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Sample records for grazing incidence small-angle

  1. Grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering from structures below an interface

    PubMed Central

    Nouhi, Shirin; Hellsing, Maja S.; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Rennie, Adrian R.

    2017-01-01

    Changes of scattering are observed as the grazing angle of incidence of an incoming beam increases and probes different depths in samples. A model has been developed to describe the observed intensity in grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering (GISANS) experiments. This includes the significant effects of instrument resolution, the sample transmission, which depends on both absorption and scattering, and the sample structure. The calculations are tested with self-organized structures of two colloidal samples with different size particles that were measured on two different instruments. The model allows calculations for various instruments with defined resolution and can be used to design future improved experiments. The possibilities and limits of GISANS for different studies are discussed using the model calculations. PMID:28808432

  2. Grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering from structures below an interface.

    PubMed

    Nouhi, Shirin; Hellsing, Maja S; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Rennie, Adrian R

    2017-08-01

    Changes of scattering are observed as the grazing angle of incidence of an incoming beam increases and probes different depths in samples. A model has been developed to describe the observed intensity in grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering (GISANS) experiments. This includes the significant effects of instrument resolution, the sample transmission, which depends on both absorption and scattering, and the sample structure. The calculations are tested with self-organized structures of two colloidal samples with different size particles that were measured on two different instruments. The model allows calculations for various instruments with defined resolution and can be used to design future improved experiments. The possibilities and limits of GISANS for different studies are discussed using the model calculations.

  3. Depth profiling of polymer films with grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Marsha A; Groves, Michael N

    2009-05-01

    A model-free method of reconstructing depth-specific lateral scattering from incident-angle-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) data is proposed. The information on the material which is available through variation of the X-ray penetration depth with incident angle is accessed through reference to the reflected branch of the GISAXS process. Reconstruction of the scattering from lateral density fluctuations is achieved by solving the resulting Fredholm integral equation with minimal a priori information about the experimental system. Results from simulated data generated for hypothetical multilayer polymer systems with constant absorption coefficient are used to verify that the method can be applied to cases with large X-ray penetration depths, as typically seen with polymer materials. Experimental tests on a spin-coated thick film of a blend of diblock copolymers demonstrate that the approach is capable of reconstruction of the scattering from a multilayer structure with the identification of lateral scattering profiles as a function of sample depth.

  4. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: application to the study of quantum dot lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja Radić, Nikola; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Dražić, Goran; Bogdanović-Radović, Iva; Holý, Václav

    2012-01-01

    The modelling of grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) from three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is described. The ordering of quantum dots in three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Theoretical models describing GISAXS intensity distributions for three general classes of lattices of quantum dots are proposed. The classes differ in the type of disorder of the positions of the quantum dots. The models enable full structure determination, including lattice type, lattice parameters, the type and degree of disorder in the quantum dot positions and the distributions of the quantum dot sizes. Applications of the developed models are demonstrated using experimentally measured data from several types of quantum dot lattices formed by a self-assembly process.

  5. Grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering microtomography demonstrated on a self-ordered dried drop of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Marion; Feldkamp, Jan M; Patommel, Jens; Roth, Stephan V; Timmann, Andreas; Gehrke, Rainer; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Schroer, Christian G

    2009-07-07

    We combine grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) with scanning X-ray microtomography to investigate the nanostructure in a dried gold/polystyrene nanocomposite drop. Local GISAXS structure factors are reconstructed at each position on the surface of this two-dimensionally heterogeneous sample with 30 microm pixel size. Evidence for four types of self-assembled colloidal crystalline structures is provided by the reconstructed data of the drop demonstrating the feasibility of the method.

  6. Silver behenate as a calibration standard of grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byeongdu; Lo, Chieh-Tsung; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, Randall E.

    2006-09-12

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) patterns of a silver behenate composite film, which has a typical layered structure, are described. The peak position of the film in the GISAXS pattern was varied depending on the incident angle, which was well described by taking into account the refraction and the reflection effects. Since the refractive index of samples depends on sample preparation, it is recommended that the measurement of silver behenate as a standard be done in conventional transmission mode to avoid any complexity.

  7. Measuring helium bubble diameter distributions in tungsten with grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Kluth, P.; Doerner, R. P.; Kirby, N.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering was performed on tungsten samples exposed to helium plasma in the MAGPIE and Pisces-A linear plasma devices to measure the size distributions of resulting helium nano-bubbles. Nano-bubbles were fitted assuming spheroidal particles and an exponential diameter distribution. These particles had mean diameters between 0.36 and 0.62 nm. Pisces-A exposed samples showed more complex patterns, which may suggest the formation of faceted nano-bubbles or nano-scale surface structures.

  8. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: application to the study of quantum dot lattices.

    PubMed

    Buljan, Maja; Radić, Nikola; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Dražić, Goran; Bogdanović-Radović, Iva; Holý, Václav

    2012-01-01

    The ordering of quantum dots in three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Theoretical models describing GISAXS intensity distributions for three general classes of lattices of quantum dots are proposed. The classes differ in the type of disorder of the positions of the quantum dots. The models enable full structure determination, including lattice type, lattice parameters, the type and degree of disorder in the quantum dot positions and the distributions of the quantum dot sizes. Applications of the developed models are demonstrated using experimentally measured data from several types of quantum dot lattices formed by a self-assembly process.

  9. Probing helium nano-bubble formation in tungsten with grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Kluth, P.; Doerner, R. P.; Kirby, N.; Corr, C.

    2015-04-01

    Helium nano-bubble formation in plasma facing materials has emerged as a major concern for the next-step fusion experiment ITER, where helium plasmas will be used during the tokamak's start-up phase. Here, we demonstrate that grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering is a powerful technique for the analysis of helium nano-bubble formation in tungsten. We measured helium bubbles with sizes between 1.5-2.5 nm in tungsten exposed to helium plasma at 700 °C, where a smaller number of larger bubbles were also observed. Depth distributions can be estimated by taking successive measurements across a range of x-ray incidence angles. Compared with traditional approaches in the field, such as transmission electron microscopy, this technique provides information across a much larger volume with high statistical precision, whilst also being non-destructive.

  10. Thermal quenching sample chamber for grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering studies of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Singh, M A; Groves, M N; Müller, M S; Stahlbrand, I J; Smilgies, D-M

    2007-11-01

    The second generation of a sample chamber designed for in situ measurement of temperature- and time-dependent polymer film nanostructure using the method of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering is presented. An increased operating temperature limit (from 260 to 400 degrees C) with precise control (+/-0.1 degrees C) at fixed temperatures as well as a fourfold increase in maximum instantaneous cooling rate (up to 73 degrees C/s) relative to the first generation chamber [M. N. Groves et al, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 39, 120 (2006)] are reported. Thermal quenches from 220 to 90 degrees C are shown to be reproducible to within +/-1 degrees C of the final temperature. Experimental tests on spin-coated films of symmetric diblock styrene-butadiene copolymer demonstrate the ability to resolve the kinetics of orientation of lamellar domains parallel to the silicon substrate, distinct from the initial formation of randomly oriented lamellar domains immediately following the thermal quench.

  11. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering from alkaline phosphatase immobilized in atmospheric plasmapolymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortore, M. G.; Sinibaldi, R.; Heyse, P.; Paulussen, S.; Bernstorff, S.; Sels, B.; Mariani, P.; Rustichelli, F.; Spinozzi, F.

    2008-06-01

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) has been used to study proteins embedded in thin polymer films obtained by a new cold, atmospheric-pressure plasma technique. In order to test the efficiency of the technology, four samples of alkaline phosphatase incorporated in organic polymer coatings in different plasma conditions have been investigated. Data have been analysed in the framework of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), by using a new method for the simultaneous fitting of the two-dimensional diffuse scattering from each sample. As a result, protein film concentration and aggregation state as well as a set of parameters describing the polymer coatings have been obtained.

  12. Asymmetric grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and anisotropic domain wall motion in obliquely grown nanocrystalline Co films.

    PubMed

    Quirós, C; Peverini, L; Díaz, J; Alija, A; Blanco, C; Vélez, M; Robach, O; Ziegler, E; Alameda, J M

    2014-08-22

    Strong asymmetries have been observed in grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) in situ patterns obtained from 30 nm-thick nanocrystalline Co films prepared by oblique sputtering (15°-75° off-sample normal). These asymmetries have been qualitatively simulated by a simple model consisting of an ensemble of 8 nm-wide inclined Co nanocolumns. It is found that narrow inclined features appear in the diffuse background resembling those characteristic of faceted systems, which can be used to obtain straightforward non-destructive estimations of buried nanocolumnar grains inclination, even for oblique angles below 45°, when the stronger and broader asymmetric features of the pattern are not yet fully formed. Furthermore, using magneto-optical microscopy, a marked change in the magnetic domain's nucleation and growth process has been observed in the sample prepared at 75°, with the stronger GISAXS asymmetries. Easy axis magnetization reversal starts by a random and homogeneous nucleation of small (∼μm) elongated domains aligned with the nanocolumn's long axis and proceeds through the preferred propagation of head-to-head domain walls (DWs) along the applied field direction. This peculiar magnetic behavior indicates that the strongly anisotropic nanostructuring created by the oblique growth process is equivalent, from a magnetic point of view, to an array of self-assembled buried nanowires. These results show how GISAXS and magneto-optical microscopy can be combined as a powerful tool for correlating the morphology and magnetism of thin nanostructured systems.

  13. Aluminum Nitride Grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy Characterized with Real-Time Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Virginia; Nepal, Neeraj; Johnson, Scooter; Robinson, Zachary; Demasi, Alexander; Hite, Jennifer; Ludwig, Karl; Eddy, Charles

    Aluminum nitride, gallium nitride, and indium nitride are being considered for many applications, and are currently being used commercially for LEDs. These III-nitride films are conventionally deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Research into depositing III-nitrides with atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) is underway as it is a fabrication friendly technique for thin films at lower temperatures. AlN deposited with ALE at 500°C have been shown to have good crystallinity, but relatively high carbon and oxygen impurities, and understanding the film deposition mechanism is an ongoing project. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is sensitive to surface features, making it useful for real time monitoring of deposition processes. AlN was monitored by GISAXS while being deposited with ALE using trimethylaluminum and hydrogen/nitrogen plasma at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. The GISAXS of AlN ALE at nominally 400°C, 450°C, and 500°C was compared to ex situ characterization with XPS and AFM.

  14. Trends in anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence for supported nanoalloyed and core-shell metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreazza, P.; Khelfane, H.; Lyon, O.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Ramos, A. Y.; Samah, M.

    2012-06-01

    As atomic structure and morphology of particles are directly correlated to their functional properties, experimental methods probing local and average features of particles at the nanoscale elicit a growing interest. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS) is a very attractive technique to investigate the size, shape and spatial distribution of nanoobjects embedded in a homogeneous matrix or in porous media. The anomalous variation of the scattering factor close to an absorption edge enables element specific investigations. In the case of supported nano-objects, the use of grazing incidence is necessary to limit the probed depth. The combination of grazing incidence with the anomalous technique provides a powerful new method, anomalous grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (AGISAXS), to disentangle complex chemical patterns in supported multi-component nano-structures. Nevertheless, a proper data analysis requires accurate quantitative measurements associated to an adapted theoretical framework. This paper presents anomalous methods applied to nanoalloys phase separation in the 1-10 nm size range, and focuses on the application of AGISAXS in bimetallic systems: nanocomposite films and core-shell supported nanoparticles.

  15. Detection of short range order in SiO2 thin-films by grazing-incidence wide and small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Kohki; Ogura, Atsushi; Hirosawa, Ichiro; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Teramoto, Akinobu; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2016-04-01

    The effects of the fabrication process conditions on the microstructure of silicon dioxide thin films of <10 nm thickness are presented. The microstructure was investigated using grazing-incidence wide and small-angle X-ray scattering methods with synchrotron radiation. The combination of a high brilliance light source and grazing incident configuration enabled the observation of very weak diffuse X-ray scattering from SiO2 thin films. The results revealed different microstructures, which were dependent on oxidizing species or temperature. The micro-level properties differed from bulk properties reported in the previous literature. It was indicated that these differences originate from inner stress. The detailed structure in an amorphous thin film was not revealed owing to detection difficulties.

  16. Accessible length scale of the in-plane structure in polarized neutron off-specular and grazing-incidence small-angle scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, R.; Bigault, T.; Wildes, A. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Saerbeck, T.; Honecker, D.; Yamazaki, D.; Soyama, K.; Courtois, P.

    2017-06-01

    Polarized neutron off-specular and grazing-incidence small-angle scattering measurements are useful methods to investigate the in-plane structure and its correlation of layered systems. Although these measurements give information on complementary and overlapping length scale, the different characteristics between them need to be taken into account when performed. In this study, the difference in the accessible length scale of the in-plane structure, which is one of the most important characteristics, was discussed using an Fe/Si multilayer together with simulations based on the distorted wave Born approximation.

  17. Dynamic investigation of gold nanocrystal assembly using in situ grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunphy, D.; Fan, H.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Brinker, C. J.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of New Mexico; SNL

    2008-01-01

    Here we investigate the dynamic self-assembly pathway of ordered gold nanocrystal arrays during the self-assembly of gold nanocrystal micelles, with and without the presence of colloidal silica precursors, using grazing-incidence X-ray scattering performed at a synchrotron source. With silica precursors present, a lattice with rhombohedral symmetry is formed from the partial collapse of a face-centered cubic structure. In the absence of silica, a transient body-centered orthorhombic phase appears, which rapidly collapses into a glassy nanocrystal film. The appearance of face-centered and body-centered structures is consistent with a phase diagram for charged colloidal particles with assembly modulated via Coulomb screening.

  18. Note: Comparison of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering of a titania sponge structure at the beamlines BW4 (DORIS III) and P03 (PETRA III)

    SciTech Connect

    Rawolle, M.; Koerstgens, V.; Ruderer, M. A.; Metwalli, E.; Guo, S.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Herzog, G.; Benecke, G.; Schwartzkopf, M.; Buffet, A.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.

    2012-10-15

    Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful technique for morphology investigation of nanostructured thin films. GISAXS measurements at the newly installed P03 beamline at the storage ring PETRA III in Hamburg, Germany, are compared to the GISAXS data from the beamline BW4 at the storage ring DORIS III, which had been used extensively for GISAXS investigations in the past. As an example, a titania thin film sponge structure is investigated. Compared to BW4, at beamline P03 the resolution of larger structures is slightly improved and a higher incident flux leads to a factor of 750 in scattered intensity. Therefore, the acquisition time in GISAXS geometry is reduced significantly at beamline P03.

  19. Structural evolution of perpendicular lamellae in diblock copolymer thin films during solvent vapor treatment investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqi; Posselt, Dorthe; Sepe, Alessandro; Shen, Xuhu; Perlich, Jan; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Papadakis, Christine M

    2013-08-01

    The structural evolution in poly(styrene-b-butadiene) (P(S-b-B)) diblock copolymer thin films during solvent vapor treatment is investigated in situ using time-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Using incident angles above and below the polymer critical angle, structural changes near the film surface and in the entire film are distinguished. The swelling of the film is one-dimensional along the normal of the substrate. During swelling, the initially perpendicular lamellae tilt within the film to be able to shrink. In contrast, at the film surface, the lamellae stay perpendicular, and eventually vanish at the expense of a thin PB wetting layer. During the subsequent drying, the perpendicular lamellae reappear at the surface, and finally, PS blocks protrude. By modeling, the time-dependent height of the protrusions can be quantitatively extracted.

  20. Mapping the structural order of laser-induced periodic surface structures in thin polymer films by microfocus beam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fabiani, Ignacio; Rebollar, Esther; García-Gutiérrez, Mari Cruz; Rueda, Daniel R; Castillejo, Marta; Ezquerra, Tiberio A

    2015-02-11

    In this work we present an accurate mapping of the structural order of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) in spin-coated thin polymer films, via a microfocus beam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS) scan, GISAXS modeling, and atomic force microscopy imaging all along the scanned area. This combined study has allowed the evaluation of the effects on LIPSS formation due to nonhomogeneous spatial distribution of the laser pulse energy, mapping with micrometric resolution the evolution of the period and degree of structural order of LIPSS across the laser beam diameter in a direction perpendicular to the polarization vector. The experiments presented go one step further toward controlling nanostructure formation in LIPSS through a deep understanding of the parameters that influence this process.

  1. Symmetric faceting of a sapphire vicinal surface revealed by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering 3D mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matringe, C.; Fakih, A.; Thune, E.; Babonneau, D.; Arnaud, S.; Blanc, N.; Boudet, N.; Guinebretière, R.

    2017-07-01

    A one dimensional periodic vicinal surface of sapphire was obtained through a self-ordering process after high-temperature thermal treatment. The morphology of the surface is described as an assembly of prisms exhibiting a rectangular base and a triangular profile orthogonal to the mean surface. Careful measurements of the whole 3D reciprocal map around the origin of the reciprocal space were performed through grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering experiments combined with a strict orientation procedure with respect to specific crystallographic directions of the sapphire crystal. We were thus able to determine accurately the actual shape of the prisms, which exhibit an isosceles triangular profile. Such a profile symmetric with respect to a plane normal to the mean sapphire vicinal surface has never been reported.

  2. Characterization of the shape and line-edge roughness of polymer gratings with grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyo Seon; Chen, Xuanxuan; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Jiang, Zhang; Strzalka, Joseph; Wang, Jin; Chen, Wei; Gronheid, Roel; de Pablo, Juan J.; Ferrier, Nicola; Doxastakis, Manolis; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-04-22

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) is increasingly used for the metrology of substrate-supported nanoscale features and nanostructured films. In the case of line gratings, where long objects are arranged with a nanoscale periodicity perpendicular to the beam, a series of characteristic spots of high-intensity (grating truncation rods, GTRs) are recorded on a two-dimensional detector. The intensity of the GTRs is modulated by the three-dimensional shape and arrangement of the lines. Previous studies aimed to extract an average cross-sectional profile of the gratings, attributing intensity loss at GTRs to sample imperfections. Such imperfections are just as important as the average shape when employing soft polymer gratings which display significant line-edge roughness. Herein are reported a series of GISAXS measurements of polymer line gratings over a range of incident angles. Both an average shape and fluctuations contributing to the intensity in between the GTRs are extracted. Lastly, the results are critically compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, and it is found that the two methods are in good agreement if appropriate corrections for scattering from the substrate (GISAXS) and contributions from the probe shape (AFM) are accounted for.

  3. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering in a twofold rough-interface medium: a new theoretical approach using the q-eigenwave formalism.

    PubMed

    Chukhovskii, F N; Roshchin, B S

    2015-11-01

    Based on the rigorous Green function formalism to describe the grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) problem, a system of two linked integral equations is derived with respect to amplitudes of the reflected and transmitted plane q-eigenwaves (eigenstate functions) propagating through two homogeneous media separated from each other by a rough surface interface. To build up the coupled solutions of these basic equations beyond the perturbation theory constraint 2kσθ0 < 1, a simple iteration procedure is proposed as opposed to the self-consistent wave approach [Chukhovskii (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 200-209; Chukhovski (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 505-512]. Using the first-order iteration, analytical expressions for the averaged specular and non-specular scattering intensity distributions have been obtained. These expressions are further analysed in terms of the GISAXS parameters {k, θ, θ0} and surface finish ones {σ, l, h}, where θ and θ0 are the scattering and incidence angles of the X-rays, respectively, σ is the root-mean-square roughness, l is the correlation length, h is the fractal surface model index, k = 2π/λ, and λ is the X-ray wavelength. A direct way to determine the surface finish parameters from the experimental specular and diffuse scattering indicatrix scan data is discussed for an example of GISAXS measurements from rough surfaces of α-quartz and CdTe samples.

  4. Characterization of the shape and line-edge roughness of polymer gratings with grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Suh, Hyo Seon; Chen, Xuanxuan; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; ...

    2016-04-22

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) is increasingly used for the metrology of substrate-supported nanoscale features and nanostructured films. In the case of line gratings, where long objects are arranged with a nanoscale periodicity perpendicular to the beam, a series of characteristic spots of high-intensity (grating truncation rods, GTRs) are recorded on a two-dimensional detector. The intensity of the GTRs is modulated by the three-dimensional shape and arrangement of the lines. Previous studies aimed to extract an average cross-sectional profile of the gratings, attributing intensity loss at GTRs to sample imperfections. Such imperfections are just as important as the average shapemore » when employing soft polymer gratings which display significant line-edge roughness. Herein are reported a series of GISAXS measurements of polymer line gratings over a range of incident angles. Both an average shape and fluctuations contributing to the intensity in between the GTRs are extracted. Lastly, the results are critically compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, and it is found that the two methods are in good agreement if appropriate corrections for scattering from the substrate (GISAXS) and contributions from the probe shape (AFM) are accounted for.« less

  5. Characterization of the shape and line-edge roughness of polymer gratings with grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyo Seon; Chen, Xuanxuan; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Jiang, Zhang; Strzalka, Joseph; Wang, Jin; Chen, Wei; Gronheid, Roel; de Pablo, Juan J.; Ferrier, Nicola; Doxastakis, Manolis; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-04-22

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) is increasingly used for the metrology of substrate-supported nanoscale features and nanostructured films. In the case of line gratings, where long objects are arranged with a nanoscale periodicity perpendicular to the beam, a series of characteristic spots of high-intensity (grating truncation rods, GTRs) are recorded on a two-dimensional detector. The intensity of the GTRs is modulated by the three-dimensional shape and arrangement of the lines. Previous studies aimed to extract an average cross-sectional profile of the gratings, attributing intensity loss at GTRs to sample imperfections. Such imperfections are just as important as the average shape when employing soft polymer gratings which display significant line-edge roughness. Herein are reported a series of GISAXS measurements of polymer line gratings over a range of incident angles. Both an average shape and fluctuations contributing to the intensity in between the GTRs are extracted. Lastly, the results are critically compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, and it is found that the two methods are in good agreement if appropriate corrections for scattering from the substrate (GISAXS) and contributions from the probe shape (AFM) are accounted for.

  6. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-28

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  7. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G.; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-01

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  8. Characterization of Lipid-Templated Silica and Hybrid Thin Film Mesophases by Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Darren R.; Alam, Todd M.; Tate, Michael P.; Hillhouse, Hugh W.; Smarsly, Bernd; Collord, Andrew D.; Carnes, Eric; Baca, Helen K.; Köhn, Ralf; Sprung, Michael; Wang, Jin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The nanostructure of silica and hybrid thin film mesophases templated by phospholipids via an evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) process was investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Diacyl phosphatidylcholines with two tails of 6 or 8 carbons were found to template 2D hexagonal mesophases, with the removal of lipid from these lipid/silica films by thermal or UV/O3 processing resulting in a complete collapse of the pore volume. Monoacyl phosphatidylcholines with single tails of 10–14 carbons formed 3D micellular mesophases; the lipid was found to be extractable from these 3D materials, yielding a porous material. In contrast to pure lipid/silica thin film mesophases, films formed from the hybrid bridged silsesquioxane precursor bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane exhibited greater stability toward (both diacyl and monoacyl) lipid removal. Ellipsometric, FTIR, and NMR studies show that the presence of phospholipid suppresses siloxane network formation, while actually promoting condensation reactions in the hybrid material. 1D X-ray scattering and FTIR data were found to be consistent with strong interactions between lipid headgroups and the silica framework. PMID:19496546

  9. Using three-dimensional 3D grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) analysis to probe pore deformation in mesoporous silica films.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Elvia Anabela Chavez; Granlund, Håvard; Sztucki, Michael; Konovalov, Oleg; Breiby, Dag W; Gibaud, Alain

    2014-02-26

    In the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in studying nanoscale objects deposited on surfaces by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). However, unravelling the structural properties of mesostructured thin films containing highly organized internal three-dimensional (3D) structures remains a challenging issue, because of the lack of efficient algorithms that allow prediction of the GISAXS intensity patterns. Previous attempts to calculate intensities have mostly been limited to cases of two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of nanoparticles at surfaces, or have been adapted to specific 3D cases. Here, we demonstrate that highly organized 3D mesoscale structures (for example, porous networks) can be modeled by the combined use of established crystallography formalism and the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). Taking advantage of the near-zero intensity of symmetry-allowed Bragg reflections, the casual extinction or existence of certain reflections related to the anisotropy of the form factor of the pores can be used as a highly sensitive method to extract structural information. We employ this generic method to probe the slightly compressed anisotropic shape and orientation of pores in a mesoporous silica thin film having P63/mmc symmetry.

  10. Atomic layer deposition-based tuning of the pore size in mesoporous thin films studied by in situ grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, Jolien; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Ide, Matthias; GrandfieldPresent Address: Department Of Materials Science; Engineering, Mcmaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada., Kathryn; Kurttepeli, Mert; Ludwig, Karl F.; Bals, Sara; van der Voort, Pascal; Detavernier, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the conformal coating of porous materials, making the technique suitable for pore size tuning at the atomic level, e.g., for applications in catalysis, gas separation and sensing. It is, however, not straightforward to obtain information about the conformality of ALD coatings deposited in pores with diameters in the low mesoporous regime (<10 nm). In this work, it is demonstrated that in situ synchrotron based grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) can provide valuable information on the change in density and internal surface area during ALD of TiO2 in a porous titania film with small mesopores (3-8 nm). The results are shown to be in good agreement with in situ X-ray fluorescence data representing the evolution of the amount of Ti atoms deposited in the porous film. Analysis of both datasets indicates that the minimum pore diameter that can be achieved by ALD is determined by the size of the Ti-precursor molecule.

  11. Atomic layer deposition-based tuning of the pore size in mesoporous thin films studied by in situ grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Dendooven, Jolien; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Ide, Matthias; Grandfield, Kathryn; Kurttepeli, Mert; Ludwig, Karl F; Bals, Sara; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Detavernier, Christophe

    2014-12-21

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the conformal coating of porous materials, making the technique suitable for pore size tuning at the atomic level, e.g., for applications in catalysis, gas separation and sensing. It is, however, not straightforward to obtain information about the conformality of ALD coatings deposited in pores with diameters in the low mesoporous regime (<10 nm). In this work, it is demonstrated that in situ synchrotron based grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) can provide valuable information on the change in density and internal surface area during ALD of TiO(2) in a porous titania film with small mesopores (3-8 nm). The results are shown to be in good agreement with in situ X-ray fluorescence data representing the evolution of the amount of Ti atoms deposited in the porous film. Analysis of both datasets indicates that the minimum pore diameter that can be achieved by ALD is determined by the size of the Ti-precursor molecule.

  12. Real-Time Studies of Gallium Adsorption and Desorption Kinetics by Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and X-ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Ozcan, A; Ludwig, K; Bhattacharyya, A

    2008-01-01

    Gallium adsorption and desorption on c-plane sapphire has been studied by real-time grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering and x-ray fluorescence as a function of substrate temperature (680-740 C) and Ga flux. The x-ray techniques monitor the surface morphology evolution and amount of Ga on the surface. During deposition, nanodroplets of liquid Ga are observed to form on the surface and coarsen. The growth of droplet size during continuous deposition follows dynamical scaling, in agreement with expectations from theory and simulations which include deposition-induced droplet coalescence. However, observation of continued droplet distance scale coarsening during desorption points to the necessity of including further physical processes in the modeling. The desorption rate at different substrate temperatures gives the activation energy of Ga desorption as 2.7 eV, comparable to measured activation energies for desorption from Ga droplets on other substrates and to the Ga heat of vaporization.

  13. In situ monitoring of laser-induced periodic surface structures formation on polymer films by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Rebollar, Esther; Rueda, Daniel R; Martín-Fabiani, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Álvaro; García-Gutiérrez, Mari-Cruz; Portale, Giuseppe; Castillejo, Marta; Ezquerra, Tiberio A

    2015-04-07

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on model spin-coated polymer films has been followed in situ by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) using synchrotron radiation. The samples were irradiated at different repetition rates ranging from 1 up to 10 Hz by using the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) with pulses of 8 ns. Simultaneously, GISAXS patterns were acquired during laser irradiation. The variation of both the GISAXS signal with the number of pulses and the LIPSS period with laser irradiation time is revealing key kinetic aspects of the nanostructure formation process. By considering LIPSS as one-dimensional paracrystalline lattice and using a correlation found between the paracrystalline disorder parameter, g, and the number of reflections observed in the GISAXS patterns, the variation of the structural order of LIPSS can be assessed. The role of the laser repetition rate in the nanostructure formation has been clarified. For high pulse repetition rates (i.e., 10 Hz), LIPSS evolve in time to reach the expected period matching the wavelength of the irradiating laser. For lower pulse repetition rates LIPSS formation is less effective, and the period of the ripples never reaches the wavelength value. Results support and provide information on the existence of a feedback mechanism for LIPSS formation in polymer films.

  14. Analysis of InGaN nanodots grown by droplet heteroepitaxy using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, J. M.; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Ludwig, K. F.; Moustakas, T. D.

    2017-08-01

    We present a detailed structural investigation of self-assembled indium gallium nitride nanodots grown on c-plane aluminum nitride templates by the droplet heteroepitaxy technique in a plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy reactor. Various growth parameters, including the total coverage of the metal species, relative and total metal effusion fluxes, and nitridation temperature were investigated. Analyses of in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns and comparison with simulations showed that the resulting crystal structure was a mixture of wurtzite and twinned zinc blende phases, with the zinc blende phase increasingly dominant for lower metal coverages and lower nitridation temperatures, and the wurtzite phase increasingly dominant for higher nitridation temperature. Studies by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that the nanodots exhibit trimodal size distributions, with the dot morphologies of the intermediate size mode often resembling aggregations of distinct clusters. Nanodots grown at higher nitridation temperatures had larger inter-dot spacings, with hexagonal in-plane ordering observable at a sufficiently high temperature. Using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering, we determined the nanodots to be approximately truncated cone shaped, and extracted the mean radius, height, and inter-dot distance for each distribution. Microstructural investigations of the nanodots by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicated that the majority of the dots were formed in dislocation-free regions, and confirmed that the intermediate size dots were approximately truncated cone shaped and consisted of both zinc blende and wurtzite regions. Mapping of the elemental distributions by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy mode indicated highly nonuniform indium distributions within both small and intermediate size dots which are potentially

  15. Operando Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering/X-ray Diffraction of Model Ordered Mesoporous Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes

    DOE PAGES

    Bhaway, Sarang M.; Qiang, Zhe; Xia, Yanfeng; ...

    2017-02-07

    Emergent lithium-ion (Li+) batteries commonly rely on nanostructuring of the active electrode materials to decrease the Li+ ion diffusion path length and to accommodate the strains associated with the insertion and de-insertion of Li+, but in many cases these nanostructures evolve during electrochemical charging–discharging. This change in the nanostructure can adversely impact performance, and challenges remain regarding how to control these changes from the perspective of morphological design. In order to address these questions, operando grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction (GISAXS/GIXD) were used to assess the structural evolution of a family of model ordered mesoporous NiCo2O4 anode filmsmore » during battery operation. The pore dimensions were systematically varied and appear to impact the stability of the ordered nanostructure during the cycling. For the anodes with small mesopores (≈9 nm), the ordered nanostructure collapses during the first two charge–discharge cycles, as determined from GISAXS. This collapse is accompanied by irreversible Li-ion insertion within the oxide framework, determined from GIXD and irreversible capacity loss. Anodes with larger ordered mesopores (17–28 nm) mostly maintained their nanostructure through the first two cycles with reversible Li-ion insertion. During the second cycle, there was a small additional deformation of the mesostructure. Furthermore, this preservation of the ordered structure lead to significant improvement in capacity retention during these first two cycles; but, a gradual loss in the ordered nanostructure from continuing deformation of the ordered structure during additional charge–discharge cycles leads to capacity decay in battery performance. We translate these multiscale operando measurements provide insight into how changes at the atomic scale (lithium insertion and de-insertion) to the nanostructure during battery operation. Moreover, small changes in the

  16. Operando Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering/X-ray Diffraction of Model Ordered Mesoporous Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Bhaway, Sarang M; Qiang, Zhe; Xia, Yanfeng; Xia, Xuhui; Lee, Byeongdu; Yager, Kevin G; Zhang, Lihua; Kisslinger, Kim; Chen, Yu-Ming; Liu, Kewei; Zhu, Yu; Vogt, Bryan D

    2017-02-28

    Emergent lithium-ion (Li(+)) batteries commonly rely on nanostructuring of the active electrode materials to decrease the Li(+) ion diffusion path length and to accommodate the strains associated with the insertion and de-insertion of Li(+), but in many cases these nanostructures evolve during electrochemical charging-discharging. This change in the nanostructure can adversely impact performance, and challenges remain regarding how to control these changes from the perspective of morphological design. In order to address these questions, operando grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction (GISAXS/GIXD) were used to assess the structural evolution of a family of model ordered mesoporous NiCo2O4 anode films during battery operation. The pore dimensions were systematically varied and appear to impact the stability of the ordered nanostructure during the cycling. For the anodes with small mesopores (≈9 nm), the ordered nanostructure collapses during the first two charge-discharge cycles, as determined from GISAXS. This collapse is accompanied by irreversible Li-ion insertion within the oxide framework, determined from GIXD and irreversible capacity loss. Conversely, anodes with larger ordered mesopores (17-28 nm) mostly maintained their nanostructure through the first two cycles with reversible Li-ion insertion. During the second cycle, there was a small additional deformation of the mesostructure. This preservation of the ordered structure lead to significant improvement in capacity retention during these first two cycles; however, a gradual loss in the ordered nanostructure from continuing deformation of the ordered structure during additional charge-discharge cycles leads to capacity decay in battery performance. These multiscale operando measurements provide insight into how changes at the atomic scale (lithium insertion and de-insertion) are translated to the nanostructure during battery operation. Moreover, small changes in the

  17. Annealing Behavior of Atomic Layer Deposited HfO2 Films Studied by Synchrotron X-ray Reflectivity and Grazing Incidence Small Angle Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.; Allen, A; Jordan-Sweet, J; Ilavsky, J

    2009-01-01

    New results are presented for the annealing behavior of ultrathin complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) gate dielectric HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). A series of ALD HfO{sub 2} dielectric films has been studied by a combination of x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. By using these techniques together, we have shown that the surface, interfaces, and internal structure of thin ALD films can be characterized with unprecedented sensitivity. Changes in film thickness, film roughness, or diffuseness of the film/substrate interface as measured by XRR are correlated with the corresponding changes in the internal film nanostructure, as measured by GISAXS. Although the films are dense, an internal film structure is shown to exist, attributed primarily to {approx} 2 nm 'missing island' porosity features close to the substrate; these are most likely associated with coalescence defects as a result of initial ALD growth, as they are not observed in the upper regions of the film. Some 8-9 nm heterogeneities are also present, which may indicate a widespread modulation in the film density pervading the entire film volume, and which likely also give rise to surface roughness. Comparison of the data between different scattering geometries and among a carefully designed sequence of samples has enabled important insights to be derived for the annealing behavior of the ALD HfO{sub 2} films. The main effects of single, brief, high temperature excursions to above 900C are to anneal out some of the fine voids and reduce the mean roughness and interfacial diffuseness of the film. These changes are indicative of densification. However, depending on the film thickness, the annealing behavior at temperatures between 650 and 800C is quite different for single excursion and cyclic anneals. Particularly for thin, just-coalesced films, XRR indicates marked increases in the film thickness and in the

  18. Self-organized ordering of Si1-xGex nanoscale islands studied by grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidbauer, M.; Wiebach, Th; Raidt, H.; Hanke, M.; Köhler, R.; Wawra, H.

    1999-05-01

    Highly regular islands of strained Si1-xGex have been grown on Si (001) by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). The islands themselves are {111}-faceted truncated pyramids with a narrow base-width size distribution and coherent behaviour. In this study we report on the state of lateral ordering within a single layer of Si1-xGex islands. Grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) was used to investigate the ordering as a function of island coverage. At very low island coverage the array behaves like a two-dimensional liquid exhibiting an increased number of island dimers which orient along the island base diagonal icons/Journals/Common/langle" ALT="langle" ALIGN="TOP"/>100icons/Journals/Common/rangle" ALT="rangle" ALIGN="TOP"/>. On increasing the coverage these dimers develop into extended chains of islands oriented along icons/Journals/Common/langle" ALT="langle" ALIGN="TOP"/>100icons/Journals/Common/rangle" ALT="rangle" ALIGN="TOP"/>. At high coverage there is strong ordering along both the icons/Journals/Common/langle" ALT="langle" ALIGN="TOP"/>100icons/Journals/Common/rangle" ALT="rangle" ALIGN="TOP"/> and the icons/Journals/Common/langle" ALT="langle" ALIGN="TOP"/>110icons/Journals/Common/rangle" ALT="rangle" ALIGN="TOP"/> directions. The self-organised ordering can be explained by two possible mechanisms: (i) that the observed ordering is driven by the anisotropy of the elastic constants where short-range order along the soft icons/Journals/Common/langle" ALT="langle" ALIGN="TOP"/>100icons/Journals/Common/rangle" ALT="rangle" ALIGN="TOP"/> directions is expected, and (ii) that there is an underlying two-dimensional ripple pattern in the wetting layer aligned along the icons/Journals/Common/langle" ALT="langle" ALIGN="TOP"/>100icons/Journals/Common/rangle" ALT="rangle" ALIGN="TOP"/> directions. At later stages of growth this pattern transforms into pseudomorphic islands.

  19. Investigating Polymer–Metal Interfaces by Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering from Gradients to Real-Time Studies

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Roth, Stephan V.

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the polymer–metal interface is crucial for advanced material design. Vacuum deposition methods for metal layer coating are widely used in industry and research. They allow for installing a variety of nanostructures, often making use of the selective interaction of the metal atoms with the underlying polymer thin film. The polymer thin film may eventually be nanostructured, too, in order to create a hierarchy in length scales. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering is an advanced method to characterize and investigate polymer–metal interfaces. Being non-destructive and yielding statistically relevant results, it allows for deducing the detailed polymer–metal interaction. We review the use of grazing incidence X-ray scattering to elucidate the polymer–metal interface, making use of the modern synchrotron radiation facilities, allowing for very local studies via in situ (so-called “stop-sputter”) experiments as well as studies observing the nanostructured metal nanoparticle layer growth in real time. PMID:28335367

  20. Grazing exit small angle X-ray scattering on grain formation in polycrystalline metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-09-25

    We recently proposed a new grazing exit geometry for measuring the small-angle scattering from thin film materials, which we call GESAXS, to contrast with the successful grazing incidence version, GISAXS. The technique is particularly useful for probing nanostructured thin film materials, especially when the coherence properties of the beam are employed. Here we demonstrate the application of GESAXS to evaporated metal films, prepared using an in-situ diffraction chamber, to investigate how their structure evolves upon annealing. Contrasting behavior is seen for Au, which preserves a roughly exponential distribution of domain sizes, and Fe for which the size distribution narrows by an Ostwald ripening process.

  1. A customizable software for fast reduction and analysis of large X-ray scattering data sets: applications of the new DPDAK package to small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Benecke, Gunthard; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Li, Chenghao; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Flucke, Gero; Hoerth, Rebecca; Zizak, Ivo; Burghammer, Manfred; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Trebbin, Martin; Förster, Stephan; Paris, Oskar; Roth, Stephan V; Fratzl, Peter

    2014-10-01

    X-ray scattering experiments at synchrotron sources are characterized by large and constantly increasing amounts of data. The great number of files generated during a synchrotron experiment is often a limiting factor in the analysis of the data, since appropriate software is rarely available to perform fast and tailored data processing. Furthermore, it is often necessary to perform online data reduction and analysis during the experiment in order to interactively optimize experimental design. This article presents an open-source software package developed to process large amounts of data from synchrotron scattering experiments. These data reduction processes involve calibration and correction of raw data, one- or two-dimensional integration, as well as fitting and further analysis of the data, including the extraction of certain parameters. The software, DPDAK (directly programmable data analysis kit), is based on a plug-in structure and allows individual extension in accordance with the requirements of the user. The article demonstrates the use of DPDAK for on- and offline analysis of scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data on biological samples and microfluidic systems, as well as for a comprehensive analysis of grazing-incidence SAXS data. In addition to a comparison with existing software packages, the structure of DPDAK and the possibilities and limitations are discussed.

  2. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  3. Grazing incidence beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkapeddi, P. R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  4. Grazing Incidence Optics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Smith, W. Scott; Gubarev, Mikhail; McCracken, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    This project is to demonstrate the capability to directly fabricate lightweight, high-resolution, grazing-incidence x-ray optics using a commercially available robotic polishing machine. Typical x-ray optics production at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) uses a replication process in which metal mirrors are electroformed on to figured and polished mandrels from which they are later removed. The attraction of this process is that multiple copies can be made from a single master. The drawback is that the replication process limits the angular resolution that can be attained. By directly fabricating each shell, errors inherent in the replication process are removed. The principal challenge now becomes how to support the mirror shell during all aspects of fabrication, including the necessary metrology to converge on the required mirror performance specifications. This program makes use of a Zeeko seven-axis computer-controlled polishing machine (see fig. 1) and supporting fabrication, metrology, and test equipment at MSFC. The overall development plan calls for proof-of-concept demonstration with relatively thick mirror shells (5-6 mm, fig. 2) which are straightforward to support and then a transition to much thinner shells (2-3 mm), which are an order of magnitude thinner than those used for Chandra. Both glass and metal substrates are being investigated. Currently, a thick glass shell is being figured. This has enabled experience to be gained with programming and operating the polishing machine without worrying about shell distortions or breakage. It has also allowed time for more complex support mechanisms for figuring/ polishing and metrology to be designed for the more challenging thinner shells. These are now in fabrication. Figure 1: Zeeko polishing machine.

  5. Near anastigmatic grazing incidence telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1984-01-01

    A performance capability assessment is presently conducted for short versus long grazing incidence telescope designs, in view of the observation that the field curvature and astigmatism that are the primary residual aberrations of a Wolter-type incidence telescope can be substantially reduced through mirror length reduction. A major advantage of the short element telescope is that, if sufficiently short, both the paraboloid and hyperboloid surfaces may be fabricated as a single piece; this significantly facilitates the task of alignment.

  6. Near anastigmatic grazing incidence telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1984-01-01

    A performance capability assessment is presently conducted for short versus long grazing incidence telescope designs, in view of the observation that the field curvature and astigmatism that are the primary residual aberrations of a Wolter-type incidence telescope can be substantially reduced through mirror length reduction. A major advantage of the short element telescope is that, if sufficiently short, both the paraboloid and hyperboloid surfaces may be fabricated as a single piece; this significantly facilitates the task of alignment.

  7. Aberrations for Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    2008-01-01

    Large number of grazing incidence telescope configurations have been designed and studied. Wolte1 telescopes are commonly used in astronomical applications. Wolter telescopes consist of a paraboloidal primary mirror and a hyperboloidal or an ellipsoidal secondary mirror. There are 8 possible combinations of Wolter telescopes. Out of these possible designs only type 1 and type 2 telescopes are widely used. Type 1 telescope is typically used for x-ray applications and type 2 telescopes are used for EUV applications. Wolter-Schwarzshild (WS) telescopes offer improved image quality over a small field of view. The WS designs are stigmatic and free of third order coma and, therefore, the PSF is significantly better over a small field of view. Typically the image is more symmetric about its centroid. As for the Wolter telescopes there are 8 possible combinations of WS telescopes. These designs have not been widely used because the surface equations are complex parametric equations complicating the analysis and typically the resolution requirements are too low to take full advantage of the WS designs. There are several other design options. Most notable are wide field x-ray telescope designs. Polynomial designs were originally suggested by Burrows4 and hyperboloid-hyperboloid designs for solar physics applications were designed by Harvey5. No general aberration theory exists for grazing incidence telescopes that would cover all the design options. Several authors have studied the aberrations of grazing incidence telescopes. A comprehensive theory of Wolter type 1 and 2 telescopes has been developed. Later this theory was expanded to include all possible combinations of grazing incidence and also normal incidence paraboloid-hyperboloid and paraboloid-ellipsoid telescopes. In this article the aberration theory of Wolter type telescopes is briefly reviewed.

  8. Replication of grazing incidence optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.

    1986-01-01

    The replication of grazing incidence optics is reviewed. Electroform and epoxy replication are described and compared. It is concluded that for light weight and deep nesting, replication has a distinct advantage over direct production. The resolution of optics produced in this manner is however, limited to about 10 arc seconds; a typical value is 40 arc seconds. Epoxy replicated pieces tend to have better optical figures than electroformed optics, but the latter can be made thinner to make more deeply nested systems.

  9. Replication of grazing incidence optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.

    1986-01-01

    The replication of grazing incidence optics is reviewed. Electroform and epoxy replication are described and compared. It is concluded that for light weight and deep nesting, replication has a distinct advantage over direct production. The resolution of optics produced in this manner is however, limited to about 10 arc seconds; a typical value is 40 arc seconds. Epoxy replicated pieces tend to have better optical figures than electroformed optics, but the latter can be made thinner to make more deeply nested systems.

  10. Infrared microanalysis of contaminants at grazing incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffner, John A.

    1991-04-01

    A new objective lens for grazing angle FT-IR microscopy provides a means for the infrared analysis of monomolecular films in small (25 X 25 micrometers ) areas. Conventional grazing incidence reflection spectroscopy is an established technology for detecting and analyzing thin surface films on metals or highly reflecting materials. The grazing incidence objective extends these techniques to microscopic areas. Applications of grazing angle FT-IR microscopy (GAM) are illustrated by exemplar analyses. The analyses of thin film lubricants and contaminants are specially important.

  11. Properties And Performance Of Grazing Incidence Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.; Kelso, S. M.

    We numerically analyze at near-grazing incidence various configurations containing elliptical, toroidal, and the recently proposed common-axis rotationally symmetric anamorphic (CARSA) elements to determine the type and importance of aberrations inherent in each. CARS pairs of elliptical mirrors are shown to have negligible focusing errors for typical synchrotron source dimensions, and therefore comprise useful building blocks from which to construct grazing-incidence optical systems. To minimize aberrations, cylindrical, spherical, or toroidal elements should be avoided.

  12. Properties and performance of grazing incidence reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.; Kelso, S. M.

    1982-05-01

    Various configurations containing elliptical, toroidal, and the recently proposed common-axis rotationally symmetric anamorphic (CARSA) elements are numerically analyzed at near-grazing incidence, to determine the type and importance of aberrations inherent in each. CARS pairs of elliptical mirrors are shown to have negligible focusing errors for typical synchrotron source dimensions, and therefore comprise useful building blocks from which to construct grazing-incidence optical systems. To minimize aberrations, cylindrical, spherical, or toroidal elements should be avoided.

  13. The active layer morphology of organic solar cells probed with grazing incidence scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2014-12-10

    Grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) provides unique insights into the morphology of active materials and thin film layers used in organic photovoltaic devices. With grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) the molecular arrangement of the material is probed. GIWAXS is sensitive to the crystalline parts and allows for the determination of the crystal structure and the orientation of the crystalline regions with respect to the electrodes. With grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) the nano-scale structure inside the films is probed. As GISAXS is sensitive to length scales from nanometers to several hundred nanometers, all relevant length scales of organic solar cells are detectable. After an introduction to GISAXS and GIWAXS, selected examples for application of both techniques to active layer materials are reviewed. The particular focus is on conjugated polymers, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT).

  14. SLOPE PROFILOMETRY OF GRAZING INCIDENCE OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    TAKACS,P.Z.

    2003-01-14

    Profiling instruments are well-suited to the measurement of grazing incidence optics, such as those found in synchrotron radiation beam lines. Slope measuring profilers, based upon the principle of the pencil beam interferometer, have proven to be especially useful in measuring the figure and slope errors on cylindrical aspheres. The Long Trace Profiler, in various configurations, is the most widely used of this class of profiler. Current performance provides slope measurement accuracy at the microradian level and height measurements accurate to 25 nm over 1 meter trace lengths.

  15. Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R.

    2012-07-15

    The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

  16. Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R.; Müller-Buschbaum, P.

    2012-07-01

    The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

  17. Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z. ); Church, E.L. . Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

    1989-08-01

    Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering at the wiggler beamline BW4 of HASYLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Perlich, J.; Rubeck, J.; Botta, S.; Gehrke, R.; Roth, S. V.; Ruderer, M. A.; Prams, S. M.; Rawolle, M.; Zhong, Q.; Koerstgens, V.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.

    2010-10-15

    We present an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) to grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS). GIWAXS refers to an x-ray diffraction method, which, based on the measurement geometry, is perfectly suited for the investigation of the material crystallinity of surfaces and thin films. It is shown that the overall experimental GIWAXS setup employing a movable CCD-detector provides the capability of reliable and reproducible diffraction measurements in grazing incidence geometry. Furthermore, the potential usage of an additional detector enables the simultaneous or successive measurement of GIWAXS and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). The new capability is illustrated by the microbeam GIWAXS measurement of a thin film of the conjugated polymer poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT). The investigation reveals the semicrystalline nature of the P3OT film by a clear identification of the wide angle scattering reflexes up to the third order in the [100]-direction as well as the first order in the [010]-direction. The corresponding microbeam GISAXS measurement on the present morphology complements the characterization yielding the complete sample informa-tion from subnanometer up to micrometer length scales.

  19. Development of Adjustable Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Paul B.; Davis, W.; Schwartz, D. A.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Wilke, R. H. T.

    2010-03-01

    We report on the development of adjustable grazing incidence optics. We are developing bimorph mirrors for high resolution (sub-arc second) imaging. Bimorph mirrors consist of a thin layer of piezo-electric material deposited on the back surface of a thin (< 0.4 mm) thermally formed glass or electroplated metal segmented mirror. Voltage applied across the thickness of the piezo produces a strain in the plane of the mirror surface. The strain produces bending of the mirror similar to the bi-metallic effect. No reaction structure is necessary, which allows one to densely nest mirror shells for large effective area. A pixilated array of outer electrodes on the piezo material localizes the strain to the particular piezo "pixel.” Mirror figure errors are corrected (on-orbit) via induced localized deformations. We have successfully deposited a 1-micrometer thick layer of the piezo-electric material lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) on thin glass mirrors. We report on the electrical and mechanical properties of the bimorph mirrors, and mirror requirements. We discuss finite element modeling of bimorph mirrors. In particular, we focus on how a difference in mirror mounting affects the influence functions ( the induced deformations). We are also developing the use of electrostrictive adjusters for moderate resolution (a few arc second) imaging. Electroplated nickel/cobalt full shells are mounted together using the adjusters. The adjusters are arrayed axially and tangentially between shells, with their adjustable dimension in the radial direction. Each shell is adjusted and fixed in place during mirror assembly, starting with the innermost shell. We review finite element modeling of the adjustable optics and the application of the adjustment system to correct manufacturing errors. We discuss initial tests using electrostrictive adjusters to change the shape of flat mirror segments. This work is supported by NASA Contract NNX09AE87G and a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore

  20. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  1. Analysis of FEL optical systems with grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C.E.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Bender, S.C.; Appert, Q.D.; Lawrence, G.; Barnard, C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of grazing incidence optics in resonators alleviates the problem of damage to the optical elements and permits higher powers in cavities of reasonable dimensions for a free electron laser (FEL). The design and manufacture of a grazing incidence beam expander for the Los Alamos FEL mock-up has been completed. In this paper, we describe the analysis of a bare cavity, grazing incidence optical beam expander for an FEL system. Since the existing geometrical and physical optics codes were inadequate for such an analysis, the GLAD code was modified to include global coordinates, exact conic representation, raytracing, and exact aberration features to determine the alignment sensitivities of laser resonators. A resonator cavity has been manufactured and experimentally setup in the Optical Evaluation Laboratory at Los Alamos. Calculated performance is compared with the laboratory measurements obtained so far.

