The morphology and the dynamics of these filaments and blobs vary dramatically with a sensitive dependence on the dissipation mechanisms in the system and the initial perturbation. Despite the complexity in morphology and dynamics, the nature of the entire blob formation process in the shear-less slab configuration remains strictly interchange without involving any change in magnetic topology.

  17. A Video Analysis of Use of the New 'Concussion Interchange Rule' in the National Rugby League.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A J; Iverson, G L; Stanwell, P; Moore, T; Ellis, J; Levi, C R

    2016-04-01

    The National Rugby League (NRL) in Australia introduced a new 'concussion interchange rule' (CIR) in 2014, whereby a player suspected of having sustained a concussion can be removed from play, and assessed, without an interchange being tallied against the player's team. We conducted a video analysis, describing player and injury characteristics, situational factors, concussion signs, and return to play for each "CIR" event for the 2014 season. There were 167 reported uses of the CIR. Apparent loss of consciousness/unresponsiveness was observed in 32% of cases, loss of muscle tone in 54%, clutching the head in 70%, unsteadiness of gait in 66%, and a vacant stare in 66%. More than half of the players who were removed under the CIR returned to play later in the same match (57%). Most incidences occurred from a hit up (62%) and occurred during a tackle where the initial contact was with the upper body (80%). The new concussion interchange rule has been used frequently during the first season of its implementation. In many cases, there appeared to be video evidence of injury but the athlete was cleared to return to play. More research is needed on the usefulness of video review for identifying signs of concussive injury. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Regulation of the centrifugal interchange cycle in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, A.; Winglee, R. M.; Harnett, E. M.

    2009-02-01

    Multifluid modeling of Saturn's magnetosphere produces the first numerical simulation showing the development of hot, tenuous plasma from the plasma sheet interchanging with cold, denser plasma from the inner magnetosphere. Individual injection events are seen regularly by Cassini, but with a single observation it is impossible to determine the global distribution. Multifluid simulations enable us to characterize the growth and development of not merely one injection event but show that it is a global process dependent on both the plasma distribution of ions from Enceladus and forcing by solar wind conditions. Development of the interchange arises in a fashion similar to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, except that the heavy ions are being driven outward not by gravity but by centrifugal forces. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parallel to the planetary magnetic field reduces centrifugal forcing, whereas antiparallel IMF increases the forcing, by altering the bowl-like shape of the plasma sheet. However, the interchange instability also develops under normally quiet parallel IMF conditions when the mass loading of the Enceladus torus is increased. The total number of interchange events is 1-2 higher for the antiparallel case versus the increased mass case. Interchange develops in the vicinity of 7 RS, and once the fingers of cold plasma reach ~12-14 RS (close to the inner edge of the plasma sheet) they spread in the azimuthal direction, because of the fact that the magnetic field is too weak to keep the fingers solidly locked in rotation. The derived energy characteristics of the interchanging plasma are shown to be consistent with Cassini data.

  19. 75 FR 81721 - Debit Card Interchange Fees and Routing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ...The Board is requesting public comment on proposed new Regulation II, Debit Card Interchange Fees and Routing, which: establishes standards for determining whether an interchange fee received or charged by an issuer with respect to an electronic debit transaction is reasonable and proportional to the cost incurred by the issuer with respect to the transaction; and prohibits issuers and networks from restricting the number of networks over which an electronic debit transaction may be processed and from inhibiting the ability of a merchant to direct the routing of an electronic debit transaction to any network that may process such transactions. With respect to the interchange fee standards, the Board is requesting comment on two alternatives that would apply to covered issuers: an issuer-specific standard with a safe harbor and a cap; or a cap applicable to all such issuers. The proposed rule would additionally prohibit circumvention or evasion of the interchange fee limitations (under both alternatives) by preventing the issuer from receiving net compensation from the network (excluding interchange fees passed through the network). The Board also is requesting comment on possible frameworks for an adjustment to interchange fees for fraud-prevention costs. With respect to the debit-card routing rules, the Board is requesting comment on two alternative rules prohibiting network exclusivity: one alternative would require at least two unaffiliated networks per debit card, and the other would require at least two unaffiliated networks for each type of transaction authorization method. Under both alternatives, the issuers and networks would be prohibited from inhibiting a merchant's ability to direct the routing of an electronic debit transaction over any network that may process such transactions.

  20. Interchange Instability and Transport in Matter-Antimatter Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendl, Alexander; Danler, Gregor; Wiesenberger, Matthias; Held, Markus

    2017-06-01

    Symmetric electron-positron plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic fields are intrinsically subject to interchange instability and transport. Scaling relations for the propagation velocity of density perturbations relevant to transport in isothermal magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are deduced, including damping effects when Debye lengths are large compared to Larmor radii. The relations are verified by nonlinear full-F gyrofluid computations. Results are analyzed with respect to planned magnetically confined electron-positron plasma experiments. The model is generalized to other matter-antimatter plasmas. Magnetized electron-positron-proton-antiproton plasmas are susceptible to interchange-driven local matter-antimatter separation, which can impede sustained laboratory magnetic confinement.

  1. Cassini evidence for rapid interchange transport at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Mauk, B. H.; Hill, T. W.; André, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Young, D. T.; Smith, H. T.; Persoon, A. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    During its tour Cassini has observed numerous plasma injection events in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. Here, we present a case study of one "young" plasma bubble observed when Cassini was in the equatorial plane. The bubble was observed in the equatorial plane at ˜7 Saturn radii from Saturn and had a maximum azimuthal extent of ˜0.25 Rs (Rs=Saturn radius ˜60330 km). We show that the electron density inside the event is lower by a factor ˜3 and the electron temperature higher by over an order of magnitude compared to its surroundings. The injection contains slightly increased magnetic field magnitude of 49 nT compared with a background field of 46 nT. Modelling of pitch angle distributions inside the plasma bubble and measurements of plasma drift provide a novel way to estimate that the bubble originated between 9< L<11 and had an average radial propagation speed of ˜260+60/-70 km s -1. An independent estimate of the speed of the injection following theoretical work of Pontius et al. [1986. Steady State Plasma transport in a Corotation-Dominated Magnetosphere. Geophys. Res. Lett. 13(11), 1097-1100] based on the mass per unit flux gives a maximum radial propagation speeds of 140 km s -1. These results are similar to those found by Thorne et al. [1997. Galileo evidence for rapid interchange transport in the Io torus. Geophys. Res. Lett. 24, 2131] for one event observed in Jupiter's magnetosphere near Io. We therefore suggest this is evidence of the same process operating at both planets.

  2. Arctic warming will promote Atlantic-Pacific fish interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisz, M. S.; Broennimann, O.; Grønkjær, P.; Møller, P. R.; Olsen, S. M.; Swingedouw, D.; Hedeholm, R. B.; Nielsen, E. E.; Guisan, A.; Pellissier, L.

    2015-03-01

    Throughout much of the Quaternary Period, inhospitable environmental conditions above the Arctic Circle have been a formidable barrier separating most marine organisms in the North Atlantic from those in the North Pacific. Rapid warming has begun to lift this barrier, potentially facilitating the interchange of marine biota between the two seas. Here, we forecast the potential northward progression of 515 fish species following climate change, and report the rate of potential species interchange between the Atlantic and the Pacific via the Northwest Passage and the Northeast Passage. For this, we projected niche-based models under climate change scenarios and simulated the spread of species through the passages when climatic conditions became suitable. Results reveal a complex range of responses during this century, and accelerated interchange after 2050. By 2100 up to 41 species could enter the Pacific and 44 species could enter the Atlantic, via one or both passages. Consistent with historical and recent biodiversity interchanges, this exchange of fish species may trigger changes for biodiversity and food webs in the North Atlantic and North Pacific, with ecological and economic consequences to ecosystems that at present contribute 39% to global marine fish landings.

  3. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU 3) Technical Interchange Meeting: Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU III) Technical Interchange Meeting, February 11-12, 1999, hosted by the Lockheed Martin Astronautics Waterton Facility, Denver, Colorado. Administration and publication support for this meeting were provided by the staff of the Publications and Program Services Department at the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  4. 46 CFR 535.305 - Equipment interchange agreements-exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment interchange agreements-exemption. 535.305 Section 535.305 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE OCEAN COMMON CARRIER AND MARINE TERMINAL OPERATOR AGREEMENTS SUBJECT TO THE SHIPPING ACT OF 1984...

  5. School Culture, Climate and Ethos: Interchangeable or Distinctive Concepts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Derek; Coleman, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The terms school culture, climate and ethos appear to be used interchangeably. Within the context of differing national environments there is, however, a tendency to use climate when objective data is under consideration, ethos when more subjective descriptors are involved, and culture when these two are brought together as an integrative force in…

  6. Kinetic ballooning/interchange instability in a bent plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Kubyshkina, M. G.; Artemyev, A. V.; Sergeev, V. A.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D.

    2012-06-01

    We use Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and GOES observations to investigate the plasma sheet evolution on 28 February 2008 between 6:50 and 7:50 UT, when there developed strong magnetic field oscillations with periods of 100 s. Using multispacecraft analysis of the plasma sheet observations and an empirical plasma sheet model, we determine both the large-scale evolution of the plasma sheet and the properties of the oscillations. We found that the oscillations exhibited signatures of kinetic ballooning/interchange instability fingers that developed in a bent current sheet. The interchange oscillations had a sausage structure, propagated duskward at a velocity of about 100 km/s, and were associated with fast radial electron flows. We suggest that the observed negative gradient of the ZGSM magnetic field component (∂BZ/∂X) was a free energy source for the kinetic ballooning/interchange instability. Tens of minutes later a fast elongation of ballooning/interchange fingers was detected between 6 and 16 RE downtail with the length-to-width ratio exceeding 20. The finger elongation ended with signatures of reconnection in an embedded current sheet near the bending point. These observations suggest a complex interplay between the midtail and near-Earth plasma sheet dynamics, involving localized fluctuations in both cross-tail and radial directions before current sheet reconnection.

  7. NASA/DOD Flight Experiments Technical Interchange Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Flight Experiments Technical Interchange Meeting held in Monterey California, October 5-9, 1992. Technical sessions 4 through 8 addressing space structures, propulsion, space power systems, space environments and effects, and space operations are covered. Many of the papers are presented in outline and viewgraph form.

  8. 5. SITE OVERVIEW. DETAIL VIEW OF INTERCHANGE OF ARROYO SECO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SITE OVERVIEW. DETAIL VIEW OF INTERCHANGE OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AT RIGHT, INTERSTATE 1-5 AT CENTER, AND FIGUEROA STREET AT LEFT. NOTE ARROYO SECO CHANNEL PARALLEL TO PARKWAY. NOTE AVENUE 26 BRIDGE AT CENTER. LOOKING 30° NNE. - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Los Angeles to Pasadena, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. On Ideal Stability of Cylindrical Localized Interchange Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V

    2007-05-15

    Stability of cylindrical localized ideal pressure-driven interchange plasma modes is revisited. Converting the underlying eigenvalue problem into the form of the Schroedinger equation gives a new simple way of deriving the Suydam stability criterion and calculating the growth rates of unstable modes. Near the marginal stability limit the growth rate is exponentially small and the mode has a double-peak structure.

  10. Mosholu Parkway overpass at the Mosholu Parkway interchange, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Mosholu Parkway overpass at the Mosholu Parkway interchange, looking northeast. This is the last bridge on the Henry Hudson Parkway and 0.5 mile from its terminus at the Westchester County line. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  11. 48 CFR 227.676 - Foreign patent interchange agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foreign patent interchange agreements. 227.676 Section 227.676 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Foreign License and Technical Assistance...

  12. 48 CFR 227.676 - Foreign patent interchange agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foreign patent interchange agreements. 227.676 Section 227.676 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Foreign License and Technical Assistance...

  13. 9. View of the Crockett interchange. The 1927 bridge is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of the Crockett interchange. The 1927 bridge is to the left. Entrance and exit ramps for west-bound 1-80 traffic over the 1927 bridge are visible in the center of the image. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  14. The Interchange Instability in High-Latitude Plasma Blobs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-30

    identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB- GROUP Ionospheric structure, Radio scintillation mechanism Interchange instability High latitude ionosphere...become important. We present Fome sImple analytical expressions for the growth rate of The E* B Instability "or the above three cases in Appendix B. It

  15. Electronic Data Interchange: Using Technology to Exchange Transcripts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Florida Automated System for Transferring Educational Records (FASTER) project, which permits the electronic exchange of student transcripts; uses of similar electronic data interchange (EDI) programs in other states; and the national SPEEDE/ExPRESS project, which uses a standard format for transferring electronic transcripts.…

  16. Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) for Libraries and Publishers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santosuosso, Joe

    1992-01-01

    Defines electronic data interchange (EDI) as the exchange of data between computer systems without human intervention or interpretation. Standards are discussed; and the implementation of EDI in libraries and the serials publishing community in the areas of orders and acquisitions, claims, and invoice processing is described. (LRW)

  17. The Implications of a Mixed Media Network for Information Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, John W.

    A mixed media network for information interchange is what we are always likely to have. Amid the current permutations of the storage and distribution media we see the emergence of two trends -- toward the common denominators of electronic display on the TV system and of digital processing and control. The economic implications of a mixed network…

  18. 48 CFR 227.676 - Foreign patent interchange agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... matters. The agreements also may exempt the United States from royalty and other payments. The contracting... interchange agreements between the United States and foreign governments provide for the use of patent rights...) Assistance with patent rights and royalty payments in the United States European Command (USEUCOM) area of...

  19. Knowledge Representation Standards and Interchange Formats for Causal Graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throop, David R.; Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land

    2005-01-01

    In many domains, automated reasoning tools must represent graphs of causally linked events. These include fault-tree analysis, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), planning, procedures, medical reasoning about disease progression, and functional architectures. Each of these fields has its own requirements for the representation of causation, events, actors and conditions. The representations include ontologies of function and cause, data dictionaries for causal dependency, failure and hazard, and interchange formats between some existing tools. In none of the domains has a generally accepted interchange format emerged. The paper makes progress towards interoperability across the wide range of causal analysis methodologies. We survey existing practice and emerging interchange formats in each of these fields. Setting forth a set of terms and concepts that are broadly shared across the domains, we examine the several ways in which current practice represents them. Some phenomena are difficult to represent or to analyze in several domains. These include mode transitions, reachability analysis, positive and negative feedback loops, conditions correlated but not causally linked and bimodal probability distributions. We work through examples and contrast the differing methods for addressing them. We detail recent work in knowledge interchange formats for causal trees in aerospace analysis applications in early design, safety and reliability. Several examples are discussed, with a particular focus on reachability analysis and mode transitions. We generalize the aerospace analysis work across the several other domains. We also recommend features and capabilities for the next generation of causal knowledge representation standards.

  20. Gender and Pupil Performance. Interchange 70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinklin, Teresa; Croxford, Linda; Ducklin, Alan; Frame, Barbara

    This study examined factors that influence the relative academic attainment of males and females and how good performance by both genders can be achieved. The study involved a review of literature and policy documents, statistical analysis of official data, a questionnaire survey of local authorities, and case studies of six secondary schools in…

  1. The Interchangeability of Viscoelastographic Instruments and Reagents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    each manufacturer. METHODS: We tested three sets of reagents as follows: (1) in-tem and ex-tem (Tem International GmbH); (2) kaolin and RapidTEG...parameter. Significant differences between the instruments were found in the > angle and maximum firmness of the clot for ex-tem and kaolin reagents as well... kaolin and RapidTEG (Haemonetics); (3) a well-characterized control recombinant tissue factorYphospholipid reagent. Blood was drawn from six healthy donors

  2. Mapping XML documents into databases: a Data-Driven Framework for bioinformatic data interchange.

    PubMed

    Canfield, K; Sorace, J

    2000-01-01

    The Data-Driven Framework (DDF) described here addresses two major problems for healthcare Electronic Data Interchange, data formats and software development costs. The use of a standard XML Document Type Definition (DTD) allows robust representation in any application area and leverages industry-standard tools and development directions. The DDF allows reduced software development and maintenance costs since all data-entry and database tools are generated from the DTD. The DTD can change and the tools can be regenerated. The case-study below uses the DDF for reporting cell assays to determine the roles of factors influencing cellular gene expression and regulation.

  3. 14 CFR 121.569 - Equipment interchange: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment interchange: Domestic and flag... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.569 Equipment interchange: Domestic and flag operations. (a) Before operating under an interchange agreement,...

  4. 14 CFR 121.569 - Equipment interchange: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment interchange: Domestic and flag... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.569 Equipment interchange: Domestic and flag operations. (a) Before operating under an interchange agreement,...

  5. 32 CFR 644.409 - Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Procedures for Interchange of National Forest... Interests § 644.409 Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands. (a) General. The interchange of national forest lands is accomplished in three steps: first, agreement must be reached between the two...

  6. 32 CFR 644.409 - Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for Interchange of National Forest... Interests § 644.409 Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands. (a) General. The interchange of national forest lands is accomplished in three steps: first, agreement must be reached between the two...

  7. 32 CFR 644.409 - Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Procedures for Interchange of National Forest... Interests § 644.409 Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands. (a) General. The interchange of national forest lands is accomplished in three steps: first, agreement must be reached between the two...

  8. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  9. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  10. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  11. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  12. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  13. Rules and Norms: Requirements for Rule Interchange Languages in the Legal Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Thomas F.; Governatori, Guido; Rotolo, Antonino

    In this survey paper we summarize the requirements for rule interchange languages for applications in the legal domain and use these requirements to evaluate RuleML, SBVR, SWRL and RIF. We also present the Legal Knowledge Interchange Format (LKIF), a new rule interchange format developed specifically for applications in the legal domain.

  14. XAFS Data Interchange: A single spectrum XAFS data file format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravel, B.; Newville, M.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a standard data format for the interchange of XAFS data. The XAFS Data Interchange (XDI) standard is meant to encapsulate a single spectrum of XAFS along with relevant metadata. XDI is a text-based format with a simple syntax which clearly delineates metadata from the data table in a way that is easily interpreted both by a computer and by a human. The metadata header is inspired by the format of an electronic mail header, representing metadata names and values as an associative array. The data table is represented as columns of numbers. This format can be imported as is into most existing XAFS data analysis, spreadsheet, or data visualization programs. Along with a specification and a dictionary of metadata types, we provide an application-programming interface written in C and bindings for programming dynamic languages.

  15. XAFS Data Interchange: A single spectrum XAFS data file format.

    PubMed

    Ravel, B; Newville, M

    We propose a standard data format for the interchange of XAFS data. The XAFS Data Interchange (XDI) standard is meant to encapsulate a single spectrum of XAFS along with relevant metadata. XDI is a text-based format with a simple syntax which clearly delineates metadata from the data table in a way that is easily interpreted both by a computer and by a human. The metadata header is inspired by the format of an electronic mail header, representing metadata names and values as an associative array. The data table is represented as columns of numbers. This format can be imported as is into most existing XAFS data analysis, spreadsheet, or data visualization programs. Along with a specification and a dictionary of metadata types, we provide an application-programming interface written in C and bindings for programming dynamic languages.

  16. Edge transport bifurcation in plasma resistive interchange turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, C. K.; Meng, C.; Zhou, A.; Liu, D.

    2017-05-01

    Transport bifurcation and mean E × B shear flow generation in resistive interchange turbulence are explored with self-consistent fluid simulations in a flux-driven system with both closed and open field line regions. The nonlinear evolution of resistive interchange modes shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high mean E × B shear flows. By increasing the heat flux above a threshold, large-amplitude fluctuations are induced in the plasma edge region and a transition to the state of reduced turbulent transport occurs as the Reynolds power exceeds the fluctuation energy input rate for a sufficient time period. The flux-gradient relationship shows a sharp bifurcation in the plasma edge transport.

  17. Therapeutic Interchange of Clevidipine For Sodium Nitroprusside in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Joseph E.; Thomas, Zachariah; Lee, David; Moskowitz, David M.; Nemeth, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background: Generic price inflation has resulted in rising acquisition costs for sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an agent historically described as the drug of choice for the treatment of perioperative hypertension in cardiac surgery. Purpose: To describe the implementation and cost avoidance achieved by utilizing clevidipine as an alternative to SNP in cardiac surgery patients at a 520-bed community teaching hospital that performs more than 300 cardiac surgeries each year. Methods: A multidisciplinary team inclusive of anesthesiologists, intensivists, pharmacists, and surgeons collaborated to develop a therapeutic interchange for SNP in cardiac surgery patients. Consistent with current guidelines for therapeutic interchange, the goal was to encourage a less expensive alternative that was demonstrated to be at least therapeutically equivalent to SNP based on data derived from clinical trials published in peer-reviewed literature. A comprehensive literature review identified clevidipine as an alternative to SNP for perioperative hypertension in cardiac surgery. Nicardipine was considered as well, but was not chosen as a substitute due to lack of strong evidence and comparative data with SNP. Results: Clevidipine was implemented successfully in our cardiac surgery patients and will result in a net cost avoidance of approximately $300,000 in 2016. This is thought to be driven largely by the difference in acquisition cost between clevidipine and SNP. The operating room in our institution no longer keeps SNP stocked in anesthesia trays as a result of the success of our interchange. No requests have been made to return to the SNP standard. Conclusion: Through effective communication and multidisciplinary collaboration, our institution was able to develop an evidence-based and effective therapeutic interchange program for SNP. PMID:27757002

  18. Residual turbulence from velocity shear stabilized interchange instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C. P.; Hassam, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The stabilizing effect of velocity shear on the macroscopic, broad bandwidth, ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes. A 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is employed to simulate the system. For a given flow shear, V Prime , linear growth rates are shown to be suppressed to below the shear-free level at both the small and large wavelengths. With increasing V Prime , the unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to relatively high wavenumbers, on the scale of the density gradient. In the nonlinear turbulent steady state, a similar turbulent spectrum obtains, and the convection cells are roughly circular. In addition, the density fluctuation level and the degree of flattening of the initial inverted density profile are found to decrease as V Prime increases; in fact, unstable modes are almost completely stabilized and the density profile reverts to laminar when V Prime is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. Moreover, the turbulent particle flux diminishes with increasing velocity shear such that all the flux is carried by the classical diffusive flux in the asymptotic limit. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, MCX, which investigated interchange modes in the presence of velocity shear. The experimental spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with the numerical data obtained in higher viscosity simulations for which the level of viscosity is chosen consistent with MCX Reynolds numbers at the edge. In particular, the residual turbulence in both cases is dominated by elongated convection cells. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Complete stability to interchanges is obtained only in the parameter space wherein the generalized Rayleigh inflexion theorem is satisfied.

  19. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Technical Interchange Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Technical Interchange Meeting, February 4-5, 1997, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, Texas. Abstracts are arranged in order of presentation at the meetings, with corresponding page numbers shown in the enclosed agenda. Logistics, administration, and publication support for this meeting were provided by the staff of the Publications and Program Services Department at the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  20. Theory of semicollisional drift-interchange modes in cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    Resistive interchange instabilities in cylindrical plasmas are studied, including the effects of electron diamagnetic drift, perpendicular resistivity, and plasma compression. The analyses are pertinent to the semicollisional regime where the effective ion gyro-radius is larger than the resistive layer width. Both analytical and numerical results show that the modes can be completely stabilized by the perpendicular plasma transport. Ion sound effects, meanwhile, are found to be negligible in the semicollisional regime.

  1. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU II) Technical Interchange Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, David (Compiler); Saunders, Stephen R. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains extended abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU II) Technical Interchange Meeting, November 18-19, 1997, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, Texas. Included are topics which include: Extraterrestrial resources, in situ propellant production, sampling of planetary surfaces, oxygen production, water vapor extraction from the Martian atmosphere, gas generation, cryogenic refrigeration, and propellant transport and storage.

  2. XML-Based SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Tikidjian, Raffi

    2008-01-01

    The SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language software has been designed to more efficiently send new knowledge bases to spacecraft that have been embedded with the Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE) tool. The intention of the behavioral model is to capture most of the information generally associated with a spacecraft functional model, while specifically addressing the needs of execution within SHINE and Livingstone. As such, it has some constructs that are based on one or the other.

  3. Third SEI Technical Interchange: Proceedings. [Space Exploration Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Given here are the proceedings of the 3rd Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) Technical Interchange. Topics covered include the First Lunar Outpost (FLO), the Lunar Resource Mapper, lunar rovers, lunar habitat concepts, lunar shelter construction analysis, thermoelectric nuclear power systems for SEI, cryogenic storage, a space network for lunar communications, the moon as a solar power satellite, and off-the-shelf avionics for future SEI missions.

  4. Induction of segmental interchanges in pearl millet (Pennisetum typhides).

    PubMed

    Lal, J; Srinivasachar, D

    1979-01-01

    Dry seeds of two varieties of Pennisetum typhoides (2n=14), 'Tift 23-B' and 'Bil-3B', were treated with gamma rays, diethyl sulphate (DES) and ethylene imine (EI) at their approximate LD50 dosages and the pollen mother cells of the M1 (first generation immediately after the seed treatment) plants were analysed at diakinesis for multivalent configurations resulting from segmental interchanges. While quadrivalents and trivalents were commonly found in all the mutagenic treatments, hexavalents were seen in the gamma-ray treatment only. Ring quadrivalents were common in all the treatments and their frequency was higher in gamma-ray treatment than in the treatments with the chemical mutagens of which EI produced more quadrivalents than DES. The variety 'BIL3B' was more responsive to all the mutagens used than 'Tift-23B' in which, excepting in gamma-ray treatment, no multivalents were observed in EI and DES treatments.The quadrivalents induced by different mutagens were of different types involving different chromosomes, indicating some kind of specificity of the mutagens in causing chromosome breaks. Thus, in EI-induced quadrivalents the nucleolar chromosome, the shortest chromosome of the complement, was involved, whereas in the case of DES and gamma rays it was the longest chromosome of the complement that was involved in the quadrivalent. Apparently the breaks must have been produced in different chromosomes preferentially.Self-pollinated seeds of two heterozygotes whose interchanges were induced by EI and gamma rays were given a second cycle treatment with gamma rays, again at the LD50 dosage (35 kR), and interchange stocks involving different chromosomes, up to a maximum of eight chromosomes were realized. Alternate use of EI and gamma rays offered better possibilities of obtaining inter-change heterozygotes involving more, if not all, chromosomes in a ring than two successive treatments with gamma rays alone.

  5. NN interaction from bag-model quark interchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Bozoian, M.; Maslow, J.N.; Weber, H.J.

    1982-03-01

    A partial-wave helicity-state analysis of elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering is carried out in momentum space. Its basis is a one- and two-boson exchange amplitude from a bag-model quark interchange mechanism. The resulting phase shifts and bound-state parameters of the deuteron are compared with other meson theoretic potentials and data up to laboratory energies of approx.350 MeV.

  6. Trading Places: Can Interchange Energy Solve the Torus Energy Crisis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramer, K. M.; Kivelson, M.; Khurana, K. K.

    2016-12-01

    The plasma temperature in the plasma tori around both Jupiter and Saturn increases with distance in the middle magnetosphere, rather than cooling adiabatically as the flux tube volume increases. The energy source that leads to heating is not understood. In situ observations show that the temperature increase with distance cannot be accounted for by ion pickup alone. In this work we hypothesize that injection events carrying energetic ions inward introduce sufficient energy to heat the thermal plasma as observed. Injection events at Jupiter and Saturn appear to be of two types: one in which newly reconnected flux tubes are flung planetward at high radial speeds from far downtail, and a more localized form in which flux tubes loaded with low-density, high-energy plasma "bubble" planetward due to a radially imbalanced mass distribution in the rapidly rotating system. We first show that some injection events observed at Saturn inside of 10 Saturn radii are of the latter type by using the radial variation of energetic ion flux to identify a relatively local source of a subset of injected flux tubes. We identify such injections as interchange events. We show that a typical inbound interchanging flux tube contains more energy than is present in an equivalent outgoing warm flux tube beyond 6.5 RJ at Jupiter and 8 RS at Saturn. In order to understand how much interchange events can plausibly contribute to heating the plasma, we assume the size of an inbound flux tube to be 1000 km in diameter [Thorne et al., 1997] and use the injection rate found by Lai et al. [2016] to calculate the energy input to the region between 8 and 10 RS by interchange. Initial results find that the energy is orders of magnitude lower than required to explain the heating. Flux tubes come in a variety of shapes and sizes and we will consider whether contributions from a spectrum of flux tube sizes can account for the observed temperatures.

  7. Towards a European food composition data interchange platform.

    PubMed

    Bell, Simone; Pakkala, Heikki; Finglas, Michael Paul

    2012-06-01

    Food composition data (FCD) comprises the description and identification of foods, as well as their nutrient content, other constituents, and food properties. FCD are required for a range of purposes including food labeling, supporting health claims, nutritional and clinical management, consumer information, and research. There have been differences within and beyond Europe in the way FCD are expressed with respect to food description, definition of nutrients and other food properties, and the methods used to generate data. One of the major goals of the EuroFIR NoE project (2005 - 10) was to provide tools to overcome existing differences among member states and parties with respect to documentation and interchange of FCD. The establishment of the CEN’s (European Committee for Standardisation) TC 387 project committee on Food Composition Data, led by the Swedish Standards Institute, and the preparation of the draft Food Data Standard, has addressed these deficiencies by enabling unambiguous identification and description of FCD and their quality, for dissemination and data interchange. Another major achievement of the EuroFIR NoE project was the development and dissemination of a single, authoritative source of FCD in Europe enabling the interchange and update of data between countries, and also giving access to users of FCD.

  8. Genic heterozygosity, chromosomal interchanges and fitness in rye: any relationship?

    PubMed

    Figueiras, Ana M; González-Jaén, M Teresa; Candela, Milagros; Benito, César

    2006-01-01

    Relationship between heterozygosity at allozyme loci, chromosomal interchanges and fitness was analyzed in a rye cultivar showing a polymorphism for such rearrangements. Nine allozyme systems (ACO, ACPH, GOT, GPI, LAP, MDH, PER, PGD and PGM) and five components of fitness (number of fertile tillers, total offspring, egg cell fertility, flowers/ear and seeds/ear) were studied. The estimated selection coefficients against interchange heterozygotes ranged from s = 0.12 to s = 0.34. A significant effect of the genic heterozygosity on some fitness components was observed in interchange heterozygotes (tillering and total offspring), in their standard homozygous sibs (flowers/ear and seeds/ear) and in the descendants of the crosses between standard karyotypes (flowers/ear, seeds/ear and egg cell fertility). However, the main effect was linked to genetic background associated to different crosses. Significant differences for Acph-1, Gpi-1, Lap-1, Mdh-1, Mdh-4, Pgd-2 and Pgm-1 loci were also found in some of these crosses although these differences were inconsistent. This suggests that probably the allozyme loci analyzed were not directly contributing to the fitness and that they are linked, in some cases, to different deleterious alleles depending on both cross and locus. This fact could support the local effect hypothesis as explanation although we do not discard the existence of some inbreeding level (general effect hypothesis) since all crosses and loci studied show a overall consistent trend of increased fitness with increased heterozygosity.

  9. Dynamic Instability Leading to Increased Interchange Reconnection Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-12-01

    Interchange reconnection is widely believed to play an important role in coronal magnetic field dynamics. In this investigation we investigate the 3D dynamics of interchange reconnection by extending the concept of a magnetic null-point to a null-volume, the so-called "acute-cusp field" configuration. The acute-cusp field geometry is characterized by high-beta plasma confined with favorable curvature, surrounded by a low-beta environment. First, we construct an initial translationally-symmetric potential field configuration. This configuration contains the required topological characteristics of four separate flux systems in the perpendicular plane. We then drive the system by a slow, incompressible, uniform flow at the boundary. The resulting evolution is calculated by solving numerically the MHD equations in full 3D Cartesian coordinates using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. Field shearing along the topological boundaries changes the shape of the acute-cusp field surface separating the high and low plasma beta regions. An extended, 2D current sheet is generated by the photospheric driving. We discuss the effect of 3D perturbations on the current sheet dynamics and on the rate of the resulting interchange reconnection. Finally, we discuss the implications of our simulations for coronal observations. This work has been supported, in part, by the NASA HTP and SR&T programs.

  10. A format for the interchange of scheduling models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John P.; Davis, Elizabeth K.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years a variety of space-activity schedulers have been developed within the aerospace community. Space-activity schedulers are characterized by their need to handle large numbers of activities which are time-window constrained and make high demands on many scarce resources, but are minimally constrained by predecessor/successor requirements or critical paths. Two needs to exchange data between these schedulers have materialized. First, there is significant interest in comparing and evaluating the different scheduling engines to ensure that the best technology is applied to each scheduling endeavor. Second, there is a developing requirement to divide a single scheduling task among different sites, each using a different scheduler. In fact, the scheduling task for International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) will be distributed among NASA centers and among the international partners. The format used to interchange scheduling data for ISSA will likely use a growth version of the format discussed in this paper. The model interchange format (or MIF, pronounced as one syllable) discussed in this paper is a robust solution to the need to interchange scheduling requirements for space activities. It is highly extensible, human-readable, and can be generated or edited with common text editors. It also serves well the need to support a 'benchmark' data case which can be delivered on any computer platform.

  11. In Trauma, Conventional ROTEM and TEG Results Are Not Interchangeable But Are Similar in Clinical Applicability.

    PubMed

    Rizoli, Sandro; Min, Arimie; Sanchez, Adic Perez; Shek, Pang; Grodecki, Richard; Veigas, Precilla; Peng, Henry T

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in viscoelastic hemostatic assays rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and thromboelastography (TEG) for trauma. Despite shared features, it is unknown whether their results are interchangeable and whether one is clinically superior in predicting mortality, blood transfusion, and diagnosing early trauma coagulopathy. We conducted a prospective observational study comparing equivalent ROTEM and TEG parameters. Severely injured patients expected to receive massive transfusion were included. Assays were performed simultaneously on admission and repeated over subsequent 12 hours. International normalized ratio ≥1.2 or fibrinogen <1 g/L defined coagulopathy. TEG used kaolin as coagulation initiator and ROTEM used tissue factor (conventional). Spearman nonparametric analysis and Bland-Altman difference mean plot revealed parameter association. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curves measured predictive values. 33 patients (74 ROTEM, 74 TEG) were included; 79% were male, mean Injury Severity Score was 23.5 ± 14, admission international normalized ratio was 1.33 ± 0.4, and 63.4% received blood transfusions. Overall, parameter agreement fell outside acceptable limits, with weak or no association. Clinically, ROTEM maximum clot firmness and TEG maximum amplitude showed reasonable predictive accuracy for mortality, strong accuracy for any or massive blood transfusion, reasonable for plasma transfusion and similar poor predictive accuracy for diagnosing coagulopathy. ROTEM and TEG results are not interchangeable, arguably due to different coagulation triggers. Assays had similar clinical performance. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Reconnection and interchange instability in the near magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Hesse, Michael

    2015-07-16

    This paper provides insights into the possible coupling between reconnection and interchange/ballooning in the magnetotail related to substorms and flow bursts. The results presented are largely based on recent simulations of magnetotail dynamics, exploring onset and progression of reconnection. 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with different tail deformation demonstrate a clear boundary between stable and unstable cases depending on the amount of deformation, explored up to the real proton/electron mass ratio. The evolution prior to onset, as well as the evolution of stable cases, are governed by the conservation of integral flux tube entropy S as imposed in ideal MHD, maintaining a monotonic increase with distance downtail. This suggests that ballooning instability in the tail should not be expected prior to the onset of tearing and reconnection. 3-D MHD simulations confirm this conclusion, showing no indication of ballooning prior to reconnection, if the initial state is ballooning stable. The simulation also shows that, after imposing resistivity necessary to initiate reconnection, the reconnection rate and energy release initially remain slow. However, when S becomes reduced from plasmoid ejection and lobe reconnection, forming a negative slope in S as a function of distance from Earth, the reconnection rate and energy release increase drastically. The latter condition has been shown to be necessary for ballooning/interchange instability, and the cross-tail structures that develop subsequently in the MHD simulation are consistent with such modes. The simulations support a concept in which tail activity is initiated by tearing instability but significantly enhanced by the interaction with ballooning/interchange enabled by plasmoid loss and lobe reconnection.

  13. Reconnection and interchange instability in the near magnetotail

    DOE PAGES

    Birn, Joachim; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; ...

    2015-07-16

    This paper provides insights into the possible coupling between reconnection and interchange/ballooning in the magnetotail related to substorms and flow bursts. The results presented are largely based on recent simulations of magnetotail dynamics, exploring onset and progression of reconnection. 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with different tail deformation demonstrate a clear boundary between stable and unstable cases depending on the amount of deformation, explored up to the real proton/electron mass ratio. The evolution prior to onset, as well as the evolution of stable cases, are governed by the conservation of integral flux tube entropy S as imposed in ideal MHD, maintainingmore » a monotonic increase with distance downtail. This suggests that ballooning instability in the tail should not be expected prior to the onset of tearing and reconnection. 3-D MHD simulations confirm this conclusion, showing no indication of ballooning prior to reconnection, if the initial state is ballooning stable. The simulation also shows that, after imposing resistivity necessary to initiate reconnection, the reconnection rate and energy release initially remain slow. However, when S becomes reduced from plasmoid ejection and lobe reconnection, forming a negative slope in S as a function of distance from Earth, the reconnection rate and energy release increase drastically. The latter condition has been shown to be necessary for ballooning/interchange instability, and the cross-tail structures that develop subsequently in the MHD simulation are consistent with such modes. The simulations support a concept in which tail activity is initiated by tearing instability but significantly enhanced by the interaction with ballooning/interchange enabled by plasmoid loss and lobe reconnection.« less

  14. Effects of radial motion on interchange injections at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kennelly, T.; Khurana, K.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle injections are regularly observed in Saturn's inner magnetosphere by Cassini. They are attributed to an ongoing process of flux-tube interchange driven by the strong centrifugal force associated with Saturn's rapid rotation. Numerical simulations suggest that these interchange injections can be associated with inward flow channels, in which plasma confined to a narrow range of longitudes moves radially toward the planet, gaining energy, while ambient plasma in the adjacent regions moves more slowly outward. Most previous analyses of these events have neglected this radial motion and inferred properties of the events under the assumption that they appear instantaneously at the spacecraft's L-shell and thereafter drift azimuthally. This paper describes features of injections that can be related to their radial motion prior to observation. We use a combination of phase space density profiles and an updated version of a test-particle model to quantify properties of the injection. We are able to infer the longitudinal width of the injection, the radial travel time from its point of origin, and the starting L shell of the injection. We can also predict which energies can remain inside the channel during the radial transport. To highlight the effects of radial propagation at a finite speed, we focus on those interchange injections without extensive features of azimuthal dispersion. Injections that have traveled radially for one or more hours prior to observation would have been initiated at a different local time than that of the observation. Finally, we describe an injection where particles have drifted azimuthally into a flow channel prior to observation by Cassini.

  15. Standard Simulator Data Base (SSDB) Interchange Format (SIF) Design Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-17

    Technology NITP National Imagery Transmission Format PDR Preliminary Design Review RGB Red-Green- Blue SDBF Simulator Data Bane Facility SIr SSDB Interchange...File. The SIF/BDI implementation of the NITF standard shall store the actual band value(s) at each texel position (e.g., the red, green, and blue ...Encodina. A single SMC/FDC code shall require six bytes of storage, in one band of data. The high-order byte whall represent the SMC value in simple binary

  16. Directory interchange format manual, version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Directory Interchange Format (DIF) is a data structure used to exchange directory level information about data sets among information systems. The format consists of a number of fields that describe the attributes of a directory entry and text blocks that contain a descriptive summary of and references for the directory entry. All fields and the summary are preceded by labels identifying their contents. All values are ASCII character strings. The structure is intended to be flexible, allowing for future changes in the contents of directory entries.

  17. Interchange instability in finite conductivity accelerated plasma arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourouis, M.; Huerta, M. A.; Rodriguez-Trelles, F.

    1993-01-01

    A first order perturbation expansion of the MHD equations is used to study the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability in accelerated plasma arcs. The mode equation is fourth-order, due to the inclusion of finite conductivity. It is solved numerically to yield results that are an improvement over previous work. The growth rates are less than in the infinite conductivity model. As in previous work the growth rates in typical rail launcher situations are large enough to permit full development of the instability.

  18. System comprising interchangeable electronic controllers and corresponding methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Glen F. (Inventor); Salazar, George A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system comprising an interchangeable electronic controller is provided with programming that allows the controller to adapt a behavior that is dependent upon the particular type of function performed by a system or subsystem component. The system reconfigures the controller when the controller is moved from one group of subsystem components to another. A plurality of application programs are provided by a server from which the application program for a particular electronic controller is selected. The selection is based on criteria such as a subsystem component group identifier that identifies the particular type of function associated with the system or subsystem group of components.

  19. EDI (electronic data interchange) provides strategy for laboratory results reporting.

    PubMed

    McLure, M; Barnett, P

    1994-01-01

    Historically, results of laboratory tests have been transmitted from hospitals to physicians' offices by mail and telephone. Two problems inherent in this system are the difficulty in notifying the physician and in the timeliness of delivery of results. Telephone messages may fail to reach the physician. Hard copies of reports may be misfiled, lost, or delayed in the mail. Today, test results can be transmitted between physicians' offices and hospitals via facsimile machines and electronic data interchange (EDI). This article examines the cost effectiveness, confidentiality, and opportunity for growth these alternative methods of transmission offer.

  20. Assessing Interchangeability at Cluster-Levels with Multiple-Informant Data

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhehui; Breslau, Joshua; Gardiner, Joseph C.; Chen, Qiaoling; Breslau, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Studies examining the relationship between neighborhood social disorder and health often rely on multiple informants. Such studies assume interchangeability of the latent constructs derived from multiple-informant data. Existing methods examining this assumption do not clearly delineate the uncertainty at individual levels from that at neighborhood levels. We propose a multi-level variance component factor model that allows this delineation. Data come from a survey of a representative sample of children born between 1983 and 1985 in the inner city of Detroit and nearby middle-class suburbs. Results indicate that the informant-level models tend to exaggerate the effect of places due to differences between persons. Our evaluations of different methodologies lead to the recommendation of the multi-level variance component factor model whenever multiple-informant reports can be aggregated at a neighborhood level. PMID:24038232

  1. FUEL INTERCHANGEABILITY FOR LEAN PREMIXED COMBUSTION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Don Ferguson; Geo. A. Richard; Doug Straub

    2008-06-13

    In response to environmental concerns of NOx emissions, gas turbine manufacturers have developed engines that operate under lean, pre-mixed fuel and air conditions. While this has proven to reduce NOx emissions by lowering peak flame temperatures, it is not without its limitations as engines utilizing this technology are more susceptible to combustion dynamics. Although dependent on a number of mechanisms, changes in fuel composition can alter the dynamic response of a given combustion system. This is of particular interest as increases in demand of domestic natural gas have fueled efforts to utilize alternatives such as coal derived syngas, imported liquefied natural gas and hydrogen or hydrogen augmented fuels. However, prior to changing the fuel supply end-users need to understand how their system will respond. A variety of historical parameters have been utilized to determine fuel interchangeability such as Wobbe and Weaver Indices, however these parameters were never optimized for today’s engines operating under lean pre-mixed combustion. This paper provides a discussion of currently available parameters to describe fuel interchangeability. Through the analysis of the dynamic response of a lab-scale Rijke tube combustor operating on various fuel blends, it is shown that commonly used indices are inadequate for describing combustion specific phenomena.

  2. Deep water X-mas tree standardization -- Interchangeability approach

    SciTech Connect

    Paula, M.T.R.; Paulo, C.A.S.; Moreira, C.C.

    1995-12-31

    Aiming the rationalization of subsea operations to turn the production of oil and gas more economical and reliable, standardization of subsea equipment interfaces is a tool that can play a very important role. Continuing the program initiated some years ago, Petrobras is now harvesting the results from the first efforts. Diverless guidelineless subsea Christmas trees from four different suppliers have already been manufactured in accordance to the standardized specification. Tests performed this year in Macae (Campos Basin onshore base), in Brazil, confirmed the interchangeability among subsea Christmas trees, tubing hangers, adapter bases and flowline hubs of different manufacturers. This interchangeability, associated with the use of proven techniques, results in operational flexibility, savings in rig time and reduction in production losses during workovers. By now, 33 complete sets of subsea Christmas trees have already been delivered and successfully tested. Other 28 sets are still being manufactured by the four local suppliers. For the next five years, more than a hundred of these trees will be required for the exploration of the new discoveries. This paper describes the standardized equipment, the role of the operator in an integrated way of working with the manufacturers on the standardization activities, the importance of a frank information flow through the involved companies and how a simple manufacturing philosophy, with the use of construction jigs, has proved to work satisfactorily.