  2. Characterization of a Grazing-Incidence Dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. Seth

    2010-10-01

    The grazing-incidence dye laser remains a versatile device for generating tunable laser radiation for a variety of scientific applications. A homebuilt grazing incidence dye laser was constructed at Francis Marion University. This laser is pumped by the second harmonic output from a Continuum Surelite I YAG laser. A small percentage of the pump radiation is coupled into the dye laser. A cylinder lens brings this light to a tight focus on the laser dye. The resulting fluorescence is dispersed by a diffraction grating that is held at grazing-incidence. A portion of this light is reflected by a tuning mirror and is directed back into the active medium for amplification. The output wavelength is controlled by scanning the tuning mirror. The performance of this dye laser was analyzed. The results will be presented and discussed.

  3. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  4. Absolute calibration in grazing incidence interferometry via rotational averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mantel, Klaus; Lamprecht, Juergen; Lindlein, Norbert; Schwider, Johannes

    2006-06-01

    Interferometry in grazing incidence can be used to test cylindrical mantle surfaces. The absolute accuracy of the resulting surface profiles is limited by systematic wavefront aberrations caused in the interferometer, in particular due to an inversion of the test wavefront in an interferometer using diffractive beam splitters. For cylindrical specimens, a calibration method using four positions has therefore been investigated. This test is combined with another method of optical metrology: the rotational averaging procedure. The implementation for grazing incidence is described and measurement results for hollow cylinders are presented. The gain in accuracy is demonstrated.

  5. Absolute calibration in grazing incidence interferometry via rotational averaging.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Klaus; Lamprecht, Jürgen; Lindlein, Norbert; Schwider, Johannes

    2006-06-01

    Interferometry in grazing incidence can be used to test cylindrical mantle surfaces. The absolute accuracy of the resulting surface profiles is limited by systematic wavefront aberrations caused in the interferometer, in particular due to an inversion of the test wavefront in an interferometer using diffractive beam splitters. For cylindrical specimens, a calibration method using four positions has therefore been investigated. This test is combined with another method of optical metrology: the rotational averaging procedure. The implementation for grazing incidence is described and measurement results for hollow cylinders are presented. The gain in accuracy is demonstrated.

  6. Development of a temporally and spatially resolved grazing incidence spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D.D.; Fortner, R.J.; Price, D.F.; Stewart, R.E.; Gilman, C.; Helava, H.

    1980-01-01

    The design considerations are presented for a grazing incidence spectrometer which will resolve both temporally and spatially the emission from a wide variety of plasmas. The basis of the design involves use of microchannel plates (MCPs) which are curved to conform to the Rowland circle of the spectrometer. The spectra are obtained when the anode is properly biased. The use of multiple anodes allows gating and with appropriate delays results in sequential time resolution of a few nanoseconds. Simultaneous gating of the anodes with spatial resolution of < 100..mu.. for any given time frame can also be obtained. The efficiency of this spectrometer is also compared with conventional grazing incidence spectrometers.

  7. Design and performance analysis of multilayer nested grazing incidence optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fuchang; Deng, Loulou; Mei, Zhiwu; Li, Liansheng; Lv, Zhengxin

    2014-10-01

    We have developed X-ray grazing incidence optics with a single mirror. Although t can be used to demonstrate and test on the ground to verify the feasibility of X-ray detection system, it is unable to meet the requirements of X-ray pulsar navigation due to small effective area and large mass. There is an urgent need to develop multilayer nested grazing incidence optics, which consists of multilayer mirrors to form a coaxial and confocal system to maximize the use of space and increase the effective area. In this paper, aiming at the future demand of X-ray pulsar navigation, optimization and analysis of nested X-ray grazing incidence optics was carried out, the recurrence relations between the layers of mirrors were derived, reasonable initial structural parameters and stray light reduction method was given, and theoretical effective collection area was calculated. The initial structure and stray light eliminating structure are designed. The optical-mechanical-thermal numerical model was established using optical analysis software and finite element software for stray light analysis, focusing performance analysis, tolerance analysis, and mechanical analysis, providing evidence and guidance for the processing and alignment of nested X-ray grazing incidence optics.

  8. Analysis of a new class of grazing incidence spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. C.; Bowyer, S.

    1986-01-01

    The throughput and imaging properties of one of a new class of grazing incidence spectroscopic telescope are examined with a Monte Carlo ray tracing technique. The results are compared with Wolter Schwarzschild type II telescopes of similar size. The image quality of this telescope is comparable, and the control of the off-axis light is superior to the Wolter Schwarzschild design.

  9. Grazing incidence ion erosion in the presence of adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redinger, A.; Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Michely, T.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of a background pressure of adsorbable species on sputtering and surface damage in grazing incidence ion erosion of Pt(111) is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The background pressure implies a partial surface coverage with adsorbates, which in turn causes an enhancement of the erosion rate by a factor of up to 40 compared to the clean case. Partial pressures of molecular oxygen and carbon monoxide were maintained during ion erosion with 5 keV Ar+ for various grazing angles between 81° and 87° and temperatures ranging from 400 to 550 K.

  10. Novel micro-reactor flow cell for investigation of model catalysts using in situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kehres, Jan; Pedersen, Thomas; Masini, Federico; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Diaz, Ana; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk; Hansen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of a novel and highly sensitive micro-reactor device for performing in situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering experiments of model catalyst systems is presented. The design of the reaction chamber, etched in silicon on insulator (SIO), permits grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) in transmission through 10 µm-thick entrance and exit windows by using micro-focused beams. An additional thinning of the Pyrex glass reactor lid allows simultaneous acquisition of the grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS). In situ experiments at synchrotron facilities are performed utilizing the micro-reactor and a designed transportable gas feed and analysis system. The feasibility of simultaneous in situ GISAXS/GIWAXS experiments in the novel micro-reactor flow cell was confirmed with CO oxidation over mass-selected Ru nanoparticles. PMID:26917133

  11. X-ray small-angle scattering from sputtered CeO{sub 2}/C bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Haviar, S.; Dubau, M.; Khalakhan, I.; Vorokhta, M.; Matolinova, I.; Matolin, V.; Vales, V.; Endres, J.; Holy, V.; Buljan, M.; Bernstorff, S.

    2013-01-14

    Surface and interface morphology of cerium oxide/carbon bilayers used as thin-film catalysts is studied by grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy, and the dependence of the structural parameters on the thicknesses of the constituting layers is investigated. The applicability of x-ray scattering and its advantages over standard analytical methods are discussed.

  12. Active full-shell grazing-incidence optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Jacqueline M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    MSFC has a long history of developing full-shell grazing-incidence x-ray optics for both narrow (pointed) and wide field (surveying) applications. The concept presented in this paper shows the potential to use active optics to switch between narrow and wide-field geometries, while maintaining large effective area and high angular resolution. In addition, active optics has the potential to reduce errors due to mounting and manufacturing lightweight optics. The design presented corrects low spatial frequency error and has significantly fewer actuators than other concepts presented thus far in the field of active x-ray optics. Using a finite element model, influence functions are calculated using active components on a full-shell grazing-incidence optic. Next, the ability of the active optic to effect a change of optical prescription and to correct for errors due to manufacturing and mounting is modeled.

  13. Active Full-Shell Grazing-Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jacqueline M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    MSFC has a long history of developing full-shell grazing-incidence x-ray optics for both narrow (pointed) and wide field (surveying) applications. The concept presented in this paper shows the potential to use active optics to switch between narrow and wide-field geometries, while maintaining large effective area and high angular resolution. In addition, active optics has the potential to reduce errors due to mounting and manufacturing lightweight optics. The design presented corrects low spatial frequency error and has significantly fewer actuators than other concepts presented thus far in the field of active x-ray optics. Using a finite element model, influence functions are calculated using active components on a full-shell grazing-incidence optic. Next, the ability of the active optic to effect a change of optical prescription and to correct for errors due to manufacturing and mounting is modeled.

  14. Adjustable Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Reid, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    With its unique subarcsecond imaging performance, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory illustrates the importance of fine angular resolution for x-ray astronomy. Indeed, the future of x-ray astronomy relies upon x-ray telescopes with comparable angular resolution but larger aperture areas. Combined with the special requirements of nested grazing-incidence optics, mass, and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically and programmatically challenging. The goal of this technology research is to enable the cost-effective fabrication of large-area, lightweight grazing-incidence x-ray optics with subarcsecond resolution. Toward this end, the project is developing active x-ray optics using slumped-glass mirrors with thin-film piezoelectric arrays for correction of intrinsic or mount-induced distortions.

  15. Grazing-incidence antireflection films. I. Basic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, J. P.; Hung, N. V.; Trammell, G. T.; Gerdau, E.; Mueller, M.; Rüffer, R.; Winkler, H.

    1985-10-01

    We discuss the possibility of a new interference technique for x-ray and γ-ray optics-the simple idea of grazing-incidence antireflection films (GIAR films)-for creating high-efficiency antireflection coatings for near-grazing-incidence reflection of hard x rays and γ rays. The motivation is the possible application to producing ``ultranarrow'' bandpass filters for synchrotron radiation with frequency widths ~=10-8-10-6 eV, giving a unique high-resolution, long-coherence-length, x-ray source for probing soft inelastic excitations and opening up new possibilities in x-ray interferometry. In this first of two papers on nonresonant GIAR films, we develop the basic theory and discuss in detail the simplest ideas for achieving antireflection films-impedance-matched quarter-wave films and damping stabilized solutions-which can both be obtained by coating a high-density mirror with a single lower-density film.

  16. Backscatter from a periodic rough surface at near grazing incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A. K.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of periodic surface roughness on the radar cross section (RCS) was studied. The surface roughness was formed by a small sinusoidal variation in a planar surface. RCS measurements were obtained for two different sinusoidal variations near grazing incidence for both principle polarizations. Significant grating lobes were observed in the measurements which directly correspond to the roughness characteristics. A physical optics solution was generated and compared to the measurements with reasonable agreement.

  17. Grazing-incidence metal deposition: Pattern formation and slope selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Jorritsma, Louis C.; Poelsema, Bene

    2000-05-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy of Cu on Cu(001) at grazing angles of incidence has been studied using spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction. At angles of incidence larger than 50° the evolving surface morphology no longer shows the fourfold symmetry inherent to Cu(001), leaving only the plane of incidence as a mirror plane. The surface roughness as well as the slope of the grown mound structures increase with increasing deposition angle. These findings are explained by steering, which originates from long-range attractive forces between incident atoms and substrate atoms and leads to preferential arrival of atoms on top of islands. Steering is of general importance and should routinely be considered in growth studies when the angle of incidence of the depositing beam is larger than 50°.

  18. Cyclic Sommerfeld resonances in nanorods at grazing incidences.

    PubMed

    Feng, Simin; Halterman, Klaus; Overfelt, Pamela L; Bowling, Donald

    2009-10-26

    We investigate electromagnetic scattering from nanoscale wires and reveal the emergence of a family of exotic resonances for source waves close to grazing incidence. These grazing resonances have a much higher Q-bandwidth product and thus, a much higher Q factor and broader bandwidth than the pure plasmonic resonances found in metal nanowires. Furthermore, these grazing resonances are much less susceptible to material losses than surface plasmon resonances. Contrary to the process of exciting surface plasmon resonances, these grazing resonances can arise in both dielectric and metallic nanowires and appear near to the cutoff wavelength of the circular waveguide. This peculiar resonance effect originates from the excitation of long range guided surface waves through the interplay of coherently scattered continuum modes coupled with first-order azimuthal propagating modes of the cylindrical nanowire. These first-order cyclic Sommerfeld waves and associated cyclic Sommerfeld resonances revealed here opens up the possibility of an alternative scheme of enhanced fields with a better merit (higher Q-bandwidth product and lower loss) than conventional surface plasmon resonances in the nano-regime. This nanowire resonance phenomenon can be utilized in broad scientific areas, including: metamaterial designs, nanophotonic integration, nanoantennas, and nanosensors.

  19. Design of grazing incidence and ATR objectives for FTIR microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffner, John A.; Alexay, Christopher C.; Hornlein, R. W.

    1992-03-01

    The optical designs of the grazing incidence and the internal reflecting objective lenses for FT- IR microspectroscopy are described. Each of these lenses extends the FT-IR microscope's abilities for spectral analysis of microscopic samples. The function of both objectives is dependent upon the basic FT-IR microscope principals of remote aperture beam splitting and remote image plane masking. Dual remote confocal aperture masks are implicit for minimizing diffraction effects. These two objectives use Fourier plan masks to define the angular aperture of the incident radiation through the objective and onto the sample. These lenses are used for both imaging and spectral analysis

  20. X-Ray Standing Wave at Grazing Incidence and Exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Osami; Jach, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Grazing-angle X-ray standing waves (GAXSWs) generated dynamically are discussed under a geometry where incident, specularly reflected, and specularly diffracted waves make grazing angles to a crystal surface. The grazing angles are close to the critical angle for total external reflection. A Bragg condition is satisfied on lattice planes perpendicular to the surface. We explain all waves excited inside and outside the crystal using a three-dimensional dispersion surface. The perpendicular components of the waves are derived from the geometrical consideration on the basis of phase continuity on the boundary surface. Electric fields are formulated by solving simultaneous equations of boundary conditions for the tangential components of electric field and the normal components of the magnetic fields. The GAXSW field is formed by the interference of incident, specularly reflected, and specularly diffracted beams above the surface. The external field intensity, modulated along the surface, is expressed, while the position-dependent behaviors of the intensity are discussed. The output, proportional to the local field intensity at an adsorbed atom, is normally parametrized by the coherent position and the coherent fraction. We introduce two examples of in-plane structural analyses of iodine adsorbed on Ge(111) and 10-nm-thick Ca0.39Sr0.61F2 epilayer film on GaAs(111).

  1. Properties and performance of grazing-incidence mirror systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.; Kelso, S. M.

    1982-04-01

    We investigate the performance of, and the origin of aberrations in, beam lines based on simple and the recently proposed CARSA mirror elements. New results include the identification of the sums of off-grazing angles and their squares as figures of merit for total reflectance and scattering losses in near-grazing-incidence systems, and the discovery that the usual image distortions and aberrations previously associated with simple elements can essentially be eliminated with pairs of elliptical mirrors having a common rotational symmetry axis. Slit throughput efficiencies and sensitivities to system stability are calculated for both horizontal and vertical dispersion for several representative beam lines using a ray-tracing program developed for CARSA systems. We find that high-resolution operation is possible with no entrance slit for CARSA combinations.

  2. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    The refractive index for most materials is slightly less than unity, which opens an opportunity to develop the grazing incidence neutron imaging optics. The ideal material for the optics would be natural nickel and its isotopes. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has active development program on the nickel replicated optics for use in x-ray astronomy. Brief status report on the program is presented. The results of the neutron focusing optic test carried by the MSFC team at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are also presented. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  3. Spherical mirror grazing incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Jr., Webster C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An optical system for x-rays combines at least two spherical or near spherical mirrors for each dimension in grazing incidence orientation to provide the functions of a lens in the x-ray region. To focus x-ray radiation in both the X and the Y dimensions, one of the mirrors focusses the X dimension, a second mirror focusses the Y direction, a third mirror corrects the X dimension by removing comatic aberration and a fourth mirror corrects the Y dimension. Spherical aberration may also be removed for an even better focus. The order of the mirrors is unimportant.

  4. Steering-Enhanced Roughening during Metal Deposition at Grazing Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Jorritsma, Louis C.; Poelsema, Bene

    1999-05-01

    It is shown that steering may have an important influence on the morphology of growing films. Steering originates from long-range attractive forces between incoming atoms and substrate atoms and leads to preferential arrival of atoms on top of islands. This phenomenon is most pronounced for grazing incidence deposition and results in significantly increased roughness of the growing film. Steering, which is expected to be generally valid but has so far been disregarded in growth studies, is illustrated for the growth of Cu/Cu(001).

  5. Equal-curvature grazing-incidence x-ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Saha, Timo T; Zhang, William

    2003-08-01

    We introduce a new type of x-ray telescope design, an equal-curvature telescope. We simply add a second-order axial sag to the base grazing-incidence cone-cone telescope. The radius of curvature of the sag terms is the same on the primary surface and on the secondary surface. The design is optimized such that the on-axis image spot at the focal plane is minimized. The on-axis rms spot diameter of two telescopes that we studied is less than 0.2 arc sec. The off-axis performance is comparable with that of equivalent Wolter type 1 telescopes.

  6. Design and development of grazing incidence x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fuchang; Mei, Zhiwu; Ma, Tao; Deng, Loulou; Shi, Yongqiang; Li, Liansheng

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsar navigation has attracted extensive attentions from academy and engineering domains. The navigation accuracy is can be enhanced through design of X-ray mirrors to focus X-rays to a small detector. The Wolter-I optics, originally proposed based on a paraboloid mirror and a hyperboloid mirror for X-ray imaging, has long been widely developed and employed in X-ray observatory. Some differences, however, remain in the requirements on optics between astronomical X-ray observation and pulsar navigation. The simplified Wolter-I optics, providing single reflection by a paraboloid mirror, is more suitable for pulsar navigation. In this paper, therefore, the grazing incidence X-ray mirror was designed further based on our previous work, with focus on the reflectivity, effective area, angular resolution and baffles. To evaluate the performance of the manufactured mirror, the surface roughness and reflectivity were tested. The test results show that the grazing incidence mirror meets the design specifications. On the basis of this, the reflectivity of the mirror in the working bandwidth was extrapolated to evaluate the focusing ability of the mirror when it works together with the detector. The purpose of our current work to design and develop a prototype mirror was realized. It can lay a foundation and provide guidance for the development of multilayer nested X-ray mirror with larger effective area.

  7. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  8. Sputtering at grazing ion incidence: Influence of adatom islands

    SciTech Connect

    Rosandi, Yudi; Redinger, Alex; Michely, Thomas; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2010-09-15

    When energetic ions impinge at grazing incidence onto an atomically flat terrace, they will not sputter. However, when adatom islands (containing N atoms) are deposited on the surface, they induce sputtering. We investigate this effect for the specific case of 83 deg. -incident 5 keV Ar ions on a Pt (111) surface by means of molecular-dynamics simulation and experiment. We find that - for constant coverage {Theta} - the sputter yield has a maximum at island sizes of N congruent with 10-20. A detailed picture explaining the decline of the sputter yield toward larger and smaller island sizes is worked out. Our simulation results are compared with dedicated sputtering experiments, in which a coverage of {Theta}=0.09 of Pt adatoms are deposited onto the Pt (111) surface and form islands with a broad distribution around a most probable size of N congruent with 20.

  9. Study of the in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system using polarized neutron scattering under grazing incidence geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, R.; Bigault, T.; Wildes, A. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Soyama, K.; Courtois, P.

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system with a polycrystalline grain size less than the ferromagnetic exchange length was investigated using polarized neutron off-specular scattering and grazing incidence small angle scattering measurements to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the magnetic properties which are different from the bulk. These complementary measurements with different length scales and the data analysis based on the distorted wave Born approximation revealed the lateral correlation on a length scale of sub- μm due to the fluctuating orientation of the magnetization in the layer. The obtained in-plane magnetic structure is consistent with the random anisotropy model, i.e. competition between the exchange interactions between neighboring spins and the local magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  10. Wavefront Sensing Analysis of Grazing Incidence Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, Scott; Saha, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Wavefront sensing is a process by which optical system errors are deduced from the aberrations in the image of an ideal source. The method has been used successfully in near-normal incidence, but not for grazing incidence systems. This innovation highlights the ability to examine out-of-focus images from grazing incidence telescopes (typically operating in the x-ray wavelengths, but integrated using optical wavelengths) and determine the lower-order deformations. This is important because as a metrology tool, this method would allow the integration of high angular resolution optics without the use of normal incidence interferometry, which requires direct access to the front surface of each mirror. Measuring the surface figure of mirror segments in a highly nested x-ray telescope mirror assembly is difficult due to the tight packing of elements and blockage of all but the innermost elements to normal incidence light. While this can be done on an individual basis in a metrology mount, once the element is installed and permanently bonded into the assembly, it is impossible to verify the figure of each element and ensure that the necessary imaging quality will be maintained. By examining on-axis images of an ideal point source, one can gauge the low-order figure errors of individual elements, even when integrated into an assembly. This technique is known as wavefront sensing (WFS). By shining collimated light down the optical axis of the telescope and looking at out-of-focus images, the blur due to low-order figure errors of individual elements can be seen, and the figure error necessary to produce that blur can be calculated. The method avoids the problem of requiring normal incidence access to the surface of each mirror segment. Mirror figure errors span a wide range of spatial frequencies, from the lowest-order bending to the highest order micro-roughness. While all of these can be measured in normal incidence, only the lowest-order contributors can be determined

  11. Structural characterization of irreversibly adsorbed polymer layers at the polymer/solid interface - In-situ grazing incidence angle x-ray scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Naisheng; Chen, Fen; Chen, Xiameng; Han, Zexi; Liang, Chen; Gin, Peter; Asada, Mitsunori; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tad

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, great attention has been paid to irreversibly adsorbed polymer layers formed on solid substrates since they can modify various properties of polymeric materials confined at the nanometer scale. In this talk, by the combined use of in-situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray reflectivity techniques, we aim to characterize the detailed structures of the adsorbed layers composed of different homopolymers (polystyrene, polybutadiene, poly (ethylene oxide), and poly (methyl methacrylate)) prepared on silicon substrates. We will highlight the generality/differences in the structures, leading to a better understanding of the formation process of the adsorbed layers at the impenetrable solid interfaces.

  12. Grazing Incidence Pumping for Efficient X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-09-30

    We report progress in developing efficient pumping of laser-driven x-ray lasers that opens new possibilities for both high average power x-ray lasers as well as producing progressively shorter wavelength lasers. The new scheme of grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) is described. In essence, a chosen electron density region of a pre-formed plasma column, produced by a longer pulse at normal incidence onto a slab target, is selectively pumped by focusing the short pulse {approx}ps laser at a determined grazing incidence angle to the target. The controlled use of refraction of the pumping laser in the plasma results in several benefits: The pump laser path length is longer and there is an increase in the laser absorption in the gain region for creating a collisional Ni-like ion x-ray laser. There is also an inherent traveling wave, close to c, that increases the overall pumping efficiency. The scheme requires careful tailoring of the pump and plasma conditions to the specific x-ray laser under investigation but the main advantage is a 3 - 30 times reduction in the laser pump energy for mid-Z materials. We report several examples of this new x-ray laser on two different laser systems. The first demonstrates a 10 Hz x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm pumped with a total of 150 mJ of 800 nm wavelength from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The second case is shown where the COMET laser is used both at 527 nm and 1054 nm wavelength to pump higher Z materials with the goal of extending the wavelength regime of tabletop x-ray lasers below 10 nm.

  13. Ground effects on aircraft noise. [near grazing incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, W. L., Jr.; Hilton, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate air-to-ground propagation of sound near grazing incidence. A turbojet-powered aircraft was flown at low altitudes over the ends of two microphone arrays. An eight-microphone array was positioned along a 1850 m concrete runway. The second array consisted of 12 microphones positioned parallel to the runway over grass. Twenty-eight flights were flown at altitudes ranging from 10 m to 160 m. The acoustic data recorded in the field reduced to one-third-octave band spectra and time correlated with the flight and weather information. A small portion of the data was further reduced to values of ground attenuation as a function of frequency and incidence angle by two different methods. In both methods, the acoustic signals compared originated from identical sources. Attenuation results obtained by using the two methods were in general agreement. The measured ground attenuation was largest in the frequency range of 200 to 400 Hz. A strong dependence was found between ground attenuation and incidence angle with little attenuation measured for angles of incidence greater than 10 to 15 degrees.

  14. The design and evaluation of grazing incidence relay optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John M.; Chase, R. C.; Silk, J. K.; Krieger, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray astronomy, both solar and celestial, has many needs for high spatial resolution observations which have to be performed with electronic detectors. If the resolution is not to be detector limited, plate scales in excess of 25 microns arc/sec, corresponding to focal lengths greater than 5 m, are required. In situations where the physical size is restricted, the problem can be solved by the use of grazing incidence relay optics. A system was developed which employs externally polished hyperboloid-hyperboloid surfaces to be used in conjunction with a Wolter-Schwarzschild primary. The secondary is located in front of the primary focus and provides a magnification of 4, while the system has a plate scale of 28 microns arc/sec and a length of 1.9 m. The design, tolerance specification, fabrication and performance at visible and X-ray wavelengths of this optical system are described.

  15. Grazing-incidence spectrometer on the SSPX spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W

    2008-05-02

    The Silver Flat Field Spectrometer (SFFS) is a high-resolution grazing-incidence diagnostic for magnetically confined plasmas. It covers the wavelength range of 25-450 {angstrom} with a resolution of {Delta}{lambda} = 0.3 {angstrom} FWHM. The SFFS employs a spherical 1200 lines/mm grating for flat-field focusing. The imaging is done using a back-illuminated Photometrics CCD camera allowing a bandwidth of around 200 {angstrom} per spectrum. The spectrometer has been used for atomic spectroscopy on electron beam ion traps and for plasma spectroscopy on magnetic confinement devices. The design of the SFFS and the spectrometer setup at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) in Livermore will be presented.

  16. Grazing-Incidence Neutron Optics based on Wolter Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of grazing-incidence neutron imaging optics based on the Wolter geometries have been successfully demonstrated. Biological microscopy, neutron radiography, medical imaging, neutron crystallography and boron neutron capture therapy would benefit from high resolution focusing neutron optics. Two bounce optics can also be used to focus neutrons in SANS experiments. Here, the use of the optics would result in lower values of obtainable scattering angles. The high efficiency of the optics permits a decrease in the minimum scattering vector without lowering the neutron intensity on sample. In this application, a significant advantage of the reflective optics over refractive optics is that the focus is independent of wavelength, so that the technique can be applied to polychromatic beams at pulsed neutron sources.

  17. Image processing for grazing incidence fast atom diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiossac, Maxime; Roncin, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD, or FAD) has developed as a surface sensitive technique. Compared with thermal energies helium diffraction (TEAS or HAS), GIFAD is less sensitive to thermal decoherence but also more demanding in terms of surface coherence, the mean distance between defects. Such high quality surfaces can be obtained from freshly cleaved crystals or in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber where a GIFAD setup has been installed allowing in situ operation. Based on recent publications by Atkinson et al. (2014) and Debiossac et al. (2014), the paper describes in detail the basic steps needed to measure the relative intensities of the diffraction spots. Care is taken to outline the underlying physical assumptions.

  18. Diffraction-limited performance of grazing incidence optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Diffraction effects of X-ray optical systems are often (justifiably) ignored due to the small wavelength of the X-ray radiation. However, the extremely large obscuration ratio inherent to grazing incidence optical systems produces a profound degradation of the diffraction image over that produced by a moderately obscured aperture of the same diameter. The contradictory requirements of large collecting area and relatively short length of optical elements has tended to result in proposed designs containing many concentric shells with increasingly higher obscuration ratios. In this paper it is shown that diffraction effects in such systems can significantly affect the achievable optical performance at the low energy (long wavelength) end of the intended operating spectral range. Parametric diffraction-limited performance predictions for both imaging and spectrographic applications will be presented and compared to AXAF performance goals and/or BBXRT fabrication techniques.

  19. Step edge sputtering yield at grazing incidence ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henri; Polop, Celia; Michely, Thomas; Friedrich, Andreas; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2004-06-18

    The surface morphology of Pt(111) was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy after 5 keV Ar+ ion bombardment at grazing incidence in dependence of the ion fluence and in the temperature range between 625 and 720 K. The average erosion rate was found to be strongly dependent on the ion fluence and the substrate temperature during bombardment. This dependence is traced back to the variation of step concentration with temperature and fluence. We develop a simple model allowing us to determine separately the constant sputtering yields for terraces and for impact area stripes in front of ascending steps. The experimentally determined yield of these stripes--the step-edge sputtering yield--is in excellent agreement with our molecular dynamics simulations performed for the experimental situation.

  20. Grazing Incidence Pumping for High Efficiency X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2005-10-03

    Over the last decade, most laser-driven collisional excitation x-ray lasers have relied on the absorption of the pump energy incident at normal incidence to a pre-formed plasma. The main advantage is that the inversion can be created at various plasma regions in space and time where the amplification and ray propagation processes are best served. The main disadvantage is that different plasma regions regardless of the contribution to the inversion have to be pumped simultaneously in order to make the laser work. This leads to a loss of efficiency. The new scheme of grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) addresses this issue. In essence, a chosen electron density region of a pre-formed plasma column, produced by a longer pulse at normal incidence onto a slab target, is selectively pumped by focusing a short pulse of 100 fs-10 ps duration laser at a determined grazing incidence angle to the target surface. The exact angle is dependent on the pump wavelength and relates to refraction of the drive beam in the plasma. The controlled use of refraction of the pumping laser in the plasma results in several benefits: The pump laser path length is longer and there is an increase in the laser absorption in the gain region for creating a collisional Ni-like ion x-ray laser. There is also an inherent traveling wave, close to c, that increases the overall pumping efficiency. This can lead to a 3-30 times reduction in the pump energy for mid-Z, sub-20 nm lasers. We report several examples of this new x-ray laser on two different laser systems. The first demonstrates a 10 Hz x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm pumped with a total of 150 mJ of 800 nm wavelength from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The second case is shown where the COMET laser is used both at 527 nm and 1054 nm wavelength to pump higher Z materials with the goal of extending the wavelength regime of tabletop x-ray lasers below 10 nm.

  1. Meteoroid and space debris impacts in grazing-incidence telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. D.; Wells, A.; Abbey, A. F.; Ambrosi, R. M.

    2008-06-01

    Context: Micrometeoroid or space debris impacts have been observed in the focal planes of the XMM-Newton and Swift-XRT (X-ray Telescope) X-ray observatories. These impacts have resulted in damage to, and in one case the failure of, focal-plane Charge-Coupled Device (CCDs) detectors. Aims: We aim to quantify the future risks of focal-plane impacts in present and future X-ray observatories. Methods: We present a simple model for the propagation of micrometeoroids and space debris particles into telescopes with grazing-incidence X-ray optics, which is based on the results of previous investigations into grazing-incidence hypervelocity impacts by microscopic particles. We then calculate micrometeoroid and space debris fluxes using the Micrometeoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference model (MASTER2005). The risks of future focal-plane impact events in three present (Swift-XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra) and two future (SIMBOL-X and XEUS) X-ray observatories are then estimated on the basis of the calculated fluxes and the model for particle propagation. Results: The probabilities of at least one impact occurring in the Swift-XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra focal planes, in a one year period from the time of writing in November 2007 are calculated to be ~5% and ~50% and ~3%. First-order predictions of the impact rates expected for the future SIMBOL-X and XEUS X-ray observatories yield probabilities for at least one focal-plane impact, during nominal 5-year missions, of more than 94% and 99%, respectively. Conclusions: The propagation of micrometeoroids and space debris particles into the focal planes of X-ray telescopes is highest for Wolter optics with the largest collecting areas and the lowest grazing angles. Telescopes in low-Earth orbits encounter enhanced particle fluxes compared with those in higher orbits and a pointing avoidance strategy for certain directions can reduce the risk of impacts. Future X-ray observatories, with large collecting areas and

  2. Full surface interferometric testing of grazing incidence mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, John L.

    1990-02-01

    This contract demonstrated the proof-of-principle of the Full Surface Interferometric Scanner (FSIS), an instrument which can rapidly and reliably measure both the full surface figure as well as the macroroughness of grazing incidence optics. The FSIS has the potential to fill the need of SDIO to characterize and qualify the necessary off-axis aspherical mirror technology that will be used for weapon pointing, beam control, and beam propagation through several environments and countermeasures. This instrument design is based on the use of normal incidence, sub-aperture interferometry and wavefront shearing interferometry which surmounts many of the problems encountered by other (e.g., long trace profilers) techniques. This new system, the FSIS, for which we have developed a breadboard system which makes novel use of three sequential operations: sub-aperture slope measurement, wavefront integration, and surface profile synthesis. It appears that the FSIS will find application in X ray and UV high resolution lithography, medical imaging, astronomy, physics, microbiology, and industrial (surface) quality control.

  3. Contamination of grazing incidence EUV mirrors - An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osantowski, John F.; Fleetwood, C. F.

    1988-01-01

    Contamination assessment for space optical systems requires an understanding of the sensitivity of component performance, e.g. mirror reflectance, to materials deposited on the mirror surface. In a previous study, the sensitivity of typical normal incidence mirror coatings to surface deposits of generic hydrocarbons was reported. Recent activity in the development of grazing incidence telescopes for extreme ultraviolet space astronomy has stimulated the need for a similar assessment in the spectral region extending from approximately 100 A to 1000 A. The model used for analysis treats the contamination layer as a continuous thin film deposited on the mirror surface. The mirror surfaces selected for this study are opaque vacuum deposited gold and the uncoated and polished Zerodur. Scatter caused by film irregularities or particulates are not included in this assessment. Parametric evaluations at 100, 500, and 1000 A determine the sensitivity of mirror reflectance to a range of optical constants selected for the generic contaminants. This sensitivity analysis combined with the limited amount of optical data in the EUV for hydrocarbons, is used to select representative optical constants for the three wavelength regions. Reflectance versus contamination layer thickness curves are then calculated and used to determine critical thickness limits based on allowable reflectance change. Initial observations indicate that thickness limits will be highly dependent on the real part of the complex index of refraction of the contaminant film being less than 1.0. Preliminary laboratory measurements of samples contaminated with some commonly encountered hydrocarbons confirm trends indicated in the analytical studies.

  4. Substantial Difference in Ordering of 10, 15, and 20 nm Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on a Water Surface: In Situ Characterization by the Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Vorobiev, A; Khassanov, A; Ukleev, V; Snigireva, I; Konovalov, O

    2015-10-27

    In the present study, for the first time, a unique combination of in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray reflectivity, accompanied by the pressure-area isotherm analysis, Brewster angle microscopy, and ex situ scanning electron microscopy, was applied for investigation of two-dimensional superlattices of magnetic nanoparticles as they form on a water surface in a Langmuir trough. Iron oxide particles of different sizes stabilized with a single layer of oleic acid were used. It is demonstrated that monodisperse 10 nm particles on a water surface reproducibly form identical highly ordered monolayers in a wide range of experimental conditions, while monodisperse 20 nm particles always form compact three-dimensional clusters and never the monolayers. Monodisperse particles of an intermediate size, 15 nm in diameter, build a metastable monolayer, which shows a tendency for spontaneous transformation to bi-, tri-, and multilayer islands. The importance to use both grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray reflectivity together with the complementary techniques, to avoid misinterpretation of separate experimental data sets, is underlined.

  5. Grazing incidence optics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 3, 4, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osantowski, John F. (Editor); Van Speybroeck, Leon (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on the diffraction-limited performance of grazing incidence optical systems; transverse ray aberrations of Wolter type 1 telescopes; hybrid X-ray telescope systems; surface characterization of grazing incidence optics in the extreme UV and X-ray regions; and the surface roughness properties of synchrotron radiation optics. Topics discussed include the simulation of free-abrasive grinding of grazing incidence mirrors with vertical-honing and flexible blades; mirrors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer; the design and development of conical X-ray imaging mirrors; thermal loading considerations for synchrotron radiation mirrors; and grazing incidence optics for synchrotron radiation insertion-device beams. Consideration is given to the interpretation of glancing incidence scattering measurements; damage processes in short wavelength coated FEL optics; the replication of grain incidence optics; and the assembly and alignment of the Technology Mirror Assembly.

  6. Grazing-incidence optical magnetic recording with super-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sidney R; Kullock, René; McCarron, Ryan; Rechev, Katya; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Bitton, Ora; Dawson, Paul; Hecht, Bert; Oron, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is often considered the next major step in the storage industry: it is predicted to increase the storage capacity, the read/write speed and the data lifetime of future hard disk drives. However, despite more than a decade of development work, the reliability is still a prime concern. Featuring an inherently fragile surface-plasmon resonator as a highly localized heat source, as part of a near-field transducer (NFT), the current industry concepts still fail to deliver drives with sufficient lifetime. This study presents a method to aid conventional NFT-designs by additional grazing-incidence laser illumination, which may open an alternative route to high-durability HAMR. Magnetic switching is demonstrated on consumer-grade CoCrPt perpendicular magnetic recording media using a green and a near-infrared diode laser. Sub-500 nm magnetic features are written in the absence of a NFT in a moderate bias field of only μ0 H = 0.3 T with individual laser pulses of 40 mW power and 50 ns duration with a laser spot size of 3 μm (short axis) at the sample surface – six times larger than the magnetic features. Herein, the presence of a nanoscopic object, i.e., the tip of an atomic force microscope in the focus of the laser at the sample surface, has no impact on the recorded magnetic features – thus suggesting full compatibility with NFT-HAMR. PMID:28144562

  7. Surface Pb nanoparticle aggregation, coalescence and differential capacitance in a deep eutectic solvent using a simultaneous sample-rotated small angle x-ray scattering and electrochemical methods approach [Surface Pb nanoparticle aggregation, coalescence and differential capacitance in a deep eutectic solvent using a simultaneous grazing transmission small angle x-ray scattering and electrochemical methods approach

    DOE PAGES

    Hammons, Joshua A.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-01-18

    Nanoparticle electrodeposition is a simple and scalable approach to synthesizing supported nanoparticles. Used with a deep eutectic solvent (DES), surface nanoparticles can be assembled and exhibit unique surface charge separation when the DES is adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface. Key to understanding and controlling the assembly and the capacitance is a thorough understanding of surface particle mobility and charge screening, which requires an in-situ approach. In this study, Pb particle formation, size, shape and capacitance are resolved in a 1:2 choline Cl–: urea deep eutectic solvent whilst sweeping the cell potential in the range: 0.2 V to –1.2 V (vs.more » Ag/AgCl). These system parameters were resolved using a complementary suite of sample-rotated small angle X-ray scattering (SR-SAXS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are presented and discussed in detail. This approach is able to show that both particle and ion transport are impeded in the DES, as aggregation occurs over the course of 6 minutes, and dissolved Pb ions accumulate and remain near the surface after a nucleation pulse is applied. The DES-Pb interactions strongly depend on the cell potential as evidenced by the specific differential capacitance of the Pb deposit, which has a maximum value of 2.5 +/– 0.5 F g–1 at –1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Together, the SR-SAXS-EIS approach is able to characterize the unique nanoparticle capacitance, mobility and ion mobility in a DES and can be used to study a wide range of nanoparticle deposition systems in-situ.« less

  8. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating

  9. Development of Grazing Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Khaykovich, B.; Liu, D.; Ramsey, B. D.; Zavlin, V. E.; Kilaru, K.; Romaine, S.; Rosati, R. E.; Bruni, R.; Moncton, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Because of their wave nature, thermal and cold neutrons can be reflected from smooth surfaces at grazing incidence angles, be reflected by multilayer coatings or be refracted at boundaries of different materials. The optical properties of materials are characterized by their refractive indices which are slightly less than unity for most elements and their isotopes in the case of cold and thermal neutrons as well as for x-rays. The motivation for the optics use for neutrons as well as for x-rays is to increase the signal rate and, by virtue of the optic's angular resolution, to improve the signal-to-noise level by reducing the background so the efficiency of the existing neutron sources use can be significantly enhanced. Both refractive and reflective optical techniques developed for x-ray applications can be applied to focus neutron beams. Typically neutron sources have lower brilliance compared to conventional x-ray sources so in order to increase the beam throughput the neutron optics has to be capable of capturing large solid angles. Because of this, the replicated optics techniques developed for x-ray astronomy applications would be a perfect match for neutron applications, so the electroformed nickel optics under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) can be applied to focus neutron beams. In this technique, nickel mirror shells are electroformed onto a figured and superpolished nickel-plated aluminum cylindrical mandrel from which they are later released by differential thermal contraction. Cylindrical mirrors with different diameters, but the same focal length, can be nested together to increase the system throughput. The throughput can be increased further with the use of the multilayer coatings deposited on the reflectivr surface of the mirror shells. While the electroformed nickel replication technique needs to be adopted for neutron focusing, the technology to coat the inside of cylindrical mirrors with neutron multilayers has to be

  10. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  11. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Gaevskii, A. Yu. Golentus, I. E.

    2015-03-15

    The diffraction of X rays incident on a crystal surface under grazing angles under conditions of total external reflection has been investigated. An approach is proposed in which exact solutions to the dynamic problem of grazing-incidence diffraction in an ideal crystal are used as initial functions to calculate the diffuse component of diffraction in a crystal with defects. The diffuse component of diffraction is calculated for a crystal with surface defects of a dilatation-center type. Exact formulas of the continuum theory which take into account the mirror-image forces are used for defect-induced atomic displacements. Scattering intensity maps near Bragg peaks are constructed for different scan modes, and the conditions for detecting primarily the diffuse component are determined. The results of dynamic calculations of grazing-incidence diffraction in defect-containing crystals are compared with calculations in the kinematic approximation.

  12. Varied-space grazing incidence gratings in high resolution scanning spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hettrick, M.C.; Underwood, J.H.

    1986-09-10

    We discuss the dominant geometrical aberrations of a grazing incidence reflection grating and new techniques which can be used to reduce or eliminate them. Convergent beam geometries and the aberration correction possible with varied groove spacings are each found to improve the spectral resolution and speed of grazing incidence gratings. In combination, these two techniques can result in a high resolution (lambda/..delta..lambda>10/sup 4/) monochromator or scanning spectrometer with a simple rotational motion for scanning wavelength or selecting the spectral band.

  13. Varied-space grazing incidence gratings in high resolution scanning spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hettrick, M.C.; Underwood, J.H.

    1986-10-01

    We discuss the dominant geometrical aberrations of a grazing incidence reflection grating and new techniques which can be used to reduce or eliminate them. Convergent beam geometries and the aberration correction possible with varied groove spacings are each found to improve the spectral resolution and speed of grazing incidence gratings. In combination, these two techniques can result in a high resolution (lambda/..delta..lambda > 10/sup 4/) monochromator or scanning spectrometer with a simple rotational motion for scanning wavelength or selecting the spectral band. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Grazing incidence metal optics for the Berkeley Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, D.; Malina, R. F.; Bowyer, S.

    1985-01-01

    The four flight Wolter-Schwarzschild mirrors currently under fabrication for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite are described. The principal figuring operation of these grazing incidence metal mirrors (gold over nickel on an aluminum substrate) is carried out by diamond turning at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Turning has been accomplished and optical testing results analyzed for three of the mirrors. As-turned values of 1.7 arc sec full width at half maximum (FWHM) and half energy width (HEW) of 5 arc seconds in the visible have been achieved. These results illustrate the great potential of precision fabrication technology for the production of large grazing incidence optics.

  15. Probing the Local Order of Single Phospholipid Membranes Using Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. E.; Majewski, J.; Watkins, E. B.; Mulder, D. J.; Gog, T.; Kuhl, T. L.

    2008-02-01

    We report the first grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements of a single phospholipid bilayer at the solid-liquid interface. Our grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflectivity measurements reveal that the lateral ordering in a supported DPPE (1, 2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine) bilayer is significantly less than that of an equivalent monolayer at the air-liquid interface. Our findings also indicate that the leaflets of the bilayer are uncoupled in contrast to the scattering from free standing phosphatidylcholine bilayers. The methodology presented can be readily implemented to study more complicated biomembranes and their interaction with proteins.

  16. Molecular effects in H2 scattering from metal surfaces at grazing incidence.

    PubMed

    Díaz, C; Rivière, P; Martín, F

    2009-07-03

    Collisions of fast atoms with surfaces at grazing incidence have been recently proposed as a promising new tool to determine surface parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Here we show, by means of classical dynamics calculations performed with first-principles six-dimensional potential energy surfaces for H2/NiAl(110) and H2/Pd(111) that, under grazing incidence conditions, fast light molecular projectiles are also useful to determine sticking probabilities at thermal energies, from the threshold up to the saturation limit. Thus they are the ideal complement to traditional experiments at thermal energies to determine sticking curves up to the saturation limit.

  17. Geometrical factor correction in grazing incident x-ray fluorescence experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenbin; Zhu Jingtao; Ma Xiaoying; Li Haochuan; Wang Hongchang; Wang Zhanshan; Sawhney, Kawal J. S.

    2012-05-15

    The geometrical factor in the grazing incident x-ray fluorescence analysis is an important angle-dependent term, which can have a great effect on the measured data. In this paper, the effects of the geometrical factor on the florescence yield have been demonstrated. A formula is presented to estimate the geometrical factor, which includes the experimental parameters of the beam and setup. The validity of this formula is proven by the good agreement between the calculated fluorescence yields with the experimental results in grazing incident x-ray fluorescence analysis.

  18. A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Engelhorn, K.; Cho, B.I.; Lee, H.J.; Greaves, M.; Weber, C.P.; Falcone, R.W.; Padmore, H. A.; Heimann, P.A.

    2010-02-18

    An ultrafast x-ray streak camera has been realized using a grazing incidence reflection photocathode. X-rays are incident on a gold photocathode at a grazing angle of 20 degree and photoemitted electrons are focused by a large aperture magnetic solenoid lens. The streak camera has high quantum efficiency, 600fs temporal resolution, and 6mm imaging length in the spectral direction. Its single shot capability eliminates temporal smearing due to sweep jitter, and allows recording of the ultrafast dynamics of samples that undergo non-reversible changes.

  19. Grazing incidence metal optics for the Berkeley Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, D.; Malina, R. F.; Bowyer, S.

    1985-01-01

    The four flight Wolter-Schwarzschild mirrors currently under fabrication for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite are described. The principal figuring operation of these grazing incidence metal mirrors (gold over nickel on an aluminum substrate) is carried out by diamond turning at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Turning has been accomplished and optical testing results analyzed for three of the mirrors. As-turned values of 1.7 arc sec full width at half maximum (FWHM) and half energy width (HEW) of 5 arc seconds in the visible have been achieved. These results illustrate the great potential of precision fabrication technology for the production of large grazing incidence optics.

  20. Grazing incidence telescopes - A new class for soft X-ray and EUV spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettrick, M. C.; Bowyer, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new class of grazing incidence telescopes is identified, and its advantages for stellar spectroscopy are discussed. In particular, three types of telescope geometry consisting of a primary and a secondary, both at grazing incidence, are proposed. Type I delivers a converging beam having a real focus; type II delivers a diverging beam from a virtual focus, and type III delivers a collimated beam concentrated relative to the primary aperture. The three telescope types are shown to possess unique properties which improve the efficiency and shorten the length of soft X-ray/EUV spectrographs.

  1. Design, fabrication and performance of two grazing incidence telescopes for celestial extreme ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Cash, W.; Malina, R. F.; Bowyer, S.

    1977-01-01

    The design and performance of grazing incidence telescopes for celestial extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy are described. The telescopes basically consist of a star tracker, collimator, grazing incidence mirror, vacuum box lid, vacuum housing, filters, a ranicon detector, an electronics box, and an aspect camera. For the survey mirror a Wolter-Schwarzschild type II configuration was selected. Diamond-turning was used for mirror fabrication, a technique which machines surfaces to the order of 10 microns over the required dimensions. The design of the EUV spectrometer is discussed with particular reference to the optics for a primarily spectroscopic application and the fabrication of the f/10 optics.

  2. Design of stigmatic grazing incidence telescopes with non-parabolic primaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, C. E.; Korsch, D.

    1979-01-01

    A two-mirror grazing-incidence telescope having a non-parabolic primary, and designed to be free of spherical aberration has been investigated. A method for determining the second surface equation is described, when the surface equation for one mirror is given. Application to grazing incidence systems such as used in X-ray and planed for EUV astronomy is discussed. Of special interest is the design of a secondary mirror when the hyperboloid of a conventional Wolter type I system is taken as the primary.

  3. Grazing-incidence grating compressor for applications to free-electron-lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Frassetto, Fabio Miotti, Paolo; Poletto, Luca

    2016-07-27

    The design of a grating compressor for FEL pulses is discussed here. The design is based on the use of two grazing-incidence gratings. The available grating geometries, the classical diffraction mount and the off-plane one, are discussed.

  4. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  5. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity of gold and iridium coated flat mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschenbach, Bernd; Braeuninger, Heinrich; Burkert, Wolfgang

    In the context of developing high reflectivity coatings for X-ray telescopes highly polished Zerodur and BK-7 glass flats have been coated with either gold or iridium. Grazing incidence reflectivity measurements at various X-ray energies are reported and compared with standard theory prediction.

  6. Angular Distributions of Sputtered Atoms from Semiconductor Targets at Grazing Ion Beam Incidence Angles

    SciTech Connect

    Sekowski, M.; Burenkov, A.; Martinez-Limia, A.; Hernandez-Mangas, J.; Ryssel, H.

    2008-11-03

    Angular distributions of ion sputtered germanium and silicon atoms are investigated within this work. Experiments are performed for the case of grazing ion incidence angles, where the resulting angular distributions are asymmetrical with respect to the polar angle of the sputtered atoms. The performed experiments are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations from different programs. We show here an improved model for the angular distribution, which has an additional dependence of the ion incidence angle.

  7. Coherent Reflection of He Atom Beams from Rough Surfaces at Grazing Incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Schewe, H. Christian; Meijer, Gerard; Schoellkopf, Wieland

    2010-09-24

    We report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component k{sub z} of the incident wave vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of k{sub z} only. This behavior is explained by quantum reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of k{sub z} the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also depend on the parallel component k{sub x} of the wave vector. The material specific k{sub x} dependence for this classic reflection at the repulsive branch of the potential is discussed in terms of an averaging out of the surface roughness under grazing incidence conditions.

  8. Upgrade of small angle x-ray scattering beamline BL-6A at the photon factory

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H. Igarashi, N.; Mori, T.; Saijo, S.; Nagatani, Y.; Kosuge, T.; Shimizu, N.; Ohta, H.

    2016-07-27

    BL-6A has been operational since 2011 as a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) beamline at the Photon Factory (PF), and beginning in 2013 its old components and systems, which were mainly inside the experimental hutch, have been extensively updated. Both the vacuum-passes located between the sample stage and the detector and the fixed surface plate have been replaced by a new semi-automatic diffractometer. These upgrades allow simultaneous SAXS/WAXS experiments and grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements to be conducted. The hybrid pixel detector PILATUS3 1M is installed for SAXS, and PILATUS 100K is available as a WAXS detector. Additionally, a pinhole equipped with a micro-ion chamber is available to realize a lower-background and higher-resolution of low angles. Moreover, in a simultaneous SAXS/WAXS experiment, we developed a new beam stop with an embedded photodiode. Thus, BL-6A has evolved into a multipurpose beamline capable of dealing with various types of samples and experimental techniques.

  9. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  10. Reactive scattering of H{sub 2} from metal surfaces under fast-grazing-incidence conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Martin, F.

    2010-07-15

    We have studied the interaction of molecular hydrogen with metal surfaces under fast-grazing-incidence conditions, by means of classical dynamics calculations based on density functional theory six-dimensional potential energy surfaces. We have performed calculations on two activated systems, H{sub 2}/NiAl(110) and H{sub 2}/Cu(111), and on two nonactivated systems, H{sub 2}/Pd(111) and H{sub 2}/Pd(110). We show that for rather open surfaces the computed 1-R probabilities (where R represents the reflectivity) as a function of the normal collision energy at grazing incidence (along low-Miller-index directions) mimic reasonably well the dissociative adsorption probabilities obtained at normal incidence and thermal energies from the dissociation threshold up to the saturation limit. Our results indicate that fast grazing incidence experiments could be used as complement to traditional sticking experiments at thermal energies to determine dissociative adsorption saturation limits, which are usually unreachable due to limitations in traditional molecular beam experiments

  11. Grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy: instrumentation aspects and scientific opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holderer, O.; Frielinghaus, H.; Wellert, S.; Lipfert, F.; Monkenbusch, M.; von Klitzing, R.; Richter, D.

    2014-07-01

    Grazing Incidence Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy (GINSES) opens new possibilities for observing the thermally driven dynamics of macromolecules close to a rigid interface. The information about the dynamics can be retrieved as a function of scattering depth of the evanescent neutron wave, on the length scale in the range of some 10-100 nm. Using a classical neutron spin echo spectrometer with a laterally collimated beam, dynamics can be measured in grazing incidence geometry. We show examples of how the interface modifies the dynamics of microemulsions, membranes and microgels. Instrumental details and possible improvements for this technique will be presented. The key issue is the low intensity for dynamics measurements with an evanescent neutron wave. Conceptual questions how a specialised instrument could improve the experimental technique will be discussed.

  12. High Repetition Rate Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser operating at 18.9 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-05-11

    We have demonstrated a 10 Hz Ni-like Mo X-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ total pump energy by employing a novel pumping scheme. The grazing incidence scheme is described, where a picosecond pulse is incident at a grazing angle to a Mo plasma column produced by a slab target irradiated by a 200 ps laser pulse. This scheme uses refraction of the short pulse at a pre-determined electron density to increase absorption to pump a specific gain region. The high efficiency inherent to this scheme allows a reduction in the pump energy where 70 mJ long pulse energy and 80 mJ short pulse energy are sufficient to produce lasing at a 10 Hz repetition rate. Under these conditions and by optimizing the delay between the pulses, we achieve strong amplification and saturation for 4 mm long targets.

  13. Gamma rays from grazing incidence cosmic rays in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Interactions of grazing incidence, ultra high-energy cosmic rays with the earth's atmosphere may provide a new method of studying energetic cosmic rays with gamma-ray satellites. It is found that these cosmic ray interactions may produce gamma-rays on millisecond timescales which may be detectable by satellites. An extremely low gamma-ray background for transient gamma-ray events and a large area of interaction, the earth's surface, make the scheme plausible. The effective cross section of detection of interactions for cosmic rays above 10(exp 20) eV is found to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than Earth-based detection techniques. This method may eventually offer an efficient way of probing this region of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum where events are scarce. In this paper, a conceptual model is presented for the production of short bursts of gamma-rays based on these grazing incidence encounters with the Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Henri; Redinger, Alex; Messlinger, Sebastian; Stoian, Georgiana; Michely, Thomas; Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Linke, Udo

    2006-06-15

    Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar{sup +} grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}. A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for ripple formation under grazing incidence. The importance of distinct diffusion processes--step adatom generation at kinks and adatom lattice gas formation--for temperature dependent transitions in the surface morphology is highlighted. Surprisingly, ion bombardment effects like thermal spike induced adatom production and planar subsurface channeling are important for pattern ordering.

  15. Opto-mechanical Analyses for Performance Optimization of Lightweight Grazing-incidence Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Jacqueline; Kolodsiejczak, Jeffrey; Odell, Stephen; Elsner, Ronald; Weisskopf, Martin; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    New technology in grazing-incidence mirror fabrication and assembly is necessary to achieve sub-arcsecond optics for large-area x-ray telescopes. In order to define specifications, an understanding of performance sensitivity to design parameters is crucial. MSFC is undertaking a systematic study to specify a mounting approach, mirror substrate, and testing method. Because the lightweight mirrors are typically flimsy, they are susceptible to significant distortion due to mounting and gravitational forces. Material properties of the mirror substrate along with its thickness and dimensions significantly affect the distortions caused by mounting and gravity. A parametric study of these properties and their relationship to mounting and testing schemes will indicate specifications for the design of the next generation of lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors. Initial results will be reported.

  16. Opto-mechanical Analyses for Performance Optimization of Lightweight Grazing-incidence Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Jacqueline M.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Odell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    New technology in grazing-incidence mirror fabrication and assembly is necessary to achieve subarcsecond optics for large-area x-ray telescopes. In order to define specifications, an understanding of performance sensitivity to design parameters is crucial. MSFC is undertaking a systematic study to specify a mounting approach, mirror substrate, and testing method. Lightweight mirrors are typically flimsy and are, therefore, susceptible to significant distortion due to mounting and gravitational forces. Material properties of the mirror substrate along with its dimensions significantly affect the distortions caused by mounting and gravity. A parametric study of these properties and their relationship to mounting and testing schemes will indicate specifications for the design of the next generation of lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors. Here we report initial results of this study.

  17. Opto-Mechanical Analyses for Performance Optimization of Lightweight Grazing-Incidence Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Jacqueline; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Odell, Steve; Eisner, Ronald; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    New technology in grazing-incidence mirror fabrication and assembly is necessary to achieve sub-arcsecond optics for large-area x-ray telescopes. In order to define specifications, an understanding of performance sensitivity to design parameters is crucial. MSFC is undertaking a systematic study to specify a mounting approach, mirror substrate, and testing method. Because the lightweight mirrors are typically flimsy, they are susceptible to significant distortion due to mounting and gravitational forces. Material properties of the mirror substrate along with its thickness and dimensions significantly affect the distortions caused by mounting and gravity. A parametric study of these properties and their relationship to mounting and testing schemes will indicate specifications for the design of the next generation of lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors. Initial results will be reported.

  18. Grazing incidence reflection coefficients of rhodium, osmium, platinum, and gold from 50 to 300 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettrick, M. C.; Edelstein, J.; Flint, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance measurements were made of several metals illuminated from various angles with light at 14 wavelengths in the interval 46.5-283 A. The metals, Rh, Os, Pt and Au were deposited as 125 A films on a binding substrate through electron beam epitaxy. Measurements were made with a grazing incidence monochromator and a reflectometer. The data generally showed lowered reflectance with increasing angles of illumination and shorter wavelengths. The reflectance peak, however, was located at wavelengths of 100-160 A, particularly at large grazing incidences. The wavelengths correspond with the 5p to epsilon-d transition in all of the elements. Rh displayed the highest overall reflectance, and both Rh and Os were more efficient than Au or Pt.

  19. Final Report for "Accurate Numerical Models of the Secondary Electron Yield from Grazing-incidence Collisions".

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2008-10-21

    Effects of stray electrons are a main factor limiting performance of many accelerators. Because heavy-ion fusion (HIF) accelerators will operate in regimes of higher current and with walls much closer to the beam than accelerators operating today, stray electrons might have a large, detrimental effect on the performance of an HIF accelerator. A primary source of stray electrons is electrons generated when halo ions strike the beam pipe walls. There is some research on these types of secondary electrons for the HIF community to draw upon, but this work is missing one crucial ingredient: the effect of grazing incidence. The overall goal of this project was to develop the numerical tools necessary to accurately model the effect of grazing incidence on the behavior of halo ions in a HIF accelerator, and further, to provide accurate models of heavy ion stopping powers with applications to ICF, WDM, and HEDP experiments.

  20. Differential Deposition to Correct Surface Figure Deviations in Astronomical Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    A coating technique is being developed to correct the surface figure deviations in reflective-grazing-incidence X-ray optics. These optics are typically designed to have precise conic profiles, and any deviation in this profile, as a result of fabrication, results in a degradation of the imaging performance. To correct the mirror profiles, physical vapor deposition has been utilized to selectively deposit a filler material inside the mirror shell. The technique, termed differential deposition, has been implemented as a proof of concept on miniature X-ray optics developed at MSFC for medical-imaging applications. The technique is now being transferred to larger grazing-incidence optics suitable for astronomy and progress to date is reported.

  1. Electroform replication of grazing incidence X-ray optics. [spaceborne telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Purcell, W. R.; Bedford, D.; Simnett, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Work to produce mirrors via electroform replication is reported. Work on small (6 cm by 9 cm) cylindrical pieces and on 40 cm long by 12 cm wide Wolter shaped mirrors is summarized. It is shown that electroforming is a viable technique for producing relatively inexpensive grazing incidence X-ray optics, as long as modest resolution (1 min of arc) and size (12 cm diameter by 40 cm long) are specified.

  2. Time-domain theory of gyrotron traveling wave amplifiers operating at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Zheleznov, I. V.

    2015-01-15

    Time-domain theory of the gyrotron traveling wave tube (gyro-TWT) operating at grazing incidence has been developed. The theory is based on a description of wave propagation by a parabolic equation. The results of the simulations are compared with experimental results of the observation of subnanosecond pulse amplification in a gyro-TWT consisting of three gain sections separated by severs. The theory developed can also be used successfully for a description of amplification of monochromatic signals.

  3. Triple-path collector optics for grazing incident x-ray emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tokushima, T; Horikawa, Y; Shin, S

    2011-07-01

    A new type of collector optics was developed for grazing incident x-ray emission spectrometer. The collector optics used two cylindrical mirrors to add two extra light paths while keeping the center light path that directly illuminates the grating. The design and properties of the spectrometer using the triple-path collector optics were evaluated using ray-tracing simulations, and validity of this design in terms of throughput and energy resolution was confirmed by the experimentally obtained spectra.

  4. X-ray testing of grazing incidence optics fabricated at the University of Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Cash, Webster

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the methods and results of X-ray testing for the grazing-incidence optics of the F/5.73 Wolter Type I telescope, whose mirror had flown on a NASA sounding rocket in March, 1991. Attention is given to the tests of the inplane (full aperture) and offplane (apodized aperture) imaging response at 0.25-1.50 keV energies; correlations with surface figures are discussed.

  5. Grazing Incidence Nickel Replicated Optics for Hard X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peturzzo, J. J., III; Elsner, R. F.; Joy, M. K.; ODell, S. L.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for future hard x-ray (up to 50 keV) telescopes are lightweight, high angular resolution optics with large collecting areas. Grazing incidence replicated optics are an excellent candidate for this, type of mission, providing better angular resolution, comparable area/unit mass, and simpler fabrication than multilayer-coated foils. Most importantly, the technology to fabricate the required optics currently exists. A comparison of several hard x-ray telescope designs will be presented.

  6. InN Thin Film Lattice Dynamics by Grazing Incidence Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, J.; Bosak, A.; Krisch, M.; Manjón, F. J.; Romero, A. H.; Garro, N.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kuball, M.

    2011-05-01

    Achieving comprehensive information on thin film lattice dynamics so far has eluded well established spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate here the novel application of grazing incidence inelastic x-ray scattering combined with ab initio calculations to determine the complete elastic stiffness tensor, the acoustic and low-energy optic phonon dispersion relations of thin wurtzite indium nitride films. Indium nitride is an especially relevant example, due to the technological interest for optoelectronic and solar cell applications in combination with other group III nitrides.

  7. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis.

    PubMed

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities for in situ and in operando GISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  8. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities for in situ and in operando GISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed. PMID:25610632

  9. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in themore » soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.« less

  10. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  11. Growth of nano-dots on the grazing-incidence mirror surface under FEL irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikov, I V; Buzmakov, A V; Siewert, F; Tiedtke, K; Störmer, M; Samoylova, L; Sinn, H

    2016-01-01

    A new phenomenon on X-ray optics surfaces has been observed: the growth of nano-dots (40-55 nm diameter, 8-13 nm height, 9.4 dots µm(-2) surface density) on the grazing-incidence mirror surface under irradiation by the free-electron laser (FEL) FLASH (5-45 nm wavelength, 3° grazing-incidence angle). With a model calculation it is shown that these nano-dots may occur during the growth of a contamination layer due to polymerization of incoming hydrocarbon molecules. The crucial factors responsible for the growth of nano-dots in the model are the incident peak intensity and the reflection angle of the beam. A reduction of the peak intensity (e.g. replacement of the FEL beam by synchrotron radiation) as well as a decrease of the incident angle by just 1° (from 3° to 2°) may result in the total disappearance of the nano-dots. The model calculations are compared with surface analysis of two FLASH mirrors.

  12. Small angle slot divertor concept for long pulse advanced tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Sang, C. F.; Stangeby, P. C.; Lao, L. L.; Taylor, T. S.; Thomas, D. M.

    2017-04-01

    SOLPS-EIRENE edge code analysis shows that a gas-tight slot divertor geometry with a small-angle (glancing-incidence) target, named the small angle slot (SAS) divertor, can achieve cold, dissipative/detached divertor conditions at relatively low values of plasma density at the outside midplane separatrix. SAS exhibits the following key features: (1) strong enhancement of the buildup of neutral density in a localized region near the plasma strike point on the divertor target; (2) spreading of the cooling front across the divertor target with the slot gradually flaring out from the strike point, thus effectively reducing both heat flux and erosion on the entire divertor target surface. Such a divertor may potentially provide a power and particle handling solution for long pulse advanced tokamaks.

  13. Analysis and design of grazing incidence x-ray optics for pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fuchang; Chen, Jianwu; Li, Liansheng; Mei, Zhiwu

    2013-10-01

    As a promising new technology for deep space exploration due to autonomous capability, pulsar navigation has attracted extensive attentions from academy and engineering domains. The pulsar navigation accuracy is determined by the measurement accuracy of Time of Arrival (TOA) of X-ray photon, which can be enhanced through design of appropriate optics. The energy band of X-ray suitable for pulsar navigation is 0.1-10keV, the effective focusing of which can be primely and effectively realized by the grazing incidence reflective optics. The Wolter-I optics, originally proposed based on a paraboloid mirror and a hyperboloid mirror for X-ray imaging, has long been widely developed and employed in X-ray observatory. Some differences, however, remain in the requirements on optics between astronomical X-ray observation and pulsar navigation. X-ray concentrator, the simplified Wolter-I optics, providing single reflection by a paraboloid mirror, is more suitable for pulsar navigation. In this paper, therefore, the requirements on aperture, effective area and focal length of the grazing incidence reflective optics were firstly analyzed based on the characteristics, such as high time resolution, large effective area and low angular resolution, of the pulsar navigation. Furthermore, the preliminary design of optical system and overall structure, as well as the diaphragm, was implemented for the X-ray concentrator. Through optical and FEA simulation, system engineering analysis on the X-ray concentrator was finally performed to analyze the effects of environmental factors on the performance, providing basis and guidance for fabrication of the X-ray concentrator grazing incidence optics.

  14. Partially coherent X-ray wavefront propagation simulations including grazing-incidence focusing optics.

    PubMed

    Canestrari, Niccolo; Chubar, Oleg; Reininger, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    X-ray beamlines in modern synchrotron radiation sources make extensive use of grazing-incidence reflective optics, in particular Kirkpatrick-Baez elliptical mirror systems. These systems can focus the incoming X-rays down to nanometer-scale spot sizes while maintaining relatively large acceptance apertures and high flux in the focused radiation spots. In low-emittance storage rings and in free-electron lasers such systems are used with partially or even nearly fully coherent X-ray beams and often target diffraction-limited resolution. Therefore, their accurate simulation and modeling has to be performed within the framework of wave optics. Here the implementation and benchmarking of a wave-optics method for the simulation of grazing-incidence mirrors based on the local stationary-phase approximation or, in other words, the local propagation of the radiation electric field along geometrical rays, is described. The proposed method is CPU-efficient and fully compatible with the numerical methods of Fourier optics. It has been implemented in the Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) computer code and extensively tested against the geometrical ray-tracing code SHADOW. The test simulations have been performed for cases without and with diffraction at mirror apertures, including cases where the grazing-incidence mirrors can be hardly approximated by ideal lenses. Good agreement between the SRW and SHADOW simulation results is observed in the cases without diffraction. The differences between the simulation results obtained by the two codes in diffraction-dominated cases for illumination with fully or partially coherent radiation are analyzed and interpreted. The application of the new method for the simulation of wavefront propagation through a high-resolution X-ray microspectroscopy beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA) is demonstrated.

  15. An analysis of grazing incidence metal mirrors in a laser ICF reactor driver

    SciTech Connect

    Bieri, R.; Guinan, M.

    1991-07-12

    Grazing incidence metal mirrors (GIMMs) are examined to replace dielectric mirrors for the final elements in a laser beam line for an inertial confinement fusion reactor. For a laser driver with a wavelength from 250 to 500 nm in a 10-ms pulse, irradiated mirrors made of Al, Al alloys, or Mg were found to have calculated laser damage limits of 0.3--2.3 J/cm{sup 2} of beam energy and neutron lifetime fluence limits of over 5 {times} 10{sup 20} 14 MeV n/cm{sup 2} when used at grazing incidence and operated at room temperature or at 77 K. A final focusing system including mirrors made of Al alloy 7475 at room temperature or at liquid nitrogen temperatures used with a driver which delivers 5 MJ of beam energy in 32 beams would require 32 mirrors of roughly 10 m{sup 2} each. This chapter includes calculations of damage limits for GIMMs and discusses critical issues relevant to the integrity and lifetime of such mirrors in a reactor environment. The reflectivities of various metals are calculated from measured optical constants at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures for 250- to 500-nm light at both normal and grazing incidence. Then, for the mirrors in a representative system, the thermal absorption and conduction rates of the best candidate metals are used with the maximum allowable cyclic thermal stress to give the maximum allowed surface-temperature rise and surface thermal load. The allowed surface thermal load and surface reflectivity give the maximum beam energy density and the minimum size for each mirror. For mirrors made of aluminum alloy 7475 and initially operated at room temperature, the resulting optical damage threshold and allowable temperature rise give a required mirror size for each final mirror. Critical issues relevant to the integrity and lifetime of such mirrors in a reactor environment are briefly discussed.

  16. Radiation damage in polymer films from grazing-incidence X-ray scattering measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Vaselabadi, Saeed Ahmadi; Shakarisaz, David; Ruchhoeft, Paul; ...

    2016-02-16

    Grazing-incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) is widely used to analyze the crystallinity and nanoscale structure in thin polymer films. However, ionizing radiation will generate free radicals that initiate cross-linking and/or chain scission, and structural damage will impact the ordering kinetics, thermodynamics, and crystallinity in many polymers. We report a simple methodology to screen for beam damage that is based on lithographic principles: films are exposed to patterns of x-ray radiation, and changes in polymer structure are revealed by immersing the film in a solvent that dissolves the shortest chains. The experiments are implemented with high throughput using the standard beam linemore » instrumentation and a typical GIXS configuration. The extent of damage (at a fixed radiation dose) depends on a range of intrinsic material properties and experimental variables, including the polymer chemistry and molecular weight, exposure environment, film thickness, and angle of incidence. The solubility switch for common polymers is detected within 10-60 sec at ambient temperature, and we verified that this first indication of damage corresponds with the onset of network formation in glassy polystyrene and a loss of crystallinity in polyalkylthiophenes. Therefore, grazing-incidence x-ray patterning offers an efficient approach to determine the appropriate data acquisition times for any GIXS experiment.« less

  17. Radiation damage in polymer films from grazing-incidence X-ray scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vaselabadi, Saeed Ahmadi; Shakarisaz, David; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Strzalka, Joseph; Stein, Gila E.

    2016-02-16

    Grazing-incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) is widely used to analyze the crystallinity and nanoscale structure in thin polymer films. However, ionizing radiation will generate free radicals that initiate cross-linking and/or chain scission, and structural damage will impact the ordering kinetics, thermodynamics, and crystallinity in many polymers. We report a simple methodology to screen for beam damage that is based on lithographic principles: films are exposed to patterns of x-ray radiation, and changes in polymer structure are revealed by immersing the film in a solvent that dissolves the shortest chains. The experiments are implemented with high throughput using the standard beam line instrumentation and a typical GIXS configuration. The extent of damage (at a fixed radiation dose) depends on a range of intrinsic material properties and experimental variables, including the polymer chemistry and molecular weight, exposure environment, film thickness, and angle of incidence. The solubility switch for common polymers is detected within 10-60 sec at ambient temperature, and we verified that this first indication of damage corresponds with the onset of network formation in glassy polystyrene and a loss of crystallinity in polyalkylthiophenes. Therefore, grazing-incidence x-ray patterning offers an efficient approach to determine the appropriate data acquisition times for any GIXS experiment.

  18. Grazing-incidence telescope-spectrograph for space solar-imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poletto, L; Tondello, G

    2001-06-01

    The design of a stigmatic grazing-incidence instrument for space applications to solar-imaging spectroscopy is presented. It consists of a double telescope and a spectrograph: Telescope I consists of a single cylindrical mirror with parabolic section, focusing the radiation on the entrance slit of the spectrograph in the spectral dispersion plane; telescope II consists of two cylindrical mirrors with aspherical section in a Wolter configuration, focusing the radiation on the spectrograph focal plane in the direction perpendicular to the spectral dispersion plane. The spectrograph consists of a grazing-incidence spherical variable-line-spaced grating with flat-field properties. Telescope II is crossed with respect to the grating and telescope I; i.e., it is mounted with its tangential planes coincident with the grating equatorial plane. The spectrum is acquired by a detector mounted at near-normal incidence with respect to the direction of the exit beam. The spectral resolution is also preserved for off-axis angles. The effective collecting area of the instrument can be preserved by adoption of a nested configuration for telescope II without degradation of the spectral resolution.

  19. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. ); Ponce, V.H. ); Echenique, P.M. )

    1992-10-19

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He{sup +} ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the {l angle}100{r angle} direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1.

  20. Calibration for cylindrical specimens in grazing-incidence interferometry via integration of difference measurements.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Klaus; Lamprecht, Jürgen; Lindlein, Norbert; Schwider, Johannes

    2006-11-01

    Cylindrical specimens may be tested advantageously by using grazing-incidence interferometry. A multiple positions test in combination with rotational averaging has recently been used to separate the surface deviations of the specimen from the interferometric aberrations. To reduce the measuring time and to check whether the results are reliable, a second procedure is now investigated, which uses the principle of the multiple positions test to determine quantities proportional to the difference quotients of the surface deviations. After numerical integration, the results can be compared with those obtained previously by rotational averaging. The measurement principle is described, and calibration results are presented.

  1. Calibration for cylindrical specimens in grazing-incidence interferometry via integration of difference measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mantel, Klaus; Lamprecht, Juergen; Lindlein, Norbert; Schwider, Johannes

    2006-11-01

    Cylindrical specimens may be tested advantageously by using grazing-incidence interferometry. A multiple positions test in combination with rotational averaging has recently been used to separate the surface deviations of the specimen from the interferometric aberrations.To reduce the measuring time and to check whether the results are reliable, a second procedure is now investigated, which uses the principle of the multiple positions test to determine quantities proportional to the difference quotients of the surface deviations. After numerical integration,the results can be compared with those obtained previously by rotational averaging. The measurement principle is described, and calibration results are presented.

  2. XAFS data acquisition with 2D-detectors: Transmission mode XAFS and grazing incidence EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Gasse, J.-C.; Bögel, R.; Wagner, R.; Frahm, R.

    2016-05-01

    XAFS-experiments in transmission and reflection modes have been performed using a Pilatus 100K pixel detector. Transmission mode XAFS spectra from a Co metal foil and Co3O4 were recorded to evaluate the data quality offered by this 2D-detector. Furthermore, the pixel detector was also used to measure reflection mode grazing incidence EXAFS data. Using different regions of interest in the collected scattering patterns, we will show that the diffuse scattering can be separated for the different contributing surfaces and interfaces, allowing simultaneous investigations of surfaces and buried interfaces within multi-layered samples.

  3. Simulations of a grazing-incidence pumped x-ray laser at 14.7 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, F.; Zhang, J.; Dong, Q. L.; Lu, X.; Li, Y. J.

    2006-02-15

    Numerical simulations of the grazing-incidence pumped Ni-like Pd x-ray laser at 14.7 nm (4d{yields}4p, J=0{yields}1) is performed using a modified one-dimensional hydrodynamic code MEDUSA. The effective absorption of the main laser pulse in the gain region is greatly increased due to the lengthened propagation path. Results predict that a saturated output of the x-ray laser can be achieved with only subjoules driver energy on a 4-mm-long Pd target.

  4. Mounting for Fabrication, Metrology, and Assembly of Full Shell Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Jacqueline M.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ronald F.

    2014-01-01

    Future x-ray telescopes will likely require lightweight mirrors to attain the large collecting areas needed to accomplish the science objectives. Understanding and demonstrating processes now is critical to achieving sub-arcsecond performance in the future. Consequently, designs not only of the mirrors but of fixtures for supporting them during fabrication, metrology, handling, assembly, and testing must be adequately modeled and verified. To this end, MSFC is using finite-element modeling to study the effects of mounting on full-shell grazing-incidence mirrors, during all processes leading to flight mirror assemblies. Here we report initial results of this study.

  5. Grazing incidence diffraction of keV helium atoms on a Ag(110) surface.

    PubMed

    Bundaleski, N; Khemliche, H; Soulisse, P; Roncin, P

    2008-10-24

    Diffraction of fast atoms at grazing incidence has been recently demonstrated on the surface of alkali halides and wide band gap semiconductors, opening applications for the online monitoring of surface processes such as growth of ultrathin layers. This Letter reports energy resolved diffraction of helium on Ag(110) metal surface showing that a band gap is not mandatory to restrict the decoherence due to electron-hole pair excitations by the keV projectile. Measurement of the energy loss, which is in the eV range, sheds light on the scattering process.

  6. A grazing incidence monochromator for the photon energy range 5 - 250 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Follath, R.; Schmidt, J.S.

    2004-05-12

    A new grazing incidence beamline at the U125/1-undulator at BESSY augments the beamtime capacity of high flux beamlines in the low energy range. The new beamline will deliver 1012 - 1013 photons/sec/0.1A with a resolving power of more than 10.000 in the energy range from 5 - 250 eV. The design minimizes depolarization effects on circularly polarized light available after a future upgrade of the undulator to an elliptical one. The start of user operation with linearly polarized light is envisaged for the end of 2004.

  7. AXAF optical technology analysis. [effects of alignment figure errors on the performance of grazing incidence telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1979-01-01

    A grazing incidence telescope with six nested subsystems is investigated through the effects of misalignment and surface deformations on it's image quality. The axial rms-spot size serves as measure for the image quality. The surface deformations are simulated by ellipsoidal and sinusoidal deviation elements. Each type of defect is analyzed in the single two-element system. The full nested system is then analyzed in the presence of all possible defects on all twelve elements, whereby the magnitude of the defects is randomized within a given upper limit.

  8. Electroformed grazing incidence X-ray mirrors for a mirror array telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.; Matsui, Yutaka; Bedford, D. K.; Simnett, G. M.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    1987-01-01

    Grazing incidence Wolter type I mirrors for higher-energy X-rays have been replicated from two superpolished mandrels by electroforming. Single mirrors and a nested pair were tested with 1.5- and 6.4-keV X-rays, and their subminute of arc resolution and reflectivity close to the theoretical values are confirmed. The design of the mandrels, the mirror mounting scheme, and results of the X-ray test are presented. The microroughnesses of the mirrors measured using an optical profilometer were compared with the X-ray test results.

  9. Electrochemically adsorbed Pb on Ag (111) studied with grazing- incidence x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Ross, P.N.; Melroy, O.R.; Toney, M.F.; Borges, G.L.; Samant, M.G.

    1989-04-01

    Grazing-incidence x-ray scattering studies of the evolution of electrochemically deposited layers of lead on silver (111) as a function of applied electrochemical potential are presented. Measurements were made with the adsorbed layers in contact with solution in a specially designed sample cell. The observed lead structures are a function of the applied potential and range from an incommensurate monolayer, resulting from underpotential deposition, to randomly oriented polycrystalline bulk lead, resulting from lower deposition potentials. These early experiments demonstrate the ability of in situ x-ray diffraction measurements to determine structures associated with electrochemical deposition. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  11. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  12. Small-Angle Scattering on Magnetoferritin Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balejčíková Petrenko, L., VI; Avdeev, MV; Garamus, VM; Almásy, L.; Kopčanský, P.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetoferritin is a synthetically prepared magnetic bio-complex, consisting of apoferritin shell and iron-based nanoparticles. Superparamagnetic behaviour, nanoscale size (about 12 nm) and biological origin allow to use magnetoferritin in various applications. In this report, we present a general overview about basic physicochemical properties of magnetoferritin, as determined by small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering experiments and some interesting references on their potential bio-applications.

  13. Image defects from surface and alignment errors in grazing incidence telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    1989-01-01

    The rigid body motions and low frequency surface errors of grazing incidence Wolter telescopes are studied. The analysis is based on surface error descriptors proposed by Paul Glenn. In his analysis, the alignment and surface errors are expressed in terms of Legendre-Fourier polynomials. Individual terms in the expression correspond to rigid body motions (decenter and tilt) and low spatial frequency surface errors of mirrors. With the help of the Legendre-Fourier polynomials and the geometry of grazing incidence telescopes, exact and approximated first order equations are derived in this paper for the components of the ray intercepts at the image plane. These equations are then used to calculate the sensitivities of Wolter type I and II telescopes for the rigid body motions and surface deformations. The rms spot diameters calculated from this theory and OSAC ray tracing code agree very well. This theory also provides a tool to predict how rigid body motions and surface errors of the mirrors compensate each other.

  14. Diffuse scattering from interface roughness in grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, S. A.; Kondrashkina, E. A.; Schmidbauer, M.; Köhler, R.; Pfeiffer, J.-U.; Jach, T.; Souvorov, A. Yu.

    1996-09-01

    A theory of x-ray diffuse scattering from interface roughness in grazing-incidence diffraction (GID) is presented. The theory assumes dynamical diffraction of x rays from perfect multilayers with the diffuse scattering from roughness calculated in the distorted-wave Born approximation. This permits the calculation of scattering due to roughness at all points on the diffraction curves, including the vicinity of the Bragg peaks. It is shown that the measurements of diffuse scattering in GID can provide information on atomic ordering at crystal interfaces which is not accessible by usual x-ray specular reflection and nonspecular x-ray scattering. The theory is found to be in good agreement to the two GID experiments carried out with an etched Ge surface and an AlAs/GaAs superlattice at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, respectively. In the case of the etched Ge surface, an anti-Yoneda dip in the diffuse scattering pattern at the Bragg peak and two symmetrical shoulders on the Bragg curve wings have been found and explained. In the case of the AlAs/GaAs superlattice, the diffuse scattering has been separated from GID by means of high-resolution measurements. A comparison between diffuse scattering in GID and diffuse scattering in grazing incidence far from the diffraction conditions has shown that the atomic ordering was preserved in the interface roughness, while it was partially destroyed in the surface roughness.

  15. Grazing-incidence spectrometer for soft X-ray solar imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Fabio; Coraggia, Stefano; Miotti, Paolo; Poletto, Luca

    2013-07-29

    The design and realization of a stigmatic grazing-incidence instrument for space applications to solar imaging spectroscopy is presented. We propose an optical layout in which imaging and spectral capabilities are decoupled by the use of crossed cylindrical mirrors. The design consists of a double telescope and a spectrograph: telescope I consists of a single cylindrical mirror with parabolic section, focusing the radiation on the entrance slit of the spectrograph in the spectral dispersion plane; telescope II consists of two cylindrical mirrors with aspherical section in Wolter configuration focusing the radiation on the spectrograph focal plane in the direction perpendicular to the spectral dispersion plane; the spectrograph consists of a grazing-incidence spherical variable-line-spaced grating with flat-field properties. Telescope II is crossed with respect to the grating and telescope I, i.e., is mounted with its tangential planes coincident with the grating equatorial plane, to decouple spectral and spatial focusing properties. The spectral resolution is preserved also for off-axis angles. The instrument that has been realized operates in the 4-26 nm spectral range and has a field of view of 0.5 deg to image the full Sun disk.

  16. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  17. Image defects from surface and alignment errors in grazing incidence telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    1989-01-01

    The rigid body motions and low frequency surface errors of grazing incidence Wolter telescopes are studied. The analysis is based on surface error descriptors proposed by Paul Glenn. In his analysis, the alignment and surface errors are expressed in terms of Legendre-Fourier polynomials. Individual terms in the expression correspond to rigid body motions (decenter and tilt) and low spatial frequency surface errors of mirrors. With the help of the Legendre-Fourier polynomials and the geometry of grazing incidence telescopes, exact and approximated first order equations are derived in this paper for the components of the ray intercepts at the image plane. These equations are then used to calculate the sensitivities of Wolter type I and II telescopes for the rigid body motions and surface deformations. The rms spot diameters calculated from this theory and OSAC ray tracing code agree very well. This theory also provides a tool to predict how rigid body motions and surface errors of the mirrors compensate each other.

  18. Fragmentation of polyatomic molecules by grazing incidence surface-induced dissociation (GI-SID).

    PubMed

    Wieghaus, A; Schmidt, L; Popova, A M; Komarov, V V; Jungclas, H

    1999-11-01

    The grazing incidence surface-induced dissociation (GI-SID) of n-hexadecylpyridinium and verapamil ions generated by fission fragment desorption was studied. These molecules show the effect of enhanced surface-induced dissociation at grazing incidence as it was observed in former experiments with metal organic ions. A liquid film of perfluorinated polyether is used as collision surface. Small hydrocarbon fragment ions predominate in the GI-SID spectra. Pyridine ions appear as specific fragment ions in the GI-SID spectrum of n-hexadecylpyridinium. The GI-SID conversion efficiency varies in the range 40-70%. The experimental results are discussed within the scope of a quantum mechanical model which is based on the accumulation of internal molecular energy by resonant excitation of collective vibrational states and energy transfer to a trap bond due to dipole-dipole interactions. In this context the GI-SID spectra of n-hexadecylpyridinium and verapamil ions are compared with the fragmentation occurring in regular (252)Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry.

  19. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  20. Performance analysis of grazing incidence imaging systems. [X ray telescope aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, C. E.; Korsch, D.

    1977-01-01

    An exact expression relating the coordinates of a point on the incident ray, a point of reflection from an arbitrary surface, and a point on the reflected ray is derived. The exact relation is then specialized for the case of grazing incidence, and first order and third order systematic analyses are carried out for a single reflective surface and then for a combination of two surfaces. The third order treatment yields a complete set of primary aberrations for single element and two element systems. The importance of a judicious choice for a coordinate system in showing field curvature to clearly be the predominant aberration for a two element system is discussed. The validity of the theory is verified through comparisons with the exact ray trace results for the case of the telescope.

  1. Study of the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering of strongly disturbed fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchin, B. S.; Chukhovsky, F. N.; Pavlyuk, M. D.; Opolchentsev, A. M.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2017-03-01

    The applicability of different approaches to the description of hard X-ray scattering from rough surfaces is generally limited by a maximum surface roughness height of no more than 1 nm. Meanwhile, this value is several times larger for the surfaces of different materials subjected to treatment, especially in the initial treatment stages. To control the roughness parameters in all stages of surface treatment, a new approach has been developed, which is based on a series expansion of wavefield over the plane eigenstate-function waves describing the small-angle scattering of incident X-rays in terms of plane q-waves propagating through the interface between two media with a random function of relief heights. To determine the amplitudes of reflected and transmitted plane q-waves, a system of two linked integral equations was derived. The solutions to these equations correspond (in zero order) to the well-known Fresnel expressions for a smooth plane interface. Based on these solutions, a statistical fractal model of an isotropic rough interface is built in terms of root-mean-square roughness σ, two-point correlation length l, and fractal surface index h. The model is used to interpret X-ray scattering data for polished surfaces of single-crystal cadmium telluride samples.

  2. Thermal transport in thin films measured by time-resolved, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Walko, D. A.; Sheu, Y.-M.; Trigo, M.; Reis, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    We use depth- and time-resolved x-ray diffraction to study thermal transport across single crystal Bi films grown on sapphire in order to determine the thermal conductivity of the film and the Kapitza conductance of the interface. Ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser pulses were used to heat the films; x-ray diffraction then measured the film's lattice expansion. Use of grazing incidence diffraction geometry provided depth sensitivity, as the x-ray angle of incidence was varied near the critical angle. The shift of the film's Bragg peak position with time was used to determine the film temperature averaged over an x-ray penetration depth that could be selected by choice of the angle of incidence. For films that were thick compared to the laser penetration depth, we observed a large temperature gradient at early times. In this case, measurements with the incident angle near or well above the critical angle were more sensitive to the film conductivity or Kapitza conductance, respectively. For thinner films, however, cooling was dominated by the Kapitza conductance at all accessible time scales.

  3. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 54 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs.

  5. Compact diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser in grazing-incidence configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez Gutierrez, J. C.; Damzen, M. J.; Pinto-Robledo, V. J.; Kir'yanov, A. V.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.

    The analysis of compact CW diode-side-pumped grazing-incidence-geometry Nd:YVO4 laser designs is presented. An output power of 5 W (λ=1064 nm) was produced at 17 W of diode pump (conversion efficiency of 30%) in single transverse TEM00 mode operation at high laser beam quality (Mx2 1.05 and My2 1.01). The resonator geometry was analyzed by applying generalized 4×4 matrix modeling of the spatial mode size, including the impact on the laser operation of cavity astigmatism and a thermal lens in the laser slab. The simplicity and compactness of the laser cavities allow their use for technological applications.

  6. Sputtering of SiC with low energy He and Ar ions under grazing incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosiba, R.; Ecke, G.; Ambacher, O.; Menyhard, M.

    2003-10-01

    The effect of low energy sputtering under grazing incidence upon the surface composition of SiC was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy. The energy of the sputtering projectiles (He, Ar) varied from 200 to 1500 eV. Peak shifts to the higher energies with increasing argon ion energy were observed for all silicon and carbon Auger transitions. These shifts were explained by enhanced damage of the surface region within the sampling depth of the Auger electrons. The insensitivity of the Auger peak position to the energy of helium ions indicates that the damage state in the surface region does not change with the increasing energy of helium ions. An increase of the carbon concentration with the decrease of the argon energy was observed. The experiments were accompanied by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations by the TRIDYN code.

  7. Investigation of a semiconductor superlattice by use of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, U.; Seifert, W.; Fornell, J.-O.; Rhan, H.; Metzger, H.; Rugel, S.; Peisl, J.

    1992-01-01

    A GaInAs/InP superlattice with 10 periods grown by a MOCVD technique on [001] InP was measured by X-ray diffraction under grazing incidence. The details of the GID technique are explained and the results on the superlattice real structure are interpreted in terms of a kinematical scattering approach. Because the depth probed by the X-rays is extremely reduced to a near-surface region both the thickness of the supercell (44 ± 1 monolayers) and of the (GaIn)As quantum wells (2 ± 1 monolayers) can be determined with monolayer accuracy. By successively increasing the penetration depth of the X-rays, the vertical density profile is probed in different regions below the sample surface. The measurements indicate that the thickness of the solid solution layer varies by about 1-2 monolayers laterally and in depth. The composition of the layers is different from that expected from the growth conditions.

  8. Differential Deposition for Surface Figure Corrections in Grazing Incidence X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Atkins, Carolyn; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Broadway, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Differential deposition corrects the low- and mid- spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure of Wolter-type grazing incidence X-ray optics. Figure deviations is one of the major contributors to the achievable angular resolution. Minimizing figure errors can significantly improve the imaging quality of X-ray optics. Material of varying thickness is selectively deposited, using DC magnetron sputtering, along the length of optic to minimize figure deviations. Custom vacuum chambers are built that can incorporate full-shell and segmented Xray optics. Metrology data of preliminary corrections on a single meridian of full-shell x-ray optics show an improvement of mid-spatial frequencies from 6.7 to 1.8 arc secs HPD. Efforts are in progress to correct a full-shell and segmented optics and to verify angular-resolution improvement with X-ray testing.

  9. Differential Deposition Technique for Figure Corrections in Grazing Incidence X-ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    A differential deposition technique is being developed to correct the low- and mid-spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure profile of Wolter type grazing incidence X-ray optics. These deviations arise due to various factors in the fabrication process and they degrade the performance of the optics by limiting the achievable angular resolution. In the differential deposition technique, material of varying thickness is selectively deposited along the length of the optic to minimize these deviations, thereby improving the overall figure. High resolution focusing optics being developed at MSFC for small animal radionuclide imaging are being coated to test the differential deposition technique. The required spatial resolution for these optics is 100 m. This base resolution is achievable with the regular electroform-nickel-replication fabrication technique used at MSFC. However, by improving the figure quality of the optics through differential deposition, we aim at significantly improving the resolution beyond this value.

  10. Development of differential deposition technique for figure corrections in grazing incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2009-08-01

    A differential deposition technique is being developed to correct the low- and mid-spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure profile of Wolter-type grazing-incidence X-ray optics. These deviations arise due to various factors in the fabrication process and they degrade the performance of optics by limiting the achievable angular resolution. In the differential deposition technique, material is selectively deposited in varying thickness along the length of the optic to minimize these deviations, thereby improving the overall figure. The process is being tested on focusing X-ray optics being developed at MSFC for small-animal radionuclide imaging. The required spatial resolution for these optics is 100 μm (30 arc secs), which can be achieved with the electroformnickel- replication fabrication technique regularly employed at MSFC. However, by improving the figure quality of the optics through differential deposition, we aim to significantly improve the resolution beyond this value.

  11. Fabrication of a grazing incidence telescope by grinding and polishing techniques on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Cash, Webster; Green, James

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the fabrication processes, by grinding and polishing, used in making the mirrors for a f/2.8 Wolter type-I grazing incidence telescope at Boulder (Colorado), together with testing procedure used to determine the quality of the images. All grinding and polishing is done on specially designed machine that consists of a horizontal spindle to hold and rotate the mirror and a stroke arm machine to push the various tools back and forth along the mirrors length. The progress is checked by means of the ronchi test during all grinding and polishing stages. Current measurements of the telescope's image quality give a FWHM measurement of 44 arcsec, with the goal set at 5-10 arcsec quality.

  12. Aberrations of varied line-space grazing incidence gratings in converging light beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettrick, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses of the imaging properties of several designs for varied-line space gratings in converging beams of light in grazing-incidence spectrometers are presented. An explicit model is defined for the case of a plane-reflection grating intercepting light that converges and is reflected to a stigmatic point associated with the zero-order image of the grating. Smooth spatial variation of the grating constant then permits aberration correction. The aberrations are expressed as polynomials in the grating lens coordinates using power series expansions. Application of the model is illustrated in terms of aberrations experienced with the short wavelength spectrometer on the EUVE satellite. Attention is given to straight and parallel in-plane grooves, curved groove in-plane designs and off-plane grooves. Aberrations due to dispersions and misalignment are also considered.

  13. Grazing Incidence X-ray diffraction on Langmuir films: toward atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Pignat, J; Daillant, J; Leiserowitz, L; Perrot, F

    2006-11-09

    We have analyzed grazing incidence diffration (GIXD) data from condensed phases of Langmuir films of long-chain fatty acids at the air-water interface by using a new method consisting of a careful extraction of the structure factors followed by fitting of molecular parameters. We show that, contrary to the general belief, the information contained in GIXD spectra is enough to obtain near-atomic structural information. In particular, we directly determine for the first time the orientation of the chain backbone planes and of the carboxylic headgroups and we evaluate chain conformation defects. This new method allowed us to evidence a new phase of symmetry p2gm at high pressure, corresponding to a minimum in lattice energy, but never observed.

  14. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-10-21

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beam lines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the NSLS) and the effects of these figure errors on a class of soft x-ray beam lines are presented. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-01-01

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the National Synchrotron Light Source) and the effects of these figure errors on two classes of soft x-ray beamlines are presented.

  16. Experimental test of Monte Carlo proton transport at grazing incidence in GEANT4, FLUKA and MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Tilly, Nina; Ahnesjö, Anders; Traneus, Erik

    2008-02-01

    The ability of the Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport codes GEANT4.8.1 and GEANT4.8.2, FLUKA2006 and MCNPX2.4.0 to model proton transport at grazing incidence onto tungsten blocks has been tested and compared to experimental measurements. The test geometry consisted of a narrow proton beam of two energies, 98 MeV and 180 MeV, impinging on a thick tungsten alloy block at grazing incidence. The distribution of forward out-scatter from the tungsten alloy block was measured with a fluorescent screen viewed with a CCD camera via a mirror. In the MC simulations, the experimental setup was modelled and the dose deposited to the fluorescent screen material was scored. Simulations and measurements were made for four different incidence angles (3.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10°). Several different sets of calculations were performed, studying the impact of different user-defined settings in the different MC packages. The study of different parameters settings in the GEANT4.8.1 simulation showed a strong dependence of the calculated out-scatter probability on the maximum allowed step length. For the largest incidence angle an increase of 60% in the out-scatter probability was found when restricting the maximum allowed step length to 0.05 cm. We also observed that the stepping algorithm of GEANT4.8.1 and 4.8.2 introduces a small non-physical directional and positional asymmetry at the exit boundary of the tungsten alloy block. The shape of the energy spectrum of protons being out-scattered agreed between the codes. The dose-weighted forward out-scatter probability, i.e. the ratio between the total signal from the unscattered beam and the out-scattered beam, showed a qualitative agreement of simulations compared to measurements. Quantitatively, the deviation of the simulations reached as high as 37%, while the experimental uncertainty was 14%. The mean emission angle of the simulations was within 16% of the measurement for all incidence angles with a measurement uncertainty of 8%.

  17. Adaptive grazing incidence optics for the next generation of x-ray observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, C.; Pearson, D.; Plinta, A.; Metro, B.; Lintz, E.; Shropshire, D.; Danner, R.

    2010-09-01

    Advances in X-ray astronomy require high spatial resolution and large collecting area. Unfortunately, X-ray telescopes with grazing incidence mirrors require hundreds of concentric mirror pairs to obtain the necessary collecting area, and these mirrors must be thin shells packed tightly together... They must also be light enough to be placed in orbit with existing launch vehicles, and able to be fabricated by the thousands for an affordable cost. The current state of the art in X-ray observatories is represented by NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory with 0.5 arc-second resolution, but only 400 cm2 of collecting area, and by ESA's XMM-Newton observatory with 4,300 cm2 of collecting area but only 15 arc-second resolution. The joint NASA/ESA/JAXA International X-ray Observatory (IXO), with {15,000 cm2 of collecting area and 5 arc-second resolution which is currently in the early study phase, is pushing the limits of passive mirror technology. The Generation-X mission is one of the Advanced Strategic Mission Concepts that NASA is considering for development in the post-2020 period. As currently conceived, Gen-X would be a follow-on to IXO with a collecting area >= 50 m2, a 60-m focal length and 0.1 arc-second spatial resolution. Gen-X would be launched in {2030 with a heavy lift Launch Vehicle to an L2 orbit. Active figure control will be necessary to meet the challenging requirements of the Gen-X optics. In this paper we present our adaptive grazing incidence mirror design and the results from laboratory tests of a prototype mirror.

  18. The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champey, P. R.; Winebarger, A. R.; Kobayashi, K.; Savage, S. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Cheimets, P.; Hertz, E.; Golub, L.; Ramsey, B.; McCracken, J.; Heilmann, R.; Schattenburg, M.; Bruccoleri, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) is a NASA soundingrocket instrument designed to observe soft X-ray emissions at 0.5 - 2.0 keV energies in thesolar atmosphere. The primary science goal is to differentiate steady, low-frequency heatingevents from sporadic, high-frequency heating events in the active region core For the first time, high-temperature, low-emission plasma will be observed directly with 5 arcsec spatialand 22 mÅ spectral resolution. The novel optical design consists of a Wolter I telescope anda 3-optic grazing-incidence spectrograph. The X-ray spectrograph utilizes a finite conjugatemirror pair and a planar, nanoprinted-silicon varied line space grating, which is being devel-oped by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The telescope and spectrographmirrors will be nickel replicated and coated with iridium. Mandrel fabrication and nickelreplication will be done at MSFC as part of its replicated X-ray optics program. Mounting,alignment, and integration of the ight optics will be performed at the Harvard-SmithsonianCenter for Astrophysics (SAO). The MaGIXS science camera is being developed at MSFCand is based on CLASP heritage, which obtained read noise performance of 5.5 e?- RMS. Thecamera will include a e2v Technologies 2kx2k frame transfer CCD with 4-channel readout(500 kpixel/s/channel). We will present an overview of the MaGIXS optical system andfabrication of the telescope and spectrograph mirrors.

  19. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements

  20. Grazing incidence modeling of a metamaterial-inspired dual-resonance acoustic liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-03-01

    To reduce the noise emitted by commercial aircraft turbofan engines, the inlet and aft nacelle ducts are lined with acoustic absorbing structures called acoustic liners. Traditionally, these structures consist of a perforated facesheet bonded on top of a honeycomb core. These traditional perforate over honeycomb core (POHC) liners create an absorption spectra where the maximum absorption occurs at a frequency that is dictated by the depth of the honeycomb core; which acts as a quarter-wave resonator. Recent advances in turbofan engine design have increased the need for thin acoustic liners that are effective at low frequencies. One design that has been developed uses an acoustic metamaterial architecture to improve the low frequency absorption. Specifically, the liner consists of an array of Helmholtz resonators separated by quarter-wave volumes to create a dual-resonance acoustic liner. While previous work investigated the acoustic behavior under normal incidence, this paper outlines the modeling and predicted transmission loss and absorption of a dual-resonance acoustic metamaterial when subjected to grazing incidence sound.

  1. Highly charged ions impinging on a stepped metal surface under grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, A.; Niemann, D.; Stolterfoht, N.; Heiland, W.

    2003-05-01

    We report on energy loss measurements and charge state distributions for 60 keV N{sup 6+} and 75 keV N{sup 5+} ions scattered off a Pt(110)(1x2) single crystal surface. In particular, the influence of surface steps on the energy loss and the outgoing charge states is discussed. The scattering angle and the angle of incidence are varied. We use grazing incidence conditions, i.e., the momentum perpendicular to the surface is low enough to prevent penetration through the first atomic layer. Image charge effects are observed leading to an additional projectile acceleration towards the surface. Outgoing charge states are detected from 1+ up to 3+. Axial channeling conditions are defined by scattering along the azimuthal [001] direction, i.e., the projectiles are guided along the [001]-atomic rows. The energy loss for axial channeling is found to be somewhat larger and the energy distribution to be broadened in comparison with the spectra for planar channeling conditions. The broadening is attributed to the interaction of the projectiles with the side wall potentials of the surface channels. We find a strong increase in the energy loss with increasing scattering angle, which exceeds the calculated contribution of the elastic energy transfer by orders of magnitudes. These increased energy losses are attributed to the interaction of the ions with the surface steps.

  2. X-ray grazing incidence study of inhomogeneous strain relaxation in Si/SiGe wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, A.; Zhuang, Y.; Holý, V.; Stangl, J.; Zerlauth, S.; Schäffler, F.; Bauer, G.; Darowski, N.; Pietsch, U.