  3. Directory interchange format manual, version 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Directory Interchange Format (DIF) is a data structure used to exchange directory-level information about data sets among information systems. In general the format consists of a number of fields that describe the attributes of a directory entry and text blocks that contain a descriptive summary of and references for the directory entry. All fields and the summary are preceded by labels identifying their contents. All values are ASCII character strings. The structure is intended to be flexible, allowing for future changes in the contents of directory entries. The manual is structured as follows: section 1 is a general description of what constitutes a directory entry; section 2 describes the content of the individual fields within the data structure, together with some examples. Also included in the six appendices is a description of the syntax used within the examples; samples of the directory interchange format applied to different data sets; the allowable discipline keywords; a current list of valid location keywords; a list of allowable parameter keywords; a list of acronyns and a glossary of terms used; and a description of the Standard Formatted Data Unit header, which may be added to the front of a DIF file to identify the file as a registered standard format.

  4. Signatures of interchange reconnection: STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations combined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Rouillard, A. P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Démoulin, P.; Harra, L. K.; Lavraud, B.; Davies, J. A.; Opitz, A.; Luhmann, J. G.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Galvin, A. B.

    2009-10-01

    Combining STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations has presented an opportunity to follow a filament eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME) on 17 October 2007 from an active region (AR) inside a coronal hole (CH) into the heliosphere. This particular combination of "open" and closed magnetic topologies provides an ideal scenario for interchange reconnection to take place. With Hinode and STEREO data we were able to identify the emergence time and type of structure seen in the in-situ data four days later. On the 21st, ACE observed in-situ the passage of an ICME with "open" magnetic topology. The magnetic field configuration of the source, a mature AR located inside an equatorial CH, has important implications for the solar and interplanetary signatures of the eruption. We interpret the formation of an "anemone" structure of the erupting AR and the passage in-situ of the ICME being disconnected at one leg, as manifested by uni-directional suprathermal electron flux in the ICME, to be a direct result of interchange reconnection between closed loops of the CME originating from the AR and "open" field lines of the surrounding CH.

  5. 2014 Trans-Atlantic Research and Development Interchange ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Trans-Atlantic Research and Development Interchange on Sustainability (TARDIS) has been bringing together a select group of scientists and engineers for in-depth discussions on sustainability on a bi-annual basis since 2004. TARDIS 2014 included twenty eight individuals from across the globe discussing issues related to progress towards sustainability. The discussion included policies, technologies, societal structure and norms, business practices and culture, and time-frames. As discussed later, the focus was on four questions: (1) what progress has been accomplished in sustainability? (2) why has there not been more progress in moving societies towards sustainability? (3) what are the road-blocks to progress towards sustainability? (4) what are the policies, technologies, and other changes that are needed to make further progress towards sustainability? One salient conclusion from TARDIS 2014 is that while sustainability has entered mainstream thinking, significant social, economic, technological, and business barriers remain to further progress towards a sustainable path as discussed throughout this report. The Trans-Atlantic Research and Development Interchange on Sustainability is a bi-annual workshop alternatively held in the United States and Austria. The purpose is to bring the best thinkers from across the globe to discuss, explore, and clarify major issues related to sustainability. A report summarizing teh finding and discussions is prepared and d

  6. Uncertainty-based Estimation of the Secure Range for ISO New England Dynamic Interchange Adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Wu, Di; Hou, Zhangshuan; Sun, Yannan; Maslennikov, S.; Luo, Xiaochuan; Zheng, T.; George, S.; Knowland, T.; Litvinov, E.; Weaver, S.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-04-14

    The paper proposes an approach to estimate the secure range for dynamic interchange adjustment, which assists system operators in scheduling the interchange with neighboring control areas. Uncertainties associated with various sources are incorporated. The proposed method is implemented in the dynamic interchange adjustment (DINA) tool developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for ISO New England. Simulation results are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Interchange and Infernal Fishbone Modes in Plasmas with Tangentially Injected Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko; Ya.I.; Marchenko; V.S.; White; R.B.

    2006-01-01

    New energetic particle mode instabilities of fishbone type are predicted. The considered instabilities are driven by the circulating energetic ions. They can arise in plasmas of tokamaks and spherical tori with weak magnetic shear in the wide core region and strong shear at the periphery, provided that the central safety factor is close to the ratio m/n, where m and n are the poloidal mode number and toroidal mode number, respectively. The instability with m = n = 1 has interchange-like spatial structure, whereas the structure of instabilities with m/n > 1 is similar to that of the infernal MHD mode (except for the region in vicinity of the local Alfvén resonance).

  8. Interchange and infernal fishbone modes in plasmas with tangentially injected beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Marchenko, V.S.; White, R.B.

    2006-05-15

    New energetic particle mode instabilities of fishbone type are predicted. The considered instabilities are driven by circulating energetic ions. They can arise in plasmas of tokamaks and spherical tori with weak magnetic shear in the wide core region and strong shear at the periphery, provided that the central safety factor is close to the ratio m/n, where m and n are the poloidal mode number and toroidal mode number, respectively. The instability with m=n=1 has a mainly interchange-like radial structure, whereas the radial structure of instabilities with m/n>1 is mainly similar to that of the infernal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) mode; the differences between the fishbone mode structures and MHD mode structures are considerable only in the vicinity of the local Alfven resonance.

  9. HST Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC) Static Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, William V.

    2008-01-01

    The HST Super Light Weight Interchangeable Carrier Static Test program calls for a total of 15 load cases with an average of 9 simultaneous push/pull locations per load case. This testing program represents the most complex static test ever attempted at Goddard Space Flight Center. Many unique multi-pull fixtures were designed to apply the simultaneous loading. Additionally, a total of 600 channels of data required processing for each loadcase. A total of 1100 separate strain gages were installed on SLIC. A team of 15 trained technicians were needed to apply test loads via mechanical hand pumps for several load cases. All 15 load cases were successfully conducted within 15 weeks. The ManTech team successfully tested all SLIC 1200 interface clips to the required testing loads. Several unique designs were needed to address testing challenges as loadline interference, Payload Safety, payload flexibility and opposing load applications.

  10. Transport scaling in interchange-driven toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Paolo; Rogers, B. N.

    2009-06-15

    Two-dimensional fluid simulations of a simple magnetized torus are presented, in which the vertical and toroidal components of the magnetic field create helicoidal field lines that terminate on the upper and lower walls of the plasma chamber. The simulations self-consistently evolve the full radial profiles of the electric potential, density, and electron temperature in the presence of three competing effects: the cross-field turbulent transport driven by the interchange instability, parallel losses to the upper and lower walls, and the input of particles and heat by external plasma sources. Considering parameter regimes in which equilibrium ExB shear flow effects are weak, we study the dependence of the plasma profiles--in particular the pressure profile scale length--on the parameters of the system. Analytical scalings are obtained that show remarkable agreement with the simulations.

  11. Interchangeable end effector tools utilized on the protoflight manipulator arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A subset of teleoperator and effector tools was designed, fabricated, delivered and successfully demonstrated on the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) protoflight manipulator arm (PFMA). The tools delivered included a rotary power tool with interchangeable collets and two fluid coupling mate/demate tools; one for a Fairchild coupling and the other for a Purolator coupling. An electrical interface connector was also provided for the rotary power tool. A tool set, from which the subset was selected, for performing on-orbit satellite maintenance was identified and conceptionally designed. Maintenance requirements were synthesized, evaluated and prioritized to develop design requirements for a set of end effector tools representative of those needed to provide on-orbit maintenance of satellites to be flown in the 1986 to 2000 timeframe.

  12. EDI (electronic data interchange): the best in business partner cooperation.

    PubMed

    Pirelli, T

    1989-10-01

    This is the first of a three-part series on electronic data interchange (EDI) applications in the materials management and accounts payable departments, especially as they relate to transactions with outside vendors. Part Two will cover EDI applications within a hospital, from one computer system to another. The article will illustrate how the new HL7 standards will make "seamless" interfaces an economic reality for the first time. Part Three will focus on the paperwork reduction aspects of EDI, and the resultant cost savings. Through the use of permanent CD-ROM storage, the day will come when a hospital's business transactions (purchase orders, invoices, checks) as well as medical records, will never be generated on paper.

  13. SCHIP: Statistics for Chromosome Interphase Positioning Based on Interchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vives, Sergi; Loucas, Bradford; Vazquez, Mariel; Brenner, David J.; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Cornforth, Michael; Arsuaga, Javier

    2005-01-01

    he position of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus is believed to be associated with a number of biological processes. Here, we present a web-based application that helps analyze the relative position of chromosomes during interphase in human cells, based on observed radiogenic chromosome aberrations. The inputs of the program are a table of yields of pairwise chromosome interchanges and a proposed chromosome geometric cluster. Each can either be uploaded or selected from provided datasets. The main outputs are P-values for the proposed chromosome clusters. SCHIP is designed to be used by a number of scientific communities interested in nuclear architecture, including cancer and cell biologists, radiation biologists and mathematical/computational biologists.

  14. Interchange of electronic design through VHDL and EIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    The need for both robust and unambiguous electronic designs is a direct requirement of the astonishing growth in design and manufacturing capability during recent years. In order to manage the plethora of designs, and have the design data both interchangeable and interoperable, the Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) program is developing two major standards for the electronic design community. The VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is designed to be the lingua franca for transmission of design data between designers and their environments. The Engineering Information System (EIS) is designed to ease the integration of data betweeen diverse design automation systems. This paper describes the rationale for the necessity for these two standards and how they provide a synergistic expressive capability across the macrocosm of design environments.

  15. Interchange of electronic design through VHDL and EIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Richard M.

    1987-10-01

    The need for both robust and unambiguous electronic designs is a direct requirement of the astonishing growth in design and manufacturing capability during recent years. In order to manage the plethora of designs, and have the design data both interchangeable and interoperable, the Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) program is developing two major standards for the electronic design community. The VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is designed to be the lingua franca for transmission of design data between designers and their environments. The Engineering Information System (EIS) is designed to ease the integration of data betweeen diverse design automation systems. This paper describes the rationale for the necessity for these two standards and how they provide a synergistic expressive capability across the macrocosm of design environments.

  16. SCHIP: Statistics for Chromosome Interphase Positioning Based on Interchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vives, Sergi; Loucas, Bradford; Vazquez, Mariel; Brenner, David J.; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Cornforth, Michael; Arsuaga, Javier

    2005-01-01

    he position of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus is believed to be associated with a number of biological processes. Here, we present a web-based application that helps analyze the relative position of chromosomes during interphase in human cells, based on observed radiogenic chromosome aberrations. The inputs of the program are a table of yields of pairwise chromosome interchanges and a proposed chromosome geometric cluster. Each can either be uploaded or selected from provided datasets. The main outputs are P-values for the proposed chromosome clusters. SCHIP is designed to be used by a number of scientific communities interested in nuclear architecture, including cancer and cell biologists, radiation biologists and mathematical/computational biologists.

  17. An Ensemble Approach for Forecasting Net Interchange Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Vlachopoulou, Maria; Gosink, Luke J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Ferryman, Thomas A.; Zhou, Ning; Tong, Jianzhong

    2013-09-01

    The net interchange schedule (NIS) is the sum of the transactions (MW) between an ISO/RTO and its neighbors. Effective forecasting of the submitted NIS can improve grid operation efficiency. This paper applies a Bayesian model averaging (BMA) technique to forecast submitted NIS. As an ensemble approach, the BMA method aggregates different forecasting models in order to improve forecasting accuracy and consistency. In this study, the BMA method is compared to two alternative approaches: a stepwise regression method and an artificial neural network (ANN) trained for NIS forecasting. In our comparative analysis, we use field measurement data from the Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland (PJM) Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) to train and test each method. Our preliminary results indicate that ensemble-based methods can provide more accurate and consistent NIS forecasts in comparison to non-ensemble alternate methods.

  18. Collaboration for Education with the Apple Learning Interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Patrick A.; Zimmerman, T.; Knierman, K. A.

    2006-12-01

    We present a progressive effort to deliver online education and outreach resources in collaboration with the Apple Learning Interchange, a free community for educators. We have created a resource site with astronomy activities, video training for the activities, and the possibility of interactive training through video chat services. Also in development is an online textbook for graduate and advanced undergraduate courses in stellar evolution, featuring an updatable and annotated text with multimedia content, online lectures, podcasts, and a framework for interactive simulation activities. Both sites will be highly interactive, combining online discussions, the opportunity for live video interaction, and a growing library of student work samples. This effort promises to provide a compelling model for collaboration between science educators and corporations. As scientists, we provide content knowledge and a compelling reason to communicate, while Apple provides technical expertise, a deep knowledge of online education, and a way for us to reach a wide audience of higher education, community outreach, and K-12 educators.

  19. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-07-03

    The US Department of Energy Office of Geothermal Technologies (OGT) is funding and overseeing the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), a distributed information system providing access to integrated data in support of, and generated in, all phases of geothermal development. NGDS is being built in an open paradigm and will employ state-of-the-art informatics approaches and capabilities to advance the state of geothermal knowledge in the US. This document presents guidelines related to provision and interchange of data assets in the context of the National Geothermal Data System. It identifies general specifications for NGDS catalog metadata and data content, and provides specific instructions for preparation and submission of data assets by OGT-funded projects.

  20. The Harang reversal and the interchange stability of the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Shinichi; Gkioulidou, Matina; Wang, Chih-Ping; Wolf, Richard A.

    2016-04-01

    The present study addresses steady convection in the plasma sheet in terms of the interchange stability with special attention to the Harang reversal. The closure of the tail current with a field-aligned current (FAC) results from the divergence/convergence of the pressure gradient current. If the magnetotail is in a steady state, the associated change of local plasma pressure p has to balance with its advective change. Accordingly, for adiabatic transport, the flux tube entropy parameter pVγ increases and decreases along the convection path in regions corresponding to downward and upward FACs, respectively. This requirement, along with the condition for the interchange stability imposes an important constraint on the direction of convection especially in the regions of downward FACs. It is deduced that for the dusk cell, the convection in the downward R2 current has to be directed azimuthally duskward, which follows the sunward, possibly dawnward deflected, convection in the region of the premidnight upward R1 current. This duskward turn of convection takes place in the vicinity of the R1-R2 demarcation, and it presumably corresponds to the Harang reversal. For the dawn cell the convection in the postmidnight downward R1 current has to deflect dawnward, and then it proceeds sunward in the upward R2 current. The continuity of the associated ionospheric currents consistently reproduces the assumed FAC distribution. The proposed interrelationships between the convection and FACs are also verified with a quasi-steady plasma sheet configuration and convection reproduced by a modified Rice Convection Model with force balance.

  1. The Harang Reversal and the Interchange Stability of the Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Wang, C. P.; Wolf, R.

    2015-12-01

    During the substorm growth phase the overall convection, electric currents, and aurora structures in the nightside ionosphere often change very gradually over prolonged (> 1 hr) periods, and therefore the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) system can be considered to be in a quasi-steady state. For the source region of a downward field-aligned current (FAC) the cross-tail current, which is carried mostly by ions, closes with a FAC, which is carried by electrons moving away from the ionosphere. Thus both ions and electrons accumulate there and accordingly, the plasma pressure increases. In the source region of an upward FAC, in contrast, the reduction of plasma pressure is expected. Since the plasma pressure, more precisely the entropy parameter (pVr), is most critical for the interchange stability of the magnetotail, this simple assessment raises a fundamental question about the magnetotail dynamics, that is, how the magnetotail remains to be steady. In this study we argue that if the magnetosphere is in a steady state, those expected increase and decrease in plasma pressure need to balance with the change due to the plasma transport by convection. This requirement, along with the condition for the interchange stability, leads to the conclusion that the associated pattern of convection has a structure that is presumably the magnetospheric counter part of the Harang reversal. More specifically, for the dusk convection cell, the convection flow is directed azimuthally westward in the source region of the downward R2 current, whereas it is directed sunward in the source region of the upward R1 current. We verify this idea by examining a quasi-steady magnetotail modeled by the RCM-Dungey code. Using equi-potential contours as a reference we also suggest that auroral arcs mapped to the equator tend to be oriented in the east-west and Sun-Earth direction if they are located in the premidnight R2 and R1 currents, respectively.

  2. Structural Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Language: A Comparative Analysis of InterChange Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Kwang-Kyu

    1996-01-01

    Compares one form of synchronous computer-mediated communication, Daedalus InterChange, with analogous spoken and written corpora. Finds that the InterChange discourse mode is not merely intermediate between speaking and writing; rather the electronic medium uniquely fosters some behaviors and inhibits others, in support of the view that physical…

  3. 32 CFR 644.408 - Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interchange of national forest and military and... Property and Easement Interests § 644.408 Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands. 16 U.S.C. 505a, 505b authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture, with respect to national forest lands...

  4. 32 CFR 644.408 - Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interchange of national forest and military and... Property and Easement Interests § 644.408 Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands. 16 U.S.C. 505a, 505b authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture, with respect to national forest lands...

  5. 32 CFR 644.408 - Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Interchange of national forest and military and... Property and Easement Interests § 644.408 Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands. 16 U.S.C. 505a, 505b authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture, with respect to national forest lands...

  6. 32 CFR 644.408 - Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Interchange of national forest and military and... Property and Easement Interests § 644.408 Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands. 16 U.S.C. 505a, 505b authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture, with respect to national forest lands...

  7. 32 CFR 644.408 - Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Interchange of national forest and military and... Property and Easement Interests § 644.408 Interchange of national forest and military and civil works lands. 16 U.S.C. 505a, 505b authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture, with respect to national forest lands...

  8. Compressibility effect on magnetic-shear-localized ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sangeeta; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    2005-08-15

    Eigenmode analysis of a magnetic-shear-localized ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchange instability in the presence of plasma compressibility indicates the marginal stability criterion (D{sub I}=1/4) is not affected by the compressibility effects. Above the marginal stability criterion, plasma compressibility causes a significant reduction in the growth rate of an ideal interchange instability.

  9. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  10. 22 CFR 501.3 - Noncompetitive interchange between Civil Service and Foreign Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Noncompetitive interchange between Civil Service and Foreign Service. 501.3 Section 501.3 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS § 501.3 Noncompetitive interchange between Civil Service and...

  11. Structural Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Language: A Comparative Analysis of InterChange Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Kwang-Kyu

    1996-01-01

    Compares one form of synchronous computer-mediated communication, Daedalus InterChange, with analogous spoken and written corpora. Finds that the InterChange discourse mode is not merely intermediate between speaking and writing; rather the electronic medium uniquely fosters some behaviors and inhibits others, in support of the view that physical…

  12. 77 FR 66165 - Information Required in Notices and Petitions Containing Interchange Commitments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... 11323 to acquire (through purchase or lease) and operate a rail line. The collection of agreements with... exemption where the underlying lease or line sale includes an interchange commitment. DATES: Comments are.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Interchange commitments are ``contractual provisions included with a sale or lease...

  13. What Kind of International Interchange Is Beneficial? Experiences of Taiwanese Indigenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shan-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Because of globalization, international interchanges among indigenes in every country have become more frequent. Influenced by international multicultural trends, Taiwan's government not only supports indigenous populations to revive their traditional cultures, but also encourages the promotion of the international interchange activities among…

  14. The Place of Community-Based Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study of Interchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on one strand of community engagement: community-based learning for students. It considers in particular Interchange as a case study. Interchange is a registered charity based in, but independent of, a department in a Higher Education Institution. It brokers between undergraduate research/work projects and Voluntary Community…

  15. 78 FR 18666 - Agency Information Collection Activities; New Information Collection: Lease and Interchange of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Information Collection: Lease and Interchange of Vehicles AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration... codified in 49 CFR Part 376, ``Lease and Interchange of Vehicles.'' These regulations require certain for-hire motor carriers to have a formal lease when leasing equipment. ACTION: Notice and request...

  16. WEDI (Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange) co-chair predicts big savings from EDI.

    PubMed

    Brophy, J T

    1992-10-01

    Electronic data interchange has the potential to save billions of healthcare dollars--that's the gospel according to Joe Brophy. The Travelers Insurance Company president and co-chair of the Health and Human Services Workgroup on Electronic Data Interchange is taking this sermon to the people.

  17. The Place of Community-Based Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study of Interchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on one strand of community engagement: community-based learning for students. It considers in particular Interchange as a case study. Interchange is a registered charity based in, but independent of, a department in a Higher Education Institution. It brokers between undergraduate research/work projects and Voluntary Community…

  18. Automatic detection of ECG cable interchange by analyzing both morphology and interlead relations.

    PubMed

    Han, Chengzong; Gregg, Richard E; Feild, Dirk Q; Babaeizadeh, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    ECG cable interchange can generate erroneous diagnoses. For algorithms detecting ECG cable interchange, high specificity is required to maintain a low total false positive rate because the prevalence of interchange is low. In this study, we propose and evaluate an improved algorithm for automatic detection and classification of ECG cable interchange. The algorithm was developed by using both ECG morphology information and redundancy information. ECG morphology features included QRS-T and P-wave amplitude, frontal axis and clockwise vector loop rotation. The redundancy features were derived based on the EASI™ lead system transformation. The classification was implemented using linear support vector machine. The development database came from multiple sources including both normal subjects and cardiac patients. An independent database was used to test the algorithm performance. Common cable interchanges were simulated by swapping either limb cables or precordial cables. For the whole validation database, the overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting precordial cable interchange were 56.5% and 99.9%, and the sensitivity and specificity for detecting limb cable interchange (excluding left arm-left leg interchange) were 93.8% and 99.9%. Defining precordial cable interchange or limb cable interchange as a single positive event, the total false positive rate was 0.7%. When the algorithm was designed for higher sensitivity, the sensitivity for detecting precordial cable interchange increased to 74.6% and the total false positive rate increased to 2.7%, while the sensitivity for detecting limb cable interchange was maintained at 93.8%. The low total false positive rate was maintained at 0.6% for the more abnormal subset of the validation database including only hypertrophy and infarction patients. The proposed algorithm can detect and classify ECG cable interchanges with high specificity and low total false positive rate, at the cost of decreased sensitivity for

  19. Observational test of the interchange stability associated with near-tail dipolarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Kim, K.; Ohtani, S.; Park, M.

    2010-12-01

    The interchange instability is a pressure gradient-driven instability. Formally speaking, the interchange mode can be considered to be a special case of the more general ballooning mode in the sense that the perpendicular displacement (as multiplied by the magnetic field strength) of the interchange mode is defined to be constant along the magnetic field line while that of a ballooning mode can be localized to the “bad curvature” region (i.e. the equatorial plane). Since the radial pressure profile in the near-earth tail is expected to become steeper prior to the substorm onset, instability of either interchange or ballooning type mode may be expected to occur. An observational test is generally non-trivial and difficult for the ballooning mode. For the interchange mode, however, the classic analytic criterion has long been known and thus using this criterion an observational test of the instability can be more feasible. The only difficulty has been how to evaluate the flux tube volume, for which Wolf et al. [2006] have suggested a useful formula. Using the formula, we have evaluated the interchange criterion for a set of pair-dipolarization events that are radially aligned. We found that the near-tail configuration before and during a dipolarization is likely stable against the interchange mode. Using a number of more dipolarizations, we have performed an analysis on evaluating the interchange criterion in a statistical manner and reached the results that support the conclusion of the interchange stability. This seems to suggest to us that the interchange instability is unlikely a candidate to trigger dipolarizations in association with substorms. But, the ballooning instability, the mode structure of which can be localized near the equatorial plane, remains a possibility responsible for dipolarizations.

  20. Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?

    PubMed Central

    Carminatti, Lorival J.; Possamai, Carlos A. P.; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F.; de Lucas, Ricardo D.; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key points T-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests. T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness. In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol. PMID:24149741

  1. Use of data description languages in the interchange of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pignede, M.; Real-Planells, B.; Smith, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) is developing Standards for the interchange of information between systems, including those operating under different environments. The objective is to perform the interchange automatically, i.e. in a computer interpretable manner. One aspect of the concept developed by CCSDS is the use of a separate data description to specify the data being transferred. Using the description, data can then be automatically parsed by the receiving computer. With a suitably expressive Data Description Language (DDL), data formats of arbitrary complexity can be handled. The advantages of this approach are: (1) that the description need only be written and distributed once to all users, and (2) new software does not need to be written for each new format, provided generic tools are available to support writing and interpretation of descriptions and the associated data instances. Consequently, the effort of 'hard coding' each new format is avoided and problems of integrating multiple implementations of a given format by different users are avoided. The approach is applicable in any context where computer parsable description of data could enhance efficiency (e.g. within a spacecraft control system, a data delivery system or an archive). The CCSDS have identified several candidate DDL's: EAST (Extended Ada Subset), TSDN (Transfer Syntax Data Notation) and MADEL (Modified ASN.1 as a Data Description Language -- a DDL based on the Abstract Syntax Notation One - ASN.1 - specified in the ISO/IEC 8824). This paper concentrates on ESA's development of MADEL. ESA have also developed a 'proof of concept' prototype of the required support tools, implemented on a PC under MS-DOS, which has successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the approach, including the capability within an application of retrieving and displaying particular data elements, given its MADEL description (i.e. a data description written in MADEL). This paper outlines

  2. An harmonised vocabulary for communicating and interchanging biofilms experimental results.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Azevedo, Nuno F; Lourenço, Anália

    2014-10-23

    Biofilm studies are at the crossroads of Biology, Chemistry, Medicine, Material Science and Engineering, among other fields. Data harmonisation in Biofilms is therefore crucial to allow for researchers to collaborate, interchange, understand, and replicate studies at an inter-laboratory and inter-domain scale. The international Minimum Information About a Biofilms Experiment initiative has prepared a set of guidelines for documenting biofilms experiments and data, namely the minimum information checklist. This paper goes a step forward and describes a new ontology for the broad description of biofilm experiments and data. In such an interdisciplinary context we chose to rely on a common integration framework provided by a foundational ontology that facilitates the addition and extension of various sub-domain modules, and the consistent integration of terminology extracted from several existing ontologies, e.g. EXPO and ChEBI. The community is participating actively in the production of this resource, and it is already used by public biofilms-centred databases, such as BiofOmics, and bioinformatics tools, such as the Biofilms Experiment Workbench. This practical validation serves the purpose of disseminating the controlled vocabulary among researchers and identifying current limitations, glitches, and inconsistencies. Information branches will be added, extended or refactored according to user feedback and group discussions.

  3. Measurements of Turbulent Transport in Simple Interchange Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, Kenneth; Rowan, William; Williams, Chad; Koepke, Mark; Nogami, Sam

    2016-10-01

    The Helimak is an approximation to the infinite cylindrical slab with a size large compared with turbulence transverse scale lengths, but with open field lines of finite length. It is also an excellent simplified model of a tokamak SOL. Interchange modes are the dominant instability, characterized by a very high level of nonlinearly saturated fluctuations, 50%. Flow velocity profiles and shear can be greatly modified by the application of radial electric fields through external biasing of the flux surfaces - cylindrical shells. Using newly-developed novel baffled probes that can directly measure the actual plasma potential, a multi-tip configuration optimized for local inference of the electrostatic particle flux has been built for the Helimak. The first radial profiles of the particle flux and the changes with bias will be presented. The contrast between the baffled probe measurements of plasma potential and conventional probe measurements of floating potential will be shown. Work supported by the Department of Energy OFES DE-FG02-04ER54766.

  4. Format for Interchange and Display of 3D Terrain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul; Powell, Mark; Vona, Marsette; Norris, Jeffrey; Morrison, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Visible Scalable Terrain (ViSTa) is a software format for production, interchange, and display of three-dimensional (3D) terrain data acquired by stereoscopic cameras of robotic vision systems. ViSTa is designed to support scalability of data, accuracy of displayed terrain images, and optimal utilization of computational resources. In a ViSTa file, an area of terrain is represented, at one or more levels of detail, by coordinates of isolated points and/or vertices of triangles derived from a texture map that, in turn, is derived from original terrain images. Unlike prior terrain-image software formats, ViSTa includes provisions to ensure accuracy of texture coordinates. Whereas many such formats are based on 2.5-dimensional terrain models and impose additional regularity constraints on data, ViSTa is based on a 3D model without regularity constraints. Whereas many prior formats require external data for specifying image-data coordinate systems, ViSTa provides for the inclusion of coordinate-system data within data files. ViSTa admits highspeed loading and display within a Java program. ViSTa is designed to minimize file sizes and maximize compressibility and to support straightforward reduction of resolution to reduce file size for Internet-based distribution.

  5. Space Solar Power Technical Interchange Meeting 2: SSP TIM 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Jim; Hawk, Clark W.

    1998-01-01

    The 2nd Space Solar Power Technical Interchange Meeting (SSP TIM 2) was conducted September 21st through 24th with the first part consisting of a Plenary session. The summary results of this Plenary session are contained in part one of this report. The attendees were then organized into Working Breakout Sessions and Integrated Product Team (IPT) Sessions for the purpose of conducting in-depth discussions in specific topic areas and developing a consensus as to appropriate study plans and actions to be taken. The Second part covers the Plenary Summary Session, which contains the summary results of the Working Breakout Sessions and IPT Sessions. The appendix contains the list of attendees. The ob'jective was to provide an update for the study teams and develop plans for subsequent study activities. This SSP TIM 2 was initiated and the results reported electronically over the Internet. The International Space Station (ISS) could provide the following opportunities for conducting research and technology (R&T) which are applicable to SSP: (1) Automation and Robotics, (2) Advanced Power Generation, (3) Advanced Power Management & Distribution (PMAD), (4) Communications Systems and Networks, (5) Energy Storage, (6) In Space Propulsion (ISP), (7) Structural Dynamics and Control, and Assembly and (8) Wireless Power Transmission.

  6. RCM simulation of interchange transport in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. W.; Liu, X.; Sazykin, S. Y.; Wolf, R.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulations with the Rice Convection Model have been used to study the radial transport of plasma in Saturn's inner magnetosphere (L < 12) where the magnetic field is dominated by the planetary dipole. This transport occurs through a time-variable pattern of wider outflow channels containing cool, dense plasma from interior sources, alternating with narrower inflow channels containing hot, tenuous plasma from the outer magnetosphere. The 'smoking gun' of this interchange transport process is the pervasive presence of V-shaped injection/dispersion signatures in linear energy-time spectrograms that are observed by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) on every pass through the inner magnetosphere. Using observed hot plasma distributions at L~12 as input, we have now successfully simulated these V-shaped signatures. We will show these simulation results and compare them with observed signatures. We will also describe future improvements to the model including relaxing the dipole-field assumption, thus enabling us to simulate local-time asymmetries imposed by the outer magnetosphere and tail.

  7. Using electronic data interchange to report product quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Donald F.; Frank, Donald T.

    1993-03-01

    The Product Quality Deficiency Report (PQDR) is a Department of Defense form that identifies deficiencies in the manufacture, repair, or procurement of materiel. It may be used by DoD employees or contractors to identify defects at any point in the item's life. DoD generates nearly 75,000 such deficiency reports each year. In most cases, when a defect is identified, Standard Form (SF) 368 is completed and sent to the activity managing the contract under which the materiel was procured. That activity, usually in conjunction with the contractor, investigates the complaint, attempts to determine a cause and a corrective action, and must make some disposition of the defective materiel. The process is labor- and paper-intensive and time-consuming. Technology can reduce the costs of the process and at the same time improve timeliness by electronically exchanging discrepancy data between activities. Electronic data interchange (EDI) is one technology for electronically passing PQDR data. It is widely used in industry and increasingly within DoD. DMRD 941 defines DoD's commitment to use EDI and cites the PQDR and other discrepancy reports as early candidates for EDI. In this report, we describe how EDI can be linked to changes in PQDR processing practices to provide further improvements.

  8. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin; Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J.; Ling, D. C.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2014-08-15

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (⩽4 μm), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10{sup −7} T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K.

  9. Evaluation of cardiac output by 5 arterial pulse contour techniques using trend interchangeability method

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Diouf, Momar; de Wilde, Robert B.P.; Dupont, Hervé; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac output measurement with pulse contour analysis is a continuous, mini-invasive, operator-independent, widely used, and cost-effective technique, which could be helpful to assess changes in cardiac output. The 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot have been described to compare the changes between 2 measurements performed under different conditions, and the direction of change by using different methods of measurements. However, the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot present a number of limitations, with a risk of misinterpretation in routine clinical practice. We describe a new trend interchangeability method designed to objectively define the interchangeability of each change of a variable. Using the repeatability of the reference method, we classified each change as either uninterpretable or interpretable and then as either noninterchangeable, in the gray zone or interchangeable. An interchangeability rate can then be calculated by the number of interchangeable changes divided by the total number of interpretable changes. In this observational study, we used this objective method to assess cardiac output changes with 5 arterial pulse contour techniques (Wesseling's method, LiDCO, PiCCO, Hemac method, and Modelflow) in comparison with bolus thermodilution technique as reference method in 24 cardiac surgery patients. A total of 172 cardiac output variations were available from the 199 data points: 88 (51%) were uninterpretable, according to the first step of the method. The second step of the method, based on the 84 (49%) interpretable variations, showed that only 18 (21%) to 30 (36%) variations were interchangeable regardless of the technique used. None of pulse contour cardiac output technique could be interchangeable with bolus thermodilution to assess changes in cardiac output using the trend interchangeability method in cardiac surgery patients. Future studies may consider using this method to assess interchangeability of changes between different

  10. Kinetic and resistive effects on interchange instabilities for a cylindrical model spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Hammett, G.W.; Tang, W.M.

    1983-04-01

    The stabilizing influence of diamagnetic drift effects on ideal and resistive interchange modes is investigated. A resistive-ballooning-mode equation is derived using a kinetic theory approach and is applied to a cylindrical model spheromak equilibrium. It is found that these kinetic effects can significantly improve the ..beta.. limits for collisionless interchange stability. For the resistive modes, the diamagnetic drift terms lead to growth rates which scale linearly with resistivity and are considerably reduced in magnitude. However, the resistive interchange growth rates estimated for near-term spheromak parameters remain significant.

  11. Morphology of Interchange-Driven Injections in Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Jia, X.; Jackman, C. M.; Khurana, K. K.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    As Cassini passes close to Saturn during its regular orbits, evidence of particle injections can often be found in many different data sets (including MAG, CAPS, MIMI, and RPWS). One reason injections are easily visible in Saturn's inner magnetosphere is that the circumplanetary neutral gas distribution can reduce the intensities of some charged particles. For example, energetic ions can be lost from the system following charge exchange with neutrals and energetic electrons can lose energy in collisions with gas and dust. Injections in the inner magnetosphere are believed to be flux tube interchange events that are part of a larger circulation system in which cold dense plasma flows outward carrying magnetic flux with it. The closed magnetic flux is ultimately returned to the inner magnetosphere in the form of injections of rapidly moving hotter but lighter flux tubes from the middle magnetosphere. In this presentation, we will look at injections from the perspective of multiple Cassini data sets. Some features of these structures have already been identified in the literature from one or more data sets. For example, the tendency for injections to appear as enhancements (depressions) in magnetic field strength at low (high) magnetic latitude has been documented (Andre et al. 2007). Furthermore, that flux tube bundles seem to narrow in spatial extent in the equatorial plane in the higher magnetic field region has also been described. Here, we will look at selected structures distributed in radial distance and latitude as a step toward generalizing their characteristics at various locations. We will consider issues such as the magnetic signature in the field components, the typical wave signatures, the energy range of the injection, and the presence of isolated features versus multiple features occurring simultaneously. We will also discuss observational issues, such as when each instrument is optimally suited to detect injections, and how this relates to their

  12. Interchange Slip-Running Reconnection and Sweeping SEP-Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Klein, K.-L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model to explain how particles, accelerated at a reconnection site that is not magnetically connected to the Earth, could eventually propagate along the well-connected open flux tube. Our model is based on the results of a low-beta resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulation of a three-dimensional line-tied and initially current-free bipole, that is embedded in a non-uniform open potential field. The topology of this configuration is that of an asymmetric coronal null-point, with a closed fan surface and an open outer spine. When driven by slow photospheric shearing motions, field lines, initially fully anchored below the fan dome, reconnect at the null point, and jump to the open magnetic domain. This is the standard interchange mode as sketched and calculated in 2D. The key result in 3D is that, reconnected open field lines located in the vicinity of the outer spine, keep reconnecting continuously, across an open quasi-separatrix layer, as previously identified for non-open-null-point reconnection. The apparent slipping motion of these field lines leads to form an extended narrow magnetic flux tube at high altitude. Because of the slip-running reconnection, we conjecture that if energetic particles would be travelling through, or be accelerated inside, the diffusion region, they would be successively injected along continuously reconnecting field lines that are connected farther and farther from the spine. At the scale of the full Sun, owing to the super-radial expansion of field lines below 3 solar radius, such energetic particles could easily be injected in field lines slipping over significant distances, and could eventually reach the distant flux tube that is well-connected to the Earth.

  13. Alternate-1 and Alternate-2 Orientations in Interchange (Reciprocal Translocation) Quadrivalents

    PubMed Central

    Rickards, Geoffrey K.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic properties of the spindle, and published numerical data, argue that the differentiation of alternate-1 and alternate-2 orientations of an interchange quadrivalent is real and meaningful, contra Boussy (1982). PMID:17246129

  14. 32 CFR 644.409 - Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... municipality, names of the forest, project or installation, and number of acres to be interchanged by each department. (2) If the areas involved include public domain lands, the number and date of the Executive Order...

  15. 32 CFR 644.409 - Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... municipality, names of the forest, project or installation, and number of acres to be interchanged by each department. (2) If the areas involved include public domain lands, the number and date of the Executive Order...

  16. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Fifth technical information interchange meeting, Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fifth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  17. The electromagnetic interchange mode in a partially ionized collisional plasma. [spread F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kennel, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    A collisional electromagnetic dispersion relation is derived from two-fluid theory for the interchange mode coupled to the Alfven, acoustic, drift and entropy modes in a partially ionized plasma. The fundamental electromagnetic nature of the interchange model is noted; coupling to the intermediate Alfven mode is strongly stabilizing for finite k sub z. Both ion viscous and ion-neutral stabilization are included, and it was found that collisions destroy the ion finite Larmor radius cutoff at short perpendicular wavelengths.

  18. Electronic Data Interchange (EDI): Using Electronic Commerce to Enhance Defense Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    AD-A238 559 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Using Electronic Commerce to Enhance Defense Logistics Judith E. Payne, Robert H. Anderson N STATEN= A... electronic commerce to enhance defense logistics / Judith L. Payne and Robert H, Anderson. "Prepared for the Assistant Sccretary of Defense (Production and...by RAND 1700 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138 | ,! R-4030-P&L Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Using Electronic Commerce to

  19. Complex stability and dynamic subunit interchange modulates the disparate activities of the yeast moonlighting proteins Hal3 and Vhs3

    PubMed Central

    Abrie, J. Albert; Molero, Cristina; Ariño, Joaquín; Strauss, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hal3 and Vhs3 are moonlighting proteins, acting both as inhibitors of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase Ppz1 and as subunits (together with Cab3) of the unique heterotrimeric phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme of Hemiascomycetous yeast. Both these roles are essential: PPCDC catalyses the third step of coenzyme A biosynthesis, while Ppz1 inhibition is required for regulation of monovalent cation homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which these proteins’ disparate activities are regulated are not well understood. The PPCDC domains (PDs) of Hal3, Vhs3 and Cab3 constitute the minimum requirement for these proteins to show both PPCDC activity and, in the case of Hal3 and Vhs3, to bind to Ppz1. Using these PD proteins as a model system to study the possibility of dynamic interchange between these roles, we provide evidence that Hal3 binds Ppz1 as a monomer (1:1 stoichiometry), requiring it to de-oligomerize from its usual homo- and heterotrimeric states (the latter having PPCDC activity). This de-oligomerization is made possible by structural features that set Hal3 apart from Vhs3, increasing its ability to undergo monomer exchange. These findings suggest that oligomer interchange may be a significant factor in the functional regulation of these proteins and their various unrelated (moonlighting) functions. PMID:26514574

  20. Improving Area Control Error Diversity Interchange (ADI) Program by Incorporating Congestion Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guttromson, Ross T.; McManus, Bart

    2010-04-30

    The area control error (ACE) determines how much a balancing authority (BA) needs to move its regulating units to meet mandatory control performance standard requirements. Regulation is an expensive resource that could cost several hundred million dollars a year for a BA. The amount of regulation needed in a system is increasing with more intermittent generation resources added to the system. The ACE diversity interchange (ADI) program provides a tool for reducing the regulation requirement by combining ACEs from several participating BAs followed by sharing the total ACE among all participating balancing areas. The effect is achieved as a result of the low statistical correlation between the original ACEs of participating BAs. A rule-based ADI approach has already been put into practice in the US Western Interconnection. The degree of actual ACE sharing is artificially limited because of the unknown redistribution of power flows and possible system congestion (these factors are not monitored in the existing ADI). This paper proposes a two-step linear programming (LP) ADI approach that incorporates congestion constraints. In the first step of the proposed LP ADI, the line transmission limits are enforced by setting up corresponding constraints. In the second step, the business fairness is pursued. Simulation is performed to compare the properties of the proposed LP ADI and the existing rule-based ADI. Favorable features, such as avoiding line limit violations and increasing the degree of possible ACE sharing, are observed for the proposed LP ADI.

  1. Equivalence and interchangeability of narrow therapeutic index drugs in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Atholl

    2013-10-01

    The calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), ciclosporin and tacrolimus, are the mainstay of immunosuppression in solid organ transplantation. Generic formulations of these drugs are now available. With increasing pressure on healthcare budgets and the consequent need to match health expectations to available resources, substitution with a generic product appears an attractive option to reduce costs. Approval of generic products differs from innovator drugs, and narrow therapeutic index drugs (NTIs; including CNIs) bring their own particular considerations. With NTIs, small variations in drug exposure could result in reduced immunosuppression or drug toxicity with potentially adverse effects on patient outcomes. NTIs are subject to stricter regulatory approval versus many other generic drugs. However, different generic formulations may still not necessarily be therapeutically equivalent in individuals, raising the possibility of significant differences in exposure between products. Although regional recommendations vary, many guidelines emphasise the need for NTI drug substitution to be initiated by the transplant physician, thus ensuring careful therapeutic monitoring and reduced negative patient impact. The need for therapeutic monitoring during generic substitution has important implications for the overall costs of generic treatment as these costs have to be factored in to the potential savings made from using generic formulations. The reduced acquisition costs of generic products may not necessarily translate into lower overall healthcare costs. This article examines the issue of equivalence and interchangeability of NTI drugs used in organ transplantation, the implications of the approval process for generic drugs on treatment efficacy and safety, and the effective management of substitutions between products.

  2. Therapeutic Interchange of Parenteral Anticoagulants: Challenges for Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committees.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2011-11-07

    This is a review of key factors for pharmacy and therapeutics committees to consider when developing a therapeutic interchange (TI) program for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. Recent patient safety initiatives aimed at reducing the incidence of hospital-acquired VTE may increase the prescribing of thromboprophylactic agents recommended in VTE management guidelines. As a result, more pharmacy and therapeutics committees may consider TI programs for parenteral anticoagulants. However, the TI of anticoagulants appears challenging at this time. Firstly, the therapeutic equivalence of the commonly prescribed parenteral anticoagulants, enoxaparin, dalteparin and fondaparinux, has not been established. Secondly, because of the wide range of clinical indications for these anticoagulants, a blanket agent-specific TI program could lead to off-label use. Use of an indication-specific TI program could be difficult to manage administratively, and may cause prescribing confusion and errors. Thirdly, careful dosing and contraindications of certain parenteral anticoagulants in special patient populations, such as those with renal impairment, further impact the suitability of these agents for inclusion in TI programs. Finally, although TI may appear to offer lower drug-acquisition costs, it is important to determine its effect on all cost parameters and ultimately ensure that the care of patients requiring VTE prophylaxis is not compromised.