    2003-01-01

    The elastic strain relaxation in a series of dry-etched periodic multilayer Si/SiGe wire samples with different etching depths was investigated systematically by means of grazing incidence diffraction (GID). The samples were patterned by holographic lithography and reactive ion etching from a Si/SiGe superlattice grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were employed to obtain information on the shape of the wires. The inhomogeneous strain distribution in the etched wires and in the non-etched part of the multilayers was derived by means of finite element calculations which were used as an input for simulations of the scattered X-ray intensities in depth dependent GID. The theoretical calculations for the scattered intensities are based on distorted-wave Born approximation. The unperturbed scattering potential was chosen with a reduced optical density corresponding to the ratio of wire width and wire period, in order to reflect the main interaction between the incident X-rays and the patterned samples. The calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data demonstrating the variation of strain relaxation with depth.

  3. Dynamic grazing incidence fast atom diffraction during molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, P. Eddrief, M.; Etgens, V. H.; Khemliche, H. Debiossac, M.; Mulier, M.; Lalmi, B.; Roncin, P.; Momeni, A.

    2014-07-14

    A Grazing Incidence Fast Atom Diffraction (GIFAD) system has been mounted on a commercial molecular beam epitaxy chamber and used to monitor GaAs growth in real-time. In contrast to the conventionally used Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction, all the GIFAD diffraction orders oscillate in phase, with the change in intensity related to diffuse scattering at step edges. We show that the scattered intensity integrated over the Laue circle is a robust method to monitor the periodic change in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth, with oscillation phase and amplitude independent of incidence angle and crystal orientation. When there is a change in surface reconstruction at the start of growth, GIFAD intensity oscillations show that there is a corresponding delay in the onset of layer-by-layer growth. In addition, changes in the relative intensity of different diffraction orders have been observed during growth showing that GIFAD has the potential to provide insight into the preferential adatom attachment sites on the surface reconstruction during growth.

  4. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. ); Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M. )

    1994-01-15

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He[sup +] ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the [l angle]100[r angle] direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., [approx]0.9 for 53 MeV B[sup 4+] and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces.

  5. Development and performance of grazing and normal incidence collectors for the HVM DPP and LPP sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, G.; Bragheri, A.; Cassol, G. L.; Johnson, B.; Rossi, M.; Zocchi, F. E.

    2010-04-01

    Media Lario Technologies (MLT), leveraging off its unique in-field collector experience, has designed the Grazing Incidence Collector (GIC) for the Sn-fueled Discharge Produced Plasma (DPP) source developed by Philips Extreme UV (PEUV) and XTREME technologies (XT) for High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) deployment. The performance of the HVM GIC described in this work shows a point-source collection efficiency of 24%, and is enabled by an integrated thermal control system designed to ensure optical stability for an absorbed thermal load of 6 kW. The GIC reflective layer has been custom tailored to match the debris mitigation strategy developed and characterized by PEUV and XT, supporting at least a 1-year lifetime proposition of the source-collector module. Leveraging off the experience gained in GIC, MLT is developing the processes to manufacture the Normal Incidence Collector (NIC) for Laser Produced Plasma (LPP) sources. Using its proprietary disruptive replication technology by electroforming, MLT is developing thermal management designs for NIC enabling stable operation at room temperature. This work reports on the performance of (symbol) 150 mm thermally managed NIC demonstrators. The mirror substrates have been integrated with new proprietary thermal management designs that are well suited to the electroformed mirrors. We also report on the reflectivity of the Mo/Si multilayer coated mirror, achieving maximum reflectivity values of 62% and a center wavelength (FWHM) of 13.52 nm, which demonstrates acceptable performance in an LPP NIC application.

  6. Small Angle Elastic Scattering of Protons off of Spinless Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Alan Graham

    1988-12-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 800 MeV protons incident on ^ {12}C, ^{40} Ca, and ^{208}Pb in the momentum transfer range 20 MeV/c < q < 130 MeV/c have been measured. The data was taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Special delay -line drift chambers with dead regions for the beam to pass through them were used to obtain the data. Through the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear contributions to the differential cross section in the small angle region, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude alpha_{rm n}(0) = Ref_{rm n}(0)/Imf_{rm n }(0) is extracted. The importance of knowing this quantity at lower energies in order to study the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering theories is discussed.

  7. X-ray fluorescence induced by standing waves in the grazing-incidence and grazing-exit modes: study of the Mg-Co-Zr system.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yuchun; Yuan, Yanyan; Le Guen, Karine; André, Jean Michel; Zhu, Jingtao; Wang, Zhanshan; Bridou, Françoise; Giglia, Angelo; Jonnard, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The characterization of Mg-Co-Zr tri-layer stacks using X-ray fluorescence induced by X-ray standing waves, in both the grazing-incidence (GI) and the grazing-exit (GE) modes, is presented. The introduction of a slit in the direction of the detector improves the angular resolution by a factor of two and significantly improves the sensitivity of the technique for the chemical characterization of the buried interfaces. By observing the intensity variations of the Mg Kα and Co Lα characteristic emissions as a function of the incident (GI mode) or detection (GE mode) angle, it is shown that the interfaces of the Si/[Mg/Co/Zr] × 30 multilayer are abrupt, whereas in the Si/[Mg/Zr/Co] × 30 multilayer a strong intermixing occurs at the Co-on-Zr interfaces. An explanation of this opposite behavior of the Co-on-Zr and Zr-on-Co interfaces is given by the calculation of the mixing enthalpies of the Co-Mg, Co-Zr and Mg-Zr systems, which shows that the Co-Zr system presents a negative value and the other two systems present positive values. Together with the difference of the surface free energies of Zr and Co, this leads to the Mg/Zr/Co system being considered as a Mg/CoxZry bi-layer stack, with x/y estimated around 3.5.

  8. New figuring model based on surface slope profile for grazing-incidence reflective optics

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Lin; Huang, Lei; Bouet, Nathalie; ...

    2016-08-09

    Surface slope profile is widely used in the metrology of grazing-incidence reflective optics instead of surface height profile. Nevertheless, the theoretical and experimental model currently used in deterministic optical figuring processes is based on surface height, not on surface slope. This means that the raw slope profile data from metrology need to be converted to height profile to perform the current height-based figuring processes. The inevitable measurement noise in the raw slope data will introduce significant cumulative error in the resultant height profiles. As a consequence, this conversion will degrade the determinism of the figuring processes, and will have anmore » impact on the ultimate surface figuring results. To overcome this problem, an innovative figuring model is proposed, which directly uses the raw slope profile data instead of the usual height data as input for the deterministic process. In this article, first the influence of the measurement noise on the resultant height profile is analyzed, and then a new model is presented; finally a demonstration experiment is carried out using a one-dimensional ion beam figuring process to demonstrate the validity of our approach.« less

  9. New figuring model based on surface slope profile for grazing-incidence reflective optics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lin; Huang, Lei; Bouet, Nathalie; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Vescovi, Matthew; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi; Idir, Mourad

    2016-08-09

    Surface slope profile is widely used in the metrology of grazing-incidence reflective optics instead of surface height profile. Nevertheless, the theoretical and experimental model currently used in deterministic optical figuring processes is based on surface height, not on surface slope. This means that the raw slope profile data from metrology need to be converted to height profile to perform the current height-based figuring processes. The inevitable measurement noise in the raw slope data will introduce significant cumulative error in the resultant height profiles. As a consequence, this conversion will degrade the determinism of the figuring processes, and will have an impact on the ultimate surface figuring results. To overcome this problem, an innovative figuring model is proposed, which directly uses the raw slope profile data instead of the usual height data as input for the deterministic process. In this article, first the influence of the measurement noise on the resultant height profile is analyzed, and then a new model is presented; finally a demonstration experiment is carried out using a one-dimensional ion beam figuring process to demonstrate the validity of our approach.

  10. Differential deposition technique for figure corrections in grazing-incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Gregory, Don A.

    2011-10-01

    A differential deposition technique was investigated as a way to minimize axial figure errors in full-shell, grazing-incidence, reflective x-ray optics. These types of optics use a combination of off-axis conic segments--hyperbolic, parabolic, and/or elliptical, to reflect and image x-rays. Several such mirrors or ``shells'' of decreasing diameter are typically concentrically nested to form a single focusing unit. Individual mirrors are currently produced at Marshall Space Flight Center using an electroforming technique, in which the shells are replicated off figured and superpolished mandrels. Several factors in this fabrication process lead to low- and mid-spatial frequency deviations in the surface profile of the shell that degrade the imaging quality of the optics. A differential deposition technique, discussed in this paper, seeks to improve the achievable resolution of the optics by correcting the surface profile deviations of the shells after fabrication. As a proof of concept, the technique was implemented on small-animal radionuclide-imaging x-ray optics being considered for medical applications. This paper discusses the deposition technique, its implementation, and the experimental results obtained to date.

  11. New figuring model based on surface slope profile for grazing-incidence reflective optics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lin; Huang, Lei; Bouet, Nathalie; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Vescovi, Matthew; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi; Idir, Mourad

    2016-08-09

    Surface slope profile is widely used in the metrology of grazing-incidence reflective optics instead of surface height profile. Nevertheless, the theoretical and experimental model currently used in deterministic optical figuring processes is based on surface height, not on surface slope. This means that the raw slope profile data from metrology need to be converted to height profile to perform the current height-based figuring processes. The inevitable measurement noise in the raw slope data will introduce significant cumulative error in the resultant height profiles. As a consequence, this conversion will degrade the determinism of the figuring processes, and will have an impact on the ultimate surface figuring results. To overcome this problem, an innovative figuring model is proposed, which directly uses the raw slope profile data instead of the usual height data as input for the deterministic process. In this article, first the influence of the measurement noise on the resultant height profile is analyzed, and then a new model is presented; finally a demonstration experiment is carried out using a one-dimensional ion beam figuring process to demonstrate the validity of our approach.

  12. One-dimensional ion-beam figuring for grazing-incidence reflective optics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Idir, Mourad; Bouet, Nathalie; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Huang, Lei; Vescovi, Matthew; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional ion-beam figuring (1D-IBF) can improve grazing-incidence reflective optics, such as Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. 1D-IBF requires only one motion degree of freedom, which reduces equipment complexity, resulting in compact and low-cost IBF instrumentation. Furthermore, 1D-IBF is easy to integrate into a single vacuum system with other fabrication processes, such as a thin-film deposition. The NSLS-II Optical Metrology and Fabrication Group has recently integrated the 1D-IBF function into an existing thin-film deposition system by adding an RF ion source to the system. Using a rectangular grid, a 1D removal function needed to perform 1D-IBF has been produced. In this paper, demonstration experiments of the 1D-IBF process are presented on one spherical and two plane samples. The final residual errors on both plane samples are less than 1 nm r.m.s. The surface error on the spherical sample has been successfully reduced by a factor of 12. The results show that the 1D-IBF method is an effective method to process high-precision 1D synchrotron optics.

  13. New figuring model based on surface slope profile for grazing-incidence reflective optics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Huang, Lei; Bouet, Nathalie; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Vescovi, Matthew; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi; Idir, Mourad

    2016-09-01

    Surface slope profile is widely used in the metrology of grazing-incidence reflective optics instead of surface height profile. Nevertheless, the theoretical and experimental model currently used in deterministic optical figuring processes is based on surface height, not on surface slope. This means that the raw slope profile data from metrology need to be converted to height profile to perform the current height-based figuring processes. The inevitable measurement noise in the raw slope data will introduce significant cumulative error in the resultant height profiles. As a consequence, this conversion will degrade the determinism of the figuring processes, and will have an impact on the ultimate surface figuring results. To overcome this problem, an innovative figuring model is proposed, which directly uses the raw slope profile data instead of the usual height data as input for the deterministic process. In this paper, first the influence of the measurement noise on the resultant height profile is analyzed, and then a new model is presented; finally a demonstration experiment is carried out using a one-dimensional ion beam figuring process to demonstrate the validity of our approach.

  14. Development Status of Adjustable Grazing Incidence Optics for 0.5 Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Paul B.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Allured, Ryan; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Marquez, Vanessa; McMuldroch, Stuart; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We describe progress in the development of adjustable grazing incidence X-ray optics for 0.5 arcsec resolution cosmic X-ray imaging. To date, no optics technology is available to blend high resolution imaging like the Chandra X-ray Observatory, with square meter collecting area. Our approach to achieve these goals simultaneously is to directly deposit thin film piezoelectric actuators on the back surface of thin, lightweight Wolter-I or Wolter- Schwarschild mirror segments. The actuators are used to correct mirror figure errors due to fabrication, mounting and alignment, using calibration and a one-time figure adjustment on the ground. If necessary, it will also be possible to correct for residual gravity release and thermal effects on-orbit. In this paper we discuss our most recent results measuring influence functions of the piezoelectric actuators using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. We describe accelerated and real-time lifetime testing of the piezoelectric material, and we also discuss changes to, and recent results of, our simulations of mirror correction.

  15. High repetition rate collisional soft x-ray lasers based on grazing incidence pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, B M; Wang, Y; Larotonda, M A; Alessi, D; Berrill, M; Rocca, J J; Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2005-11-18

    We discuss the demonstration of gain-saturated high repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers producing microwatt average powers at wavelengths ranging from 13.9 to 33 nm. The results were obtained heating a pre-created plasma with a picosecond optical laser pulse impinging at grazing incidence onto a pre-created plasma. This pumping geometry increases the energy deposition efficiency of the pump beam into the gain region, making it possible to saturate soft x-ray lasers in this wavelength range with a short pulse pump energy of only 1 J at 800 nm wavelength. Results corresponding to 5 Hz repetition rate operation of gain-saturated 14.7 nm Ni-like Pd and 32.6 nm line Ne-like Ti lasers pumped by a table-top Ti:sapphire laser are reported. We also discuss results obtained using a 1 {omega} 1054 nm pre-pulse and 2{omega} 527 nm short pulse from a Nd:glass pump laser. This work demonstrates the feasibility of producing compact high average power soft x-ray lasers for applications.

  16. Ray-tracing of shape metrology data of grazing incidence x-ray astronomy mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocchi, Fabio E.; Vernani, Dervis

    2008-07-01

    A number of future X-ray astronomy missions (e.g. Simbol-X, eROSITA) plan to utilize high throughput grazing incidence optics with very lightweight mirrors. The severe mass specifications require a further optimization of the existing technology with the consequent need of proper optical numerical modeling capabilities for both the masters and the mirrors. A ray tracing code has been developed for the simulation of the optical performance of type I Wolter masters and mirrors starting from 2D and 3D metrology data. In particular, in the case of 2D measurements, a 3D data set is reconstructed on the basis of dimensional references and used for the optical analysis by ray tracing. In this approach, the actual 3D shape is used for the optical analysis, thus avoiding the need of combining the separate contributions of different 2D measurements that require the knowledge of their interactions which is not normally available. The paper describes the proposed approach and presents examples of application on a prototype engineering master in the frame of ongoing activities carried out for present and future X-ray missions.

  17. Technology development of adjustable grazing incidence x-ray optics for sub-arc second imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, P. B.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Cotroneo, V.; Davis, W.; Johnson-Wilke, R. L.; McMuldroch, S.; Ramsey, B. D.; Schwartz, D. A.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Vikhlinin, A.; Wilke, R. H. T.

    2012-09-01

    We report on technical progress made over the past year developing thin film piezoelectric adjustable grazing incidence optics. We believe such mirror technology represents a solution to the problem of developing lightweight, sub-arc second imaging resolution X-ray optics. Such optics will be critical to the development next decade of astronomical X-ray observatories such as SMART-X, the Square Meter Arc Second Resolution X-ray Telescope. SMART-X is the logical heir to Chandra, with 30 times the collecting area and Chandra-like imaging resolution, and will greatly expand the discovery space opened by Chandra’s exquisite imaging resolution. In this paper we discuss deposition of thin film piezoelectric material on flat glass mirrors. For the first time, we measured the local figure change produced by energizing a piezo cell - the influence function, and showed it is in good agreement with finite element modeled predictions. We determined that at least one mirror substrate material is suitably resistant to piezoelectric deposition processing temperatures, meaning the amplitude of the deformations introduced is significantly smaller than the adjuster correction dynamic range. Also, using modeled influence functions and IXO-based mirror figure errors, the residual figure error was predicted post-correction. The impact of the residual figure error on imaging performance, including any mid-frequency ripple introduced by the corrections, was modeled. These, and other, results are discussed, as well as future technology development plans.

  18. High-Repetition-Rate Grazing-Incidence Pumped X-Ray Laser Operating at 18.9 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, R.; Dunn, J.; Patel, P. K.; Price, D. F.; Smith, R. F.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.

    2005-03-01

    We have demonstrated a 10 Hz Ni-like Mo x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ total pump energy by employing a novel pumping scheme. The grazing-incidence scheme is described, where a picosecond pulse is incident at a grazing angle to a Mo plasma column produced by a slab target irradiated by a 200 ps laser pulse. This scheme uses refraction of the short pulse at a predetermined electron density to increase absorption to pump a specific gain region. The higher coupling efficiency inherent to this scheme allows a reduction in the pump energy where 70 mJ long pulse energy and 80 mJ short pulse energy are sufficient to produce lasing at a 10 Hz repetition rate. Under these conditions and by optimizing the delay between the pulses, we achieve strong amplification and close to saturation for 4 mm long targets.

  19. Phonon modes at the 2H-NbSe2 surface observed by grazing incidence inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; Requardt, H; Stettner, J; Serrano, J; Krisch, M; Müller, M; Press, W

    2005-12-16

    We have determined the dispersion of acoustic and optical surface phonon modes 2H-NbSe2 at the by inelastic x-ray scattering under grazing incidence conditions. Already, at room temperature, an anomaly is observed close to the charge density wave -vector position located at about one-third along the Gamma-M direction of the Brillouin zone. Our results indicate that the anomaly for the surface mode occurs at a lower energy than that measured in bulk sensitive geometry in the same experiment, showing evidence of a modified behavior in the uppermost layers. We demonstrate that inelastic x-ray scattering in grazing incidence conditions provides a unique tool to selectively study either surface or bulk lattice dynamics in a single experiment.

  20. Simultaneous measurements of X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence fluorescence at BL-16 beamline of Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Gangadhar; Kane, S. R.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Tiwari, M. K.

    2015-05-15

    A new multipurpose x-ray reflectometer station has been developed and augmented at the microfocus beamline (BL-16) of Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source to facilitate synchronous measurements of specular x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence emission from thin layered structures. The design and various salient features of the x-ray reflectometer are discussed. The performance of the reflectometer has been evaluated by analyzing several thin layered structures having different surface interface properties. The results reveal in-depth information for precise determination of surface and interface properties of thin layered materials demonstrating the immense potential of the combined measurements of x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence fluorescence on a single reflectometer.

  1. Compact extreme ultraviolet reflectometer for the characterization of grazing incidence optics based on a gas discharge light source

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Klaus; Rosier, Oliver; Metzmacher, Christof

    2005-04-01

    A grazing incidence reflectometer operating in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range around 13.5 nm is presented which is making use of a compact xenon pinch plasma light source. The apparatus allows for measuring the absolute reflectivity of a sample for grazing incidence angle in the range from typically 5 deg. to 35 deg. by comparing the EUV diode signal for the reflected light and a reference diode with an accuracy of better than 2%. Design criteria for proper matching of diode apertures and distances with respect to the spatially extended plasma source are presented. The absolute accuracy has been checked by investigating a ruthenium sample with low roughness, which has a reflectivity in the EUV close to the theoretical limit. Comparison to measurements at the EUV-reflectometer of the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt in Berlin at a synchrotron source confirm the absolute accuracy of better than 2% for the reflectivity for the angle interval of interest.

  2. In Situ Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction Study of Electrochemically Deposited Pb Monolayer on Ag(111),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-12

    potential for the deposition of Pb2 on a Pb electrode and hence is termed underpotential deposition (UPD). 19 No additional lead is deposited until...K. 0 In Situ Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction Study Interim Technical Report of Electrochemically Deposited Pb rMbno layers on...nunoalayer adsorbed at a metal-liquid interface. Diffraction peaks were * ~. observed from a monoalayer of lead electrochemicially deposited onto a

  3. Q-switched laser-assisted grazing incidence pumping (QAGRIP) for efficient soft x-ray laser generation.

    PubMed

    Delmas, Olivier; Pittman, Moana; Cassou, Kevin; Guilbaud, Olivier; Kazamias, Sophie; Cojocaru, Gabriel V; Neveu, Olivier; Demailly, Julien; Baynard, Elsa; Ursescu, Daniel; Ros, David

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated a new scheme for laser plasma transient collisional soft x-ray lasers based on the use of an additional laser to produce the preplasma. Soft x-ray emission measurements made for different solid targets are presented and discussed. A significant enhancement of the SXRL emission as compared to double-pulse single-beam grazing incidence (DGRIP) using the same pump laser is reported for 13.9- and 32.6-nm SXRL wavelengths.

  4. Development of grazing incidence devices for space-borne time of flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadu, A.; Devoto, P.; Louarn, P.; Sauvaud, J.-A.

    2012-04-01

    Time of flight mass spectrometer is widely used to study space plasmas in planetary and solar missions. This space-borne instrument selects ions in function of their energy through an electrostatic analyzer. Particles are then post-accelerated to energies in the range of 20 keV to cross a carbon foil. At the foil exit, electrons are emitted and separated from ion beam in the time of flight section. A first detector (a Micro-Channel Plate or MCP) emits a start signal at electron arrival and a second one emits a stop signal at incident ion end of path. The time difference gives the speed of the particle and its mass can be calculated, knowing its initial energy. However, current instruments suffer from strong limitations. The post acceleration needs very high voltage power supplies which are heavy, have a high power consumption and imply technical constraints for the development. A typical instrument weighs from 5 to 6 kg, includes a 20 kV power supply, consumes a least 5 W and encounters corona effect and electrical breakdown problems. Moreover, despite the particle high energy range, scattering and straggling phenomena in the carbon foil significantly reduce the instrument overall resolution. Some methods, such as electrostatic focus lenses or reflectrons, really improve mass separation but global system efficiency remains very low because of the charge state dependence of such devices. The main purpose of our work is to replace carbon foil by grazing incidence MCP's - also known as MPO's, for Micro Pore Optics - for electron emission. Thus, incident particles would back-scatter onto the channel inner surface with an angle of a few degrees. With this solution, we can decrease dispersion sources and lower the power supplies to post accelerate ions. The result would be a lighter and simpler instrument with a substantial resolution improvement. We have first simulated MPO's behavior with TRIM and MARLOWE Monte-Carlo codes. Energy scattering and output angle computed

  5. Adjustable Grazing Incidence X-ray Optics with 0.5 Arc Second Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Paul

    We seek to develop adjustable grazing incidence optics for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this development is thin, lightweight mirrors with angular resolution of 0.5 arc seconds, comparable to the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The new mirror design consists of thin segments of a Wolter-I grazing incidence mirror, with piezo-electric material deposited directly on the back surface of the mirror. Depositing a pattern of independently addressable electrodes on top of the piezoelectric material produces an array of independent piezo cells. Energizing a particular cell introduces a localized deformation in the mirror without the need for a reaction structure. By applying the appropriate voltage to the piezo cells, it is possible to correct mirror figure errors that result from mirror fabrication, gravity release, mounting, and thermal effects. Because the thin mirrors segments are lightweight, they can be densely nested to produce collecting area thirty times that of Chandra, on an affordably priced mission. This Supporting Technology program is a follow-on to an existing APRA program. In the existing program we demonstrated the first successful deposition of piezoelectric material on thermally formed glass substrates. We showed that the localized deformations produced by the piezo cells match finite element predictions, and the piezo cell adjustment range meets requirements necessary to achieve the desired figure correction. We have also shown through simulation that representative mirror figure errors can be corrected via modeled influence functions to achieve 0.5 arc sec imaging performance. This provides a firm foundation on which to develop further the technology. We will continue to optimize the deposition of thin piezoelectric films onto thermally formed glass and electroplated metal mirror segments to improve yield and manufacturability. We will deposit piezoelectric material onto conical mirror segments and demonstrate figure correction in agreement with prediction

  6. Archetypal structure of ultrathin alumina films: Grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prévot, G.; Le Moal, S.; Bernard, R.; Croset, B.; Lazzari, R.; Schmaus, D.

    2012-05-01

    We have studied by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction the atomic structure of an ultrathin alumina film grown on Ni(111). We show that, since there is neither registry between the film and the substrate nor induced Ni relaxations, this system appears to be a prototypical freestanding oxide layer. We have been able to unambiguously determine the three-dimensional structure of the film, which consists of a substrate/Al16/O24/Al24/O28 stacking within a (18.23 × 10.53 Å) R0° unit cell. From the different Al coordinations (3/4/5) in the layer and from the precise determination of the Al-O interatomic distances, we conclude that the film structure presents some similarities with the η phase of bulk alumina, which also has a high surface/bulk ratio. The precise comparison between these two structures allows us to explain that the perfect 3 ratio between the two sides of the mesh of the film is governed by the stacking of the two central planes, combining oxygen close-packed atoms below Al atoms in tetrahedral or pyramidal positions. Moreover, Al atoms at the interface plane of the ultrathin film adopt a quasitrihedral configuration, which confirms that, in the alumina η phase, Al atoms with such a coordination are located near the surface of the nanocrystals. The atomic structure is also very close to the one first proposed by Kresse [G. Kresse, M. Schmid, E. Napetschnig, M. Shishkin, L. Köhler, and P. Varga, ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1107783 308, 1440 (2005)] for alumina films on NiAl(110). This strongly suggests that this atomic model, within small variations, can be extended to ultrathin alumina film on numerous other metal substrates and may be quasi-intrinsic to a freestanding layer rather than governed by the interactions between the film and the substrate.

  7. Test results for an AOA-Xinetics grazing incidence x-ray deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, Charles; Egan, Richard; Landers, Franklin; Cavaco, Jeffrey; Ezzo, Kevin; Khounsary, Ali

    2014-09-01

    X-ray telescopes use grazing incidence mirrors to focus X-ray photons from celestial objects. To achieve the large collecting areas required to image faint sources, thousands of thin, doubly curved mirrors are arranged in nested cylindrical shells to approximate a filled aperture. These mirrors require extremely smooth surfaces with precise figures to provide well-focused beams and small image spot sizes. The Generation-X telescope proposed by SAO would have a 12-meter aperture, a 50 m2 collecting area and 0.1 arc-second spatial resolution. This resolution would be obtained by actively controlling the mirror figure with piezoelectric actuators deposited on the back of each 0.4 mm thick mirror segment. To support SAO's Generation-X study, Northrop Grumman used internal funds to look at the feasibility of using Xinetics deformable mirror technologies to meet the Generation-X requirements. We designed and fabricated two 10 x 30 cm Platinum-coated silicon mirrors with 108 surface-parallel electrostrictive Lead Magnesium Niobate (PMN) actuators bonded to the mirror substrates. These mirrors were tested at optical wavelengths by Xinetics to assess the actuator's performance, but no funds were available for X-ray tests. In 2013, after receiving an invitation to evaluate the mirror's performance at Argonne National Laboratory, the mirrors were taken out of storage, refurbished, retested at Xinetics and transported to ANL for metrology measurements with a Long Trace Profilometer, a Fizeau laser interferometer, and X-ray tests. This paper describes the development and testing of the adaptive x-ray mirrors at AOAXinetics. Marathe, et al, will present the results of the tests at Argonne.

  8. Optical performance of grazing incidence X-ray/EUV telescopes for space science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Patrick Louis

    In order to improve and expand the field of X-ray astronomy, and imaging in general, we find that these days a comprehensive systems engineering approach to X-ray image formation must be undertaken. While some industrial interests have taken steps in this direction, any academic approach is lacking from within the archival literature to date, and there are virtually no established university courses. Indeed, it would seem that top level, optical-systems-engineering is exclusively reserved for those seasoned professionals who have accumulated (though somewhat artistically) the ``know-how'' to efficiently conceive and implement excellent optical designs. Such expert knowledge is not and should not be mysterious. To this end, we attempt to formulate a highly comprehensive approach to X-ray optical systems engineering and implement it within the context of the Wolter Type-I and Type-II (grazing incidence) telescopes currently utilized for practical X-ray/EUV astronomy. In addition, we will transform the classical paraboloid- hyperboloid designs into `aplanatic' and `isoplanatic', hyperboloid-hyperboloid systems, where certain coma conditions are minimized. As will be shown, one gains little improvement in performance when choosing a quasi-aplanatic mirror design over a classical one, owing to scatter and other image degradation effects. Next we will show that a generalized hyperboloid-hyperboloid design can be comprehensively optimized for any imaging requirement, where the operational field-of-view is weighted according to spatial information content. Our H-H design has been optimized for the GOES Solar X-ray Imager mission and adopted by NASA and NOAA. It is currently undergoing fabrication by Raytheon Optical Systems Inc. who is under subcontract to the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. Our design is expected to result in an 80% increase in optical system performance over the original SXI baseline design.

  9. Investigation of Surface Waves in Deep and Shallow Water using Coherent Radars at Grazing Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, M.; Horstmann, J.; Carrasco, R.; Seemann, J.; Stresser, M.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent microwave radars operating at X-band near grazing incidence are utilized to measure the backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity from the small-scale surface roughness of the ocean. The radar backscatter is dependent on the wind and strongly modulated by the surface waves and therefore enables to retrieve the surface wind as well as surface waves. The radar measured Doppler velocities are also modulated by contributions from the wind, current and waves and allow getting additional information on these parameters. In addition coherent marine radars allow to observe breaking waves, which lead to a increase in radar backscatter as well as a strong change of the Doppler speed.Within this presentation we will introduce and validate new methods to measure spectral wave properties such as wave directions, periods and significant wave height from coherent marine radars. The methods have been applied in deep and shallow water and validated to measurements of directional wave riders as well as an Acoustic Wave and Current Profiler. These comparisons show an overall excellent performance of coherent radars for the retrieval of spectral wave properties (e.g. Hs rms of 0.2 m). Furthermore, new methodologies will be presented that enable to observe and quantify wave breaking in deep water as well as in the littoral zone. The above mentioned methods have been applied to investigate the influence of Offshore Wind Farms (OWF) on the wave field with respect to the spectral properties as well as the amount of wave breaking. We will present the results obtained during a cruise in May 2015 within and around the OWF Dantysk in the German Bight of the North Sea, which consist of eighty 3.5 MW wind turbines. In addition we will present our initial results on the investigation of wave dissipation in the littoral zone at the coast of the island Sylt using marine radars, pressure gauges as well as directional wave riders.

  10. Investigation of binary coating material mixtures using grazing incidence EUV-reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasa, I.; Neiers, X.; Mende, M.; Jensen, L.; Ristau, D.

    2014-10-01

    Having been of special interest in thin film technology for a long time already, mixtures of coating materials are still in the focus of research aiming for highest performance in high power as well as in ultra-short pulse laser applications. On the one hand, coating material combinations allow customizing the coating for a certain application by modifying advantageously the refractive index or the band gap energy. On the other hand, that technology is essential in the production of Rugate-filters, using gradually varied refractive index profiles. Therefore, it is of special interest to get insight into the composition of such mixed layers, not only in terms of refractive index and absorption coefficient, but also to evaluate the fractions of materials involved for gaining a better understanding, and therefore to reach highest possible reproducibility for production of such kind of thin films. In this work, single layers of binary mixtures of aluminum oxide, aluminum fluoride, and silicon dioxide are studied with respect to their composition using extreme ultraviolet reflectometry (EUV-R). As the penetration depth of EUV radiation is only a few tens of nanometers under grazing incidence, this non-invasive measurement technique is sensitive to the near surface composition of the film. Therefore it allows investigating the layer material independently of the substrate on which it was deposited. Using specific absorption edges of the involved materials in the EUV spectrum, an empirical correlation between EUV response and mixture ratio is developed and compared to the deep ultraviolet (VUV) absorption edges of the mixture materials.

  11. Application of a finite element method for computing grazing incidence wave structure in an impedance tube - Comparison with experiment. [for duct liner aeroacoustic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, H. C.; Parrott, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    The acoustic performance of a liner specimen, in a grazing incidence impedance tube, is analyzed using a finite element method. The liner specimen was designed to be a locally reacting, two-degree-of-freedom type with the resistance and reactance provided by perforated facesheets and compartmented cavities. Measured and calculated wave structures are compared for both normal and grazing incidence from 0.3 to 1.2 kHz. A finite element algorithm was incorporated into an optimization loop in order to predict liner grazing incidence impedance from measured SWR and null position data. Results suggest that extended reaction effects may have been responsible for differences between normal and grazing incidence impedance estimates.

  12. Analytical computation of the off-axis effective area of grazing incidence X-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Cotroneo, V.; Basso, S.; Conconi, P.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: Focusing mirrors for X-ray telescopes in grazing incidence, introduced in the 70s, are characterized in terms of their performance by their imaging quality and effective area, which in turn determines their sensitivity. Even though the on-axis effective area is assumed in general to characterize the collecting power of an X-ray optic, the telescope capability of imaging extended X-ray sources is also determined by the variation in its effective area with the off-axis angle. The effective area, in general, decreases as the X-ray source moves off-axis, causing a loss of sensitivity in the peripheral regions of the telescope's field of view. Methods: The complex task of designing optics for future X-ray telescopes entails detailed computations of both imaging quality and effective area on- and off-axis. Because of their apparent complexity, both aspects have been, so far, treated by using ray-tracing routines aimed at simulating the interaction of X-ray photons with the reflecting surfaces of a given focusing system. Although this approach has been widely exploited and proven to be effective, it would also be attractive to regard the same problem from an analytical viewpoint, to assess an optical design of an X-ray optical module with a simpler calculation than a ray-tracing routine. This would also improve the efficiency of optimization tasks when designing the X-ray optical modules. In this paper, we thereby focused on developing analytical solutions to compute the off-axis effective area of double-reflection X-ray mirrors. Results: We have developed useful analytical formulae for the off-axis effective area of a double-reflection mirror in the double cone approximation, requiring only an integration and the standard routines to calculate the X-ray coating reflectivity for a given incidence angle. The computation is easily applicable also to Wolter-I mirrors (such as those of NeXT, NuSTAR, HEXIT-SAT, IXO) and the approximation improves as the f-number of the

  13. Analysis of a wedge prism to perform small-angle beam deviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderakova, Dagmar; Strba, Anton

    2003-07-01

    The contribution is to present both the theoretical and experimental analysis of a wedge prism, which allows us to perform very small angle deviation of a passing beam in a simply way. No high precise steering element is necessary. The results of the theoretical analysis, i.e. the dependence of the propagation vector on the angle of incidence had been verified experimentally, using both Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a holographic grating. The results obtained have proved the advantage of the method proposed, which may be of great importance anywhere if small-angle deviation of propagation wave vector is needed.

  14. Electromagnetic wave scattering at near-grazing incidence from a gently undulating, rough surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Sperley, E. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    Models to estimate the reflection coefficient of a statistically rough surface, for example the works of Beckmann, Smith, and Vesecky are discussed. Bistatic radar experiments carried out during the Apollo 16 mission provide a data set with which to compare theoretical models and experimental data. These bistatic S-band radar experiments provide experimental estimates of the Moon's bistatic, forward scatter, reflection coefficient for grazing angles of 2.5 to 78 deg. Theoretical expressions for the reflection coefficient are developed for comparison with these experimental data. At grazing angles below 10 deg the models of Smith and Vesecky compare favorably with the data. Beckmann's model falls significantly more rapidly with decreasing grazing angle than does the data.

  15. Electromagnetic wave scattering at near-grazing incidence from a gently undulating, rough surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Sperley, E. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    Models to estimate the reflection coefficient of a statistically rough surface, for example the works of Beckmann, Smith, and Vesecky are discussed. Bistatic radar experiments carried out during the Apollo 16 mission provide a data set with which to compare theoretical models and experimental data. These bistatic S-band radar experiments provide experimental estimates of the Moon's bistatic, forward scatter, reflection coefficient for grazing angles of 2.5 to 78 deg. Theoretical expressions for the reflection coefficient are developed for comparison with these experimental data. At grazing angles below 10 deg the models of Smith and Vesecky compare favorably with the data. Beckmann's model falls significantly more rapidly with decreasing grazing angle than does the data.

  16. X-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes developed for the LIL program.

    PubMed

    Rosch, R; Boutin, J Y; le Breton, J P; Gontier, D; Jadaud, J P; Reverdin, C; Soullié, G; Lidove, G; Maroni, R

    2007-03-01

    This article describes x-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes, developed for the experimental program carried out on the Ligne d'Integration Laser (LIL) facility [J. P. Le Breton et al., Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001 (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), pp. 856-862] (24 kJ, UV-0.35 nm). The design includes a large target-to-microscope (400-700 mm) distance required by the x-ray ablation issues anticipated on the Laser MégaJoule facility [P. A. Holstein et al., Laser Part. Beams 17, 403 (1999)] (1.8 MJ) which is under construction. Two eight-image Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766 (1948)] with different spectral wavelength ranges and with a 400 mm source-to-mirror distance image the target on a custom-built framing camera (time resolution of approximately 80 ps). The soft x-ray version microscope is sensitive below 1 keV and its spatial resolution is better than 30 microm over a 2-mm-diam region. The hard x-ray version microscope has a 10 microm resolution over an 800-microm-diam region and is sensitive in the 1-5 keV energy range. Two other x-ray microscopes based on an association of toroidal/spherical surfaces (T/S microscopes) produce an image on a streak camera with a spatial resolution better than 30 microm over a 3 mm field of view in the direction of the camera slit. Both microscopes have been designed to have, respectively, a maximum sensitivity in the 0.1-1 and 1-5 keV energy range. We present the original design of these four microscopes and their test on a dc x-ray tube in the laboratory. The diagnostics were successfully used on LIL first experiments early in 2005. Results of soft x-ray imaging of a radiative jet during conical shaped laser interaction are shown.

  17. Small angle elastic scattering of protons off of spinless nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, A.G.

    1988-07-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 800 MeV protons incident on /sup 12/C, /sup 40/Ca, and /sup 208/Pb in the momentum transfer range 20 MeV/c < q < 130 MeV/c have been measured. The data was taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Special delay-line drift chambers with dead regions for the beam to pass through them were used to obtain the data. Through the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear contributions to the differential cross section in the small angle region, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude ..cap alpha../sub n/(0) = Ref/sub n/(0)/Imf/sub n/(0) is extracted. The importance of knowing this quantity at lower energies in order to study the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering theories is discussed. 130 refs., 60 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Mildner, D F R

    2016-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.

  19. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry. PMID:27275140

  20. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-05-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. Furthermore, the aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.

  1. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-05-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding tomore » the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. Furthermore, the aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.« less

  2. Characteristics of surface sound pressure and absorption of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave.

    PubMed

    Sum, K S; Pan, J

    2007-07-01

    Distributions of sound pressure and intensity on the surface of a flat impedance strip flush-mounted on a rigid baffle are studied for a grazing incident plane wave. The distributions are obtained by superimposing the unperturbed wave (the specularly reflected wave as if the strip is rigid plus the incident wave) with the radiated wave from the surface vibration of the strip excited by the unperturbed pressure. The radiated pressure interferes with the unperturbed pressure and distorts the propagating plane wave. When the plane wave propagates in the baffle-strip-baffle direction, it encounters discontinuities in acoustical impedance at the baffle-strip and strip-baffle interfaces. The radiated pressure is highest around the baffle-strip interface, but decreases toward the strip-baffle interface where the plane wave distortion reduces accordingly. As the unperturbed and radiated waves have different magnitudes and superimpose out of phase, the surface pressure and intensity increase across the strip in the plane wave propagation direction. Therefore, the surface absorption of the strip is nonzero and nonuniform. This paper provides an understanding of the surface pressure and intensity behaviors of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave, and of how the distributed intensity determines the sound absorption coefficient of the strip.

  3. Note: Setup for chemical atmospheric control during in situ grazing incidence X-ray scattering of printed thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pröller, Stephan; Moseguí González, Daniel; Zhu, Chenhuii; Schaible, Eric; Wang, Cheng; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Hexemer, Alexander; Herzig, Eva M.

    2017-06-01

    In order to tailor the assembling of polymers and organic molecules, a deeper understanding of the kinetics involved in thin film production is necessary. While post-production characterization only provides insight on the final film structure, more sophisticated experimental setups are needed to probe the structure formation processes in situ during deposition. The drying kinetics of a deposited organic thin film strongly influences the assembling process on the nanometer scale. This work presents an experimental setup that enables fine control of the atmosphere composition surrounding the sample during slot die coating, while simultaneously probing the film formation kinetics using in situ grazing incidence X-ray scattering and spectroscopy.

  4. Efficiency of a Grazing-Incidence Off-Plane Grating in the Soft X-Ray Region

    SciTech Connect

    Seely,J.; Goray, L.; Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Laming, M.; Holland, G.; Flanagan, K.; Heilmann, R.; Chang, C.; Schattenberg, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency measurements of a grazing-incidence diffraction grating in the off-plane mount were performed using polarized synchrotron radiation. The grating had 5000 grooves/mm, an effective blaze angle of 14 deg., and was gold coated. The efficiencies in the two polarization orientations (TM and TE) were measured in the 1.5-5.0 nm wavelength range and were compared with the efficiencies calculated using the PCGrate-SX code. The TM and TE efficiencies differ, offering the possibility of performing unique science studies of astrophysical, solar, and laboratory sources by exploiting the polarization sensitivity of the off-plane grating.

  5. Sense Determination of Micropipes via Grazing-Incidence Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography in 4H Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,Y.; Dhanaraj, G.; Dudley, M.; Sanchez, E.; MacMillan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Computer modeling using the ray-tracing method has been used to simulate the grazing-incidence x-ray topographic images of micropipes in 4H silicon carbide recorded using the pyramidal (11-28) reflection. Simulation results indicate that the images of micropipes appear as white features of roughly elliptical shape, canted to one side or other of the g vector depending on the dislocation sense. Observed images compare well with the simulations, demonstrating that the direction of cant provides a simple, nondestructive, and reliable way to reveal the senses of micropipes. Sense assignment has been validated using back-reflection reticulography.

  6. Note: Setup for chemical atmospheric control during in situ grazing incidence X-ray scattering of printed thin films.

    PubMed

    Pröller, Stephan; Moseguí González, Daniel; Zhu, Chenhuii; Schaible, Eric; Wang, Cheng; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Hexemer, Alexander; Herzig, Eva M

    2017-06-01

    In order to tailor the assembling of polymers and organic molecules, a deeper understanding of the kinetics involved in thin film production is necessary. While post-production characterization only provides insight on the final film structure, more sophisticated experimental setups are needed to probe the structure formation processes in situ during deposition. The drying kinetics of a deposited organic thin film strongly influences the assembling process on the nanometer scale. This work presents an experimental setup that enables fine control of the atmosphere composition surrounding the sample during slot die coating, while simultaneously probing the film formation kinetics using in situ grazing incidence X-ray scattering and spectroscopy.

  7. Marangoni Convection Induced Ripple on Grazing Incidence Liquid Metal Mirror (GILMM) Used for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R

    2001-08-27

    A spatial variation of temperature in the sodium film on the surface of the grazing incidence liquid metal mirror (GILMM) will give rise to convection due to the temperature dependent variation in surface tension. This is called thermal capillary convection or the Marangoni effect and causes the surface to have ripples or waves. This note estimates the magnitude of this effect and finds, with care, design parameters can be chosen to make the resulting ripples sufficiently small so that a laser beam can be focused on a target of 1/4 mm spot size at 30 m distance, for example. Smaller spot sizes are discussed.

  8. Interferometric 2D small angle generator for autocollimator calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, Ville; Byman, Ville; Palosuo, Ilkka; Hemming, Björn; Lassila, Antti

    2017-06-01

    Small angle generators are simple devices for providing small angles traceable to the definition of the SI-unit radian. The most accurate ones use a laser interferometer for measurement of angular displacement. Small angle generators used for autocollimator calibration usually create angles around a single axis. A two-directional angle generator would be preferable, as it could more efficiently reveal artefacts related to angular displacement across both axes, such as orthogonality of the autocollimator’s measuring axes. Characterizing errors depending on one axis only would also be easier, as the setup needs to be aligned only once for studying both axes of the autocollimator. We describe a novel interferometric two-directional small angle generator which we have built and tested for autocollimator calibration. The range is  ±1000″ for both axes. The estimated standard uncertainty for full range is 0.0036″ for the horizontal and 0.0053″ for the vertical direction.

  9. Modified sine bar device measures small angles with high accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M.

    1968-01-01

    Modified sine bar device measures small angles with enough accuracy to calibrate precision optical autocollimators. The sine bar is a massive bar of steel supported by two cylindrical rods at one end and one at the other.

  10. Kinetics of copper growth on graphene revealed by time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, M.; Siffalovic, P.; Jergel, M.; Pelletta, M.; Halahovets, Y.; Vegso, K.; Kotlar, M.; Majkova, E.

    2017-01-01

    Metal growth on graphene has many applications. Transition metals are known to favor three-dimensional (3D) cluster growth on graphene. Copper is of particular interest for cost-effective surface-supported catalysis applications and as a contact material in electronics. This paper presents an in situ real-time study of Cu growth kinetics on graphene covering all stages preceding formation of a continuous film performed by laboratory-based grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) technique. In particular, nucleation and 3D cluster growth, coalescence, and percolation stages were identified. The cluster nucleation saturates after reaching a density of 1012c m-2 at ≈1 monolayer thickness. A Kratky plot and a paracrystal model with cumulative structural disorder were necessary to evaluate properly cluster growth and coalescence, respectively. The power law scaling constants 0.27 ±0.05 and 0.81 ±0.02 of the temporal evolution of Cu cluster size suggest the growth of isolated clusters and dynamic cluster coalescence keeping the cluster shape, respectively. Coalescence and percolation thresholds occur at Cu thicknesses of 2 ±0.4 and 8.8 ±0.7 nm , respectively. This paper demonstrates the potential of laboratory-based in situ GISAXS as a vital diagnostic tool for tailoring a large variety of Cu nanostructures on graphene based on an in situ Cu growth monitoring which is applicable in a broad range of deposition times.

  11. Correction of Spherical Aberration in Grazing-Incidence X-ray Optics by Combination of Spherical-Concave Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, A.

    2011-09-09

    In grazing-incidence total-reflection mirror optics for x-rays, spherical aberrations and coma are the most serious aberrations for microfocusing and microimaging. High-resolution imaging is believed to be possible only when an aspherical mirror system is used. However, the spherical aberrations of a spherical-concave mirror in a grazing-incidence condition can be eliminated by sequential reflection of spherical mirrors of similar shapes. A sub-micrometer one-dimensional focusing is easily achieved by the spherical-aberration-corrected tandem-spherical mirror optics. By configuring four spherical mirrors in an analogy of the crossed mirror optics (Kirkpatrick-Baez optics), it is possible to achieve sub-micrometer focused beam size in the hard x-ray region. Preliminary experiments on x-ray microfocusing have been carried out at beamline 20XU of SPring-8, and a 0.5 {mu}mx0.4 {mu}m beam size was achieved at 8 keV.

  12. Design of high-bandwidth one- and two-dimensional photonic bandgap dielectric structures at grazing incidence of light.

    PubMed

    Fekete, J; Várallyay, Z; Szipocs, R

    2008-10-10

    We propose one-dimensional photonic bandgap (PB) dielectric structures to be used at grazing incidence in order to obtain an extended bandgap exhibiting considerably reduced reflection loss and dispersion compared to similar structures used at a normal incidence of light. The well-known quarter-wave condition is applied for the design in this specific case, resulting in resonance-free reflection bands without drops in reflection versus wavelength function and a monotonous variation of the group delay dispersion versus wavelength function, which are important issues in femtosecond pulse laser applications. Based on these results we extend our studies to two-dimensional PB structures and provide guidelines to the design of leaking mode-free hollow-core Bragg PB fibers providing anomalous dispersion over most of the bandgap.

  13. Determination of the geometric corrugation of graphene on SiC(0001) by grazing incidence fast atom diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zugarramurdi, A.; Debiossac, M.; Lunca-Popa, P.; Mayne, A. J.; Borisov, A. G.; Mu, Z.; Roncin, P.; Khemliche, H.; Momeni, A.

    2015-03-09

    We present a grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD) study of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). This system shows a Moiré-like 13 × 13 superlattice above the reconstructed carbon buffer layer. The averaging property of GIFAD results in electronic and geometric corrugations that are well decoupled; the graphene honeycomb corrugation is only observed with the incident beam parallel to the zigzag direction while the geometric corrugation arising from the superlattice is revealed along the armchair direction. Full-quantum calculations of the diffraction patterns show the very high GIFAD sensitivity to the amplitude of the surface corrugation. The best agreement between the calculated and measured diffraction intensities yields a corrugation height of 0.27 ± 0.03 Å.

  14. An efficient magic state approach to small angle rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.; O'Gorman, Joe

    2016-12-01

    Standard error-correction techniques only provide a quantum memory and need extra gadgets to perform computation. Central to quantum algorithms are small angle rotations, which can be fault-tolerantly implemented given a supply of an unconventional species of magic state. We present a low-cost distillation routine for preparing these small angle magic states. Our protocol builds on the work of Duclos-Cianci and Poulin (2015 Phys. Rev. A 91 042315) by compressing their circuit. Additionally, we present a method of diluting magic states that reduces costs associated with very small angle rotations. We quantify performance by the expected number of noisy magic states consumed per rotation, and compare with other protocols. For modest-sized angles, our protocols offer a factor 24 improvement over the best-known gate synthesis protocols and a factor 2 over the Duclos-Cianci and Poulin protocol. For very small angle rotations, the dilution protocol dramatically reduces costs, giving several orders magnitude improvement over competitors. There also exists an intermediary regime of small, but not very small, angles where our approach gives a marginal improvement over gate synthesis. We discuss how different performance metrics may alter these conclusions.

  15. Surficial phase-identification and structural profiles from weathered natural pyrites: A grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuanfeng; Pan, Yuguan; Xue, Jiyue; Su, Guizhen

    2009-01-01

    Five pyrites with original crystal face (1 0 0) with different tarnish colours were selected from one pyrite-bearing ore sample from Tongling multi-metal deposit, Anhui, China. They are henna mottled with dark violet, yellow mottled with red, yellow, blue mottled with violet and reddish brown in surface colour. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD) was used to study the phases formed or precipitated on the surface of pyrite (1 0 0) face during chemical weathering. By changing the incident angle, GIXRD can provide information on the changes in the mineral phases from the surface as a function of depth. Products formed or precipitated on the surface of pyrite (1 0 0) face are one or several sulfur or iron-bearing hydrated oxides and include gypsum, jalpaite, goethite, goldichite. The sulfur-bearing minerals present on the surface imply the oxidation of sulfur to sulfate, or the reduction of sulfur to sulfide. By analyzing a series of GIXRD patterns obtained at different angles of incidence for a single pyrite, the mineral assemblage differs from the surface into the body of the crystal. Taking the reddish brown sample as an example, four diffraction profiles at 2.575, 2.2105, 1.9118 and 1.613 Å are present in the pattern of a 2° incident angle experiment whereas they cannot be found at a GIXRD angle smaller than 0.6°.

  16. Small-angle neutron scattering from samples of expanded carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, S. G. Valiev, E. Z.; Dorofeev, Yu. A.; Pirogov, A. N.; Skryabin, Yu. N.; Makotchenko, V. G.; Nazarov, A. S.; Fedorov, V. E.

    2006-12-15

    The subatomic structure of expanded graphite has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. Samples were synthesized during quick thermal decomposition of intercalated compounds based on oxidized graphite. They had a low bulk density (up to 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}) and were characterized by considerable small-angle scattering. It has been established that majority of the volume of expanded graphite samples is occupied by participles with characteristic sizes in two ranges: from 6 to 8 nm and from 20 to 30 nm. Small particles have properties of a surface fractal with the dimension D{sub s} = 2.4-2.6, whereas the larger particles are mainly smooth and have the dimension D{sub s} = 2.0-2.1. The specific surface of the samples studied was determined from the small-angle scattering data.

  17. Impedance Scaling for Small-angle Tapers and Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11

    In this note I will prove that the impedance calculated for a small-angle collimator or taper, of arbitrary 3D profile, has a scaling property that can greatly simplify numerical calculations. This proof is based on the parabolic equation approach to solving Maxwell's equation developed in Refs. [1, 2]. We start from the parabolic equation formulated in [3]. As discussed in [1], in general case this equation is valid for frequencies {omega} >> c/a where a is a characteristic dimension of the obstacle. However, for small-angle tapers and collimators, the region of validity of this equation extends toward smaller frequencies and includes {omega} {approx} c/a.

  18. Exploring surface landscapes with molecules: rotationally induced diffraction of H2 on LiF(001) under fast grazing incidence conditions.

    PubMed

    Del Cueto, M; Muzas, A S; Somers, M F; Kroes, G J; Díaz, C; Martín, F

    2017-06-28

    Atomic diffraction by surfaces under fast grazing incidence conditions has been used for almost a decade to characterize surface properties with more accuracy than with more traditional atomic diffraction methods. From six-dimensional solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we show that diffraction of H2 molecules under fast grazing incidence conditions could be even more informative for the characterization of ionic surfaces, due to the large anisotropic electrostatic interaction between the quadrupole moment of the molecule and the electric field created by the ionic crystal. Using the LiF(001) surface as a benchmark, we show that fast grazing incidence diffraction of H2 strongly depends on the initial rotational state of the molecule, while rotationally inelastic processes are irrelevant. We demonstrate that, as a result of the anisotropy of the impinging projectile, initial rotational excitation leads to an increase in intensity of high-order diffraction peaks at incidence directions that satisfy precise symmetry constraints, thus providing a more detailed information on the surface characteristics than that obtained from low-order atomic diffraction peaks under fast grazing incidence conditions. As quadrupole-ion surface potentials are expected to accurately represent the interaction between H2 and any surface with a marked ionic character, our analysis should be of general applicability to any of such surfaces. Finally, we show that a density functional theory description of the molecule-ion surface potential catches the main features observed experimentally.

  19. An analysis of two classes of grazing incidence mirrors for use with Rowland circle spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James; Bowyer, Stuart

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparative analysis of Hettrick Bowyer Type II (HBII) and Wolter-Schwarzschild Type II (WSII) optics for use with Rowland circle spectrometers. The HBII can substitute, with few exceptions, for a WSII in any Rowland circle with little change in spectrometer performance or design. However, the HBII telescope offers several clear advantages over the WSII in these configurations. Because the HBII employs a virtual focus, it requires a much shorter instrument length than a WSII. For example, a 3-m Rowland circle spectrometer, fed by an optimized, f/10, 1-m diameter WSII, has a total instrument length of 6 m. If a HBII is used to feed the identical spectrometer, the entire instrument length can be as little as 3 m. In addition, the improved imaging gained with the larger graze angles of the HBII design results in better resolution in slitless operation modes.

  20. Surface complexation studied via combined grazing-incidence EXAFS and surface diffraction: Arsenate on hematite (0001) and (10-12)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.; Trainor, T.; Eng, P.; Catalano, J.; Brown, G.; Davis, J.; Rogers, J.; Bargar, J.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction [crystal-truncation-rod (CTR)] studies of the surface structure of moisture-equilibrated hematite reveal sites for complexation not present on the bulk oxygen-terminated surface, and impose constraints on the types of inner-sphere sorption topologies. We have used this improved model of the hematite surface to analyze grazing-incidence EXAFS results for arsenate sorption on the c(0001) and r(10-12) surfaces measured in two electric vector polarizations. This work shows that the reconfiguration of the surface under moist conditions is responsible for an increased adsorption density of arsenate complexes on the (0001) surface relative to predicted ideal termination, and an abundance of "edge-sharing" bidentate complexes on both studied surfaces. We consider possible limitations on combining the methods due to differing surface sensitivities, and discuss further analysis possibilities using both methods. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  1. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  2. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction of single GaAs nanowires at locations defined by focused ion beams.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Genziana; Schott, Rüdiger; Biermanns, Andreas; Davydok, Anton; Reuter, Dirk; Carbone, Gerardina; Schülli, Tobias U; Wieck, Andreas D; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2013-08-01

    Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction measurements on single GaAs nanowires (NWs) grown on a (111)-oriented GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy are reported. The positions of the NWs are intentionally determined by a direct implantation of Au with focused ion beams. This controlled arrangement in combination with a nanofocused X-ray beam allows the in-plane lattice parameter of single NWs to be probed, which is not possible for randomly grown NWs. Reciprocal space maps were collected at different heights along the NW to investigate the crystal structure. Simultaneously, substrate areas with different distances from the Au-implantation spots below the NWs were probed. Around the NWs, the data revealed a 0.4% decrease in the lattice spacing in the substrate compared with the expected unstrained value. This suggests the presence of a compressed region due to Au implantation.

  3. Note: Setup for chemical atmospheric control during in situ grazing incidence X-ray scattering of printed thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Pröller, Stephan; Moseguí González, Daniel; Zhu, Chenhuii; ...

    2017-06-01

    In order to tailor the assembling of polymers and organic molecules, a deeper understanding of the kinetics involved in thin film production is necessary. While post-production characterization only provides insight on the final film structure, more sophisticated experimental setups are needed to probe the structure formation processes in situ during deposition. The drying kinetics of a deposited organic thin film strongly influences the assembling process on the nanometer scale. Lastly, this work presents an experimental setup that enables fine control of the atmosphere composition surrounding the sample during slot die coating, while simultaneously probing the film formation kinetics using inmore » situ grazing incidence X-ray scattering and spectroscopy.« less

  4. Multilayer coated grazing incidence condenser for large numerical aperture objective at wavelength of 4.5 nm.

    PubMed

    Ejima, T; Hatano, T; Ohno, K; Fukayama, T; Aihara, S; Yanagihara, M; Tsuru, T

    2014-10-10

    A grazing incidence condenser is developed for objectives with large numerical aperture working in Carbon-window wavelength region (λ=4.4-5.0  nm) with the use of a point light source. The condenser is composed of four pieces of toroidal mirrors and a piece of the mirror was fabricated to evaluate the performance of the mirror. The radii of the toroidal mirror are determined by ray-trace calculation, and each radius of the mirror substrate and the roughness of the polished surface were evaluated to satisfy the designed parameter. A Co/C reflection multilayer is also designed to reflect soft x-ray light at 4.5 nm wavelength, and the reflection multilayer was deposited on the mirror surface. Measured reflectance of the toroidal mirror with the reflection multilayer is higher than 0.32 at 4.5 nm wavelength.

  5. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Hell, N; Träbert, E; Widmann, K

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  6. Nondestructive quantitative synchrotron grazing incidence x-ray scattering analysis of cylindrical nanostructures in supported thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J.; Yang, S. Y.; Lee, B.; Joo, W.; Heo, K.; Kim, J. K.; Ree, M.; X-Ray Science Division; Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive nanostructural analysis is indispensable in the development of nanomaterials and nanofabrication processes for use in nanotechnology applications. This paper demonstrates a quantitative, nondestructive analysis of nanostructured thin films supported on substrates and their templated nanopores by using grazing incidence X-ray scattering and data analysis with a derived scattering theory. The analysis disclosed that vertically oriented nanodomain cylinders had formed in 20-100 nm thick films supported on substrates, which consisted of a mixture of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) and PMMA homopolymer, and that the PMMA nanodomain cylinders were selectively etched out by ultraviolet light exposure and a subsequent rinse with acetic acid, resulting in a well ordered nanostructure consisting of hexagonally packed cylindrical nanopores.

  7. Spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caha, O.; Mikulik, P.; Novak, J.; Holy, V.; Moss, S.C.; Norman, A.; Mascarenhas, A.; Reno, J.L.; Krause, B.

    2005-07-15

    The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

  8. Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process for Development of Grazing Incidence Optics for Hard X-Ray Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran Sayeed; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The presentation includes grazing incidence X-ray optics, motivation and challenges, mid spatial frequency generation in cylindrical polishing, design considerations for polishing lap, simulation studies and experimental results, future scope, and summary. Topics include current status of replication optics technology, cylindrical polishing process using large size polishing lap, non-conformance of polishin lap to the optics, development of software and polishing machine, deterministic prediction of polishing, polishing experiment under optimum conditions, and polishing experiment based on known error profile. Future plans include determination of non-uniformity in the polishing lap compliance, development of a polishing sequence based on a known error profile of the specimen, software for generating a mandrel polishing sequence, design an development of a flexible polishing lap, and computer controlled localized polishing process.

  9. Effectiveness of Near-Grazing Incidence Reflection in Creating the Rotationally Modulated Lanes in the Jovian Hectometric Radio Emission Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Groene, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Galileo plasma wave instrument has identified a narrow (in frequency) attenuation band in the hectometric emission that varies in frequency with system 3 longitude. It is possible to model this emission band assuming a high-latitude cyclotron source region with emission that is efficiently attenuated when the ray path is nearly tangent to an L shell that is close to the Io flux tube. The data suggest that the mechanism for attenuating the emission is very efficient, with the ratio of attenuated to unattenuated emission I/I(sub o) < 0.02, and not a strong function of frequency. In this paper we demonstrate that incoherent scattering alone cannot explain the attenuation lane, which does not preclude coherent scattering by uncertain processes. We find rather that the source of attenuation is consistent with near-grazing incidence reflection of emission from an L shell that is near the Io flux tube (a caustic surface).

  10. Quantitative determination of ion distributions in bacterial lipopolysaccharide membranes by grazing-incidence X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Schubert, Thomas; Konovalov, Oleg V.; Quinn, Bonnie E.; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Oliveira, Rafael G.; Pink, David A.; Tanaka, Motomu

    2010-01-01

    A model of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria was created by the deposition of a monolayer of purified rough mutant lipopolysaccharides at an air/water interface. The density profiles of monovalent (K+) and divalent (Ca2+) cations normal to the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) monolayers were investigated using grazing-incidence X-ray fluorescence. In the absence of Ca2+, a K+ concentration peak was found in the negatively charged LPS headgroup region. With the addition of CaCl2, Ca2+ ions almost completely displaced K+ ions from the headgroup region. By integrating the experimentally reconstructed excess ion density profiles, we obtained an accurate measurement of the effective charge density of LPS monolayers. The experimental findings were compared to the results of Monte Carlo simulations based on a coarse-grained minimal model of LPS molecules and showed excellent agreement. PMID:20442333

  11. Analysis of Chlorine Ions in Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Thin Film Using Synchrotron Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yang-Yi; Wu, Albert T.; Ku, Ching-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Yi

    2012-10-01

    Antimony-doped tin oxide (SnO2:Sb, ATO) films have been deposited on glass substrates using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. The precursors are mixed with SnCl4, SbCl5, and O2 to prepare the films. This study used synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) to investigate the film microstructure. Our results show that the precursors of chlorine ions were involved in the doping mechanism, causing the microstructure of films to change slightly. The film has an average transmittance between 85.8 and 82.1% within a visible spectral range from 400 to 800 nm. The minimal resistivity was 6.1×10-4 Ω cm after doping. The synchrotron GIXRD data show that the chlorine ions caused the lattice constant change. A possible mechanism was proposed to explain the enhancement in electrical property due to chlorine dopants.

  12. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  13. On the Alignment and Focusing of the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champey, Patrick; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Cheimets, Peter; Hertz, Edward; Golub, Leon; Ramsey, Brian; McCracken, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) is a NASA sounding rocket instrument that is designed to observe soft X-ray emissions from 24 - 6.0 A (0.5 - 2.0 keV energies) in the solar atmosphere. For the rst time, high-temperature, low-emission plasma will be observed directly with 5 arcsecond spatial resolution and 22 mA spectral resolution. The unique optical design consists of a Wolter - I telescope and a 3-optic grazing- incidence spectrometer. The spectrometer utilizes a nite conjugate mirror pair and a blazed planar, varied line spaced grating, which is directly printed on a silicon substrate using e-beam lithography. The grating design is being nalized and the grating will be fabricated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Izentis LLC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is producing the nickel replicated telescope and spectrometer mirrors using the same facilities and techniques as those developed for the ART-XC and FOXSI mirrors. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) will mount and align the optical sub-assemblies based on previous experience with similar instruments, such as the Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The telescope and spectrometer assembly will be aligned in visible light through the implementation of a theodolite and reference mirrors, in addition to the centroid detector assembly (CDA) { a device designed to align the AXAF-I nested mirrors. Focusing of the telescope and spectrometer will be achieved using the X-ray source in the Stray Light Facility (SLF) at MSFC. We present results from an alignment sensitivity analysis performed on the on the system and we also discuss the method for aligning and focusing MaGIXS.

  14. On the alignment and focusing of the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champey, Patrick; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Cheimets, Peter; Hertz, Edward; Golub, Leon; Ramsey, Brian; McCracken, Jeff; Marquez, Vanessa; Allured, Ryan; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Schattenburg, Mark; Bruccoleri, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) is a NASA sounding rocket instrument that is designed to observe soft X-ray emissions from 24 - 6.0 Å (0.5 - 2.0 keV energies) in the solar atmosphere. For the first time, high-temperature, low-emission plasma will be observed directly with 5 arcsecond spatial resolution and 22 mÅ spectral resolution. The unique optical design consists of a Wolter - I telescope and a 3-optic grazing- incidence spectrometer. The spectrometer utilizes a finite conjugate mirror pair and a blazed planar, varied line spaced grating, which is directly printed on a silicon substrate using e-beam lithography. The grating design is being finalized and the grating will be fabricated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Izentis LLC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is producing the nickel replicated telescope and spectrometer mirrors using the same facilities and techniques as those developed for the ART-XC and FOXSI mirrors. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) will mount and align the optical sub-assemblies based on previous experience with similar instruments, such as the Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The telescope and spectrometer assembly will be aligned in visible light through the implementation of a theodolite and reference mirrors, in addition to the centroid detector assembly (CDA) - a device designed to align the AXAF-I nested mirrors. Focusing of the telescope and spectrometer will be achieved using the X-ray source in the Stray Light Facility (SLF) at MSFC. We present results from an alignment sensitivity analysis performed on the on the system and we also discuss the method for aligning and focusing MaGIXS.

  15. Development and prospects of Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuo, Tai-Sen; Cheng, He; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) is an upgrade of the traditional Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique which can cover three orders of magnitude of length scale from one nanometer to one micrometer. It is a powerful tool for structure calibration in polymer science, biology, material science and condensed matter physics. Since the first VSANS instrument, D11 in Grenoble, was built in 1972, new collimation techniques, focusing optics (multi-beam converging apertures, material or magnetic lenses, and focusing mirrors) and higher resolution detectors combined with the long flight paths and long incident neutron wavelengths have been developed. In this paper, a detailed review is given of the development, principles and application conditions of various VSANS techniques. Then, beam current gain factors are calculated to evaluate those techniques. A VSANS design for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is thereby presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474119, 11305191)

  16. Two-dimensional X-ray focusing by off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Fakhrtdinov, Rashid; Irzhak, Dmitry; Firsov, Alexander; Firsov, Anatoly; Svintsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexey; Roshchupkin, Dmitry

    2017-02-01

    The results of studying a two-dimensional X-ray focusing by an off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source are presented. This optics enables obtaining a focal spot of 2 μm on the laboratory X-ray source with a focusing efficiency of 30% at a high signal/noise ratio.

  17. Thermomechanical design of the grazing incidence metal mirror of the prometheus-L IFE reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N.M.; El-Azab, A.

    1994-12-31

    In Laser IFE reactors the reflectivity and absorptivity of the grazing metal mirror depend on the neutron dose received by the mirror surface. In addition to these irradiation effects, the surface deformation due to neutron irradiation-induced swelling and due to thermal loads change the focusing quality of the mirror. In the present work, a thorough review of the irradiation effects on the changes in mirror surface quality is presented. A mirror design methodology, which considers the deformation due to the loads associated with laser beam and the deformation due to neutron-irradiation induced swelling is discussed. The basic philosophy considered in the design is to separate the functions and choose the best possible materials to perform these specific functions. An aluminum thin layer, for the purpose of reflection of the laser beam, is deposited on a SiC substrate. The SiC substrate provides a rigid bulk, through which coolant is provided to remove the heat absorbed during laser pulses, and avoids the need for a thicker aluminum layer that undergoes more swelling than SiC. A concrete frame is designed to provide the ultimate resistance against thermally-induced deformation. Other features of the design will also be presented.

  18. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byeongdu; Senesi-Good, Andrew J.; Li, Tao

    2016-09-28

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and ångström length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle’s size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchal structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X ray characterization tools. We conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-rays scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and in operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  19. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J.; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-04-07

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and ångström length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle’s size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchal structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X ray characterization tools. Furthermore, we conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-rays scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and in operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  20. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J.; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-04-07

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and ångström length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle’s size, size distribution,more » shape, and organization into hierarchal structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X ray characterization tools. Furthermore, we conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-rays scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and in operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.« less

  1. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-09-28

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and angstrom length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle's size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchical structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well as the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X-ray characterization tools. We conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-ray scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  2. Metrology and Alignment of Light Weight Grazing Incidence X-Ray Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, William; Content, David; Petre, Robert; Saha, Timo

    2000-01-01

    Metrology and alignment of light weight X-ray optics have been a challenge for two reasons: (1) that the intrinsic mirror quality and distortions caused by handling can not be easily separated, and (2) the diffraction limits of the visible light become a severe problem at the order of one arc-minute. Traditional methods of using a normal incident pencil or small parallel beam which monitors a tiny fraction of the mirror in question at a given time can not adequately monitor those distortions. We are developing a normal incidence setup that monitors a large fraction, if not the whole, of the mirror at any given time. It will allow us to align thin X-ray mirrors to-an accuracy of a few arc seconds or to a limit dominated by the mirror intrinsic quality.

  3. A SMALL-ANGLE DRILL-HOLE WHIPSTOCK

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, D.E.; Olsen, J.L.; Bennett, W.P.

    1963-01-29

    A small angle whipstock is described for accurately correcting or deviating a drill hole by a very small angle. The whipstock is primarily utilized when drilling extremely accurate, line-of-slight test holes as required for diagnostic studies related to underground nuclear test shots. The invention is constructed of a length of cylindrical pipe or casing, with a whipstock seating spike extending from the lower end. A wedge-shaped segment is secured to the outer circumference of the upper end of the cylinder at a position diametrically opposite the circumferential position of the spike. Pin means are provided for affixing the whipstock to a directional drill bit and stem to alloy orienting and setting the whipstock properly in the drill hole. (AEC)

  4. LASER BEAMS. CAVITIES: Efficient diffraction grating for use in a grazing-incidence configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, S. V.

    1998-05-01

    Numerical-experiment methods were used to investigate a combined structure consisting of a dielectric diffraction grating and a metal mirror. It was found that the diffraction efficiency of such a combined grating with specially selected parameters can reach 40%—70% when the angle of incidence is 89°. This should make it possible to improve considerably the characteristics of single-frequency tunable pulsed lasers.

  5. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering) from polymers and colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been remarkably successful in providing detailed quantitative structural information on complex everyday materials, such as polymers and colloids, which are often of considerable industrial as well as academic interest. This paper reviews some recent SANS experiments on polymers and colloids, including ferrofluids, and discusses the use of these apparently complex systems as general physical models of the liquid or solid state.

  6. SASBDB, a repository for biological small-angle scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Erica; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Previtali, Gianpietro; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) are fundamental tools used to study the global shapes of proteins, nucleic acids, macromolecular complexes and assemblies in solution. Due to recent advances in instrumentation and computational methods, the quantity of experimental scattering data and subsequent publications is increasing dramatically. The need for a global repository allowing investigators to locate and access experimental scattering data and associated models was recently emphasized by the wwPDB small-angle scattering task force (SAStf). The small-angle scattering biological data bank (SASBDB) www.sasbdb.org has been designed in accordance with the plans of the SAStf as part of a future federated system of databases for biological SAXS and SANS. SASBDB is a comprehensive repository of freely accessible and fully searchable SAS experimental data and models that are deposited together with the relevant experimental conditions, sample details and instrument characteristics. At present the quality of deposited experimental data and the accuracy of models are manually curated, with future plans to integrate automated systems as the database expands. PMID:25352555

  7. Diffusion and nucleation in multilayer growth of PTCDI-C8 studied with in situ X-ray growth oscillations and real-time small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, Anton; Bommel, Sebastian; Wolf, Christopher; Pithan, Linus; Weber, Christopher; Beyer, Paul; Santoro, Gonzalo; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Kowarik, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    We study nucleation and multilayer growth of the perylene derivative PTCDI-C8 and find a persistent layer-by-layer growth, transformation of island shapes, and an enhancement of molecular diffusivity in upper monolayers (MLs). These findings result from the evaluation of the ML-dependent island densities, obtained by in situ real-time grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements and simultaneous X-ray growth oscillations. Complementary ex situ atomic force microscopy snapshots of different growth stages agree quantitatively with both X-ray techniques. The rate and temperature-dependent island density is analyzed using different mean-field nucleation models. Both a diffusion limited aggregation and an attachment limited aggregation model yield in the first two MLs the same critical nucleus size i, similar surface diffusion attempt frequencies in the 1019-1020 s-1 range, and a decrease of the diffusion barrier Ed in the 2nd ML by 140 meV.

  8. Observing the Sun in hard X-rays using grazing incidence optics: the FOXSI and HEROES projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson, Colleen

    2014-06-01

    Solar flares accelerate particles up to high energies through various acceleration mechanisms which are not currently understood. Hard X-rays are the most direct diagnostic of flare-accelerated electrons. However past and current hard x-ray observation lack the sensitivity and dynamic range necessary to observe the faint signature of accelerated electrons in the acceleration region, the solar corona. These limitations can be easily overcome through the use of HXR focusing optics coupled with solid state pixelated detectors. We present results from the recent flights of two sub-orbital payloads that have applied grazing incidence HXR optics to solar observations. FOXSI, short for Focusing Optics X-Ray Solar Imager, was launched on a sounding rocket in November 2012 from White Sanda and observed a solar flare. HEROES, short for High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, observed the sun for 7 hours from a high altitude balloon on September 21, 2013. We present recent results as well as the capabilities of a possible future satellite mission

  9. Density dependent composition of InAs quantum dots extracted from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Sanyal, Milan K.; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Dey, Arka B.; Bhattacharyya, Arpan; Seeck, Oliver H.; Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Felle, Martin; Bennett, Anthony J.; Shields, Andrew J.

    2015-10-01

    Epitaxial InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs substrate are being used in several applications ranging from quantum communications to solar cells. The growth mechanism of these dots also helps us to explore fundamental aspects of self-organized processes. Here we show that composition and strain profile of the quantum dots can be tuned by controlling in-plane density of the dots over the substrate with the help of substrate-temperature profile. The compositional profile extracted from grazing incidence x-ray measurements show substantial amount of inter-diffusion of Ga and In within the QD as a function of height in the low-density region giving rise to higher variation of lattice parameters. The QDs grown with high in-plane density show much less spread in lattice parameter giving almost flat density of In over the entire height of an average QD and much narrower photoluminescence (PL) line. The results have been verified with three different amounts of In deposition giving systematic variation of the In composition as a function of average quantum dot height and average energy of PL emission.

  10. Probing the self-assembled nanostructures of functional polymers with synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Ree, Moonhor

    2014-05-01

    For advanced functional polymers such as biopolymers, biomimic polymers, brush polymers, star polymers, dendritic polymers, and block copolymers, information about their surface structures, morphologies, and atomic structures is essential for understanding their properties and investigating their potential applications. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) is established for the last 15 years as the most powerful, versatile, and nondestructive tool for determining these structural details when performed with the aid of an advanced third-generation synchrotron radiation source with high flux, high energy resolution, energy tunability, and small beam size. One particular merit of this technique is that GIXS data can be obtained facilely for material specimens of any size, type, or shape. However, GIXS data analysis requires an understanding of GIXS theory and of refraction and reflection effects, and for any given material specimen, the best methods for extracting the form factor and the structure factor from the data need to be established. GIXS theory is reviewed here from the perspective of practical GIXS measurements and quantitative data analysis. In addition, schemes are discussed for the detailed analysis of GIXS data for the various self-assembled nanostructures of functional homopolymers, brush, star, and dendritic polymers, and block copolymers. Moreover, enhancements to the GIXS technique are discussed that can significantly improve its structure analysis by using the new synchrotron radiation sources such as third-generation X-ray sources with picosecond pulses and partial coherence and fourth-generation X-ray laser sources with femtosecond pulses and full coherence.

  11. Crystal structure of oligothiophene thin films characterized by two-dimensional grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Videlot-Ackermann, Christine; Ackermann, Jörg; Brisset, Hugues; Hirosawa, Ichiro; Yoshimoto, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structure in an highly oriented organic thin film was determined using two dimensional grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (2D-GIXD). α,ω-Hexyl-distyryl-bithiophene (DH-DS2T) was chosen as the material for the structural analysis, because it is a typical organic semiconductor showing a high crystallinity and an ordered layer-growth behavior. A 2D-GIXD pattern over large range of scattering angles was obtained by using high-brightness synchrotron radiation in SPring-8 and high-sensitive 2D X-ray detector (PILATUS 300 K). The analysis of the observed 2D-GIXD pattern was made to clarify that the crystal structure of highly oriented DH-DS2T thin films belongs to a monoclinic unit-cell with a = 0.58 nm, b = 0.78 nm, c = 3.43 nm, and β = 94.3°, and the space group is determined to be P21/a by considering the extinction rule. Furthermore, by fitting the simulated Bragg peak intensities to the experimental data, the molecular structure is determined. In this structure, two molecules are included in the unit cell and they tilt about 25° against substrate normal.

  12. An Investigation of Differential Deposition for Figure Corrections in Full-Shell Grazing-Incidents X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kirenmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    We are investigating differential deposition as a way of correcting small figure errors inside full-shell grazing-incidence x-ray optics. The optics in our study are fabricated using the electroformed-nickel-replication technique, and the figure errors arise from fabrication errors in the mandrel, from which the shells are replicated, as well as errors induced during the electroforming process. Combined, these give sub-micron-scale figure deviations which limit the angular resolution of the optics to approx. 10 arcsec. Sub-micron figure errors can be corrected by selectively depositing (physical vapor deposition) material inside the shell. The requirements for this filler material are that it must not degrade the ultra-smooth surface finish necessary for efficient x-ray reflection (approx. 5 A rms), and must not be highly stressed. In addition, a technique must be found to produce well controlled and defined beams within highly constrained geometries, as some of our mirror shells are less than 3 cm in diameter.

  13. Density dependent composition of InAs quantum dots extracted from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manjula; Sanyal, Milan K.; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Dey, Arka B.; Bhattacharyya, Arpan; Seeck, Oliver H.; Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Felle, Martin; Bennett, Anthony J.; Shields, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs substrate are being used in several applications ranging from quantum communications to solar cells. The growth mechanism of these dots also helps us to explore fundamental aspects of self-organized processes. Here we show that composition and strain profile of the quantum dots can be tuned by controlling in-plane density of the dots over the substrate with the help of substrate-temperature profile. The compositional profile extracted from grazing incidence x-ray measurements show substantial amount of inter-diffusion of Ga and In within the QD as a function of height in the low-density region giving rise to higher variation of lattice parameters. The QDs grown with high in-plane density show much less spread in lattice parameter giving almost flat density of In over the entire height of an average QD and much narrower photoluminescence (PL) line. The results have been verified with three different amounts of In deposition giving systematic variation of the In composition as a function of average quantum dot height and average energy of PL emission. PMID:26506865

  14. Surface structure of sterically stabilized ferrofluids in a normal magnetic field: grazing-incidence x-ray study.

    PubMed

    Vorobiev, A; Gordeev, G; Konovalov, O; Orlova, D

    2009-03-01

    We studied the internal structure of sterically stabilized water- and oil-based ferrofluids in the vicinity of the free interface with a gas by means of x-ray reflectometry and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It was found that in-depth distribution of the magnetic nanoparticles in the layer close to the interface is essentially inhomogeneous. In the case of water-based ferrofluids an enhanced concentration of surfactant and subsequent reduced concentration of the particles were detected in the 100-200-A -thick interface-adjacent layer. Scattering patterns possessing characteristic features of powder diffraction revealed partial ordering of the surfactant in a multilamellar structure. External magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the interface effectively reduced thickness of the depleted layer bringing the particles from the bulk to the surface. However no field-induced correlations between the particles were detected. In the top 500-A -thick layer of an oil-based ferrofluid depletion of the particles density was also present; however, no special arrangement of the surfactant molecules was manifested by the experimental data. Interestingly, for all samples we observed wavy surface deformation appearing in the normal magnetic field of a strength H much smaller than the critical values H_{c} calculated according to the conventional theory of ferrofluid surface instability. This deformation with lateral periodicity of a few millimeters has an amplitude smoothly increasing up to a few microns at H=0.5H_{c} .

  15. Ruthenium-Platinum Thin Film Analysis Using Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.

    2004-09-03

    Ruthenium (Ru, Z = 44) is a Platinum Group Metal that has a standard hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystalline structure. Platinum (Pt, Z = 78) has a face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline structure. When these metals are co-sputtered onto a silicon substrate, creating a few nm-thin film, they form an alloy with a combination of HCP and FCC structure. Direct methanol fuel cells rely on an anode catalyst to draw hydrogen from liquid methanol. Highly efficient fuel cells based on polymer electrolyte catalysts, known as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, have been developed, but require large amounts of a costly platinum catalyst. Thin-film nanostructure bimetallic alloys have been produced to reduce the amount of expensive Platinum needed for catalysis, and also to improve the electrochemical properties of the catalyst. Supported RuPt particles have been shown to have superior activity as anode catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation and demonstrate an improvement in resistance to poisoning in comparison to unalloyed Pt. The percentage of Ruthenium in a RuPt thin film and the process by which the alloy is produced will dictate the crystalline structure, and thus the electrochemical properties of the film. Pure Ruthenium, Pure Platinum, and eight intermediate samples at differing percent composition of Ruthenium were characterized by their X-ray diffraction patterns. The incident beam is from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory beam and operates at approximately a 1.4 Angstrom wavelength. The results show that 0% Ru through 46.17% Ru exhibit a majority FCC structure, 56.07% Ru and 60.61% Ru are mixed phase, and from 67.03% Ru through 100% Ru, the samples exhibit a HCP structure.

  16. The dedicated high-resolution grazing-incidence X-ray scattering beamline 8-ID-E at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhang; Li, Xuefa; Strzalka, Joseph; Sprung, Michael; Sun, Tao; Sandy, Alec R; Narayanan, Suresh; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Wang, Jin

    2012-07-01

    As an increasingly important structural-characterization technique, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) has found wide applications for in situ and real-time studies of nanostructures and nanocomposites at surfaces and interfaces. A dedicated beamline has been designed, constructed and optimized at beamline 8-ID-E at the Advanced Photon Source for high-resolution and coherent GIXS experiments. The effectiveness and applicability of the beamline and the scattering techniques have been demonstrated by a host of experiments including reflectivity, grazing-incidence static and kinetic scattering, and coherent surface X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The applicable systems that can be studied at 8-ID-E include liquid surfaces and nanostructured thin films.

  17. ASIC for Small Angle Neutron Scattering Experiments at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Smith, Graham C.; Yu, Bo; Vernon, Emerson; Britton, Charles L.; Bryan, William L.; Clonts, Lloyd G.; Frank, Shane S.

    2007-06-01

    We present an ASIC for a 3He gas detector to be used in small angle neutron scattering experiments at the spallation neutron source in oak ridge. The ASIC is composed of 64 channels with low noise charge amplification, filtering, timing and amplitude measurement circuits, where an innovative current-mode peak-detector and digitizer (PDAD) is adopted. The proposed PDAD provides at the same time peak detection and A/D conversion in real time, at low power, and without requiring a clock signal. The channels share an efficient data sparsification and derandomization scheme, a 30-bit 256 deep FIFO, and low voltage differential signaling.

  18. Small-angle scattering and 3D structure interpretation.

    PubMed

    Trewhella, Jill

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on advances in the application of solution small-angle scattering (SAS) in structural analysis of biomolecules and the complexes they form. Examples highlighted illustrate the unique contribution of SAS, using both X-rays and neutrons, in hybrid or integrative modelling methods. The increased information content when neutron scattering with contrast variation is used is a particular focus. Finally, progress toward an agreed reporting framework, the development of open data and model archives, and the importance of these initiatives is covered.

  19. Calculations of transonic boattail flow at small angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, A.; Chow, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    A transonic flow past a boattailed afterbody under a small angle of attack was examined. It is known that the viscous effect offers significant modifications of the pressure distribution on the afterbody. Thus, the formulation for the inviscid flow was based on the consideration of a flow past a nonaxisymmetric body. The full three dimensional potential equation was solved through numerical relaxation, and quasi-axisymmetric boundary layer calculations were performed to estimate the displacement effect. It was observed again that the viscous effects were not negligible. The trend of the final results agreed well with the experimental data.

  20. Multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 19-22, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Editor); Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The present volume on multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography discusses AXAF grazing incidence mirrors, the theory and high throughput optics of grazing incidence optics, multilayer mirror fabrication and characterization, and multilayer optics for X-ray projection lithography. Attention is given to the VETA-I X-ray detection system, a motion detection system for AXAF X-ray ground testing, image analysis of the AXAF VETA-I X-ray mirror, and optical constants from mirror reflectivities measured at synchrotrons. Topics discussed include the application of aberration theory to calculate encircled energy of Wolter I-II telescopes, W/C multilayers deposited on plastic films, nonspecular X-ray scattering from Si/Mo multilayers, and multilayer thin-film design as FUV polarizers. Also discussed are thin-film filter lifetesting results in the EUV, chromospheric and coronal observations with multilayer optics, present and future requirements of soft X-ray projection lithography, and the imaging Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscope.

  1. Small-Angle Scattering from Nanoscale Fat Fractals.

    PubMed

    Anitas, E M; Slyamov, A; Todoran, R; Szakacs, Z

    2017-12-01

    Small-angle scattering (of neutrons, x-ray, or light; SAS) is considered to describe the structural characteristics of deterministic nanoscale fat fractals. We show that in the case of a polydisperse fractal system, with equal probability for any orientation, one obtains the fractal dimensions and scaling factors at each structural level. This is in agreement with general results deduced in the context of small-angle scattering analysis of a system of randomly oriented, non-interacting, nano-/micro-fractals. We apply our results to a two-dimensional fat Cantor-like fractal, calculating analytic expressions for the scattering intensities and structure factors. We explain how the structural properties can be computed from experimental data and show their correlation to the variation of the scaling factor with the iteration number. The model can be used to interpret recorded experimental SAS data in the framework of fat fractals and can reveal structural properties of materials characterized by a regular law of changing of the fractal dimensions. It can describe successions of power-law decays, with arbitrary decreasing values of the scattering exponents, and interleaved by regions of constant intensity.

  2. Analysis of PKR Structure by Small-Angle Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    VanOudenhove, Jennifer; Anderson, Eric; Krueger, Susan; Cole, James L.

    2009-04-27

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is a key component of the interferon antiviral defense pathway. Upon binding double-stranded RNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation reactions that activate the kinase. PKR contains an N-terminal double-stranded RNA binding domain, which consists of two tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs, and a C-terminal kinase domain. We have used small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering to define the conformation of latent PKR in solution. Guinier analysis indicates a radius of gyration of about 35 {angstrom}. The p(r) distance distribution function exhibits a peak near 30 {angstrom}, with a broad shoulder extending to longer distances. Good fits to the scattering data require models that incorporate multiple compact and extended conformations of the two interdomain linker regions. Thus, PKR belongs to the growing family of proteins that contain intrinsically unstructured regions. We propose that the flexible linkers may allow PKR to productively dimerize upon interaction with RNA activators that have diverse structures.

  3. Small-Angle Scattering from Nanoscale Fat Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.; Slyamov, A.; Todoran, R.; Szakacs, Z.

    2017-06-01

    Small-angle scattering (of neutrons, x-ray, or light; SAS) is considered to describe the structural characteristics of deterministic nanoscale fat fractals. We show that in the case of a polydisperse fractal system, with equal probability for any orientation, one obtains the fractal dimensions and scaling factors at each structural level. This is in agreement with general results deduced in the context of small-angle scattering analysis of a system of randomly oriented, non-interacting, nano-/micro-fractals. We apply our results to a two-dimensional fat Cantor-like fractal, calculating analytic expressions for the scattering intensities and structure factors. We explain how the structural properties can be computed from experimental data and show their correlation to the variation of the scaling factor with the iteration number. The model can be used to interpret recorded experimental SAS data in the framework of fat fractals and can reveal structural properties of materials characterized by a regular law of changing of the fractal dimensions. It can describe successions of power-law decays, with arbitrary decreasing values of the scattering exponents, and interleaved by regions of constant intensity.

  4. Emerging applications of small angle solution scattering in structural biology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2015-03-01

    Small angle solution X-ray and neutron scattering recently resurfaced as powerful tools to address an array of biological problems including folding, intrinsic disorder, conformational transitions, macromolecular crowding, and self or hetero-assembling of biomacromolecules. In addition, small angle solution scattering complements crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and other structural methods to aid in the structure determinations of multidomain or multicomponent proteins or nucleoprotein assemblies. Neutron scattering with hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation, or X-ray scattering with sucrose contrast variation to a certain extent, is a convenient tool for characterizing the organizations of two-component systems such as a nucleoprotein or a lipid-protein assembly. Time-resolved small and wide-angle solution scattering to study biological processes in real time, and the use of localized heavy-atom labeling and anomalous solution scattering for applications as FRET-like molecular rulers, are amongst promising newer developments. Despite the challenges in data analysis and interpretation, these X-ray/neutron solution scattering based approaches hold great promise for understanding a wide variety of complex processes prevalent in the biological milieu.

  5. Emerging applications of small angle solution scattering in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2015-01-01

    Small angle solution X-ray and neutron scattering recently resurfaced as powerful tools to address an array of biological problems including folding, intrinsic disorder, conformational transitions, macromolecular crowding, and self or hetero-assembling of biomacromolecules. In addition, small angle solution scattering complements crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and other structural methods to aid in the structure determinations of multidomain or multicomponent proteins or nucleoprotein assemblies. Neutron scattering with hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation, or X-ray scattering with sucrose contrast variation to a certain extent, is a convenient tool for characterizing the organizations of two-component systems such as a nucleoprotein or a lipid-protein assembly. Time-resolved small and wide-angle solution scattering to study biological processes in real time, and the use of localized heavy-atom labeling and anomalous solution scattering for applications as FRET-like molecular rulers, are amongst promising newer developments. Despite the challenges in data analysis and interpretation, these X-ray/neutron solution scattering based approaches hold great promise for understanding a wide variety of complex processes prevalent in the biological milieu. PMID:25516491

  6. Flat lens criterion by small-angle phase.

    PubMed

    Ott, Peter; Al Shakhs, Mohammed H; Lezec, Henri J; Chau, Kenneth J

    2014-12-01

    We show that a classical imaging criterion based on angular dependence of small-angle phase can be applied to any system composed of planar, uniform media to determine if it is a flat lens capable of forming a real paraxial image and to estimate the image location. The real paraxial image location obtained by this method shows agreement with past demonstrations of far-field flat-lens imaging and can even predict the location of super-resolved images in the near-field. The generality of this criterion leads to several new predictions: flat lenses for transverse-electric polarization using dielectric layers, a broadband flat lens working across the ultraviolet-visible spectrum, and a flat lens configuration with an image plane located up to several wavelengths from the exit surface. These predictions are supported by full-wave simulations. Our work shows that small-angle phase can be used as a generic metric to categorize and design flat lenses.

  7. Theory of oblique and grazing incidence Talbot‑Lau interferometers and demonstration in a compact source x‑ray reflective interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han; Kemble, Camille K; Bennett, Eric E

    2011-12-05

    With the advent of Talbot-Lau interferometers for x-ray phase-contrast imaging, oblique and grazing incidence configurations are now used in the pursuit of sub-micron grating periods and high sensitivity. Here we address the question whether interferometers having oblique incident beams behave in the same way as the well-understood normal incidence ones, particularly when the grating planes are non-parallel. We derive the normal incidence equivalence of oblique incidence geometries from wave propagation modeling. Based on the theory, we propose a practical method to correct for non-parallelism of the grating planes, and demonstrate its effectiveness with a polychromatic hard x-ray reflective interferometer.

  8. Effect of agro-ecological zone and grazing system on incidence of East Coast Fever in calves in Mbale and Sironko Districts of Eastern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rubaire-Akiiki, Christopher M; Okello-Onen, Joseph; Musunga, David; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Vaarst, Mettee; Okello, David; Opolot, Charles; Bisagaya, A; Okori, C; Bisagati, C; Ongyera, S; Mwayi, M T

    2006-08-17

    Between May 2002 and February 2003 a longitudinal survey was carried out in Mbale and Sironko Districts of Eastern Uganda to determine the influence of agro-ecological zones (AEZ) and grazing systems on tick infestation patterns and incidence of East Coast Fever (ECF) in bovine calves. The study area was stratified into AEZ (lowland, midland and upland) and grazing systems {zero grazing (ZG), restricted-outdoor grazing (ROG) and communal grazing (CG)}, whose strata had previously been shown to influence the prevalence of ECF, babesiosis and anaplasmosis. One hundred and eighty-five smallholder dairy farms with a total of 198 calves of both sexes, between the ages of 1 day and 6 weeks, were purposively selected from the AEZ-grazing system strata. Nine dynamic cohorts (11-51 calves in each) of these calves were examined and sampled monthly. Ticks infesting the calves were counted from one side of the animal body and categorized into the different species, sex and feeding status. Sera were collected at recruitment and monthly thereafter and antibodies against Theileria parva, T. mutans, Babesia bigemina, B. bovis and Anaplasma marginale were measured using ELISA. Tick challenge (total and specific) varied with AEZ and grazing system. The risk of infection with T. parva was higher in the lowland zone compared to the upland zone (hazard ratio (HR)=2.59; 95% CI: 1.00-6.34). The risk of infection with T. parva was higher in the CG system than the ZG system (HR=10.00; 95% CI: 3.61-27.92). The incidence risk for sero-conversion, over the 10 months study period, was 62, 16 and 9% in the lowland, midland and upland zones, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of the calves in lowland-CG stratum sero-converted by the age of 6 months, while 56 and 8% did so in the lowland-ROG and the lowland-ZG stratum, respectively. The results of this study show the need to consider farm circumstances and the variation in ECF risk, both spatially and temporally when designing control strategies

  9. Slumping technique for the manufacturing of a representative x-ray grazing incidence mirror module for future space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, Mauro; Proserpio, Laura; Basso, Stefano; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta M.; Pareschi, Giovanni; Salmaso, Bianca; Sironi, Giorgia; Spiga, Daniele; Tagliaferri, Giampiero; Vecchi, Gabriele; Zambra, Alberto; Parodi, Giancarlo; Martelli, Francesco; Gallieni, Daniele; Tintori, Matteo; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Ferrario, Ivan; Burwitz, Vadim

    2013-09-01

    The Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB, Italy), with the financing support of the European Space Agency (ESA), has concluded a study regarding a glass shaping technology for the production of grazing incidence segmented x-ray optics. This technique uses a hot slumping phase, in which pressure is actively applied on thin glass foils being shaped, to form a cylindrical approximation of Wolter I x-ray segments, and a subsequent cold slumping phase, in which the final Wolter I profile is then freeze into the glass segments during their integration in elemental X-ray Optical Units. The final goal of this study was the manufacturing of a prototype containing a number of slumped pair plates (meaning parabola and hyperbola couples) having representative dimensions to be tested both in UV light and in x-rays at the Panter facility (Germany). In this paper, the INAF-OAB slumping technique, comprising a shaping step and an integration step is described, together with the results obtained on the manufactured prototype modules: the first prototype was aimed to test the ad-hoc designed and built semi-automatic Integration MAchine (IMA) and debug its control software. The most complete module comprises 40 slumped segments of Schott D263 glass type of dimension 200 mm x 200 mm and thickness of 0.4 mm, slumped on Zerodur K20 mould and stacked together through glued BK7 glass structural ribs to form the first entire x-ray optical module ever built totally composed by glass. A last prototype was aimed at demonstrate the use of Schott glass AF32 type instead of D263. In particular, a new hot slumping experimental set-up is described whose advantage is to permit a better contact between mould and glass during the shaping process. The integration procedure of the slumped segments into the elemental module is also reviewed.

  10. Grazing incidence diffraction studies of the interactions between ursane-type antimicrobial triterpenes and bacterial anionic phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł; Fontaine, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    α-Amyrin (AMalf) and ursolic acid (Urs) are ursane-type pentacyclic triterpenes which exhibit wide spectrum of antibacterial activity. These surface active compounds can be incorporated into bacterial membranes and alter their structure and function; however, the exact mechanism of their action still needs to be elucidated. Thus, we decided to study the interactions of these terpenes with specific anionic phospholipids:cardiolipins and phosphatidylglycerols extracted from Escherichia coli in the model environment of Langmuir monolayers. To characterize the ordering of the terpene molecules in one-component films as well as to study their interactions with the bacterial phospholipids in binary monolayers we applied grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). It turned out that amyrins and ursolic acid molecules form crystalline hexagonal phases in Langmuir monolayers, in which the molecules are oriented uprightly. Regarding the mixtures, it was found that in the monolayers with Urs crystalline domains are present till moderate or even low Urs proportion. In contrast, in the mixtures with AMalf crystalline domains were observed only at the highest terpene concentration. In the interpretation of our results we underlined the significance of the interactions between the cyclopropane ring present in the hydrophobic part of the bacterial phospholipids and the terminal ring of the terpene structure. We proposed that the significant differences between the systems with AMalf and Urs are connected with the formation of hydrogen bonds between the Urs hydrophobic moieties. It can be inferred from the results that Urs is a more membrane-active agent than AMalf. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Finite-size effect in light transmission through highly forward scattering media at grazing angles.

    PubMed

    Marinyuk, V V; Sheberstov, S V

    2016-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of light transmission through a disordered medium with large (compared to the light wavelength) inhomogeneities. Both numerical integration and analytic treatments of the radiative transfer equation are performed. An effect of the single-scattering phase function on the total transmittance is found in a subdiffusion thickness range. The effect reveals itself at grazing angles of incidence and originates from small-angle multiple scattering of light. A simple analytic formula for the total transmittance is derived. Our results are in good agreement with data of independent numerical calculations.

  12. Structure of a two-dimensional crystal in a Langmuir monolayer: grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and macroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, C.; Gallet, F.; Graner, F.; Goldmann, M.; Peterson, I.; Renault, A.

    1994-06-01

    Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction is performed on a Langmuir monolayer made of pure fluorescent NBD-stearic acid, spread at the free surface of water. It shows several intense narrow peaks in the solid phase, at the same wavevectors as the brightest peaks observed earlier by electron diffraction, for a monolayer transferred onto an amorphous polymer substrate. Thus the solid phase has the same crystalline structure on water and on solid substrate. The relative peak intensities are comparable in both experiments, and in the proposed model for the molecular structure. This model also accounts for the very large anisotropy of the crystalline phase and its optical properties. This phase could be ferroelectric, as previously assumed in order to explain the elongated shape of the crystals. Une monocouche de Langmuir, composée d'acide NBD-stéarique fluorescent pur, déposée à la surface libre de l'eau, est analysée par diffraction de rayons X sous incidence rasante. On détecte plusieurs pics étroits et intenses dans la phase solide, aux mêmes vecteurs d'onde que les pics les plus brillants précédemment observés par diffraction électronique, pour une monocouche transférée sur un substrat de polymère amorphe. La phase solide a donc la même structure cristalline sur l'eau et sur substrat solide. Les intensités relatives des pics sont comparables dans les deux expériences, ainsi que dans le modèle proposé pour la structure moléculaire. Ce modèle rend également compte de l'anisotropie très importante de la phase cristalline et de ses propriétés optiques. Il pourrait s'agir d'une phase ferroélectrique, comme cela avait été précédemment supposé pour expliquer la forme allongée des cristaux.

  13. The measurement capabilities of cross-sectional profile of Nanoimprint template pattern using small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Eiji; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Itoh, Masamitsu; Omote, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Ogata, Kiyoshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2016-05-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is one of the most potential candidates for the next generation lithography for semiconductor. It will achieve the lithography with high resolution and low cost. High resolution of NIL will be determined by a high definition template. Nanoimprint lithography will faithfully transfer the pattern of NIL template to the wafer. Cross-sectional profile of the template pattern will greatly affect the resist profile on the wafer. Therefore, the management of the cross-sectional profile is essential. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GI-SAXS) technique has been proposed as one of the method for measuring cross-sectional profile of periodic nanostructure pattern. Incident x-rays are irradiated to the sample surface with very low glancing angle. It is close to the critical angle of the total reflection of the x-ray. The scattered x-rays from the surface structure are detected on a two-dimensional detector. The observed intensity is discrete in the horizontal (2θ) direction. It is due to the periodicity of the structure, and diffraction is observed only when the diffraction condition is satisfied. In the vertical (β) direction, the diffraction intensity pattern shows interference fringes reflected to height and shape of the structure. Features of the measurement using x-ray are that the optical constant for the materials are well known, and it is possible to calculate a specific diffraction intensity pattern based on a certain model of the cross-sectional profile. The surface structure is estimated by to collate the calculated diffraction intensity pattern that sequentially while changing the model parameters with the measured diffraction intensity pattern. Furthermore, GI-SAXS technique can be measured an object in a non-destructive. It suggests the potential to be an effective tool for product quality assurance. We have developed a cross-sectional profile measurement of quartz template pattern using GI-SAXS technique. In this

  14. Measurement of two-dimensional small angle deviation with a prism interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Kumar, Y. Pavan

    2008-09-20

    A new technique for the measurement of two-dimensional small angular deviation is presented. A compound prism, which effectively produces a combination of two right-angled prisms in orthogonal directions, and plane reference surfaces have been utilized for the measurement of the orthogonal components of the angular tilt of an incident plane wavefront. Each orthogonal component of the angular tilt is separately measured from the angular rotation of the resultant wedge fringes between two plane wavefronts generated due to splitting of the incident plane wavefront by the corresponding set of right-angled prism and plane reference surface. The technique is shown to have high sensitivity for the measurement of small angle deviation. A monolithic prism interferometer, which is practically insensitive to vibration, is also proposed. Results obtained for the measurement of a known tilt angle are presented.