  3. Equivalence and interchangeability of narrow therapeutic index drugs in organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Atholl

    2013-01-01

    The calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), ciclosporin and tacrolimus, are the mainstay of immunosuppression in solid organ transplantation. Generic formulations of these drugs are now available. With increasing pressure on healthcare budgets and the consequent need to match health expectations to available resources, substitution with a generic product appears an attractive option to reduce costs. Approval of generic products differs from innovator drugs, and narrow therapeutic index drugs (NTIs; including CNIs) bring their own particular considerations. With NTIs, small variations in drug exposure could result in reduced immunosuppression or drug toxicity with potentially adverse effects on patient outcomes. NTIs are subject to stricter regulatory approval versus many other generic drugs. However, different generic formulations may still not necessarily be therapeutically equivalent in individuals, raising the possibility of significant differences in exposure between products. Although regional recommendations vary, many guidelines emphasise the need for NTI drug substitution to be initiated by the transplant physician, thus ensuring careful therapeutic monitoring and reduced negative patient impact. The need for therapeutic monitoring during generic substitution has important implications for the overall costs of generic treatment as these costs have to be factored in to the potential savings made from using generic formulations. The reduced acquisition costs of generic products may not necessarily translate into lower overall healthcare costs. This article examines the issue of equivalence and interchangeability of NTI drugs used in organ transplantation, the implications of the approval process for generic drugs on treatment efficacy and safety, and the effective management of substitutions between products. PMID:24089632

  4. Statistical and regulatory considerations in assessments of interchangeability of biological drug products.

    PubMed

    Tóthfalusi, Lászlo; Endrényi, László; Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-05-01

    When the patent of a brand-name, marketed drug expires, new, generic products are usually offered. Small-molecule generic and originator drug products are expected to be chemically identical. Their pharmaceutical similarity can be typically assessed by simple regulatory criteria such as the expectation that the 90% confidence interval for the ratio of geometric means of some pharmacokinetic parameters be between 0.80 and 1.25. When such criteria are satisfied, the drug products are generally considered to exhibit therapeutic equivalence. They are then usually interchanged freely within individual patients. Biological drugs are complex proteins, for instance, because of their large size, intricate structure, sensitivity to environmental conditions, difficult manufacturing procedures, and the possibility of immunogenicity. Generic and brand-name biologic products can be expected to show only similarity but not identity in their various features and clinical effects. Consequently, the determination of biosimilarity is also a complicated process which involves assessment of the totality of the evidence for the close similarity of the two products. Moreover, even when biosimilarity has been established, it may not be assumed that the two biosimilar products can be automatically substituted by pharmacists. This generally requires additional, careful considerations. Without declaring interchangeability, a new product could be prescribed, i.e. it is prescribable. However, two products can be automatically substituted only if they are interchangeable. Interchangeability is a statistical term and it means that products can be used in any order in the same patient without considering the treatment history. The concepts of interchangeability and prescribability have been widely discussed in the past but only in relation to small molecule generics. In this paper we apply these concepts to biosimilars and we discuss: definitions of prescribability and interchangeability and

  5. Theory of energetic trapped particle-induced resistive interchange-ballooning modes

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-02-01

    A theory describing the influence of energetic trapped particles on resistive interchange-ballooning modes in tokamaks is presented. It is shown that a population of hot particles trapped in the region of adverse curvature can resonantly interact with and destabilize the resistive interchange mode, which is stable in their absence because of favorable average curvature. The mode is different from the usual resistive interchange mode not only in its destabilization mechanism, but also in that it has a real component to its frequency comparable to the precessional drift frequency of the rapidly circulating energetic species. Corresponding growth rate and threshold conditions for this trapped-particle-driven instability are derived and finite banana width effects are shown to have a stabilizing effect on the mode. Finally, the ballooning/tearing dispersion relation is generalized to include hot particles, so that both the ideal and the resistive modes are derivable in the appropriate limits. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Interaction between static magnetic islands and interchange modes in a straight heliotron plasma with high resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kinya; Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi

    2010-06-15

    Fundamental mechanism of the nonlinear interaction between static magnetic islands generated by an external field and a resistive interchange mode is investigated in a straight heliotron plasma with high resistivity by using a numerical method based on the reduced magnetohydrodynamics equations. The behavior of the magnetic islands is examined at the steady state after the nonlinear saturation of the interchange mode. The width and the phase of the magnetic islands are changed by the mode evolution. These changes are almost determined by the linear combination of the two perturbed poloidal magnetic fluxes, the flux imposed externally and the flux attributed to the interchange mode, in spite of the fact that the changes result from the nonlinear process. It is also obtained that the amount of the local change of the pressure at the resonant surface in the saturation state depends on the phase of the static magnetic islands.

  7. Characteristics of magnetic island formation due to resistive interchange instability in helical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, R.; Matsumoto, Y.; Itagaki, M.; Oikawa, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Sato, M.

    2014-05-15

    Focusing attention on the magnetic island formation, we investigate the characteristics of the resistive interchange magnetohydrodynamics instabilities, which would limit a high beta operational regime in helical type fusion reactors. An introduction of a new index, i.e., the ratio of the magnetic fluctuation level to the radial displacement, enables us to make a systematic analysis on the magnetic island formation in the large helical device-like plasmas during the linear growth phase; (i) the interchange instability with the second largest growth rate makes the magnetic island larger than that with the largest growth rate when the amplitude of the radial displacement in both cases is almost the same as each other; (ii) applied to a typical tearing instability, the index is smaller than that for the interchange instability with the second largest growth rate.

  8. Positional interchanges influence the physical and technical match performance variables of elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Schuth, G; Carr, G; Barnes, C; Carling, C; Bradley, P S

    2016-01-01

    Positional variation in match performance is well established in elite soccer but no information exists on players switching positions. This study investigated the influence of elite players interchanging from one position to another on physical and technical match performance. Data were collected from multiple English Premier League (EPL) seasons using a computerised tracking system. After adhering to stringent inclusion criteria, players were examined across several interchanges: central-defender to fullback (CD-FB, n = 11, 312 observations), central-midfielder to wide-midfielder (CM-WM, n = 7, 171 observations), wide-midfielder to central-midfielder (WM-CM, n = 7, 197 observations) and attacker to wide-midfielder (AT-WM, n = 4, 81 observations). Players interchanging from CD-FB covered markedly more high-intensity running and sprinting distance (effect size [ES]: -1.56 and -1.26), lost more possessions but made more final third entries (ES: -1.23 and -1.55). Interchanging from CM-WM and WM-CM resulted in trivial to moderate differences in both physical (ES: -0.14-0.59 and -0.21-0.39) and technical performances (ES: -0.48-0.64 and -0.36-0.54). Players interchanging from AT-WM demonstrated a moderate difference in high-intensity running without possession (ES: -0.98) and moderate-to-large differences in the number of clearances, tackles and possessions won (ES: -0.77, -1.16 and -1.41). The data demonstrate that the physical and technical demands vary greatly from one interchange to another but utility players seem able to adapt to these positional switches.

  9. Automatic 3D high-fidelity traffic interchange modeling using 2D road GIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-03-01

    3D road models are widely used in many computer applications such as racing games and driving simulations. However, almost all high-fidelity 3D road models were generated manually by professional artists at the expense of intensive labor. There are very few existing methods for automatically generating 3D high-fidelity road networks, especially for those existing in the real world. Real road network contains various elements such as road segments, road intersections and traffic interchanges. Among them, traffic interchanges present the most challenges to model due to their complexity and the lack of height information (vertical position) of traffic interchanges in existing road GIS data. This paper proposes a novel approach that can automatically produce 3D high-fidelity road network models, including traffic interchange models, from real 2D road GIS data that mainly contain road centerline information. The proposed method consists of several steps. The raw road GIS data are first preprocessed to extract road network topology, merge redundant links, and classify road types. Then overlapped points in the interchanges are detected and their elevations are determined based on a set of level estimation rules. Parametric representations of the road centerlines are then generated through link segmentation and fitting, and they have the advantages of arbitrary levels of detail with reduced memory usage. Finally a set of civil engineering rules for road design (e.g., cross slope, superelevation) are selected and used to generate realistic road surfaces. In addition to traffic interchange modeling, the proposed method also applies to other more general road elements. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is highly effective and useful in many applications.

  10. Electromagnetic interchange-like mode and zonal flow in electron-magnetohydrodynamic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2006-10-15

    A numerical simulation of the nonlinear state of interchange instability associated with electron inertia in an unmagnetized plasma is studied. It is shown that a self-consistent sheared transverse electron current flow is generated due to nonlinear mechanisms. This zonal flow can reduce the growth rate of the magnetic interchange-like instability and reach a steady state. The zonal flow generation mechanisms are discussed by truncated Fourier mode representation. In the truncated model, three mode equations are considered that have an exact analytic solution that matches well with the numerical solution. The effect of different boundary conditions in such investigations is also discussed.

  11. On the choice of a phase interchange strategy for a multiscale DEM-VOF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzetti, Gabriele; Peters, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    In this work a novel Multiscale DEM-VOF method is adopted to study three phase flows. It consists in solving the fluid momentum, mass conservation and the phase advection at a different scale with respect to the fluid-particle coupling problem. This allows the VOF scheme to resolve smaller fluid structures than a classic DEM-VOF method, and opens the possibility of adopting different volume interchange techniques. Two different volume interchange techniques are here described and compared with reference to high and low particle concentration scenarios. Considerations about the respective computational costs are also proposed.

  12. The Interchangeability of Plasma and Whole Blood Metal Ion Measurement in the Monitoring of Metal on Metal Hips

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ibrahim A.; Rogers, Joanne; King, Amanda Christina; Clutton, Juliet; Winson, Daniel; John, Alun

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and twenty six paired samples of plasma and whole blood were measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique for metal ions analysis to determine a relationship between them. There was a significant difference between the mean plasma and whole blood concentrations of both cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) (p < 0.0001 for both Co and Cr). The mean ratio between plasma and whole blood Cr and Co was 1.56 (range: 0.39–3.85) and 1.54 (range: 0.64–18.26), respectively, but Bland and Altman analysis illustrated that this relationship was not universal throughout the range of concentrations. There was higher variability at high concentrations for both ions. We conclude that both these concentrations should not be used interchangeably and conversion factors are unreliable due to concentration dependent variability. PMID:26798516

  13. First North American fossil monkey and early Miocene tropical biotic interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Jonathan I.; Woodruff, Emily D.; Wood, Aaron R.; Rincon, Aldo F.; Harrington, Arianna R.; Morgan, Gary S.; Foster, David A.; Montes, Camilo; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Jud, Nathan A.; Jones, Douglas S.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2016-05-01

    New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are a diverse part of modern tropical ecosystems in North and South America, yet their early evolutionary history in the tropics is largely unknown. Molecular divergence estimates suggest that primates arrived in tropical Central America, the southern-most extent of the North American landmass, with several dispersals from South America starting with the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama 3-4 million years ago (Ma). The complete absence of primate fossils from Central America has, however, limited our understanding of their history in the New World. Here we present the first description of a fossil monkey recovered from the North American landmass, the oldest known crown platyrrhine, from a precisely dated 20.9-Ma layer in the Las Cascadas Formation in the Panama Canal Basin, Panama. This discovery suggests that family-level diversification of extant New World monkeys occurred in the tropics, with new divergence estimates for Cebidae between 22 and 25 Ma, and provides the oldest fossil evidence for mammalian interchange between South and North America. The timing is consistent with recent tectonic reconstructions of a relatively narrow Central American Seaway in the early Miocene epoch, coincident with over-water dispersals inferred for many other groups of animals and plants. Discovery of an early Miocene primate in Panama provides evidence for a circum-Caribbean tropical distribution of New World monkeys by this time, with ocean barriers not wholly restricting their northward movements, requiring a complex set of ecological factors to explain their absence in well-sampled similarly aged localities at higher latitudes of North America.

  14. First North American fossil monkey and early Miocene tropical biotic interchange.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jonathan I; Woodruff, Emily D; Wood, Aaron R; Rincon, Aldo F; Harrington, Arianna R; Morgan, Gary S; Foster, David A; Montes, Camilo; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Jud, Nathan A; Jones, Douglas S; MacFadden, Bruce J

    2016-05-12

    New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are a diverse part of modern tropical ecosystems in North and South America, yet their early evolutionary history in the tropics is largely unknown. Molecular divergence estimates suggest that primates arrived in tropical Central America, the southern-most extent of the North American landmass, with several dispersals from South America starting with the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama 3-4 million years ago (Ma). The complete absence of primate fossils from Central America has, however, limited our understanding of their history in the New World. Here we present the first description of a fossil monkey recovered from the North American landmass, the oldest known crown platyrrhine, from a precisely dated 20.9-Ma layer in the Las Cascadas Formation in the Panama Canal Basin, Panama. This discovery suggests that family-level diversification of extant New World monkeys occurred in the tropics, with new divergence estimates for Cebidae between 22 and 25 Ma, and provides the oldest fossil evidence for mammalian interchange between South and North America. The timing is consistent with recent tectonic reconstructions of a relatively narrow Central American Seaway in the early Miocene epoch, coincident with over-water dispersals inferred for many other groups of animals and plants. Discovery of an early Miocene primate in Panama provides evidence for a circum-Caribbean tropical distribution of New World monkeys by this time, with ocean barriers not wholly restricting their northward movements, requiring a complex set of ecological factors to explain their absence in well-sampled similarly aged localities at higher latitudes of North America.

  15. 75 FR 62919 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... at McIntire Road Project in Virginia AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road project in the City of Charlottesville, Virginia... approvals for the following project in the State of Virginia: Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire...

  16. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  17. Interchangeability between first-line generic antiretroviral products prequalified by WHO using adjusted indirect comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gwaza, Luther; Gordon, John; Welink, Jan; Potthast, Henrike; Leufkens, Hubert; Stahl, Matthias; García-Arieta, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The scaling-up of access to antiretroviral therapy, particularly in low- to middle-income countries, was facilitated by the introduction and widespread use of generic antiretroviral medicines and fixed-dose combinations. Generic medicines are approved by regulatory authorities based on the demonstration of bioequivalence with the innovator or reference product, as well as meeting quality standards. In clinical practice, however, it is not unusual for generics to be interchanged between each other. This study investigated the differences in bioavailability between WHO-prequalified first-line antiretroviral generics by means of adjusted indirect comparisons to ensure interchangeability between these generics. Data on 34 products containing emtricitabine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, lamivudine and efavirenz in single formulations or fixed-dose combinations were included in the analysis. The 90% CI for the adjusted indirect comparisons was calculated using the homoscedastic method that uses the conventional t-test, and assumes homogeneity of variances between the studies and small sample sizes. The combined standard deviation of both bioequivalence studies was calculated from the variability of each individual study. The adjusted indirect comparisons between generics showed that the differences, expressed as 90% CIs, are less than 30%. Confidence in the interchangeability of two generic products was reduced if the mean difference between the test and reference in the original studies is more than 10%. From a bioequivalence perspective, the generic antiretroviral medicines prequalified by WHO are interchangeable with the reference, as well as between each other without safety or efficacy concerns.

  18. The Implicit Curriculum in Social Work Education: The Culture of Human Interchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogo, Marion; Wayne, Julianne

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the culture of human interchange, which is included as a component of the implicit curriculum in the current EPAS. It presents the use of the implicit curriculum concept in teacher and medical education as a context for its application to social work education. The authors argue that professional behaviors taught in the…

  19. Specification for Teaching Machines and Programmes (Interchangeability of Programmes). Part 1, Linear Machines and Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Standards Institution, London (England).

    To promote interchangeability of teaching machines and programs, so that the user is not so limited in his choice of programs, the British Standards Institute has offered a standard. Part I of the standard deals with linear teaching machines and programs that make use of the roll or sheet methods of presentation. Requirements cover: spools,…

  20. Defense Information Systems Agency Management of Trouble Tickets for Electronic Commerce/Electronic Data Interchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Institute CSC Customer Service Center DISA Defense Information Systems Agency DLA Defense Logistics Agency EC/EDI Electronic Commerce / Electronic Data...INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY SUBJECT: *Audit Report on the Defense Information Systems Agency Management of Trouble Tickets for the Electronic Commerce ...Information Systems Agency Management of Trouble Tickets for Electronic Commerce / Electronic Data Interchange Executive Summary Introduction. The Deputy

  1. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  2. The Implicit Curriculum in Social Work Education: The Culture of Human Interchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogo, Marion; Wayne, Julianne

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the culture of human interchange, which is included as a component of the implicit curriculum in the current EPAS. It presents the use of the implicit curriculum concept in teacher and medical education as a context for its application to social work education. The authors argue that professional behaviors taught in the…

  3. Baseline Assessment Literature Review and Pre-School Record Keeping in Scotland. Interchange No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, J. Eric; Watt, Joyce; Napuk, Angela; Normand, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Every opportunity should be taken to communicate research findings both inside and outside government programs and make them accessible to policy makers, teachers, lecturers, parents, and employers. The "Interchange" series aims to further improve the Educational Research Unit's (ERU) dissemination of the findings of research funded by…

  4. 2014 Trans-Atlantic Research and Development Interchange on Sustainability (Tardis 2014): Summary of Discussions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Trans-Atlantic Research and Development Interchange on Sustainability (TARDIS) has been bringing together a select group of scientists and engineers for in-depth discussions on sustainability on a bi-annual basis since 2004. TARDIS 2014 included twenty eight individuals from ...

  5. Nonlinear excitation of convective cells by interchange modes and spectrum cascade processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlenko, V.P.; Weiland, J.

    1980-04-01

    Convective cell formation due to interchange modes has been studied. The spectral cascade processes between such waves have been considered in the limit k/sub parallel/=0 where the influence of gravity is particularly strong. Possibilities for up conversion are found.

  6. Fluency Effects in Recognition Memory: Are Perceptual Fluency and Conceptual Fluency Interchangeable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanska, Meredith; Olds, Justin M.; Westerman, Deanne L.

    2014-01-01

    On a recognition memory test, both perceptual and conceptual fluency can engender a sense of familiarity and elicit recognition memory illusions. To date, perceptual and conceptual fluency have been studied separately but are they interchangeable in terms of their influence on recognition judgments? Five experiments compared the effect of…

  7. The Use of Electronic Data Interchange under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhinehart, Paul T.

    1996-01-01

    When used in managing college student records, electronic data interchange allows electronic student records to be fed directly into a receiving institution's database instead of being sent by mail. Although the process offers many clear advantages, one important question that must be addressed is how students' privacy will be protected under a…

  8. EDI (electronic data interchange) for human resources saves money and time.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, J J; Kibat, G

    1994-01-01

    Healthcare financial managers seeking immediate cost savings through the use of electronic data interchange (EDI) may find that the automation of repetitive transactions can reduce staffing levels in hospital human resource departments and lower the cost of employee benefits. New procedures and EDI also can tighten controls on hospital employee health benefit eligibility and reduce the per employee cost of benefits.

  9. Using EDI (electronic data interchange) to improve the accounts payable department.

    PubMed

    Bort, R; Schinderle, D R

    1994-01-01

    Additional paperwork, escalating costs, and an outdated accounts payable system at St. Joseph Health System forced management staff to alter the way the accounts payable department operates. This article describes the process the health system used to automate one of its accounts payable departments by using electronic data interchange/electronic funds transfer (EDI/EFT) technology.

  10. On the Interchangeability of Individually Administered and Group Administered Ability Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Baruch; Sela, Roni

    2003-01-01

    This research studied the interchangeability of individually administered and group administered cognitive tests. Seventy undergraduate students took the Hebrew version of the WAIS-R (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised), and their IQs were measured. They also took the IPET (Israeli Psychometric Entrance Test) and their IPET scores were…

  11. Fluency Effects in Recognition Memory: Are Perceptual Fluency and Conceptual Fluency Interchangeable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanska, Meredith; Olds, Justin M.; Westerman, Deanne L.

    2014-01-01

    On a recognition memory test, both perceptual and conceptual fluency can engender a sense of familiarity and elicit recognition memory illusions. To date, perceptual and conceptual fluency have been studied separately but are they interchangeable in terms of their influence on recognition judgments? Five experiments compared the effect of…

  12. Pre-School Educational Provision in Rural Areas. Interchange 69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copus, Andrew; Petrie, Scott; Shucksmith, Janet; Shucksmith, Mark; Still, Margaret; Watt, Joyce

    The Scottish Executive Education Department has pledged to achieve universal provision of preschool education for 3- and 4-year-olds, whose parents want it, by 2002. The particular factors affecting delivery of preschool education in rural areas were examined through telephone interviews with local education authorities and voluntary preschool…

  13. Interchangeability Evaluation of Multisource Ibuprofen Drug Products Using Biowaiver Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Shohin, I. E.; Kulinich, J. I.; Vasilenko, G. F.; Ramenskaya, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    The WHO biowaiver procedure for BCS Class II weak acids was evaluated by running two multisource IR ibuprofen drug products (Ibuprofen, 200 mg tablets, Tatchempharmpreparaty, Russia and Ibuprofen, 200 mg tablets, Biosintez, Russia) with current Marketing Authorizations (i.e. in vivo bioequivalent) through that procedure. Risks associated with excipients interaction and therapeutic index were considered to be not critical. In vitro dissolution kinetic studies were carried out according WHO Guidance (WHO Technical Report Series, No. 937, Annexes 7 and 8) using USP Apparatus II (paddle method) at 75 rpm. Dissolution profiles of test and reference ibuprofen tablets were considered equivalent in pH 4.5 using factors f1 (13) and f2 (72) and not equivalent in pH 6.8 (factor f1 was 26 and f2 was 24). Drug release of ibuprofen at pH 1.2 was negligible due to its weak acid properties. Therefore, two in vivo bioequivalent tablets were declared bioinequivalent by this procedure, indicating that procedure seems to be over-discriminatory. PMID:22707831

  14. Hepatitis A vaccine response in HIV-infected patients: are TWINRIX and HAVRIX interchangeable?

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Humberto R; Hallit, Rabih R; Debari, Vincent A; Slim, Jihad

    2013-02-18

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection remains a health risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons. Seroconversion rates among HAV vaccinated HIV-infected patients have been shown to be reduced compared to the general population. Current guidelines regard HAV vaccines as interchangeable, however there no published data comparing their efficacy in HIV patients. Our study evaluated the impact of different factors, including type of vaccination, on the immunologic response to hepatitis A vaccination in HIV-infected patients in the HAART era. This was a retrospective review of 226 HIV-infected patients at our clinic in Newark, NJ. Patients were eligible if at least one dose HAVRIX (1440 ELISA units) or TWINRIX (720 ELISA units) was administered and had anti-HAV antibody data pre- and post-vaccination. Numerous variables were evaluated for their effect on seroconversion. Seroconversion developed in 53.5% of the population. Responders had higher baseline median CD4 counts (446 versus 362 cells/mm(3); P=0.004) and lower median HIV RNA levels (475 copies/mL versus 5615 copies/mL; P=0.018) than non-responders. Patients with CD4 counts>350 cell/mm(3) were more likely to respond than those with CD4 counts<200 cell/mm(3), 60% and 35%, respectively (P=0.0498). Responders were also more likely to be virologically suppressed (48% versus 32%; P=0.0024). TWINRIX recipients had a 7-fold increased probability of seroconversion when virologically suppressed and less likely to respond if the vaccination series was not completed (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.18-0.96). Seroconversion rates to HAV vaccination are significantly impaired among HIV-infected patients. CD4 cell count and virologic suppression at vaccination impact response. Seroconversion among TWINRIX recipients appeared to be more sensitive to these factors and vaccine series completion in comparison to those administered HAVRIX. Among HIV-patients requiring hepatitis a and b vaccination, the advantage of TWINRIX over

  15. [Drug interchangeability: clinical approach and consumer's point of view].

    PubMed

    Rumel, Davi; Nishioka, Sérgio de Andrade; Santos, Adélia Aparecida Marçal dos

    2006-10-01

    The rational construction of an essential drug list, considering the patient's need, drug safety, availability and the best cost-benefit ratio, is based on drug safety, efficacy and quality. However, in daily practice, the prescriber's decision is mostly influenced by drug effectiveness, following criteria that increase adherence to the treatment, such as relative drug toxicity, convenience, cost and prescriber's experience. In addition, frequent launching of new molecules for the same therapeutic indication, together with wide publicity targeting prescribers, interferes with the decision-making process. Similarly, the bonuses offered by the industry for over-the-counter drug sales interfere with the consumer's choice. The confrontation between known human biological variability and the knowledge that there is no absolute similarity between drugs of the same therapeutic class, or even generic drugs, has an impact on the prescriber's drug list, which should include the concept of first and second choice drugs. Prescribers' unfamiliarity with these subjects is a determinant factor for irrational drug use: a public health issue. The objective of this study was to introduce to drug prescribers information that can help them building up a rational drug list for their patients, based on the National Health Surveillance Agency (Anvisa) experience of drug regulation.

  16. Superthermal Electron Energy Interchange in the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Liemohn, M. W.; Himwich, E. W.

    2013-01-01

    A self-consistent approach to superthermal electron (SE) transport along closed field lines in the inner magnetosphere is used to examine the concept of plasmaspheric transparency, magnetospheric trapping, and SE energy deposition to the thermal electrons. The dayside SE population is generated both by photoionization of the thermosphere and by secondary electron production from impact ionization when the photoelectrons collide with upper atmospheric neutral particles. It is shown that a self-consistent approach to this problem produces significant changes, in comparison with other approaches, in the SE energy exchange between the plasmasphere and the two magnetically conjugate ionospheres. In particular, plasmaspheric transparency can vary by a factor of two depending on the thermal plasma content along the field line and the illumination conditions of the two conjugate ionospheres. This variation in plasmaspheric transparency as a function of thermal plasma and ionospheric conditions increases with L-shell, as the field line gets longer and the equatorial pitch angle extent of the fly-through zone gets smaller. The inference drawn from these results is that such a self-consistent approach to SE transport and energy deposition should be included to ensure robustness in ionosphere-magnetosphere modeling networks.

  17. Superthermal electron energy interchange in the ionosphere-plasmasphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Liemohn, M. W.; Himwich, E. W.

    2013-02-01

    A self-consistent approach to superthermal electron (SE) transport along closed field lines in the inner magnetosphere is used to examine the concept of plasmaspheric transparency, magnetospheric trapping, and SE energy deposition to the thermal electrons. The dayside SE population is generated both by photoionization of the thermosphere and by secondary electron production from impact ionization when the photoelectrons collide with upper atmospheric neutral particles. It is shown that a self-consistent approach to this problem produces significant changes, in comparison with other approaches, in the SE energy exchange between the plasmasphere and the two magnetically conjugate ionospheres. In particular, plasmaspheric transparency can vary by a factor of two depending on the thermal plasma content along the field line and the illumination conditions of the two conjugate ionospheres. This variation in plasmaspheric transparency as a function of thermal plasma and ionospheric conditions increases with L-shell, as the field line gets longer and the equatorial pitch angle extent of the fly-through zone gets smaller. The inference drawn from these results is that such a self-consistent approach to SE transport and energy deposition should be included to ensure robustness in ionosphere-magnetosphere modeling networks.

  18. Superthermal Electron Energy Interchange in the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Liemohn, M. W.; Himwich, E. W.

    2013-01-01

    A self-consistent approach to superthermal electron (SE) transport along closed field lines in the inner magnetosphere is used to examine the concept of plasmaspheric transparency, magnetospheric trapping, and SE energy deposition to the thermal electrons. The dayside SE population is generated both by photoionization of the thermosphere and by secondary electron production from impact ionization when the photoelectrons collide with upper atmospheric neutral particles. It is shown that a self-consistent approach to this problem produces significant changes, in comparison with other approaches, in the SE energy exchange between the plasmasphere and the two magnetically conjugate ionospheres. In particular, plasmaspheric transparency can vary by a factor of two depending on the thermal plasma content along the field line and the illumination conditions of the two conjugate ionospheres. This variation in plasmaspheric transparency as a function of thermal plasma and ionospheric conditions increases with L-shell, as the field line gets longer and the equatorial pitch angle extent of the fly-through zone gets smaller. The inference drawn from these results is that such a self-consistent approach to SE transport and energy deposition should be included to ensure robustness in ionosphere-magnetosphere modeling networks.

  19. Ion finite Larmor radius effects on the interchange instability in an open system

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Sato, S.; Okuyama, Y.; Kato, S.; Kubota, R.

    2013-11-15

    A particle simulation of an interchange instability was performed by taking into account the ion finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects. It is found that the interchange instability with large FLR grows in two phases, that is, linearly growing phase and the nonlinear phase subsequent to the linear phase, where the instability grows exponentially in both phases. The linear growth rates observed in the simulation agree well with the theoretical calculation. The effects of FLR are usually taken in the fluid simulation through the gyroviscosity, the effects of which are verified in the particle simulation with large FLR regime. The gyroviscous cancellation phenomenon observed in the particle simulation causes the drifts in the direction of ion diamagnetic drifts.

  20. Transition from drift to interchange instabilities in an open magnetic field line configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Podesta, M.

    2008-03-15

    The transition from a regime dominated by drift instabilities to a regime dominated by pure interchange instabilities is investigated and characterized in the simple magnetized toroidal device TORPEX [TORoidal Plasma EXperiment, A. Fasoli et al., Phys. of Plasmas 13, 055906 (2006)]. The magnetic field lines are helical, with a dominant toroidal component and a smaller vertical component. Instabilities with a drift character are observed in the favorable curvature region, on the high field side with respect to the maximum of the background density profile. For a limited range of values of the vertical field they coexist with interchange instabilities in the unfavorable curvature region, on the plasma low field side. With increasing vertical magnetic field magnitude, a gradual transition between the two regimes is observed on the low field side, controlled by the value of the field line connection length. The observed transition follows the predictions of a two-fluid linear model.

  1. Modulation of thermal conductivity in kinked silicon nanowires: phonon interchanging and pinching effects.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Yang, Nuo; Wang, Bing-Shen; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-04-10

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the reduction of the thermal conductivity by kinks in silicon nanowires. The reduction percentage can be as high as 70% at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the reduction is also calculated. By calculating phonon polarization vectors, two mechanisms are found to be responsible for the reduced thermal conductivity: (1) the interchanging effect between the longitudinal and transverse phonon modes and (2) the pinching effect, that is, a new type of localization, for the twisting and transverse phonon modes in the kinked silicon nanowires. Our work demonstrates that the phonon interchanging and pinching effects, induced by kinking, are brand-new and effective ways in modulating heat transfer in nanowires, which enables the kinked silicon nanowires to be a promising candidate for thermoelectric materials.

  2. Fast detection of genetic information by an optimized PCR in an interchangeable chip.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Xiao, Kang; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we report the construction of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device for fast amplification and detection of DNA. This device consists of an interchangeable PCR chamber, a temperature control component as well as an optical detection system. The DNA amplification happens on an interchangeable chip with the volumes as low as 1.25 μl, while the heating and cooling rate was as fast as 12.7°C/second ensuring that the total time needed of only 25 min to complete the 35 cycle PCR amplification. An optimized PCR with two-temperature approach for denaturing and annealing (Td and Ta) of DNA was also formulated with the PCR chip, with which the amplification of male-specific sex determining region Y (SRY) gene marker by utilizing raw saliva was successfully achieved and the genetic identification was in-situ detected right after PCR by the optical detection system.

  3. Interchange and Flow Velocity Shear Instabilities in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Genoni, T.; Rose, D.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) events. However, the existing ionospheric models do not describe density irregularities with typical scales of several ion Larmor radii that affect UHF and L bands. These irregularities can be produced in the process of nonlinear evolution of interchange or flow velocity shear instabilities. The model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. The derived nonlinear equations will be numerically solved by using the code Flute, which was originally developed for High Energy Density applications and modified to describe interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere. The high-resolution simulations will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the AFRL C/NOFS satellite low-resolution data during EPBs.

  4. Several benthic species can be used interchangeably in integrated sediment quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, A; Khosrovyan, A; Del Valls, T A; Obispo, R; Serrano, F; Conradi, M; Riba, I

    2013-06-01

    The selection of the best management option for contaminated sediments requires the biological assessment of sediment quality using bioindicator organisms. There have been comparisons of the performance of different test species when exposed to naturally occurring sediments. However, more research is needed to determine their suitability to be used interchangeably. The sensitivity of two amphipod species (Ampelisca brevicornis and Corophium volutator) to sediments collected from four different commercial ports in Spain was tested. For comparison the lugworm, Arenicola marina, which is typically used for bioaccumulation testing, was also tested. Chemical analyses of the sediments were also conducted. All species responded consistently to the chemical exposure tests, although the amphipods, as expected, were more sensitive than the lugworm. It was found that C. volutator showed higher vulnerability than A.brevicornis. It was concluded that the three species can be used interchangeably in the battery of tests for integrated sediment quality assessment.

  5. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G.; Ernst, D. R.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  6. Complex patterning by vertical interchange atom manipulation using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Pou, Pablo; Custance, Oscar; Jelinek, Pavel; Abe, Masayuki; Perez, Ruben; Morita, Seizo

    2008-10-17

    The ability to incorporate individual atoms in a surface following predetermined arrangements may bring future atom-based technological enterprises closer to reality. Here, we report the assembling of complex atomic patterns at room temperature by the vertical interchange of atoms between the tip apex of an atomic force microscope and a semiconductor surface. At variance with previous methods, these manipulations were produced by exploring the repulsive part of the short-range chemical interaction between the closest tip-surface atoms. By using first-principles calculations, we clarified the basic mechanisms behind the vertical interchange of atoms, characterizing the key atomistic processes involved and estimating the magnitude of the energy barriers between the relevant atomic configurations that leads to these manipulations.

  7. Device interchangeability on anterior chamber depth and white-to-white measurements: a thorough literature review

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Vicent, Alberto; Pérez-Vives, Cari; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa; García-Lázaro, Santiago; Montés-Micó, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We have reviewed a set of recently published studies that compared the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and/or white-to-white (WTW) distance obtained by means of different measuring devices. Since some of those studies reached contradictory conclusions regarding device interchangeability, this review was carried out in attempting to clarify which clinical devices can or cannot be considered as interchangeable in clinical practice to measure ACD and/or WTW distance, among these devices: A-scan, ultrasound biomicroscopy, Orbscan and Orbscan II (Bausch&Lomb Surgical Inc., San Dimas, California, USA), Pentacam and Pentacam HR (Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany), Galilei (Ziemer, Switzerland), Visante optical coherence tomography (Visante OCT, Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California, USA), IOLMaster (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Jena, Germany), and Lenstar LS 900/Biograph (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland/Alcon Laboratories Inc., Ft Worth, Texas, USA). PMID:27500117

  8. Commutability and interchangeability of commercial quality control materials with feline plasma for common biochemical analytes.

    PubMed

    Baral, Randolph M; Dhand, Navneet K; Freeman, Kathleen P

    2016-06-01

    Species-specific plasma or serum pools are considered the ideal standard material for quality control materials (QCM) instead of commercially available human QCM. However, using plasma or serum pools is limited by volume restrictions, degradation over time, and a narrow range of analyte concentrations. Concentrations of QCM analytes should be consistent or commutable with those from species-specific plasma/serum samples, and the precision from plasma pools should be comparable or interchangeable with commercial human QCM. The aims of this study were to determine the commutability and interchangeability of 2 levels of commercial QCM (MAS chemTRAK-H [CT]) with feline plasma pools (PP) from normal and renal disease cats measured using a commercial laboratory analyzer and a veterinary in-house analyzer. Agreement between the 2 analyzers was assessed for 16 analytes by correlation and Passing-Bablok regression analyses of feline plasma samples. The difference between each CT data point and the regression line (residuals) was determined and standardized, and CT were considered 'commutable' with PP if the standardized residual was within a range of -3 to 3. Coefficients of variation (CVs) for CT and PP for 16 analytes on 2 analyzers were compared by bootstrap analysis to determine interchangeability. Most CT analytes were within the range of patient plasma sample analytes, thus commutable. Only 2 analytes had equivalent precision for both levels of CT and both levels of PP, and 5 additional analytes had similar precision for at least one level of CT compared to at least one level of PP. The QCM assessed is commutable to feline PP within the tested ranges for 2 particular analyzers. Commutability does not grant interchangeability. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. Impact of an interchange program to support use of insulin pens.

    PubMed

    Ward, Leah G; Aton, Sara S

    2011-07-15

    The impact of a hospital initiative to reduce staff needle-stick injuries and overall insulin costs by switching from use of insulin vials to use of insulin pens for treatment of inpatients was evaluated. An interchange program entailing a switch from vial-and-syringe insulin administration to insulin delivery via prefilled injector pens was implemented at a specialty clinic and hospital. Patient and employee incident reports were reviewed to identify insulin-related staff needle-stick injuries and to assess patient safety indicators during six-month periods before and after implementation of the interchange. Pharmaceutical purchasing data were used to compare total insulin costs for the two periods. In the six months after implementation of the interchange program, nurses treated 2,084 patients with subcutaneous insulin products; there was one staff needle-stick injury, compared with five injuries during the designated preimplementation period (2,118 patients treated). During the six months after the switch to insulin injector pens, there were four reports of wrong-drug errors (three errors during dispensing and one error during administration to the patient), all involving insulin detemir and insulin aspart pens; in addition, there was one reported wrong-time error associated with a sliding-scale order for insulin aspart. Total insulin product costs for the preimplementation and postimplementation periods were $124,181 and $60,655, respectively. Using an interchange program to support the use of insulin pens at a specialty clinic and hospital provided increased staff safety and cost savings.

  10. Effects of resistive interchange instabilities on energy confinement in reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    AN Zhi-gang; Diamond, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    Electron conduction losses due to magnetic flutter produced by resistive interchange instabilities and the resulting confinement deterioration mechanism are investigated analytically. Using approximate solutions of MHD equations for even and odd potential parities, the potential and magnetic perturbation levels at saturation are estimated. These results are used to calculate the stochastic magnetic field diffusion coefficients. An expression for the anomalous electron thermal conductivity is then derived for collision-less and collisional regimes. Scaling laws for energy confinement are inferred therefrom.

  11. THEMIS observation of Kinetic Ballooning/Interchange Waves in the High Bz Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Evgeny V.; Nakamura, Rumi; Kubyshkina, Marina V.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; A, Sergeev, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Using THEMIS observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures, we investigate the properties of the waves when a high background plasma sheet Bz is seen. We find that such waves are in a better agreement with the existing kinetic simulations. Using adapted Tsyganenko models, we also show conjugate all-sky camera observations in the course of the development of the waves.

  12. Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic Dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.

    2005-05-06

    Centrifugally driven interchange instabilities are observed in a laboratory plasma confined by a dipole magnetic field. The instabilities appear when an equatorial mesh is biased to drive a radial current that causes rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities are quasicoherent in the laboratory frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures.

  13. Implementing Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) with Small Business Suppliers in the Pre-Award Acquisition Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    initiative " Electronic Commerce through EDI." Consistent with the DoD initiative to implement EDI with industry, participation of small businesses in the pre...paperwork associated with the pre-award acquisition process, electronic commerce is being integrated with EDI through electronic bulletin boards...This thesis will explore the issues surrounding DoD’s successfully implementing the use of Electronic Commerce / Electronic Data Interchange (EC/EDI

  14. Interchangeability of generic anti-epileptic drugs: a quantitative analysis of topiramate and gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Maliepaard, Marc; Banishki, Nikola; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; Teerenstra, Steven; Elferink, André J

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the so-called "shift" or "drift" problem might occur when generic anti-epileptic drugs are interchanged, and thus to assess if generic anti-epileptic drugs are interchangeable and can be used in an efficacious and safe way on the basis of their bioequivalence to one and the same reference product. The bioequivalence of topiramate and gabapentin generics was evaluated. For proper interstudy comparison, individual exposure data (AUC and C(max)) for each bioequivalence study present in the registration dossier was normalized based on the absolute exposure data of one of two innovators. The exposure-normalized plasma concentration curves of the generic product arms between studies were compared, providing indirect evidence of bioequivalence of the different generics. Additionally, comparisons were made for generic-generic as well as innovator-innovator exchange based on absolute exposure data from individual bioequivalence studies. In almost all cases, estimated 90% confidence intervals of the AUC and C(max) ratios for generic-generic interchange were within the routine 80-125% criterion. When absolute, non-corrected exposure data were used for this interstudy comparison, in a number of cases 90% confidence intervals outside the 80-125% criterion were found upon interchanging generics from two studies. However, a similar pattern of 90% confidence intervals outside the 80-125% criterion was observed for the comparison of innovator arms, despite the fact that the innovator was identical in all studies. Our results strongly indicate that the so-called drifting problem upon generic-generic substitution does not result in important differences in exposure upon exchanging topiramate generics or gabapentin generics.

  15. Solar Wind Driven Magnetotail Ballooning-interchange Evolves to Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Theory and 3D simulations for the mid-tail dynamics showing a proposed solution to the 3-minute problem are presented motivated by the CLUSTER and THEMIS substorm data [ Nakamura et al. 2006]. The model shows that the ballooning-interchange starts the dynamics and then after a suitably long period of minutes in the nonlinear state there is a change in structure to that of magnetic reconnections. While these two eigenmodes have opposite symmetries in the classic symmetric geotail geometry [Prichett-Coroniti-Pellat (1997)], the symmetry is broken for typical solar winds on to a tilted Earth magnetic dipole. The model includes distinct north IN(t) and south IS(t) magnetopause closing currents with corresponding N-S magnetopause boundary conditions. Small asymmetric perturbations are sufficient in the quasi-stationary nonlinear state of the ballooning interchange dynamics to have the structures evolve into fast magnetic reconnection events. The classic measure of interchange called delta-prime is stable during this simuations. The nonlinear growth rates are obtained with nonlinear FLR-fluid two component fluid simulations. When the mid-tail Bz (x,z,t) structure is such as to give the fast ballooning-interchange instability we show that in the nonlinear stage the dynamics changes the structure producing magnetic islands of the scale observed in the CLUSTER substorm data. We conclude that asymmetric geotail models give more reliable forecasting of the onset of subtorms. We discuss the effect of the dynamics on magnetospheric structures as they propagate to the inner magnetospheric-tail boundary layer.

  16. Concepts for a Standard Data Interchange Structure (SDIS) INPE proposal to CCSDS/Panel 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, E. W.; Martins, R. C.

    1983-05-01

    Concepts for a standard data interchange structure (SDIS) are proposed. Applications processes, products and an end-to-end reference physical and system model are identified for characterization of services to be offered with the aid of a SDIS, as a system. Implementation aspects are proposed for the SDIS: logical structure, format and protocol, inspired on the ISO/ANSI Reference Model for open systems interconnection.

  17. Observation of n=1 Resistive Interchange Mode in low-β Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Y.; Ramos, J. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Snipes, J.; Wolfe, S.; Taylor, G.

    1999-11-01

    A localized MHD perturbation, which is identified as a resistive interchange mode, has been observed during the current ramp of Alcator C-Mod, when βN is as low as 0.15. Using two grating polychromators which can cover more than half of the whole plasma profile, very localized (within 2cm) Te fluctuations were observed in the core region, which has a hollow equilibrium Te profile. Based on magnetic diagnostics, the toroidal mode number is n=1. The pressure gradients at the channels where the fluctuations were observed were positive (p^' >0) and they were located close to an inner rational surface of the reversed q-profile with q = 5. According to resistive interchange mode theory(GLASSER, A.H. et al., Phys. Fluids. 19) (1976) 567, such a hollow pressure profile with q > 1 in a low-β plasma can be unstable. A resistive MHD analysis of this equilibrium, using the MARS(BONDESON, A. et al, Phys. Fluids B4) (1992) 1889 code, predicts such an unstable mode with toroidal mode number, n=1. Unlike DIII-D observations(CHU, M.S. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 )(1996) 2710, this resistive interchange mode during low-β plasma is due to the inverted pressure gradient in the core, not to high β.

  18. Excitation of the centrifugally driven interchange instability in a plasma confined by a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.; Waksman, J.

    2005-05-15

    The centrifugally driven electrostatic interchange instability is excited for the first time in a laboratory magnetoplasma. The plasma is confined by a dipole magnetic field, and the instability is excited when an equatorial mesh is biased to induce a radial current that creates rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities appear quasicoherent in the lab frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. The mode structure is measured using a multiprobe correlation technique as well as a novel 96-point polar imaging diagnostic which measures particle flux along field lines that map to the pole. Interchange instabilities caused by hot electron pressure are simultaneously observed at the hot electron drift frequency. Adjusting the hot electron fraction {alpha} modifies the stability as well as the structures of the centrifugally driven modes. In the presence of larger fractions of energetic electrons, m=1 is observed to be the dominant mode. For faster rotating plasmas containing fewer energetic electrons, m=2 dominates. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures in both regimes. The low azimuthal mode numbers seen in the experiment and simulation can also be interpreted with a local, linear dispersion relation of the electrostatic interchange instability. Drift resonant hot electrons give the instability a real frequency, inducing stabilizing ion polarization currents that preferentially suppress high-m modes.

  19. Generation of Periodic Signatures at Saturn Through Titan's Interaction with the Centrifugal Interchange Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winglee, R.; Kidder, A. R.; Harnett, E. M.; Paty, C. S.; Snowden, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the high degree of alignment of Saturn's dipole with its rotation axis, no strong rotational periodicities are expected. However, Cassini data demonstrated the existence of such periodicities not only in Saturn's kilometric radio emissions (SKR), but in the plasma and magnetic field signatures. Multi-fluid/multi-scale simulations that include the heavy ions from the Enceladus plasma torus, the light ions of the solar wind and the interaction of Titan with the Kronian magnetosphere show that the rotational period is embedded in the development of the interchange instability but the planetary period is masked by high-frequency components of the instability. The presence of Titan is shown to damp the high-frequency components in association with the flapping of Titan's ion tail and this enables the fundamental frequency near the planetary rotation frequency to grow at the expense of the high-frequency components. As a result, the interchange instability is seen to change from one where 5-7 large interchange fingers dominate to one where there are about 3 which cause the modulation of magnetospheric parameters near the planetary period. This modulation includes the movement of the magnetopause, the injection of energetic particles into the inner magnetosphere and the plasma density at high latitudes both of which control Saturn's kilometic radiation.