  15. The 40m General Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, George D; Bailey, Katherine M; Buchanan, Michelle V; Butler, Paul D; Heller, William T; Littrell, Ken; Lynn, Gary W; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Myles, Dean A A; Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    A high-flux, 40m long small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument has been constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The facility utilizes a mechanical velocity selector, pinhole collimation and a high count-rate (> 105 Hz), large-area (1m2) two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The incident wavelength ( ), resolution ( / ), incident collimation and sample-detector distance are independently variable under computer control. The detector can translate 45cm off axis to increase the overall Q-range (< 0.001 < Q = 4 -1sin < 1 -1), where 2 is the angle of scatter. The design and characteristics of this instrument are described along with examples of scattering data to illustrate the performance.

  16. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  17. Grazing incidence neutron optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 .ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering studies of vesicle stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.

    1997-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate the structure of mixed colloids of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) with the bile salt, cholylglycine (CG), in D{sub 2}O as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). At atmospheric pressure, the system forms an isotropic phase of mixed, single bilayer vesicles (SLV`s). Increasing the external hydrostatic pressure brought about significant changes in particle morphology. At T = 25 C, application of a pressure of 3.5 MPa resulted in the collapse of the SLV`s. Further increase of P, up to 51.8 MPa, resulted in a transition from a phase of ordered (stacked), collapsed vesicles to one of stacked, ribbon-like particles. A similar collapse of the vesicles was observed at higher temperature (T = 37 C) with increasing P, but at this temperature, no ribbon phase was found at the highest pressure explored.

  19. Small-angle electron scattering from magnetic artificial lattice.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Kazuya; Koyama, Tsukasa; Mori, Shigeo; Harada, Ken; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    In this study, quantitative reciprocal-space analyses of magnetic domain structures in magnetic artificial lattices of patterned elements were performed by means of the small-angle electron scattering (SAES) technique. Using a conventional transmission electron microscope with a LaB(6) thermal-emission electron gun, Lorentz deflection due to magnetic moments in patterned elements and Bragg diffraction due to the lattice periodicity are simultaneously recorded at an angle of the order of less than 1 10(-)(6) rad when using electron waves with high spatial coherency and large camera length. The present SAES technique together with TEM real-space imaging methods such as Lorentz microscopy will be useful in analyzing electromagnetic fields in nano-scaled materials.

  20. Small-angle electron scattering of magnetic fine structures.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic structures in magnetic artificial lattices and chiral magnetic orders in chiral magnets have been quantitatively analyzed in the reciprocal space by means of small-angle electron scattering (SAES) method. Lorentz deflection due to magnetic moments and Bragg diffraction due to periodicity are simultaneously recorded at an angle of the order of or less than 1 × 10(-6) rad, using a camera length of more than 100 m. The present SAES method, together with TEM real-space imaging methods such as in-situ Lorentz microscopy, is very powerful in analyzing magnetic fine structures in magnetic materials. Indeed, the existence of both a chiral helimagnetic structure and a chiral magnetic soliton lattice in a chiral magnet CrNb3S6 has been successfully verified for the first time using the present complementary methods.

  1. SMALL ANGLE CRAB COMPENSATION FOR LHC IR UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    CALAGA,R.; DORDA, U.; OHMI, D.; OIDE, K.; TOMAS, R.; ZIMMERMANN, F.

    2007-06-25

    A small angle (< 1 mrad) crab scheme is an attractive option for the LHC luminosity upgrade to recover the geometric luminosity loss from the finite crossing angle [I]. The luminosity loss increases steeply to unacceptable levels as the IP beta function is reduced below its nominal value (see Fig. 1 in Ref. [2]). The crab compensation in the LHC can be accomplished using only two sets of deflecting RF cavities, placed in collision-free straight sections of the LHC to nullify the effective crossing angles at IPI & IP5. We also explore a 400 MHz superconducting cavity design and discuss the pertinent RF challenges. We present IR optics configurations with low-angle crab crossing, study the beam-beam performance and proton-beam emittance growth in the presence of crab compensation, lattice errors, and crab RF noise sources.

  2. Radiation damage study using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétfalvi, E.; Török, Gy; Rosta, L.

    2000-03-01

    Nuclear radiation provides important changes in the microstructure of metallic components of nuclear power plant and research reactors, influencing their mechanical properties. The investigation of this problem has primary interest for the safety and life-time of such nuclear installations. For the characterization of this kind of nanostructures small angle neutron scattering technique is a very useful tool. We have carried out experiments on samples of irradiated reactor vessel material and welded components of VVER-440-type reactors on the SANS instrument at the Budapest Research Reactor. In our measurements irradiated as well as non-irradiated samples were compared and magnetic field was applied for viewing the magnetic structure effects of the materials. A clear modification of the structure due to irradiation was obtained. Our data were analyzed by the ITP92 code, the inverse Fourier transform program of O. Glatter [1].

  3. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  4. A novel small-angle neutron scattering detector geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Jackson, Andrew; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Piscitelli, Francesco; Kirstein, Oliver; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel 2π detector geometry for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) applications is presented and its theoretical performance evaluated. Such a novel geometry is ideally suited for a SANS instrument at the European Spallation Source (ESS). Motivated by the low availability and high price of 3He, the new concept utilizes gaseous detectors with 10B as the neutron converter. The shape of the detector is inspired by an optimization process based on the properties of the conversion material. Advantages over the detector geometry traditionally used on SANS instruments are discussed. The angular and time resolutions of the proposed detector concept are shown to satisfy the requirements of the particular SANS instrument. PMID:24046504

  5. Disordered porous solids : from chord distributions to small angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, P.; Tchoubar, D.

    1992-06-01

    Disordered biphasic porous solids are examples of complex interfacial media. Small angle scattering strongly depends on the geometrical properties of the internal surface partitioning a porous system. Properties of the second derivative of the bulk autocorrelation function quantitatively defines the level of connection between the small angle scattering and the statistical properties of this interface. A tractable expression of this second derivative, involving the pore and the mass chord distribution functions, was proposed by Mering and Tchoubar (MT). Based on the present possibility to make a quantitative connection between imaging techniques and the small angle scattering, this paper tries to complete and to extend the MT approach. We first discuss how chord distribution functions can be used as fingerprints of the structural disorder. An explicit relation between the small angle scattering and these chord distributions is then proposed. In a third part, the application to different types of disorder is critically discussed and predictions are compared to available experimental data. Using image processing, we will consider three types of disorder : the long-range Debye randomness, the “ correlated " disorder with a special emphasis on the structure of a porous glass (the vycor), and, finally, complex structures where length scale invariance properties can be observed. Les solides poreux biphasiques sont des exemples de milieux interfaciaux complexes. La diffusion aux petits angles (SAS) dépend fortement des propriétés géométriques de l'interface partitionant le milieu poreux. Les propriétés de la dérivée seconde de la fonction d'autocorrélation de densité définit quantitativement le niveau de connection entre la diffusion aux petits angles et les caractéristiques statistiques de cette interface. Une expression utilisable de cette seconde dérivée, impliquant les distributions de cordes associées à la phase massique et au réseau de pores, fut

  6. Small angle scattering from protein/sugar conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andrew; White, John

    2006-11-01

    The Maillard reaction between free amine groups on proteins and sugars is well known. We have examined the effect of the reaction of the casein group of milk proteins with sugars on their nanoscale structure and aggregation. The small angle neutron scattering from beta casein and sodium caseinate and their sugar conjugates have been studied as a function of solution concentration. At high conjugate concentration (greater than ca. 5 mg/ml) the addition of sugar reduces supra-micellar aggregation of the protein whilst at lower concentration, where the protein is expected to be deaggregated already, little effect is seen. Guinier analysis of the scattering data show a radius of gyration of around 75 A˚ for beta casein in solution and around 80 A˚ for the sucrose conjugate.

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering study of polymeric micellar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Chu, B. ); Schneider, D.K. )

    1994-11-17

    Polymeric micellar structures formed by a PEO-PPO-PEO copolymer in o-xylene in the presence of water were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. In order to reveal the detailed micellar structure, different contrasts among the micellar core, the micellar shell, and the dispersing medium (background) were constructed by selectively changing the protonated/deuterated combination of water and xylene. The micellar structure could be well described by a core-shell structure with the scattering behavior of the micellar shell being very similar to that of a star polymer. The solubilized water existed not only in the micellar core but also in the micellar shell. The volume fraction of a copolymer segments in the micellar shell was rather low, being of the order of 0.2. There seemed to be no sharp interface between the micellar core and the micellar shell. 25 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Small angle neutron scattering using a triple axis spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmend, F.U.; Kamal, I.; Yunus, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    SANS technique has been developed on a triple axis neutron spectrometer at TRIGA Mark II (3 MW) research reactor, AERE, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Double crystal (with very small mosaic spread {approximately} 1 min.) diffraction known as Bonse and Hart`s method has been employed in this technique. Such a device is a useful tool for small angle scattering in the Q range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -1} {Angstrom}{sup -1} and for real time experiments at short time scales. Therefore, large objects and large distance interparticle correlations can be investigated easily by this method. Test measurements using alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) sample has been carried out to exploit this method. The radius of gyration has been determined and the data has been fitted to the scattering function of a sphere.

  9. Windows for small-angle X-ray scattering cryostats.

    PubMed

    Lurio, Laurence; Mulders, Norbert; Paetkau, Mark; Jemian, Pete R; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec

    2007-11-01

    To determine the suitability of commonly used windows for small-angle X-ray scattering, a range of materials, including Kapton, (aluminized) Mylar, beryllium, high-purity aluminium foil, mica and silicon nitride have been studied. At small wavevector transfers, Q, in the range 2 x 10(-3) to 0.2 nm(-1), the scattering from Kapton, mica and beryllium is reasonably well described by power laws in Q with exponents of -3.25, -3.6 and -3.9, respectively. There are large variations in the scattering from mica, but a freshly cleaved natural mica window was by far the weakest scatterer. For applications where radiation in the infrared or visible range should be blocked, aluminized Mylar is the most suitable material. Both Mylar and Kapton can be used to make very simple demountable superfluid-tight windows using indium O-ring seals.

  10. Small Angle Physics at CDF: A Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, Riccardo

    1989-12-16

    In 1989 CDF collected data in special high beta runs with a trigger selecting elastic and inelastic events in order to measure the total cross section ({sigma}{sub tot}) and the differential elastic cross section (d{sigma}{sub el}/dt). Data were taken at cms energies of 300, 540, 1000 and 1800 GeV. A double arm magnetic spectrometer located along the beam pipe tags the particles scattered at very small angles and tracking detectors surrounding the interaction point reveal particles produced at larger angles. We discuss the status of the analysis of elastic and inelastic events with emphasis on the event selection and the background subtraction. 5 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. E. Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-15

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  12. High resolution grazing-incidence in-plane x-ray diffraction for measuring the strain of a Si thin layer.

    PubMed

    Omote, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the strain of a thin Si layer deposited on a SiGe layer using a high resolution x-ray diffraction system. The Si layer was deposited on the SiGe layer in order to introduce a tensile strain to the Si layer. To measure the in-plane lattice constant accurately, we have employed so-called grazing-incidence in-plane diffraction. For this measurement, we have made a new five-axis x-ray goniometer which has four ordinal circles (ω, 2θ, χ, φ) plus a counter-χ-axis for selecting the exit angle of the diffracted x-rays. In grazing-incidence geometry, an incident x-ray is focused on the sample surface in order to obtain good diffraction intensity even though the layer thickness is less than 5 nm. Because diffracted x-rays are detected through analyzer crystals, the diffraction angle can be determined with an accuracy of ± 0.0003°. This indicates that the strain sensitivity is about 10( - 5) when we measure in-plane Si 220 diffraction. Use of x-ray diffraction could be the best standard metrology method for determining strain in thin layers. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that incident/exit angle selected in-plane diffraction is very useful for height/depth selective strain determination.

  13. Monte-Carlo simulation of an ultra small-angle neutron scattering instrument based on Soller slits

    SciTech Connect

    Rieker, T.; Hubbard, P.

    1997-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate an ultra small-angle neutron scattering instrument for use at a pulsed source based on a Soller slit collimator and analyzer. The simulations show that for a q{sub min} of {approximately}le-4 {angstrom}{sup -1} (15 {angstrom} neutrons) a few tenths of a percent of the incident flux is transmitted through both collimators at q=0.

  14. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) as the final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    1999-06-25

    A thin film of liquid metal serves as a grazing incident liquid metal mirror (GILMM) for robust final optics of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the mirror can withstand, called the damage limit, of a sodium film 85{degree} from normal arbitrarily set by surface temperature rise of 200 C to limit liquid ablation is 57 J/cm{sup 2} normal to the beam for a 20 ns pulse and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2} for a 10 ps pulse of 0.35 pm light. Liquid aluminum can handle 106 J/cm{sup 2}. The damage limit actually should be set by avoiding liquid ablation due to the rapid surface heating which is expected to result in even higher temperatures rises than 200 C and even higher power densities. The liquid surface is kept flat to the required accuracy by a combination of polished substrate, adaptive optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film. The film's substrate must be polished to {+-}0.015 m. Then surface tension keeps the surface smooth over short distances (<10 mm) and low Reynolds number laminar flow keeps the surface smooth by keeping the film thickness constant to less than {+-} 0.01 pm over long distance >10 mm. Adaptive (deformable) optics techniques keep the substrate flat to within {+-}0.06 {micro}m over 100 mm distance and {+-}0.6 {micro}m over 1,000 mm distances. The mirror can withstand the x-ray pulse when located 30 m away from the microexplosions of nominal yield of 400 MJ (50 MJ x rays) when Li is used but for higher atomic number liquids like Na and Al there may be too high a temperature rise forcing use of other x-ray attenuation methods such as xenon gas, which may be needed for first wall protecting anyway. The cumulative damage from neutrons causing warpage of the liquid film's substrate can be compensated by adaptive optics techniques giving the mirrors long life, perhaps 30 years. The GILMM should be applicable to both direct and indirect drive and pulse lengths appropriate to slow compression

  15. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    1999-06-30

    A thin film of liquid metal is suggested as a grazing incident liquid metal mirror (GILMM) for robust final optics of a laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the mirror can withstand, called the damage limit, of a sodium film 85{sup o} from normal is calculated to be 57 J/cm{sup 2} normal to the beam for a 20 ns pulse and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2} for a 10 ps pulse of 0.35 {micro}m light (2 m{sup 2} and 90 m{sup 2} of mirror area per 100 kJ of laser energy at 20 ns and 10 ps, respectively). Feasibility relies on keep the liquid surface flat to the required accuracy by a combination of polished substrate, adaptive (deformable) optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film. The film's substrate must be polished to {+-} 0.015 pm. Then surface tension keeps the surface smooth over short distances (<10 mm) and low Reynolds number laminar flow keeps the surface smooth by keeping the film thickness constant to less than + 0.01 w over long distance >10 mm. Adaptive optics techniques keep. the substrate flat to within {+-} 0.06 pm over 100 mm distance and {+-}0.6 {micro}m over 1000 mm distances. The mirror can stand the x-ray pulse when located 30 m away from the microexplosions of nominal yield of 400 MJ (50 MJ of X rays) when Li is used but for higher atomic number liquids like Na there may be too high a temperature rise forcing use of other x-ray attenuation methods such as attenuation by xenon gas. The cumulative damage from neutrons causing warpage of the liquid film's substrate can be compensated by adaptive optics techniques giving the mirrors long life, perhaps 30 years. The GILMM should be applicable to both direct and indirect drive and pulse lengths appropriate to slow compression ({approx}20 ns) or fast ignition ({approx}10 ps). For direct drive laser beams near the poles (70{sup o}, where 90{sup o} is vertical), stable thin films become more challenging. Proof of concept experiments are needed to verify the

  16. A 10 Hz Grazing Incidence pumped Ni-like Mo laser at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ pump energy

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-09-30

    The first demonstration of the grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) scheme for laser-driven x-ray lasers (XRLs) is described utilizing 2-pulse pumping. A long pulse is incident normal to the target to produce a plasma with a particular density profile. Then a short pulse is incident at a grazing angle, chosen to optimally couple the short pulse laser energy into the specific density region where the inversion process will occur. The short pulse is simultaneously absorbed and refracted at a maximum electron density specified by the chosen pump angle then turns back into the gain region. The increased path length gives improved absorption allowing a reduction in the drive energy required for lasing. A Ni-like Mo XRL at 18.9 nm has been demonstrated with only 150 mJ total pump energy and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We report high gains of 60 cm{sup -1} and the achievement of gain saturation for targets of 4 mm length.

  17. Elemental depth profiling of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 thin films by reference-free grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streeck, C.; Beckhoff, B.; Reinhardt, F.; Kolbe, M.; Kanngießer, B.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Schock, H. W.

    2010-02-01

    The semiconductor band gap of the Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe) compound can be varied by the In to Ga ratio. This composition variation determines the photovoltaic properties of CIGSe thin films. Their composition depth profile has to be optimized in order to obtain maximum efficiencies in solar cell applications. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis under grazing incidence conditions provides non-destructive access to the compositional depth profile of the CIGSe thin films and, hence, represents a new non-destructive method, which does not require well-characterized standards for calibration purposes. Based on an analytical description of the physical processes, fluorescence line intensities of the specimen can be calculated by using fundamental atomic parameters. The general suitability of the method for determining depth gradients in CIGSe thin films is first shown by calculations. Reference-free XRF test measurements were carried out at the FCM beamline in the PTB laboratory at BESSY II. X-ray fluorescence was induced by photon excitation at energies of 4.0 keV and 10.5 keV, respectively, using various shallow incident angles. The calculations and the experimental measurements show that even small differences in the Ga/In profile may be distinguished, indicating that grazing incidence XRF is a promising tool for a non-destructive characterization of compositional depth profiles. Further refinement of the operational parameters may contribute to the sensitivity of the method.

  18. New Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Every, E.; Deyhim, A.; Kulesza, J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of a new Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument for use in National Institute of Standards And Technology (NIST) will be discussed. This instrument is similar to a shorter instrument we designed and delivered to ANSTO in Australia called the Bilby SANS instrument. The NIST VSANS and the ANSTO Bilby SANS instruments have very similar dimensions for length and diameter and have similar requirements for internal detector motion, top access port, walkway supports, and ports; however, the Bilby SANS instrument vacuum requirement was lower (7.5×10-5 Torr) and the entire (60,000 pound) vessel was required to move 1.5 meters on external rails with a repeatability of 100 um, which ADC achieved. The NIST VSANS length is 24 meter, internal diameter 2.3 meter with three internal carriages. The NIST VSANS instrument, which covers the usual SANS range will also allow configuration to cover the range between q ∼⃒ 10-4 A-1 to 10-3 A-1 with a sample beam current of (104 neutrons/s). The key requirements are a second position-sensitive detector system having a 1 mm pixel size and a longer sample-detector flight path of 20 m (i.e., a 40 m instrument).

  19. Characterization of photosynthetic supramolecular assemblies using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Marone, P.; Wagner, A.M.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1995-12-31

    We are using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to resolve structural features of supramolecular assemblies of photosynthetic proteins in liquid and frozen solutions. SANS resolves the size, shape, and structural homogeneity of macromolecular assemblies in samples identical to those used for spectroscopic assays of photosynthetic function. Likely molecular structures of the supramolecular assemblies can be identified by comparing experimental scattering data with scattering profiles calculated for model supramolecular assemblies built from crystal structures of the individual proteins. SANS studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, RC, presented here, show that the detergent solubilized RC exists in a variety of monomeric and aggregation states. The distribution between monomer and aggregate was found to depend strongly upon detergent, temperature and nature of additives, such as ethylene glycol used for low temperature spectroscopy and polyethylene glycol used for crystallization. Likely aggregate structures are being identified by fitting the experimental scattering profiles with those calculated for model aggregates built-up using the RC crystal structure. This work establishes the foundation for using SANS to identify intermediates in the RC crystallization pathways, and for determining likely structures of complexes formed between the RC and its physiological reaction partners, cytochrome c, and the LHI antenna complex.

  20. Heparin's solution structure determined by small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Chen, Yin; Cress, Brady F; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Heparin is a linear, anionic polysaccharide that is widely used as a clinical anticoagulant. Despite its discovery 100 years ago in 1916, the solution structure of heparin remains unknown. The solution shape of heparin has not previously been examined in water under a range of concentrations, and here is done so in D2 O solution using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Solutions of 10 kDa heparin-in the millimolar concentration range-were probed with SANS. Our results show that when sodium concentrations are equivalent to the polyelectrolyte's charge or up to a few hundred millimoles higher, the molecular structure of heparin is compact and the shape could be well modeled by a cylinder with a length three to four times its diameter. In the presence of molar concentrations of sodium, the molecule becomes extended to nearly its full length estimated from reported X-ray measurements on stretched fibers. This stretched form is not found in the presence of molar concentrations of potassium ions. In this high-potassium environment, the heparin molecules have the same shape as when its charges were mostly protonated at pD ≈ 0.5, that is, they are compact and approximately half the length of the extended molecules.

  1. Small angle x-ray scattering with edge-illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modregger, Peter; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Benarafa, Charaf; Schittny, Johannes C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Endrizzi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Sensitivity to sub-pixel sample features has been demonstrated as a valuable capability of phase contrast x-ray imaging. Here, we report on a method to obtain angular-resolved small angle x-ray scattering distributions with edge-illumination- based imaging utilizing incoherent illumination from an x-ray tube. Our approach provides both the three established image modalities (absorption, differential phase and scatter strength), plus a number of additional contrasts related to unresolved sample features. The complementarity of these contrasts is experimentally validated by using different materials in powder form. As a significant application example we show that the extended complementary contrasts could allow the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema in a murine model. In support of this, we demonstrate that the properties of the retrieved scattering distributions are consistent with the expectation of increased feature sizes related to pulmonary emphysema. Combined with the simplicity of implementation of edge-illumination, these findings suggest a high potential for exploiting extended sub-pixel contrasts in the diagnosis of lung diseases and beyond.

  2. Design of a small angle spectrometer: Application to food systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Marcela

    This thesis describes the design of a new class of spectrometer developed for the study of light scattering phenomena at very low angles. Its detection system is a state of the art Charged Couple Device (CCD) camera of short data gathering time and very high sensitivity and dynamic range. The Small Angle Light Scattering technique in this work is shown to be a useful tool for determining size distributions of particles whose diameter is larger than approximately 300 nm. For particles smaller than this size, the technique is a sensitive probe of Rayleigh scattering. The advantages presented by the use of a solid state camera enables the study of relatively fast dynamic phenomena such as aggregation. In this particular work, we followed the aggregation of casein micelles caused by the addition of rennet, and the aggregation of β- Lactoglobulin stabilized oil in water emulsions caused by the addition of CaCl2. For this last case, a discrete inversion technique, incorporating the Mie scattering theory, was applied to obtain size distribution histograms of the emulsion droplets as a function of aggregation time.

  3. Small-angle scattering model for multilamellar vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Frielinghaus, Henrich

    2007-11-15

    A small-angle neutron-x-ray-light-scattering model for multilamellar vesicles is developed on the basis of a simple geometry. N spherical shells with radii of an arithmetic series are allowed for displacements {delta}R which are limited by {delta}R

  4. Branch Content in Hybrid Materials using Small-Angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Greg

    2005-03-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrid materials often display ramified mass- fractal structures characterized by primary particle size, aggregate size, and mass-fractal dimension. Physical properties, such as mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties and electrical conductivity (in carbon composites for instance), can not be predicted using only these structural features since such properties are intimately tied to the degree and type of branching as shown by Witten [1]. Witten suggested the use of the minimum dimension, or the related connectivity dimension, to calculate mechanical response in these hybrid systems. A viable technique to quantify the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension in hybrid materials has, until recently, been absent from the literature. This presentation will discuss the use of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to describe branch content in hybrid materials [2] and will outline an approach to use the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension to predict static and dynamic mechanical properties for hybrid materials based on structure [1, 3]. 1. Witten TA, Rubinstein M, Colby RH Reinforcement of Rubber by Fractal Aggregates J Phys II 3 (3): 367-383 (1993). 2. Beaucage G Determination of branch fraction and minimum dimension of mass-fractal aggregates Phys Rev E 70 (3): art. no. 031401 Part 1 (2004). 3. Kohls DJ, Beaucage G Rational design of reinforced rubber Curr Opin Solid St M 6 (3): 183-194 (2002).

  5. GIXSGUI: a MATLAB toolbox for grazing-incidence X-ray scattering data visualization and reduction, and indexing of buried three-dimensional periodic nanostructured films

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhang

    2015-06-01

    GIXSGUI is a MATLAB toolbox that offers both a graphical user interface and script-based access to visualize and process grazing-incidence X-ray scattering data from nanostructures on surfaces and in thin films. It provides routine surface scattering data reduction methods such as geometric correction, one-dimensional intensity linecut, two-dimensional intensity reshaping etc. Three-dimensional indexing is also implemented to determine the space group and lattice parameters of buried organized nanoscopic structures in supported thin films.

  6. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at small angles, measured at ANKE-COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarian, Z.

    2016-03-01

    The most accepted approach to describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is the partial wave analysis (PWA), which translates various experimental observables to the common language of the partial waves. The reliable analysis relies not only on the quality experimental data, but also on the measurements of scattering observables over preferably the full angular range. Small angle scattering has been measured for six beam energies between 0.8 and 2.4 GeV using polarized proton beam incident on both proton and deuteron unpolarized targets at COSY-ANKE. This proceeding will report on the published and preliminary results for both pp and pn scattering from this and other recent experiments at ANKE. This study aims to provide the valuable observables to the SAID group in order to improve the phenomenological understanding of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  7. Grazing Occultations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Doug; Hlynialuk, John

    1983-01-01

    A "grazing occultation" occurs when a star or other astronomical body is covered up by the extreme northern or southern limb of the moon in its easterly motion about the earth. Graze phenomena, organizing a graze expedition, and the scientific/educational value of observing grazes are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  8. The effect of the shape function on small-angle scattering analysis by the maximum entropy method

    SciTech Connect

    Jemian, P.R.; Allen, A.J. |

    1992-09-15

    Analysis of small-angle scattering data to obtain a particle size distribution is dependent upon the shape function used to model the scattering. Using a maximum entropy analysis of small-angle scattering data, the effect of shape function selection on obtained size distribution is demonstrated using three different shape functions to describe the same scattering data from each of two steels. The alloys have been revealed by electron microscopy to contain a distribution of randomly oriented and mainly non-interacting, irregular, ellipsoidal precipitates. Comparison is made between the different forms of the shape function. Effect of an incident wavelength distribution is also shown. The importance of testing appropriate shape functions and validating these against other microstructural studies is discussed.

  9. Lattice distortion analysis of nonpolar a-plane $(11bar 20)$ GaN films by using a grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yong Gon; Kim, Jihoon; Hwang, Sung-Min; Kim, Jihyun; Jang, Soohwan; Kim, Heesan; Baik, Kwang Hyeon

    2015-02-01

    This work examines the anisotropic microstructure and the lattice distortions of nonpolar a-plane GaN ( a-GaN) films by using the grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction technique. Faulted a-GaN films typically exhibit an in-plane anisotropy of the structural properties along the X-ray in-beam directions. For this reason, the anisotropic peak broadenings of the X-ray rocking curves (XRCs) were observed for various angle (phi) rotations for a-GaN films with and without SiN x interlayers. Analysis revealed the peak widths of the XRCs displayed an isotropic behavior for a nonpolar a-GaN bulk crystal. Thus, the in-plane anisotropy of the XRC peak widths for nonpolar a-GaN films apparently originates from the heteroepitaxial growth of the a-GaN layer on a foreign substrate. The lattice distortion analysis identified the presence of compressive strains in both the two in-plane directions (the c- and the m-axis), as well as a tensile strain along the normal growth direction. In addition, the observed frequency shifts in the Raman E2 (high) mode for the a-GaN films showed the existence of considerable in-plane compressive strain on both a-GaN films, as confirmed by the lattice distortion analysis performed using the grazing-incidence XRD method.

  10. Grazing-incidence measurements of {ital L}-shell line emission from highly charged Fe in the soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Utter, S.B.; Brown, G.V. |; Beiersdorfer, P.; Clothiaux, E.J.; Podder, N.K.

    1999-01-01

    Line emission from highly charged ions in the soft x-ray region represents an important diagnostic for high-temperature plasmas. The wavelength region of 10{endash}30 {Angstrom} is occupied by lines from the {ital K}-shell transitions in N through Ne and {ital L}-shell transitions in Ti through Ni. Crystal spectrometers have previously been used to investigate Fe line radiation under well controlled conditions using the LLNL electron beam ion trap facility in this wavelength region. To complement this work we have instituted a grazing-incidence spectrometer with a variable line-spaced, concave grating and a flat field of focus which is suited for a multichannel detector. Simultaneous observations of the Ne-like Fe{sup 16+}n=3{r_arrow}2 transitions were made with this instrument and a flat-crystal spectrometer in order to establish the linear polarization of the Fe XVII lines. We present a description of the grating spectrometer and discuss its performance in comparison with Rowland circle based grazing incidence instruments. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Design of axisymmetric multi-mirror grazing incidence system to increase the numerical aperture of neutron and X-ray microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Watanabe, Norio; Asami, Hiroshi; Shimada, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    An axisymmetric multi-mirror system for neutron and X-ray microscopes is proposed to increase their numerical aperture and collection efficiency. A Wolter type-I mirror is used as the basis of the multi-mirror system at grazing incidence. The addition of an even number of hyperboloid mirrors to the Wolter type-I mirror can satisfy both an equal optical path length and Abbe's sine condition. The numerical aperture increases in proportion to the number of mirrors. The optical parameters of the system with four tandem mirrors are calculated for neutrons and X-rays with a wavelength of 0.4 nm by assuming that the average grazing angle of incidence is 5.4 mrad and the magnification is 10. The inner diameters of the mirrors are limited to <10 mm considering the total length of the optical system. Tolerance of off-axis distance was calculated using a ray-tracing computer simulation. Ray tracing shows that a blur size <14 nm will be possible at an off-axis displacement of 10 μm.

  12. Multiple scattering in grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction: impact on lattice-constant determination in thin films

    PubMed Central

    Resel, Roland; Bainschab, Markus; Pichler, Alexander; Dingemans, Theo; Simbrunner, Clemens; Stangl, Julian; Salzmann, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical scattering effects are observed in grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction experiments using an organic thin film of 2,2′:6′,2′′-ternaphthalene grown on oxidized silicon as substrate. Here, a splitting of all Bragg peaks in the out-of-plane direction (z-direction) has been observed, the magnitude of which depends both on the incidence angle of the primary beam and the out-of-plane angle of the scattered beam. The incident angle was varied between 0.09° and 0.25° for synchrotron radiation of 10.5 keV. This study reveals comparable intensities of the split peaks with a maximum for incidence angles close to the critical angle of total external reflection of the substrate. This observation is rationalized by two different scattering pathways resulting in diffraction peaks at different positions at the detector. In order to minimize the splitting, the data suggest either using incident angles well below the critical angle of total reflection or angles well above, which sufficiently attenuates the contributions from the second scattering path. This study highlights that the refraction of X-rays in (organic) thin films has to be corrected accordingly to allow for the determination of peak positions with sufficient accuracy. Based thereon, a reliable determination of the lattice constants becomes feasible, which is required for crystallographic structure solutions from thin films. PMID:27140152

  13. Multiple scattering in grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction: impact on lattice-constant determination in thin films.

    PubMed

    Resel, Roland; Bainschab, Markus; Pichler, Alexander; Dingemans, Theo; Simbrunner, Clemens; Stangl, Julian; Salzmann, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Dynamical scattering effects are observed in grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction experiments using an organic thin film of 2,2':6',2''-ternaphthalene grown on oxidized silicon as substrate. Here, a splitting of all Bragg peaks in the out-of-plane direction (z-direction) has been observed, the magnitude of which depends both on the incidence angle of the primary beam and the out-of-plane angle of the scattered beam. The incident angle was varied between 0.09° and 0.25° for synchrotron radiation of 10.5 keV. This study reveals comparable intensities of the split peaks with a maximum for incidence angles close to the critical angle of total external reflection of the substrate. This observation is rationalized by two different scattering pathways resulting in diffraction peaks at different positions at the detector. In order to minimize the splitting, the data suggest either using incident angles well below the critical angle of total reflection or angles well above, which sufficiently attenuates the contributions from the second scattering path. This study highlights that the refraction of X-rays in (organic) thin films has to be corrected accordingly to allow for the determination of peak positions with sufficient accuracy. Based thereon, a reliable determination of the lattice constants becomes feasible, which is required for crystallographic structure solutions from thin films.

  14. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions☆

    PubMed Central

    Ingerle, D.; Meirer, F.; Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2014-01-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  15. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions.

    PubMed

    Ingerle, D; Meirer, F; Pepponi, G; Demenev, E; Giubertoni, D; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  16. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingerle, D.; Meirer, F.; Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  17. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES...Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Weapons and Materials...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles 5a. CONTRACT

  18. Small Angle X ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES...Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Weapons and Materials...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles 5a. CONTRACT

  19. Small angle light scattering characterization of single micrometric particles in microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannhauser, David; Romeo, Giovanni; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2013-04-01

    A CCD-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus has been used to characterize single micrometric particles flowing in a micro-channel. The measured scattering vector spans the range 2x10-2 - 6:8x101μm-1. The incident laser light is collimated to a spot of about 50 μm in diameter at the sample position with a divergence lower than 0.045 rad. Such small collimated laser beam opens the possibility to perform on-line SALS of micron-sized particles flowing in micro-channels. By properly designing the micro-channel and using a viscoelastic liquid as suspending medium we are able to realize a precise 3D focusing of the target particles. The forward scattering emitted from the particle is collected by a lens with high numerical aperture. At the focal point of that lens a homemade beam stop is blocking the incident light. Finally, a second lens maps the scattered light on the CCD sensor, allowing to obtain far field images on short distances. Measurements with mono-disperse polystyrene particles, both in quiescent and in-flow conditions have been realized. Experiments in-flow allow to measure the single particle scattering. Results are validated by comparison with calculations based on the Lorenz-Mie theory. The quality of the measured intensity profiles confirms the possibility to use our apparatus in real multiplex applications, with particles down to 1 μm in radius.

  20. In situ small-angle x-ray and nuclear resonant scattering study of the evolution of structural and magnetic properties of an Fe thin film on MgO (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gagan; Gupta, Ajay; Gupta, Mukul; Schlage, Kai; Wille, H.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of magnetron sputtered Fe films on clean single crystalline MgO (001) substrate has been studied using in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence nuclear resonant scattering (GINRS) measurements. While GISAXS provides information about morphological changes, GINRS provides information about structural and magnetic properties, thus making it possible to correlate the evolution of magnetic properties with that of morphology and structure of the film. The film exhibits a Volmer-Weber type growth, with percolation transition occurring around 2 nm film thickness. Presence of a finite quadrupole splitting, as seen in GINRS measurements, suggests a significant distortion from cubic symmetry up to a film thickness of 3.5 nm, which can be attributed to hybridization between Fe 3 d and O 2 p orbitals at the interface as well as in-plane tensile strain induced as a result of coalescence of islands. Initially Fe islands exhibit superparamagnetic relaxation, while finite magnetic moment appears upon formation of macroscopic percolation islands. The film exhibits a weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), which vanishes concurrently with disappearance of structural distortion, suggesting that the observed PMA at least partly originates from inherent strain in the film. No presence of any known oxide of Fe was detected at the interface. More precise information about topological and magnetic structure of the interfaces between Fe and MgO layers is obtained using combined x-ray reflectivity and nuclear resonance reflectivity measurements on a 57Fe/MgO multilayer. Measurements show that about two monolayers of Fe at the interface have a reduced hyperfine field, providing evidence for hybridization with O atoms, as predicted by theory.

  1. Si Nanoribbons on Ag(110) Studied by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density-Functional Theory: Evidence of a Pentamer Chain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prévot, Geoffroy; Hogan, Conor; Leoni, Thomas; Bernard, Romain; Moyen, Eric; Masson, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    We report a combined grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density-functional theory (DFT) study which clearly elucidates the atomic structure of the Si nanoribbons grown on the missing-row reconstructed Ag(110) surface. Our study allows us to discriminate between the theoretical models published in the literature, including the most stable atomic configurations and those based on a missing-row reconstructed Ag(110) surface. GIXD measurements unambiguously validate the pentamer model grown on the reconstructed surface, obtained from DFT. This pentamer atomistic model accurately matches the high-resolution STM images of the Si nanoribbons adsorbed on Ag(110). Our study closes the long-debated atomic structure of the Si nanoribbons grown on Ag(110) and definitively excludes a honeycomb structure similar to that of freestanding silicene.

  2. Modern approaches to investigation of thin films and monolayers: X-ray reflectivity, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering and X-ray standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbina, M. A.; Chvalun, S. N.; Ponomarenko, S. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    The review concerns modern experimental methods of structure determination of thin films of different nature. The methods are based on total reflection of X-rays from the surface and include X-ray reflectivity, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering and X-ray standing waves. Their potential is exemplified by the investigations of various organic macromolecular systems that exhibit the properties of semiconductors and are thought to be promising as thin-film transistors, light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells. It is shown that combination of the title methods enable high-precision investigations of the structure of thin-film materials and structure formation in them, i.e., it is possible to obtain information necessary for improvement of the operating efficiency of elements of organic electronic devices. The bibliography includes 92 references.

  3. Use of intermediate focus for grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering experiments at the beamline P03 of PETRA III, DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, G.; Buffet, A.; Döhrmann, R.; Yu, S.; Roth, S. V.; Körstgens, V.; Müller-Buschbaum, P.; Gedde, U.; Hedenqvist, M.

    2014-04-15

    We describe the new experimental possibilities of the micro- and nanofocus X-ray scattering beamline P03 of the synchrotron source PETRA III at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), which arise from experiments with smaller beam sizes in the micrometer range. This beamline has been upgraded recently to perform new kinds of experiments. The use of an intermediate focus allows for reducing the beam size of microfocused hard X-rays while preserving a large working distance between the focusing elements and the focus position. For the first time, this well-known methodology has been employed to grazing incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS). As examples, we highlight the applications to in situ studies using microfluidic devices in GISAXS geometry as well as the investigation of the crystallinity of thin films in GIWAXS geometry.

  4. Si Nanoribbons on Ag(110) Studied by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density-Functional Theory: Evidence of a Pentamer Chain Structure.

    PubMed

    Prévot, Geoffroy; Hogan, Conor; Leoni, Thomas; Bernard, Romain; Moyen, Eric; Masson, Laurence

    2016-12-30

    We report a combined grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density-functional theory (DFT) study which clearly elucidates the atomic structure of the Si nanoribbons grown on the missing-row reconstructed Ag(110) surface. Our study allows us to discriminate between the theoretical models published in the literature, including the most stable atomic configurations and those based on a missing-row reconstructed Ag(110) surface. GIXD measurements unambiguously validate the pentamer model grown on the reconstructed surface, obtained from DFT. This pentamer atomistic model accurately matches the high-resolution STM images of the Si nanoribbons adsorbed on Ag(110). Our study closes the long-debated atomic structure of the Si nanoribbons grown on Ag(110) and definitively excludes a honeycomb structure similar to that of freestanding silicene.

  5. Characterization of ion beam sputtered deposited W/Si multilayers by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dhawan, Rajnish Rai, Sanjay

    2016-05-23

    W/Si multilayers four samples have been deposited on silicon substrate using ion beam sputtering system. Thickness of tungsten (W) varies from around 10 Å to 40 Å while the silicon (Si) thickness remains constant at around 30 Å in multilayers [W-Si]{sub x4}. The samples have been characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and X-ray reflectivity technique (XRR). GIXRD study shows the crystalline behaviour of W/Si multilayer by varying W thickness and it is found that above 20 Å the W film transform from amorphous to crystalline phase and X-ray reflectivity data shows that the roughnesses of W increases on increasing the W thicknesses in W/Si multilayers.

  6. Discrimination and quantification of contamination and implanted solar wind in Genesis collector shards using grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray techniqies: Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Eng, P.; Ghose, S.; Burnett, D.

    2006-12-13

    Grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence is a non-destructive technique that can differentiate the embedded solar wind component from surface contamination and collector background in the Genesis shards. Initial solar Fe abundance in D30554 is 8 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. Accurate knowledge of the composition of the Sun provides a baseline, which allows an understanding of how the solar system has evolved over time and how solar processes and solar wind mechanics behave. Unfortunately, the errors in photospheric abundances are too large for many planetary science problems and this hampers our understanding of these different processes. Analyses of solar wind implanted in meteorites or lunar soils have provided more precise data but alteration processes on these bodies may complicate such information. In response to this need for pristine solar wind samples, NASA developed and launched the Genesis Probe. Unfortunately, the probe smashed into the Utah desert shattering the 300 collector plates into 15,000+ pieces all of which are now coated in a both a fine terrestrial dust and Si and Ge powder from the disrupted collectors themselves. The solar wind penetration depth is 100-200 nm and the superposed contamination layers are typically 40-50 nm. Stringent cleaning regimes have the potential of removing the solar wind itself. The best solution is to have sufficient spatial resolution to separately analyze the surface contamination and penetrated solar wind. To that end, three Genesis collector array shards and their appropriate flight spares were characterized via grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence and x-ray reflectivity. The goals were (1) to evaluate the various cleaning methods used to eliminate contamination, (2) to identify the collector substrates most suited for this technique, (3) to determine whether the solar wind signature could be deconvolved from the collector background signature, and (4) to measure the relative abundances of Ca to Ge in the embedded solar

  7. EDITORIAL Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, Goran; Heenan, Richard

    2010-10-01

    There are 52 papers in these Proceedings. The papers are divided into 10 thematic sections and a section for invited papers and reviews. The sections and the respective section editors are given below. Section Editor(s) Invited Papers and Reviews Peter Griffiths, Wim Bras, Rudolf Winter Beamlines and Instrumentation Elliot Gilbert, Wim Bras, Nigel Rhodes Theory, Data processing and Modelling Jan Skov Pedersen, Carlo Knupp Biological Systems and Membranes Richard Heenan, Cameron Neylon Ceramics, Glasses and Porous Materials Rudolf Winter Colloids and Solutions Peter Griffiths Hierarchical Structures and Fibres Steve Eichhorn, Karen Edler Metallic and Magnetic Systems Armin Hoell Polymers Patrick Fairclough Time resolved Diffraction, Kinetic and Dynamical Studies João Cabral, Christoph Rau We are grateful to all section editors and the many anonymous referees for their invaluable effort which made the publication of the Proceedings possible. The refereeing process was strict and thorough, some papers were rejected and most were improved. The resulting compendium gives a good overview of recent developments in small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering theory, application, methods of analysis and instrumentation. Thus it should be a useful source of reference for a number of years to come. The papers are a good reflection of the material presented at the meeting. Because of the general high quality of the articles, it was difficult to decide which to highlight and be fair to all contributors. The following in particular have caught the attention of the editors. Highlighted papers A statistical survey of publications reporting the application of SAXS and SANS by Aldo Craievich (paper 012003) is recommended reading for anyone needing convincing about the vibrancy of this scientific field and the ever expanding use of these techniques. Two aspects of coherent X-ray scattering, made available by the advent of the 3rd generation synchrotron sources, are discussed in the

  8. On the implementation of the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation for a pseudo-spherical atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, D.; Doicu, A.; Loyola, D.; Trautmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical problems appear when solving the radiative transfer equation for systems with strong anisotropic scattering. To avoid oscillations in the solution a large number of discrete ordinates is required. As a consequence, the computing time increases considerably with O(N3), where N is the number of discrete ordinates. The performance can be improved partially by the delta-M method of Wiscombe [1], but this approach distorts the initial boundary problem and can lead to errors in small viewing angles. The efficiency of the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation for analyzing systems containing clouds and coarsest fraction of aerosol has been demonstrated by Budak and Korkin [2]. In this work we extend the plan-parallel version of the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation, as described in [2], to a pseudo-spherical atmosphere. The conventional pseudo-spherical technique relies on the separation of the total radiance into the direct solar beam and the diffuse radiance [3];the direct solar radiance is treated in a spherical geometry, while the diffuse radiance is computed in a plane-parallel geometry. Taking into account that in the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation, the radiance is separated into an 'anisotropic' and a smooth part, and that the direct solar beam is already included into anisotropic part, we introduce a pseudo-spherical correction by substracting the direct solar beam in a plane-parallel geometry and adding it in a pseudo-spherical geometry. In our simulations we considered a scenario which is typically for the UV/UIS instruments like GOME-2: a spectral interval between 315 nm and 335 nm, and an inhomogeneous atmosphere containing a cloud layer with an asymmetry parameter of 0.9. The numerical results evidenced that the differences between the pseudo-spherical and the plan-parallel models are of about 10 % for an incident angle of 80 degrees, 1 % for 65 degrees and less than 0.3 % for 50

  9. A revision of soft proton scattering at grazing incidence and its implementation in the uc(geant)4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Alejandro; Perinati, Emanuele; Diebold, Sebastian; Tenzer, Chris; Santangelo, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    The scattering of soft protons inside the Wolter-type optics of X-ray observatories has been proven to concentrate these particles onto the focal plane instruments. The funneling of these protons increases the instrumental background and can also contribute to the degrading of the detectors. The instrumental background and degradation of the detector's performance experienced by Chandra and XMM-Newton is significantly larger than what was expected on the basis of previous Monte Carlo simulations. For Chandra the main issue is the degradation of the energy resolution due to lattice displacements in the detectors. For XMM the contribution to the instrumental background is more significant. In between, new laboratory measurements as well as a revision of the theory are needed to correctly assess the impact of the environmental radiation for future missions. In this publication we present a uc(Geant)4 class that will allow future users to select between either theoretical models or measured data to simulate the scattering of soft protons at grazing angles. To develop this method, we revisit the theory of elastic scattering of protons on polished surfaces and implement these approaches into uc(Geant)4. We also implemented recently performed measurements using parts of eROSITA (extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) mirror shells as scattering targets as another scattering model to be used within the uc(Geant)4 toolkit.

  10. An unsplit Convolutional perfectly matched layer technique improved at grazing incidence for the differential anisotropic elastic wave equation: application to 3D heterogeneous near surface slices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2007-05-01

    In geophysical exploration, high computational cost of full waveform inverse problem can be drastically reduced by implementing efficient boundary conditions. In many regions of interest for the oil industry or geophysical exploration, nearly tabular geological structures can be handled and analyzed by setting receivers in wells or/and at large offset. Then, the numerical modelling of waves travelling in thin slices along wells and near surface structures can provide very fast responses if highly accurate absorbing conditions around the slice are introduced in the wave propagation modelling. Here we propose then a Convolutional version of the well known Perfectly Matched layer technique. This optimized version allows the generation of seismic waves travelling close to the boundary layer at almost grazing incidence, which allows the treatment of thin 3D slices. The Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, introduced in 1994 by Bérenger for Maxwell's equations, has become classical in the context of numerical simulations in electromagnetics, in particular for 3D finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) calculations. One of the most attractive properties of a PML model is that no reflection occurs at the interface between the physical domain and the absorbing layer before truncation to a finite-size layer and discretization by a numerical scheme. Therefore, the absorbing layer does not send spurious energy back into the medium. This property holds for any frequency and angle of incidence. However, the layer must be truncated in order to be able to perform numerical simulations, and such truncation creates a reflected wave whose amplitude is amplified by the discretization process. In 2001, Collino and Tsogka introduced a PML model for the elastodynamics equation written as a first-order system in velocity and stress with split unknowns, and discretized it based on the standard 2D staggered-grid finite-difference scheme of Virieux (1986). Then in 2001 and 2004

  11. Multiple excitation of Fuchs-Kliewer phonons by Ne⁺ ions back-scattered by the LiF(100) surface at grazing incidence.

    PubMed

    Lucas, A A; Sunjic, M; Benedek, G

    2013-09-04

    An analytic model is developed to describe the inelastic processes occurring when keV Ne(+) ions are scattered at grazing incidence by the (100) surface of LiF. The large energy losses (up to 30 eV) of the reflected Ne(+) particles reported by Borisov et al (1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 5378) are shown to arise specifically from the long-range coupling between the projectiles and the so-called Fuchs-Kliewer (FK) optical phonons of LiF whose fields extend far outside the surface. The strength of the coupling is estimated, allowing one to compute the average number of excited FK phonon quanta (ħωS = 0.071 eV) and hence the mean energy losses. For emerging, neutralized Ne(0), a distinct energy loss mechanism is shown to occur, namely the excitation of FK phonons and other types of surface collective modes associated with the screening of the F(0) 'hole' left behind by the neutralization process. This mechanism contributes a large fraction of the loss, additional to that suffered by the incident Ne(+) ion. The model explains the experimental observations quantitatively (1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 5378). The paper ends with a discussion of the large energy broadening of the observed loss peaks.

  12. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Change of Packing Structure of Condensed-Phase in a Micro-Phase Separated Langmuir Monolayer Studied by Grazing-Incidence X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iimura, Ken-ichi; Kato, Teiji; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2007-10-01

    Packing structure of condensed-phase in a binary mixed Langmuir monolayer of behenic acid (C22) and perfluoro-2,5,8-trimethyl-3,6,9-trioxadodecanoic acid (PFPE) on a cadmium acetate aqueous solution was studied by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) as a function of the subphase temperature. The measurements were made during temperature scan at a fixed molecular area to explain the morphological change of the condensed-phase domains due to a thermal treatment reported previously [1]. Analysis of GIXD data implies that the condensed-phase domains are composed of only the C22 molecules perpendicularly oriented and very closely packed in a centered rectangular unit cell with orthorhombic distortion at low temperatures. As the temperature increases the area occupied by molecule increases, and above 25 °C the lattice becomes disordered, which would allow morphological transformation of the condensed-phase domains. The process of packing structure change is almost reversible except for non-equilibrium phases observed for the monolayer spread at a low temperature, 5.5 °C.

  14. First measurements of highly ionized impurity emission distribution by grazing-incidence flat-field extreme ultraviolet spectrometer in HL-2A.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhengying; Dong, Chunfeng; Zhou, Hangyu; Morita, Shigeru; Sun, Ping; Fu, Bingzhong; Lu, Ping; Ding, Xuantong; Yang, Qingwei; Duan, Xuru

    2014-11-01

    A space-resolved grazing-incidence flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been developed in the HL-2A tokamak to measure vertical impurity emission profiles with simultaneous spectral, temporal, and spatial resolution. The spectrometer working in the wavelength range of 30-500 Å has been equipped with a gold-coated varied-line-spacing holographic grating with curvature of 5606 mm and a back illuminated charge-coupled device with size of 6.6 × 26.6 mm(2) (255 × 1024 pixels). A lower half of the HL-2A plasma with averaged minor radius of 40 cm is observed when the spectrometer with horizontal dispersion is placed at a distance of 7.5 m away from the plasma center. An excellent spatial resolution of 12 mm is achieved when a space-resolved slit with vertical width of 0.5 mm is adopted. The radial profiles of intrinsic impurities in several ionization stages have been measured with high throughput and extremely low stray light.

  15. The flight test of a grazing incidence relay optics telescope for solar X-ray astronomy utilizing a thinned, back-illuminated CCD detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. Daniel; Davis, John M.

    1988-01-01

    The new AS&E Ultrahigh Resolution Soft X-ray Solar Research Rocket Payload has been successfully flown twice on Black Brant IX Sounding Rockets from White Sands Missile Range. These flights, conducted on 15 August 1987 and 11 December 1987, provided the first test of the new payload which consists of 3.8X magnifying hyperboloid-hyperboloid grazing incidence relay optic used in conjunction with an existing Wolter-I primary mirror. An RCA SID 500 series CCD detector was utilized in a thinned, back-illuminated configuration for recording the images. The 5.4 m effective focal length of the compound optics system resulted in a plate scale of 1 arc second per pixel which is comparable to the inherent resolution of the primary mirror. These flights represent the first use in X-ray astronomy of either of these two new technologies. These observations are presented with comparison to laboratory measurements and theoretical expectations of the instrument performance.

  16. Sense Determination of Micropipes via Grazing-incidence Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography in 4H-Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Dudley, M; Sanchez, E; MacMillan, M

    2009-01-01

    Grazing-incidence synchrotron topography studies of micropipes (MPs) and closed-core threading screw dislocations (TSDs) have been carried out and the results compared with ray-tracing simulations. Simulations indicate that both MPs and TSDs appear as roughly elliptically shaped white features which are canted to one side or the other of the g-vector depending on the dislocation sense and which have asymmetric perimeters of dark contrast which are greatly enhanced on the side towards which the feature is canted (again depending on the dislocation sense). For MPs, observations are generally consistent with this although the cant of the features is more obviously discerned than the asymmetry in the perimeter contrast. Sense assignment for MPs has been validated using back-reflection reticulography. For TSDs, observation are again generally consistent with the simulations although the smaller feature size and the variability in the line direction of the TSDs make the asymmetry of perimeter contrast a more obvious and reliable way to determine the dislocation sense than the sense of cant. TSD dislocation senses so obtained were validated using back-reflection images of same-sign and opposite-sign pairs.

  17. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies of condensed double-chain phospholipid monolayers formed at the soft air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Stefaniu, Cristina; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    The use of highly brilliant synchrotron light sources in the middle of the 1980s for X-ray diffraction has revolutionized the research of condensed monolayers. Since then, monolayers gained popularity as convenient quasi two-dimensional model systems widely used in biophysics and material science. This review focuses on structures observed in one-component phospholipid monolayers used as simplified two-dimensional models of biological membranes. In a monolayer system the phase transitions can be easily triggered at constant temperature by increasing the packing density of the lipids by compression. Simultaneously the monolayer structure changes are followed in situ by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Competing interactions between the different parts of the molecule are responsible for the different monolayer structures. These forces can be modified by chemical variations of the hydrophobic chain region, of the hydrophilic head group region or of the interfacial region between chains and head groups. Modifications of monolayer structures triggered by changes of the chemical structure of double-chain phospholipids are highlighted in this paper.

  18. Insights from arsenate adsorption on rutile (110): grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and DFT+U study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Hu, Shan; Duan, Jinming; Jing, Chuanyong

    2014-07-03

    Insights into the bonding of As(V) at the metal oxide/aqueous interface can further our understanding of its fate and transport in the environment. The motivation of this work is to explore the interfacial configuration of As(V) on single crystal rutile (110) using grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-XAFS) and planewave density functional calculations with on-site repulsion (DFT+U). In contrast to the commonly considered corner-sharing bidentate binuclear structure, tetrahedral As(V) binds as an edge/corner-sharing tridentate binuclear complex on rutile (110), as evidenced by observation of three As-Ti distances at 2.83, 3.36, and 4.05 Å. In agreement with the GI-XAFS analysis, our DFT+U calculations for this configuration resulted in the lowest adsorption energy among five possible alternatives. In addition, the electron density difference further demonstrated the transfer of charge between surface Ti atoms and O atoms in AsO4. This charge transfer consequently induced the formation of a chemical bond, which is also confirmed by the partial density of states analysis. Our results may shed new light on coupling the GI-XAFS and DFT approaches to explore molecular-scale adsorption mechanisms on single crystal surfaces.

  19. A compact soft x-ray (0.1-1.2 keV) calibration bench for radiometric measurements using an original versatile Rowland circle grazing incidence monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes an original Rowland circle grazing incidence spectrometer used as a monochromator for a soft x-ray Manson source in order to calibrate both the source and detectors over the 0.1-1.2 keV spectral range. The originality of the instrument lies on a patented vacuum manipulator which allows the simultaneous boarding of two detectors, one (reference) for measuring the monochromatic radiation and the second to be calibrated. In order to achieve this, the vacuum manipulator is able to interchange, in vacuum, one detector with the other in front of the exit slit of the monochromatizing stage. One purpose of this apparatus was to completely eliminate the intrinsic bremsstrahlung emission of the x-ray diode source and isolate each characteristic line for quantitative detector calibrations. Obtained spectral resolution (Δλ/λ<10-2) and spectral purity (>98%) fully meet this objective. Initially dimensioned to perform calibration of bulky x-ray cameras unfolded on the Laser MégaJoule Facility, other kinds of detector can be obviously calibrated using this instrument. A brief presentation of the first calibration of an x-ray CCD through its quantum efficiency (QE) measurement is included in this paper as example. Comparison with theoretical model for QE and previous measurements at higher energy are finally presented and discussed.

  20. Evaluation of a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer for highly charged ion plasma emission in soft x-ray spectral region from 1 to 10 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Thanh Hung; Kondo, Yoshiki; Tamura, Toshiki; Ono, Yuichi; Hara, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Ishino, Masahiko; Nishikino, Masaharu; Makimura, Tetsuya; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer operating on the spectral region from 1 to 10 nm was built for research on physics of high temperature and high energy density plasmas. It consists of a flat-field grating with 2400 lines/mm as a dispersing element and an x-ray charged coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The diffraction efficiency of the grating and the sensitivity of the CCD camera were directly measured by use of synchrotron radiation at the BL-11D beamline of the Photon Factory (PF). The influence of contamination to the spectrometer also was characterized. This result enables us to evaluate the absolute number of photons in a wide range wavelength between 1 and 10 nm within an acquisition. We obtained absolutely calibrated spectra from highly charged ion plasmas of Gd, from which a maximum energy conversion efficiency of 0.26% was observed at a Nd:YAG laser intensity of 3 × 1012 W/cm2.

  1. Molecular organization of bacterial membrane lipids in mixed systems--A comprehensive monolayer study combined with Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction and Brewster Angle Microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Wydro, Paweł; Flasiński, Michał; Broniatowski, Marcin

    2012-07-01

    To properly design and investigate new antibacterial drugs a detailed description of the organization of bacterial membrane is highly important. Therefore in this work we performed a comprehensive characteristic of the Langmuir monolayers composed of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) mixed in a wide range of composition and treated as an artificial cytoplasmic layer of bacterial membrane. To obtain detailed information on the properties of these films we combined the analysis of the surface pressure-area curves with the surface potential measurements, Brewster Angle Microscopy studies and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction experiments. It was found that the investigated phospholipids mix nonideally in the monolayers and that the most favorable packing of molecules occurs at their equimolar proportion. This is directly connected with the formation of hydrogen bonds between both types of molecules in the system. All the collected experimental data evidenced that dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) form highly ordered associates of fixed (DPPE:DPPG 1:1) stoichiometry. The obtained results allow one to conclude a nonuniform distribution of lipids in bacterial membranes and the existence of domains composed of the investigated phospholipids. The latter seems to be of great importance in the perspective of further studies on the mechanism of action of antibacterial agents.

  2. Three-Dimensional Morphology Control Yielding Enhanced Hole Mobility in Air-Processed Organic Photovoltaics: Demonstration with Grazing-Incidence Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Moore, Levi M J; Bhattacharya, Mithun; Wu, Qi; Youm, Sang Gil; Nesterov, Evgueni E; Morgan, Sarah E

    2017-07-12

    Polymer organic photovoltaic (OPV) device performance is defined by the three-dimensional morphology of the phase-separated domains in the active layer. Here, we determine the evolution of morphology through different stages of tailored solvent vapor and thermal annealing techniques in air-processed poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester-based OPV blends. A comparative evaluation of the effect of solvent type used for vapor annealing was performed using grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering, atomic force microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy to probe the active-layer morphology. A nonhalogenated orthogonal solvent was found to impart controlled morphological features within the exciton diffusion length scales, enhanced absorbance, greater crystallinity, increased paracrystalline disorder, and improved charge-carrier mobility. Low-boiling, fast-diffusing isopropanol allowed the greatest control over the nanoscale structure of the solvents evaluated and yielded a cocontinuous morphology with narrowed domains and enhanced paths for the charge carrier to reach the anode.

  3. Evaluation of a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer for highly charged ion plasma emission in soft x-ray spectral region from 1 to 10 nm.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Thanh Hung; Kondo, Yoshiki; Tamura, Toshiki; Ono, Yuichi; Hara, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Ishino, Masahiko; Nishikino, Masaharu; Makimura, Tetsuya; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer operating on the spectral region from 1 to 10 nm was built for research on physics of high temperature and high energy density plasmas. It consists of a flat-field grating with 2400 lines/mm as a dispersing element and an x-ray charged coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The diffraction efficiency of the grating and the sensitivity of the CCD camera were directly measured by use of synchrotron radiation at the BL-11D beamline of the Photon Factory (PF). The influence of contamination to the spectrometer also was characterized. This result enables us to evaluate the absolute number of photons in a wide range wavelength between 1 and 10 nm within an acquisition. We obtained absolutely calibrated spectra from highly charged ion plasmas of Gd, from which a maximum energy conversion efficiency of 0.26% was observed at a Nd:YAG laser intensity of 3 × 10(12) W/cm(2).

  4. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Å spectral band

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, K. Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2014-11-15

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  5. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Å spectral band

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2014-11-01

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li+ or Li2 +, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li+ and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li2 + lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  6. Signal, noise, and resolution in correlated fluctuations from snapshot small-angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Kirian, Richard A; Schmidt, Kevin E; Wang, Xiaoyu; Doak, R Bruce; Spence, John C H

    2011-07-01

    It has been suggested that the three-dimensional structure of one particle may be reconstructed using the scattering from many identical, randomly oriented copies ab initio, without modeling or a priori information. This may be possible if these particles are frozen in either space or time, so that the conventional two-dimensional small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) distribution contains fluctuations and is no longer isotropic. We consider the magnitude of the correlated fluctuation SAXS (CFSAXS) signal for typical x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) beam conditions and compare this against the errors derived with the inclusion of Poisson photon counting statistics. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is found to rapidly approach a limit independent of the number of particles contributing to each diffraction pattern, so that the addition of more particles to a "single-particle-per-shot" experiment may be of little value, apart from reducing solvent background. When the scattering power is significantly less than one photon per particle per Shannon pixel, the SNR grows in proportion to incident flux. We provide simulations for protein molecules in support of these analytical results, and discuss the effects of solvent background scatter. We consider the SNR dependence on resolution and particle size, and discuss the application of the method to glasses and liquids, and the implications of more powerful XFELs, smaller focused beams, and higher pulse repetition rates for this approach. We find that an accurate CFSAXS measurement may be acquired to subnanometer resolution for protein molecules if a 9-keV beam containing 10(13) photons is focused to a ~100-nm spot diameter, provided that the effects of solvent background can be reduced sufficiently.

  7. Effect of xenon bombardment on ruthenium-coated grazing incidence collector mirror lifetime for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Martin; Allain, Jean-Paul; Titov, Vladimir; Hendricks, Matthew R.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Rokusek, Daniel; Chrobak, Christopher; Tarrio, Charles; Barad, Yaniv; Grantham, Steven; Lucatorto, Thomas B.; Rice, Brian

    2006-09-01

    The effect of energetic xenon ion bombardment on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflectivity performance of mirrors is of vital importance for the performance of discharge- and laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet lithography sources. To study these effects, we measured absolute and relative reflectivities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing facility to quantify the effects of singly ionized Xe ion bombardment on the reflectivity of Ru EUV collector mirrors. Results show that unity sputtering is reached at Xe{sup +} energies near 400-500 eV. The Xe{sup +}-induced sputter yield decreases an order of magnitude with only a 60% decrease in energy. Incident angle-dependent data of Xe{sup +} bombardment show that the sputter yield is weakly dependent on angle at energies near 1 keV. Dynamic measurements of in situ EUV reflectivity during Xe{sup +} irradiation show that the oxygen state of the reflecting mirror has a significant effect on reflectivity performance. For example, 13.5 nm light reflecting from an oxygen-rich mirror results in over a 40% loss in reflectivity. These studies also found that the surface roughness increased only at the atomic scale (subnanometer scale) when exposed to energetic Xe{sup +} and thus did not contribute to EUV reflectivity losses except for cases of very high fluences (>10{sup 16} cm{sup -2})

  8. Role of the precursor in a triple-pulse pumping scheme of a nickel-like silver soft-x-ray laser in the grazing-incidence-pumping geometry.

    PubMed

    Janulewicz, K A; Kim, C M

    2010-11-01

    Soft x-ray lasers pumped in the grazing incidence geometry show strongly reduced energetic needs but hardly changed conversion efficiency between the pump energy and the output short-wavelength radiation. Numerical analysis presented in the paper concerns with performance of a Ni-like Ag soft-x-ray laser pumped by a triple-pulse structure in the grazing incidence geometry as a function of the puming conditions. It was found that a weak precursor preceding the main preforming and heating pulses by a few nanoseconds is crucial for the energy deposition. Its presence enables in different arrangements a reasonable reduction in the pump energy and relaxation of the steep density gradients as well as a control over partition of the deposited energy. As a consequence, it was concluded that a well energetically balanced three- or multipulse composition seems to be a reasonable way to achieve performance improvement.

  9. Small-angle scattering gives direct structural information about a membrane protein inside a lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Kynde, Søren A R; Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Simonsen, Jens Baek; Schweins, Ralf; Mortensen, Kell; Arleth, Lise

    2014-02-01

    Monomeric bacteriorhodopsin (bR) reconstituted into POPC/POPG-containing nanodiscs was investigated by combined small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering. A novel hybrid approach to small-angle scattering data analysis was developed. In combination, these provided direct structural insight into membrane-protein localization in the nanodisc and into the protein-lipid interactions. It was found that bR is laterally decentred in the plane of the disc and is slightly tilted in the phospholipid bilayer. The thickness of the bilayer is reduced in response to the incorporation of bR. The observed tilt of bR is in good accordance with previously performed theoretical predictions and computer simulations based on the bR crystal structure. The result is a significant and essential step on the way to developing a general small-angle scattering-based method for determining the low-resolution structures of membrane proteins in physiologically relevant environments.

  10. Small-angle approximation to the transfer of narrow laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The broadening and the signal power detected of a laser beam traversing an anisotropic scattering medium were examined using the small-angle approximation to the radiative transfer equation in which photons suffering large-angle deflections are neglected. To obtain tractable answers, simple Gaussian and non-Gaussian functions for the scattering phase functions are assumed. Two other approximate approaches employed in the field to further simplify the small-angle approximation solutions are described, and the results obtained by one of them are compared with those obtained using small-angle approximation. An exact method for obtaining the contribution of each higher order scattering to the radiance field is examined but no results are presented.

  11. Small Angle Neutron Scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hammouda, B.; Krueger, S.; Glinka, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The small angle neutron scattering technique is a valuable method for the characterization of morphology of various materials. It can probe inhomogeneities in the sample (whether occurring naturally or introduced through isotopic substitution) at a length scale from the atomic size (nanometers) to the macroscopic (micrometers) size. This work provides an overview of the small angle neutron scattering facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and a review of the technique as it has been applied to polymer systems, biological macromolecules, ceramic, and metallic materials. Specific examples have been included. PMID:28053456

  12. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-24

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  13. Elemental depth profiling in transparent conducting oxide thin film by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence combined analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotella, H.; Caby, B.; Ménesguen, Y.; Mazel, Y.; Valla, A.; Ingerle, D.; Detlefs, B.; Lépy, M.-C.; Novikova, A.; Rodriguez, G.; Streli, C.; Nolot, E.

    2017-09-01

    The optical and electrical properties of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films are strongly linked with the structural and chemical properties such as elemental depth profile. In R&D environments, the development of non-destructive characterization techniques to probe the composition over the depth of deposited films is thus necessary. The combination of Grazing-Incidence X-ray Fluorescence (GIXRF) and X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is emerging as a fab-compatible solution for the measurement of thickness, density and elemental profile in complex stacks. Based on the same formalism, both techniques can be implemented on the same experimental set-up and the analysis can be combined in a single software in order to refine the sample model. While XRR is sensitive to the electronic density profile, GIXRF is sensitive to the atomic density (i. e. the elemental depth profile). The combination of both techniques allows to get simultaneous information about structural properties (thickness and roughness) as well as the chemical properties. In this study, we performed a XRR-GIXRF combined analysis on indium-free TCO thin films (Ga doped ZnO compound) in order to correlate the optical properties of the films with the elemental distribution of Ga dopant over the thickness. The variation of optical properties due to annealing process were probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. We studied the evolution of atomic profiles before and after annealing process. We show that the blue shift of the band gap in the optical absorption edge is linked to a homogenization of the atomic profiles of Ga and Zn over the layer after the annealing. This work demonstrates that the combination of the techniques gives insight into the material composition and makes the XRR-GIXRF combined analysis a promising technique for elemental depth profiling.

  14. Relationship between electrical properties and crystallization of indium oxide thin films using ex-situ grazing-incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    González, G. B.; Okasinski, J. S.; Buchholz, D. B.; ...

    2017-05-25

    Grazing-incidence, wide-angle x-ray scattering measurements were conducted on indium oxide thin films grown on silica substrates via pulsed laser deposition. Growth temperatures (TG) in this study ranged from -50 °C to 600 °C, in order to investigate the thermal effects on the film structure and its spatial homogeneity, as well as their relationship to electrical properties. Films grown below room temperature were amorphous, while films prepared at TG = 25 °C and above crystallized in the cubic bixbyite structure, and their crystalline fraction increased with deposition temperature. The electrical conductivity (σ) and electrical mobility (μ) were strongly enhanced at lowmore » deposition temperatures. For TG = 25 °C and 50 °C, a strong < 100 > preferred orientation (texture) occurred, but it decreased as the deposition temperature, and consequential crystallinity, increased. Higher variations in texture coefficients and in lattice parameters were measured at the film surface compared to the interior of the film, indicating strong microstructural gradients. At low crystallinity, the in-plane lattice spacing expanded, while the out-of-plane spacing contracted, and those values merged at TG = 400 °C, where high μ was measured. This directional difference in lattice spacing, or deviatoric strain, was linear as a function of both deposition temperature and the degree of crystallinity. The crystalline sample with TG = 100 °C had the lowest mobility, as well as film diffraction peaks which split into doublets. The deviatoric strains from these doublet peaks differ by a factor of four, supporting the presence of both a microstructure and strain gradient in this film. More isotropic films exhibit larger l values, indicating that the microstructure directly correlates with electrical properties. Lastly, these results provide valuable insights that can help to improve the desirable properties of indium oxide, as well as other transparent conducting oxides.« less

  15. Neutron and X-ray Scattering From Single Supported Lipid Bilayers: Reflectometry, Grazing Incidence In-Plane Diffraction and Off-Specular Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2010-03-01

    Biological membranes mediate transport and communication between the cell and its surroundings. They defend the cell against invasive agents, and most present day drugs interact with membrane components. Complexity of the cell membranes renders many of their characteristics impenetrable to fundamental physical studies. As a result, a significant emphasis has been placed on developing model lipid membranes that facilitate the physical and chemical characterization of particular membrane features. X-ray (XR) and neutron reflectivity (NR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) techniques can be utilized to measure the structure of single, supported lipid bilayers in bulk water. GIXD studies demonstrated that bilayers formed by vesicle fusion have more disorder in the inner leaflet compared to structures prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett/Schaeffer (LB/S) technique. In both cases, only a modest water cushion was detected between the bilayer and substrate. Diffraction from in-plane ordered domains was observed from bilayers prepared by either technique. In the case of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers, the ordered domains were coupled across both leaflets, scattering as one entity. Contrastingly, the ordered domains were uncoupled in 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) bilayers. NR can be effectively used to study polymer-supported single lipid bilayers in bulk water. Using NR and fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrated that a hydrated, surface-tethered polymer network capable of five-fold change in thickness over a 25-37 C temperature range can be a novel support for single DPPC bilayers in a liquid environment. Moderate temperature change swells the polymer, lifting the membrane from the substrate, creating a nearly aqueous cushion. Additionally, as the polymer swells, it promotes both in- and out-of-plane undulations in the supported membrane. Off-specular neutron scattering was used to deduce the in

  16. Simulation of Grazing-Incidence Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topographic Images of Micropipes in 4H-SiC and Determination of Their Dislocation Senses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,Y.; Dudley, M.; Sanchez, E.; Macmillan, M.

    2008-01-01

    Detailed comparison has been drawn between synchrotron white beam X-ray topographic images of micropipes in 4H-SiC, recorded using pyramidal plane reflections in grazing-incidence geometry, and images simulated using the ray-tracing method. The simulations were carried out with and without the influence of surface relaxation effects. The images simulated in the absence of surface relaxation effects appear as white elliptical shaped features, canted to one side or other of the g-vector (depending on the dislocation sense), surrounded by a dark contrast perimeter which thickens at both ends of the major axis and which exhibits two fold symmetry axes parallel to the major and minor axes. On the other hand, on the images simulated taking into account the effects of surface relaxation, the features are again canted to one side or other of the g-vector (depending on the dislocation sense) but do not exhibit the same symmetry in that one of the sides of the oval shape is flattened (along the major axis) and the distribution of intensity around the perimeter no longer possesses the two fold symmetry axes parallel to the major and minor axes. While the details of the distribution of the dark perimeter contrast observed on the recorded images are not so easy to correlate with the simulated distributions, the sense of cant of the roughly elliptical white features on the observed images can be easily correlated with the simulations. Since the sense of cant has the same behavior as a function of dislocation sense for simulations carried out with and without surface relaxation, this provides a high level of confidence that the sense of cant of these features can be readily used to determine the senses of the micropipes.

  17. Constellation-X to Generation-X: evolution of large collecting area moderate resolution grazing incidence x-ray telescopes to larger area high-resolution adjustable optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Paul B.; Cameron, Robert A.; Cohen, Lester; Elvis, Martin; Gorenstein, Paul; Jerius, Diab; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William A.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Zhang, William W.

    2004-10-01

    Large collecting area x-ray telescopes are designed to study the early Universe, trace the evolution of black holes, stars and galaxies, study the chemical evolution of the Universe, and study matter in extreme environments. The Constellation-X mission (Con-X), planned for launch in 2016, will provide ~ 10^4 cm^2 collecting area with 15 arc-sec resolution, with a goal of 5 arc-sec. Future missions require larger collecting area and finer resolution. Generation-X (Gen-X), a NASA Visions Mission, will achieve 100 m^2 effective area at 1 keV and angular resolution of 0.1 arc-sec, half power diameter. We briefly describe the Con-X flowdown of imaging requirements to reflector figure error. To meet requirements beyond Con-X, Gen-X optics will be thinner and more accurately shaped than has ever been accomplished. To meet these challenging goals, we incorporate for the first time active figure control with grazing incidence optics. Piezoelectric material will be deposited in discrete cells directly on the back surface of the optical segments, with the strain directions oriented parallel to the surface. Differential strain between the two layers of the mirror causes localized bending in two directions, enabling local figure control. Adjusting figure on-orbit eases fabrication and metrology. The ability to make changes to mirror figure adds margin by mitigating risk due to launch-induced deformations and/or on-orbit degradation. We flowdown the Gen-X requirements to mirror figure and four telescope designs, and discuss various trades between the designs.

  18. Study of interface correlation in W/C multilayer structure by specular and non-specular grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, A. Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.; Maidul Haque, S.; Tripathi, S.; De, Rajnarayan; Rai, S.

    2015-10-28

    W/C/W tri-layer thin film samples have been deposited on c-Si substrates in a home-built Ion Beam Sputtering system at 1.5 × 10{sup −3} Torr Ar working pressure and 10 mA grid current. The tri-layer samples have been deposited at different Ar{sup +} ion energies between 0.6 and 1.2 keV for W layer deposition and the samples have been characterized by specular and non-specular grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements. By analyzing the GIXR spectra, various interface parameters have been obtained for both W-on-C and C-on-W interfaces and optimum Ar{sup +} ion energy for obtaining interfaces with low imperfections has been found. Subsequently, multilayer W/C samples with 5-layer, 7-layer, 9-layer, and 13-layer have been deposited at this optimum Ar{sup +} ion energy. By fitting the specular and diffused GIXR data of the multilayer samples with the parameters of each interface as fitting variables, different interface parameters, viz., interface width, in-plane correlation length, interface roughness, and interface diffusion have been estimated for each interface and their variation across the depth of the multilayers have been obtained. The information would be useful in realizing W/C multilayers for soft X-ray mirror application in the <100 Å wavelength regime. The applicability of the “restart of the growth at the interface” model in the case of these ion beam sputter deposited W/C multilayers has also been investigated in the course of this study.

  19. Limits of applicability of the concept of scattering amplitude in small-angle scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.; Lvov, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of the concept of scattering amplitude to the description of small-angle scattering experiments has been considered. An expression has been obtained for a scattered radiation flux on a detector under much milder conditions than the condition of Fraunhofer diffraction. The influence of incoherence of the source on the results has been evaluated.

  20. Monte Carlo calculation of large and small-angle electron scattering in air

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, B. I.; Higginson, D. P.; Eng, C. D.; ...

    2017-08-12

    A Monte Carlo method for angle scattering of electrons in air that accommodates the small-angle multiple scattering and larger-angle single scattering limits is introduced. In this work, the algorithm is designed for use in a particle-in-cell simulation of electron transport and electromagnetic wave effects in air. The method is illustrated in example calculations.

  1. Studying fractal geometry on submicron length scales by small-angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; Lin, J.

    1988-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that internal surfaces of porous geological materials, such as rocks and lignite coals, can be described by fractals down to atomic length scales. In this paper, the basic properties of self-similar and self-affine fractals are reviewed and how fractal dimensions can be measured by small-angle scattering experiments are discussed.

  2. Informing the improvement of forest products durability using small angle neutron scattering

    Treesearch

    Nayomi Plaza-Rodriguez; Sai Venkatesh Pingali; Shuo Qian; William T. Heller; Joseph E. Jakes

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of how wood nanostructure swells with moisture is needed to accelerate the development of forest products with enhanced moisture durability. Despite its suitability to study nanostructures, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) remains an underutilized tool in forest products research. Nanoscale moisture-induced structural changes in intact and...

  3. Amazing Grazing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Cris

    Countless acres of grasslands stretch across the American West. Centuries ago, bison roamed the range freely and lived off the grass. By the 19th century, herds of cattle grazed the same land. Over time, much of the original grassland was either plowed and planted or trampled to dust, causing the topsoil to dry up and blow away. Today many…

  4. Amazing Grazing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Cris

    Countless acres of grasslands stretch across the American West. Centuries ago, bison roamed the range freely and lived off the grass. By the 19th century, herds of cattle grazed the same land. Over time, much of the original grassland was either plowed and planted or trampled to dust, causing the topsoil to dry up and blow away. Today many…

  5. Nonuniformity in natural rubber as revealed by small-angle neutron scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karino, Takeshi; Ikeda, Yuko; Yasuda, Yoritaka; Kohjiya, Shinzo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2007-02-01

    The microscopic structures of natural rubber (NR) and deproteinized NR (DPNR) were investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). They were compared to those of isoprene rubber (IR), which is a synthetic analogue of NR in terms of chemical structure without any non-rubber components like proteins. Comparisons of the structure and mechanical properties of NR, DPNR, and IR lead to the following conclusions. (i) The well-known facts, for example, the outstanding green strength of NR and strain-induced crystallization, are due not much to the presence of proteins but to other components such as the presence of phospholipids and/or the higher stereoregularity of NR. It also became clear the naturally residing proteins accelerate the upturn of stress at low strain. The protein phases work as cross-linking sites and reinforcing fillers in the rubbery matrix. (ii) The microscopic structures of NR were successfully reproduced by SANS intensity functions consisting of squared-Lorentz and Lorentz functions, indicating the presence of inhomogeneities in bulk and thermal concentration fluctuations in swollen state, respectively. On the other hand, IR rubbers were homogeneous in bulk. (iii) The inhomogeneities in NR are assigned to protein aggregates of the order of 200 A or larger. Although these aggregates are larger in size as well as in volume fraction than those of cross-link inhomogeneities introduced by cross-linking, they are removed by deproteinization. (iv) Swelling of both NR and IR networks introduces gel-like concentration fluctuations whose mesh size is of the order of 20 A.

  6. BIOISIS: Biological Macromolecules by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tainer, John [Scripps Research Institute; Hura, Greg [LBNL; Rambo, Robert P. [LBNL

    BIOISIS is an open access database dedicated to the study of biological macromolecules by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). BIOISIS aims to become the complete source for the deposition, distribution and maintenance of small angle X-ray scattering data and technologies. The database is designed around the concept of an ôexperimentö and relates a specific experiment to a set of genes, organisms, computational models and experimental data. As of May 2012, BIOSIS contains 7,118 genes covering four different organisms. Forty-two modeled structures are available. Clicking on a structures reveals scattering curves, experimental conditions, and experimental values. The data are collected at Beamline 12.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS).[Copied with editing from http://www.bioisis.net/about

  7. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  8. Quaternary structure built from subunits combining NMR and small-angle x-ray scattering data.

    PubMed Central

    Mattinen, Maija-Liisa; Pääkkönen, Kimmo; Ikonen, Teemu; Craven, Jeremy; Drakenberg, Torbjörn; Serimaa, Ritva; Waltho, Jonathan; Annila, Arto

    2002-01-01

    A new principle in constructing molecular complexes from the known high-resolution domain structures joining data from NMR and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements is described. Structure of calmodulin in complex with trifluoperazine was built from N- and C-terminal domains oriented based on residual dipolar couplings measured by NMR in a dilute liquid crystal, and the overall shape of the complex was derived from SAXS data. The residual dipolar coupling data serves to reduce angular degrees of freedom, and the small-angle scattering data serves to confine the translational degrees of freedom. The complex built by this method was found to be consistent with the known crystal structure. The study demonstrates how approximate tertiary structures of modular proteins or quaternary structures composed of subunits can be assembled from high-resolution structures of domains or subunits using mutually complementary NMR and SAXS data. PMID:12124297

  9. Solution properties of a CO{sub 2}-soluble fluoropolymer via small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, J.B.; Combes, J.R.; Romack, T.J.; Canelas, D.A.; Betts, D.E.; Samulski, E.T.; DeSimone, J.M.; Londono, D.; Wignall, G.D.

    1996-01-31

    In this communication, we report the first characterization of solutions of a high molecular weight polymer in supercritical CO{sub 2} by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is shown that small-angle neutron scattering gives key molecular parameters of an amorphous fluoropolymer in supercritical CO{sub 2}, i.e., the molecular weight, radius of gyration, and second virial coefficient, and thereby gives insights into a polymer chain`s behavior in this unique solvent. The positive sign of the second virial coefficients indicate that this medium is a good solvent - there is no evidence of a collapsed chain conformation. In fact, we conclude from the SANS data that, in CO{sub 2}, the poly(FOA) chain dimensions are expanded relative to those characteristic of its melt. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Quantitative characterization of the contrast mechanisms of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Long, G. G.; Levine, L.E.; Ilavsky, J.; Jemain, P.R.; NIST

    2008-04-01

    A general treatment of X-ray imaging contrast for ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) imaging is presented; this approach makes use of phase propagation and dynamical diffraction theory to account quantitatively for the intensity distribution at the detector plane. Simulated results from a model system of micrometer-sized spherical SiO{sub 2} particles embedded in a polypropylene matrix show good agreement with experimental measurements. Simulations by means of a separate geometrical ray-tracing method also account for the features in the USAXS images and offer a complementary view of small-angle X-ray scattering as a contrast mechanism. The ray-tracing analysis indicates that refraction, in the form of Porod scattering, and, to a much lesser extent, X-ray reflection account for the USAXS imaging contrast.

  11. Multiple small angle neutron scattering: A new two-dimensional ultrasmall angle neutron scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenzweig, C.; Hils, T.; Muehlbauer, S.; Ay, M.; Lorenz, K.; Georgii, R.; Gaehler, R.; Boeni, P.

    2007-11-12

    We report on the demonstration experiment of the multiple small angle neutron scattering (MSANS) technique at a 5.6 m long neutron beam line, leading to a q resolution of 3x10{sup -4} A{sup -1}. The MSANS technique is based on two two-dimensional multihole apertures placed at the front end of the collimator and close to the sample, respectively. By choosing the proper MSANS geometry, individual diffraction patterns are superimposed leading to a large gain in intensity. Using MSANS as an option for standard small angle neutron scattering beam lines, the q resolution could be increased to 10{sup -5} A{sup -1} without dramatically sacrificing intensity.

  12. Small-angle neutron scattering studies from solutions of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Stivala, S.S.; Damle, S.P.; Gregory, J.D.; Bunick, G.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering, SANS, of the proteoglycan subunit of bovine nasal cartilage in 0.15N LiCl at 25/sup 0/C yielded the radius of gyration, R/sub g/, radius of gyration of the cross-section, R/sub q/, persistence length, a, and the molecular weight, M. The following values were obtained: M = 3.9 x 10/sup 6/, R/sub g/ = 745 A, R/sub q/ = 34.6 A and a = 35.2 A. These values compare favorably with those that were obtained from small angle x-ray scattering, SAXS, of a similar extract. The scattering curve of the proteoglycan subunit in D/sub 2/O showed a characteristic broad peak in the specified angular range similar to that observed from SAXS, thus confirming the polyelectrolyte nature of the proteoglycan. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (DT)

  13. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2014-09-24

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  14. Small-angle X-ray scattering method to characterize molecular interactions: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Allec, Nicholas; Choi, Mina; Yesupriya, Nikhil; Szychowski, Brian; White, Michael R; Kann, Maricel G; Garcin, Elsa D; Daniel, Marie-Christine; Badano, Aldo

    2015-07-10

    Characterizing biomolecular interactions is crucial to the understanding of biological processes. Existing characterization methods have low spatial resolution, poor specificity, and some lack the capability for deep tissue imaging. We describe a novel technique that relies on small-angle X-ray scattering signatures from high-contrast molecular probes that correlate with the presence of biomolecular interactions. We describe a proof-of-concept study that uses a model system consisting of mixtures of monomer solutions of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as the non-interacting species and solutions of GNP dimers linked with an organic molecule (dimethyl suberimidate) as the interacting species. We report estimates of the interaction fraction obtained with the proposed small-angle X-ray scattering characterization method exhibiting strong correlation with the known relative concentration of interacting and non-interacting species.

  15. Neutronographic investigations of supramolecular structures on upgraded small-angle spectrometer YuMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklin, A. I.; Rogachev, A. V.; Soloviov, D. V.; Ivankov, O. I.; Kovalev, Yu S.; Utrobin, P. K.; Kutuzov, S. A.; Soloviev, A. G.; Rulev, M. I.; Gordeliy, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    Abstract.The work is a review of neutronographic investigations of supramolecular structures on upgraded small-angle spectrometer YuMO. Here, key parameters of small-angle spectrometers are considered. It is shown that two-detector system is the basis of YuMO upgrade. It allows to widen the dynamic q-range twice. In result, the available q-range is widened and dynamic q-range and data collection rate are doubled. The detailed description of YuMO spectrometer is given.The short review of experimental researches made on the spectrometer in the polymers field, biology, material science and physical chemistry is given. The current investigations also have a methodological aspect. It is shown that upgraded spectrometer provides advanced world level of research of supramolecular structures.

  16. Using the MCLIB Library: Small-Angle Instrument with Focusing-Mirror Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, Philip A.

    1997-12-31

    Focusing mirrors in 1 or 2 dimensions can be used to increase the intensity in a small-angle instrument while maintaining high resolution. Using the recently added toroidal mirror region type in MCLlB (Monte Carlo library for neutron instrument design), we compare five mirror shares: the ideal ellipsoid the tangent toroid, 8 tangent toroidal segments, 8 tangential cylindrical segments, and 20 tangential cylindrical segments. A small-angle scattering instrument on a spallation source was simulated to study resolution. Comparisons show that the ellipsoid provides superior resolution, but that the 8 tangential toroids are a good compromise. A resolution of 0.00056 {Angstrom}{sup -1}(rms), or (-)(+)11% at Q = 0.005 {Angstrom}{sup -1}, was achieved in the simulation using neutrons in the wavelength range 4-15 A. The count rate is high because the full area of the moderator is viewed.

  17. In-situ Grazing-Incidence EXAFS Study of Pb(II) Chemisorption on Hematite (0001) and (1-102) Surfaces (titled changed by journal: IN SITU GRAZING INCIDENCE EXTENDED X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE STUDY OF PB(II) CHEMISORPTION ON HEMATITE (0001) AND (1-102) SURFACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, J

    2004-03-19

    The dominant mode of binding of aqueous Pb(II) to single crystal (0001) (C-cut) and (1-102) (R-cut) surfaces of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been determined using grazing-incidence x-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) spectroscopy. Oligomeric Pb(II) complexes were found to bind in inner-sphere modes on both surfaces, which is in contrast with the binding of aqueous Pb(II) on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) surfaces, where Pb(II) was found in past GI-XAFS studies to bind in a dominantly outer-sphere mode, indicating a significant difference in reactivity of these two surfaces to Pb(II). This difference in reactivity to Pb(II) is explained on the basis of recent crystal truncation rod diffraction studies of the {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} C-cut surfaces in contact with bulk water, which found major structural differences between the surfaces of these two metal oxides.

  18. SFF analysis of the small angle scattering data for investigation of a vesicle systems structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Kiselev, M. A.; Zhabitskaya, E. I.; Gruzinov, A. Yu.; Aksenov, V. L.; Ipatova, O. M.; Druzhilovskaya, O. S.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental data on the small angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (SAXS) are analyzed on a basis of Separated form factors method (SFF) for a study of the drug delivery Phospholipid Transport Nano System (PTNS). Basic parameters of polydispersed population of PTNS nanoparticles (average radius of PTNS-particles, polydispersity of radius, thickness of membrane) have been determined. The results are discussed in comparison with the SFF results for the “classical” vesicular system of dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC).

  19. Two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors for small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McElhaney, S.A.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, various detectors available for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are discussed, along with some current developments being actively pursued. A section has been included to outline the various methodologies of position encoding/decoding with discussions on trends and limitations. Computer software/hardware vary greatly from institute and experiment and only a general discussion is given to this area. 85 refs., 33 figs.

  20. Small-angle stability analysis of a linear control system for a high power communication satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omalley, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    A small angle stability analysis is presented for one particular configuration of a high power communication satellite having a linear control system. Both the central body and the solar array are treated as rigid bodies. The control system studied consists of three-axis control of the central body and one-axis control of the solar array rotation relative to the central body. The results yield preliminary indications of the relation of stability to satellite inertias and control gains.

  1. Small-angle scatter tomography with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Zhu, Zheyuan; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle x-ray scatter imaging has a high intrinsic contrast in cancer research and other applications, and provides information on molecular composition and micro-structure of the tissue. In general, the implementations of small-angle coherent scatter imaging can be divided into two main categories: direct tomography and angular dispersive computerized tomography. Based on the recent development of energy-discriminative photon-counting detector array, here we propose a computerized tomography setup based on energy-dispersive measurement with a photon-counting detector array. To show merits of the energy-dispersive approach, we have performed numerical tests with a phantom containing various tissue types, in comparison with the existing imaging approaches. The results show that with an energy resolution of ~6 keV, the energy dispersive tomography system with a broadband tabletop x-ray would outperform the angular dispersive system, which makes the x-ray small-angle scatter tomography promising for high-specificity tissue imaging.

  2. Using a Hexagonal Mirror for Varying Light Intensity in the Measurement of Small-Angle Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Chang; Lin, Jiun-You; Chang, Chia-Ou

    2016-01-01

    Precision positioning and control are critical to industrial-use processing machines. In order to have components fabricated with excellent precision, the measurement of small-angle variations must be as accurate as possible. To achieve this goal, this study provides a new and simple optical mechanism by varying light intensity. A He-Ne laser beam was passed through an attenuator and into a beam splitter. The reflected light was used as an intensity reference for calibrating the measurement. The transmitted light as a test light entered the optical mechanism hexagonal mirror, the optical mechanism of which was created by us, and then it entered the power detector after four consecutive reflections inside the mirror. When the hexagonal mirror was rotated by a small angle, the laser beam was parallel shifted. Once the laser beam was shifted, the hitting area on the detector was changed; it might be partially outside the sensing zone and would cause the variation of detection intensity. This variation of light intensity can be employed to measure small-angle variations. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this method. The resolution and sensitivity are 3 × 10−40 and 4 mW/° in the angular range of 0.6°, respectively, and 9.3 × 10−50 and 13 mW/° in the angular range of 0.25°. PMID:27537893

  3. The potential for studying the effects of microgravity on connective tissue by small angle light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, K.; Bellare, A.; Shortkroff, S.; Dahlgren, E.

    In order to address the effects of microgravity on living tissue, we must examine and understand tissue response on a molecular level. Doing so requires the development of quantitative techniques for characterizing tissue behavior on the micrometer scale under both normal and reduced gravitational fields. It has been demonstrated that small angle light scattering holds great promise in this regard. Small angle light scattering (SALS) has been used to probe tissue microstructure on the micron and sub-micron length scales. Quantitative information on feature geometry, dimension and orientation was obtained. Here, we discuss the application of small angle light scattering techniques to the study of connective tissue. Two terrestrial situations relevant to future microgravity studies were considered: the anisotropic behavior of collagen fibers in rabbit tendon in response to increasing load; and, the variation in collagen structure in healthy and arthritic human cartilage. SALS allowed quantitative determination of both fiber diameter and degree of orientation, providing a level of information beyond that obtainable by light and electron microscopies. The primary advantages of SALS over these techniques lies in its quantitative nature and reduced sample preparation requirements. SALS requires neither vacuum or the use of dyes, eliminating important potential sources of artifacts. Results from these studies compare favorably with microscopy studies and demonstrate the importance of the quantitative nature of the technique. In addition, these results also demonstrate the potential of SALS for providing quantitative analysis of effects of microgravity on structural and connective tissue.

  4. Reconstruction of three-dimensional anisotropic structure from small-angle scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guan-Rong; Wang, Yangyang; Wu, Bin; Wang, Zhe; Do, Changwoo; Smith, Gregory S.; Bras, Wim; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Péter; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2017-08-01

    When subjected to flow, the structures of many soft-matter systems become anisotropic due to the symmetry breaking of the spatial arrangements of constituent particles at the microscopic level. At present, it is common practice to use various small-angle scattering techniques to explore flow-induced microstructural distortion. However, there has not been a thorough discussion in the literature on how a three-dimensional anisotropic structure can be faithfully reconstructed from two-dimensional small-angle scattering spectra. In this work, we address this issue rigorously from a mathematical perspective by using real spherical harmonic expansion analysis. We first show that, except for cases in which mechanical perturbation is sufficiently small, the existing small-angle scattering techniques generally do not provide complete information on structural distortion. This limitation is caused by the linear dependence of certain real spherical harmonic basis vectors on the flow-vorticity and flow-velocity gradient planes in the Couette shear cell. To circumvent the constraint imposed by this geometry, an alternative approach is proposed in which a parallel sliding plate shear cell is used with a central rotary axis along the flow direction. From the calculation of rotation of the reference frame, we demonstrate the feasibility of this experimental implementation for a fully resolved three-dimensional anisotropic structure via a case study of sheared polymers.

  5. Solution structure and excitation energy transfer in phycobiliproteins of Acaryochloris marina investigated by small angle scattering.

    PubMed

    Golub, M; Combet, S; Wieland, D C F; Soloviov, D; Kuklin, A; Lokstein, H; Schmitt, F-J; Olliges, R; Hecht, M; Eckert, H-J; Pieper, J

    2017-04-01

    The structure of phycobiliproteins of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina was investigated in buffer solution at physiological temperatures, i.e. under the same conditions applied in spectroscopic experiments, using small angle neutron scattering. The scattering data of intact phycobiliproteins in buffer solution containing phosphate can be well described using a cylindrical shape with a length of about 225Å and a diameter of approximately 100Å. This finding is qualitatively consistent with earlier electron microscopy studies reporting a rod-like shape of the phycobiliproteins with a length of about 250 (M. Chen et al., FEBS Letters 583, 2009, 2535) or 300Å (J. Marquart et al., FEBS Letters 410, 1997, 428). In contrast, phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer lacking phosphate revealed a splitting of the rods into cylindrical subunits with a height of 28Å only, but also a pronounced sample aggregation. Complementary small angle neutron and X-ray scattering experiments on phycocyanin suggest that the cylindrical subunits may represent either trimeric phycocyanin or trimeric allophycocyanin. Our findings are in agreement with the assumption that a phycobiliprotein rod with a total height of about 225Å can accommodate seven trimeric phycocyanin subunits and one trimeric allophycocyanin subunit, each of which having a height of about 28Å. The structural information obtained by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering can be used to interpret variations in the low-energy region of the 4.5K absorption spectra of phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer solutions containing and lacking phosphate, respectively.

  6. Dynamical process of skyrmion-helical magnetic transformation of the chiral-lattice magnet FeGe probed by small-angle resonant soft x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Y.; Morikawa, D.; Honda, T.; Nakao, H.; Murakami, Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Kawasaki, M.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Small-angle soft x-ray scattering in resonance with Fe L absorption edge has been investigated for helical magnetic order and magnetic skyrmion crystal (SkX) in B20-type cubic FeGe. Transformation of magnetic structures among helical, conical, SkX, and field-polarized spin-collinear forms is observed with the application of a magnetic field parallel to the incident soft x-ray. The resonant soft x-ray scattering with high q -resolution revealed a transient dynamics of SkX, such as rotation of SkX and variation of the SkX lattice constant, upon the change of magnetic field.

  7. Energy loss and electron and x-ray emission of slow highly charged Arq+ ions in grazing incidence on an Al(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xianwen; Hu, Bitao; Zhang, Chengjun; Wang, Jijin; Chen, Chunhua

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the classical over-barrier model, energy loss, electron emission, and x-ray emission of slow highly charged ion Arq+ grazing on the Al(111) single-crystal surface under various azimuthal angles have been studied. The enhancement of energy loss, potential electron emission yields, intensity of KL1 satellite lines, or x-ray yields for the Ar17+ ion grazing along low-index crystallographic directions was observed. The calculated energy-loss spectra of atomic projectiles Ar0 interacting with metallic surface agree reasonably well with experiment. The inner-shell filling contributions through the side feeding mechanism, Auger transitions, and the radiative decay process are discussed by analyzing the final charge-state distributions of the reflected ions, potential electron emission yields, and x-ray yields under different azimuthal angles.

  8. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  9. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-19

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  10. Grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence analysis for non-destructive determination of In and Ga depth profiles in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber films

    SciTech Connect

    Streeck, C.; Brunken, S.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Weber, A.; Schock, H.-W.; Mainz, R.; Gerlach, M.; Hönicke, P.; Lubeck, J.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Herzog, C.; Kanngießer, B.

    2013-09-09

    Development of highly efficient thin film solar cells involves band gap engineering by tuning their elemental composition with depth. Here we show that grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and well-characterized instrumentation is suitable for a non-destructive and reference-free analysis of compositional depth profiles in thin films. Variation of the incidence angle provides quantitative access to the in-depth distribution of the elements, which are retrieved from measured fluorescence intensities by modeling parameterized gradients and fitting calculated to measured fluorescence intensities. Our results show that double Ga gradients in Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} can be resolved by GIXRF.

  11. Characterization of two new stable block copolymer mesophases by synchrotron small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, C.; Micha, M. A.; Oestreich, S.; Förster, S.; Antonietti, M.

    1998-05-01

    Block copolymers made of polystyrene and fluorinated blocks represent a new class of polymers with a very strong incompatibility between the two blocks. They exhibit new stable block copolymer mesophases which are not considered in the phase diagrams of diblock copolymers in the strong and super-strong segregation regime. The solid-state structures of two polymers with different compositions are characterized by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, thus proving the existence of a quadratically perforated layer phase and a 2D phase of sanidically degenerated cylinders.

  12. Clustering of water molecules in ultramicroporous carbon: In-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Contescu, Cristian I.; Rai, Durgesh K.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.

    2016-10-19

    The adsorption of water is central to most of the applications of microporous carbon as adsorbent material. We report early kinetics of water adsorption in the microporous carbon using in-situ small-angle neutron scattering. It is observed that adsorption of water occurs via cluster formation of molecules. Interestingly, the cluster size remains constant throughout the adsorption process whereas number density of clusters increases with time. The role of surface chemistry of microporous carbon on the early kinetics of adsorption process was also investigated. Lastly, the present study provides direct experimental evidence for cluster assisted adsorption of water molecules in microporous carbon (Do-Do model).

  13. Cylindrical aggregates of chlorophylls studied by small-angle neutron scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, D.L.; Katz, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron small-angle scattering has demonstrated tubular chlorophyll aggregates formed by self-assembly of a variety of chlorophyll types in nonpolar solvents. The size and other properties of the tubular aggregates can be accounted for by stereochemical properties of the chlorophyll molecules. Features of some of the structures are remarkably similar to light harvesting chlorophyll complexes in vivo, particularly for photosynthetic bacteria. These nanotube chlorophyll structures may have applications as light harvesting biomaterials where efficient energy transfer occurs from an excited state which is highly delocalized.

  14. An overview of resid characterization by mass spectrometry and small angle scattering techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J. E.; Winans, R. E.

    1999-07-14

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss what is known about the molecular structures found in petroleum resid from mass spectrometry and small angle neutron and X-ray scattering methods. The question about molecular size distributions and the occurrence of aggregation in the asphaltene fraction will be examined. Our understanding of this problem has evolved with the application of new analytical methods. Also, correlations with results from other approaches will be discussed. In addition, the issue of the nature of the heteroatom-containing molecules will be examined and the challenges that remain in this area.

  15. Study of structural irregularities of smectite clay systems by small-angle neutron scattering and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stefanis, A.; Tomlinson, A. A. G.; Steriotis, Th. A.; Charalambopoulou, G. Ch.; Keiderling, U.

    2007-04-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and its contrast-matching variant are employed in order to determine structural properties (inter-pillar distances and mass/surface fractal dimensions of the clay layers and pillars) of a series of smectite natural clays (montmorillonite, beidellite, and bentonite) and their pillared and pillared/ion-exchanged analogues. Moreover, a comparative analysis with the adsorption data is carried out on the basis of a systematic study of the structural changes induced by a particular treatment or modification (e.g. pillaring) of the clay systems.

  16. Small angle X-ray scattering study of coal soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Parker, J. T.; Seifert, S.; Fletcher, T. H.

    2000-02-14

    The objective of this study is to examine, by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the formation of soot from individual coal particle combustion in a methane flat flame burner. The SAXS instrument at the Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can be used to observe both the formation of spherules and clusters since it can access length scales of 6--6000 {angstrom}. The high X-ray flux enables rapid acquisition of scattering data of various regions of the flame. SAXS data reveal particle size, shape, surface areas, and surface roughness.