  20. Parameter-Space Survey of Linear G-mode and Interchange in Extended Magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2017-09-11

    The extended magnetohydrodynamic stability of interchange modes is studied in two configurations. In slab geometry, a local dispersion relation for the gravitational interchange mode (g-mode) with three different extensions of the MHD model [P. Zhu, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 085005 (2008)] is analyzed. Our results delineate where drifts stablize the g-mode with gyroviscosity alone and with a two-fluid Ohm’s law alone. Including the two-fluid Ohm’s law produces an ion drift wave that interacts with the g-mode. This interaction then gives rise to a second instability at finite ky. A second instability is also observed in numerical extended MHD computations of linear interchange in cylindrical screw-pinch equilibria, the second configuration. Particularly with incomplete models, this mode limits the regions of stability for physically realistic conditions. But, applying a consistent two-temperature extended MHD model that includes the diamagnetic heat flux density (more » $$\\vec{q}$$*) makes the onset of the second mode occur at larger Hall parameter. For conditions relevant to the SSPX experiment [E.B. Hooper, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 113001 (2012)], significant stabilization is observed for Suydam parameters as large as unity (Ds≲1).« less

  1. Thiol-disulfide interchange in the tocinoic acid/glutathione system during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Thing, Mette; Zhang, Jun; Laurence, Jennifer; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2010-12-01

    Thiol-disulfide interchange ("disulfide scrambling") is a common mechanism of covalent aggregation for protein drugs. Using tocinoic acid (cyclo-S-Cys-Tyr-Ile-Gln-Asn-Cys-(S); TA(ox)) and glutathione (γGlu-Cys-Gly; GSH), our previous work demonstrated that thiol/disulfide interchange is affected by lyophilization in a manner consistent with irreversible and regioselective loss of TA(ox) (Zhang et al., 2009, J Pharm Sci 98/9: 3312-3318). Here, we explore the contributions of stages of the lyophilization cycle to perturbations in thiol/disulfide interchange in the TA/GSH system. TA(ox) and GSH were co-lyophilized from phosphate buffer in the presence or absence of various excipients, then analyzed for TA(ox) and mixed disulfide products by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (rp-HPLC). Perturbations were found to occur primarily during freezing, before significant amounts of ice were removed by sublimation. Addition of a lyoprotectant (sucrose), a cryoprotectant (Tween-20) and flash-freezing influenced the product distribution only while ice was still present. Decreasing the redox potential by the addition of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) affected the product distribution differently in lyophilized samples and solution controls, but in neither case led to increased conservation of TA(ox). © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  2. Ion pressure gradient effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz and interchange instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, David; Myra, James

    2016-10-01

    In the flow-free state, radial force-balance implies that the poloidal components of the ExB and ion diamagnetic drifts, grad(Pi) / n, are mirrored : vE + vdi = 0. Analysis of the linearized fluid equations shows that the mirrored state is stable in the absence of the interchange drive, grad(Pe +Pi) / n, i.e., the K-H instability is absent. With the interchange drive present, the mirrored-state growth rate passes through a global minimum value with increasing ion pressure gradient, due to sheared ExB flow and diamagnetic suppression, admitting a stability interval in a neighborhood of the minimum if other damping mechanisms are present. The K-H instability is recovered, absent the interchange drive, if force-balance is generalized to include neoclassical poloidal flows (vE + vdi + vnc = 0, vnc grad(Ti)), so that mirroring is lost. Implications for achieving a quiescent H-mode are discussed, and SOLT simulations, which include nonlinear ion pressure effects, are compared with the linear picture. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  3. B-A interchanges are an unlikely pathway for B chromosome integration into the standard genome.

    PubMed

    Bakkali, M; Cabrero, J; Camacho, J P M

    2003-01-01

    One of the conceivable evolutionary pathways of a parasitic B chromosome is its integration into the host genome through translocation to an A chromosome. To investigate this possibility, we analyze here the nature, meiotic behavior and genetic effects of a spontaneous interchange between a medium-sized autosome and a B chromosome, found in one male caught in a Moroccan population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans and the offspring of controlled crosses with six different females. Most metaphase I cells analyzed (115 out of 118) showed a trivalent with chiasmata in both the interstitial and pairing segments, which predicted about half of genetically unbalanced spermatozoa. The analysis of 234 embryos sired by this male on six females showed the lethality of some meiotic products paralleled to a decrease in egg fertility (0.541 +/- 0.051, compared to the 0.879 +/- 0.017 shown by females mated to standard males). These results suggest that the cost of the B-A interchange on host fitness, in terms of gametic inviability, highly diminishes the possibility of frequency increase for the interchange to reach a polymorphic status, which is the first and indispensable step to reach fixation and thus integration of the B chromosome DNA into the host genome.

  4. A standardized SOA for clinical data interchange in a cardiac telemonitoring environment.

    PubMed

    Gazzarata, Roberta; Vergari, Fabio; Cinotti, Tullio Salmon; Giacomini, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Care of chronic cardiac patients requires information interchange between patients' homes, clinical environments, and the electronic health record. Standards are emerging to support clinical information collection, exchange and management and to overcome information fragmentation and actors delocalization. Heterogeneity of information sources at patients' homes calls for open solutions to collect and accommodate multidomain information, including environmental data. Based on the experience gained in a European Research Program, this paper presents an integrated and open approach for clinical data interchange in cardiac telemonitoring applications. This interchange is supported by the use of standards following the indications provided by the national authorities of the countries involved. Taking into account the requirements provided by the medical staff involved in the project, the authors designed and implemented a prototypal middleware, based on a service-oriented architecture approach, to give a structured and robust tool to congestive heart failure patients for their personalized telemonitoring. The middleware is represented by a health record management service, whose interface is compliant to the healthcare services specification project Retrieve, Locate and Update Service standard (Level 0), which allows communication between the agents involved through the exchange of Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 documents. Three performance tests were carried out and showed that the prototype completely fulfilled all requirements indicated by the medical staff; however, certain aspects, such as authentication, security and scalability, should be deeply analyzed within a future engineering phase.

  5. Transitions in the Lives of Children and Young People: Resilience Factors. Interchange 78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Tony; Blackburn, Sarah

    This report draws upon an extensive review of the international literature on resilience to describe effective strategies in health, education, and social work for helping children to cope with periods of transition through promoting resilience. The report takes a broad view of childrens transitions, meaning any episode where children have to cope…

  6. Evaluation of a Therapeutic Interchange from Fluticasone/Salmeterol to Mometasone/Formoterol in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Yip, Elaine; Karimi, Sahar; Pien, Linda T

    2016-04-01

    in the occurrence of COPD exacerbations 6 months pre- and postconversion from fluticasone/salmeterol to mometasone/formoterol. COPD exacerbations were defined by the diagnosis or documentation of a COPD exacerbation during any hospitalizations, urgent care (UC)/emergency department (ED) visits, or clinic encounters. Secondary outcomes included the determination of the difference in the occurrence of intensive care unit admissions, hospitalizations, UC/ED visits, and clinic encounters for COPD exacerbations 6 months pre- and postconversion; number of patients who required modification in therapy; and any reasons for mometasone/for-moterol discontinuation postconversion. Patients served as their own controls to compare any differences in outcomes while taking mometasone/formoterol versus fluticasone/salmeterol. Within our patient population, 34.2% (n = 178) of patients experienced at least 1 COPD exacerbation while prescribed fluticasone/salmeterol compared with 28.6% (n = 149) of patients while prescribed mometasone/formoterol (P = 0.030). Mometasone/formoterol therapy did not demonstrate any statistically significant differences in the secondary outcomes (P < 0.050). A later subgroup analysis of the primary outcome revealed that factors associated with a statistically significant decrease in the occurrence of COPD exacerbations were male sex (P = 0.023), comorbid asthma (P = 0.026), and conversion from fluticasone/salmeterol to a more potent dose of mometasone/formoterol (P = 0.014). There was a statistically significant decrease in the proportion of patients who experienced COPD exacerbations postconversion from fluticasone/salmeterol to mometasone/formoterol. This study is an example of a real-world therapeutic interchange that provides additional data to support the use of mometasone/formoterol for its unlabeled COPD indication. No outside funding supported this study. The authors report no financial or other conflicts of interest related to the subject of this

  7. Interchangeability and comparative effectiveness between generic and brand montelukast immediate release tablets after a single oral administration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Mousa, Ayman; Ghazal, Nadia; Bustami, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Montelukast is a leukotriene receptor antagonist. The release of leukotrienes causes narrowing and constricting in the respiratory airways. Blocking the action of these leukotrienes, montelukast can be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of chronic asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interchangeability and comparative effectiveness between a generic and a brand montelukast 10 mg immediate release tablets (Broncast(®) and Singulair(®), respectively) after a single oral dose among Arab Mediterranean volunteers. An open-label, randomized two-period crossover bioequivalence design was conducted in 31 healthy male volunteers with a 1 week washout between each study period and under fasting conditions. The plasma drug concentration was assessed by using a previously validated LC MS/MS method. The ratio between the generic and brand of geometric least squares means was reported for both generic and brand products. Moreover, an in vitro dissolution study was conducted on generic and brand tablets using three different pH media, and similarity and non-similarity factors (f2 and f1) were calculated. The used bioanalytical method was found to be linear within the range 6.098-365.855 ng/mL. The correlation coefficient was close to 0.999 during the course of the study validation. Statistical comparison of the main pharmacokinetic parameters showed the inexistence of any significant difference between generic and the brand. The point estimates (ratios of geometric means) were 111.939, 111.711, and 112.169 % for AUC0-24, AUC0-∞, and Cmax, respectively. The 90 % confidence intervals (CIs) were within the pre-defined limits of 80.00-125.00 % as specified by the FDA and EMA for bioequivalence studies. F2 and f1 were higher than 50 and lower than 15, respectively in all selected pH media. Broncast(®) immediate release film coated tablets (10 mg/tablet) are bioequivalent to Singulair(®) immediate release film coated tablets (10 mg/tablet), with a

  8. NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Craig, D. A.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Technical Interchange Meeting was to increase the quantity and quality of technical, cost, and programmatic data used to model the impact of investing in different technologies. The focus of this meeting was the Technology Tool Box (TTB), a database of performance, operations, and programmatic parameters provided by technologists and used by systems engineers. The TTB is the data repository used by a system of models known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS). This report describes the result of the November meeting, and also provides background information on ATLAS and the TTB.

  9. Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) Project First Technical Interchange Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Robert; Kille, Robert; Kirsten, Richard; Rigterink, Paul; Sielski, Henry; Gratteau, Melinda F. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    A three-day NASA Virtual Airspace and Modeling Project (VAMS) Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) was held at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. on May 21 through May 23,2002. The purpose of this meeting was to share initial concept information sponsored by the VAMS Project. An overall goal of the VAMS Project is to develop validated, blended, robust and transition-able air transportation system concepts over the next five years that will achieve NASA's long-term Enterprise Aviation Capacity goals. This document describes the presentations at the TIM, their related questions and answers, and presents the TIM recommendations.

  10. Chemical and nuclear emergencies: Interchanging lessons learned from planning and accident experience

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, V.; Sorensen, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    Because the goal of emergency preparedness for both chemical and nuclear hazards is to reduce human exposure to hazardous materials, this paper examines the interchange of lessons learned from emergency planning and accident experience in both industries. While the concerns are slightly different, sufficient similarity is found for each to draw implications from the others experience. Principally the chemical industry can learn from the dominant planning experience associated with nuclear power plants, while the nuclear industry can chiefly learn from the chemical industry's accident experience. 23 refs.

  11. The Great American Biotic Interchange: Dispersals, Tectonics, Climate, Sea Level and Holding Pens.

    PubMed

    Woodburne, Michael O

    2010-12-01

    The biotic and geologic dynamics of the Great American Biotic Interchange are reviewed and revised. Information on the Marine Isotope Stage chronology, sea level changes as well as Pliocene and Pleistocene vegetation changes in Central and northern South America add to a discussion of the role of climate in facilitating trans-isthmian exchanges. Trans-isthmian land mammal exchanges during the Pleistocene glacial intervals appear to have been promoted by the development of diverse non-tropical ecologies. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10914-010-9144-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  12. The Great American Biotic Interchange: Dispersals, Tectonics, Climate, Sea Level and Holding Pens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The biotic and geologic dynamics of the Great American Biotic Interchange are reviewed and revised. Information on the Marine Isotope Stage chronology, sea level changes as well as Pliocene and Pleistocene vegetation changes in Central and northern South America add to a discussion of the role of climate in facilitating trans-isthmian exchanges. Trans-isthmian land mammal exchanges during the Pleistocene glacial intervals appear to have been promoted by the development of diverse non-tropical ecologies. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10914-010-9144-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21125025

  13. Pressure driven tearing and interchange modes in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Paccagnella, R.

    2013-01-15

    In this work, the magneto-hydro-dynamic stability of pressure driven modes in the reversed field pinch has been analyzed. It is shown that at low and intermediate {beta}'s, i.e., typically for values below 20-25%, the tearing parity is dominant, while only at very high {beta}, well above the achieved experimental values, at least part of the modes are converted to ideal interchange instabilities. Before their transition to ideal instabilities, according to their Lundquist number scaling, they can be classified as resistive-g modes.

  14. DoD Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) in Contracting Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-20

    Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) to support Department of Defense (DoD) procurement processes has been under consideration for some time. A 1988 Deputy Secretary of Defense memo calls for maximum use of EDI, based on 10 years of DoD EDI investigation and experiments. In 1990, Defense Management Review Decision 941 stated, ’The strategic goal of DoD’s current efforts is to provide the department with the capability to initiate, conduct, and maintain its external business related transactions and internal logistics, contracting, and

  15. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory for localized interchange modes in toroidal anisotropic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tonghui Wan, B. N.; Sun, Y.; Shen, B.; Qian, J. P.; Zheng, L. J.

    2016-08-15

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory for localized interchange modes is developed for toroidal plasmas with anisotropic pressure. The work extends the existing theories of Johnson and Hastie [Phys. Fluids 31, 1609 (1988)], etc., to the low n mode case, where n is the toroidal mode number. Also, the plasma compressibility is included, so that the coupling of the parallel motion to perpendicular one, i.e., the so-called apparent mass effect, is investigated in the anisotropic pressure case. The singular layer equation is obtained, and the generalized Mercier's criterion is derived.

  16. Universal Statistical Properties of Drift-Interchange Turbulence in TORPEX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Labit, B.; Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Diallo, A.; Mueller, S. H.; Plyushchev, G.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.

    2007-06-22

    A unique parabolic relation is observed to link skewness and kurtosis of around ten thousand density fluctuation signals, measured over the whole cross section of a toroidal magnetized plasma for a broad range of experimental conditions. All the probability density functions of the measured signals, including those characterized by a negative skewness, are universally described by a special case of the Beta distribution. Fluctuations in the drift-interchange frequency range are necessary and sufficient to assure that probability density functions can be described by this specific Beta distribution.

  17. Experimental Observation of the Blob-Generation Mechanism from Interchange Waves in a Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Podesta, M.; Fasoli, A.; Poli, F. M.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.; Brunner, S.; Diallo, A.; Graves, J.; Mueller, S. H.

    2008-02-08

    The mechanism for blob generation in a toroidal magnetized plasma is investigated using time-resolved measurements of two-dimensional structures of electron density, temperature, and plasma potential. The blobs are observed to form from a radially elongated structure that is sheared off by the ExB flow. The structure is generated by an interchange wave that increases in amplitude and extends radially in response to a decrease of the radial pressure scale length. The dependence of the blob amplitude upon the pressure radial scale length is discussed.

  18. Interchanging scores between clinical dementia rating scale and global deterioration scale.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Hye; Lee, Byung Hwa; Kim, Seonwoo; Hahm, Dong Seok; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Yoon, Soo Jin; Jeong, Yong; Ha, Choong Keun; Nab, Duk L

    2003-01-01

    Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale and Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) are commonly used to measure the severity of dementia. However, no specific rules are available to convert the scores of CDR into those of GDS and vice versa. Using a semi-structured interview, two examiners independently rated CDR and GDS in 78 patients with dementia and 34 controls. Regression analysis showed a curvilinear relationship between CDR and GDS. This curve may provide a rule to interchange the scores of GDS and CDR (or Sum of Boxes of CDR).

  19. Design and development of an interchangeable nanomicroelectrospray source for a quadrupole mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas R.; Sagerman, Gary; Wood, Troy D.

    2003-10-01

    An interchangeable microelectrospray and nanoelectrospray ionization source has been designed and constructed for use on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. This new source is specially designed to conduct nanoelectrospray experiments utilizing pulled borosilicate glass emitters, as well as various ionization modes utilizing silica capillaries. The source design facilitates the easy exchange between a microelectrospray source and nanoelectrospray source. The microionspray assembly can be quickly replaced by the nanoelectrospray adaptation in order to conduct nanoelectrospray experiments. Furthermore, this source design allows for the coupling of low flow separation techniques, like microliquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis.

  20. The free energy in a class of quantum spin systems and interchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnberg, J. E.

    2016-07-01

    We study a class of quantum spin systems in the mean-field setting of the complete graph. For spin S = 1/2, the model is the Heisenberg ferromagnet, and for general spin S ∈ 1/2 N, it has a probabilistic representation as a cycle-weighted interchange process. We determine the free energy and the critical temperature (recovering results by Tóth and by Penrose when S = 1/2). The critical temperature is shown to coincide (as a function of S) with that of the q = 2S + 1 state classical Potts model, and the phase transition is discontinuous when S ≥ 1.

  1. Assessing the value of laboratory electronic data interchange in the department of veterans affairs.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Colene M; Rudin, Robert S; Johnston, Douglas S; Pan, Eric C

    2010-11-13

    We modeled the adoption, costs and monetezied benefits of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA's) internally developed Laboratory Electronic Data Interchange (LEDI) application from 2001-2007. LEDI provides standards-based electronic exchange of laboratory data and secure transmission of laboratory test orders and results. Once the initial development and installation costs were accounted for, LEDI likely produced value for the VA in savings of laboratory staff time for test ordering and results processing. We estimate that the VA needed to realize 20 percent of projected labor saving to recover its investment in LEDI.

  2. From medical record to patient record through electronic data interchange (EDI).

    PubMed

    Kinkhorst, O M; Lalleman, A W; Hasman, A

    1996-07-01

    In this contribution the role of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) for patient records is discussed. It is our opinion that unlimited access to patient records of different care provides is not a wise thing to do and may even not be acceptable legally. The exchange of EDI messages may be a solution in that the relevant information is exchanged on a need to know basis under the responsibility of the care provider that generated the information. The state of the art with respect to the availability of EDI messages in Europe is presented.

  3. The neutronic and fuel cycle performance of interchangeable 3500 MWth metal and oxide fueled LMRs

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, E.K.; Wade, D.C.

    1989-03-01

    This study summarizes the neutronic and fuel cycle analysis performed at Argonne National Laboratory for an oxide and a metal fueled 3500 MWth LMR. The oxide and metal core designs were developed to meet reactor performance specifications that are constrained by requirements for core loading interchangeability and for small burnup reactivity swing. Differences in the computed performance parameters of the oxide and metal cores, arising from basic differences in their neutronic characteristics, were identified and discussed. It is shown that metal and oxide cores designed to the same ground rules exhibit many similar performance characteristics; however, they differ substantially in reactivity coefficients, control strategies, and fuel cycle options. 12 refs., 25 figs.

  4. Bringing Order to Chaos: RIF as the New Standard for Rule Interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, Sandro

    As the W3C Rule Interchange Format (RIF) nears completion, we consider what it offers users and how it may change the design of systems and change the industry. More than just a standard XML format for rules, RIF is integrated with the W3C Semantic Web technology stack, offering a vision for combining some of the best features of the Web with the best features of rule systems. RIF is designed to directly handle rule bases which use only standard features, but it can be extended. Some example extensions and possible areas for future standards work will be discussed.

  5. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  6. A longitudinal multilevel CFA-MTMM model for interchangeable and structurally different methods

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tobias; Schultze, Martin; Eid, Michael; Geiser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    One of the key interests in the social sciences is the investigation of change and stability of a given attribute. Although numerous models have been proposed in the past for analyzing longitudinal data including multilevel and/or latent variable modeling approaches, only few modeling approaches have been developed for studying the construct validity in longitudinal multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) measurement designs. The aim of the present study was to extend the spectrum of current longitudinal modeling approaches for MTMM analysis. Specifically, a new longitudinal multilevel CFA-MTMM model for measurement designs with structurally different and interchangeable methods (called Latent-State-Combination-Of-Methods model, LS-COM) is presented. Interchangeable methods are methods that are randomly sampled from a set of equivalent methods (e.g., multiple student ratings for teaching quality), whereas structurally different methods are methods that cannot be easily replaced by one another (e.g., teacher, self-ratings, principle ratings). Results of a simulation study indicate that the parameters and standard errors in the LS-COM model are well recovered even in conditions with only five observations per estimated model parameter. The advantages and limitations of the LS-COM model relative to other longitudinal MTMM modeling approaches are discussed. PMID:24860515

  7. [The requirements of standard and conditions of interchangeability of medical articles].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V; Lukicheva, T I

    2013-11-01

    The article deals with possibility to apply specific approaches under evaluation of interchangeability of medical articles for laboratory analysis. The development of standardized analytical technologies of laboratory medicine and formulation of requirements of standards addressed to manufacturers of medical articles the clinically validated requirements are to be followed. These requirements include sensitivity and specificity of techniques, accuracy and precision of research results, stability of reagents' quality in particular conditions of their transportation and storage. The validity of requirements formulated in standards and addressed to manufacturers of medical articles can be proved using reference system, which includes master forms and standard samples, reference techniques and reference laboratories. This approach is supported by data of evaluation of testing systems for measurement of level of thyrotrophic hormone, thyroid hormones and glycated hemoglobin HB A1c. The versions of testing systems can be considered as interchangeable only in case of results corresponding to the results of reference technique and comparable with them. In case of absence of functioning reference system the possibilities of the Joined committee of traceability in laboratory medicine make it possible for manufacturers of reagent sets to apply the certified reference materials under development of manufacturing of sets for large listing of analytes.

  8. Interchangeable neck shape-specific coils for a clinically realizable anterior neck phased array system.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael J; Parker, Dennis L; Bolster, Bradley D; Kim, Seong-Eun; McNally, J Scott; Treiman, Gerald S; Hadley, J Rock

    2017-02-10

    To demonstrate the interchangeable neck shape-specific (NSS) coil concept that supplements standard commercial spine and head/neck coils to provide simultaneous high-resolution (hi-res) head/neck imaging with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Two NSS coils were constructed on formers designed to fit two different neck shapes. A 7-channel (7ch) ladder array was constructed on a medium neck former, and a 9-channel (9ch) ladder array was constructed on large neck former. Both coils were interchangeable with the same preamp housing. The 7ch and 9ch coils demonstrate SNR gains of approximately 4 times and 3 times over the Siemens 20-channel head/neck coil in the carotid arteries of our volunteers, respectively. Coupling between the Siemens 32-channel spine coil, Siemens 20-channel head/neck coil, and the NSS coils was negligible, allowing for simultaneous hi-res head/neck imaging with high SNR. This study demonstrates that supplementing existing commercial spine and head/neck coils with an NSS coil allows uniform simultaneous hi-res imaging with high SNR in the anterior neck, while maintaining SNR of the commercial coil in the head and posterior neck. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Nonlinear saturation of ideal interchange modes in a sheared magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A.D.

    1990-09-01

    Pressure-driven ideal modes cannot completely interchange flux tubes of a sheared magnetic field; instead, they saturate, forming new helical equilibria. These equilibria are studied both analytically and numerically with reduced MHD equations in a flux-conserving Lagrangian representation. For unstable localized modes, the structure of the nonlinear layer generated around the resonant flux surface depends on the value of Mercier parameter D{sub M}. Its width is found to be proportional to the position of the inflection point on the linear eigenfunction. Perturbed surfaces in equilibrium always have folds, i.e., areas where the direction of the original reduced magnetic field is reserved. But only far from the instability threshold does the internal structure of the nonlinear layer resemble bubble' formation. The appearance of sheet currents and island-like structures along the resonant flux surface may be of interest for the description of forced reconnection in models with finite resistivity. Analytic results are found to be in agreement with 2-D numerical simulations. This study also includes the case of ballooning instability by representing nonlocal driving terms through the matching parameter {Delta}{prime}, which defines the outer boundary conditions for the interchange layer. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Botulinum toxin type A products are not interchangeable: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Brin, Mitchell F; James, Charmaine; Maltman, John

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) products are injectable biologic medications derived from Clostridium botulinum bacteria. Several different BoNTA products are marketed in various countries, and they are not interchangeable. Differences between products include manufacturing processes, formulations, and the assay methods used to determine units of biological activity. These differences result in a specific set of interactions between each BoNTA product and the tissue injected. Consequently, the products show differences in their in vivo profiles, including preclinical dose response curves and clinical dosing, efficacy, duration, and safety/adverse events. Most, but not all, published studies document these differences, suggesting that individual BoNTA products act differently depending on experimental and clinical conditions, and these differences may not always be predictable. Differentiation through regulatory approvals provides a measure of confidence in safety and efficacy at the specified doses for each approved indication. Moreover, the products differ in the amount of study to which they have been subjected, as evidenced by the number of publications in the peer-reviewed literature and the quantity and quality of clinical studies. Given that BoNTAs are potent biological products that meet important clinical needs, it is critical to recognize that their dosing and product performance are not interchangeable and each product should be used according to manufacturer guidelines. PMID:25336912

  11. Parasites of freshwater fishes and the Great American Biotic Interchange: a bridge too far?

    PubMed

    Choudhury, A; García-Varela, M; Pérez-Ponce de León, G

    2017-03-01

    We examine the extent to which adult helminths of freshwater fishes have been part of the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI), by integrating information in published studies and new data from Panama with fish biogeography and Earth history of Middle America. The review illustrates the following: (1) the helminth fauna south of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, and especially south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, shows strong Neotropical affinities; (2) host-parasite associations follow principles of the 'biogeographic core fauna' in which host-lineage specificity is pronounced; (3) phylogenetic analysis of the widespread freshwater trematode family Allocreadiidae reveals a complex history of host-shifting and co-diversification involving mainly cyprinodontiforms and characids; (4) allocreadiids, monogeneans and spiruridan nematodes of Middle American cyprinodontiforms may provide clues to the evolutionary history of their hosts; and (5) phylogenetic analyses of cryptogonimid trematodes may reveal whether or how cichlids interacted with marine or brackish-water environments during their colonization history. The review shows that 'interchange' is limited and asymmetrical, but simple narratives of northward isthmian dispersal will likely prove inadequate to explain the historical biogeography of many host-parasite associations in tropical Middle America, particularly those involving poeciliids. Finally, our study highlights the urgent need for targeted survey work across Middle America, focused sampling in river drainages of Colombia and Venezuela, and deeper strategic sampling in other parts of South America, in order to develop and test robust hypotheses about fish-parasite associations in Middle America.

  12. Collisionless interchange instability 1. Numerical simulations of intermediate-scale irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Zargham, S.; Seyler, C.E. )

    1987-09-01

    Numerical simulations of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability are presented. The model and simulations are applicable to bottomside and topside spread F, unstable barium cloud dynamics, and collisional interchange instability in general. The principal result is that the evolution of the effective electric field, and shocklike structures propagating perpendicular to E{sub eff}along the extrema of the quasiperiodic structures. The spectral properties of the nonlinear state are analyzed using one-dimensional power spectra calculated along spatial trajectories for selected angles to E{sub eff}. In this way a direct comparison to in situ probe data can be made. The inherent anisotropy of the nonlinear state is reflected in major qualitative differences between the spectra taken parallel to and perpendicular to E{sub eff}. The fundamental finding of the present work is that anisotropy in interchange dynamics is much greater than had been previously reported. This strong anisotropy can explain much of the spectral and spatial structural characteristics of both bottomside and topside spread F. In a companion paper a comparison of the simulation results to various in situ data sets is given.

  13. Investigation into the interchangeability of generic formulations using immunosuppressants and a broad selection of medicines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Teerenstra, Steven; Neef, Cees; Burger, David; Maliepaard, Marc

    2015-08-01

    To date, the interchangeability of generic drugs has only been investigated for a limited number of medicines. The objective of this study was to investigate generic-generic drug interchangeability in a large subset of generic formulations in order to cover a broad spectrum of drugs. Orally administered drugs for investigation in this study were selected using strict, predefined criteria, with the purpose to avoid bias. This selection procedure yielded atorvastatin, bicalutamide, naratriptan, olanzapine, perindopril, and venlafaxine. Further, ciclosporin, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil were investigated as test immunosuppressants. Adjusted indirect comparisons were conducted between generic drugs containing the same active substance, and the 90% confidence interval (CI) for AUC and Cmax was calculated. In total, 120 bioequivalence studies were identified in the Dutch medicine regulatory agency's database, allowing 292 indirect comparisons between generic drugs. The indirect comparison results indicated that in the vast majority of cases, i.e., 80.5%, the 90% CIs for both AUCt and Cmax fell within the bioequivalence criteria (in 90.1 and 87.0% for AUCt and Cmax, respectively). In 1% of the 292 indirect comparison for AUCt and 3% for Cmax, a wider range of 75-133% (or 80-125%) was exceeded. Overall, our study suggests that exposure-related risks associated with the exchange of different generic drugs in clinical practice are not increased to a relevant extent compared to the situation in which a generic is exchanged with the innovator.

  14. A longitudinal multilevel CFA-MTMM model for interchangeable and structurally different methods.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tobias; Schultze, Martin; Eid, Michael; Geiser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    One of the key interests in the social sciences is the investigation of change and stability of a given attribute. Although numerous models have been proposed in the past for analyzing longitudinal data including multilevel and/or latent variable modeling approaches, only few modeling approaches have been developed for studying the construct validity in longitudinal multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) measurement designs. The aim of the present study was to extend the spectrum of current longitudinal modeling approaches for MTMM analysis. Specifically, a new longitudinal multilevel CFA-MTMM model for measurement designs with structurally different and interchangeable methods (called Latent-State-Combination-Of-Methods model, LS-COM) is presented. Interchangeable methods are methods that are randomly sampled from a set of equivalent methods (e.g., multiple student ratings for teaching quality), whereas structurally different methods are methods that cannot be easily replaced by one another (e.g., teacher, self-ratings, principle ratings). Results of a simulation study indicate that the parameters and standard errors in the LS-COM model are well recovered even in conditions with only five observations per estimated model parameter. The advantages and limitations of the LS-COM model relative to other longitudinal MTMM modeling approaches are discussed.

  15. Numerical simulations of interchange/tearing instabilities in 2D slab with a numerical model for edge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hideaki; Zheng, Linjin; Horton, Wendell

    2017-09-01

    Numerical simulations of interchange/tearing instabilities in a 2D slab with a numerical model for edge plasma resistivity are carried out. Plasma outside the Last Closed Flux Surface (LCFS), or the scrape-off layer (SOL), can be characterized by open magnetic fields which terminate on the divertor plates in the outside. A numerical model with current diffusivity is developed to enforce a low-level saturated current profile in the SOL region as well as a current jump across the LCFS. The numerical simulations show that interchange modes can transform into tearing modes, as the current-interchange tearing modes which has been proposed by Zheng and Furukawa [Phys. Plasmas 17, 052508 (2010)]. An applicability of the model to the tokamak edge stability and ELM studies is discussed.

  16. IEEE P1157 Medical Data Interchange (MEDIX) Committee Overview and Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, John J.; Benson, Timothy J. R.; Spector, Andrew L.

    1990-01-01

    Working under the auspices of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (IEEE EMBS), the IEEE P1157 Medical Data Interchange (MEDIX) Committee has been chartered with developing international standards for communication of medical information between heterogeneous healthcare information systems. The IEEE P1157 Standards are based upon, and will conform to, the International Standards Organization (ISO) Reference Model for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI)[1]. The IEEE P1157 Committee has adopted a phased approach and is working towards balloting the initial standards, which apply to communications between a patient care system (PCS) and selected ancillaries in the medical center setting. A parallel, longer range effort, focused on developing a reference model for electronic exchange of the medical record structure, content, and related medical knowledge, is in progress.

  17. Pd/Cu site interchange in UCu{sub 5-x}Pd{sub x}

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bauer, E.D.; Maple, M.B.; Chau, R.; Kwei, G.H.

    2001-07-11

    Although Pd/Cu site interchange in the non-Fermi liquid (NFL) material UCu{sub 4}Pd has been observed, the relationship between this disorder and the NFL behavior remains unclear. In order to better compare to the UCu{sub 5-x}Pd{sub x} phase diagram, they report results from Pd K edge x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments on this series (x = 0.3-1.5) that determine the fraction of Pd atoms on the nominally Cu (16e) sites, s. They find that for these unannealed samples, s is at least 17% for all the samples measured, even for x < 1.0, although it does climb monotonically beyond its minimum at x = 0.7. These data are compared to changes in the lattice parameter as a function of x.

  18. NASA's Single-Pilot Operations Technical Interchange Meeting: Proceedings and Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comerford, Doreen; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel B.; Wu, Shu-Chieh; Mogford, Richard H.; Battiste, Vernol; Johnson, Walter W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center and Langley Research Center are jointly investigating issues associated with potential concepts, or configurations, in which a single pilot might operate under conditions that are currently reserved for a minimum of two pilots. As part of early efforts, NASA Ames Research Center hosted a technical interchange meeting in order to gain insight from members of the aviation community regarding single-pilot operations (SPO). The meeting was held on April 10-12, 2012 at NASA Ames Research Center. Professionals in the aviation domain were invited because their areas of expertise were deemed to be directly related to an exploration of SPO. NASA, in selecting prospective participants, attempted to represent various relevant sectors within the aviation domain. Approximately 70 people representing government, academia, and industry attended. A primary focus of this gathering was to consider how tasks and responsibilities might be re-allocated to allow for SPO.

  19. Security aspects of electronic data interchange between a state health department and a hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, J A; Klockner, Rocke; Ladd-Wilson, Stephen; Zechnich, Andrew; Bangs, Christopher; Kohn, Melvin A

    2004-01-01

    Electronic emergency department reporting provides the potential for enhancing local and state surveillance capabilities for a wide variety of syndromes and reportable conditions. The task of protecting data confidentiality and integrity while developing electronic data interchange between a hospital emergency department and a state public health department proved more complex than expected. This case study reports on the significant challenges that had to be resolved to accomplish this goal; these included application restrictions and incompatibilities, technical malfunctions, changing standards, and insufficient dedicated resources. One of the key administrative challenges was that of coordinating project security with enterprise security. The original project has evolved into an ongoing pilot, with the health department currently receiving secure data from the emergency department at four-hour intervals. Currently, planning is underway to add more emergency departments to the project.

  20. Thermal Energy Interchange During Anaerobic Methane Fermentation of Waste Organic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pohland, F. G.

    1968-01-01

    An experimental calorimeter-type anaerobic fermentation system was developed to evaluate the extent of thermal energy interchange during anaerobic digestion of waste organic solids at 36 C. Results over a period of 184 days indicated that the energy released during conversion of the waste substrate was utilized primarily for the production of CH4 and that any excess released as heat during normal digestion was not sufficient to overcome heat losses from the system. The more exothermic response observed during retarded digestion was attributed to the accumulation of volatile acids and associated reduction in gas yields. After combustion of the CH4 produced during digestion, between 2,370 and 3,950 kcal per lb of volatile solids converted per day was available for heating the process and maintaining optimal temperature conditions. Images Fig. 1 PMID:5684202

  1. The development of standards for the common ICAO Data Interchange Network /CIDIN/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, W. T.

    1982-12-01

    This paper describes recent work by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) to develop standards applicable to a modern data network to serve the aeronautical community. The ICAO work is discussed in relation to the seven layer architecture for open systems interconnection that has been identified by ISO and explains the transport service functions considered to date (Levels 1-4). The requirement for more modern facilities is reviewed in the light of evolution of air traffic facilities from manual to more automated type in which teleprocessing will become increasingly important. Compatibility with international standards and application of public data networks in the private aeronautical environment is discussed. An outline is presented of the domestic data interchange plan for aeronautical data, showing the evolution of the data network and provision of aeronautical data bases. Finally, an indication of the likely impact of satellite bearers on network topology is given.

  2. Neuronal Prediction of Opponent’s Behavior during Cooperative Social Interchange in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Haroush, Keren; Williams, Ziv M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY A cornerstone of successful social interchange is the ability to anticipate each other’s intentions or actions. While generating these internal predictions is essential for constructive social behavior, their single neuronal basis and causal underpinnings are unknown. Here, we discover specific neurons in the primate dorsal anterior cingulate that selectively predict an opponent’s yet unknown decision to invest in their common good or defect and distinct neurons that encode the monkey’s own current decision based on prior outcomes. Mixed population predictions of the other was remarkably near optimal compared to behavioral decoders. Moreover, disrupting cingulate activity selectively biased mutually beneficial interactions between the monkeys but, surprisingly, had no influence on their decisions when no net-positive outcome was possible. These findings identify a group of other-predictive neurons in the primate anterior cingulate essential for enacting cooperative interactions and may pave a way toward the targeted treatment of social behavioral disorders. PMID:25728667

  3. Carnivorans at the Great American Biotic Interchange: new discoveries from the northern neotropics.

    PubMed

    Forasiepi, Analia M; Soibelzon, Leopoldo H; Gomez, Catalina Suarez; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Quiroz, Luis I; Jaramillo, Carlos; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2014-11-01

    We report two fossil procyonids, Cyonasua sp. and Chapalmalania sp., from the late Pliocene of Venezuela (Vergel Member, San Gregorio Formation) and Colombia (Ware Formation), respectively. The occurrence of these pre-Holocene procyonids outside Argentina and in the north of South America provides further information about the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). The new specimens are recognized in the same monophyletic group as procyonids found in the southern part of the continent, the "Cyonasua group," formed by species of Cyonasua and Chapalmalania. The phylogenetic analysis that includes the two new findings support the view that procyonids dispersed from North America in two separate events (initially, previous to the first major migration wave-GABI 1-and then within the last major migration wave-GABI 4-). This involved reciprocal lineage migrations from North to South America, and included the evolution of South American endemic forms.

  4. Net Interchange Schedule Forecasting of Electric Power Exchange for RTO/ISOs

    SciTech Connect

    Ferryman, Thomas A.; Haglin, David J.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Yin, Jian; Shen, Chao; Tuffner, Francis K.; Lin, Guang; Zhou, Ning; Tong, Jianzhong

    2012-07-26

    Neighboring independent system operators (ISOs) exchange electric power to enable efficient and reliable operation of the grid. Net interchange (NI) schedule is the sum of the transactions (in MW) between an ISO and its neighbors. Effective forecasting of the amount of actual NI can improve grid operation efficiency. This paper presents results of a preliminary investigation into various methods of prediction that may result in improved prediction accuracy. The methods studied are linear regression, forward regression, stepwise regression, and support vector machine (SVM) regression. The work to date is not yet conclusive. The hope is to explore the effectiveness of other prediction methods and apply all methods to at least one new data set. This should enable more confidence in the conclusions.

  5. When driving on the left side is safe: Safety of the diverging diamond interchange ramp terminals.

    PubMed

    Claros, Boris; Edara, Praveen; Sun, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    How safe are the ramp terminals of a diverging diamond interchange (DDI)? This paper answered this question using data from DDI sites in Missouri. First, crash prediction models for ramp terminals for different crash severities were developed. These models were then utilized in the Empirical Bayes (EB) evaluation of DDI ramp terminals. Due to inconsistencies in crash reporting for freeways in Missouri, individual crash reports were reviewed to properly identify ramp terminal crashes. A total of 13,000 crash reports were reviewed for model development and EB evaluation. The study found that the DDI ramp terminals were safer than the conventional diamond signalized terminals. The DDI ramp terminals experienced 55% fewer fatal and injury crashes, 31.4% fewer property damage only crashes, and 37.5% fewer total crashes.

  6. An XXX male resulting from paternal X-Y interchange and maternal X-X nondisjunction.

    PubMed Central

    Annerén, G; Andersson, M; Page, D C; Brown, L G; Berg, M; Läckgren, G; Gustavson, K H; de la Chapelle, A

    1987-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy was found to have a 47,XXX karyotype. Restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism analysis showed that, of his three X chromosomes, one is of paternal and two are of maternal origin. The results of Y-DNA hybridization were reminiscent of those in XX males in two respects. First, hybridization to Southern transfers revealed the presence in this XXX male of sequences derived from the Y-chromosomal short arm. Second, in situ hybridization showed that this Y DNA was located on the tip of the X-chromosomal short arm. We conclude that this XXX male resulted from the coincidence of X-X nondisjunction during maternal meiosis and aberrant X-Y interchange either during or prior to paternal meiosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2889356

  7. A gene pattern mining algorithm using interchangeable gene sets for prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Choi, Kwangmin; Su, Wei; Kim, Sun; Yang, Jiong

    2008-02-26

    Mining gene patterns that are common to multiple genomes is an important biological problem, which can lead us to novel biological insights. When family classification of genes is available, this problem is similar to the pattern mining problem in the data mining community. However, when family classification information is not available, mining gene patterns is a challenging problem. There are several well developed algorithms for predicting gene patterns in a pair of genomes, such as FISH and DAGchainer. These algorithms use the optimization problem formulation which is solved using the dynamic programming technique. Unfortunately, extending these algorithms to multiple genome cases is not trivial due to the rapid increase in time and space complexity. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for mining gene patterns in more than two prokaryote genomes using interchangeable sets. The basic idea is to extend the pattern mining technique from the data mining community to handle the situation where family classification information is not available using interchangeable sets. In an experiment with four newly sequenced genomes (where the gene annotation is unavailable), we show that the gene pattern can capture important biological information. To examine the effectiveness of gene patterns further, we propose an ortholog prediction method based on our gene pattern mining algorithm and compare our method to the bi-directional best hit (BBH) technique in terms of COG orthologous gene classification information. The experiment show that our algorithm achieves a 3% increase in recall compared to BBH without sacrificing the precision of ortholog detection. The discovered gene patterns can be used for the detecting of ortholog and genes that collaborate for a common biological function.

  8. The Effect of Interchange Rotation Period and Number on Australian Football Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Paul G; Wisbey, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Montgomery, PG, and Wisbey, B. The effect of interchange rotation period and number on Australian Football running performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1890-1897, 2016-To determine the effect of on-field rotation periods and total number of game rotations on Australian Football running performance, elite Australian Football players (n = 21, mean ± SD; 23.2 ± 1.7 years; 183.5 ± 3.7 cm; 83.2 ± 4.5 kg) had Global Positioning System game data from 22 rounds divided into a total of 692 on-field playing periods. These periods were allocated into time blocks of 2:00-minute increments, with the log transformed percentage differences in running performance (m·min) between blocks analyzed by effect size and meaningful differences. A total of 7,730 game rotation and associated average m·min combinations collected over 3 Australian Football seasons were also assessed by effect size and meaningful differences. Running capacity decreases after 5:00 minutes by ∼3% for each 2:00 minutes of on-field time up to 9:00 minutes, with variable responses between positions up to 6.7% for nomadic players. For each rotation less than 6 per game, clear small-to-moderate decreases up to 3.6% in running capacity occurred per rotation. To maintain a high level of running capacity, shorter on-field periods are more effective in Australian Football; however, players and coaches should be aware that with interchange restriction, slightly longer on-field periods achieve similar results.

  9. Attention Interchanges at Story-Time: A Case Study from a Deaf and Hearing Twin Pair Acquiring Swedish Sign Language in Their Deaf Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer-Wolrath, Emelie

    2012-01-01

    This case study longitudinally analyzes and describes the changes of attentional expressions in interchanges between a pair of fraternal twins, 1 deaf and 1 hearing, from the age of 10-40 months, and their Deaf family members. The video-observed attentional expressions of initiating and reestablishing interchange were grouped in 5 functional…

  10. Attention Interchanges at Story-Time: A Case Study from a Deaf and Hearing Twin Pair Acquiring Swedish Sign Language in Their Deaf Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer-Wolrath, Emelie

    2012-01-01

    This case study longitudinally analyzes and describes the changes of attentional expressions in interchanges between a pair of fraternal twins, 1 deaf and 1 hearing, from the age of 10-40 months, and their Deaf family members. The video-observed attentional expressions of initiating and reestablishing interchange were grouped in 5 functional…

  11. Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) Fluid Toxicity Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) with the Payload Safety Review Panel (PSRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheredy, William A.

    2012-01-01

    A Technical Interchange meeting was held between the payload developers for the Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) and the NASA Safety Review Panel concerning operational anomaly that resulted in overheating one of the fluid heaters, shorted a 24VDC power supply and generated Perfluoroisobutylene (PFiB) from Perfluorohexane.

  12. Racism, the Left and Twenty-First-Century Socialism: Some Observations on the Gur-Ze'ev/McLaren Interchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The Gur-Ze'ev/McLaren interchange covered a wide range of issues that are important for twenty-first century socialists. In this article, the author concentrates on two of them: first, Gur-Ze'ev's charge that critical pedagogy is part of the "new anti-Semitism"; second, his critique of McLaren's support for Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian…

  13. 22 CFR 501.9 - Interchange of FSOs between Broadcasting Board of Governors and other Foreign Affairs Agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Interchange of FSOs between Broadcasting Board of Governors and other Foreign Affairs Agencies. 501.9 Section 501.9 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING... Broadcasting Board of Governors and other Foreign Affairs Agencies. Foreign Service Officers (FSOs)...

  14. Regional consequences of a biotic interchange: insights from the Lessepsian invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrot, Rafal; Albano, Paolo G.; Chattopadhyay, Devapriya; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The fossil record provides ample evidence of large-scale biotic interchanges and their pervasive effects on regional biotas, but mechanisms controlling such events are difficult to decipher in deep time. Massive invasion of Indo-Pacific species into the Mediterranean Sea triggered by the opening of the Suez Canal offers a unique opportunity to examine the ecological consequences of breaking down biogeographic barriers. We developed an extensive database of taxonomic composition, body size and ecological characteristics of the Red Sea and Mediterranean bivalve fauna in order to link biotic selectivity of the invasion process with its effects on the recipient biota. Shallow-water occurrence and presence outside the tropical zone in other regions are the strongest predictors of the successful transition through the Suez Canal. Subsequent establishment of alien species in the Mediterranean Sea correlates with early arrival and preference for hard substrates. Finally, large-bodied species and hard-bottom dwellers are over-represented among the invasive aliens that have reached the spread stage and impose a strong impact on native communities. Although body size is important only at the last invasion stage, alien species are significantly larger compared to native Mediterranean bivalves. This reflects biogeographic difference in the body-size distributions of the source and recipient species pools related to the recent geological history of the Mediterranean Sea. Contrary to the general expectations on the effects of temperature on average body size, continued warming of the Mediterranean Sea accelerates the entry of tropical aliens and thus indirectly leads to increase in the proportion of large-bodied species in local communities and the regional biota. Invasion-driven shifts in species composition are stronger in hard-substrate communities, which host a smaller pool of incumbent species and are more susceptible to the establishment of newcomers. Analogous differences

  15. Rice Convection Model simulation of the 18 April 2002 sawtooth event and evidence for interchange instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wolf, R. A.; Sazykin, S.; Spiro, R. W.; Brandt, P. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Frey, H. U.

    2008-11-01

    We present the results of a Rice Convection Model (RCM) simulation of the 18 April 2002 sawtooth event. This event occurred as a series of quasi-periodic substorms during fairly stable solar wind conditions. It is modeled by (1) prescribing a solar-wind-driven magnetic field model (T01_s) augmented by additional current loops representing the magnetic effects of the substorm current wedge and (2) by carefully specifying a substorm-phase-dependent plasma distribution at the RCM outer boundary at 8 Re such that a hot and attenuated plasma distribution is used after every substorm onset. The set of input parameters was adjusted to make the simulation results agree with the primary signatures of the sawtooth event, specifically the sequence of magnetic field stretching and dipolarization observed by the GOES spacecraft and the associated sharp increases and gradual decreases in the flux of energetic protons measured by the LANL/Synchronous Orbit Plasma Analyzer (SOPA) instruments on other geosynchronous spacecrafts. The results suggest the important role that higher temperature and lower density plasma-sheet plasma plays in producing flux enhancements at geosynchronous orbit. The results also confirm that induction electric fields associated with magnetic field collapse after substorm onsets can serve as a likely mechanism for the energization of particles up to 25 keV. Synthetic high-energy neutral atom images are compared with IMAGE/HENA measurements for 10-60 keV hydrogen atoms. Magnetic field dipolarization over a large range of local time resulted in a dramatic reduction in the plasma entropy parameter PV5/3 on the boundary. The simulation indicates that the ring current intensified 10-20 minutes after every onset, associated with the injection of low PV5/3 flux tubes through the boundary. The low PV5/3 plasma also produced an interchange convection in the inner magnetosphere, which drives Birkeland currents in a quasi-periodic upward-downward pattern with a

  16. Heparin Reversal After Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Are Point-of-Care Coagulation Tests Interchangeable?

    PubMed

    Willems, Ariane; Savan, Veaceslav; Faraoni, David; De Ville, Andrée; Rozen, Laurence; Demulder, Anne; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Protamine is used to neutralize heparin after patient separation from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Different bedside tests are used to monitor the adequacy of heparin neutralization. For this study, the interchangeability of the activated coagulation time (ACT) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM; Tem Innovations GmbH, Basel, Switzerland) clotting time (CT) ratios in children undergoing cardiac surgery was assessed. Single-center, retrospective, cohort study between September 2010 and January 2012. University children's hospital. The study comprised children 0 to 16 years old undergoing elective cardiac surgery with CPB. Exclusion criteria were preoperative coagulopathy, Jehovah's witnesses, and children in a moribund condition (American Society of Anesthesiologists score 5). None. After heparin neutralization with protamine, the ratio between ACT, with and without heparinase, and the CT measured with INTEM/HEPTEM (intrinsic test activated with ellagic acid was performed without heparinase [INTEM] and with heparinase [HEPTEM]) using tests of ROTEM were calculated. Agreement was evaluated using Cohen's kappa statistics, Passing-Bablok regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. Among the 173 patients included for analysis, agreement between both tests showed a Cohen's kappa statistic of 0.06 (95% CI: -0.02 to 0.14; p = 0.22). Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 0.01, with a standard deviation of 0.13, and limits of agreement between -0.24 and 0.26. Passing-Bablok regression showed a systematic difference of 0.40 (95% CI: 0.16-0.59) and a proportional difference of 0.61 (95% CI: 0.42-0.86). The residual standard deviation was 0.11 (95% CI: -0.22 to 0.22), and the test for linearity showed p = 0.10. ACT, with or without heparinase, and the INTEM/HEPTEM CT ratios are not interchangeable to evaluate heparin reversal after pediatric patient separation from CPB. Therefore, the results of these tests should be corroborated with the absence/presence of bleeding and integrated into

  17. Generic products of antiepileptic drugs: a perspective on bioequivalence and interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Midha, Kamal K

    2010-06-01

    Most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available as generic products, yet neurologists and patients are reluctant to switch to generics. Generic AEDs are regarded as bioequivalent to brand AEDs after meeting the average bioequivalence criteria; consequently, they are considered to be interchangeable with their respective brands without loss of efficacy and safety. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the present bioequivalence requirements are already so rigorous and constrained that there is little possibility that generics that meet regulatory bioequivalence criteria could lead to therapeutic problems. So is there a scientific rationale for the concerns about switching patients with epilepsy to bioequivalent generics? Herein we discuss the assessment of bioequivalence and propose a scaled-average bioequivalence approach where scaling of bioequivalence is carried out based on brand lot-to-lot variance as an alternative to the conventional bioequivalence test as a means to determine whether switching patients to generic formulations, or vice versa, is a safe and effective therapeutic option. Meeting the proposed scaled-average bioequivalence requirements will ensure that when an individual patient is switched, he or she has fluctuations in plasma levels similar to those from lot-to-lot of the brand reference levels and thus should make these generic products safely switchable without change in efficacy and safety outcomes.

  18. Comparison of shear flow formation between resonant and non-resonant resistive interchange modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unemura, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Wakatani, M.

    1999-11-01

    It is known that the poloidal shear flow is produced from the nonlinear resistive interchange modes(A. Hasegawa and M. Wakatani, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59) 1581 (1987)(B.A. Carreras and V. E. Lynch, Phys. Fluids B 5) 1795 (1993). Since the non-resonant resistive modes also become unstable(K. Ichiguchi, Y. Nakamura and M. Wakatani, Nucl. Fusion 31) 2073 (1991), the nonlinear behavior is compared between the resonant and non-resonant modes from the point of view of poloidal flow formation. For understanding the difference, we studied single helicity (m,n)=(3,2) mode in a cylindrical geometry.Rotational transform profile, ι(r), was changed. First, we assumed ι(r)=0.51+0.39r^2, and increased ι(0). This change represents a finite beta effect in currentless stellarators. When the resonant surface exists with ι(r_s)=2/3, the poloidal flow are created near the resonant surface. And, in the case when no resonant surface exists but ι_min ~ 2/3, the non-resonant (3,2) mode grows and poloidal shear flow is also generated; however, the magnitude decreases sharply with the increase of ι_min.

  19. MAPA: Implementation of the Standard Interchange Format and use for analyzing lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana G.; Cary, John R.

    1997-05-01

    MAPA (Modular Accelerator Physics Analysis) is an object oriented application for accelerator design and analysis with a Motif based graphical user interface. MAPA has been ported to AIX, Linux, HPUX, Solaris, and IRIX. MAPA provides an intuitive environment for accelerator study and design. The user can bring up windows for fully nonlinear analysis of accelerator lattices in any number of dimensions. The current graphical analysis methods of Lifetime plots and Surfaces of Section have been used to analyze the improved lattice designs of Wan, Cary, and Shasharina (this conference). MAPA can now read and write Standard Interchange Format (MAD) accelerator description files and it has a general graphical user interface for adding, changing, and deleting elements. MAPA's consistency checks prevent deletion of used elements and prevent creation of recursive beam lines. Plans include development of a richer set of modeling tools and the ability to invoke existing modeling codes through the MAPA interface. MAPA will be demonstrated on a Pentium 150 laptop running Linux.

  20. The interchange of disease and health between the Old and New Worlds.

    PubMed Central

    Berlinguer, G

    1992-01-01

    A review of the five centuries since Columbus discovered America helps us understand the mutual contributions of the Old and the New Worlds to the history of diseases and their treatment. It also shows the consequences of this "mutual discovery" as they are currently emerging in the fields of health, culture, and the environment. To evaluate the multiple aspects of the interchange between the Old and New Worlds, this paper discusses the following: the causes of the rapid decline of the original American populations; the diffusion of communicable diseases between the two civilizations; the health consequences of nutritional changes on both sides of the Atlantic; drug addictions, as they developed through the centuries and as they exist today; the ways diseases were and are evaluated, prevented, diagnosed, and treated; and the mutual impact of different models of health services. Arguing that a major global change following the discovery of America was the transition from isolation of the two worlds to communication, and, more recently, to global interdependence, the paper also discusses some problems of bioethical relevance and the possible impact of new epidemics. Finally, it suggests that a critical analysis of the past may help stimulate future cooperation and solidarity. PMID:1384365

  1. Summary of Work for Joint Research Interchanges with DARWIN Integrated Product Team 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1999-01-01

    The intent of Stanford University's SciVis group is to develop technologies that enabled comparative analysis and visualization techniques for simulated and experimental flow fields. These techniques would then be made available under the Joint Research Interchange for potential injection into the DARWIN Workspace Environment (DWE). In the past, we have focused on techniques that exploited feature based comparisons such as shock and vortex extractions. Our current research effort focuses on finding a quantitative comparison of general vector fields based on topological features. Since the method relies on topological information, grid matching and vector alignment is not needed in the comparison. This is often a problem with many data comparison techniques. In addition, since only topology based information is stored and compared for each field, there is a significant compression of information that enables large databases to be quickly searched. This report will briefly (1) describe current technologies in the area of comparison techniques, (2) will describe the theory of our new method and finally (3) summarize a few of the results.

  2. Summary of Work for Joint Research Interchanges with DARWIN Integrated Product Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1999-01-01

    The intent of Stanford University's SciVis group is to develop technologies that enabled comparative analysis and visualization techniques for simulated and experimental flow fields. These techniques would then be made available un- der the Joint Research Interchange for potential injection into the DARWIN Workspace Environment (DWE). In the past, we have focused on techniques that exploited feature based comparisons such as shock and vortex extractions. Our current research effort focuses on finding a quantitative comparison of general vector fields based on topological features. Since the method relies on topological information, grid matching an@ vector alignment is not needed in the comparison. This is often a problem with many data comparison techniques. In addition, since only topology based information is stored and compared for each field, there is a significant compression of information that enables large databases to be quickly searched. This report will briefly (1) describe current technologies in the area of comparison techniques, (2) will describe the theory of our new method and finally (3) summarize a few of the results.

  3. Microfluidic impact printer with interchangeable cartridges for versatile non-contact multiplexed micropatterning

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuzhe; Huang, Eric; Lam, Kit S.; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-01-01

    Biopatterning has been increasingly used for well-defined cellular microenvironment, patterned surface topology, and guided biological cues; however, it meets additional challenges on biocompatibility, temperature and chemical sensitivity and limited reagent volume. In this paper, we target at combining the desired features from the non-contact inkjet printing and the dot-matrix impact printing to establish a versatile multiplexed micropatterning platform, referred to as Microfluidic Impact Printer (MI-Printer), for emerging biomedical applications. Using this platform, we can achieve the distinct features of no cross-contamination, minute volume manipulation with minimal dead volume, high-throughput and biocompatible printing process, multiplexed patterning with automatic alignment, printing availability for complex medium (cell suspension or colloidal solutions), interchangeable/disposable microfluidic cartridge design with out-of-cleanroom microfabrication, simple printing system assembly and configuration, all highly desirable towards biological applications. Specifically, the printing resolution of the MI-printer platform has been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed. Printed droplets with 80µm in diameter have been repeatedly obtained. Furthermore, two unique features of MI-printer platform, multiplexed printing and self-alignment printing, have been successfully experimentally demonstrated (less than 10µm misalignment). In addition, combinatorial patterning and biological patterning, which utilizes the multiplexed and self-alignment printing nature of the MI-printer, have been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this robust printing technique for emerging biomedical applications. PMID:23525299

  4. DOD Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) in contracting report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    Use of Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) to support Department of Defense (DoD) procurement processes has been under consideration for some time. A 1988 Deputy Secretary of Defense memo calls for maximum use of EDI, based on 10 years of DoD EDI investigation and experiments. In 1990, Defense Management Review Decision 941 stated, 'The strategic goal of DoD's current efforts is to provide the department with the capability to initiate, conduct, and maintain its external business related transactions and internal logistics, contracting, and financial activities without requiring the use of hard copy media.' The EC in Contracting PAT membership reflected a broad cross section of Military Services and Defense Agencies working on a full-time basis for 60 days. The diversity of the EC in Contracting PAT ensured that the needs and concerns of all DoD components were addressed during the creation of the report. The resultant plan, therefore, represents a comprehensive approach for implementing EC throughout the DoD.

  5. Experimental characterization of drift-interchange instabilities in a simple toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Brunner, S.; Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Plyushchev, G.; Podesta, M.

    2006-10-15

    Low frequency electrostatic instabilities are investigated on TORPEX [Fasoli, Labit, McGrath, Mueller, Podesta, and Poli, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 48, 119 (2003)], a toroidal device for basic plasma physics experiments with a toroidal magnetic field 100 mT and a small vertical magnetic field ({<=}4 mT). A two-dimensional (2D) profile of the frequency and amplitude of density and potential fluctuations is reconstructed using electrostatic probes with high space and time resolution. The measured phase velocity, corrected for the Doppler shift induced by the ExB drift, is consistent with the electron diamagnetic drift velocity. The local dispersion relation, measured along and across the magnetic field, is in agreement with the predictions of a linear kinetic slab model for drift waves. Unstable modes are generated in regions of unfavorable curvature, where the pressure gradient is colinear with the magnetic field gradient. It is demonstrated that the curvature of the magnetic field lines is essential for driving the observed instabilities, which are therefore identified as drift-interchange modes.

  6. Five Micron High Resolution MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Simple, Interchangeable, Multi-Resolution Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Lee, Young Jin

    2017-01-01

    High-spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is crucial for the mapping of chemical distributions at the cellular and subcellular level. In this work, we improved our previous laser optical system for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI, from 9 μm practical laser spot size to a practical laser spot size of 4 μm, thereby allowing for 5 μm resolution imaging without oversampling. This is accomplished through a combination of spatial filtering, beam expansion, and reduction of the final focal length. Most importantly, the new laser optics system allows for simple modification of the spot size solely through the interchanging of the beam expander component. Using 10×, 5×, and no beam expander, we could routinely change between 4, 7, and 45 μm laser spot size, in less than 5 min. We applied this multi-resolution MALDI-MSI system to a single maize root tissue section with three different spatial resolutions of 5, 10, and 50 μm and compared the differences in imaging quality and signal sensitivity. We also demonstrated the difference in depth of focus between the optical systems with 10× and 5× beam expanders.

  7. Efficient sorting of genomic permutations by translocation, inversion and block interchange.

    PubMed

    Yancopoulos, Sophia; Attie, Oliver; Friedberg, Richard

    2005-08-15

    Finding genomic distance based on gene order is a classic problem in genome rearrangements. Efficient exact algorithms for genomic distances based on inversions and/or translocations have been found but are complicated by special cases, rare in simulations and empirical data. We seek a universal operation underlying a more inclusive set of evolutionary operations and yielding a tractable genomic distance with simple mathematical form. We study a universal double-cut-and-join operation that accounts for inversions, translocations, fissions and fusions, but also produces circular intermediates which can be reabsorbed. The genomic distance, computable in linear time, is given by the number of breakpoints minus the number of cycles (b-c) in the comparison graph of the two genomes; the number of hurdles does not enter into it. Without changing the formula, we can replace generation and re-absorption of a circular intermediate by a generalized transposition, equivalent to a block interchange, with weight two. Our simple algorithm converts one multi-linear chromosome genome to another in the minimum distance.

  8. Kinetic feature of dipolarization fronts produced by interchange instability in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Haoyu

    2017-04-01

    A two-dimensional extended MHD simulation is performed to study the kinetic feature of depolarization fronts (DF) in the scale of the ion inertial length / ion Larmor radius. The interchange instability, arising due to the force imbalance between the tailward gradient of thermal pressure and Earthward magnetic curvature force, self-consistently produces the DF in the near-Earth region. Numerical investigations indicate that the DF is a tangential discontinuity, which means that the normal plasma velocity across the DF should be zero in the reference system that is static with the DF structure. The electric system, including electric field and current, is determined by Hall effect arising in the scale of ion inertial length. Hall effect not only mainly contributes on the electric field normal to the tangent plane of the DF, increases the current along the tangent plane of the DF, but also makes the DF structure asymmetric. The drifting motion of the large-scale DF structure is determined by the FLR effect arising in the scale of ion Larmor radius. The ion magnetization velocity induced by the FLR effect is towards to duskward at the subsolar point of the DF, but the y component of velocity in the region after the DF, which dominantly results in the drifting motion of the whole mushroom structure towards the dawn.

  9. Exercise and leukocyte interchange among central circulation, lung, spleen, and muscle ☆

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Gregory R.; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Nance, Dwight M.; Kodesh, Einat; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Cooper, Dan M.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating leukocytes increase rapidly with exercise then quickly decrease when the exercise ends. We tested whether exercise acutely led to bidirectional interchange of leukocytes between the circulation and the lung, spleen, and active skeletal muscle. To accomplish this it was necessary to label a large number of immune cells (granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes) in a way that resulted in minimal perturbation of cell function. Rats were injected intravenously with a single bolus of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinamidyl ester (CFSE) dye which is rapidly and irreversibly taken up by circulating cells. The time course of the disappearance of labeled cells and their reappearance in the circulation following exercise was determined via flow cytometry. The majority of circulating leukocytes were labeled at 4 h. post-injection and this proportion slowly declined out to 120 h. At both 24 and 120 h, running resulted in an increase in the proportion of labeled leukocytes in the circulation. Analysis of the skeletal muscle, spleen and lung indicated that labeled leukocytes had accumulated in those tissues and were mobilized to the circulation in response to exercise. This indicates that there is an ongoing exchange of leukocytes between the circulation and tissues and that exercise can stimulate their redistribution. Exchange was slower with muscle than with spleen and lung, but in all cases, influenced by exercise. Exercise bouts redistribute leukocytes between the circulation and the lung, spleen and muscle. The modulatory effects of exercise on the immune system may be regulated in part by the systemic redistribution of immune cells. PMID:21238578

  10. [Interchangeability of biological drugs: considerations about the approval of biogeneric formulations in Chile].

    PubMed

    Saavedra S, Iván; Quiñones S, Luis

    2006-12-01

    Once drug patents expire, the health authorities can approve the registry of similar products. They must request to the manufacturer, the bibliographic background of the original product and the analytical results that certify drug quality. An inspection of the premises of the manufacturer is also required. The main goal of this approval is to decrease cost, considering that the original product is usually more expensive. This is a current situation due to the imminent expiration of the patents of many biopharmaceutical products. Therefore, in Chile, the Public Health (ISP) and the Ministry of Health should consider that for this kind of products, until now, there are no interchangeable generic drugs, and that the similar drugs that are offered have a different chemical composition, since they have been manufactured through different processes. In the case of biological drugs (e.g. erythropoietir, somatotropin, heparin) the quality and homogeneity depend from the manufacture process. Its complete composition can not be absolutely elucidated; therefore small impurities or conformational variants can elicit an altered immune response or unexpected adverse reactions. This indicates that the approval of a biogeneric drug requires in addition to pharmacokinetic studies, preclinical and clinical analytical studies such as physicochemical assays, biological and immunological test. This issues have been established by WHO and have been incorporated for the main drug registry entities all over the world (FDA, EMEA, ANVISA) to approve biogeneric products.

  11. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  12. Consumption of high-energy phosphates during active sodium and potassium interchange in frog muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dydynska, Maria; Harris, E. J.

    1966-01-01

    1. Potassium-depleted muscles have been analysed for cations, phosphocreatine, adenosine triphosphate and lactate before or after an exposure to a medium with 10 mM potassium salt. 2. The net movements of sodium out and potassium in when the system is anaerobic but not otherwise poisoned are accompanied by break-down of phosphocreatine and formation of lactate. 3. In bicarbonate media oligomycin has little perceptible effect upon these observed changes, which is taken to indicate that mitochondrial phosphorylation is not essential. An inhibition by oligomycin was noted in media buffered with Tris. 4. Dinitrofluorobenzene, which poisons creatine phosphotransferase, leads to the cation changes being accompanied by break-down of ATP and formation of lactate. This indicates that ATP is more directly concerned with energizing the ion movements than is phosphocreatine. 5. Iodoacetate inhibits the glycolytic process and the ion movement is then accompanied by more phosphocreatine break-down than in the other conditions; the level of ATP also falls. 6. The mean number of sodium ions moved out is closely equal to the number of potassium ions moved in. Conditions mentioned in (2) and (3) above lead to about 2·5 sodium ions being moved out per high-energy phosphate bond hydrolysed provided allowance is made for the glycolytic resynthesis of ATP. 7. Some measurements of membrane potential under comparable conditions of ion movement are reported and these are used to calculate the energy requirement of the process of sodium—potassium interchange. PMID:5937418

  13. Five Micron High Resolution MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Simple, Interchangeable, Multi-Resolution Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Lee, Young Jin

    2017-03-01

    High-spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is crucial for the mapping of chemical distributions at the cellular and subcellular level. In this work, we improved our previous laser optical system for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI, from 9 μm practical laser spot size to a practical laser spot size of 4 μm, thereby allowing for 5 μm resolution imaging without oversampling. This is accomplished through a combination of spatial filtering, beam expansion, and reduction of the final focal length. Most importantly, the new laser optics system allows for simple modification of the spot size solely through the interchanging of the beam expander component. Using 10×, 5×, and no beam expander, we could routinely change between 4, 7, and 45 μm laser spot size, in less than 5 min. We applied this multi-resolution MALDI-MSI system to a single maize root tissue section with three different spatial resolutions of 5, 10, and 50 μm and compared the differences in imaging quality and signal sensitivity. We also demonstrated the difference in depth of focus between the optical systems with 10× and 5× beam expanders.

  14. Experimental characterization of drift-interchange instabilities in a simple toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, F. M.; Brunner, S.; Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Müller, S. H.; Plyushchev, G.; Podestà, M.

    2006-10-01

    Low frequency electrostatic instabilities are investigated on TORPEX [Fasoli, Labit, McGrath, Müller, Podestà, and Poli, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 48, 119 (2003)], a toroidal device for basic plasma physics experiments with a toroidal magnetic field 100mT and a small vertical magnetic field (⩽4mT). A two-dimensional (2D) profile of the frequency and amplitude of density and potential fluctuations is reconstructed using electrostatic probes with high space and time resolution. The measured phase velocity, corrected for the Doppler shift induced by the E×B drift, is consistent with the electron diamagnetic drift velocity. The local dispersion relation, measured along and across the magnetic field, is in agreement with the predictions of a linear kinetic slab model for drift waves. Unstable modes are generated in regions of unfavorable curvature, where the pressure gradient is colinear with the magnetic field gradient. It is demonstrated that the curvature of the magnetic field lines is essential for driving the observed instabilities, which are therefore identified as drift-interchange modes.

  15. Application of the NIMROD Code to Resistive Interchange Instabilities in D-IIID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Chu, M. S.; Leboeuf, J.-N.

    1998-11-01

    We apply the NIMROD code to the study of linear and nonlinear resistive interchange instabilities (g-modes) in the D-IIID tokamak. NIMROD advances the linear or nonlinear, time-dependent, MHD or 2-fluid equations, using bilinear finite elements in flux coordinates in the poloidal plane; a pseudo-spectral Fourier representation in the toroidal direction; and a semi-implicit time step. New features of the code have been developed to allow accurate treatment of these modes, which pose major challenges to numerical simulation due to their sharp radial gradients about multiple mode rational surfaces, very small parallel gradients, and very small growth rate. Parallel additive Schwarz preconditioning of conjugate gradients, supplemented with a coarse-grid correction, has been developed to accelerate linear system solution, the most time-consuming component of the code. This is essential because of the exceptionally large condition number of the linear system, which is close to ideal MHD. Packed gridding about singular surfaces is used to improve spatial resolution while avoiding excessive grid size. Techniques have been developed to minimize nabla \\cdot B with minimum effect on physical behavior. Comparisons are given to analytical theory and other numerical computations. New visualization techniques are presented.

  16. Understanding and Using DICOM, the Data Interchange Standard for Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bidgood, W. Dean; Horii, Steven C.; Prior, Fred W.; Van Syckle, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Standard specifies a non-proprietary data interchange protocol, digital image format, and file structure for biomedical images and image-related information. The fundamental concepts of the DICOM message protocol, services, and information objects are reviewed as background for a detailed discussion of the functionality of DICOM; the innovations and limitations of the Standard; and the impact of various DICOM features on information system users. DICOM addresses five general application areas: (1) network image management, (2) network image interpretation management, (3) network print management, (4) imaging procedure management, (5) off-line storage media management. DICOM is a complete specification of the elements required to achieve a practical level of automatic interoperability between biomedical imaging computer systems—from application layer to bit-stream encoding. The Standard is being extended and expanded in modular fashion to support new applications and incorporate new technology. An interface to other Information Systems provides for shared management of patient, procedure, and results information related to images. A Conformance Statement template enables a knowledgeable user to determine if interoperability between two implementations is possible. Knowledge of DICOM's benefits and realistic understanding of its limitations enable one to use the Standard effectively as the basis for a long term implementation strategy for image management and communications systems. PMID:9147339

  17. Development of an interchangeable end effector mechanism for the Ranger telerobotic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Robert; Akin, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The Ranger program at the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) at the University of Maryland is a demonstration of an extremely low cost, space flight experiment. The Ranger vehicle is designed to perform teleoperated spacecraft maintenance. Completing the various tasks included in spacecraft maintenance requires several specific tools. This paper describes the Ranger interchangeable end effector mechanism (IEEM). Its design allows Ranger to change end effectors to utilize the appropriate tool for the various tasks. The Ranger vehicle is designed with four manipulators. A seven degree-of-freedom (DOF) grappling manipulator securely attaches the vehicle to the work site. A 6 DOF camera positioning manipulator allows the operator to position a stereo pair of video cameras for visual feedback. The two remaining manipulators are the 7 DOF dexterous arms. They are the primary means by which Ranger accomplishes its required tasks. At the end of each of these dexterous manipulators is an IEEM. This paper begins with a brief overview of the Space Systems Laboratory and the Ranger program. The constraints leading to the requirements for an IEEM are described. The following section then describes the design strategies and the down selection process resulting in two candidate designs, taper and pneumatic connector type. Next, the leading candidate design is described in detail, followed by a preliminary discussion of failure modes and planned testing. The paper concludes with a brief review and a section discussing future work.

  18. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D; Séguin, F H; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Town, R P J; Betti, R; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M

    2009-07-01

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m> approximately [8pibeta(1+D_{m}k_{ perpendicular};{2}gamma_{max};{-1})];{1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  19. Effect of Viscosity on Growth Rates of Interchange Modes in Magnetic Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, R. L.; Nachtrieb, R.

    1999-11-01

    Thermal insulating B fields in imploding MIF/MTF confinement systems, as in predecessor static wall confinement systems, must close in the confined plasma and, therefore, have unfavorable curvature for MHD interchange mode stability. Analytic inviscid estimates with typical compressed z-pinch fields Bth=1MG, plasma density n=3.e20 and radius a=1cm give max. m=0 mode growth rates, Gm, of order 1.e8s-1 with wavelengths Lz of .1a to .5a. Thermal conduction to the confining wall increases B there and Gm significantly, as Vekstein discusses in concluding in effect that such confinement would not be useful for fusion. These growth rates and mode forms are confirmed by two supporting compressible models(Freidberg/McCrory). Happily when viscosity(Braginskii) is included; G is reduced, esp. at longer wavelengths, Lz, with scaling Lz**-1, and viscosities of 1e2 to 1e4 poise for the example plasmas give Gm's of order 1.e7s-1 and less with realistic time dependent profiles. We conclude that these Gm's are consistent with significant fusion yields. This work was presented at the UCLA/DoE ICC conference, 3/3-6/97.

  20. Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium Standardization of Biobank Data: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Sato, Izumi; Kawasaki, Yohei; Ide, Kazuki; Sakakibara, Iori; Konomura, Keiko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    The National Center Biobank Network (NCBN), consisting of six national centers (NCs) for advanced and specialized medical care, was launched in Japan in 2012 to collect biological specimens and health-related data. The common data formats of the six NCs, however, are not widely known outside the NCs. Therefore, we investigated whether the data elements collected by the NCBN could be made to conform to the international standards of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). We attempted to map the NCBN data elements (202 items) onto the Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM), a set of CDISC standards on the submission format of electronic clinical data approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The results showed that all 202 items of the NCBN data could be mapped onto the SDTM and fulfilled 50%-70% of the required items of each domain specified in the SDTM. We concluded that, while the standardization of biobank data according to the CDISC standards is possible, there is a need to consider whether additional items must be included in the NCBN and to have experts familiar with the CDISC standards review the standardization needs.

  1. Telomeres and centromeres have interchangeable roles in promoting meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Tomita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres and centromeres have traditionally been considered to perform distinct roles. During meiotic prophase, in a conserved chromosomal configuration called the bouquet, telomeres gather to the nuclear membrane (NM), often near centrosomes. We found previously that upon disruption of the fission yeast bouquet, centrosomes failed to insert into the NM at meiosis I and nucleate bipolar spindles. Hence, the trans-NM association of telomeres with centrosomes during prophase is crucial for efficient spindle formation. Nonetheless, in approximately half of bouquet-deficient meiocytes, spindles form properly. Here, we show that bouquet-deficient cells can successfully undergo meiosis using centromere–centrosome contact instead of telomere–centrosome contact to generate spindle formation. Accordingly, forced association between centromeres and centrosomes fully rescued the spindle defects incurred by bouquet disruption. Telomeres and centromeres both stimulate focal accumulation of the SUN domain protein Sad1 beneath the centrosome, suggesting a molecular underpinning for their shared spindle-generating ability. Our observations demonstrate an unanticipated level of interchangeability between the two most prominent chromosomal landmarks. PMID:25688135

  2. Interchange Method in Compressible Magnetized Couette Flow: Magnetorotational and Magnetoconvective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanas, D.; Christodoulou, D.; Contopoulos, J.

    We obtain the general form of the axisymmetric stability criteria in a magnetized, compressible Couette flow using a variational principle, the so-called interchange method, which we applied successfully in the incompressible case in the past. This formulation accounts for the simultaneous presence of gravity, rotation, entropy and density gradients, a toroidal magnetic field and a weak axial magnetic field in its initial equilibrium state. The crucial aspect of the method is its explicit implementation of the relevant conservation laws in the computation of the "free energy" of the system in its original equilibrium. As in the incompressilbe case, the presence of an axial field invalidates the conservation laws of angular momentum and azimuthal magnetic flux, introducing instead isorotation and axial current conservation along field lines. The stability criteria are therefore markedly different depending on whether an axial magnetic field is present. In limiting cases our formulation transparently recovers the convective and Parker instability criteria, as well as those of Newcomb and Terkovnikov pertaining to rotating magnetized plasmas derived through the implementation of much more laborious techniques.

  3. Analysis of two 47,XXX males reveals X-Y interchange and maternal or paternal nondisjunction.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G; Schempp, W; Fraccaro, M; Bausch, E; Bigozzi, V; Maraschio, P; Montali, E; Simoni, G; Wolf, U

    1989-02-01

    Two cases of 47,XXX males were studied, one of which has been published previously (Bigozzi et al. 1980). Analysis of X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed that in this case, one X chromosome was of paternal and two were of maternal origin, whereas in the other case, two X chromosomes were of paternal and one of maternal origin. Southern blot analysis with Y-specific DNA probes demonstrated the presence of Y short arm sequences in both XXX males. In one case, the results obtained pointed to a paracentric inversion on Yp of the patient's father. In situ hybridization indicated that the Y-specific DNA sequences were localized on Xp22.3 in one of the three X chromosomes in both cases. The presence of Y DNA had no effect on random X inactivation. It is concluded that both XXX males originate from aberrant X-Y interchange during paternal meiosis, with coincident nondisjunction of the X chromosome during maternal meiosis in case 1, and during paternal meiosis II in case 2.

  4. Five Micron High Resolution MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Simple, Interchangeable, Multi-Resolution Optical System

    DOE PAGES

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Lee, Young Jin

    2017-01-03

    High-spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is crucial for the mapping of chemical distributions at the cellular and subcellular level. Here in this work, we improved our previous laser optical system for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI, from ~9 μm practical laser spot size to a practical laser spot size of ~4 μm, thereby allowing for 5 μm resolution imaging without oversampling. This is accomplished through a combination of spatial filtering, beam expansion, and reduction of the final focal length. Most importantly, the new laser optics system allows for simple modification of the spot size solely through the interchanging ofmore » the beam expander component. Using 10×, 5×, and no beam expander, we could routinely change between ~4, ~7, and ~45 μm laser spot size, in less than 5 min. We applied this multi-resolution MALDI-MSI system to a single maize root tissue section with three different spatial resolutions of 5, 10, and 50 μm and compared the differences in imaging quality and signal sensitivity. Lastly, we also demonstrated the difference in depth of focus between the optical systems with 10× and 5× beam expanders.« less

  5. Quasilinear theory of interchange modes in a closed field line configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, A.; Freidberg, J. P.; Kesner, J.

    2007-10-15

    Two important issues for any magnetic fusion configuration are the maximum achievable values of {beta} and energy confinement time when ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes are excited. It is well known that the excitation of the MHD unstable modes typically can lead to violent restructuring of the plasma profiles. The particle and energy transport associated with these modes normally dominates all other transport mechanisms and can lead to plasma disruptions and a rapid loss of energy. This paper analytically investigates the transport of particle density, energy, and magnetic field due to the ideal MHD interchange mode in a closed-line system using the quasilinear approximation. The transport equations are derived for a static plasma in a hardcore Z-pinch configuration and generalized to an arbitrary axisymmetric toroidal closed poloidal field line configuration. It is shown that violation of the marginal stability criterion leads to rapid quasilinear transport that drives the pressure profile back to its marginal profile and forces the particle density to be inversely proportional to {integral}dl/B. The applicability of the quasilinear approximation is numerically tested for the hardcore Z-pinch magnetic configuration using a full nonlinear code.

  6. Match intensity and pacing strategies in rugby league: an examination of whole-game and interchanged players, and winning and losing teams.

    PubMed

    Black, Georgia M; Gabbett, Tim J

    2014-06-01

    There is currently limited information on whether pacing occurs during rugby league match play. In addition, to date no research has investigated whether pacing strategies differ between winning and losing teams. This study investigated the pacing strategies of whole-game and interchanged rugby league players. Furthermore, we investigated the pacing strategies of winning and losing teams. Fifty-two rugby league players, from a sample of 11 teams competing in a semi-elite competition, underwent global positioning system analysis. Performances were divided into match quartiles for whole-game and interchanged players. Total distance, including low- and high-speed distances, and repeated high-intensity effort bouts were recorded. The total distance and low-speed distance covered across all quartiles of the match, but specifically quartiles 1 and 8, were greater for interchanged players than whole-game players. The match outcome differentially affected the pacing strategies of whole-game and interchanged players. Whole-game players from winning teams set a higher pacing strategy than whole-game players from losing teams (effect size [ES] = 1.03 ± 0.77, 96%, very likely), whereas interchanged players from losing teams demonstrated a greater "end-spurt" than interchanged players from winning teams (ES = 0.60 ± 0.52, 96%, very likely). The pacing strategies of interchanged players were higher than whole-game players, irrespective of playing position. The results of this study suggest that pacing strategies differ between interchanged and whole-game rugby league players. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a different pacing strategy between winning and losing teams. These findings suggest that physical preparation for rugby league matches, and recovery from these matches, should be individualized for whole-game and interchanged players. Finally, performing physically intense training on a regular basis is likely to develop the physical and mental qualities required to

  7. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  8. Observation of a critical pressure gradient for the stabilization of interchange modes in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Federspiel, L.; Labit, B.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Theiler, C.

    2009-09-15

    The existence of a critical pressure gradient needed to drive the interchange instability is experimentally demonstrated in the simple magnetized torus TORoidal Plasma EXperiment [A. Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)]. This gradient is reached during a scan in the neutral gas pressure p{sub n}. Around a critical value for p{sub n}, depending on the magnetic configuration and on the injected rf power, a small increase in the neutral gas pressure triggers a transition in the plasma behavior. The pressure profile is locally flattened, stabilizing the interchange mode observed at lower neutral gas densities. The measured value for the critical gradient is close to the linear theory estimate.

  9. Cryogenic mechanisms for scanning and interchange of the Fabry-Perot interferometers in the ISO long wavelength spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. R.; Furniss, I.; Patrick, T. J.; Sidey, R. C.; Towlson, W. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is an ESA cornerstone mission for infrared astronomy. Schedules for launch in 1993, its four scientific instruments will provide unprecedented sensitivity and spectral resolution at wavelengths which are inaccessible using ground-based techniques. One of these, the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS), will operate in the 45 to 180 micron region (Emery et. al., 1985) and features two Fabry-Perot interferometers mounted on an interchange mechanism. The entire payload module of the spacecraft, comprising the 60 cm telescope and the four focal plane instruments, is maintained at 2 to 4 K by an onboard supply of liquid helium. The mechanical design and testing of the cryogenic interferometer and interchange mechanisms are described.

  10. Assessment of the Multitrait-Multimethod Matrix Validity of Likert Scales via Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flamer, Stephen

    1983-01-01

    Multitrait-Multimethod analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to investigate differences in Likert, Thurstone, and Semantic Differential techniques. Results indicated that these measurement techniques are not completely interchangeable. (JKS)

  11. Is there a need for a formulary of clinically interchangeable medicines to guide generic substitution in Saudi Arabia?

    PubMed Central

    Alrasheedy, Alian A.; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Aljadhey, Hisham; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah

    2013-01-01

    The escalating healthcare expenditure is a major challenge to sustainability of the healthcare systems. To confront the escalating health expenditure in general and medicines expenditure in particular, many countries promoted the use of generic medicines. To promote generic medicines, many countries have adopted a generic substitution (GS) policy and generic prescribing. To effectively implement the GS policy, it is evident in the literature that it is essential to have an evidence-based guide on therapeutic equivalence and formulary of interchangeable medicines to guide responsible GS. In Saudi Arabia, GS is permissive and pharmacists are given the right to perform GS. While the prescriber's approval is not a requirement, patient consent is required when performing GS. Although there are some general drug references, such as the Saudi National Formulary (SNF) and list of registered medicines in the Saudi market, but there is currently no information available to healthcare professionals that documents the therapeutic and bioequivalence between medicines. Thus, it is essential to have a formulary of interchangeable medicines to guide appropriate GS or at least to include such vital information regarding therapeutic equivalence and brand interchangeability as part of the SNF. That, in turn, will not only make healthcare professionals more confident when providing GS, but will also enable the avoidance of situations where GS is inappropriate. PMID:24023460

  12. Is there a need for a formulary of clinically interchangeable medicines to guide generic substitution in Saudi Arabia?

    PubMed

    Alrasheedy, Alian A; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Aljadhey, Hisham; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah

    2013-06-01

    The escalating healthcare expenditure is a major challenge to sustainability of the healthcare systems. To confront the escalating health expenditure in general and medicines expenditure in particular, many countries promoted the use of generic medicines. To promote generic medicines, many countries have adopted a generic substitution (GS) policy and generic prescribing. To effectively implement the GS policy, it is evident in the literature that it is essential to have an evidence-based guide on therapeutic equivalence and formulary of interchangeable medicines to guide responsible GS. In Saudi Arabia, GS is permissive and pharmacists are given the right to perform GS. While the prescriber's approval is not a requirement, patient consent is required when performing GS. Although there are some general drug references, such as the Saudi National Formulary (SNF) and list of registered medicines in the Saudi market, but there is currently no information available to healthcare professionals that documents the therapeutic and bioequivalence between medicines. Thus, it is essential to have a formulary of interchangeable medicines to guide appropriate GS or at least to include such vital information regarding therapeutic equivalence and brand interchangeability as part of the SNF. That, in turn, will not only make healthcare professionals more confident when providing GS, but will also enable the avoidance of situations where GS is inappropriate.

  13. The Ballooning/Interchange Instability as a Source of Dipolarization Fronts and Auroral Streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Pritchett, P. L.; Nishimura, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Ballooning/InterChange Instability (BICI) can be excited in a 3D plasma sheet configuration in a region where the entropy decreases with distance down the tail. This mode represents a low-frequency extension to curved magnetic geometry of the familiar LHDI in straight magnetic geometry. Initially, this mode produces the familiar interchange fingers with a wavelength comparable to a few times the local equatorial ion gyroradius. Nonlinearly, however, as the modes propagate earthward at a speed of about 0.6 V_Ti, the dominant fingers steepen as they sweep up magnetic flux to form intense "heads" with strength comparable to the lobe field. This evolution process represents a self-consistent dynamical realization of the bubble scenario proposed by Chen and Wolf [1993]. 3-D particle-in-cell simulations are used to determine the properties of the nonlinear BICI heads. The cross-tail extent of a head is typically of the order of 4000-5000 km; the transition thickness of the B_z increase at the leading edge is about the local ion inertial length; the heads feature a Region 1 (substorm current wedge) sense field-aligned current structure; eventually a head breaks up into multiple substructures of width 600-800 km. This breakup occurs when the ion gyroradius in the head becomes smaller than the y width of the head, thereby permitting the BICI process to generate secondary heads. These subheads are regions where the electrons are not frozen-in to the field (E + U_e X B/c ne 0); the deviation from the ideal Ohm's law arises from strong electron pressure gradients and electron inertial term at the scalloped head. The breakup of the head structures should be manifested in the formation of structures within the corresponding auroral streamer. These predictions will be compared with observations of such streamer substructures obtained by the THEMIS all-sky imager network.

  14. Endotracheal aspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis: interchangeable diagnostic modalities in suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia?

    PubMed

    Scholte, Johannes B J; van Dessel, Helke A; Linssen, Catharina F M; Bergmans, Dennis C J J; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Roekaerts, Paul M H J; van Mook, Walther N K A

    2014-10-01

    Authoritative guidelines state that the diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) can be established using either endotracheal aspirate (ETA) or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analysis, thereby suggesting that their results are considered to be in accordance. Therefore, the results of ETA Gram staining and semiquantitative cultures were compared to the results from a paired ETA-BALF analysis. Different thresholds for the positivity of ETAs were assessed. This was a prospective study of all patients who underwent bronchoalveolar lavage for suspected VAP in a 27-bed university intensive care unit during an 8-year period. VAP was diagnosed when ≥ 2% of the BALF cells contained intracellular organisms and/or when BALF quantitative culture revealed ≥ 10(4) CFU/ml of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. ETA Gram staining and semiquantitative cultures were compared to the results from paired BALF analysis by Cohen's kappa coefficients. VAP was suspected in 311 patients and diagnosed in 122 (39%) patients. In 288 (93%) patients, the results from the ETA analysis were available for comparison. Depending on the threshold used and the diagnostic modality, VAP incidences varied from 15% to 68%. For the diagnosis of VAP, the most accurate threshold for positivity of ETA semiquantitative cultures was moderate or heavy growth, whereas the optimal threshold for BALF Gram staining was ≥ 1 microorganisms per high power field. The Cohen's kappa coefficients were 0.22, 0.31, and 0.60 for ETA and paired BALF Gram stains, cultures, and BALF Gram stains, respectively. Since the ETA and BALF Gram stains and cultures agreed only fairly, they are probably not interchangeable for diagnosing VAP. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Endotracheal Aspirate and Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Analysis: Interchangeable Diagnostic Modalities in Suspected Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia?

    PubMed Central

    van Dessel, Helke A.; Linssen, Catharina F. M.; Bergmans, Dennis C. J. J.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Roekaerts, Paul M. H. J.; van Mook, Walther N. K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Authoritative guidelines state that the diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) can be established using either endotracheal aspirate (ETA) or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analysis, thereby suggesting that their results are considered to be in accordance. Therefore, the results of ETA Gram staining and semiquantitative cultures were compared to the results from a paired ETA-BALF analysis. Different thresholds for the positivity of ETAs were assessed. This was a prospective study of all patients who underwent bronchoalveolar lavage for suspected VAP in a 27-bed university intensive care unit during an 8-year period. VAP was diagnosed when ≥2% of the BALF cells contained intracellular organisms and/or when BALF quantitative culture revealed ≥104 CFU/ml of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. ETA Gram staining and semiquantitative cultures were compared to the results from paired BALF analysis by Cohen's kappa coefficients. VAP was suspected in 311 patients and diagnosed in 122 (39%) patients. In 288 (93%) patients, the results from the ETA analysis were available for comparison. Depending on the threshold used and the diagnostic modality, VAP incidences varied from 15% to 68%. For the diagnosis of VAP, the most accurate threshold for positivity of ETA semiquantitative cultures was moderate or heavy growth, whereas the optimal threshold for BALF Gram staining was ≥1 microorganisms per high power field. The Cohen's kappa coefficients were 0.22, 0.31, and 0.60 for ETA and paired BALF Gram stains, cultures, and BALF Gram stains, respectively. Since the ETA and BALF Gram stains and cultures agreed only fairly, they are probably not interchangeable for diagnosing VAP. PMID:25078907

  16. Lapin Data Interchange Among Database, Analysis and Display Programs Using XML-Based Text Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of grant NCC3-966 was to investigate and evaluate the interchange of application-specific data among multiple programs each carrying out part of the analysis and design task. This has been carried out previously by creating a custom program to read data produced by one application and then write that data to a file whose format is specific to the second application that needs all or part of that data. In this investigation, data of interest is described using the XML markup language that allows the data to be stored in a text-string. Software to transform output data of a task into an XML-string and software to read an XML string and extract all or a portion of the data needed for another application is used to link two independent applications together as part of an overall design effort. This approach was initially used with a standard analysis program, Lapin, along with standard applications a standard spreadsheet program, a relational database program, and a conventional dialog and display program to demonstrate the successful sharing of data among independent programs. Most of the effort beyond that demonstration has been concentrated on the inclusion of more complex display programs. Specifically, a custom-written windowing program organized around dialogs to control the interactions have been combined with an independent CAD program (Open Cascade) that supports sophisticated display of CAD elements such as lines, spline curves, and surfaces and turbine-blade data produced by an independent blade design program (UD0300).

  17. Lapin Data Interchange Among Database, Analysis and Display Programs Using XML-Based Text Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate and evaluate the interchange of application- specific data among multiple programs each carrying out part of the analysis and design task. This has been carried out previously by creating a custom program to read data produced by one application and then write that data to a file whose format is specific to the second application that needs all or part of that data. In this investigation, data of interest is described using the XML markup language that allows the data to be stored in a text-string. Software to transform output data of a task into an XML-string and software to read an XML string and extract all or a portion of the data needed for another application is used to link two independent applications together as part of an overall design effort. This approach was initially used with a standard analysis program, Lapin, along with standard applications a standard spreadsheet program, a relational database program, and a conventional dialog and display program to demonstrate the successful sharing of data among independent programs. See Engineering Analysis Using a Web-Based Protocol by J.D. Schoeffler and R.W. Claus, NASA TM-2002-211981, October 2002. Most of the effort beyond that demonstration has been concentrated on the inclusion of more complex display programs. Specifically, a custom-written windowing program organized around dialogs to control the interactions have been combined with an independent CAD program (Open Cascade) that supports sophisticated display of CAD elements such as lines, spline curves, and surfaces and turbine-blade data produced by an independent blade design program (UD0300).

  18. Transcriptional activity of the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta Holobiont: molecular evidence for metabolic interchange

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Cara L.; Labrie, Micheline; Jarett, Jessica K.; Lesser, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to our understanding of the taxonomic composition of the symbiotic microbes in marine sponges, the functional diversity of these symbionts is largely unknown. Furthermore, the application of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic techniques to functional questions on sponge host-symbiont interactions is in its infancy. In this study, we generated a transcriptome for the host and a metatranscriptome of its microbial symbionts for the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, from the Caribbean. In combination with a gene-specific approach, our goals were to (1) characterize genetic evidence for nitrogen cycling in X. muta, an important limiting nutrient on coral reefs (2) identify which prokaryotic symbiont lineages are metabolically active and, (3) characterize the metabolic potential of the prokaryotic community. Xestospongia muta expresses genes from multiple nitrogen transformation pathways that when combined with the abundance of this sponge, and previous data on dissolved inorganic nitrogen fluxes, shows that this sponge is an important contributor to nitrogen cycling biogeochemistry on coral reefs. Additionally, we observed significant differences in gene expression of the archaeal amoA gene, which is involved in ammonia oxidation, between coral reef locations consistent with differences in the fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen previously reported. In regards to symbiont metabolic potential, the genes in the biosynthetic pathways of several amino acids were present in the prokaryotic metatranscriptome dataset but in the host-derived transcripts only the catabolic reactions for these amino acids were present. A similar pattern was observed for the B vitamins (riboflavin, biotin, thiamin, cobalamin). These results expand our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in sponges, and the metabolic interchange highlighted here advances the field of symbiont physiology by elucidating specific metabolic pathways where there is high potential for host

  19. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION FORCED BY THE FILAMENT ERUPTION INSIDE A PSEUDO-STREAMER

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jiayan; Jiang, Yunchun; Xu, Zhe; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao

    2015-04-20

    We present rare observational signatures of interchange reconnection (IR) forced by the filament eruption inside a pseudo-streamer (PS). The PS was centered above a positive-polarity region bounded by two negative-polarity coronal holes (CHs), and thus its base contained two polarity inversion lines and a pair of loop arcades where two filaments were harbored. In white-light coronagraph data from two different views, it showed up as a fan-shaped structure consisting of fine rays and a coronal streamer. Followed by a two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection, one of the filaments and its overlying arcade erupted away from the nearby CH and flew over the other arcade to interact with the PS's remote CH. As a result, distinct ribbon-like remote brightenings formed along the remote CH boundary and were connected to the positive-polarity flare ribbon by a loop system, but the nearby open-field region largely remained unchanged except that compact brightenings and a following small coronal dimming appeared close to one end of the erupted filament. In combination with the coronal magnetic configuration that derived from the potential-field source-surface model, these observations can be interpreted as follows: the erupting field was first deflected and guided by the nearby CH's open field and then reconnected with the oppositely oriented open field of the remote CH, during which both the closed field bridging the erupted filament and the remoter CH's open field were transported in the opposite direction. The observations thus supported the idea that PSs provide favorable environments for IR to take place and remote brightenings along their CH boundaries represent a credible IR signature on the solar surface.

  20. Prescription Omega-3 Fatty Acid Products and Dietary Supplements Are Not Interchangeable.

    PubMed

    Hilleman, Daniel; Smer, Aiman

    2016-01-01

    To provide an overview of prescription and dietary supplement omega-3 fatty acid (OM3-FA) products and considerations for clinical use. Narrative review. The PubMed database was searched for cardiovascular-related investigations focused on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (limit: English-only articles). Additional regulatory information on prescription and dietary supplements was obtained from United States Food and Drug Administration online sources. Prescription QM3-FA products are supported by robust clinical development and safety monitoring programs, whereas dietary supplements are not required to demonstrate safety or efficacy prior to marketing. There are no over-the-counter OM3-FA products available in the United States. Investigations of OM3-FA dietary supplements show that quantities of EPA and DHA are highly variable within and between brands. Dietary supplements also may contain potentially harmful components, including oxidized OM3-FA, other lipids, cholesterol, and toxins. Prescription OM3-FA products may contain DHA and EPA or EPA alone. All prescription OM3-FA products have demonstrated statistically significant triglyceride reduction as monotherapy or in combination with statins in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Differential effects between products containing EPA and DHA compared with a high-purity EPA product (icosapent ethyl) have clinical implications: Increases in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol associated with DHA have the potential to confound strategies for managing patients with dyslipidemia. Cardiovascular outcomes studies of prescription CM3-FA products are ongoing. OM3-FA dietary supplements should not be substituted for prescription products, and prescription OM3-FA products that contain DHA are not equivalent to or interchangeable with high-purity EPA (icosapent ethyl) and should not be substituted for it.

  1. The SNOMED DICOM microglossary: controlled terminology resource for data interchange in biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, W D

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an authoritative, non-proprietary information resource that provides an efficient mechanism for embedding specialized clinical knowledge into the design of healthcare telecommunications systems. The resource marries two types of data interchange standards, a message/electronic-document standard and a terminology standard. In technical terms, it is part protocol and part database. Industry, academia, professional specialty societies, and the federal government participated in its development. The development of multi-specialty content has broadly engaged biomedical domain experts to an unprecedented degree in voluntary, non-proprietary message/document-standards development. The resource is the SNOMED DICOM Microglossary (SDM), a message-terminology (or document-content) mapping resource. The message/electronic-document standard is DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine). The terminology standard is SNOMED, (Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine). The SDM specifies the mapping of multi-specialty imaging terminology from SNOMED to DICOM data elements. DICOM provides semantic constraints and a framework for discourse that are lacking in SNOMED. Thus the message standard and the computer-based terminology both depend upon and complete each other. The combination is synergistic. By substitution of different templates of specialty terminology from the SDM, a generic message template, such as the DICOM Visible Light (Color Diagnostic) Image or the DICOM Structured Reporting specification can be reconfigured for diverse applications. Professional societies, with technical assistance from the College of American Pathologists, contribute and maintain their portions of the terminology, and can use SDM templates and term lists in clinical practice guidelines for the structure and content of computer-based patient records.

  2. Interchangeable SF3B1 inhibitors interfere with pre-mRNA splicing at multiple stages.

    PubMed

    Effenberger, Kerstin A; Urabe, Veronica K; Prichard, Beth E; Ghosh, Arun K; Jurica, Melissa S

    2016-03-01

    The protein SF3B1 is a core component of the spliceosome, the large ribonucleoprotein complex responsible for pre-mRNA splicing. Interest in SF3B1 intensified when tumor exome sequencing revealed frequent specific SF3B1 mutations in a variety of neoplasia and when SF3B1 was identified as the target of three different cancer cell growth inhibitors. A better mechanistic understanding of SF3B1's role in splicing is required to capitalize on these discoveries. Using the inhibitor compounds, we probed SF3B1 function in the spliceosome in an in vitro splicing system. Formerly, the inhibitors were shown to block early steps of spliceosome assembly, consistent with a previously determined role of SF3B1 in intron recognition. We now report that SF3B1 inhibitors also interfere with later events in the spliceosome cycle, including exon ligation. These observations are consistent with a requirement for SF3B1 throughout the splicing process. Additional experiments aimed at understanding how three structurally distinct molecules produce nearly identical effects on splicing revealed that inactive analogs of each compound interchangeably compete with the active inhibitors to restore splicing. The competition indicates that all three types of compounds interact with the same site on SF3B1 and likely interfere with its function by the same mechanism, supporting a shared pharmacophore model. It also suggests that SF3B1 inhibition does not result from binding alone, but is consistent with a model in which the compounds affect a conformational change in the protein. Together, our studies reveal new mechanistic insight into SF3B1 as a principal player in the spliceosome and as a target of inhibitor compounds.

  3. Interchange Method in Compressible Magnetized Couette Flow: Magnetorotational and Magnetoconvective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Contopoulos, John; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2003-03-01

    We obtain the general forms of the axisymmetric stability criteria in a magnetized compressible Couette flow using an energy variational principle, the so-called interchange or Chandrasekhar's method, which we applied successfully in the incompressible case. This formulation accounts for the simultaneous presence of gravity, rotation, a toroidal magnetic field, a weak axial magnetic field, entropy gradients, and density gradients in the initial equilibrium state. The power of the method lies in its simplicity, which allows us to derive extremely compact and physically clear expressions for the relevant stability criteria despite the inclusion of so many physical effects. In the implementation of the method, all the applicable conservation laws are explicitly taken into account during the variations of a quantity with dimensions of energy that we call the ``free-energy function.'' As in the incompressible case, the presence of an axial field invalidates the conservation laws of angular momentum and azimuthal magnetic flux and introduces instead isorotation and axial current conservation along field lines. Our results are therefore markedly different depending on whether an axial magnetic field is present, and they generalize in two simple expressions all previously known, partial stability criteria for the appearance of magnetorotational instability. Furthermore, the coupling between magnetic tension and buoyancy and its influence to the dynamics of nonhomoentropic magnetized flows become quite clear from our results. In the limits of plane-parallel atmospheres and homoentropic flows, our formulation easily recovers the stability criteria for suppression of convective and Parker instabilities, as well as some related special cases studied over 40 years ago by Newcomb and Tserkovnikov via laborious variational techniques.

  4. Observation of the hot electron interchange instability in a high beta dipolar confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Eugenio Enrique

    In this thesis the first study of the high beta, hot electron interchange (HEI) instability in a laboratory, dipolar confined plasma is presented. The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is a new research facility that explores the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. In initial experiments long-pulse, quasi-steady state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 sec have been produced with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Creation of high-pressure, high beta plasma is possible only when intense HEI instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. LDX plasma exist within one of three regimes characterized by its response to heating and fueling. The observed HEI instability depends on the regime and can take one of three forms: as quasiperiodic bursts during the low density, low beta plasma regime, as local high beta relaxation events in the high beta plasma regime, and as global, intense energy relaxation bursts, both in the high beta and afterglow plasma regimes. Measurements of the HEI instability are made using high-impedance, floating potential probes and fast Mirnov coils. Analysis of these signals reveals the extent of the transport during high beta plasmas. During intense high beta HEI instabilities, fluctuations at the edge significantly exceed the magnitude of the equilibrium field generated by the high beta electrons and energetic electron confinement ends in under 100 musec. For heated plasmas, one of the consequences of the observed high beta transport is the presence of hysteresis in the neutral gas fueling required to stabilize and maintain the high beta plasma. Finally, a nonlinear, self-consistent numerical simulation of the growth and saturation of the HEI instability has been adapted for LDX and compared to experimental observations.

  5. Interchange Method in Compressible Magnetized Couette Flow: Magnetorotational and Magnetoconvective Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Contopoulos, John; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2002-01-01

    We obtain the general forms of the axisymmetric stability criteria in a magnetized compressible Couette flow using an energy variational principle, the so-called interchange or Chandrasekhar s met hod, which we applied successfully in the incompressible case. This formulation accounts for the simultaneous presence of gravity, rotation, a toroidal magnetic field, a weak axial magnetic field, entropy gradients, and density gradients in the initial equilibrium state. The power of the method lies in its simplicity which allows us to derive extremely compact and physically clear expressions for the relevant stability criteria despite the inclusion of so many physical effects. In the implementation of the method, all the applicable conservation laws are explicitly taken into account during the variations of a quantity with dimensions of energy which we call the free energy function. As in the incompressible case, the presence of an axial field invalidates the conservation laws of angular momentum and azimuthal magnetic flux and introduces instead isorotation and axial current conservation along field lines. Our results are therefore markedly different depending on whether an axial magnetic field is present, and generalize in two simple expressions all previously known, partial stability criteria for the appearance of magnetorotational instability. Furthermore, the coupling between magnetic tension and buoyancy and its influence to the dynamics of nonhomoentropic magnetized flows becomes quite clear from our results. In the limits of plane-parallel atmospheres and homoentropic flows, our formulation easily recovers the stability criteria for suppression of convective and Parker instabilities, as well as some related special cases studied over 40 years ago by Newcomb and Tserkovnikov via laborious variational techniques.

  6. Geoscience terminology for data interchange: the CGI Geoscience Terminology Work Group (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S. M.; Gtwg, G.

    2013-12-01

    . Petersburg, Russia in June, 2013. The group decided on workflow procedures and discussed technology for vocabulary accessibility, which is still a problem. Eleven new vocabularies were adopted to add to the current portfolio of 31 vocabularies developed for GeoSciML interchange documents. Additional vocabularies are under development for GeoSciML v3, and EarthResourceML https://www.seegrid.csiro.au/wiki/CGIModel/EarthResourceML. Other outstanding work items include integrating multilingual geoscience terms developed by the MLT Working Group with existing CGI vocabularies to provide multilingual support, establishing existing vocabularies in a permanent repository under stewardship of the GTWG, and documenting policies for vocabulary management.

  7. Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Technical Interchange Meeting 2 (SERT TIM 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe; Sanders, Clark W.

    2000-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Propulsion Research Center hosted the Space Solar Power Exploratory Research & Technology (SERT) Technical Interchange Meeting TIM) 2 in Huntsville, Alabama December 7-10. 1999 with 126 people in attendance. The SERT program includes both competitively procured activities. which are being implemented through a portfolio of focused R&D investments--with the maximum leveraging of existing resources inside and outside NASA. and guided by these system studies. Axel Roth. Director of the Flight Projects Directorate NASA MSFC, welcomed the SERT TIM 2 participants and challenged them to develop the necessary technologies and demonstrations that will lead to Space Solar Power (SSP) International implementation. Joe Howell, NASA MSFC, reiterated the SERT TIM 2 objectives: 1) Refining and modeling systems approaches for the utilization of SSP concepts and technologies, ranging, from the near-term e.g. for space science, exploration and commercial space applications to the far-term (e. g. SSP for terrestrial markets), including systems concepts, technology, infrastructure (i.g., transportation), and economics. 2) Conducting technology research, development and demonstration activities to produce "proof- of-concept" validation of critical SSP elements for both the nearer and farther-term applications. 3) Initiating partnerships Nationality and Internationally that could be expanded, as appropriate, to pursue later SSP technology and applications (e.g., space science. colonization, etc.). Day one began with the NASA Centers presenting their SERT activities summary since SERT TIM 1 and wound up with a presentation by Masahiro Mori, NASDA titled "NASDA In-house Study for SSP". Demonstration for the Near-Term. Day two began with the SERT Systems Studies and Analysis reports resulting from NRA 8-23 followed by presentations of SERT Technology Demonstrations reports resulting from NRA 8-23. Day two closed with John Mankins presentation

  8. Index of consciousness and bispectral index values are interchangeable during normotension and hypotension but not during non pulsatile flow state during cardiac surgical procedures: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Holla, Srinivasa; Jawali, Vivek

    2010-04-01

    Awareness under anesthesia is an avoidable complication during general anesthesia. Anesthetic depth monitors assist anesthesiologists in providing appropriate levels of anesthesia. Index of consciousness monitoring is a recently introduced monitor in the array of anesthesia depth monitors. The objective of this study was to assess the interchangeability of bispectral index, which is already in clinical use and the recently introduced index of consciousness techniques. The other objective was to assess this interchangeability during normotension, hypotension and during pulseless state in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. This study is a prospective observational study, conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. Fifteen cardiac surgical patients undergoing off pump and conventional coronary artery bypass under cardiopulmonary bypass participated in the study. Bispectral index and index of consciousness monitoring were carried out simultaneously during various stages of consciousness, and assessed for interchangeability. Bland Altman plotting and 'mountain plot' were used to assess the interchangeability. Eleven in the cohort underwent off pump and the rest (n = 4) conventional coronary artery bypass surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. A set of 887 data were obtained during the study period. The data were classified as those obtained during normotension, hypotension and pulseless state during cardiopulmonary bypass. 732 sets of data were obtained during normotension, 84 during hypotension and 71 during cardiopulmonary bypass. Overall interchangeability was good, suggested by low bias (0.96), high precision (0.54), r value of 0.7 and P value of <0.0001. It was found that the data obtained during normotension was also interchangeable, suggested by low bias (0.8), high precision (0.54) and r value of 0.7. The data obtained during hypotension was not as highly interchangeable as during normotension-bias 0.4, precision 1.66 and r value of 0.7. The

  9. Local Regulation of Interchange Turbulence in a Dipole-Confined Plasma Torus using Current-Collection Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. Maximillian

    2014-10-01

    Turbulence in a dipole-confined plasma is dominated by interchange fluctuations with complex dynamics and short coherence. We report the first laboratory demonstration of the regulation of interchange turbulence in a plasma torus confined by an axisymmetric dipole magnet using active feedback. Feedback is performed by varying the bias to an electrode in proportion to the electric potential measured at other locations. The phase and amplitude of the bias to the electrode is adjusted with a linear circuit, forming a relatively broad-band current-collection feedback system. Changing the gain and phase of collection results in modification of turbulent fluctuations, observed as amplification or suppression of turbulent spectrum. Significantly, power can be either extracted from or injected into the turbulence. When the gain and phase are adjusted to suppress turbulence, the external circuit becomes a controlled load extracting power from the plasma. This is analogous to the regulation of magnetospheric convection by ionospheric currents. When the gain and phase of the external circuit is adjusted to amplify turbulence, the direction of power flow from the electrode reverses, enhancing the fluctuations. Although we observe significant changes to the intensity and spectrum of plasma fluctuations, these changes appear only on those magnetic field lines within a region near the current collector equal in size to the turbulent correlation length and shifted in the direction of the electron magnetic drift. We conclude that the effects of this feedback on turbulence in a dipole plasma torus is localized. The clear influence of current-collection feedback on interchange turbulence suggests the possibility of global regulation of turbulent motion using multiple sensor and electrode pairs as well as the ability to perform controlled tests of bounce-averaged gyrokinetic theory of turbulence in the geometry of a dipole plasma torus. Supported by NSF-DOE Partnership for Plasma

  10. Distribution, persistence and interchange of Epstein-Barr virus strains among PBMC, plasma and saliva of primary infection subjects.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Hin; Chan, Koon Wing; Chan, Kwok Hung; Chiang, Alan Kwok Shing

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed at investigating the distribution, persistence and interchange of viral strains among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), plasma and saliva of primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection subjects. Twelve infectious mononucleosis (IM) patients and eight asymptomatic individuals (AS) with primary EBV infection were followed longitudinally at several time points for one year from the time of diagnosis, when blood and saliva samples were collected and separated into PBMC, plasma and saliva, representing circulating B cell, plasma and epithelial cell compartments, respectively. To survey the viral strains, genotyping assays for the natural polymorphisms in two latent EBV genes, EBNA2 and LMP1, were performed and consisted of real-time PCR on EBNA2 to distinguish type 1 and 2 viruses, fluorescent-based 30-bp typing assay on LMP1 to distinguish deletion and wild type LMP1, and fluorescent-based heteroduplex tracking assays on both EBNA2 and LMP1 to distinguish defined polymorphic variants. No discernible differences were observed between IM patients and AS. Multiple viral strains were acquired early at the start of infection. Stable persistence of dominant EBV strains in the same tissue compartment was observed throughout the longitudinal samples. LMP1-defined strains, China 1, China 2 and Mediterranean+, were the most common strains observed. EBNA2-defined groups 1 and 3e predominated the PBMC and saliva compartments. Concordance of EBNA2 and LMP1 strains between PBMC and saliva suggested ready interchange of viruses between circulating B cell and epithelial cell pools, whilst discordance of viral strains observed between plasma and PBMC/saliva indicated presence of viral pools in other undetermined tissue compartments. Taken together, the results indicated that the distribution, persistence and interchange of viral strains among the tissue compartments are more complex than those proposed by the current model of EBV life cycle.

  11. Simulation and evaluation of the Sh-2F helicopter in a shipboard environment using the interchangeable cab system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulk, C. H., Jr.; Astill, D. L.; Donley, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    The operation of the SH-2F helicopter from the decks of small ships in adverse weather was simulated using a large amplitude vertical motion simulator, a wide angle computer generated imagery visual system, and an interchangeable cab (ICAB). The simulation facility, the mathematical programs, and the validation method used to ensure simulation fidelity are described. The results show the simulator to be a useful tool in simulating the ship-landing problem. Characteristics of the ICAB system and ways in which the simulation can be improved are presented.

  12. DoD Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Convention: ASC X12 Transaction Set 110 Air Freight Invoice (Version 003020)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    930315 DEPARYMEWT OF DEijj AIR FREIGHT INVOICE EDo COIWTImON 110.003020 TABLE 10.2-1 Contrut Segment Hierarchy 930315 10.2.3 AIR FREIHT INVOICE...Control Envelope Control Segments Pos Seg Req Industry No. ID Name Des Use Loop USE 10 ISA Interchange Control Header M 1 USE 20 GS Functional Group...and industry identifier of the EDI standard being used. (See X12 Dictionary) Version/Release [027 1 Code value agreed to by trading partners. See X1 2

  13. DoD Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Convention: ASC X12 Transaction Set 859 Generic Freight Invoice (Version 003020)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    10.2.4 930415 DEPARTMENT OF DBEFESE GENERIC FREIGHT INVOICE EDI coNvENlION 859.003020 Interchange Control Envelope Control Segments Pos Seg Req Industry ...Standards Committee X1 2 GS08 480 Version/Releasefindusty id Code M ID 1112 Code indicating the version, release, subrelease and industry identifier of the...530 PER Administrative Communications 0 3 Contact Table 2 - Detail Area PoeSe Req Industry No. I, Name Des Ue Lxp USE 10 LX Assigned Number M 1 LX/999

  14. Suppression of Trapped Energetic Ions Driven Resistive Interchange Modes with Electron Cyclotron Heating in a Helical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X. D.; Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Seki, R.; Nicolas, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Nagaoka, K.; Ogawa, K.; Tanaka, K.; Isobe, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kubo, S.; Sakakibara, S.; Bando, T.; Ido, T.; Ozaki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Takemura, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The resistive interchange mode destabilized by the resonant interaction with the trapped energetic ions is fully suppressed when the injected power of electron cyclotron heating exceeds a certain threshold. It is shown for the first time that the complete stabilization of the energetic-particle-driven mode without relaxing the energetic particle (EP) pressure gradient is possible by reducing the radial width of the eigenmodes δw , especially when δw narrows to a small enough value relative to the finite orbit width of EP.

  15. Interchangeability between 24-hour collection and single spot urines for vanillylmandelic and homovanillic acid levels in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cangemi, Giuliana; Barco, Sebastiano; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Viscardi, Elisabetta; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Garaventa, Alberto; Melioli, Giovanni; Conte, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    The determination of the two urinary catecholamine metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) is of crucial importance for the diagnosis and follow-up of neuroblastoma (NB). The standard practice for their measurement requires the use of 24-hour collections that are time consuming and difficult to obtain. In this article, we directly demonstrate that 24-hour collections and single spot urines are interchangeable for the determination of HVA and VMA expressed as ratio on creatinine concentration. This study can be useful for a faster management of NB at onset.

  16. Identification of interchangeable cross-species function of elongation factor-1 alpha promoters in babesia bigemina and babesia bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Tick borne Babesia bigemina is responsible for acute and potentially lethal hemolytic disease in cattle. The development of genetic manipulation tools necessary to the better understanding of parasite biology is currently limited by the lack of a complete parasite genome and experimental...

  17. Isomerization of neopentyl chloride and neopentyl bromide by a 1,2-interchange of a halogen atom and a methyl group.

    PubMed

    Lisowski, Carmen E; Duncan, Juliana R; Ranieri, Anthony J; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2010-09-30

    The recombination of chloromethyl and t-butyl radicals at room temperature was used to generate neopentyl chloride molecules with 89 kcal mol(-1) of internal energy. The observed unimolecular reactions, which give 2-methyl-2-butene and 2-methyl-1-butene plus HCl, as products, are explained by a mechanism that involves the interchange of a methyl group and the chlorine atom to yield 2-chloro-2-methylbutane, which subsequently eliminates hydrogen chloride by the usual four-centered mechanism to give the observed products. The interchange isomerization process is the rate-limiting step. Similar experiments were done with CD(2)Cl and C(CH(3))(3) radicals to measure the kinetic-isotope effect to help corroborate the proposed mechanism. Density functional theory was employed at the B3PW91/6-31G(d',p') level to verify the Cl/CH(3) interchange mechanism and to characterize the interchange transition state. These calculations, which provide vibrational frequencies and moments of inertia of the molecule and transition state, were used to evaluate the statistical unimolecular rate constants. Matching the calculated and experimental rate constants, gave 62 ± 2 kcal mol(-1) as the threshold energy for interchange of the Cl atom and a methyl group. The calculated models also were used to reinterpret the thermal unimolecular reactions of neopentyl chloride and neopentyl bromide. The previously assumed Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement mechanism for these reactions can be replaced by a mechanism that involves the interchange of the halogen atom and a methyl group followed by HCl or HBr elimination from 2-chloro-2-methylbutane and 2-bromo-2-methylbutane. Electronic structure calculations also were done to find threshold energies for several related molecules, including 2-chloro-3,3-dimethylbutane, 1-chloro-2-methyl-2-phenylpropane, and 1-chloro-2-methyl-2-vinylpropane, to demonstrate the generality of the interchange reaction involving a methyl, or other hydrocarbon groups, and a

  18. Reciprocation and interchange of grooming, agonistic support, feeding tolerance, and aggression in semi-free-ranging Barbary macaques.

    PubMed

    Carne, Charlotte; Wiper, Sue; Semple, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Evidence from a range of primate species indicates that grooming can be exchanged either for itself or for other rank-related "commodities," such as agonistic support, feeding tolerance, or reduced aggression. Patterns of exchange behavior have been found to vary considerably between species, and understanding the causes of this variation is central to the study of the evolution of primate social systems. It is, therefore, essential that exchange behavior is examined in a wide range of species and settings. This article is the first to explore the reciprocation and interchange of grooming in the Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus). We collected focal data on semi-free-ranging adult female Barbary macaques at Trentham Monkey Forest, England, and analyzed dyadic data using Generalized Linear Mixed Models. We found evidence for the reciprocal exchange of grooming and for the interchange of grooming for agonistic support and tolerance while feeding. There was no evidence that grooming was traded for a reduction in aggression; indeed, we found a positive relationship between aggression given and grooming received. This may reflect the "extortion" of grooming from subordinates by dominant animals. These results will facilitate comparative analyses of exchange behavior by adding to the current database a new species, characterized by a different social style from those macaque species previously investigated. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fine-scale niche structure of Neotropical forests reflects a legacy of the Great American Biotic Interchange.

    PubMed

    Sedio, Brian E; Paul, John R; Taylor, Charlotte M; Dick, Christopher W

    2013-01-01

    The tendency of species to retain their ancestral niches may link processes that determine community assembly with biogeographic histories that span geological time scales. Biogeographic history is likely to have had a particularly strong impact on Neotropical forests because of the influence of the Great American Biotic Interchange, which followed emergence of a land connection between North and South America ~3 Ma. Here we examine the community structure, ancestral niches and ancestral distributions of the related, hyperdiverse woody plant genera Psychotria and Palicourea (Rubiaceae) in Panama. We find that 49% of the variation in hydraulic traits, a strong determinant of community structure, is explained by species' origins in climatically distinct biogeographic regions. Niche evolution models for a regional sample of 152 species indicate that ancestral climatic niches are associated with species' habitat distributions, and hence local community structure and composition, even millions of years after dispersal into new geographic regions.

  20. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Ochando, M. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Carralero, D.; Hidalgo, C.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  1. Summary of geotechnical services for the proposed Route 24/580/980 interchange improvement in Oakland, California

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabaie, A.; Majchrzak, M.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents a summary of the geotechnical services in connection with the proposed Route 24/580/980 Interchange Improvement in Oakland, California. The purpose of the work was to provide drilling equipment and personnel to log test borings, collect soils samples, testing of excess soil cutting for environmental concerns and disposal of excess soils cutting. A field investigation was conducted from September 7 through September 26, 1995. The field work consisted of drilling 7 borings (B-1 through B-7) at the approximate locations shown on the Boring Location Map provided by CALTRANS. These borings extended to approximately 200 feet below the ground surface. This project is part of a CALTRANS earthquake retrofit project.

  2. A Statistical study of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability signatures using THEMIS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurisic, Mirjana; Panov, Evgeny; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We use THEMIS data from 2010-2012 tail seasons to collect observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures. Over seventy observations with closely located THEMIS probes P3-P5 reveal that BICI-like plasma sheet oscillations may appear at different magnetic local time. For these, we derive background plasma sheet parameters such as BZ, δBZ/δx and plasma beta, and investigate solar wind conditions. We also estimate the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations such as frequency and amplitude. Based on this, we search for a relation between the background plasma sheet parameters and the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations.

  3. Education, income, and occupational class cannot be used interchangeably in social epidemiology. Empirical evidence against a common practice

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Siegfried; Hemström, Örjan; Peter, Richard; Vågerö, Denny

    2006-01-01

    Study objective Education, income, and occupational class are often used interchangeably in studies showing social inequalities in health. This procedure implies that all three characteristics measure the same underlying phenomena. This paper questions this practice. The study looked for any independent effects of education, income, and occupational class on four health outcomes: diabetes prevalence, myocardial infarction incidence and mortality, and finally all cause mortality in populations from Sweden and Germany. Design Sweden: follow up of myocardial infarction mortality and all cause mortality in the entire population, based on census linkage to the Cause of Death Registry. Germany: follow up of myocardial infarction morbidity and all cause mortality in statutory health insurance data, plus analysis of prevalence data on diabetes. Multiple regression analyses were performed to calculate the effects of education, income, and occupational class before and after mutual adjustments. Setting and participants Sweden (all residents aged 25–64) and Germany (Mettman district, Nordrhein‐Westfalen, all insured persons aged 25–64). Main results Correlations between education, income, and occupational class were low to moderate. Which of these yielded the strongest effects on health depended on type of health outcome in question. For diabetes, education was the strongest predictor and for all cause mortality it was income. Myocardial infarction morbidity and mortality showed a more mixed picture. In mutually adjusted analyses each social dimension had an independent effect on each health outcome in both countries. Conclusions Education, income, and occupational class cannot be used interchangeably as indicators of a hypothetical latent social dimension. Although correlated, they measure different phenomena and tap into different causal mechanisms. PMID:16905727

  4. Residual Strahls in Solar Wind Electron Dropouts: Signatures of Magnetic Connection to the Sun, Disconnection, or Interchange Reconnection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Pagel, C.

    2008-01-01

    A recent assessment of suprathermal electron heat flux dropouts (HFDs) in the solar wind eliminated 90% as possible signatures of field lines disconnected from the Sun at both ends (Pagel et al., 2005b). The primary reason for elimination was the presence of a residual field-aligned strahl presumably signaling field lines connected to the Sun. Using high-time-resolution data from the Wind spacecraft, this paper tests whether the residual strahls were an artifact of averaging over pitch angle distributions (PADs) with and without strahls. An automated search for PADs without strahls (flat PADs) yields an occurrence rate of only 14% within HFDs, but a detailed case study shows that these flat PADs are imbedded within intervals of nearly flat PADs, that is, PADS with residual strahls that cannot be artifacts of averaging. An attractive alternative is that the residual strahls result from intermixing of originally back-scattered fluxes (haloes) of unequal intensities on field lines that have either disconnected or interchange reconnected at the Sun. A reevaluation of reported streaming of higher-energy electrons in HFDs suggests a similar cause. While the high-time-resolution data show high variability of PAD profiles within HFDs, this paper reopens the possibility that a substantial fraction signal disconnection or interchange reconnection. Estimated occurrence rates of fields having undergone these processes based upon published HFD rates are of the same order of magnitude as the surprisingly low values of 1-5% recently predicted by a model of a balanced heliospheric flux budget (Owens and Crooker, 2007).

  5. Teacher Mobility and Transnational, "British World" Space: The League of the Empire's "Interchange of Home and Dominion Teachers", 1907-1931

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutchley, Jody

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of teachers who participated in the League of the Empire's "Interchange of Home and Dominion Teachers" scheme through a tripartite approach to "British World" space. First, it identifies the mechanisms through which exchanges were established. It analyses the patterns of teacher mobility…

  6. [Data interchange in blood transfusion: the impact of a new standard on the evolution of health electronic data exchange in France].

    PubMed

    Ferrera, V; Staccini, P; Chiaroni, J; Quaranta, J F; Boulay, F; De Micco, P

    1998-10-01

    The sanitary and social data interchange within care establishments or networks is today the subject of many national or international considerations. Electronic data interchange in the health field has characteristics linked to ethical and deontological principles of care staff. Used daily, this tool contributes to the quality of care, to the optimization of patient treatment and to the organization of the system care. In the transfusion field, the standardization of messages related to the traceability of blood products in now required by the No. 2 instruction of French Blood Agency, which rules the using of national norms elaborated by the French Agency of Normalization. If the technicality is the greater part of these regulated and formalized messages, this standardization systematizes and justifies the nominative and ciphered data interchange in an open environment, opening a new dimension in the interoperability of data system between care establishments. This article analyzes the characteristics and the potential impact of this normalization on the evolution of the electronic data interchange in the health field.

  7. Foreign Languages in the Upper Secondary School: A Study of the Causes of Decline. Interchange 59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interchange, 1999

    1999-01-01

    A study of the decline in second language enrollments in Scotland's upper secondary schools is summarized. A survey conducted in 1998, sent to a random sample representing 25 percent of all secondary schools in the country, elicited administrator and language teacher opinions concerning factors influencing language enrollments. Some students were…

  8. International Cancer of the Head and Neck, Genetics and Environment (InterCHANGE) Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Evaluate the Association Between Certain Environmental Exposures (e.g. Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, Betel Nut Chewing…) and Head and Neck Cancers; Assess the Effect of Genetic Factors, Including Both SNP and Copy Number Variation (CNV) Through Analysis of Both Main Effect and Gene-gene Interaction

  9. Quality of the water in Borrow Ponds near a major highway interchange, Dade County, Florida, October-November 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaven, T.R.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

    1978-01-01

    Water, bottom sediment, and aquatic plants were sampled from ponds near a major south Florida highway interchange to document concentrations of selected constituents in an aquatic environment near heavy vehicular traffic. Generally, concentrations of constituents were within the range expected in an uncontaminated environment in south Florida. However, concentrations did exceed south Florida background levels or Environmental Protection Agency criteria in a few cases. Two trace elements--chromium (20 micrograms per liter) in ponded surface water and lead (500 micrograms per gram) in bottom sediment--exceeded background levels. Concentrations of dieldrin (22 micrograms per kilogram) and polychlorinated biphenyls (53 micrograms per kilogram) also exceed background levels in bottom sediment. The concentration of phenol (23 micrograms per liter) in ground water exceeded Environmental Protection Agency quality criteria by 22 micrograms per liter, but was within the background range for south Florida. Ten metals were detected in the cattail or algal samples, but only iron, manganese, and zinc were in higher concentrations than those in the bottom sediment. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Large-Scale Phosphoproteome of Human Whole Saliva Using Disulphide-Thiol-Interchange Covalent Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Erdjan; Siqueira, Walter L.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Oppenheim, Frank G.

    2010-01-01

    Thus far only a handful of phosphoproteins with important biological functions have been identified and characterized in oral fluids and these include some of the abundant protein constituents of saliva. Whole saliva (WS) samples were trypsin digested followed by chemical derivatization using dithiothreitol (DTT) of the phospho-serine/threonine containing peptides. The DTT-phosphopeptides were enriched by covalent disulphide-thiol-interchange chromatography and analysis by nano-flow LC-ESI-MS/MS. The specificity of DTT chemical derivatization was evaluated separately under different base-catalyzed conditions with NaOH and Ba(OH)2, blocking cysteine residues by iodoacetamide and enzymatic O-deglycosylation prior to DTT reaction. Further analysis of WS samples which were subjected to either of these conditions provided supporting evidence for phosphoprotein identifications. The combined chemical strategies and mass spectrometric analyses identified 65 phosphoproteins in WS of which 28 were based on two or more peptide identification criteria with high confidence, and 37 were based on a single phosphopeptide identification. Most of the identified proteins, ~80%, were hitherto unknown phosphoprotein components. This study represents the first large-scale documentation of phosphoproteins of WS. The origins and identity of WS phosphoproteome suggest significant implications for both basic science and the development of novel biomarkers/diagnostic tools for both systemic and oral disease states. PMID:20659418

  12. A U.S. Geological Survey Data Standard (Specifications for representation of geographic point locations for information interchange)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1983-01-01

    This standard establishes uniform formats for geographic point location data. Geographic point location refers to the use of a coordinate system to define the position of a point that may be on, above, or below the Earth's surface. It provides a means for representing these data in digital form for the purpose of interchanging information among data systems and improving clarity and accuracy of interpersonal communications. This document is an expansion and clarification of National Bureau of Standards FIPS PUB 70, issued October 24, 1980. There are minor editorial changes, plus the following additions and modifications: (I) The representation of latitude and longitude using radian measure was added. (2) Alternate 2 for Representation of Hemispheric Information was deleted. (3) Use of the maximum precision for all numerical values was emphasized. The Alternate Representation of Precision was deleted. (4) The length of the zone representation for the State Plane Coordinate System was standardized. (5) The term altitude was substituted for elevation throughout to conform with international usage. (6) Section 3, Specifications for Altitude Data, was expanded and upgraded significantly to the same level of detail as for the horizontal values. (7) A table delineating the coverage of Universal Transverse Mercator zones and the longitudes of the Central Meridians was added and the other tables renumbered. (8) The total length of the representation of point location data at maximum precision was standardized.

  13. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2016-12-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines.

  14. Crash Risk Prediction Modeling Based on the Traffic Conflict Technique and a Microscopic Simulation for Freeway Interchange Merging Areas.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Xiang, Qiaojun; Ma, Yongfeng; Gu, Xin; Li, Han

    2016-11-19

    This paper evaluates the traffic safety of freeway interchange merging areas based on the traffic conflict technique. The hourly composite risk indexes (HCRI) was defined. By the use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photography and video processing techniques, the conflict type and severity was judged. Time to collision (TTC) was determined with the traffic conflict evaluation index. Then, the TTC severity threshold was determined. Quantizing the weight of the conflict by direct losses of different severities of freeway traffic accidents, the calculated weight of the HCRI can be obtained. Calibration of the relevant parameters of the micro-simulation simulator VISSIM is conducted by the travel time according to the field data. Variables are placed into orthogonal tables at different levels. On the basis of this table, the trajectory file of every traffic condition is simulated, and then submitted into a surrogate safety assessment model (SSAM), identifying the number of hourly traffic conflicts in the merging area, a statistic of HCRI. Moreover, the multivariate linear regression model was presented and validated to study the relationship between HCRI and the influencing variables. A comparison between the HCRI model and the hourly conflicts ratio (HCR), without weight, shows that the HCRI model fitting degree was obviously higher than the HCR. This will be a reference to design and implement operational planners.

  15. Reciprocal translocations in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.): pattern of transmission, detection of multiple interchanges and their independence.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu

    2010-01-01

    Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) is a diploid crop having 2n = 14 chromosomes. Four different plant types, heterozygous for reciprocal translocation (RT), RT-1, RT-2, RT-3, and RT-4 showing pollen semisterility, were isolated in induced mutant population of three varieties of grass pea. Transmission rate of these 4 translocations was studied in advanced selfed and intercrossed progenies, whereas multiple chromosomal interchanges were detected by the pattern of chromosomal ring formation at meiosis I in the F(1) progeny of RTxRT. RT transmitted at an average of 48.89% in selfed progeny and along with normal plants, RT and translocation homozygotes produced some trisomic plants in the segregation progeny. RT-3 showing maximum frequency (68.20%) of zig-zag or alternate chromosome orientation exhibited highest transmission (55.20%). Presence of a ring of 6 or 2 rings of 4 chromosomes in F(1) double heterozygotes obtained from RTxRT suggested involvement of one common chromosome in translocations of RT-1, RT-2, and RT-4 but a different one in common between RT-2 and RT-3. No common chromosome, however, was shared by RT-3 and RT-4. Thus, 5 out of 7 chromosomes are involved in the present RTs, and one of the translocated chromosomes in RT-1 line was always associated with nucleolar organizing region.

  16. Neotropical mammal diversity and the Great American Biotic Interchange: spatial and temporal variation in South America's fossil record.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Juan D; Forasiepi, Analía; Jaramillo, Carlos; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2014-01-01

    The vast mammal diversity of the Neotropics is the result of a long evolutionary history. During most of the Cenozoic, South America was an island continent with an endemic mammalian fauna. This isolation ceased during the late Neogene after the formation of the Isthmus of Panama, resulting in an event known as the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). In this study, we investigate biogeographic patterns in South America, just before or when the first immigrants are recorded and we review the temporal and geographical distribution of fossil mammals during the GABI. We performed a dissimilarity analysis which grouped the faunal assemblages according to their age and their geographic distribution. Our data support the differentiation between tropical and temperate assemblages in South America during the middle and late Miocene. The GABI begins during the late Miocene (~10-7 Ma) and the putative oldest migrations are recorded in the temperate region, where the number of GABI participants rapidly increases after ~5 Ma and this trend continues during the Pleistocene. A sampling bias toward higher latitudes and younger records challenges the study of the temporal and geographic patterns of the GABI.

  17. The interchange of immunophilins leads to parallel pathways and different intermediates in the assembly of Hsp90 glucocorticoid receptor complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ebong, Ima-obong; Beilsten-Edmands, Victoria; Patel, Nisha A; Morgner, Nina; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-01-01

    Hormone receptors require participation of the chaperones Hsp40/Hsp70 to form client-transfer complexes with Hsp90/Hop. Interaction with the co-chaperone p23 releases Hop and Hsp70, and the immunophilin FKBP52 mediates transfer of the Hsp90-receptor complex to the nucleus. Inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transport by FKBP51, but not by FKBP52, has been observed at the cellular level, but the subunit composition of the intermediates involved has not been deduced. Here we use mass spectrometry to show that FKBP51/52 form analogous complexes with GR/Hsp90/Hop/Hsp70/ATP, but differences emerge upon addition of p23 to client-transfer complexes. When FKBP51 is present, a stable intermediate is formed (FKBP51)1(GR)1(Hsp90)2(p23)2 by expulsion of Hsp70 and Hop. By contrast, in the presence of FKBP52, ejection of p23 also takes place to form the nuclear transfer complex (FKBP52)1(GR)1(Hsp90)2. Our results are therefore consistent with pathways in which FKBP51/52 are interchangeable during the early assembly reactions. Following interaction with p23, however, the pathways diverge with FKBP51 sequestering GR in a stable intermediate complex with p23. By contrast, binding of FKBP52 occurs almost concomitantly with release of p23 to form a highly dynamic transfer complex, primed for interaction with the dynactin transport machinery. PMID:27462449

  18. Large-scale phosphoproteome of human whole saliva using disulfide-thiol interchange covalent chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salih, Erdjan; Siqueira, Walter L; Helmerhorst, Eva J; Oppenheim, Frank G

    2010-12-01

    To date, only a handful of phosphoproteins with important biological functions have been identified and characterized in oral fluids, and these include some of the abundant protein constituents of saliva. Whole saliva (WS) samples were trypsin digested, followed by chemical derivatization using dithiothreitol (DTT) of the phospho-serine/threonine-containing peptides. The DTT-phosphopeptides were enriched by covalent disulfide-thiol interchange chromatography and analysis by nanoflow liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The specificity of DTT chemical derivatization was evaluated separately under different base-catalyzed conditions with NaOH and Ba(OH)(2), blocking cysteine residues by iodoacetamide and enzymatic O-deglycosylation prior to DTT reaction. Further analysis of WS samples that were subjected to either of these conditions provided supporting evidence for phosphoprotein identifications. The combined chemical strategies and mass spectrometric analyses identified 65 phosphoproteins in WS; of these, 28 were based on two or more peptide identification criteria with high confidence and 37 were based on a single phosphopeptide identification. Most of the identified proteins (∼80%) were previously unknown phosphoprotein components. This study represents the first large-scale documentation of phosphoproteins of WS. The origins and identity of WS phosphoproteome suggest significant implications for both basic science and the development of novel biomarkers/diagnostic tools for systemic and oral disease states.

  19. Crash Risk Prediction Modeling Based on the Traffic Conflict Technique and a Microscopic Simulation for Freeway Interchange Merging Areas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shen; Xiang, Qiaojun; Ma, Yongfeng; Gu, Xin; Li, Han

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the traffic safety of freeway interchange merging areas based on the traffic conflict technique. The hourly composite risk indexes (HCRI) was defined. By the use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photography and video processing techniques, the conflict type and severity was judged. Time to collision (TTC) was determined with the traffic conflict evaluation index. Then, the TTC severity threshold was determined. Quantizing the weight of the conflict by direct losses of different severities of freeway traffic accidents, the calculated weight of the HCRI can be obtained. Calibration of the relevant parameters of the micro-simulation simulator VISSIM is conducted by the travel time according to the field data. Variables are placed into orthogonal tables at different levels. On the basis of this table, the trajectory file of every traffic condition is simulated, and then submitted into a surrogate safety assessment model (SSAM), identifying the number of hourly traffic conflicts in the merging area, a statistic of HCRI. Moreover, the multivariate linear regression model was presented and validated to study the relationship between HCRI and the influencing variables. A comparison between the HCRI model and the hourly conflicts ratio (HCR), without weight, shows that the HCRI model fitting degree was obviously higher than the HCR. This will be a reference to design and implement operational planners. PMID:27869763

  20. The interchangeability of global positioning system and semiautomated video-based performance data during elite soccer match play.

    PubMed

    Harley, Jamie A; Lovell, Ric J; Barnes, Christopher A; Portas, Matthew D; Weston, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    In elite-level soccer, player motion characteristics are commonly generated from match play and training situations using semiautomated video analysis systems and global positioning system (GPS) technology, respectively. Before such data are used collectively to quantify global player load, it is necessary to understand both the level of agreement and direction of bias between the systems so that specific interventions can be made based on the reported results. The aim of this report was to compare data derived from both systems for physical match performances. Six elite-level soccer players were analyzed during a competitive match using semiautomated video analysis (ProZone® [PZ]) and GPS (MinimaxX) simultaneously. Total distances (TDs), high speed running (HSR), very high speed running (VHSR), sprinting distance (SPR), and high-intensity running distance (HIR; >4.0 m·s(-1)) were reported in 15-minute match periods. The GPS reported higher values than PZ did for TD (GPS: 1,755.4 ± 245.4 m; PZ: 1,631.3 ± 239.5 m; p < 0.05); PZ reported higher values for SPR and HIR than GPS did (SPR: PZ, 34.1 ± 24.0 m; GPS: 20.3 ± 15.8 m; HIR: PZ, 368.1 ± 129.8 m; GPS: 317.0 ± 92.5 m; p < 0.05). Caution should be exercised when using match-load (PZ) and training-load (GPS) data interchangeably.

  1. Neotropical mammal diversity and the Great American Biotic Interchange: spatial and temporal variation in South America's fossil record

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Juan D.; Forasiepi, Analía; Jaramillo, Carlos; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2015-01-01

    The vast mammal diversity of the Neotropics is the result of a long evolutionary history. During most of the Cenozoic, South America was an island continent with an endemic mammalian fauna. This isolation ceased during the late Neogene after the formation of the Isthmus of Panama, resulting in an event known as the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). In this study, we investigate biogeographic patterns in South America, just before or when the first immigrants are recorded and we review the temporal and geographical distribution of fossil mammals during the GABI. We performed a dissimilarity analysis which grouped the faunal assemblages according to their age and their geographic distribution. Our data support the differentiation between tropical and temperate assemblages in South America during the middle and late Miocene. The GABI begins during the late Miocene (~10–7 Ma) and the putative oldest migrations are recorded in the temperate region, where the number of GABI participants rapidly increases after ~5 Ma and this trend continues during the Pleistocene. A sampling bias toward higher latitudes and younger records challenges the study of the temporal and geographic patterns of the GABI. PMID:25601879

  2. The threshold temperature where type-I and type-II interchange in mesoscopic superconductors at the Bogomolnyi limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Isaías G.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we discuss the H - T phase diagram for mesoscopic squared superconducting samples at the Bogomolnyi limit, where the Ginzburg-Landau constant κ = 1 /√{ 2}. We calculate Hp (T), the vortex penetration field, and Hu (T) the upper critical field. Through the study of the temperature dependence on the Hp, it is possible to distinguish the region where the magnetic field penetrates into the sample, like a type-I or a type-II superconductor. It permits to determine the threshold temperature T⋆ (L , H) where the phase transition from type-I to type-II occurs for some different sizes L of the mesoscopic superconducting samples. The calculation of the upper critical field Hu (T), for these samples, shows that, these two curves, Hp (T) and Hu (T), overlap at the threshold temperature mentioned above. The magnetization of the system was calculated for all sizes studied in this work, and for temperatures above and below T⋆ (L , H). This study confirms the existence of the threshold temperature, T⋆ (L , H), where type-I and type-II interchange in mesoscopic superconductors at the Bogomolnyi limit.

  3. A workflow for column interchangeability in liquid chromatography using modeling software and quality-by-design principles.

    PubMed

    Kormány, Róbert; Tamás, Katalin; Guillarme, Davy; Fekete, Szabolcs

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to develop a generic workflow to evaluate the chromatographic resolution in a large design space and easily find some replacement column for the method. To attain this objective from a limited number of initial experiments, modern LC modeling software (Drylab) was employed to study the behaviour of the compounds and visually compare the parts of design spaces obtained with different columns, where a given criterion of critical resolution is fullfilled. A zone of robust space can then easily be found by overlapping design spaces. By using 50×2.1mm columns packed with sub-2μm fully porous particles (UHPLC), the resolution in the entire design space can be modeled on the basis of only 2-3h experimental work per column. To demonstrate the applicability of the developed procedure, amlodipine and its related pharmacopeia impurities were selected as a case study. It was demonstrated that two columns from different providers (Waters Acquity HSS C18, Thermo Hypersil Gold C18) can be interchanged, providing a sufficient resolution at the same working point and a high degree of robustness around this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Characteristics of Astrocytomas and Oligodendrogliomas Are Caused by Two Distinct and Interchangeable Signaling Formats1

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chengkai; Lyustikman, Yelena; Shih, Alan; Hu, Xiaoyi; Fuller, Gregory N; Rosenblum, Marc; Holland, Eric C

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Chronic platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling in glial progenitors leads to the formation of oligodendrogliomas in mice, whereas chronic combined Ras and Akt signaling leads to astrocytomas. Different histologies of these tumors imply that the pathways activated by these two oncogenic stimulations are different, and that the apparent lineage of the tumor cells may result from specific signaling activity. Therefore, we have investigated the signaling effects of PDGF in culture and in gliomas in vivo. In culture, PDGF transiently activates ERK1/2 and Akt, and subsequently elevates p21 and PCNA expression similar to chronic PDGF autocrine signaling in cultured astrocytes and PDGF-induced oligodendrogliomas in vivo. Culture experiments show that autocrine PDGF stimulation, and combined active Ras and Akt generate signaling patterns that are in some ways mutually exclusive. Furthermore, forced Akt activity in the context of chronic PDGF stimulation results in cells with an astrocytic differentiation pattern both in culture and in vivo. These data imply that these two interconvertible signaling motifs are distinct in mice and lead to gliomas resembling the two major glioma histologies found in humans. The ability of signaling activity to convert tumor cells from one lineage to another presents a mechanism for the development of tumors apparently comprised of cells from multiple lineages. PMID:15967117

  5. Multilevel multitrait-multimethod latent analysis of structurally different and interchangeable raters of school climate.

    PubMed

    Konold, Timothy; Cornell, Dewey

    2015-09-01

    Informant-based systems of assessment are common platforms for measuring a variety of educational and psychological constructs where the use of multiple informants is considered best practice. In many instances, structurally different informant types (e.g., students and teachers) are solicited on the basis of their unique roles with the target of measurement. The use of multiple informants provides an opportunity to evaluate the degree to which the obtained ratings are influenced by the trait of focus and extraneous sources that can be attributed to the rater. Data from a multilevel multitrait-multimethod design in which students (N = 35,565) and teachers (N = 9,112), from 340 middle schools, responded to items measuring 3 dimensions of school climate were evaluated through a multilevel correlated trait-correlated method latent variable model. Results indicated that ratings of school climate obtained by students and teachers demonstrated high levels of convergent validity, and that school-level ratings obtained by students and teachers were equitable in the assessment of teasing and bullying. Student ratings of support and structure yielded somewhat stronger evidence of convergent validity than ratings obtained by teachers as revealed by their respective trait factor loadings. This was explained in part by the higher levels of common method effects that were observed for teachers. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Maintaining LU Factors of a General Sparse Matrix.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    true that 11021 - /A, and so (2.2) is acceptable. In effect , (2.2) involves a row interchange. Use of these elementary factorizations is commonly known...and also discourages a com- pounding effect when iii plays the role of v or wr in later elementary factorizations. Pairwise pivoting may be used in...10 or perhaps 100, it is in practice an effective strategy for factorizing and updating alike. 2.3. Discussion. The factorization (2.1) could have

  7. Thermoset recycling via high-pressure high-temperature sintering: Revisiting the effect of interchange chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Jeremy Edward

    and between particles. The technique of high-pressure high-temperature sintering has worked on all types of thermoset materials. Typical mechanical properties for sintered SBR powder rubber are as follows: 1.3 MPa 100% Modulus, 12.0 MPa Tensile Strength and 300% Elongation at Break. The goal of this research is two-fold. First, to gain an understanding of the variables that control the process of high-pressure high-temperature sintering. Second, to study the factors governing the mechanism of fusion with the hope of controlling and exploiting this process so that tires can be recycled to produce high quality and high-value added products.

  8. Interchange of L polymerase protein between two strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IV alters temperature sensitivities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Yusuff, Shamila; Vakharia, Vikram N; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-02

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) has four genotypes (I-IV) and sub-lineages within genotype I and IV. Using a reverse genetics approach, we explored the importance of the L gene for growth characteristics at different temperatures following interchange of the L gene within genotype IV (IVa and IVb) strains. VHSV strains harboring heterologous L gene were recovered and we show that the L gene determines growth characteristics at different temperatures in permissive cell lines.

  9. Disruption mechanism in the helix of SPF peptide by interchanging E5 and K10 residues: inference from molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Sunilkumar, P N; Nair, Divya G; Sadasivan, C; Haridas, M

    2009-02-01

    Seminalplasmin (SPLN) is a 47-residue peptide (SDEKASPDKHHRFSLSRYAKLANRLANPKLLETFLSKWIGDRGNRSV) from bovine seminal plasma. It has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, without any hemolytic activity. The 28-40 segment of SPLN with the sequence PKLLETFLSKWIG, designated as SPF, is the most hydrophobic stretch of SPLN and primarily responsible for the membrane-perturbing activity of SPLN. It was reported that SPF has a helical structure and the interchange of E5 and K10 residues disrupted the helical structure. The present paper reports a possible mechanism of disruption of the helical structure of SPF peptide during the interchange of E5 and K10 residues. The result is based on simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulation studies on SPF and its four analogues with K10E, K10D, E5K, and E5K & K10E substitutions. It showed that K10 residue has a critical role in maintaining the highest helical content and the positions of charged residues are also very important for maintaining the helical structure of the SPF peptide. Formation of some new long-range hydrogen bonds and the rupture of some short-range hydrogen bonds involving the tenth residue led to the disruption of helical structure of SPF peptide when E5 and K10 residues are interchanged.

  10. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are not interchangeable to assess the Achilles tendon cross-sectional-area.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Annika; Stafilidis, Savvas; Tilp, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The major aim of this study was to compare ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of the Achilles tendon cross-sectional area (CSA). Further aims were to conduct reliability analyses and to assess the influence of transducer pressure on the tendon properties in US measurements. The Achilles tendon CSA of 15 participants was assessed at two positions with US and MRI by use of a standardized protocol. Method comparison was performed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t test. Reliability was assessed by coefficients of variation (CV), intraclass correlation (ICC2,2), standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC95). A paired t test was performed to investigate the effect of probe pressure on tendon CSA and thickness. Mean US measurements provided a ~5.5% smaller CSA compared to MRI measurements. Intra-rater reliability analyses of US demonstrated CV values of 1.5-4.9%, ICC of 0.89-0.97, SEM and MDC95 values of 0.22-0.77 mm(2) and 0.61-2.16 mm(2) for both raters, whereby CV values for intra-rater reliability of MRI ranged from 1.0 to 3.7%. Inter-rater reliability was lower for both modalities. Pressure applied on the transducer altered Achilles tendon CSA and thickness significantly (p < 0.05). Our findings show that US and MRI cannot be used interchangeably for Achilles tendon CSA assessments, however, each imaging modality separately is reliable to assess this property. Pressure applied on the transducer during US measurements causes alterations of the tendon's morphology and should be avoided.

  11. Trend of digital camera and interchangeable zoom lenses with high ratio based on patent application over the past 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensui, Takayuki

    2012-10-01

    Although digitalization has tripled consumer-class camera market scale, extreme reductions in prices of fixed-lens cameras has reduced profitability. As a result, a number of manufacturers have entered the market of the System DSC i.e. digital still camera with interchangeable lens, where large profit margins are possible, and many high ratio zoom lenses with image stabilization functions have been released. Quiet actuators are another indispensable component. Design with which there is little degradation in performance due to all types of errors is preferred for good balance in terms of size, lens performance, and the rate of quality to sub-standard products. Decentering, such as that caused by tilting, sensitivity of moving groups is especially important. In addition, image stabilization mechanisms actively shift lens groups. Development of high ratio zoom lenses with vibration reduction mechanism is confronted by the challenge of reduced performance due to decentering, making control over decentering sensitivity between lens groups everything. While there are a number of ways to align lenses (axial alignment), shock resistance and ability to stand up to environmental conditions must also be considered. Naturally, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to make lenses smaller and achieve a low decentering sensitivity at the same time. 4-group zoom construction is beneficial in making lenses smaller, but decentering sensitivity is greater. 5-group zoom configuration makes smaller lenses more difficult, but it enables lower decentering sensitivities. At Nikon, the most advantageous construction is selected for each lens based on specifications. The AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II and AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR are excellent examples of this.

  12. Revised age of the late Neogene terror bird (Titanis) in North America during the Great American Interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFadden, Bruce J.; Labs-Hochstein, Joann; Hulbert, Richard C., Jr.; Baskin, Jon A.

    2007-02-01

    The giant flightless terror bird Titanis walleri is known from Florida and Texas during the late Neogene. The age of T. walleri is problematic because this taxon co-occurs with temporally mixed (i.e., time-averaged) faunas at two key sites. Thus, prior to this study, T. walleri from the Santa Fe River, Florida (type locality), was either as old as late Pliocene (ca. 2.2 Ma) or as young as latest Pleistocene (ca. 15 ka). Likewise, T. walleri from the Nueces River, Texas, was either early Pliocene (ca. 5 Ma) or latest Pleistocene (ca. 15 ka). In order to better resolve this age range, the rare earth element (REE) patterns of T. walleri from the Santa Fe River, Florida, were compared to two biochronologically distinctive groups (late Pliocene versus late Pleistocene) of fossil mammals from the same locality. Similarly, the REE patterns of T. walleri from Texas were compared to two groups (early Pliocene versus latest Pleistocene) of fossil mammals from the same locality. The REE patterns of T. walleri from Florida are indistinguishable from those of the co-occurring late Pliocene mammals. Likewise, the REE pattern of T. walleri from Texas is indistinguishable from those of the co-occurring early Pliocene mammals. Given these REE constraints, the revised age of T. walleri is early Pliocene in Texas (ca. 5 Ma) and late Pliocene (ca. 2.2 1.8 Ma) in Florida. As such, T. walleri is interpreted as an early immigrant during the Great American Interchange prior to the formation of the Isthmian land bridge. No evidence currently exists for Pleistocene T. walleri in North America.

  13. NexTemp thermometer can be used interchangeably with tympanic or mercury thermometers for emergency department use.

    PubMed

    Rajee, Mani; Sultana, Ron V

    2006-06-01

    To determine the agreement between the chemical dot NexTemp thermometer with mercury and tympanic thermometers and the repeatability of measurements using these devices. A prospective study involving a convenience sample of 194 consenting adult patients presenting to the ED, Freemasons Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. A survey of emergency medical staff was conducted to determine what they considered an acceptable level of agreement and repeatability for a putative new thermometer. The NexTemp thermometer's performance was judged against this. For each thermometer, a set of two temperature measurements was made in every patient. The sequence of the set of readings (and hence device) was random between patients and the staff member performing one set was blinded to the results of the other two sets of readings in each patient. The method of Bland and Altman was used for assessing agreement and repeatability. Clinicians considered that a new thermometer should exhibit repeatability of +/- 0.3 degrees C and agree with existing devices within +/- 0.5 degrees C. The tympanic thermometer had 95% limits of repeatability of -0.8-0.5 degrees C compared with the NexTemp (-0.3-0.4 degrees C) and mercury thermometers (-0.3-0.4 degrees C). The NexTemp thermometer agreed with mercury thermometer within -0.6-0.5 degrees C. The tympanic thermometer agreed with the mercury thermometer within -1.0-1.1 degrees C. Based on temperature measurement only, the NexTemp thermometer can be used interchangeably with current mercury and tympanic thermometers.

  14. Air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for urethral pressure measurement: a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Pascal; Roth, Beat; Burkhard, Fiona C; Kessler, Thomas M

    2008-09-01

    We determined and compared urethral pressure measurements using air charged and microtip catheters in a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial. A consecutive series of 64 women referred for urodynamic investigation underwent sequential urethral pressure measurements using an air charged and a microtip catheter in randomized order. Patients were blinded to the type and sequence of catheter used. Agreement between the 2 catheter systems was assessed using the Bland and Altman 95% limits of agreement method. Intraclass correlation coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest were 0.97 and 0.93, and for functional profile length they were 0.9 and 0.78, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients and Lin's concordance coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters were r = 0.82 and rho = 0.79 for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest, and r = 0.73 and rho = 0.7 for functional profile length, respectively. When applying the Bland and Altman method, air charged catheters gave higher readings than microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (mean difference 7.5 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (mean difference 1.8 mm). There were wide 95% limits of agreement for differences in maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (-24.1 to 39 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (-7.7 to 11.3 mm). For urethral pressure measurement the air charged catheter is at least as reliable as the microtip catheter and it generally gives higher readings. However, air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for clinical purposes because of insufficient agreement. Hence, clinicians should be aware that air charged and microtip catheters may yield completely different results, and these differences should be acknowledged during clinical decision making.

  15. Ground-motion variability resulting from the January 17, 1994, M = 6.6 Northridge earthquake at the interchange between highways 14 and I-5 in the northern San Fernando Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P.; McCallen, D.; Heuze, F.; Lewis, P.; Cullen, J.

    1994-02-04

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory responded to the 17 January 1994, Northridge earthquake by sending an information gathering team to observe and study the collapse of the interchange between highways 14 and I-5 in the northern San Fernando Valley. This field team examined the structural failure at the interchange and the surface soil conditions, and they installed high-grain RefTek seismic recorders to record aftershocks. We recorded aftershocks for two weeks. Analyses of aftershock recordings in this report illustrate the degree of differential support motion for this site, and the higher than expected ground motion from an earthquake of this size and distance. We used the aftershock recordings of small earthquakes as empirical Green`s functions and synthesized strong ground motion at three sites in the interchange area. Results presented here are based on an assumption that the geology of the interchange area remained linear in its response to the main event.

  16. PAUCam filter interchange system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, F.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; de Vicente, J.; Fernández, E.; Gaztañaga, E.; Grañena, F.; Jiménez, J.; Maiorino, M.; Martí, P.; Miquel, R.; Sánchez, E.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla, I.; Tonello, N.

    2010-07-01

    The Physics of the Accelerating Universe (PAU) is a new project whose main goal is to study dark energy surveying the galaxy distribution. For that purpose we need to determine the galaxy redshifts. The most accurate way to determine the redshift of a galaxy and measure its spectral energy distribution (SED) is achieved with spectrographs. The PAU collaboration is building an instrument (PAUCam) devoted to perform a large area survey for cosmological studies using an alternative approach. SEDs are sampled and redshifts determined using narrow band filter photometry. For efficiency and manufacturability considerations, the filters need to be placed close to the CCD detector surfaces on segmented filter trays. The most innovative element of PAUCam is a set of 16 different exchangeable trays to support the filters arranged in a jukebox-like changing mechanism inside the cryostat. The device is designed to operate within the range of temperatures from 150K to 300K at the absolute pressure of 10-8mbar, being class-100 compliant.

  17. Hypertext Interchange Using ICA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rada, Roy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses extended ICA (Integrated Chameleon Architecture), a public domain toolset for generating text-to-hypertext translators. A system called SGML-MUCH has been developed using E-ICA (Extended Integrated Chameleon Architecture) and is presented as a case study with converters for the hypertext systems MUCH, Guide, Hyperties, and Toolbook.…

  18. Linguistic and Paralinguistic Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Philip

    Current linguistic theory rigidly compartmentalizes the "cognitive," linguistic aspects of human communication and the presumed "emotive," paralinguistic elements that occur in both human and nonhuman communication. The segmental phonetic units of human speech, according to this view, are supposed to convey linguistically relevant information,…

  19. Electronic Data Interchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    INFRASTRUCTURE ...... 51 1. COMMUNICATIONS STRUCTURE ............. 51 a. Integrated-Internal network structure ........... 53 b. Integrated-External...rest of the world. EDI provides a faster, more accurate, less costly method of communication than do traditional methods of business com- munications...such as mail, telephone, and personal delivery. However, EDI is doing more than just changing how businesses communicate ; it is changing the way

  20. Electronic document interchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Jim

    1993-01-01

    The operational impact of various storage formats related to electronic publishing of documents in the NASA Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program is discussed. Questions are raised about the development of full text, surrogate, and hybrid storage formats. It appears that the eventual configuration will contain a mix of storage formats based on user demand.

  1. Futures Information Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Univ., Amherst. School of Education.

    This newsletter is an information exchange effort on the part of the Futures Information Center being established at the University of Massachusetts. Typical issues will contain information on innovative lesson plans, ideas, materials, project descriptions, or other facets which are being implemented at various levels and schools on the topic of…

  2. Low endemism, continued deep-shallow interchanges, and evidence for cosmopolitan distributions in free-living marine nematodes (order Enoplida)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nematodes represent the most abundant benthic metazoa in one of the largest habitats on earth, the deep sea. Characterizing major patterns of biodiversity within this dominant group is a critical step towards understanding evolutionary patterns across this vast ecosystem. The present study has aimed to place deep-sea nematode species into a phylogenetic framework, investigate relationships between shallow water and deep-sea taxa, and elucidate phylogeographic patterns amongst the deep-sea fauna. Results Molecular data (18 S and 28 S rRNA) confirms a high diversity amongst deep-sea Enoplids. There is no evidence for endemic deep-sea lineages in Maximum Likelihood or Bayesian phylogenies, and Enoplids do not cluster according to depth or geographic location. Tree topologies suggest frequent interchanges between deep-sea and shallow water habitats, as well as a mixture of early radiations and more recently derived lineages amongst deep-sea taxa. This study also provides convincing evidence of cosmopolitan marine species, recovering a subset of Oncholaimid nematodes with identical gene sequences (18 S, 28 S and cox1) at trans-Atlantic sample sites. Conclusions The complex clade structures recovered within the Enoplida support a high global species richness for marine nematodes, with phylogeographic patterns suggesting the existence of closely related, globally distributed species complexes in the deep sea. True cosmopolitan species may additionally exist within this group, potentially driven by specific life history traits of Enoplids. Although this investigation aimed to intensively sample nematodes from the order Enoplida, specimens were only identified down to genus (at best) and our sampling regime focused on an infinitesimal small fraction of the deep-sea floor. Future nematode studies should incorporate an extended sample set covering a wide depth range (shelf, bathyal, and abyssal sites), utilize additional genetic loci (e.g. mtDNA) that are

  3. Interchangeability of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines with different carrier proteins in the United Kingdom infant immunisation schedule.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Andrews, Nick J; Waight, Pauline; Hallis, Bassam; Matheson, Mary; England, Anna; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Borrow, Ray; Burbidge, Polly; Pearce, Emma; Goldblatt, David; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-29

    An open, non-randomised study was undertaken in England during 2011-12 to evaluate vaccine antibody responses in infants after completion of the routine primary infant immunisation schedule, which included two doses of meningococcal group C (MenC) conjugate (MCC) vaccine at 3 and 4 months. Any of the three licensed MCC vaccines could be used for either dose, depending on local availability. Healthy term infants registered at participating general practices (GPs) in Hertfordshire and Gloucestershire, UK, were recruited prospectively to provide a single blood sample four weeks after primary immunisation, which was administered by the GP surgery. Vaccination history was obtained at blood sampling. MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) and IgG antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib), pertussis toxin (PT), diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and thirteen pneumococcal serotypes were analysed according to MCC vaccines received. MenC SBA responses differed significantly (P<0.001) according to MCC vaccine schedule as follows: MenC SBA geometric mean titres (GMTs) were significantly lower in infants receiving a diphtheria cross-reacting material-conjugated MCC (MCC-CRM) vaccine followed by TT-conjugated MCC (MCC-TT) vaccine (82.0; 95% CI, 39-173; n=14) compared to those receiving two MCC-CRM (418; 95% CI, 325-537; n=82), two MCC-TT (277; 95% CI, 223-344; n=79) or MCC-TT followed by MCC-CRM (553; 95% CI, 322-949; n=18). The same group also had the lowest Hib geometric mean concentrations (0.60 μg/mL, 0.27-1.34) compared to 1.85 μg/mL (1.23-2.78), 2.86 μg/mL (2.02-4.05) and 4.26 μg/mL (1.94-9.36), respectively. Our results indicate that MCC vaccines with different carrier proteins are not interchangeable. When several MCC vaccines are available, children requiring more than one dose should receive MCC vaccines with the same carrier protein or, alternatively, receive MCC-TT first wherever possible.

  4. Multi-Proxy Approach to the Atlantic-Indian Water Interchange Along the Last Three Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Méndez, G.; Zahn, R.; Hall, I.; Rickaby, R.

    2005-12-01

    Multi-centennial mean grainsize (SS), paired planktonic ( G. bulloides) and benthic foraminifera ( C. wuellerstorfi ) stable isotope and trace element records of IMAGES core MD96-2080 are used to document surface and deep interchange of waters between the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The core is from the western slope of the Agulhas Bank, off the southern tip of Africa, within the main gateway of Atlantic-Indian ocean interbasin exchange. At a water depth of 2488 m it is currently located within the southern extension of NADW bounded above and below by Upper and Lower CDW. The records display prominent orbital modulation and faster sub-orbital variability that is linked to climate variability seen in marine records at high southern latitudes, and in Antarctic ice core records. Departures from the orbitally modulated pattern occur in benthic C-13 along MIS 5 suggesting an alternation between water masses with similar C-13 signature. Low C-13 levels during glacial periods point to a substitution of NADW by CDW, while flow speeds are increased as indicated by high values of SS. The pattern mimics that seen at a mid-depth SW Pacific core site (Hall et al., 2001) suggesting a hemisphere-wide significance for the southern hemisphere oceans. The combined benthic C-13 and Cd/Ca patterns are used to discriminate between water masses and to separate preformed from THC-related signals contained in the glacial-interglacial and millennial patterns. The data profiles show significant differences in the rate of change of ice volume (O-18), chemical ventilation (C-13) and physical circulation (SS) during glacial to interglacial transitions and interglacial to glacial transitions that suggest a large inertia of ocean physics but also confirm the significance of Southern Ocean THC water mass formation for changing deep ocean ventilation. Coherency between the planktonic and benthic isotope records points to the existence of a direct connection between Agulhas leakage and deep outflow

  5. An In Vitro Evaluation of the Loosening of Different Interchangeable Abutments in Internal-Connection-Type Implants.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Man; Baek, Chang-Hyun; Heo, Seong-Joo; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Koak, Jai-Young; Kim, Shin-Koo; Belser, Urs C

    The aim of this study was to compare the loosening of interchangeable one-piece abutments connected to internal-connection-type implants after cyclic loading. Four implant abutment groups (n = 7 in each group) with Straumann tissue-level implants were assessed: Straumann solid abutment (group S), Southern Implants solid abutment (group SI), Implant Direct straight abutment (group ID), and Blue Sky Bio regular platform abutment (group BSB). The implant was firmly held in a special jig to ensure fixation. Abutment screws were tightened to manufacturers' recommended torque with a digital torque gauge. The hemispherical loading members were fabricated for the load cell of a universal testing machine to evenly distribute the force on the specimens and to fulfill the ISO 14801:2007 standard. A cyclic loading of 25 N at 30 degrees to the implant's long axis was applied for a duty of a half million cycles. Tightening torques were measured prior to the loading. Removal torques were measured after cyclic loading. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the significance level was set at P < .05. The mean removal torques after cyclic loading were 34.0 ± 1.1 Ncm (group S), 25.0 ± 1.5 Ncm (group SI), 23.9 ± 2.1 Ncm (group ID), and 27.9 ± 1.3 Ncm (group BSB). Removal torques of each group were statistically different in the order of group S > group BSB > groups SI and ID (P < .05). The mean reduction rates were -2.9% ± 3.2% (group S), -21.9% ± 4.8% (group SI), -20.2% ± 7.2% (group ID), and -6.9% ± 4.3% (group BSB) after a half million cycles, respectively. Reduction rates of groups S and BSB were statistically lower than those of groups SI and ID (P < .01). The standard deviation of group S was lower than group BSB. The removal torque of the original Straumann abutment was significantly higher than those of the copy abutments. The reduction rate of the groups S and BSB abutments was lower than those of the other copy abutments.

  6. Are the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test levels 1 and 2 both useful? Reliability, responsiveness and interchangeability in young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fanchini, Maurizio; Castagna, Carlo; Coutts, Aaron J; Schena, Federico; McCall, Alan; Impellizzeri, Franco M

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the reliability, internal responsiveness and interchangeability of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YY1), level 2 (YY2) and submaximal YY1 (YY1-sub). Twenty-four young soccer players (age 17 ± 1 years; height 177 ± 7 cm; body mass 68 ± 6 kg) completed each test five times within pre- and in-season; distances covered and heart rates (HRs) were measured. Reliability was expressed as typical error of measurement (TEM) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Internal responsiveness was determined as effect size (ES) and signal-to-noise ratio (ESTEM). Interchangeability was determined with correlation between training-induced changes. The TEM and ICC for distances in the YY1 and YY2 and for HR in YY1-sub were 7.3% and 0.78, 7.1% and 0.93 and 2.2% and 0.78, respectively. The ESs and ESTEMs were 0.9 and 1.9 for YY1, 0.4 and 1.2 for YY2 and -0.3 and -0.3 for YY1-sub. Correlations between YY1 vs. YY2 and YY1-sub were 0.56 to 0.84 and -0.36 to -0.81, respectively. Correlations between change scores in YY1 vs. YY2 were 0.29 and -0.21 vs. YY1-sub. Peak HR was higher in YY1 vs. YY2. The YY1 and YY2 showed similar reliability; however, they were not interchangeable. The YY1 was more responsive to training compared to YY2 and YY1-sub.

  7. Unimolecular isomerization of CH2FCD2Cl via the interchange of Cl and F atoms: assignment of the threshold energy to the 1,2-dyotropic rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Mary K; Rossabi, Samuel M; McClintock, Corey E; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2013-08-08

    The room-temperature gas-phase recombination of CH2F and CD2Cl radicals was used to prepare CH2FCD2Cl molecules with 91 kcal mol(-1) of vibrational energy. Three unimolecular processes are in competition with collisional deactivation of CH2FCD2Cl; HCl and DF elimination to give CHF═CD2 and CH2═CDCl plus isomerization to give CH2ClCD2F by the interchange of F and Cl atoms. The Cl/F interchange reaction was observed, and the rate constant was assigned from measurement of CHCl═CD2 as a product, which is formed by HF elimination from CH2ClCD2F. These experiments plus previously published results from chemically activated CH2ClCH2F and electronic structure and RRKM calculations for the kinetic-isotope effects permit assignment of the three rate constants for CH2FCD2Cl (and for CH2ClCD2F). The product branching ratio for the interchange reaction versus elimination is 0.24 ± 0.04. Comparison of the experimental rate constant with the RRKM calculated rate constant permitted the assignment of a threshold energy of 62 ± 3 kcal mol(-1) for this type-1 dyotropic rearrangement. On the basis of electronic structure calculations, the nature of the transition state for the rearrangement reaction is discussed. The radical recombination reactions in the chemical system also generate vibrationally excited CD2ClCD2Cl and CH2FCH2F molecules, and the rate constants for DCl and HF elimination were measured in order to confirm that the photolysis of CD2ClI and (CH2F)2CO mixtures was giving reliable data for CH2FCD2Cl.

  8. Configuration Factors for Exchange of Radiant Energy Between Axisymmetrical Sections of Cylinders, Cones, and Hemispheres and Their Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschman, Albert J., Jr.; Pittman, Claud M.

    1961-01-01

    Radiation-interchange configuration factors are derived for axisymmetrical sections of cylinders, cones, and hemispheres radiating internally to annular and circular sections of their bases and to other axisymmetrical sections. The general procedure of obtaining configuration factors is outlined and the results are presented in the form of equations, tables, and figures.

  9. Interchangeability of Electrocardiography and Blood Pressure Measurement for Determining Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Free-Moving Domestic Pigs in Various Behavioral Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Annika; Tuchscherer, Armin; Puppe, Birger; Langbein, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the interchangeability between heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) measures derived from a series of interbeat intervals (IBIs) recorded via electrocardiogram (ECG) and intra-arterial blood pressure (BP) in various behavioral contexts. Five minutes of simultaneously recorded IBIs from ECG and BP signals in 11 female domestic pigs during resting, feeding, and active behavior were analyzed. Comparisons were made for measures of HR, the standard deviation of IBIs, and the root mean of the squared distances of subsequent IBIs derived from ECG and BP signals for each behavior category using statistical procedures with different explanatory power [linear regression, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland and Altman plots, and analysis of variance (ANOVA)]. Linear regression showed a strong relationship for HR during all behaviors and for HRV during resting. Excellent ICCs [lower 95% confidence intervals (CI) >0.75] and narrow limits of agreement in all behavior categories were found for HR. ICCs for HRV reached the critical lower 95% CI value of 0.75 only during resting. Using Bland and Altman plots, HRV agreement was unacceptable for all of the behavior categories. ANOVA showed significant differences between the methods in terms of HRV. BP systematically overestimated HRV compared with ECG. Our findings reveal that HR data recorded via BP agree well those recorded using ECG independently of the activity of the subject, whereas ECG and BP cannot be used interchangeably in the context of HRV in free-moving domestic pigs. PMID:26664979

  10. Differentiation and interchange of harlequin duck populations within the North Pacific. Restoration project 97161: Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goatcher, B.; Zwiefelhofer, D.; Lanctot, R.; Talbot, S.; Pierson, B.

    1999-04-01

    Concerns about constraints to harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) population recovery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill led biologists to ask whether birds in different molting and wintering areas belong to genetically distinct and, thus, demographically independent population segments. Genetic markers, which differed in mode of inheritance (two sex-linked Z-specific microsatellite loci, four biparentally inherited microsatellite loci and maternally inherited mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid sequences), were used to evaluate the degree of genetic differentiation among wintering areas within Prince William Sound, Alaska Peninsula (Katmai National Park) and Kodiak Archipelago (Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge). The authors also used colored leg bands to detect population interchange within and among these regions. The authors` genetic results show that differences in genotype frequencies among wintering locations within Alaska were low and non-significant for all three classes of markers. An analysis of genetic samples collected throughout the West Coast of North America revealed significant structuring at larger geographic scales. No interchange of banded birds was observed among regions and movements within regions were uncommon.

  11. The visual analog scale and a five-item verbal rating scale are not interchangeable for back pain assessment in lumbar spine disorders.

    PubMed

    Matamalas, Antònia; Ramírez, Manuel; Mojal, Sergi; García De Frutos, Ana; Molina, Antonio; Saló, Guillem; Lladó, Andreu; Cáceres, Enric

    2010-10-01

    Prospective study of patients with chronic back pain from lumbar spine disorders. To evaluate the degree of interchangeability of a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) and a 5-point verbal rating scale (VRS) for the assessment of pain intensity. The fact that VAS and Likert scales are highly intercorrelated does not mean that both types of scales can be used interchangeably. METHODS.: A total of 151 patients (mean age, 52 ± 14.6 years) undergoing elective spine surgery completed a 100-mm VAS and a discrete 5-category VRS corresponding to the first item question of the core set ("How severe was your back pain in the last week?"). Pain intensity on the VAS was rated using the same question than for the VRS. The level of order-consistency (monotonic agreement), disordered pairs (D), percentage of agreement, and systematic disagreement (relative position), and relative concentration ([RC]) were estimated. VAS assessments were transformed into a discrete 5-category, with the cut-off VAS positions being defined by quintiles and equidistantly. For VAS defined equidistantly, monotonic agreement was 0.840, D was 0.080, and the percentage of identical pairs was 53%. The corresponding figures for VAS defined by quintiles were 0.809, 0.096, and 27.8%. Inconsistencies between the VAS and the VRS scales were also demonstrated by the marginal distributions, with PR values of -0.005 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.011 to -0.002) and RC values of 0.144 (95% CI, 0.137-0.152) for VAS defined equidistantly, and PR values of 0.391 (95% CI, 0.384-0.397) and RC values of 0.265 (95% CI, 0.255-0.275) for VAS defined by quintiles. The order-consistency level was low with overlapping of pain records between the 2 scales, indicating that VAS and VRS are not interchangeable and, therefore, a results obtained with the use of each scale cannot be compared.

  12. Bridged to Fused Ring Interchange. Methodology for the Construction of Fused Cycloheptanes and Cyclooctanes. Total Syntheses of Ledol, Ledene, and Compressanolide.

    PubMed

    Gwaltney II, S. L.; Sakata, S. T.; Shea, K. J.

    1996-10-18

    The type two intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction (T2IMDA) is an efficient method for the formation of medium rings. The methodology is particularly effective for the construction of seven- and eight-membered rings. A strategy for the synthesis of functionalized cycloheptanes and cyclooctanes has been developed that involves a bridged to fused ring interchange. The T2IMDA provides a synthesis for rigid bridged bicyclic molecules that can be stereoselectively elaborated before ozonolysis of the bridgehead double bond. Following oxidative cleavage, aldol condensation provides fused bicyclic ring systems that otherwise are difficult to synthesize. This methodology is amenable to the synthesis of terpene natural products. This is demonstrated here through total syntheses of (+/-)-ledol and (+/-)-ledene and a formal synthesis of (+/-)-compressanolide.

  13. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  14. Biosynthetic studies on the tropane alkaloid hyoscyamine in Datura stramonium; hyoscyamine is stable to in vivo oxidation and is not derived from littorine via a vicinal interchange process.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Stephen; O'Hagan, David

    2002-10-01

    The conversion of littorine to hyoscyamine has been investigated by feeding deuterium labelled (RS)-[2-(2)H]-, [3, 3-(2)H(2)]-, [2, 3, 3-(2)H(3)]- phenyllactic acids to transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium. Isolation and GC-MS analyses of the isotope incorporation into the resultant hyoscyamine does not support the involvement of a vicinal interchange process operating during the isomerisation of littorine to hyoscyamine. Additionally a metabolism study with [1'-13C, 3', 3'-(2)H(2)]-hyoscyamine has established that the alkaloid is metabolically stable at C-3' with no evidence for a reversible in vivo oxidation process to the corresponding aldehyde. The data do not support an S-adenosy-L-methionine (SAM 5)/co-enzyme-B(12) mediated process for the isomerisation of littorine to hyoscyamine.

  15. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Setlow, P.

    1987-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or multiple copies of the SASP-C gene, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha/beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores.

  16. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and uv (ultraviolet) radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Setlow, P.

    1987-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of (i) one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; (ii) multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or (iii) multiple copies of the SASP-C genes, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha-beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores.

  17. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, J M; Setlow, P

    1987-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or multiple copies of the SASP-C gene, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha/beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores. Images PMID:3112127

  18. Image encryption schemes for joint photographic experts group and graphics interchange format formats based on three-dimensional baker with compound chaotic sequence generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shiyu; Tong, Xiaojun; Zhang, Miao

    2013-01-01

    We propose several methods to transplant the compound chaotic image encryption scheme with permutation based on three-dimensional (3-D) baker onto image formats such as the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) and graphics interchange format (GIF). The new methods avert the discrete cosine transform and quantization, which result in floating point precision loss, and succeed to encrypt and decrypt JPEG images lossless. The ciphered JPEG images generated by our solution own much better randomness than most other existing schemes. Our proposed method for GIF keeps the property of animation successfully. The security test results indicate the proposed methods have high security, and the speed of our algorithm is faster than classical solutions. Since JPEG and GIF image formats are popular contemporarily, we show that the prospect of chaotic image encryption is promising.

  19. Role of a Dual Splicing and Amino Acid Code in Myopia, Cone Dysfunction and Cone Dystrophy Associated with L/M Opsin Interchange Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Scott H.; Kuchenbecker, James A.; Rowlan, Jessica S.; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Human long (L) and middle (M) wavelength cone opsin genes are highly variable due to intermixing. Two L/M cone opsin interchange mutants, designated LIAVA and LVAVA, are associated with clinical diagnoses, including red-green color vision deficiency, blue cone monochromacy, cone degeneration, myopia, and Bornholm Eye Disease. Because the protein and splicing codes are carried by the same nucleotides, intermixing L and M genes can cause disease by affecting protein structure and splicing. Methods Genetically engineered mice were created to allow investigation of the consequences of altered protein structure alone, and the effects on cone morphology were examined using immunohistochemistry. In humans and mice, cone function was evaluated using the electroretinogram (ERG) under L/M- or short (S) wavelength cone isolating conditions. Effects of LIAVA and LVAVA genes on splicing were evaluated using a minigene assay. Results ERGs and histology in mice revealed protein toxicity for the LVAVA but not for the LIAVA opsin. Minigene assays showed that the dominant messenger RNA (mRNA) was aberrantly spliced for both variants; however, the LVAVA gene produced a small but significant amount of full-length mRNA and LVAVA subjects had correspondingly reduced ERG amplitudes. In contrast, the LIAVA subject had no L/M cone ERG. Conclusions Dramatic differences in phenotype can result from seemingly minor differences in genotype through divergent effects on the dual amino acid and splicing codes. Translational Relevance The mechanism by which individual mutations contribute to clinical phenotypes provides valuable information for diagnosis and prognosis of vision disorders associated with L/M interchange mutations, and it informs strategies for developing therapies. PMID:28516000

  20. Myopia and Late-Onset Progressive Cone Dystrophy Associate to LVAVA/MVAVA Exon 3 Interchange Haplotypes of Opsin Genes on Chromosome X.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Orsolya; Rajta, István; Vajas, Attila; Takács, Lili; Csutak, Adrienne; Fodor, Mariann; Kolozsvári, Bence; Resch, Miklós; Sényi, Katalin; Lesch, Balázs; Szabó, Viktória; Berta, András; Balogh, István; Losonczy, Gergely

    2017-03-01

    Rare interchange haplotypes in exon 3 of the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes cause X-linked myopia, color vision defect, and cone dysfunction. The severity of the disease varies on a broad scale from nonsyndromic high myopia to blue cone monochromatism. Here, we describe a new genotype-phenotype correlation attributed to rare exon 3 interchange haplotypes simultaneously present in the long- and middle-wavelength sensitive opsin genes (L- and M-opsin genes). A multigenerational family with X-linked high myopia and cone dystrophy was investigated. Affected male patients had infantile onset myopia with normal visual acuity and color vision until their forties. Visual acuity decreased thereafter, along with the development of severe protan and deutan color vision defects. A mild decrease in electroretinography response of cone photoreceptors was detected in childhood, which further deteriorated in middle-aged patients. Rods were also affected, however, to a lesser extent than cones. Clinical exome sequencing identified the LVAVA and MVAVA toxic haplotypes in the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes, respectively. Here, we show that LVAVA haplotype of the OPN1LW gene and MVAVA haplotype of the OPN1MW gene cause apparently nonsyndromic high myopia in young patients but lead to progressive cone-rod dystrophy with deuteranopia and protanopia in middle-aged patients corresponding to a previously unknown disease course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the joint effect of these toxic haplotypes in the two opsin genes on chromosome X.

  1. The Great American Biotic Interchange in frogs: multiple and early colonization of Central America by the South American genus Pristimantis (Anura: Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sánchez, Nelsy Rocío; Ibáñez, Roberto; Madriñán, Santiago; Sanjur, Oris I; Bermingham, Eldredge; Crawford, Andrew J

    2012-03-01

    The completion of the land bridge between North and South America approximately 3.5-3.1 million years ago (Ma) initiated a tremendous biogeographic event called the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI), described principally from the mammalian fossil record. The history of biotic interchange between continents for taxonomic groups with poor fossil records, however, is not well understood. Molecular and fossil data suggest that a number of plant and animal lineages crossed the Isthmus of Panama well before 3.5 Ma, leading biologists to speculate about trans-oceanic dispersal mechanisms. Here we present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the frog genus Pristimantis based on 189 individuals of 137 species, including 71 individuals of 31 species from Panama and Colombia. DNA sequence data were obtained from three mitochondrial (COI, 12S, 16S) and two nuclear (RAG-1 and Tyr) genes, for a total of 4074 base pairs. The resulting phylogenetic hypothesis showed statistically significant conflict with most recognized taxonomic groups within Pristimantis, supporting only the rubicundus Species Series, and the Pristimantis myersi and Pristimantis pardalis Species Groups as monophyletic. Inference of ancestral areas based on a likelihood model of geographic range evolution via dispersal, local extinction, and cladogenesis (DEC) suggested that the colonization of Central America by South American Pristimantis involved at least 11 independent events. Relaxed-clock analyses of divergence times suggested that at least eight of these invasions into Central America took place prior to 4 Ma, mainly in the Miocene. These findings contribute to a growing list of molecular-based biogeographic studies presenting apparent temporal conflicts with the traditional GABI model.

  2. Interchangeability of Quinvaxem during primary vaccination schedules: results from a phase IV, single-blind, randomized, controlled, single-center, non-inferiority study.

    PubMed

    Capeding, Maria Rosario Z; Jica, Corina; Macura-Biegun, Anna; Rauscher, Martina; Alberto, Edison

    2014-02-07

    Combination vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP) represent the core of childhood vaccination programs. Quinvaxem, a fully-liquid, pentavalent combination vaccine containing inactivated hepatitis B (HepB), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and whole-cell pertussis (wP) antigens, and tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, has been shown to be suitable for boosting children primed in infancy with another DTwP-HepB-Hib vaccine. This single-blind, randomized, controlled study was designed to demonstrate non-inferiority of a primary vaccination course (6-10-14 week schedule) of Tritanrix HB+Hib (first dose) and Quinvaxem (second/third doses) versus three doses of Quinvaxem with respect to the seroprotection/seroconversion rates for all antigens one month after vaccination course completion. Four hundred healthy subjects eligible for the local Expanded Program on Immunization were enrolled and equally randomized to the two treatment regimens. All subjects achieved seroprotection for tetanus and Hib, all except one for diphtheria, and all except two achieved seroconversion against Bordetella pertussis. Seroprotection against hepatitis B was achieved by 97.4% of Tritanrix HB+Hib followed by Quinvaxem and 94.9% of Quinvaxem subjects. Therefore, one month after vaccination course completion, seroprotection rates (seroconversion rate for B. pertussis) of Tritanrix HB+Hib followed by Quinvaxem were non-inferior to those elicited by Quinvaxem only, thus meeting the primary objective. Adverse events were comparable between the groups and were in line with the safety profile of the vaccines. The switch of vaccine had no apparent effect on safety endpoints. Our results support the use of Quinvaxem interchangeably with Tritanrix HB+Hib in a primary vaccination course and provides further evidence for the interchangeability of pentavalent vaccines (Clinical Trials.gov registry: NCT01357720). Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Interchange between coordinated and lattice solvents generates the highest energy barrier within nine-coordinated Dy(III) single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Zhijie; Yang, Qi; Chen, Sanping; Zhang, Yiquan; Wang, Wenyuan; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang

    2017-08-29

    It is crucial to promote axiality to enhance easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. Two mononuclear Dy(III) compounds, in which each Dy(III) is nine-coordinated, namely, [(C12H10N5O)Dy(NO3)2(H2O)2]·C2H5OH (1) and [(C12H10N5O)Dy(NO3)2(C2H5OH)2]·H2O (2) (HL = N(3)-(2-pyridoyl)-4-pyridinecarboxamidrazone), have been prepared through controlling the amount of C2H5OH and H2O solvents. Geometry modulations were realized by interchanging coordinated and lattice solvents, thus achieving a structure closer to the configuration of a capped square antiprism for 2 compared to that for 1. Notably, magnetic studies revealed that compound 1 displays no slow relaxation of magnetization while compound 2 exhibits single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour in the absence of a static magnetic field, with the highest energy barrier (203.11 K) of nine-coordinated Dy(III) SMMs. Ab initio calculations were performed to elucidate such a distinct performance, demonstrating that the combination of the larger charge distribution along the magnetic axis and the lower charge distribution in the equatorial plane generates a strong easy-axis ligand field to enhance magnetic properties, which is further associated with the structural symmetry. In addition, a possible coordination mode is proposed to realize high axis anisotropy for nine-coordinated Dy(III) compounds. This work presents an effective method to modulate the dynamic magnetic relaxation of the Dy(III) SMMs through interchange between coordinated and lattice solvents.

  4. Uncertainty of relative sensitivity factors in glow discharge mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meija, Juris; Methven, Brad; Sturgeon, Ralph E.

    2017-10-01

    The concept of the relative sensitivity factors required for the correction of the measured ion beam ratios in pin-cell glow discharge mass spectrometry is examined in detail. We propose a data-driven model for predicting the relative response factors, which relies on a non-linear least squares adjustment and analyte/matrix interchangeability phenomena. The model provides a self-consistent set of response factors for any analyte/matrix combination of any element that appears as either an analyte or matrix in at least one known response factor.

  5. Interchange of DNA-binding modes in the deformed and ultrabithorax homeodomains: a structural role for the N-terminal arm.

    PubMed

    Frazee, Richard W; Taylor, Jennifer A; Tullius, Thomas D

    2002-11-01

    The deformed (Dfd) and ultrabithorax (Ubx) homeoproteins regulate developmental gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster by binding to specific DNA sequences within its genome. DNA binding is largely accomplished via a highly conserved helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain that is known as a homeodomain (HD). Despite nearly identical DNA recognition helices and similar target DNA sequence preferences, the in vivo functions of the two proteins are quite different. We have previously revealed differences between the two HDs in their interactions with DNA. In an effort to define the individual roles of the HD N-terminal arm and recognition helix in sequence-specific binding, we have characterized the structural details of two Dfd/Ubx chimeric HDs in complex with both the Dfd and Ubx-optimal-binding site sequences. We utilized hydroxyl radical cleavage of DNA to assess the positioning of the proteins on the binding sites. The effects of missing nucleosides and purine methylation on HD binding were also analyzed. Our results show that both the Dfd and Ubx HDs have similar DNA-binding modes when in complex with the Ubx-optimal site. There are subtle but reproducible differences in these modes that are completely interchanged when the Dfd N-terminal arm is replaced with the corresponding region of the Ubx HD. In contrast, we showed previously that the Dfd-optimal site sequence elicits a very different binding mode for the Ubx HD, while the Dfd HD maintains a mode similar to that elicited by the Ubx-optimal site. Our current methylation interference studies suggest that this alternate binding mode involves interaction of the Ubx N-terminal arm with the minor groove on the opposite face of DNA relative to the major groove that is occupied by the recognition helix. As judged by hydroxyl radical footprinting and the missing nucleoside experiment, it appears that interaction of the Ubx recognition helix with the DNA major groove is reduced. Replacing the Dfd N-terminal arm

  6. Unimolecular reactions in the CF3CH2Cl ↔ CF2ClCH2F system: isomerization by interchange of Cl and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Enstice, Erin C; Duncan, Juliana R; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2011-02-17

    The recombination of CF(2)Cl and CH(2)F radicals was used to prepare CF(2)ClCH(2)F* molecules with 93 ± 2 kcal mol(-1) of vibrational energy in a room temperature bath gas. The observed unimolecular reactions in order of relative importance were: (1) 1,2-ClH elimination to give CF(2)═CHF, (2) isomerization to CF(3)CH(2)Cl by the interchange of F and Cl atoms and (3) 1,2-FH elimination to give E- and Z-CFCl═CHF. Since the isomerization reaction is 12 kcal mol(-1) exothermic, the CF(3)CH(2)Cl* molecules have 105 kcal mol(-1) of internal energy and they can eliminate HF to give CF(2)═CHCl, decompose by rupture of the C-Cl bond, or isomerize back to CF(2)ClCH(2)F. These data, which provide experimental rate constants, are combined with previously published results for chemically activated CF(3)CH(2)Cl* formed by the recombination of CF(3) and CH(2)Cl radicals to provide a comprehensive view of the CF(3)CH(2)Cl* ↔ CF(2)ClCH(2)F* unimolecular reaction system. The experimental rate constants are matched to calculated statistical rate constants to assign threshold energies for the observed reactions. The models for the molecules and transition states needed for the rate constant calculations were obtained from electronic structures calculated from density functional theory. The previously proposed explanation for the formation of CF(2)═CHF in thermal and infrared multiphoton excitation studies of CF(3)CH(2)Cl, which was 2,2-HCl elimination from CF(3)CH(2)Cl followed by migration of the F atom in CF(3)CH, should be replaced by the Cl/F interchange reaction followed by a conventional 1,2-ClH elimination from CF(2)ClCH(2)F. The unimolecular reactions are augmented by free-radical chemistry initiated by reactions of Cl and F atoms in the thermal decomposition of CF(3)CH(2)Cl and CF(2)ClCH(2)F.

  7. Oesophageal Doppler and calibrated pulse contour analysis are not interchangeable within a goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm in major gynaecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Feldheiser, A; Hunsicker, O; Krebbel, H; Weimann, K; Kaufner, L; Wernecke, K-D; Spies, C

    2014-11-01

    Evidence for the benefit of an intraoperative use of a goal-directed haemodynamic management has grown. We compared the oesophageal Doppler monitor (ODM, CardioQ-ODM™) with a calibrated pulse contour analysis (PCA, PiCCO2™) with regard to assessment of stroke volume (SV) changes after volume administration within a goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm during non-cardiac surgery. The data were obtained prospectively in patients with metastatic ovarian carcinoma undergoing cytoreductive surgery. During surgery, fluid challenges were performed as indicated by the goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm guided by the ODM. Monitors were compared regarding precision and trending. Clinical characteristics associated with trending were studied by extended regression analysis. A total of 762 fluid challenges were performed in 41 patients resulting in 1524 paired measurements. The precision of ODM and PCA was 5.7% and 6.0% (P=0.80), respectively. Polar plot analysis revealed a poor trending between ODM and PCA with an angular bias of -7.1°, radial limits of agreement of -58.1° to 43.8°, and an angular concordance rate of 67.8%. Dose of norepinephrine (NE) (scaled 0.1 µg kg(-1) min(-1)) [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.606 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.404-0.910); P=0.016] and changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) to a fluid challenge (scaled 10%) [adjusted OR 0.733 (95% CI: 0.635-0.845); P<0.001] were associated with trending between ODM and PCA, whereas there was no relation to type of i.v. solution. Despite a similar precision, ODM and PCA were not interchangeable with regard to measuring SV changes within a goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm. A decrease in interchangeability coincided with increasing NE levels and greater changes of MAP to a fluid challenge. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Utilizing the Signal Interchange Format (SIGIF) standard to interface a Signal Archive and Communications System (SACS) with a Picture Archive and Communications System (PACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, John A.; Bretz, James F.

    1995-05-01

    Looking to the medical environment of the 21st Century, this paper describes the use of the signal interchange format (SIGIF) standard to integrate the data collected by biological signal monitoring systems with systems from other parts of a hospital or research facility. This paper covers three parts of this process. The first is the signal archive and communications system (SACS) which collects the data directly from a patient, the second part covers the signal interchange format standard which is used to communicate data from the SACS to a picture archive and communications system (PACS), and the last part covers the changes to a PACS. The concept of a signal archive and communications system was presented at the 1993 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference as part of a paper by Joao Paulo Cunha. This paper attempts to define a specific architecture for a SACS and describe changes to published descriptions of a PACS required to complete the PACS/SACS interface. For over 15 years the use of computerized signal collections systems have been commonly accepted as part of hospital and research environments. Each manufacture has devised a unique, and usually proprietary, method of storing that information. During that time, very little has been done to provide a common standard so this information could be communicated to another computer. This has resulted in millions of miles of hard copy printouts being stored in patient records. The radiology departments have had the same problem; however, they solved the problem with the ACR/NEMA DICOM standard. The SIGIF standard is being presented as an equivalent standard to solve the communications problem for biological signal data. This paper presents a new step in the integration of bio-signal collection systems with other hospital data processing systems. The concept being presented for the first time in this paper is to convent signal information into the DICOM image format. Each pixel of the image will

  9. Micro- and nano-volume samples by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction using removable, interchangeable and portable rhenium coiled-filament assemblies and axially-viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; Lai, Bryant; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-11-01

    An electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction for micro- or nano-volume samples is described. Samples were pipetted onto coiled-filament assemblies that were purposely developed to be removable and interchangeable and were dried and vaporized into a small-volume vaporization chamber that clips onto any ICP torch with a ball joint. Interchangeable assemblies were also constructed to be small-size (e.g., less than 3 cm long with max diameter of 0.65 cm) and light-weight (1.4 g) so that they can be portable. Interchangeable assemblies with volume-capacities in three ranges (i.e., < 1 μL, 1-10 μL and 10-100 μL) were fabricated and used. The horizontally-operated NTV sample introduction was interfaced to an axially-viewed ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry) system and NTV was optimized using ICP-AES and 8 elements (Pb, Cd, Zn, V, Ba, Mg, Be and Ca). Precision was 1.0-2.3% (peak height) and 1.1-2.4% (peak area). Detection limits (obtained using 5 μL volumes) expressed in absolute-amounts ranged between 4 pg for Pb to 0.3 fg (~ 5 million atoms) for Ca. Detection limits expressed in concentration units (obtained using 100 μL volumes of diluted, single-element standard solutions) were: 50 pg/mL for Pb; 10 pg/mL for Cd; 9 pg/mL for Zn; 1 pg/mL for V; 0.9 pg/mL for Ba; 0.5 pg/mL for Mg; 50 fg/mL for Be; and 3 fg/mL for Ca. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Pb in pg/mL levels of diluted natural water Certified Reference Material (CRM) and the determination of Zn in 80 nL volumes of the liquid extracted from an individual vesicle. It is shown that portable and interchangeable assemblies with dried sample residues on them can be transported without analyte loss (for the concentrations tested), thus opening up the possibility for "taking part of the lab to the sample" applications, such as testing for Cu concentration-compliance with the lead-copper rule of the Environmental

  10. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-11-24

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target.

  11. Inhomogeneous oxygen interchange during annealing and cooling of textured bulk Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+dgr superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natividad, E.; Angurel, L. A.; Andrés, J. M.; Mayoral, M. C.

    2004-03-01

    The optimized annealing of bulk Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+dgr (Bi-2212) materials textured using the laser floating zone technique requires a two-step process, consisting of a first step at 870 °C and a second step at 801 °C. In this paper, we present an analysis of the changes induced within the samples along this thermal treatment and the subsequent cooling to room temperature. During the initial step the cationic diffusion takes place, while the oxygen content is adjusted during the second step, at lower temperature. The evolution of the superconducting properties reveals that the oxygen diffusion into the sample is not homogeneous and that the different oxygen contents along the annealing are also a consequence of a strong interchange between the central and the external sample regions. It has been shown that, at the different stages of the thermal process, the samples present different degrees of homogeneity in their superconducting properties, this being caused by the improvement of one region to the detriment of the other.

  12. Biochronology and biostratigraphy of the Uquía Formation (Pliocene early Pleistocene, NW Argentina) and its significance in the Great American Biotic Interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguero, M. A.; Candela, A. M.; Alonso, R. N.

    2007-01-01

    The Uquía Formation crops out in the Quebrada de Humahuaca in Jujuy province, Eastern Cordillera, NW Argentina. This unit is composed of a sequence of fluviatile sediments and water-laid air-fall tuff beds; it is approximately 260 m thick and unconformably overlain by Pleistocene conglomerates and Quaternary alluvium. The sediments have been folded into a syncline and broken by several faults that generally trend northwest-southeast. Following Castellanos stratigraphy, we characterize three units (Lower, Middle, and Upper) of the Uquía Formation. Biochronologically, the Lower Unit is assigned to the late Chapadmalalan, the Middle Unit ("Uquian fauna") to the late Vorohuean and Sanandresian, and the Upper Unit to the Ensenadan. Biostratigraphic evidence provides a calibration of important biochronologic events in the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI), namely, the first appearances of Erethizon, Hippidion, and proboscideans at 2.5 Ma (late Pliocene) in South America. Geological and paleobiological evidence suggest that during the late Pliocene, the area could have been a wide intermountain valley at 1400-1700 m elevation, with a more humid environment than that of the present day and some wet-dry seasonality that permitted the coexistence of forest and open areas. Uquian mammals also indicate that northwestern Argentina and the Pampean region have represented distinct biogeographical areas since at least the late Pliocene.

  13. A novel sequence-specific RNA quantification method using nicking endonuclease, dual-labeled fluorescent DNA probe, and conformation-interchangeable oligo-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Kazufumi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kita, Hiroshi; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Tsukada, Koji; Urabe, Itaru; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel, single-step, isothermal, signal-amplified, and sequence-specific RNA quantification method (L-assay). The L-assay consists of nicking endonuclease, a dual-labeled fluorescent DNA probe (DL-probe), and conformation-interchangeable oligo-DNA (L-DNA). This signal-amplified assay can quantify target RNA concentration in a sequence-specific manner with a coefficient of variation (Cv) of 5% and a lower limit of detection of 0.1 nM. Moreover, this assay allows quantification of target RNA even in the presence of a several thousandfold excess by weight of cellular RNA. In addition, this assay can be used to measure the changes in RNA concentration in real-time and to quantify short RNAs (<30 nucleotides). The L-assay requires only incubation under isothermal conditions, is inexpensive, and is expected to be useful for basic research requiring high-accuracy, easy-to-use RNA quantification, and real-time quantification. PMID:18230763

  14. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  15. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine

    PubMed Central

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target. PMID:26597768

  16. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Li, Gang; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2017-05-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  17. [Are occupation and education interchangeable as social indicators in community health? A study in an employed population].

    PubMed

    Cirera Suárez, L; Tormo Díaz, M J; Santiuste de Pablos, C; Chirlaque, M D; Galvañ Olivares, F; Navarro Sánchez, C

    2000-11-30

    Epidemiological studies and interventions to reduce inequalities in community health require the assignation of exhaustive and easy-to-obtain social indicators. Occupation and education are two of the most often used. In this study we attempt to evaluate the association between education and occupation among adult working population because if, in the absence of one of these two variables, it will be feasible to use the remaining with the lesser lost of socio-economic information. From a representative sample (n = 3091) of general population (18-65 years old) drawn out from a prevalence survey on chronic disease risk factors performed in the Region of Murcia, a log-lineal analysis has been made between education and occupation among working people (65.8% of males and 34.2% of females from the original sample). Men present significant association between managerial positions and university education. The association drops between clerks and high school graduates to increase among all manual workers with or without primary schooling education. Among women--with a lesser number of participants--the education/occupation association describes the same pattern but with higher magnitudes in the positive associations between managerial positions and university education. For both genders, the greatest associations are found in both diagonals of the education by occupation tables indicating: better occupation, more education, and the opposite. The classification of working people according to education and occupation presents association, internal consistency and gradient. In absence of comprehensive information regarding occupation, education could be an alternative as socio-economic indicator.

  18. Oxido-molybdenum complexes obtained by Cl/O interchange between MoCl5 and carboxylic acids: a crystallographic, spectroscopic and computational study.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pampaloni, Guido; Zacchini, Stefano

    2014-11-21

    The direct interaction of MoCl5 with a series of carboxylic acids has been elucidated for the first time. The reactions proceed with release of hydrogen chloride and Cl/O interchange between the metal centre and one equivalent of organic substrate: this feature is unique in the context of the chemistry generally shown by transition metal halides with carboxylic acids. The dinuclear complexes [MoOCl2(κ(1)-CX3CO2H)(μ-Cl)]2 (X = H, 1a; X = Cl, 1b) and Mo2O2Cl6(μ-CH3CO2H), 2a, were isolated as the prevalent metal products of the 1:2 molar reactions of MoCl5 with CH3COOH and CCl3COOH. Evidence for the formation of Mo2O2Cl6(μ-CCl3CO2H), 2b, was achieved by allowing MoCl5 to react with CCl3COOH in 2:3 ratio. Instead the reactions of MoCl5 with a three-fold molar excess of RCOOH afforded the mononuclear complexes MoOCl3(κ(1)-RCO2H)2 (R = CH3, 3a; CCl3, 3b; CHCl2, 3c; CMe3, 3d) in 50–60% yields. The new compounds were characterized by analytical and spectroscopic techniques, moreover the X-ray molecular structures were ascertained for 1a, 1b and 2a; 1a and 1b display single Mo–Mo bond. DFT calculations were carried out in order to shed light into structural aspects.

  19. Tetrahydroindazolone substituted 2-aminobenzamides as fluorescent probes: switching metal ion selectivity from zinc to cadmium by interchanging the amino and carbamoyl groups on the fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Xu, Qin-Chao; Li, Ri-chen; Tang, Xi; He, Ying-Fang; Zhang, Meng-Yu; Zhang, Yuan; Xing, Guo-Wen

    2012-08-21

    Three fluorescent probes CdABA', CdABA and ZnABA', which are structural isomers of ZnABA, have been designed with N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (BPEA) as chelator and 2-aminobenzamide as fluorophore. These probes can be divided into two groups: CdABA, CdABA' for Cd(2+) and ZnABA, ZnABA' for Zn(2+). Although there is little difference in their chemical structures, the two groups of probes exhibit totally different fluorescence properties for preference of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+). In the group of Zn(2+) probes, ZnABA/ZnABA' distinguish Zn(2+) from Cd(2+) with F(Zn)(2+)-F(Cd)(2+) = 1.87-2.00. Upon interchanging the BPEA and carbamoyl groups on the aromatic ring of the fluorophore, the structures of ZnABA/ZnABA' are converted into CdABA/CdABA'. Interestingly, the metal ions selectivity of CdABA/CdABA' was switched to discriminate Cd(2+) from Zn(2+) with F(Cd)(2+)-F(Zn)(2+) = 2.27-2.36, indicating that a small structural modification could lead to a remarkable change of the metal ion selectivity. (1)H NMR titration and ESI mass experiments demonstrated that these fluorescent probers exhibited different coordination modes for Zn(2+) and Cd(2+). With CdABA' as an example, generally, upon addition of Cd(2+), the fluorescence response possesses PET pathway to display no obvious shift of maximum λ(em) in the absence or presence of Cd(2+). However, an ICT pathway could be employed after adding Zn(2+) into the CdABA' solution, resulting in a distinct red-shift of maximal λ(em).

  20. Non-invasive assessment of fluid responsiveness using CNAP™ technology is interchangeable with invasive arterial measurements during major open abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Renner, J; Gruenewald, M; Hill, M; Mangelsdorff, L; Aselmann, H; Ilies, C; Steinfath, M; Broch, O

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic variables of fluid responsiveness (FR), such as pulse pressure variation (PPV), have been shown to predict the response to a fluid challenge accurately. A recently introduced non-invasive technology based on the volume-clamp method (CNAP™) offers the ability to measure PPV continuously (PPVCNAP). However, the accuracy regarding the prediction of FR in the operating room has to be proved. We compared PPVCNAP with an invasive approach measuring PPV using the PiCCO technology (PPVPiCCO). We studied 47 patients undergoing major open abdominal surgery before and after a passive leg-raising manoeuvre and i.v. fluid resuscitation. A positive response to a volume challenge was defined as ≥15% increase in stroke volume index obtained with transpulmonary thermodilution. Bootstrap methodology was used with the grey zone approach to determine the area of inconsistency regarding the ability of PPVPiCCO and PPVCNAP to predict FR. In response to the passive leg-raising manoeuvre, PPVPiCCO predicted FR with a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 72% [area under the curve (AUC) 0.86] compared with a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 72% (AUC 0.78) for PPVCNAP Regarding the volume challenge in the operating room, PPVPiCCO predicted FR with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 100% (AUC 0.97) compared with a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 93% (AUC 0.97) for PPVCNAP The grey zone approach identified a range of PPVPiCCO values (11-13%) and PPVCNAP values (7-11%) for which FR could not be predicted reliably. Non-invasive assessment of FR using PPVCNAP seems to be interchangeable with PPVPiCCO in patients undergoing major open abdominal surgery. NCT02166580. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM)

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  3. Summary Report for the Technical Interchange Meeting on Development of Baseline Material Properties and Design Guidelines for In-Space Manufacturing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Johnston, M. M.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ledbetter, F. E.; Risdon, D. L.; Stockman, T. J.; Sandridge, S. K. R.; Nelson, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Agency as a whole are currently engaged in a number of in-space manufacturing (ISM) activities that have the potential to reduce launch costs, enhance crew safety, and provide the capabilities needed to undertake long-duration spaceflight. The recent 3D Printing in Zero-G experiment conducted on board the International Space Station (ISS) demonstrated that parts of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic can be manufactured in microgravity using fused deposition modeling (FDM). This project represents the beginning of the development of a capability that is critical to future NASA missions. Current and future ISM activities will require the development of baseline material properties to facilitate design, analysis, and certification of materials manufactured using in-space techniques. The purpose of this technical interchange meeting (TIM) was to bring together MSFC practitioners and experts in materials characterization and development of baseline material properties for emerging technologies to advise the ISM team as we progress toward the development of material design values, standards, and acceptance criteria for materials manufactured in space. The overall objective of the TIM was to leverage MSFC's shared experiences and collective knowledge in advanced manufacturing and materials development to construct a path forward for the establishment of baseline material properties, standards development, and certification activities related to ISM. Participants were asked to help identify research and development activities that will (1) accelerate acceptance and adoption of ISM techniques among the aerospace design community; (2) benefit future NASA programs, commercial technology developments, and national needs; and (3) provide opportunities and avenues for further collaboration.

  4. Interchange core/shell assembly of diluted magnetic semiconductor CeO2 and ferromagnetic ferrite Fe3O4 for microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Wang, Jiaqi; Or, Siu Wing; Ho, S. L.; Tan, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Core/shell-structured CeO2/Fe3O4 and Fe3O4/CeO2 nanocapsules are prepared by interchange assembly of diluted magnetic semiconductor CeO2 and ferromagnetic ferrite Fe3O4 as the core and the shell, and vice versa, using a facile two-step polar solvothermal method in order to utilize the room-temperature ferromagnetism and abundant O-vacancies in CeO2, the large natural resonance in Fe3O4, and the O-vacancy-enhanced interfacial polarization between CeO2 and Fe3O4 for new generation microwave absorbers. Comparing to Fe3O4/CeO2 nanocapsules, the CeO2/Fe3O4 nanocapsules show an improved real permittivity of 3-10% and an enhanced dielectric resonance of 1.5 times at 15.3 GHz due to the increased O-vacancy concentration in the CeO2 cores of larger grains as well as the O-vacancy-induced enhancement in interfacial polarization between the CeO2 cores and the Fe3O4 shells, respectively. Both nanocapsules exhibit relatively high permeability in the low-frequency S and C microwave bands as a result of the bi-magnetic core/shell combination of CeO2 and Fe3O4. The CeO2/Fe3O4 nanocapsules effectively enhance permittivity and permeability in the high-frequency Ku band with interfacial polarization and natural resonance at ˜15 GHz, thereby improving absorption with a large reflection loss of -28.9 dB at 15.3 GHz. Experimental and theoretical comparisons with CeO2 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles are also made.

  5. Electronic Data Interchange Reading Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    EDI plan are mandatory for successful implementation of EDI and (4) the trasaction. sets currently being used by private industry for p rements and ac...without the use of EDL two computer simulation models were developed, one which reproduced the current system and another whose variables and...formats. The direct benefits of EDI consist in cost sav- ings, opeatonal ac:curacy, and sped prcssn of transactions This thesis provides guidelines to

  6. Using Compliance Analysis for PPP to bridge the gap between SEA and EIA: Lessons from the Turcot Interchange reconstruction in Montréal, Québec

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Undiné-Celeste Marsan, Jean-François Fournier-Peyresblanques, Bastien Forgues, Chantal Ogaa, Anita Jaeger, Jochen A.G.

    2013-09-15

    concrete projects “on the ground”. CAPPP can be used as a tool for comparative analysis in decision-making situations at various scales. CAPPP is a fairly straight-forward method that can be used by policy makers, EIA experts, and members of the general public alike. Highlights: ► We investigated the level of harmonization between SEA, plans, policies and programmes and EIA projects. ► We created a new methodology: the goal compliance analysis (GCA). ► We tested it on an ongoing project, the Turcot Interchange in Montreal, Canada. ► The method is straight-forward and can be used by policy makers, EIA experts, and members of the general public alike.

  7. Theory of three-dimensional interchange reconnection and the dynamic evolution of the global solar coronal magnetic field structure: A mechanism for the origin and generation of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Justin K.

    To understand the evolution of the solar corona and the generation of the solar wind, it is necessary to understand the structure and dynamics of the coronal magnetic field. Phenomenologically-based "quasi-steady" models have been developed under the assumption that the corona evolves as a time series of force-free equilibrium states determined by the normal-flux distribution at the photosphere. These models are successful at predicting the overall field polarity, global magnetic structures, and position of the heliospheric current sheet. However, the quasi-steady models cannot account for the observed bi-modal flow structure of the solar wind, nor several heliospheric observations with implications for the dynamics of the magnetic field. Motivated by these limitations, several researchers have proposed a fundamentally different paradigm for the evolution of the corona, the so-called interchange model. Based on the interchange reconnection (IR) process, this model predicts a structure for the coronal magnetic field which substantially differs from the quasi-steady view. Strictly speaking, IR describes three-dimensional (3D) null point reconnection, in which closed bipolar flux reconnects with coronal hole flux opening into the heliosphere. More generally, the 3D null point reconnection mechanism is a direct consequence of the nested multi-polar field structure which occurs ubiquitously throughout the entire corona. This dissertation aims to rigorously investigate the 3D null point reconnection mechanism and the consequences thereof on the coronal environment. To that end, we present several related simulations that examine current sheet formation and stability, as well as the consequences of this type of reconnection on the structure and dynamics of the global magnetic field. We show the field topology remains smooth during the evolutions, incompatible with predictions of the initially proposed interchange model. In addition, we demonstrate dynamic effects of IR

  8. Are erlotinib and gefitinib interchangeable, opposite or complementary for non-small cell lung cancer treatment? Biological, pharmacological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Giovannetti, Elisa; Cicero, Giuseppe; Pauwels, Patrick; Passiglia, Francesco; Castiglia, Marta; Rizzo, Sergio; Vullo, Francesca Lo; Fiorentino, Eugenio; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; Russo, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Gefitinib and erlotinib are the two anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) approved for treatment of advanced NSCLC patients. These drugs target one of the most important pathways in lung carcinogenesis and are able to exploit the phenomenon of 'oncogene addiction', with different efficacy according to EGFR gene mutational status in tumor samples. Gefitinib has been approved only for EGFR mutation bearing patients regardless the line of treatment, while erlotinib is also indicated in patients without EGFR mutation who undergo second- or third-line treatment. Some studies evaluated the main differences between these drugs both for direct comparison and to improve their sequential use. In particular, toxicity profile resulted partially different, and these observations may be explained by several molecular and pharmacokinetic features. Therefore, this review integrates preclinical data with clinical evidences of TKIs to guide the optimization of currently available treatments in advanced NSCLC patients.

  9. Use of dipyridyl-dithio substrates to measure directly the protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity of the auxin stimulated NADH: protein disulfide reductase (NADH oxidase) of soybean plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Morré, D J; Gomez-Rey, M L; Schramke, C; Em, O; Lawler, J; Hobeck, J; Morré, D M

    1999-10-01

    Dipyridyl-dithio substrates were cleaved by isolated vesicles of plasma membranes prepared from etiolated hypocotyls of soybean. The cleavage was stimulated by auxins at physiological concentrations. The substrates utilized were principally 2,2'-dithiodipyridine (DTP) and 6,6'-dithiodinicotinic acid (DTNA). The DTP generated 2 moles of 2-pyridinethione whereas the 6,6'-dithiodinicotinic acid generated 2 moles of 6-nicotinylthionine. Both products absorbed at 340 nm. The auxin herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) stimulated the activity approximately 2-fold to a maximum at about 10 microM. Concentrations of 2,4-D greater than 100 microM inhibited the activity. Indole-3-acetic acid stimulated the activity as well. The growth-inactive auxin, 2,3-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,3-D), was without effect. DTNA cleavage correlated with oxidation of NADH and reduction of protein disulfide bonds reported earlier in terms of location at the external plasma membrane surface, absolute specific activity, pH dependence and auxin specificity. The dipyridyl-dithio substrates provide, for the first time, a direct measure of the disulfide-thiol interchange activity of the protein previously measured only indirectly as an auxin-dependent ability of isolated plasma membrane vesicles to restore activity to scrambled and inactive RNase.

  10. Intra- versus Inter-dimer Charge Inhomogeneity in the Triangular Lattice Compounds of β'-Cs[Pd(dmit)2]2: A Degree of Freedom Characteristic of an Interchange of Energy Levels in the Molecular Orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Tamura, Masafumi; Yakushi, Kyuya; Kato, Reizo

    2016-10-01

    We have carried out the complete analyses of the C=C stretching modes in the vibrational spectra in the triangular lattice of β'-Cs[Pd(dmit)2]2 in order to solve the puzzling phenomenon that the ground state is neither spin frustration nor anti-ferromagnetic state but octamerization. We found that both charge-rich and charge-poor dimers are non-centrosymmetric dimers with the inhomogeneous charges. Because the energy levels of HOMO and LUMO are interchanged due to the tight dimerization, the cooperative interaction between the inter-site Coulomb repulsions and the valence-bond formation operates within and between dimers, those which contribute to the inter-dimer and intra-dimer charge separations, respectively. Octamer is the minimal unit under both cooperative interactions. In the high-temperature phase of β'-Cs[Pd(dmit)2]2, the competition between octamerization and tetramerization is observed because of the suppression of the intra-dimer cooperative interaction. The competition between two different states indicates the degree of freedom characteristic of the molecular orbital due to the tight dimerization. The cooperative interactions of the various X[Pd(dmit)2]2 salts are quantitatively evaluated from the C=C stretching modes.

  11. Impact Factor? Shmimpact Factor!

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The journal impact factor is a measure of the citability of articles published in that journal—the more citations generated, the more important that article is considered to be, and as a consequence the prestige of the journal is enhanced. The impact factor is not without controversy, and it can be manipulated. It no longer dominates the choices of journals to search for information. Online search engines, such as PubMed, can locate articles of interest in seconds across journals regardless of high or low impact factors. Editors desiring to increase their influence will need to focus on a fast and friendly submission and review process, early online and speedy print publication, and encourage the rapid turnaround of high-quality peer reviews. Authors desiring to have their results known to the world have never had it so good—the internet permits anyone with computer access to find the author's work. PMID:20806031

  12. Etiology of obesity: two "key issues" and other emerging factors.

    PubMed

    Serra-Majem, Lluis; Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada

    2013-09-01

    The current obesity epidemic is known to have coincided with profound societal changes involving both physical activity levels and food consumption patterns as well as demographic and cultural changes affecting the conduct of human beings in various ways. On the other hand, obesity is a complex and multifactorial chronic disease that usually becomes manifest in child hood and adolescence. Its origin is a genetic and environmental interchange, of which environmental or behavioral factors play the most important role, stemming from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. Still and all, it is rather simplistic to assume that obesity is only due to excessive consumption and/or deficient physical activity levels. Currently, various lines of investigation have been initiated that evaluate the determinants of obesity, of which nutrigenomics and gut microbiota deserve special attention.

  13. Debit Interchange Fee Study Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Tester, Jon [D-MT

    2011-03-15

    Senate - 03/15/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. AXAF FITS standard for ray trace interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Paul F.

    1993-07-01

    A standard data format for the archival and transport of x-ray events generated by ray trace models is described. Upon review and acceptance by the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Software Systems Working Group (SSWG), this standard shall become the official AXAF data format for ray trace events. The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is well suited for the purposes of the standard and was selected to be the basis of the standard. FITS is both flexible and efficient and is also widely used within the astronomical community for storage and transfer of data. In addition, software to read and write FITS format files are widely available. In selecting quantities to be included within the ray trace standard, the AXAF Mission Support team, Science Instruments team, and the other contractor teams were surveyed. From the results of this survey, the following requirements were established: (1) for the scientific needs, each photon should have associated with it: position, direction, energy, and statistical weight; the standard must also accommodate path length (relative phase), and polarization. (2) a unique photon identifier is necessary for bookkeeping purposes; (3) a log of individuals, organizations, and software packages that have modified the data must be maintained in order to create an audit trail; (4) a mechanism for extensions to the basic kernel should be provided; and (5) the ray trace standard should integrate with future AXAF data product standards.

  15. Personal Pronoun Interchanges in Mandarin Chinese Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Chi-hua

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic and interactive uses of personal pronouns are usually not as neat as traditional grammar describes in that the first and second person pronoun index speakers and addressees in a speech event. Devoted to a prevalent feature of Mandarin Chinese conversation--the switch of the first person singular pronoun "wo", "I", and the second person…

  16. AXAF FITS standard for ray trace interchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Paul F.

    1993-01-01

    A standard data format for the archival and transport of x-ray events generated by ray trace models is described. Upon review and acceptance by the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Software Systems Working Group (SSWG), this standard shall become the official AXAF data format for ray trace events. The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is well suited for the purposes of the standard and was selected to be the basis of the standard. FITS is both flexible and efficient and is also widely used within the astronomical community for storage and transfer of data. In addition, software to read and write FITS format files are widely available. In selecting quantities to be included within the ray trace standard, the AXAF Mission Support team, Science Instruments team, and the other contractor teams were surveyed. From the results of this survey, the following requirements were established: (1) for the scientific needs, each photon should have associated with it: position, direction, energy, and statistical weight; the standard must also accommodate path length (relative phase), and polarization. (2) a unique photon identifier is necessary for bookkeeping purposes; (3) a log of individuals, organizations, and software packages that have modified the data must be maintained in order to create an audit trail; (4) a mechanism for extensions to the basic kernel should be provided; and (5) the ray trace standard should integrate with future AXAF data product standards.

  17. Nuclear Propulsion Technical Interchange Meeting, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review the work performed in fiscal year 1992 in the areas of nuclear thermal and nuclear electric propulsion technology development. These proceedings are an accumulation of the presentations provided at the meeting along with annotations provided by authors. The proceedings cover system concepts, technology development, and system modeling for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). The test facilities required for the development of the nuclear propulsion systems are also discussed.

  18. 5 CFR 214.204 - Interchange agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and any agency with an executive personnel system essentially equivalent to the Senior Executive... for the movement of persons between the SES and the other system. The agreement shall define the... movement must be serving in permanent, continuing positions with career or career-type appointments. They...

  19. Hypergol Vapor Detector (HVD) technical interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loper, G. L.

    1981-08-01

    Lower explosion limit (LEL) and threshold limit value (TLV) hydrazine-fuel vapor detectors were developed. Sensitive and specific detectors are currently desired that are capable of rapidly monitoring hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine (MMH), and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) at levels that are one-half of the TLVs established for these compounds. Information on the principle of operation of each HVD, as well as specifications on the instrument size and performance are provided. Trade-offs that exist between the cost, sensitivity and specificity, and portability of the various detectors are discussed.

  20. Interchange. Program Improvement Products Identified through Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This catalog lists exemplary field-based program improvement products identified by the Dissemination and Utilization Products and Services Program (D&U) at the National Center for Research in Vocational Education. It is designed to increase awareness of these products among vocational educators and to provide information about them that…