  17. Integrative structural modeling with small angle X-ray scattering profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological advances enabled high-throughput collection of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) profiles of biological macromolecules. Thus, computational methods for integrating SAXS profiles into structural modeling are needed more than ever. Here, we review specifically the use of SAXS profiles for the structural modeling of proteins, nucleic acids, and their complexes. First, the approaches for computing theoretical SAXS profiles from structures are presented. Second, computational methods for predicting protein structures, dynamics of proteins in solution, and assembly structures are covered. Third, we discuss the use of SAXS profiles in integrative structure modeling approaches that depend simultaneously on several data types. PMID:22800408

  18. Proposed design of SAMUS (small angle muon spectrometer) toroid and its magnetic field calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.

    1988-06-09

    Presently the D/null/ detector has three big toroidal magnets; one Central Toroid (CF) and two End Wall Toroids (EF). The EF toroids have central openings 72'' x 72''. Originally, this opening was meant for possible future end-plug calorimeters. Instead we are now designing Small Angle Muon Spectrometer (SAMUS) for the opening. The major component will be built at Serpukhov. The design of the toroid magnets and its magnetic field calculations is being done by exchanging information between Serpukhov and Fermilab. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.; Bentley, P. M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N. L.; Al-Shammary, H. A. O.; Wood, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100Å scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  20. Small angle grain boundary Ge films on biaxial CaF 2/glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaire, C.; Clemmer, P. C.; Li, H.-F.; Parker, T. C.; Snow, P.; Bhat, I.; Lee, S.; Wang, G.-C.; Lu, T.-M.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrated that it is possible to grow single crystal-like Ge films on a glass substrate using a biaxially textured CaF 2 buffer layer at a low temperature of ˜400 °C. The CaF 2 buffer layer with the (1 1 1)<1 2 1> biaxial orientation was grown by the oblique angle deposition technique and characterized by X-ray pole figure analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Ge(1 1 1) heteroepitaxial films possess a single crystal-like structure with small angle grain boundaries of ≤2° misorientation.

  1. Measurement of protein size in concentrated solutions by small angle X‐ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wei, Yanru; Wang, Wenjia; Wang, Bing; Liang, Hongli; Gao, Yuxi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract By simulations on the distance distribution function (DDF) derived from small angle X‐ray scattering (SAXS) theoretical data of a dense monodisperse system, we found a quantitative mathematical correlation between the apparent size of a spherically symmetric (or nearly spherically symmetric) homogenous particle and the concentration of the solution. SAXS experiments on protein solutions of human hemoglobin and horse myoglobin validated the correlation. This gives a new method to determine, from the SAXS DDF, the size of spherically symmetric (or nearly spherically symmetric) particles of a dense monodisperse system, specifically for protein solutions with interference effects. PMID:27241796

  2. Characterising density fluctuations in liquid yttria aluminates with small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Wilding, Martin C.; Vu Van, Quang; Majerus, Odile; Hennet, Louis

    2009-01-29

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been measured in the wavevector range 0.01

  3. A small-angle large-acceptance detection system for hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Brandenburg, S.; Huisman, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mul, F. A.; Schadmand, S.; van der Schaaf, K.; Schippers, J. M.; Volkerts, M.

    2000-04-01

    The performance of a segmented large-acceptance detector, capable of measuring particles at small forward angles, is presented. The Small-Angle Large-Acceptance Detector (SALAD), was built to handle very high rates of particles impinging on the detector. Particles down to a few MeV can be detected with it. The position of charged particles is measured by two Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers while scintillator blocks are used to measure the energy of the detected particle. A stack of thin scintillators placed behind the energy detectors allows for a hardware rejection (veto) of high-energy particles going through the scintillator blocks.

  4. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Yu. V.; Rempel, A. A.; Meyer, M.; Pipich, V.; Gerth, S.; Magerl, A.

    2016-08-01

    Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on Cd and S doped glass annealed at 600 °C shows after the first 12 h nucleation and growth of spherical CdS nanoparticles with a radius of up to 34±4 Å. After the nucleation is completed after 24 h, further growth in this amorphous environment is governed by oriented particle attachment mechanism as found for a liquid medium. Towards 48 h the particle shape has changed into spheroidal with short and long axis of 40±2 Å and 120±2 Å, respectively.

  5. Application of small angle neutron scattering on the analysis of Korean compact jaw bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong; Shin, E. J.; Seong, B. S.; Paik, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was applied to analyze the nano-structure of normal and osteoporosis compact bones of Korean jaw-bones. The SANS profiles revealed the directional and regular distributions of plate-like bone crystals, lacuna rough surface and nano-sized canliculi in the compact bones. A smaller amount of bone crystals, lacuna and canliculi were present in the osteoporosis bone than in normal human bone. Microstructure observation by transmission electron microscopy and density measurement by bone densitometry supported the SANS evaluation.

  6. Correlation between fractal dimension and surface characterization by small angle X-ray scattering in marble.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Nolasco, Manlio Favio; Méndez-Vivar, Juan

    2010-03-16

    Among several analysis techniques applied to the study of surface passivation using dicarboxylic acids, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has proved to be relevant in the physicochemical interpretation of the surface association resulting between calcium carbonate and the molecular structure of malonic acid. It is possible to establish chemical affinity principles through bidimensional geometric analysis in terms of the fractal dimension obtained experimentally by SAXS. In this Article, we present results about the adsorption of malonic acid on calcite, using theoretical and mathematical principles of the fractal dimension.

  7. Small-angle and surface scattering from porous and fractal materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.

    1998-09-18

    We review the basic theoretical methods used to treat small-angle scattering from porous materials, treated as general two-phase systems, and also the basic experimental techniques for carrying out such experiments. We discuss the special forms of the scattering when the materials exhibit mass or surface fractal behavior, and review the results of recent experiments on several types of porous media and also SANS experiments probing the phase behavior of binary fluid mixtures or polymer solutions confined in porous materials. Finally, we discuss the analogous technique of off-specular scattering from surfaces and interfaces which is used to study surface roughness of various kinds.

  8. Equilibrium polymerization of liquid sulphur from small angle neutron scattering of sulphur solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, F.; Ambroise, J. P.; Bellissent, R.; Pfeuty, P.

    1992-06-01

    The reversible singular anomaly which shows up in liquid sulphur at 159°C and is also present in sulphur solutions has been clearly detected for the first time by small angle neutron scattering in solutions of sulphur with deuterated naphtalene and of sulphur with deuterated biphenyl. The observed sudden rise of the small q limit of the scattering intensity is interpreted as the signature of an equilibrium polymerization transition with formation of long sulphur chains. Experimental meausrements are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on the mean field approximation of a lattice model.

  9. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Measurements of Magnetic Cluster Sizes in Magnetic Recording Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-17

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  10. Small-angle X-ray scattering probe of intermolecular interaction in red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guan-Fen; Wang, We-Jia; Xu, Jia-Hua; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2015-03-01

    With high concentrations of hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells, self-interactions among these molecules could increase the propensities of their polymerization and aggregation. In the present work, high concentration Hb in solution and red blood cells were analyzed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Calculation of the effective structure factor indicates that the interaction of Hb molecules is the same when they are crowded together in both the cell and physiological saline. The Hb molecules stay individual without the formation of aggregates and clusters in cells. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2009CB918600) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (10979005)

  11. Application of small-angle neutron scattering to the study of forces between magnetically chained monodisperse ferrofluid emulsion droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Dr Nirmesh; Liu, Dr C K; Hawkett, Dr B. S.; Warr, G. G.; Hamilton, William A

    2014-01-01

    The optical magnetic chaining technique (MCT) developed by Leal-Calderon, Bibette and co-workers in the 1990 s allows precise measurements of force profiles between droplets in monodisperse ferrofluid emulsions. However, the method lacks an in-situ determination of droplet size and therefore requires the combination of separately acquired measurements of droplet chain periodicity versus an applied magnetic field from optical Bragg scattering and droplet diameter inferred from dynamic light scattering (DLS) to recover surface force-distance profiles between the colloidal particles. Compound refractive lens (CRL) focussed small-angle scattering (SANS) MCT should result in more consistent measurements of droplet size (form factor measurements in the absence of field) and droplet chaining period (from structure factor peaks when the magnetic field is applied); and, with access to shorter length scales, extend force measurements to closer approaches than possible by optical measurements. We report on CRL-SANS measurements of monodisperse ferrofluid emulsion droplets aligned in straight chains by an applied field perpendicular to the incident beam direction. Analysis of the scattering from the closely spaced droplets required algorithms that carefully treated resolution and its effect on mean scattering vector magnitudes in order to determine droplet size and chain periods to sufficient accuracy. At lower applied fields scattering patterns indicate structural correlations transverse to the magnetic field direction due to the formation of intermediate structures in early chain growth.

  12. Small-angle light scattering symmetry breaking in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films with inhomogeneous electrically controlled interface anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, V. A.; Konkolovich, A. V.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Miskevich, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    We have described the method of analyzing and reporting on the results of calculation of the small-angle structure of radiation scattered by a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film with electrically controlled interfacial anchoring. The method is based on the interference approximation of the wave scattering theory and the hard disk model. Scattering from an individual liquid crystal droplet has been described using the anomalous diffraction approximation extended to the case of droplets with uniform and nonuniform interface anchoring at the droplet-polymer boundary. The director field structure in an individual droplet is determined from the solution of the problem of minimizing the volume density of the free energy. The electrooptical effect of symmetry breaking in the angular distribution of scattered radiation has been analyzed. This effect means that the intensities of radiation scattered within angles +θ s and-θ s relative to the direction of illumination in the scattering plane can be different. The effect is of the interference origin and is associated with asymmetry of the phase shift of the wavefront of an incident wave from individual parts of the droplet, which appears due to asymmetry of the director field structure in the droplet, caused by nonuniform anchoring of liquid crystal molecules with the polymer on its surface. This effect is analyzed in the case of normal illumination of the film depending on the interfacial anchoring at the liquid crystal-polymer interface, the orientation of the optical axes of droplets, their concentration, sizes, anisometry, and polydispersity.

  13. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering reveal conformational changes in rhodopsin activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Perera, Suchitrhanga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey V.; Graziono, Vito; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation plays a crucial role in the development of novel improved molecular drugs. During photo-activation, the retinal chromophore of the visual GPCR rhodopsin isomerizes from 11-cis to all-trans conformation, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. The principal goals of this work are to address whether the activation of rhodopsin leads to a single state or a conformational ensemble, and how protein organizational structure changes with detergent environment in solution. We use both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to answer the above questions. For the first time we observe the change in protein conformational ensemble upon photo-activation by SANS with contrast variation, which enables the separate study of the protein structure within the detergent assembly. In addition, SAXS study of protein structure within detergent assembly suggests that the detergent molecules form a belt of monolayer (micelle) around protein with different geometrical shapes to keep the protein in folded state.

  14. A Microbeam Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study on Enamel Crystallites in Subsurface Lesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, N.; Ohta, N.; Matsuo, T.; Tanaka, T.; Terada, Y.; Kamasaka, H.; Kometani, T.

    2010-10-01

    The early caries lesion in bovine tooth enamel was studied by two different X-ray diffraction systems at the SPring-8 third generation synchrotron radiation facility. Both allowed us simultaneous measurement of the small and large angle regions. The beam size was 6μm at BL40XU and 50μm at BL45XU. The small-angle scattering from voids in the hydroxyapatite crystallites and the wide-angle diffraction from the hydroxyapatite crystals were observed simultaneously. At BL40XU an X-ray image intensifier was used for the small-angle and a CMOS flatpanel detector for the large-angle region. At BL45XU, a large-area CCD detector was used to cover both regions. A linear microbeam scan at BL40XU showed a detailed distribution of voids and crystals and made it possible to examine the structural details in the lesion. The two-dimensional scan at BL45XU showed distribution of voids and crystals in a wider region in the enamel. The simultaneous small- and wide-angle measurement with a microbeam is a powerful tool to elucidate the mechanisms of demineralization and remineralization in the early caries lesion.

  15. Uncertainties in Small-Angle Measurement Systems Used to Calibrate Angle Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack A.; Amer, Mohamed; Faust, Bryon; Zimmerman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a number of effects that can give rise to errors in small-angle measurement systems when they are used to calibrate artifacts such as optical polygons. Of these sources of uncertainty, the most difficult to quantify are errors associated with the measurement of imperfect, non-flat faces of the artifact, causing the instrument to misinterpret the average orientation of the surface. In an attempt to shed some light on these errors, we have compared autocollimator measurements to angle measurements made with a Fizeau phase-shifting interferometer. These two instruments have very different operating principles and implement different definitions of the orientation of a surface, but (surprisingly) we have not yet seen any clear differences between results obtained with the autocollimator and with the interferometer. The interferometer is in some respects an attractive alternative to an autocollimator for small-angle measurement; it implements an unambiguous and robust definition of surface orientation in terms of the tilt of a best-fit plane, and it is easier to quantify likely errors of the interferometer measurements than to evaluate autocollimator uncertainty. PMID:27366616

  16. Wavelength-independent constant period spin-echo modulated small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim; Habicht, Klaus; Tremsin, Anton; Strobl, Markus

    2016-06-15

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SEMSANS) in Time-of-Flight (ToF) mode has been shown to be a promising technique for measuring (very) small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signals and performing quantitative Dark-Field Imaging (DFI), i.e., SANS with 2D spatial resolution. However, the wavelength dependence of the modulation period in the ToF spin-echo mode has so far limited the useful modulation periods to those resolvable with the limited spatial resolution of the detectors available. Here we present our results of an approach to keep the period of the induced modulation constant for the wavelengths utilised in ToF. This is achieved by ramping the magnetic fields in the coils responsible for creating the spatially modulated beam in synchronisation with the neutron pulse, thus keeping the modulation period constant for all wavelengths. Such a setup enables the decoupling of the spatial detector resolution from the resolution of the modulation period by the use of slits or gratings in analogy to the approach in grating-based neutron DFI.

  17. Small angle scattering methods to study porous materials under high uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Sylvie; Balima, Félix; Pischedda, Vittoria; Legrand, Franck; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    We developed a high pressure cell for the in situ study of the porosity of solids under high uniaxial strain using neutron small angle scattering. The cell comprises a hydraulically actioned piston and a main body equipped with two single-crystal sapphire windows allowing for the neutron scattering of the sample. The sample cavity is designed to allow for a large volume variation as expected when compressing highly porous materials. We also implemented a loading protocol to adapt an existing diamond anvil cell for the study of porous materials by X-ray small angle scattering under high pressure. The two techniques are complementary as the radiation beam and the applied pressure are in one case perpendicular to each other (neutron cell) and in the other case parallel (X-ray cell). We will illustrate the use of these two techniques in the study of lamellar porous systems up to a maximum pressure of 0.1 GPa and 0.3 GPa for the neutron and X-ray cells, respectively. These devices allow obtaining information on the evolution of porosity with pressure in the pore dimension subdomain defined by the wave-numbers explored in the scattering process. The evolution with the applied load of such parameters as the fractal dimension of the pore-matrix interface or the apparent specific surface in expanded graphite and in expanded vermiculite is used to illustrate the use of the high pressure cells.

  18. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  19. Characterization of Nanocellulose Using Small-Angle Neutron, X-ray, and Dynamic Light Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yimin; Liu, Kai; Zhan, Chengbo; Geng, Lihong; Chu, Benjamin; Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2017-02-16

    Nanocellulose extracted from wood pulps using TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and sulfuric acid hydrolysis methods was characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The dimensions of this nanocellulose (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber (TOCN) and sulfuric acid hydrolyzed cellulose nanocrystal (SACN)) revealed by the different scattering methods were compared with those characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SANS and SAXS data were analyzed using a parallelepiped-based form factor. The width and thickness of the nanocellulose cross section were ∼8 and ∼2 nm for TOCN and ∼20 and ∼3 nm for SACN, respectively, where the fitting results from SANS and SAXS profiles were consistent with each other. DLS was carried out under both the VV mode with the polarizer and analyzer parallel to each other and the HV mode having them perpendicular to each other. Using rotational and translational diffusion coefficients obtained under the HV mode yielded a nanocellulose length qualitatively consistent with that observed by TEM, whereas the length derived by the translational diffusion coefficient under the VV mode appeared to be overestimated.

  20. Small angle scattering methods to study porous materials under high uniaxial strain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sylvie Balima, Félix; Pischedda, Vittoria; Legrand, Franck; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2015-02-15

    We developed a high pressure cell for the in situ study of the porosity of solids under high uniaxial strain using neutron small angle scattering. The cell comprises a hydraulically actioned piston and a main body equipped with two single-crystal sapphire windows allowing for the neutron scattering of the sample. The sample cavity is designed to allow for a large volume variation as expected when compressing highly porous materials. We also implemented a loading protocol to adapt an existing diamond anvil cell for the study of porous materials by X-ray small angle scattering under high pressure. The two techniques are complementary as the radiation beam and the applied pressure are in one case perpendicular to each other (neutron cell) and in the other case parallel (X-ray cell). We will illustrate the use of these two techniques in the study of lamellar porous systems up to a maximum pressure of 0.1 GPa and 0.3 GPa for the neutron and X-ray cells, respectively. These devices allow obtaining information on the evolution of porosity with pressure in the pore dimension subdomain defined by the wave-numbers explored in the scattering process. The evolution with the applied load of such parameters as the fractal dimension of the pore-matrix interface or the apparent specific surface in expanded graphite and in expanded vermiculite is used to illustrate the use of the high pressure cells.

  1. Structural analysis of Fe–Mn–O nanoparticles in glass ceramics by small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Harizanova, Ruzha; Tatchev, Dragomir; Hoell, Armin; Rüssel, Christian

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic nanocrystals containing Fe and Mn were obtained by annealing of silicate glasses with the composition 13.6Na{sub 2}O–62.9SiO{sub 2}–8.5MnO–15.0Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3−x} (mol%) at 580 °C for different periods of time. Here, we present Small Angle Neutron Scattering using Polarized neutrons (SANSPOL) and Anomalous Small Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS) investigation on these glass ceramic samples. Analysis of scattering data from both methods reveals the formation of spherical core–shell type of nanoparticles with mean sizes between 10 nm and 100 nm. ASAXS investigation shows the particles have higher concentration of iron atoms and the shell like region surrounding the particles is enriched in SiO{sub 2}. SANSPOL investigation shows the particles are found to be magnetic and are surrounded by a non-magnetic shell-like region. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic spherical core–shell nanoparticles in glass ceramics: SANSPOL and ASAXS investigations. - Highlights: • Formation and growth mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles in silicate glass. • SANSPOL and ASAXS methods employed to evaluate quantitative information. • Analyses showed formation of nanoparticles with spherical core–shell structures. • Core of the particle is magnetic and surrounded by weak magnetic shell like region.

  2. A small-angle x-ray scattering system with a vertical layout

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xiaowei; Meng, Lingpu; Cui, Kunpeng; Wu, Lihui; Li, Liangbin

    2014-12-15

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) system with a vertical layout (V-SAXS) has been designed and constructed for in situ detection on nanostructures, which is well suitable for in situ study on self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid interface and polymer processing. A steel-tower frame on a reinforced basement is built as the supporting skeleton for scattering beam path and detector platform, ensuring the system a high working stability and a high operating accuracy. A micro-focus x-ray source combining parabolic three-dimensional multi-layer mirror and scatteringless collimation system provides a highly parallel beam, which allows us to detect the very small angle range. With a sample-to-detector distance of 7 m, the largest measurable length scale is 420 nm in real space. With a large sample zone, it is possible to install different experimental setups such as film stretching machine, which makes the system perfect to follow the microstructures evolution of materials during processing. The capability of the V-SAXS on in situ study is tested with a drying experiment of a free latex droplet, which confirms our initial design.

  3. Bilayer thickness in unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles: small-angle neutron scattering using contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerka, N.; Uhríková, D.; Teixeira, J.; Balgavý, P.

    2004-07-01

    The thickness of the lipid bilayer in extruded unilamellar vesicles prepared from synthetic 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholines with monounsaturated acyl chains (diCn:1PC, n=14-22) was studied at 30°C in the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. Several contrasts of the neutron scattering length density between the aqueous phase and phospholipid bilayer of vesicles were used. The experimental data were evaluated using the small-angle form of the Kratky-Porod approximation ln[I(q)q2] vs. q2 of the SANS intensity I(q) in the appropriate range of scattering vector values q to obtain the bilayer radius of gyration Rg and its extrapolated value at infinite scattering contrast Rginf. The bilayer thickness parameter evaluated from a linear approximation of dependence of gyration radius on the inverse contrast was then obtained without using any bilayer structure model. The dependence of the thickness parameter dg≅120.5Rginf on the number n of acyl chain carbons was found to be linear with a slope of 1.8+/-0.2Å per one acyl chain carbon. This slope can be used in bilayer-protein interaction studies.

  4. SASfit: a tool for small-angle scattering data analysis using a library of analytical expressions

    PubMed Central

    Breßler, Ingo; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Thünemann, Andreas F.

    2015-01-01

    SASfit is one of the mature programs for small-angle scattering data analysis and has been available for many years. This article describes the basic data processing and analysis workflow along with recent developments in the SASfit program package (version 0.94.6). They include (i) advanced algorithms for reduction of oversampled data sets, (ii) improved confidence assessment in the optimized model parameters and (iii) a flexible plug-in system for custom user-provided models. A scattering function of a mass fractal model of branched polymers in solution is provided as an example for implementing a plug-in. The new SASfit release is available for major platforms such as Windows, Linux and MacOS. To facilitate usage, it includes comprehensive indexed documentation as well as a web-based wiki for peer collaboration and online videos demonstrating basic usage. The use of SASfit is illustrated by interpretation of the small-angle X-ray scattering curves of monomodal gold nanoparticles (NIST reference material 8011) and bimodal silica nanoparticles (EU reference material ERM-FD-102). PMID:26500467

  5. The solution structure of stilbenoid dendrimers: a small-angle scattering study.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Karpuk, Elena; Lehmann, Matthias; Meier, Herbert; Lindner, Peter; Harnau, Ludger; Ballauff, Matthias

    2006-10-13

    The spatial structure of a stilbenoid dendrimer is investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in dilute solution. All measurements are performed in toluene. The dendrimer consists of a stilbenoid scaffold with appended hexyloxy chains. SAXS is mainly sensitive to the dendrimer scaffold whereas SANS intensity, measured in fully deuterated toluene, derives from the solute molecules. The resulting SAXS and SANS intensities are analyzed by comparison with various models. It is found that the model of a circular disk gives the best description of the data. SAXS data demonstrate that the stilbenoid scaffold is flat as expected for benzene rings conjugated through vinylene units. Thus, it can be described by a circular disk with a radius of 1.6 nm and a thickness of 0.7 nm. SANS, on the other hand, shows that the hexyloxy chains are not confined in the plane defined by the core. This is derived from modeling the SANS data with a much thicker circular disk (radius: 2.4 nm, thickness: 1.8 nm). The structure factor S(q), describing the interaction of the dendrimers at higher concentrations, is modeled quantitatively with the "polymer reference interaction site model" (PRISM) integral equation formalism for hard plates such as particles. Here the structural data obtained from the analysis of the SANS data are used so that no new adjustable parameter is necessary for this description.

  6. Morphological characterization of carbon-nanofiber-reinforced epoxy nanocomposites using ultra-small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, R.S.; Anderson, D.P.; Brown, J.M.; Arlen, M.J.; Colleary, A.J.; Lafdi, K.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2010-07-01

    Studies of the properties of nanocomposites reinforced with vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (VGCFs) can be found throughout the literature. Electrical, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties are just a few of the characteristics that have been well discussed. Although these properties depend on morphology, morphological characterization is rare. Due to its 2-dimensional nature, microscopy is of limited value when analyzing network morphologies. This work will show how the characterization of the three-dimensional geometry and network formation of VGCFs can be determined using ultra-small angle scattering techniques. Ultra-small angle x-ray and neutron scattering (USAXS and USANS) were used to characterize the morphology of carbon nanofibers suspended in epoxy. Using a simplified tube model, we estimate the dimensions of suspended fibers. The assumption of tubular fibers accounts for the increased surface area observed with USAXS that is not accounted for using a solid rod model. Furthermore, USANS was used to search for a structural signature associated with the electrical percolation threshold. USANS extends to longer dimensional scales than USAXS, which measures a smaller range of momentum transfer. To determine the electrical percolation threshold, AC impedance spectroscopy was employed to verify that an electrically conductive, percolated network forms at VGCNF loadings of 0.8% < CNF wt% < 1.2%. These values correlate with the USANS data, where a morphological transition is seen at {approx}1.2% loading.

  7. A small-angle x-ray scattering system with a vertical layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xiaowei; Meng, Lingpu; Cui, Kunpeng; Wu, Lihui; Li, Liangbin

    2014-12-01

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) system with a vertical layout (V-SAXS) has been designed and constructed for in situ detection on nanostructures, which is well suitable for in situ study on self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid interface and polymer processing. A steel-tower frame on a reinforced basement is built as the supporting skeleton for scattering beam path and detector platform, ensuring the system a high working stability and a high operating accuracy. A micro-focus x-ray source combining parabolic three-dimensional multi-layer mirror and scatteringless collimation system provides a highly parallel beam, which allows us to detect the very small angle range. With a sample-to-detector distance of 7 m, the largest measurable length scale is 420 nm in real space. With a large sample zone, it is possible to install different experimental setups such as film stretching machine, which makes the system perfect to follow the microstructures evolution of materials during processing. The capability of the V-SAXS on in situ study is tested with a drying experiment of a free latex droplet, which confirms our initial design.

  8. Small-angle neutron and dynamic light scattering study of gelatin coacervates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, B.; Aswal, V. K.; Goyal, P. S.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2004-08-01

    The state of intermolecular aggregates and that of folded gelatin molecules could be characterized by dynamic laser light and small-angle neutron scattering experiments, which implied spontaneous segregation of particle sizes preceding coacervation, which is a liquid-liquid phase transition phenomenon. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) data analysis revealed two particle sizes until precipitation was reached. The smaller particles having a diameter of 50 nm (stable nanoparticles prepared by coacervation method) were detected in the supernatant, whereas the inter-molecular aggregates having a diameter of 400 nm gave rise to coacervation. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments revealed that typical mesh size of the networks exist in polymer dense phase (coacervates) [1]. Analysis of the SANS structure factor showed the presence of two length scales associated with this system that were identified as the correlation length or mesh size, xi = 10.6 Å of the network and the other is the size of inhomogeneities = 21.4 Å. Observations were discussed based on the results obtained from SANS experiments performed in 5% (w/v) gelatin solution at 60oC (xi = 50 Å, zeta = 113 Å) and 5% (w/v) gel at 28oC (xi = 47 Å, zeta = 115 Å) in aqueous phase [2] indicating smaller length scales in coacervate as compared to sol and gel.

  9. A small-angle x-ray scattering system with a vertical layout.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xiaowei; Meng, Lingpu; Cui, Kunpeng; Wu, Lihui; Li, Liangbin

    2014-12-01

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) system with a vertical layout (V-SAXS) has been designed and constructed for in situ detection on nanostructures, which is well suitable for in situ study on self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid interface and polymer processing. A steel-tower frame on a reinforced basement is built as the supporting skeleton for scattering beam path and detector platform, ensuring the system a high working stability and a high operating accuracy. A micro-focus x-ray source combining parabolic three-dimensional multi-layer mirror and scatteringless collimation system provides a highly parallel beam, which allows us to detect the very small angle range. With a sample-to-detector distance of 7 m, the largest measurable length scale is 420 nm in real space. With a large sample zone, it is possible to install different experimental setups such as film stretching machine, which makes the system perfect to follow the microstructures evolution of materials during processing. The capability of the V-SAXS on in situ study is tested with a drying experiment of a free latex droplet, which confirms our initial design.

  10. Using Small-Angle Scattering Techniques to Understand Mechanical Properties of Biopolymer-Based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Laura L.; Taraban, Marc B.

    2013-01-01

    The design and engineering of innovative biopolymer-based biomaterials for a variety of biomedical applications should be based on the understanding of the relationship between their nanoscale structure and mechanical properties. Down the road, such understanding could be fundamental to tune the properties of engineered tissues, extracellular matrices for cell delivery and proliferation/differentiation, etc. In this tutorial review, we attempt to show in what way biomaterial structural data can help to understand the bulk material properties. We begin with some background on common types of biopolymers used in biomaterials research, discuss some typical mechanical testing techniques and then review how others in the field of biomaterials have utilized small-angle scattering for material characterization. Detailed examples are then used to show the full range of possible characterization techniques available for biopolymer-based biomaterials. Future developments in the area of material characterization by small-angle scattering will undoubtedly facilitate the use of structural data to control the kinetics of assembly and final properties of prospective biomaterials. PMID:24273590

  11. Orienting rigid and flexible biological assemblies in ferrofluids for small-angle neutron scattering studies

    PubMed Central

    Sosnick, T.; Charles, S.; Stubbs, G.; Yau, P.; Bradbury, E. M.; Timmins, P.; Trewhella, J.

    1991-01-01

    Small-angle scattering from macromolecules in solution is widely used to study their structures, but the information content is limited because the molecules are generally randomly oriented and hence the data are spherically averaged. The use of oriented rodlike structures for scattering, as in fiber diffraction, greatly increases the amount of structural detail that can be obtained. A new technique using a ferromagnetic fluid has been developed to align elongated structures independent of their intrinsic magnetic properties. This technique is ideal for small-angle neutron scattering because the scattering from the ferrofluid particles can be reduced significantly by matching the neutron scattering length density of the particles to a D2O solvent (“contrast matching”). The net result is scattering primarily from the ordered biological assembly in a solution environment that can be adjusted to physiological pH and ionic strength. Scattering results from ordered tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco rattle virus, and chromain fibers are presented. ImagesFIGURE 4FIGURE 4 PMID:19431809

  12. Accounting for thermodynamic non-ideality in the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data of proteins.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J

    2016-12-01

    Hydrodynamic studies of the solution properties of proteins and other biological macromolecules are often hard to interpret when the sample is present at a reasonably concentrated solution. The reason for this is that solutions exhibit deviations from ideal behaviour which is manifested as thermodynamic non-ideality. The range of concentrations at which this behaviour typically is exhibited is as low as 1-2 mg/ml, well within the range of concentrations used for their analysis by techniques such as small-angle scattering. Here we discuss thermodynamic non-ideality used previously used in the context of light scattering and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation and apply it to the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data. The results show that there is a complementarity between the radially averaged structure factor derived from small-angle X-ray scattering/small-angle neutron scattering studies and the second virial coefficient derived from sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation experiments.

  13. Phase information recovery based on the methods of phase shifting interferometry with small angles between interfering beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzhov, V. I.; Il'inykh, S. P.; Khaibullin, S. V.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the method for recovering digital holograms obtained at small angles between interfering wave fields. The technique for obtaining data on the phase of the wavefront reflected from the object is under consideration.

  14. NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew J; Zhang, Fan; Kline, R Joseph; Guthrie, William F; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The certification of a new standard reference material for small-angle scattering [NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)], based on glassy carbon, is presented. Creation of this SRM relies on the intrinsic primary calibration capabilities of the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering technique. This article describes how the intensity calibration has been achieved and validated in the certified Q range, Q = 0.008-0.25 Å(-1), together with the purpose, use and availability of the SRM. The intensity calibration afforded by this robust and stable SRM should be applicable universally to all SAXS instruments that employ a transmission measurement geometry, working with a wide range of X-ray energies or wavelengths. The validation of the SRM SAXS intensity calibration using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is discussed, together with the prospects for including SANS in a future renewal certification.

  15. Dynamic holographic moiré patterns in photorefractive Bi12TiO20 and small-angle measurements.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, P A; Nunes, L C; Corrêa, I

    2000-09-01

    A procedure for obtaining real-time holographic moirélike patterns and measuring small angles is proposed. Two rotated sinusoidal phase gratings are superposed, and the result represents a promising technique for making small-angle measurements in metrological applications. The experiments are performed with a diffusion-only recording mechanism in the photorefractive crystal Bi12TiO20 illuminated by lambda = 0.633 microm light from a He-Ne laser.

  16. Tables for Supersonic Flow Around Right Circular Cones at Small Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Joseph L.

    1964-01-01

    The solution of supersonic flow fields by the method of characteristics requires that starting conditions be known. Ferri, in reference 1, developed a method-of-characteristics solution for axially symmetric bodies of revolution at small angles of attack. With computing machinery that is now available, this has become a feasible method for computing the aerodynamic characteristics of bodies near zero angle of attack. For sharp-nosed bodies of revolution, the required starting line may be obtained by computing the flow field about a cone at a small angle of attack. This calculation is readily performed using Stone's theory in reference 2. Some solutions of this theory are available in reference 3. However, the manner in which these results are presented, namely in a wind-fixed coordinate system, makes their use somewhat cumbersome. Additionally, as pointed out in reference 4, the flow component perpendicular to the meridian planes was computed incorrectly. The results contained herein have been computed in the same basic manner as those of reference 3 with the correct velocity normal to the meridian planes. Also, all results have been transferred into the body-fixed coordinate system. Therefore, the values tabulated herein may be used, in conjunction with the respective zero-angle-of-attack results of reference 5, as starting conditions for the method-of-characteristics solution of the flow field about axially symmetric bodies of revolution at small angles of attack. As in the zero-angle-of-attack case (ref. 5) the present results have been computed using the ideal gas value of 1.4 for the ratio of the specific heats of air. Solutions are given for cone angles from 2.5 deg to 30 deg in increments of 2.5 deg. For each cone angle, results were computed for a constant series of free-stream Mach numbers from 1.5 to 20. In addition, a solution was computed which yielded the minimum free-stream Mach number for a completely supersonic conical flow field. For cone angles of

  17. JGIXA - A software package for the calculation and fitting of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for the characterization of nanometer-layers and ultra-shallow-implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingerle, D.; Pepponi, G.; Meirer, F.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2016-04-01

    Grazing incidence XRF (GIXRF) is a very surface sensitive, nondestructive analytical tool making use of the phenomenon of total external reflection of X-rays on smooth polished surfaces. In recent years the method experienced a revival, being a powerful tool for process analysis and control in the fabrication of semiconductor based devices. Due to the downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices, junction depths as well as layer thicknesses are reduced to a few nanometers, i.e. the length scale where GIXRF is highly sensitive. GIXRF measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under varying grazing angles and results in angle dependent intensity curves. These curves are correlated to the layer thickness, depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. But the evaluation of these measurements is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function for the implants as well as for the thickness and density of nanometer-thin layers. In order to overcome this ambiguity, GIXRF can be combined with X-ray reflectometry (XRR). This is straightforward, as both techniques use similar measurement procedures and the same fundamental physical principles can be used for a combined data evaluation strategy. Such a combined analysis removes ambiguities in the determined physical properties of the studied sample and, being a correlative spectroscopic method, also significantly reduces experimental uncertainties of the individual techniques. In this paper we report our approach to a correlative data analysis, based on a concurrent calculation and fitting of simultaneously recorded GIXRF and XRR data. Based on this approach we developed JGIXA (Java Grazing Incidence X-ray Analysis), a multi-platform software package equipped with a user-friendly graphic user interface (GUI) and offering various optimization algorithms. Software and data evaluation approach were benchmarked by characterizing metal and metal oxide layers on

  18. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Nano Sized Precipitates in Ferrous Alloys.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Soo; Park, Duck-Gun; Kobayashi, Satoru

    2015-11-01

    Nano-sized precipitates in a Fe-1 wt% Cu alloy were studied by SANS (Small Angle Neutron Scattering). The SANS experiments were performed with the 40 m SANS instrument at HANARO. Due to the ferromagnetic nature of the ferrous alloys, a horizontal magnetic field of 1 Tesla was applied during the SANS experiment. The nano-sized Cu precipitates were quantitatively analyzed by SANS in the Fe-1 wt% Cu alloy. The size of the precipitates increased from 2 nm to 4 nm with increasing aging time from 20 min. to 1800 min. at 753 K. The measured A-ratio obtained from SANS data increased from 2.2 to 6.6 with increasing aging time. It is surmised that Cu clusters containing a large amount of Fe are initiated at the early stage of aging and the Fe content in the Cu precipitate decreases with increasing aging time and eventually an almost pure BCC Cu precipitate is formed.

  19. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, Jan; Doniach, Sebastian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-09-18

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. Although still a low-resolution technique, the advent of high-flux synchrotron sources and the development of algorithms for the reconstruction of 3-D electron density maps from 1-D scattering profiles have made possible the generation of useful low-resolution molecular models from SAXS data. Furthermore, SAXS is well suited for the study of unfolded or partially folded conformational ensembles as a function of time or solution conditions. Here, we review recently developed algorithms for 3-D structure modeling and applications to protein complexes. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging use of SAXS as a tool to study membrane protein-detergent complexes. SAXS is proving useful to study the folding of functional RNA molecules, and finally we discuss uses of SAXS to study ensembles of denatured proteins.

  20. Study of (Cyclic Peptide)-Polymer Conjugate Assemblies by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Liang; FitzGerald, Paul A; Warr, Gregory G; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Perrier, Sébastien

    2016-12-19

    We present a fundamental study into the self-assembly of (cyclic peptide)-polymer conjugates as a versatile supramolecular motif to engineer nanotubes with defined structure and dimensions, as characterised in solution using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). This work demonstrates the ability of the grafted polymer to stabilise and/or promote the formation of unaggregated nanotubes by the direct comparison to the unconjugated cyclic peptide precursor. This ideal case permitted a further study into the growth mechanism of self-assembling cyclic peptides, allowing an estimation of the cooperativity. Furthermore, we show the dependency of the nanostructure on the polymer and peptide chemical functionality in solvent mixtures that vary in the ability to compete with the intermolecular associations between cyclic peptides and ability to solvate the polymer shell. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Riboswitch Conformations Revealed by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Riboswitches are functional RNA molecules that control gene expression through conformational changes in response to small-molecule ligand binding. In addition, riboswitch 3D structure, like that of other RNA molecules, is dependent on cation–RNA interactions as the RNA backbone is highly negatively charged. Here, we show how small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can be used to probe RNA conformations as a function of ligand and ion concentration. In a recent study of a glycine-binding tandem aptamer from Vibrio cholerae, we have used SAXS data and thermodynamic modeling to investigate how Mg2+-dependent folding and glycine binding are energetically coupled. In addition, we have employed ab initio shape reconstruction algorithms to obtain low-resolution models of the riboswitch structure from SAXS data under different solution conditions. PMID:19381558

  2. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  3. Using small angle solution scattering data in Xplor-NIH structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Schwieters, Charles D; Clore, G Marius

    2014-07-01

    This contribution describes the use of small and wide angle X-ray and small angle neutron scattering for biomolecular structure calculation using the program Xplor-NIH, both with and without NMR data. The current algorithms used for calculating scattering curves are described, and the use of scattering data as a structural restraint is given concrete form as a fragment of an Xplor-NIH structure calculation script. We review five examples of the use of scattering data in structure calculation, including the treatment of single domain proteins, nucleic acids, structure determination of large proteins, and the use of ensemble representations to characterize small and large amplitude motions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Small angle neutron scattering as fingerprinting of ancient potteries from Sicily (Southern Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, G.; Mazzoleni, P.; Crupi, V.; Majolino, D.; Venuti, V.; Teixeira, J.

    2009-09-01

    Small angle neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in order to investigate, in microdestructive way, the mesoscopic structure of a variety of potteries of relevance to cultural heritage coming from different Sicilian (Southern Italy) archeological sites belonging to the 'Strait of Messina' area and dated back to 7th-3rd century B.C. Data have been compared with the mesoscopic parameters extracted for two series of clayey sediments typical of the Strait of Messina area and fired under controlled conditions. The observed agreement between the features of reference and archeological samples allowed us to estimate the maximum firing temperature of the latter. Information on the pore sizes was obtained by the use of the concept of fractal surface, and compared with porosimetry results.

  5. Structural characterization of chaos game fractals using small-angle scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Anitas, Eugen Mircea; Slyamov, Azat

    2017-01-01

    Small-angle scattering (SAS) technique is applied to study the nano and microstructural properties of spatial patterns generated from chaos game representation (CGR). Using a simplified version of Debye formula, we calculate and analyze in momentum space, the monodisperse scattering structure factor from a system of randomly oriented and non-interacting 2D Sierpinski gaskets (SG). We show that within CGR approach, the main geometrical and fractal properties, such as the overall size, scaling factor, minimal distance between scattering units, fractal dimension and the number of units composing the SG, can be recovered. We confirm the numerical results, by developing a theoretical model which describes analytically the structure factor of SG. We apply our findings to scattering from single scale mass fractals, and respectively to a multiscale fractal representing DNA sequences, and for which an analytic description of the structure factor is not known a priori.

  6. Structural characterization of chaos game fractals using small-angle scattering analysis

    PubMed Central

    Slyamov, Azat

    2017-01-01

    Small-angle scattering (SAS) technique is applied to study the nano and microstructural properties of spatial patterns generated from chaos game representation (CGR). Using a simplified version of Debye formula, we calculate and analyze in momentum space, the monodisperse scattering structure factor from a system of randomly oriented and non-interacting 2D Sierpinski gaskets (SG). We show that within CGR approach, the main geometrical and fractal properties, such as the overall size, scaling factor, minimal distance between scattering units, fractal dimension and the number of units composing the SG, can be recovered. We confirm the numerical results, by developing a theoretical model which describes analytically the structure factor of SG. We apply our findings to scattering from single scale mass fractals, and respectively to a multiscale fractal representing DNA sequences, and for which an analytic description of the structure factor is not known a priori. PMID:28704515

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering from polymer hydrogels with memory effect for medicine immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvelis, Yu. V. Lebedev, V. T.; Trunov, V. A.; Pavlyuchenko, V. N.; Ivanchev, S. S.; Primachenko, O. N.; Khaikin, S. Ya.

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogels synthesized based on cross-linked copolymers of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and functional monomers (acrylic acid or dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate), having a memory effect with respect to target medicine (cefazolin), have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. The hydrogels are found to have a two-level structural organization: large (up to 100 nm) aggregates filled with network cells (4-7 nm in size). The structural differences in the anionic, cationic, and amphiphilic hydrogels and the relationship between their structure and the ability of hydrogels to absorb moisture are shown. A relationship between the memory effect during cefazolin immobilization and the internal structure of hydrogels, depending on their composition and type of functional groups, is established.

  8. Micelle structural studies on oil solubilization by a small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman; Seong, Baek Seok; Ikram, Abarrul

    2009-02-01

    A small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique was applied to reveal the micelle structural changes. The micelle structural changes of 0.3 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration by addition of various oil, i.e. n-hexane, n-octane, and n-decane up to 60% (v/v) have been investigated. It was found that the size, aggregation number and the structures of the micelles changed exhibiting that the effective charge on the micelle decreases with an addition of oil. There was a small increase in minor axis of micelle while the correlation peak shifted to a lower momentum transfer Q and then to higher Q by a further oil addition.

  9. Structure of phase-inversion membranes from small-angle neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kul'velis, Yu. V.; Kononova, S. V.; Romashkova, K. A.; Lebedev, V. T.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of gradient-porous (asymmetric) membranes based on polyamide imide at different conditions of their formation has been investigated using small-angle neutron scattering. It has been shown that the membranes consist of rigid porous networks with well-defined interfaces between the polymer and the pores. It has been found that there are differences in the packings of structural elements of porous membranes-spherical pores with radii from 4 to 100 nm—depending on the membrane preformation time, drying regime, and the presence of fullerene C60 for modifying the mechanical and selective properties of membranes. The membranes also contain larger pores of micrometer sizes. Differences in the rates of saturation of membranes with water and their limiting swelling ratios are found, which can be explained by the structure of the dense layers of membranes (skin layer) and their different hydrophilities (depending on the fullerene content).

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering of nanocrystalline gadolinium and holmium with random paramagnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döbrich, Frank; Bick, Jens-Peter; Birringer, Rainer; Wolff, Matthias; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Michels, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    A neutron study of nanocrystalline terbium (Balaji G et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 227202) has shown that the randomly oriented anisotropy of the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor may lead to strongly correlated nanoscale spin disorder in the paramagnetic state which can be probed very effectively by magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In principle, this scenario is also applicable to other rare-earth metals and the size of the effect is expected to scale with the strength of the anisotropy in the paramagnetic state. Here, we report SANS results (in the paramagnetic state) on nanocrystalline inert-gas condensed samples of Gd and Ho, which represent the cases of low and high anisotropy, respectively.

  11. Aggregates structure analysis of petroleum asphaltenes with small-angle neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, R.; Hunt, J. E.; Winans, R. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Sato, S.; Takanohashi, T.; Idemitsu Kosan Co.; National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine changes in the structures of petroleum asphaltene aggregates in situ with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Asphaltenes were isolated from three different crude oils: Maya, Khafji, and Iranian Light. An aliquot of the 5 wt % asphaltene solution in deuterated Decalin, 1-methylnaphthalene, or quinoline was loaded in a special stainless steel cell for SANS measurements. SANS data measured at various temperatures from 25 to 350 {sup o}C showed various topological features different with asphaltene or solvent species. A fractal network was formed only with asphaltene of Maya in Decalin, and it remained even at 350 {sup o}C. In all of the solvents, asphaltenes aggregate in the form of a prolate ellipsoid with a high aspect ratio at 25 {sup o}C and got smaller with increasing temperature. That became a compact sphere with the size of around 25 {angstrom} in radius at 350 {sup o}C.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of statistical errors in small-angle X-ray scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Sedlak, Steffen M; Bruetzel, Linda K; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A new model is proposed for the measurement errors incurred in typical small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, which takes into account the setup geometry and physics of the measurement process. The model accurately captures the experimentally determined errors from a large range of synchrotron and in-house anode-based measurements. Its most general formulation gives for the variance of the buffer-subtracted SAXS intensity σ(2)(q) = [I(q) + const.]/(kq), where I(q) is the scattering intensity as a function of the momentum transfer q; k and const. are fitting parameters that are characteristic of the experimental setup. The model gives a concrete procedure for calculating realistic measurement errors for simulated SAXS profiles. In addition, the results provide guidelines for optimizing SAXS measurements, which are in line with established procedures for SAXS experiments, and enable a quantitative evaluation of measurement errors.

  13. New developments in the ATSAS program package for small-angle scattering data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Franke, Daniel; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Tria, Giancarlo; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Gajda, Michal; Gorba, Christian; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Konarev, Petr V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2012-01-01

    New developments in the program package ATSAS (version 2.4) for the processing and analysis of isotropic small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data are described. They include (i) multiplatform data manipulation and display tools, (ii) programs for automated data processing and calculation of overall parameters, (iii) improved usage of high- and low-resolution models from other structural methods, (iv) new algorithms to build three-dimensional models from weakly interacting oligomeric systems and complexes, and (v) enhanced tools to analyse data from mixtures and flexible systems. The new ATSAS release includes installers for current major platforms (Windows, Linux and Mac OSX) and provides improved indexed user documentation. The web-related developments, including a user discussion forum and a widened online access to run ATSAS programs, are also presented. PMID:25484842

  14. Small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Castanon, J.; Bomboi, F.; Rovigatti, L.; Zanatta, M.; Paciaroni, A.; Comez, L.; Porcar, L.; Jafta, C. J.; Fadda, G. C.; Bellini, T.; Sciortino, F.

    2016-08-01

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed of 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nanostar concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor numerically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature-independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  15. Solution structures of calcium regulating proteins: A small-angle scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Heidorn, D.B.; Seeger, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments have shown that the solution structures of two calcium-binding regulatory proteins, calmodulin and troponin C, are significantly different from their crystal structure forms. The structural differences occur in a region of calmodulin that is thought to bind to target enzymes;the calmodulin-enzyme complex is an initiator for many important biochemical processes. Calcium binding to calmodulin induces a conformational change that is a prerequisite for calmodulin binding to a target enzyme. SAXS data can characterize this conformational change and give insight into the mechanism of enzyme binding. Neutron resonance scattering promises to determine accurately the distances between calcium binding sites, thus providing important constraints on the structure of calmodulin in solution. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Small angle x-ray scattering studies of carbon anodes used in lithium rechargeable batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.; Carrado, K. A.; Winans, R. E.; Seifert, S.; Johnson, C. S.

    1999-11-16

    In ANL laboratories, disordered carbons with predictable surface area and porosity properties have been prepared using inorganic templates containing well defined pore sizes. The carbons have been tested in electrochemical cells as anodes in lithium secondary batteries. They deliver high specific capacity and display excellent performance in terms of the number of cycles run. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) during electrochemical cycling was carried out at the Advanced Photon Source, at ANL. In order to monitor the carbon electrode structural changes upon cycling, an electrochemical cell was specially designed to allow for the application of electrical current and the collection of SAXS data at the same time. Results show that upon cycling the structure of the carbon remains unchanged, which is desirable in reversible systems.

  17. The crystallization of hectorite clays as monitored by small angle X-ray scattering and NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Xu, L.; Seifert, S.; Gregory, D.; Song, K.; Botto, R. E.

    1999-12-13

    The authors have probed the 48-hr crystallization of a magnesium silicate clay called hectorite. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Photon Source using aliquots ex situ has revealed that data is consistent with ex situ XRD, TGA, AFM, and IR data in that all these techniques see clay crystallite beginning to form in the first few hours of reaction. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) ions are used to aid crystallization and become incorporated as the exchange cations within the interlayers. {sup 13}C NMR shows that 80% of the final TEA loading is accomplished in the first 10 hrs. {sup 29}Si NMR displays a visible clay silicate peak after just 1 hr. In addition, the first in situ study of clay crystallization of any kind was performed by in situ SAXS. Results are consistent with the ex situ data as well as showing the sensitivity of SAXS to sol gel reactions occurring on the order of minutes.

  18. Elucidating the Molecular Deformation Mechanism of Entangled Polymers in Fast Flow by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangyang; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis; Cheng, Shiwang; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren; Liu, Jianning; Lin, Panpan; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Understanding the viscoelastic properties of polymers is of fundamental and practical importance because of the vast and ever expanding demand of polymeric materials in daily life. Our current theoretical framework for describing the nonlinear flow behavior of entangled polymers is built upon the tube model pioneered by de Gennes, Doi, and Edwards. In this work, we critically examine the central hypothesis of the tube model for nonlinear rheology using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). While the tube model envisions a unique non-affine elastic deformation mechanism for entangled polymers, our SANS measurements show that the evolution of chain conformation of a well-entangled polystyrene melt closely follows the affine deformation mechanism in uniaxial extension, even when the Rouse Weissenberg number is much smaller than unity. This result provides a key clue for understanding the molecular deformation mechanism of entangled polymers in fast flow. Several implications from our analysis will be discussed in this talk.

  19. Clustering of water molecules in ultramicroporous carbon: In-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Contescu, Cristian I.; Rai, Durgesh K.; ...

    2016-10-19

    The adsorption of water is central to most of the applications of microporous carbon as adsorbent material. We report early kinetics of water adsorption in the microporous carbon using in-situ small-angle neutron scattering. It is observed that adsorption of water occurs via cluster formation of molecules. Interestingly, the cluster size remains constant throughout the adsorption process whereas number density of clusters increases with time. The role of surface chemistry of microporous carbon on the early kinetics of adsorption process was also investigated. Lastly, the present study provides direct experimental evidence for cluster assisted adsorption of water molecules in microporous carbonmore » (Do-Do model).« less

  20. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3, in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields.