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Sample records for grb follow-up observations

  1. LOTIS: GRB follow-up observations at early times

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H S

    1999-02-22

    LOTIS is an automated wide field-of-view telescope system capable of responding to GRB events as early as 10s after a trigger from the GCN which rapidly distributes coordinates from the Beppo/SAX, BATSE and RXTE instruments. Measurements of optical activity at these early times will provide important clues to the GRB production mechanism. In over two year's of operation, LOTIS has responded to 40 GCN triggers including GRB971217 with l10s and GRB980703 within 5 hours. We report results from these events and constraints on simultaneous optical signals during these GRB's.

  2. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  3. Radio and Optical Follow-Up Observations and Improved IPN Position of GRB 970111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T. J.; Groot, P. J.; Strom, R. G.; vanParadijs, J.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Heise, J.; intZand, J. J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on Westerbork 840 MHz, 1.4 and 5 GHz radio observations of the improved IPN-WFC error box of the gamma ray burst GRB 970111, between 26.4 hours and 120 days after the event onset. In the approximately 16 sq arcmin area defined by the IPN (BATSE and Ulysses) annulus and the published refined BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera (WFC) error box we detected no steady sources brighter than 0.56 mJy (4sigma), and no varying radio emission, down to 1.0 mJy (4sigma). We also report on B, V, R and I band observations of the error box with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at La Palma. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts - gamma rays: individual (GRB 9701 1 1)

  4. Exploring the first stars with rapid GRB follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino; Cenko, Stephen; Schmidt, Brian; Perley, Daniel; Berger, Edo; Fox, Derek; Fruchter, Andrew; Bloom, Joshua; Prochaska, Jason X.; Lopez, Sebastian; Cobb, Bethany; Roth, Kathy; Levan, Andrew; Tanvir, Nial; Rapoport, Sharon; Yuan, Fang; Chornock, Ryan; Wen-Fai, Fong; Morgan, Adam; Wiersema, Klaas

    2013-02-01

    GRBs provide a unique window on exotic, highly relativistic physics. Our discovery of cosmic explosions like GRB090423 at z=8.2, breaking the record for the most distant known object, also demonstrates the power of using GRBs as lighthouses visible into the epoch of re-ionization, pinpointing the earliest stars and galaxies. Therefore, we intend (i) to observe GRBs at very high-z, in order to explore the IGM during reionization and place fundamental constraints on the early epochs of star-formation; (ii) to study in detail the class of short-duration bursts, especially their electromagnetic signatures in relation to gravitational-wave sources; (iii) to observe exceptionally energetic bursts, such as detected by the Fermi-LAT satellite in order to test theories of quantum gravity; (iv) continue our quest for low-z GRBs associated with supernovae, which, in conjunction with a larger sample of GRB afterglow spectra will provide unique insights into the stellar progenitors and explosion sites of these intriguing phenomena. Gemini, with its flexible schedule and instrumentation suite, represents a cornerstone facility of global GRB research and we will continue to use it in combination with a large network of other facilities.

  5. Optical follow-up observations of Locburst GRB locations with OMC test camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezek, Tomás

    1999-01-01

    The test camera of the Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) experiment for INTEGRAL spacecraft achieving the angular pixel size of 18 arcsec and the field of view 7.5 degx5.1 deg has been succesfully developed and tested at the Astronomical Institute Ondrejov. The test camera is able to provide imaging down to 15 mag over the whole field of view within one exposure of 300 seconds. Although developed primarily to test the OMC performance and help with software development, this device is ideally suitable for the use as ground-based camera for the sites where Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory BATSE Locburst triggers are followed-up in optical waveband and also for widefield sky monitoring in general. The low cost of this camera makes it possible to duplicate the system to a number of observing sites. A chart and a corresponding CCD-image for the BACODINE Locburst Position 6368 taken with OMC test camera at Ondrejov observatory are also presented. The image taken 18 hours after the trigger was computer-blinked with the frame taken 30 days later. No optical activity has been found down to 13.5 mag.

  6. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  7. GRB follow-up with BOOTES Optical Chapter 5: The Swift Era

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, Martin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Vitek, Stanislav; Ugarte Postigo, Antonio de; Kubanek, Petr; Hudec, Rene

    2006-05-19

    BOOTES is a robotic system, whose primary aim is to observe gamma-ray burst prompt emission. Since 1998 BOOTES has provided follow-up observations for more than 70 GRBs; the most important results obtained so far are the detection of an OT in the short/hard GRB 000313 error box, the detection of several optical after-glow for long/soft GRBs and the non-detection of optical emission simultaneous to the high energy emission for several GRBs (both long/soft and short/hard events). During the time of operation we have got triggers from CGRO/BATSE, BeppoSAX, HETE-2, INTEGRAL and Swift. Here we present our early detections of GRB optical emission using the 30 cm Bootes-1B telescope in the R.V and I-bands since the launch of Swift.

  8. The Kepler Follow-Up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Dunham, E. W.; Gilliland, R.; Jenkins, J.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Cochran, W. D.; Howell, S.; Koch, D.; Latham, D.; Marcy, G.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission to find Earth-size exoplanets was launched on March 6, 2009, began science observations on May 11, 2009 and is now in full operation. Many planet candidates have been identified and ground based follow-up observations are weeding out false positive planet detections and beginning to confirm true planets. False positive identification techniques planned during the pre-flight phase of Kepler are proving to work well. The fraction of false positive planet detections due to binary stars sent for ground based follow-up appears small.

  9. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95 cm Schmidt telescope to survey >100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, are also expected. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%. In addition, follow-up observations will, where possible, measure the mass of confirmed planets and look for any non-transiting giant planets. The Kepler Project is Funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as a Discovery Mission.

  10. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95-cm Schmidt telescope to survey 100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to ˜ 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1,000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, will also be found. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%.

  11. Follow-up Observations of WASP-36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutra, Taylor; Boley, Aaron; Hughes, Anna; Hickson, Paul

    2017-06-01

    This ongoing work aims to provide follow-up observations of known transiting extrasolar planets using the 35-cm robotic telescope at The University of British Columbia's Southern Observatory (USO), located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The observations are part of a long-term effort to search for changes in transit signatures, such as transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs), which could indicate, for example, the presence of additional planets. To help characterize the USO for transit searches, we acquired I-band observations of WASP-36 spanning from 17 January 2017 to 27 February 2017. Three complete transits and one partial transit are included in the data. We present the analysis of these new observations and discuss potential future targets.

  12. Follow-up Observations of 788 Hohensteina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    CCD photometric observations were made in 2016 November and December of the suspected tumbler and Hungaria group member 788 Hohensteina. The goal was to find a definitive rotation period, which would presumably match one of several reported periods.

  13. The Discovery and Broadband Follow-Up of the Transient Afterglow of GRB 980703

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, J. S.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Halpern, J. P.; Marzke, R. O.; Patton, D. R.; Oke, J. B.; Horne, K. D.; Gomer, R.; hide

    1998-01-01

    We report on the discovery of the radio, infrared, and optical transient coincident with an X-ray transient proposed to be the afterglow of GRB 980703. At later times when the transient has faded below detection, we see an underlying galaxy with R = 22.6; this galaxy is the brightest host galaxy (by nearly 2 mag) of any cosmological gamma-ray burst (GRB) thus far. In keeping with an established trend, the GRB is not significantly offset from the host galaxy. Interpreting the multiwavelength data in the framework of the popular fireball model requires that the synchrotron cooling break was between the optical and X-ray bands on 1998 July 8.5 UT and that the intrinsic extinction of the transient is A(sub v) = 0.9. This is somewhat higher than the extinction for the galaxy as a whole, as estimated from spectroscopy.

  14. Optical Observations of GRB981226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Przemyslaw R.

    1998-12-01

    An attempt to observe optical transient of GRB981226 was made in BeppoSAX 6' radius region reported by Di Ciolo et al. (IAUCirc 7074). On three nights following the announcement, Dec 27-29, approximately between 1:15 and 2:30 UT I collected 10 and 15-minute frames in I band, with the 1.3 m Warsaw University Observatory Telescope on Las Campanas. This amounted to 70,70,80 minutes of integration each night at 1.4, 1.3 and 1.2" seeing respectively.

  15. MAXI J1305-704: Swift follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennea, J. A.; Altamirano, D.; Evans, P. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Curran, P.; Yamaoka, K.; Negoro, H.

    2012-04-01

    We present analysis of Swift follow-up observations of MAXI J1305-704 (Sato et al., ATEL #4024), which has been proposed to be a newly discovered Galactic black-hole binary (BHB; Greiner et al., ATEL #4030). Starting 16:07UT on April 11th, 2012, Swift observed MAXI J1305-704 for 1ks as a Target of Opportunity, with the Swift/XRT in Windowed Timing (WT) mode, to avoid pile-up. This follows initial observations made by Swift in a 4-pointing Photon Counting (PC) mode tiling observation on April 10th, initial results of which have been reported by Greiner et al.

  16. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  17. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  18. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  19. HST Service Observations of GRB 990123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Steven

    1997-07-01

    This program provides DD ToO observations of the remarkable new gamma-ray burst, GRB 990123. It is the brightest GRB detected by SAX. In rapid succession, the optical and radio afterglow to this GRB were discovered {Odewahn, Kulkarni, Djorgovski, et al.}, and a redshift of z >= 1.61 {Kelson et al.} to the GRB measured. At this redshift, the implied isotropic energy release is greater than 2 imes 10(54) erg in gamma-rays alone, an order of magnitude higher than for the already extreme GRB 971214 and more than the rest mass energy of a neutron star. In addition, the burst is interesting for the discovery of the first prompt optical emission of a GRB by the ROTSE-I team. As noted by the Caltech group, the pre-burst POSS-II images show a bright foreground galaxy close {< 2 arcsec} to the position of the optical transient. Absorption lines from two intervening systems {z=0.21 and z=0.29} have been detected in a spectrum obtained by the Nordic Optical Telescope group, which could indicate a foreground gravitational lens. If lensing is weak, the energetics of this GRB would make it the brightest object in the Universe detected to date. If the GRB is lensed and the magnification is high, measurements of time delay in the multiple images of the afterglow could be used to measure H_0 with a an accuracy of better than 10%. High resolution observations by HST are essential to resolve the environment of the GRB. The urgency of the observation is motivated by the fact that the afterglow is fading. To maximize the scientific benefit to the community of this unique event, we are observing the GRB with HST as a service and will make the data immediately available with no proprietary period.

  20. Status of the BOOTES-IR Project at OSN for GRB near-IR follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunniffe, R.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jelínek, M.; Gorosabel, J.; Moliné, B.; García-Segura, F.

    2013-07-01

    Bootes-IR (Castro-Tiradoet al. 2005) is a robotic observatory based around a 60 cm alt-az telescope (dubbed T60) that can slew rapidly while carrying heavy instrumentation at the Nasmyth foci. Initially commissioned with an optical camera, with which the optical afterglow to GRB 060707 (http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn3/5290.gcn3) was discovered, we have concentrated our efforts on the near-IR (0.8-2.5 μm) camera (BIRCAM) for which the telescope was specifically designed. The telescope is installed at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada near Granada in Spain, at an altitude of 3000 m and in an area of very low humidity. The telescope, dome, camera and liquid nitrogen generation and refilling systems have all been recently brought back into operation, and routine observations are expected to begin within the next few months.

  1. Simultaneous optical/gamma ray observations of GRB's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Wilson, R. B.; Greiner, J.; Wenzel, W.; Hudec, R.; Pravec, P.; Rezek, T.

    1992-01-01

    The photographic sky patrols of the Observatories Sonneberg (FRG), Ondrejov (CSFR), Odessa (Ukraine) are used to look for patrol plates which were exposed simultaneously with a gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by gamma ray observations. The results for the first year of data are presented. For several GRB plates which contain the GRB location, and the exposure time of which contains the time of the GRB are presented. The results of the research for optical flashes on these simultaneous plates are discussed.

  2. Discovery and Observations of the Optical Afterglow of GRB 071010B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksanen, A.; Templeton, M.; Henden, A. A.; Kann, D. A.

    2008-06-01

    On 2007 October 10 at 20:45:48 UT, the Swift satellite detected the bright, long-soft gamma-ray burst GRB 071010B in the constellation Ursa Major. Coordinates were automatically distributed via the Gamma-ray Burst Coordinate Network (GCN), and observations were begun by A. Oksanen at the Hankasalmi Observatory in Hankasalmi, Finland, within fifteen minutes of the burst. A previously uncatalogued optical source was detected at R.A. 10h 02m 09.26s, Dec. +45° 43' 50.3'' (J2000) at an unfiltered (R-band calibrated) magnitude of approximately 17.5. Imaging over the following six hours showed that the source faded, indicating that it was likely the optical afterglow of GRB 071010B. The discovery was published via the GCN Circulars, and the coordinates were subsequently used by other major telescope facilities to conduct follow-up photometry and spectroscopy. The discovery of the optical afterglow by A. Oksanen is the first discovery of a GRB afterglow by an amateur astronomer since the discovery of GRB 030725 by L. A. G. Monard in 2003 (Monard 2003). The early detection of this afterglow and subsequent dissemination of coordinates via the GCN has proved very valuable from a scientific standpoint. These data are the earliest available photometry for this burst, enabling the study of the early stages of the GRB optical light. They were also the first localization, and these coordinates were subsequently used by other major optical facilities for their follow-up observations. This burst clearly shows that individual observers still have a role to play in GRB observations even in the era of automated, robotic telescopes, and that the amateur community is an important partner of the professional community in the observation of GRB afterglows.

  3. MAGIC observation of the GRB 080430 afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Anderhub, H.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Baixeras, C.; Balestra, S.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Becker, J. K.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Britzger, D.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Commichau, S.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Costado, M. T.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Los Reyes, R.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, M.; de Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fernández, E.; Firpo, R.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Galante, N.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Godinovic, N.; Goebel, F.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hsu, C. C.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; La Barbera, A.; Laille, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moles, M.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Ninkovic, J.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pasanen, M.; Pascoli, D.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Prada, F.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Turini, N.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Zapatero, J.; de Ugarte-Postigo, A.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2010-07-01

    Context. Gamma-ray bursts are cosmological sources emitting radiation from the gamma-rays to the radio band. Substantial observational efforts have been devoted to the study of gamma-ray bursts during the prompt phase, i.e. the initial burst of high-energy radiation, and during the long-lasting afterglows. In spite of many successes in interpreting these phenomena, there are still several open key questions about the fundamental emission processes, their energetics and the environment. Aims: Independently of specific gamma-ray burst theoretical recipes, spectra in the GeV/TeV range are predicted to be remarkably simple, being satisfactorily modeled with power-laws, and therefore offer a very valuable tool to probe the extragalactic background light distribution. Furthermore, the simple detection of a component at very-high energies, i.e. at ~100 GeV, would solve the ambiguity about the importance of various possible emission processes, which provide barely distinguishable scenarios at lower energies. Methods: We used the results of the MAGIC telescope observation of the moderate resdhift (z ~ 0.76) GRB 080430 at energies above about 80 GeV, to evaluate the perspective for late-afterglow observations with ground based GeV/TeV telescopes. Results: We obtained an upper limit of F95% CL = 5.5 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 for the very-high energy emission of GRB 080430, which cannot set further constraints on the theoretical scenarios proposed for this object also due to the difficulties in modeling the low-energy afterglow. Nonetheless, our observations show that Cherenkov telescopes have already reached the required sensitivity to detect the GeV/TeV emission of GRBs at moderate redshift (z ≲ 0.8), provided the observations are carried out at early times, close to the onset of their afterglow phase.

  4. Archival Support for HST Service Observations of GRB 990123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas

    1999-07-01

    This program provides Archival Research Funding to the DD ToO observations of the remarkable new gamma-ray burst, GRB 990123. It is the brightest GRB detected by SAX. In rapid succession, the optical and radio afterglow to this GRB were discovered {Odewahn, Kulkarni, Djorgovski, et al.}, and a redshift of z >= 1.61 {Kelson et al.} to the GRB measured. At this redshift, the implied isotropic energy release is greater than 2 imes 10(54) erg in gamma-rays alone, an order of magnitude higher than for the already extreme GRB 971214 and more than the rest mass energy of a neutron star. In addition, the burst is interesting for the discovery of the first prompt optical emission of a GRB by the ROTSE-I team. As noted by the Caltech group, the pre-burst POSS-II images show a bright foreground galaxy close {< 2 arcsec} to the position of the optical transient. Absorption lines from two intervening systems {z=0.21 and z=0.29} have been detected in a spectrum obtained by the Nordic Optical Telescope group, which could indicate a foreground gravitational lens. If lensing is weak, the energetics of this GRB would make it the brightest object in the Universe detected to date. If the GRB is lensed and the magnification is high, measurements of time delay in the multiple images of the afterglow could be used to measure H_0 with an accuracy of better than 10%. High resolution observations by HST are essential to resolve the environment of the GRB. The urgency of the observation is motivated by the fact that the afterglow is fading. To maximize the scientific benefit to the community of this unique event, we are observing the GRB with HST as a service and will make the data immediately available with no proprietary period.

  5. GRB 090902B: AFTERGLOW OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S. B.; Akerlof, C.; McKay, T. A.; Swenson, C. A.; Perley, D. A.; Kleiser, I. K. W.; Guidorzi, C.; Wiersema, K.; Malesani, D.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Bersier, D.; Cano, Z.; Kobayashi, S.; Melandri, A.; Mottram, C. J.; Gomboc, A.; Ilyin, I.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A. J.

    2010-05-01

    The optical-infrared afterglow of the Large Area Telescope (LAT)-detected long-duration burst, GRB 090902B, has been observed by several instruments. The earliest detection by ROTSE-IIIa occurred 80 minutes after detection by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, revealing a bright afterglow and a decay slope suggestive of a reverse shock origin. Subsequent optical-IR observations followed the light curve for 6.5 days. The temporal and spectral behavior at optical-infrared frequencies is consistent with synchrotron fireball model predictions; the cooling break lies between optical and XRT frequencies {approx}1.9 days after the burst. The inferred electron energy index is p = 1.8 {+-} 0.2, which would however imply an X-ray decay slope flatter than observed. The XRT and LAT data have similar spectral indices and the observed steeper value of the LAT temporal index is marginally consistent with the predicted temporal decay in the radiative regime of the forward shock model. Absence of a jet break during the first 6 days implies a collimation-corrected {gamma}-ray energy E{sub {gamma}} > 2.2 x 10{sup 52} erg, one of the highest ever seen in a long-duration gamma-ray bursts. More events combining GeV photon emission with multiwavelength observations will be required to constrain the nature of the central engine powering these energetic explosions and to explore the correlations between energetic quanta and afterglow emission.

  6. Fermi Observations of short-hard GRB 090510

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Masanori; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Fermi GBM Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    GRB 090510 is a bright, short-hard Gamma-ray Burst (GRB), which triggered both Large Area Telescope (LAT) and Gamma-ray Busrt Monitor (GBM) onboard Fermi. This is the first GeV short GRB with known redshift. The delayed onset and long-lived behavior of the high energy photon of the LAT were also seen by this GRB as well as many other LAT GRBs. A broad-band spectroscopy by the LAT and GBM revealed an additional spectral component against to the traditional Band function, which is the first evidence of the extra component from short GRB. A 31 GeV photon, the highest energy photon from short GRB was detected 0.83 s after the onset of the GRB. This enables us to set the largest lower limit on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow for any GRBs assuming that the LAT 31 GeV photon is associated with the narrow spike observed with the GBM. The delayed emission of the LAT 31 GeV photon supports Lorentz invariance, and disfavors quantum-gravity theories in which a postulated granularity of space-time on a very small scale alters the speed of light, giving it a linear dependence on photon-energy.

  7. Follow-up after acute poisoning by substances of abuse: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vallersnes, Odd Martin; Jacobsen, Dag; Ekeberg, Øivind; Brekke, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart follow-up of patients after acute poisoning by substances of abuse, register whether patients referred to specialist health services attended, and whether patients contacted a general practitioner (GP) after the poisoning episode. Design Observational cohort study. Setting A primary care emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo, Norway. Subjects Patients ≥12 years treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included consecutively from October 2011 to September 2012. Main outcome measures Follow-up initiated at discharge, proportion of cases in which referred patients attended within three months, and proportion of cases in which the patient consulted a GP the first month following discharge. Results There were 2343 episodes of acute poisoning by substances of abuse. In 391 (17%) cases the patient was hospitalised, including 49 (2%) in psychiatric wards. In 235 (10%) cases the patient was referred to specialist health services, in 91 (4%) advised to see their GP, in 82 (3%) to contact social services, in 74 (3%) allotted place in a homeless shelter, and in 93 (4%) other follow-up was initiated. In 1096 (47%) cases, the patient was discharged without follow-up, and in a further 324 (14%), the patient self-discharged. When referred to specialist health services, in 200/235 (85%) cases the patient attended within three months. Among all discharges, in 527/1952 (27%) cases the patient consulted a GP within one month. When advised to see their GP, in 45/91 (49%) cases the patient did. Conclusion Attendance was high for follow-up initiated after acute poisoning by substances of abuse. Key Points Despite poor long-term prognosis, patients treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse are frequently not referred to follow-up.Nearly all patients referred to specialist health services attended, indicating the acute poisoning as an opportune moment for intervention.Advising patients to contact their GP was significantly associated with

  8. Swift Follow-Up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-Wave Transient Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  9. Swift Follow-up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-wave Transient Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eikenberry, S.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McDaniel, P.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  10. Leveraging Ensemble Dynamical Properties to Prioritize Exoplanet Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The number of transiting exoplanets now exceeds several thousand, enabling ensemble studies of the dynamical properties of exoplanetary systems. We require a mixture model of dynamical conditions (whether frozen in from formation or sculpted by planet-planet interactions) to recover Kepler's yield of transiting planets. Around M dwarfs, which will be predominate sites of exoplanet follow-up atmospheric study in the next decade, even a modest orbital eccentricity can sterilize a planet. I will describe efforts to link cheap observables, such as number of transiting planets and presence of transit timing variations, to eccentricity and mutual inclination in exoplanet systems. The addition of a second transiting planet, for example, halves the expected orbital eccentricity. For the vast majority of TESS targets, the light curve alone will furnish the sum total of data about the exoplanet. Extracting information about orbital properties from these light curves will help prioritize precious follow-up resources.

  11. Optimal Scheduling for Geosynchronous Space Object Follow-up Observations Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, A.; Fiedler, H.; Schildknecht, T.

    2016-09-01

    Optical observations for space debris in the geosynchronous region have been performed for many years. During this time, observation strategies, processing techniques and cataloguing approaches were successfully developed. Nevertheless, the importance of protecting this orbit region from space debris requires continuous monitoring in order to support collision avoidance operations. So-called follow-up observations providing information for orbit improvement estimations are necessary to maintain high accuracy of the cataloged objects. Those serve a two-fold: For one, the orbits have to be accurate enough to be able to re-observe the object after a time of no observations, that is keeping it in the catalogue, secondly, the importance of protecting active space assets from space debris requires even higher accuracy of the catalogue orbits. Due to limited observation resources and because a space debris object in the geostationary orbit region may only be observed for a limited period of time per the observation night and telescope, efficient scheduling of follow-up observations is a key element. This paper presents an optimal scheduling algorithm for a robotic optical telescope network using a genetic algorithm that has been applied providing optimal solutions for catalogue maintenance. As optimization parameter the information content of the orbit has been used. It is shown that information content utilizing the orbit's covariance and the information gain in an expected update is a useful optimization measure. Finally, simulations with simulated data of space debris objects are used to study the effectivity of the scheduling algorithm.

  12. Two years of gamma-ray burst follow up observations with BOOTES-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Cerón, José María; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Soldán, Jan; Hudec, René; Bernas, Martin; Páta, Petr; Mateo Sanguino, Tomás De Jesús; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Berná, José Angel; Nekola, Martin; Gorosabel, Javier; de La Morena, Benito A.; Más-Hesse, J. Miguel; Giménez, Alvaro; Torres Riera, José

    2001-09-01

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System exeriment (BOOTES) is designed to provide a real time observing response to the detection of Gamma Ray bursts (GRBs) using wide field cameras imaging in the I, R and V bands and, later on, deeper imaging with small robotic telescopes. It is part, within the framework of a Spanish-Czech collaboration, of a wide ongoing effort to prepare for ESA's satellite INTEGRAL. We provide a brief technical description of BOOTES. Furthermore, a table listing the results for the BOOTES 1B-Narrow Field Camera (1B-NFC), of near simultaneous observations and others, starting 5 minutes after the events, is given since first light (July 98). Additionally we discuss other scientific objectives (regular monitoring of selected objects like variable stars, nearby galaxies and bright QSOs/AGNs for flaring behaviour) and results. To date we have obtained images for about 30 events with the 1B-NFC. In one of the last searches we detected an optical transient, candidate to be the optical counterpart of the GRB 000313, although such relation has not been established to absolute certainty yet.

  13. J-GEM follow-up observations of the gravitational wave source GW151226*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Utsumi, Yousuke; Tominaga, Nozomu; Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Ohta, Kouji; Abe, Fumio; Chimasu, Sho; Furusawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kanda, Yuka; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawabata, Miho; Koshida, Shintaro; Koshimoto, Naoki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Moritani, Yuki; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Nakata, Fumiaki; Nishioka, Tsubasa; Saito, Yoshihiko; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Tristram, Paul J.; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawachi, Akiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Uemura, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi

    2017-02-01

    We report the results of optical-infrared follow-up observations of the gravitational wave (GW) event GW151226 detected by the Advanced LIGO in the framework of J-GEM (Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up). We performed wide-field optical imaging surveys with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC), Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC), and MOA-cam3. The KWFC survey started at 2.26 d after the GW event and covered 778 deg2 centered at the high Galactic region of the skymap of GW151226. We started the HSC follow-up observations from ˜12 d after the event and covered an area of 63.5 deg2 of the highest probability region of the northern sky with limiting magnitudes of 24.6 and 23.8 for the i and z bands, respectively. MOA-cam3 covered 145 deg2 of the skymap with the MOA-red filter ˜2.5 mon after the GW alert. The total area covered by the wide-field surveys was 986.5 deg2. The integrated detection probability for the observed area was ˜29%. We also performed galaxy-targeted observations with six optical and near-infrared telescopes from 1.61 d after the event. A total of 238 nearby (≤100 Mpc) galaxies were observed with a typical I band limiting magnitude of ˜19.5. We detected 13 supernova candidates with the KWFC survey, and 60 extragalactic transients with the HSC survey. Two thirds of the HSC transients were likely supernovae and the remaining one third were possible active galactic nuclei. With our observational campaign, we found no transients that are likely to be associated with GW151226.

  14. Data linkage reduces loss to follow-up in an observational HIV cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hill, Teresa; Bansi, Loveleen; Sabin, Caroline; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David; Anderson, Jane; Easterbrook, Philippa; Fisher, Martin; Gazzard, Brian; Gilson, Richard; Johnson, Margaret; Leen, Clifford; Orkin, Chloe; Schwenk, Achim; Walsh, John; Winston, Alan; Babiker, Abdel; Delpech, Valerie

    2010-10-01

    To ascertain the degree of loss to follow-up in a cohort and to identify its predictors. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals without CD4 cell counts for a year or more were defined as potentially lost to follow-up (LFU). Multivariable Poisson regression models identified the risk factors for potential LFU. Multivariable logistic regression models compared demographic and clinical characteristics of those who returned for care and those permanently LFU. Of 16,595 patients under follow-up, 43.6% were potentially LFU at least once. Of these, 39.8% were considered permanently LFU and 60.2% were seen again after 1 year. Of 9,766 episodes when patients were potentially LFU, 59% resulted in the patient returning for care at the same clinic or at a different clinic. Compared with those permanently LFU, patients returning were more likely to have started highly active antiretroviral therapy, to have higher CD4 counts and viral loads, to be younger, and to have had more CD4 tests before LFU. They were less likely to have had a previous episode of potential LFU. A substantial proportion of patients in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort study are potentially LFU. Data linkage identifies patients returning for care at different centers. Recognition of factors associated with LFU may help reduce this important source of bias in observational databases. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Observable Signatures of GRB Cocoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-01-01

    As a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet propagates within the stellar atmosphere it creates a cocoon composed of an outer Newtonian shocked stellar material and an inner (possibly relativistic) shocked jet. The jet deposits {10}51{--}{10}52 erg into this cocoon. This is comparable to the energies of the GRB and of the accompanying supernova, yet the cocoon’s signature has been largely ignored. The cocoon radiates a fraction of this energy as it expands, following the breakout from the star, and later as it interacts with the surrounding matter. We explore the possible signatures of this emission and outline a framework to calculate them from the conditions of the cocoon at the time of the jet breakout. The cocoon signature depends strongly on the, currently unknown, mixing between the shocked jet and shocked stellar material. With no mixing the γ-ray emission from the cocoon is so bright that it should have been already detected. The lack of such detections indicates that some mixing must take place. For partial and full mixing the expected signals are weaker than regular GRB afterglows. However, the latter are highly beamed while the former are wider. Future optical, UV, and X-ray transient searches, like LSST, ZTF, ULTRASAT, ISS-Lobster, and others, will most likely detect such signals, providing a wealth of information on the progenitors and jets of GRBs. While we focus on long GRBs, analogous (but weaker) cocoons may arise in short GRBs. Their signatures might be the most promising electromagnetic counterparts for gravitational wave signals from compact binary mergers.

  16. Cancer and bone fractures in observational follow-up of the RECORD study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nigel P; Curtis, Paula S; Home, Philip D

    2015-06-01

    The RECORD study evaluated the effects of rosiglitazone on cardiovascular outcomes. A 4-year observational follow-up was added to the study to monitor the occurrence of cancer and bone fractures. We present the cancer and bone fracture data aggregated across the main study and its observational follow-up. RECORD was a multicentre, open-label trial in people with type 2 diabetes on metformin or sulfonylurea monotherapy randomly assigned to addition of rosiglitazone (n = 2,220) or to a combination of metformin and sulfonylurea (n = 2,227). At the end of the main study, patients stopped study drug and were invited to enter the observational follow-up during which glucose-lowering treatment was selected by the patient's physician. Serious adverse events of cancer and serious and non-serious events of bone fracture were recorded. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00379769. Of the 4,447 patients comprising the intent-to-treat population, 2,546 entered the observational follow-up (1,288 rosiglitazone, 1,258 metformin/sulfonylurea) and added 9,336 patient-years experience to the main RECORD study, making an aggregate of 33,744 patient-years. Based on the totality of follow-up, malignancies were reported in 179 of 2,220 patients (8.1 %) in the group originally randomised to rosiglitazone and in 195 of 2,227 patients (8.8 %) in the group allocated metformin/sulfonylurea [relative risk, RR, 0.92 (95 % CI 0.76-1.12)]. More patients reported bone fractures in the rosiglitazone group (238, 10.7 %) than in the metformin/sulfonylurea control [151, 6.8 %; RR 1.58 (1.30-1.92)]. For women, the corresponding figures were rosiglitazone 156 (14.5 %), metformin/sulfonylurea 91 (8.5 %), RR 1.71 (1.34-2.18), and for men, the corresponding figures were rosiglitazone 82 (7.2 %), metformin/sulfonylurea 60 (5.2 %), RR 1.37 (0.99-1.90). Potentially high-morbidity fractures (hip, pelvis, femur, and spine) occurred in the same number of patients (31, 1.4

  17. THE DETECTION OF A SN IIn IN OPTICAL FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF ICECUBE NEUTRINO EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; for the PTF Collaboration; for the Swift Collaboration; for the Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium; and others

    2015-09-20

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.°2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0.°54. It has a redshift of z = 0.0684, corresponding to a luminosity distance of about 300 Mpc and the Pan-STARRS1 survey shows that its explosion time was at least 158 days (in host galaxy rest frame) before the neutrino alert, so that a causal connection is unlikely. The a posteriori significance of the chance detection of both the neutrinos and the SN at any epoch is 2.2σ within IceCube's 2011/12 data acquisition season. Also, a complementary neutrino analysis reveals no long-term signal over the course of one year. Therefore, we consider the SN detection coincidental and the neutrinos uncorrelated to the SN. However, the SN is unusual and interesting by itself: it is luminous and energetic, bearing strong resemblance to the SN IIn 2010jl, and shows signs of interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense circumstellar medium. High-energy neutrino emission is expected in models of diffusive shock acceleration, but at a low, non-detectable level for this specific SN. In this paper, we describe the SN PTF12csy and present both the neutrino and electromagnetic data, as well as their analysis.

  18. The sloan digital sky Survey-II supernova survey: search algorithm and follow-up observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Hogan, Craig J.; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Frieman, Joshua A.; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Depoy, D. L.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Dilday, Ben; Kessler, Richard; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; and others

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg{sup 2} region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the type Ia SNe, the main driver for the survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  19. Follow-up observations of ABDorauds: a possible radio binary in ABDorB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, Jose C.; Jauncey, David; Reynolds, John; Marti-Vidal, Ivan; Marcaide, Jon; Lestrade, Jean-Francois; Preston, Robert; Jones, Dayton

    2010-04-01

    In November 2007 we observed the double-binary system in ABDoradus with the LBA. From these observations we have determined the dynamical mass of the main star, ABDorA, and discovered radioemission in both components of the 9" appart binary, ABDorBa and ABDorBb. In view of these results, we propose LBA phase-referenced observations of ABDoradus to 1) follow-up the reflex orbital motion of ABDorA and 2) confirm the radioemission in the binary ABDorBa / ABDorBb. Should this radioemission be confirmed, the masses of both stars could be precisely determined. The combination of the dynamical masses of ABDorA, ABDorBa and ABDorBb would provide precise inputs for testing PMS models of low-mass stars, which will help to alleviate the lack of calibration points of these models for masses below 1.2 Msun (Hillenbrand & White 2004; Mathieu 2006).

  20. Follow-up observations of ABDoradus: a possible radio binary in ABDorB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, Jose C.; Jauncey, David; Reynolds, John; Marti-Vidal, Ivan; Marcaide, Jon; Lestrade, Jean-Francois; Preston, Robert; Jones, Dayton

    2009-04-01

    In November 2007 we observed the double-binary system in ABDoradus with the LBA. From these observations we have determined the dynamical mass of the main star, ABDorA, and discovered radioemission in both components of the 9" appart binary, ABDorBa and ABDorBb. In view of these results, we propose LBA phase-referenced observations of ABDoradus to 1) follow-up the reflex orbital motion of ABDorA and 2) confirm the radioemission in the binary ABDorBa / ABDorBb. Should this radioemission be confirmed, the masses of both stars could be precisely determined. The combination of the dynamical masses of ABDorA, ABDorBa and ABDorBb would provide precise inputs for testing PMS models of low-mass stars, which will help to alleviate the lack of calibration points of these models for masses below 1.2 Msun (Hillenbrand & White 2004; Mathieu 2006).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NIBLES II. Arecibo follow-up observations (Butcher+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Z.; Schneider, S.; van Driel, W.; Lehnert, M.; Minchin, R.

    2016-11-01

    HI line observations of the 139 clear or marginally detected sources from the NIBLES Arecibo follow-up observations. Observations were carried out with the Arecibo L-band wideband receiver (L-wide) with the Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor (WAPP) correlator backend using two polarizations with a bandpass of 50MHz across 4096 frequency channels corresponding to a channel separation of approximately 2.6km/s. Spectrum files are the output files from Robert Minchin's CORMEASURE routine from the Arecibo Observatory. Data have been smoothed to approximately 18.7km/s. Velocities are heliocentric in the optical convention in units of km/s and flux density is in Janskys. (6 data files).

  2. Follow-up of Prostatectomy versus Observation for Early Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J; Jones, Karen M; Barry, Michael J; Andriole, Gerald L; Culkin, Daniel; Wheeler, Thomas; Aronson, William J; Brawer, Michael K

    2017-07-13

    We previously found no significant differences in mortality between men who underwent surgery for localized prostate cancer and those who were treated with observation only. Uncertainty persists regarding nonfatal health outcomes and long-term mortality. From November 1994 through January 2002, we randomly assigned 731 men with localized prostate cancer to radical prostatectomy or observation. We extended follow-up through August 2014 for our primary outcome, all-cause mortality, and the main secondary outcome, prostate-cancer mortality. We describe disease progression, treatments received, and patient-reported outcomes through January 2010 (original follow-up). During 19.5 years of follow-up (median, 12.7 years), death occurred in 223 of 364 men (61.3%) assigned to surgery and in 245 of 367 (66.8%) assigned to observation (absolute difference in risk, 5.5 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.5 to 12.4; hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.01; P=0.06). Death attributed to prostate cancer or treatment occurred in 27 men (7.4%) assigned to surgery and in 42 men (11.4%) assigned to observation (absolute difference in risk, 4.0 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.2 to 8.3; hazard ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.39 to 1.02; P=0.06). Surgery may have been associated with lower all-cause mortality than observation among men with intermediate-risk disease (absolute difference, 14.5 percentage points; 95% CI, 2.8 to 25.6) but not among those with low-risk disease (absolute difference, 0.7 percentage points; 95% CI, -10.5 to 11.8) or high-risk disease (absolute difference, 2.3 percentage points; 95% CI, -11.5 to 16.1) (P=0.08 for interaction). Treatment for disease progression was less frequent with surgery than with observation (absolute difference, 26.2 percentage points; 95% CI, 19.0 to 32.9); treatment was primarily for asymptomatic, local, or biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) progression. Urinary incontinence and erectile and sexual dysfunction were each greater

  3. IR and Optical Observations of GRB from Campo Imperatore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziali, R.; D'Alessio, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Paola, A. Di; Burderi, L.; Fiore, F.; Israel, G.; Lorenzetti, D.; Pedichini, F.; Stella, L.; Vitali, F.

    In this poster we present a description of the Campo Imperatore Observatory facilities, suitable for very fast reaction to GRB triggers and multiwavelength observations. Two complementary instruments are available in the Observatory: the AZT-24 (1.1m Ritchey Cretien equipped with the NIR camera SWIRCAM), one of the few IR telescope working in the northern emisphere, and a Schmidt telescope (60/90/180 cm, equipped with a 2Kx2K back illuminated CCD). The IR detection of the GRB 000926, obtained with the AZT-24, is also reported.

  4. XMM FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF THREE SWIFT BAT-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Winter, L. M.

    2011-08-01

    We present XMM-Newton observations of three active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken as part of a hunt to find very heavily obscured Compton-thick AGNs. For obscuring columns greater than 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, AGNs are only visible at energies below 10 keV via reflected/scattered radiation, characterized by a flat power law. We therefore selected three objects (ESO 417-G006, IRAS 05218-1212, and MCG -01-05-047) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray survey catalog with Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) 0.5-10 keV spectra with flat power-law indices as candidate Compton-thick sources for follow-up observations with the more sensitive instruments on XMM-Newton. The XMM spectra, however, rule out reflection-dominated models based on the weakness of the observed Fe K{alpha} lines. Instead, the spectra are well fit by a model of a power-law continuum obscured by a Compton-thin absorber plus a soft excess. This result is consistent with previous follow-up observations of two other flat-spectrum BAT-detected AGNs. Thus, out of the six AGNs in the 22 month BAT catalog with apparently flat Swift XRT spectra, all five that have had follow-up observations are not likely Compton thick. We also present new optical spectra of two of these objects, IRAS 05218-1212 and MCG -01-05-047. Interestingly, though both the AGNs have similar X-ray spectra, their optical spectra are completely different, adding evidence against the simplest form of the geometric unified model of AGNs. IRAS 05218-1212 appears in the optical as a Seyfert 1, despite the {approx}8.5 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} line-of-sight absorbing column indicated by its X-ray spectrum. MCG -01-05-047's optical spectrum shows no sign of AGN activity; it appears as a normal galaxy.

  5. Using galaxy formation simulations to optimize LIGO follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Elisa; Caiazzo, Ilaria; Davé, Romeel; Heyl, Jeremy S.

    2017-04-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational radiation from merging black holes poses a challenge of how to organize the electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational-wave events as well as observed bursts of neutrinos. We propose a technique to select the galaxies that are most likely to host the event given some assumptions of whether the particular event is associated with recent star formation, low-metallicity stars or simply proportional to the total stellar mass in the galaxy. We combine data from the 2-MASS Photometric Redshift Galaxy Catalogue with results from galaxy formation simulations to develop observing strategies that potentially reduce the area of sky to search by up to a factor of 2 relative to an unweighted search of galaxies, and a factor of 20 to a search over the entire LIGO localization region.

  6. High-precision follow-up observations of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanjooloo, Yudish; Tholen, David J.; Fohring, Dora; Hung, Denise

    2016-10-01

    We present the latest results of ongoing high-precision astrometric follow-up observations of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) using the University of Hawaii 2.24 metre telescope (currently 7.5 arcmin FOV), the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT; 1 degree FOV) with MegaPrime, and the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (1.5 degree FOV). The combination of excellent observing conditions at Maunakea, and the use of no filter to maximise our throughput efficiency, allows us to recover targets having V < 24, and sometimes V < 25 under ideal conditions. We frequently achieve astrometric accuracy limited by the reference catalog and plan to improve on this capability with the implementation of the GAIA catalog. This work is funded by NASA grant NXX13AI64G.

  7. Neutrino detection of transient sources with optical follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornic, D.; Ageron, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Escoffier, S.; Schussler, F.; Vallage, B.; Vecchi, M.

    2010-12-01

    The ANTARES telescope has the opportunity to detect transient neutrino sources,such as gamma-ray bursts,core-collapse supernovae,flares of active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity to these sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. For this purpose the ANTARES Collaboration has implemented a fast on-line muon track reconstruction with a good angular resolution. These characteristics allow to trigger a network of optical telescopes in order to identify the nature of the neutrino sources. An optical follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets, coincident in time and direction, or single neutrinos with a very high energy, would not only give access to the nature of their sources but also improve the sensitivity for neutrino detection. The alert system is operational since early 2009, and as of September 2010, 22 alerts have been sent to the TAROT and ROTSE telescopes.

  8. Follow-Up Discovery Channel Telescope Observations of Transients and Variables from Optical Time Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Suvi; Liu, Tingting; Hung, Tiara

    2017-01-01

    We highlight the capabilities of the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) for follow-up observations of transients and variables discovered by optical time-domain surveys. We present two DCT programs: 1) extended-baseline imaging with the Large Monolithic Imager of periodically variable quasars from the Pan-STARRS1 survey to identify binary supermassive black hole candidates, and 2) spectroscopic classification with the DeVeny spectrograph of nuclear transients from the iPTF survey to identify tidal disruption event candidates. We demonstrate that DCT is well-matched to the magnitude ranges of the transients and variables discovered by these surveys, and has played an important role in their classification and characterization.

  9. ALMA and RATIR observations of GRB 131030A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuiyun; Urata, Yuji; Takahashi, Satoko; Im, Myungshin; Yu, Po-Chieh; Choi, Changsu; Butler, Nathaniel; Watson, Alan M.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lee, William H.; Klein, Chris; Fox, Ori D.; Littlejohns, Owen; Cucchiara, Nino; Troja, Eleonora; González, Jesús; Richer, Michael G.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Bloom, Josh; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Gehrels, Neil; Moseley, Harvey; Georgiev, Leonid; de Diego, José A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    We report on the first open-use based Atacama Large Millimeter/submm Array (ALMA) 345 GHz observation for the late afterglow phase of GRB 131030A. The ALMA observation constrained a deep limit at 17.1 d for the afterglow and host galaxy. We also identified a faint submillimeter source (ALMA J2300-0522) near the GRB 131030A position. The deep limit at 345 GHz and multifrequency observations obtained using Swift and RATIR yielded forward-shock modeling with a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation and described X-ray excess in the afterglow. The excess was inconsistent with the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from the forward shock. The host galaxy of GRB 131030A and optical counterpart of ALMA J2300-0522 were also identified in the Subaru image. Based on the deep ALMA limit for the host galaxy, the 3σ upper limits of IR luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) are estimated as LIR < 1.11 × 1011 L⊙ and SFR <18.7 (M⊙ yr-1), respectively. Although the separation angle from the burst location (3{^''.}5) was rather large, ALMA J2300-0522 may be one component of the GRB 131030A host galaxy, according to previous host galaxy cases.

  10. ALMA and RATIR observations of GRB 131030A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuiyun; Urata, Yuji; Takahashi, Satoko; Im, Myungshin; Yu, Po-Chieh; Choi, Changsu; Butler, Nathaniel; Watson, Alan M.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lee, William H.; Klein, Chris; Fox, Ori D.; Littlejohns, Owen; Cucchiara, Nino; Troja, Eleonora; González, Jesús; Richer, Michael G.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Bloom, Josh; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Gehrels, Neil; Moseley, Harvey; Georgiev, Leonid; de Diego, José A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    We report on the first open-use based Atacama Large Millimeter/submm Array (ALMA) 345 GHz observation for the late afterglow phase of GRB 131030A. The ALMA observation constrained a deep limit at 17.1 d for the afterglow and host galaxy. We also identified a faint submillimeter source (ALMA J2300-0522) near the GRB 131030A position. The deep limit at 345 GHz and multifrequency observations obtained using Swift and RATIR yielded forward-shock modeling with a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation and described X-ray excess in the afterglow. The excess was inconsistent with the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from the forward shock. The host galaxy of GRB 131030A and optical counterpart of ALMA J2300-0522 were also identified in the Subaru image. Based on the deep ALMA limit for the host galaxy, the 3σ upper limits of IR luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) are estimated as LIR < 1.11 × 1011 L⊙ and SFR <18.7 (M⊙ yr-1), respectively. Although the separation angle from the burst location (3{^''.}5) was rather large, ALMA J2300-0522 may be one component of the GRB 131030A host galaxy, according to previous host galaxy cases.

  11. Optical Follow-Up Observations of PTF10qts, a Luminous Broad-Lined Type Ic Supernova Found by the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, E. S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Hurley, K.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Poznanski, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Barthelmy, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic-BL) PTF10qts, which was discovered as part of the Palomar Transient Factory. The supernova was located in a dwarf galaxy of magnitude r = 21.1 at a redshift z = 0.0907.We find that the R-band light curve is a poor proxy for bolometric data and use photometric and spectroscopic data to construct and constrain the bolometric light curve. The derived bolometric magnitude at maximum light is Mbol = -18.51 +/- 0.2 mag, comparable to that of SN1998bw (Mbol = -18.7 mag) which was associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). PTF10qts is one of the most luminous SN Ic-BL observed without an accompanying GRB. We estimate the physical parameters of the explosion using data from our programme of follow-up observations, finding that it produced a larger mass of radioactive nickel compared to other SNeIc-BL with similar inferred ejecta masses and kinetic energies. The progenitor of the event was likely a approximately 20 solar mass star.

  12. Loss to follow-up in the Australian HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Hamish; Petoumenos, Kathy; Brown, Katherine; Baker, David; Russell, Darren; Read, Tim; Smith, Don; Wray, Lynne; Giles, Michelle; Hoy, Jennifer; Carr, Andrew; Law, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss to follow-up (LTFU) in HIV-positive cohorts is an important surrogate for interrupted clinical care which can potentially influence the assessment of HIV disease status and outcomes. After preliminary evaluation of LTFU rates and patient characteristics, we evaluated the risk of mortality by LTFU status in a high resource setting. Methods Rates of LTFU were measured in the Australian HIV Observational Database for a range of patient characteristics. Multivariate repeated measures regression methods were used to identify determinants of LTFU. Mortality by LTFU status was ascertained using linkage to the National Death Index. Survival following combination antiretroviral therapy initiation was investigated using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Of 3,413 patients included in this analysis, 1,632 (47.8%) had at least one episode of LTFU after enrolment. Multivariate predictors of LTFU included viral load (VL)>10,000 copies/ml (Rate ratio (RR) 1.63 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.45–1.84) (ref ≤400)), time under follow-up (per year) (RR 1.03 (95% CI: 1.02–1.04)) and prior LTFU (per episode) (RR 1.15 (95% CI: 1.06–1.24)). KM curves for survival were similar by LTFU status (p=0.484). LTFU was not associated with mortality in Cox proportional hazards models (univariate hazard ratio (HR) 0.93 (95% CI: 0.69–1.26) and multivariate HR 1.04 (95% CI: 0.77–1.43)). Conclusions Increased risk of LTFU was identified amongst patients with potentially higher infectiousness. We did not find significant mortality risk associated with LTFU. This is consistent with timely re-engagement with treatment, possibly via high levels of unreported linkage to other health care providers. PMID:25377928

  13. Spectroscopic Follow-Up Observations of Transiting Planet Candidates Identified by the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David; Sasselov, D. D.; Szentgyorgyi, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission is expected to identify many hundreds of transiting planet candidates in four years of continuous photometric monitoring of 100 square degrees in Cygnus and Lyra. To sort out true planets from eclipsing stellar systems that are masquerading as transiting planets, a variety of follow-up observations are planned. High resolution ground-based spectroscopy at modest signal-to-noise ratio will be used to detect orbital motion induced by stellar companions, for example by small M dwarf secondaries eclipsing solar-type primaries. The most challenging stellar imposters are blends of eclipsing binaries with nearby bright stars; even high-quality spectra may have difficulty resolving such systems. A workhorse for this initial phase of spectroscopic follow up will be TRES, a new fiber-fed echelle spectrograph on the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple Observatory. Ultimate confirmation of a transiting planet comes with the solution for a spectroscopic orbit and the derivation of an actual mass of the planet compared to the parent star. A primary goal of the Kepler Mission is to find earth-sized planets in or near the habitable zones of their host stars. The radial-velocity precision needed to derive spectroscopic orbits for the most interesting cases will require considerable improvement beyond 1 m/s. The Geneva Observatory and Harvard University have joined in a collaboration to develop such a capability at a northern site with access to the Kepler field of view. A version of the HARPS spectrograph, now in highly successful operation on the 3.6-m telescope at ESO on La Silla, is being built. Negotiations are underway to site HARPS North at the William Herschel Telescope operated by the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes on La Palma. The goal is to achieve velocity performance at the level of 20 cm/s and to push the determination of planetary masses into the terrestrial planet regime.

  14. Probing a GRB Progenitor at a Redshift of z=2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive optical/near-infrared follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226, including VLT spectroscopy and polarimetry, supplemented by Chandra X-ray and BOOTES-1 rapid response observations. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the burst when the afterglow was at a magnitude of R approx. 19. The multi-color light curve of the afterglow, with a break around 1 day after the burst, is achromatic within the observational uncertainties even during episodes of short-term fluctuations. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, consistent with low intrinsic polarization observed in other afterglows. VLT spectra show a foreground absorber of Mg II at a redshift z=1.042 and two absorption line systems at redshifts z=1.962+/-0.001 and at z=1.986+/-0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. The kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds is very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004, supporting the view that at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  15. Probing a GRB Progenitor at a Redshift of z=2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive optical/near-infrared follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226, including VLT spectroscopy and polarimetry, supplemented by Chandra X-ray and BOOTES-1 rapid response observations. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the burst when the afterglow was at a magnitude of R approx. 19. The multi-color light curve of the afterglow, with a break around 1 day after the burst, is achromatic within the observational uncertainties even during episodes of short-term fluctuations. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, consistent with low intrinsic polarization observed in other afterglows. VLT spectra show a foreground absorber of Mg II at a redshift z=1.042 and two absorption line systems at redshifts z=1.962+/-0.001 and at z=1.986+/-0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. The kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds is very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004, supporting the view that at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  16. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Boyle, M.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummitt, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clara, F.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Culter, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, M.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Finn, L. S.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Graef, C.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Kelner, M.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, N.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Li, J.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Marandi, A.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohanty, S. D.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nolting, D.; Nuttall, L.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Podkaminer, J.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Raymond, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J. H.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Salit, M.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shihan Weerathunga, T.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, R.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stefszky, M.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vallisneri, M.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Villar, A. E.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Collaboration; Bizouard, M. A.; Dietz, A.; Guidi, G. M.; Was, M.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed γ-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30°, we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  17. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF GRB 051103 FROM LIGO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G.; Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A.; Amin, R. S.; Aston, S. M.; Collaboration: LIGO Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-10

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed {gamma}-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30 Degree-Sign , we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  18. Identification and Follow-Up Observations of Low-Mass Eclipsing Binaries from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey; Lopez-Morales, M.; Marzoa, R. I.; Harrison, T.; Ule, N.; Hoffman, D.

    2011-01-01

    An outstanding problem in Astronomy for the past 15+ years has been that the radii of low-mass, (M < 1.0 M⊙), main-sequence stars in eclipsing binary systems are consistently about 15% larger than predicted by theoretical models. The main cause is hypothesized to be rapid rotation due to binary spin-up, as all but one of the currently known systems have P < 3.0 days. We present 100+ new low-mass, main-sequence, double-lined eclipsing binaries (LMMS DDEBs) from both our Kepler Guest Observer Program, as well as the initial Kepler public data release. We identify over 25 new systems with P > 10 days, extending the sample of LMMS DDEBs into this completely heretofore unexplored period range. We present the initial results of our intensive observing campaign to obtain ground-based radial-velocity and multi-color photometry follow-up of these long-period systems, in order to determine precise masses and radii. We thank all the hard-working members of the Kepler team, and acknowledge support from the Kepler Guest Observer Program, the New Mexico Space Grant Consortium, and a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  19. The 80 Ms follow-up of the X-ray afterglow of GRB 130427A challenges the standard forward shock model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; Kann, D. A.; Oates, S. R.; Schulze, S.; Zhang, B.; Cano, Z.; Gendre, B.; Malesani, D.; Rossi, A.; Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Boër, M.; Stratta, G.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-10-01

    GRB 130427A was the brightest gamma-ray burst detected in the last 30 yr. With an equivalent isotropic energy output of 8.5 × 1053 erg and redshift z = 0.34, it uniquely combined very high energetics with a relative proximity to Earth. As a consequence, its X-ray afterglow has been detected by sensitive X-ray observatories such as XMM-Newton and Chandra for a record-breaking baseline longer than 80 million seconds. We present the X-ray light curve of this event over such an interval. The light curve shows a simple power-law decay with a slope α = 1.309 ± 0.007 over more than three decades in time (47 ks-83 Ms). We discuss the consequences of this result for a few models proposed so far to interpret GRB 130427A, and more in general the significance of this outcome in the context of the standard forward shock model. We find that this model has difficulty in explaining our data, in both cases of constant density and stellar-wind circumburst media, and requires far-fetched values for the physical parameters involved.

  20. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment.

    PubMed

    David, S; Visvikis, D; Roux, C; Hatt, M

    2011-09-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumor volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumor metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using a stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on clinical datasets it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracer datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumor volume definition for radiotherapy applications.

  1. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    PubMed Central

    David, Simon; Visvikis, Dimitris; Roux, Christian; Hatt, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumour volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumour metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets, the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on the clinical datasets, it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracers datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumour volume definition for radiotherapy applications. PMID:21846937

  2. SPECKLE CAMERA OBSERVATIONS FOR THE NASA KEPLER MISSION FOLLOW-UP PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Sherry, William; Horch, Elliott; Ciardi, David R.

    2011-07-15

    We present the first results from a speckle imaging survey of stars classified as candidate exoplanet host stars discovered by the Kepler mission. We use speckle imaging to search for faint companions or closely aligned background stars that could contribute flux to the Kepler light curves of their brighter neighbors. Background stars are expected to contribute significantly to the pool of false positive candidate transiting exoplanets discovered by the Kepler mission, especially in the case that the faint neighbors are eclipsing binary stars. Here, we describe our Kepler follow-up observing program, the speckle imaging camera used, our data reduction, and astrometric and photometric performance. Kepler stars range from R = 8 to 16 and our observations attempt to provide background non-detection limits 5-6 mag fainter and binary separations of {approx}0.05-2.0 arcsec. We present data describing the relative brightness, separation, and position angles for secondary sources, as well as relative plate limits for non-detection of faint nearby stars around each of 156 target stars. Faint neighbors were found near 10 of the stars.

  3. SCUBA-2 follow-up of Herschel-SPIRE observed Planck overdensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Todd P.; Scott, Douglas; Bianconi, Matteo; Clements, David L.; Dole, Herve A.; Flores-Cacho, Inés; Guery, David; Kneissl, Ruediger; Lagache, Guilaine; Marleau, Francine R.; Montier, Ludovic; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Soucail, Genevieve

    2017-07-01

    We present SCUBA-2 follow-up of 61 candidate high-redshift Planck sources. Of these, 10 are confirmed strong gravitational lenses and comprise some of the brightest such submm sources on the observed sky, while 51 are candidate proto-cluster fields undergoing massive starburst events. With the accompanying Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver observations and assuming an empirical dust temperature prior of 34^{+13}_{-9} K, we provide photometric redshift and far-IR luminosity estimates for 172 SCUBA-2-selected sources within these Planck overdensity fields. The redshift distribution of the sources peak between a redshift of 2 and 4, with one-third of the sources having S500/S350 > 1. For the majority of the sources, we find far-IR luminosities of approximately 1013 L⊙, corresponding to star formation rates of around 1000 M⊙ yr-1. For S850 > 8 mJy sources, we show that there is up to an order of magnitude increase in star formation rate density and an increase in uncorrected number counts of 6 for S850 > 8 mJy when compared to typical cosmological survey fields. The sources detected with SCUBA-2 account for only approximately 5 per cent of the Planck flux at 353 GHz, and thus many more fainter sources are expected in these fields.

  4. WHT follow-up observations of extremely metal-poor stars identified from SDSS and LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, D. S.; González Hernández, J. I.; Allende Prieto, C.; Rebolo, R.

    2017-09-01

    Aims: We have identified several tens of extremely metal-poor star candidates from SDSS and LAMOST, which we follow up with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) telescope to confirm their metallicity. Methods: We followed a robust two-step methodology. We first analyzed the SDSS and LAMOST spectra. A first set of stellar parameters was derived from these spectra with the FERRE code, taking advantage of the continuum shape to determine the atmospheric parameters, in particular, the effective temperature. Second, we selected interesting targets for follow-up observations, some of them with very low-quality SDSS or LAMOST data. We then obtained and analyzed higher-quality medium-resolution spectra obtained with the Intermediate dispersion Spectrograph and Imaging System (ISIS) on the WHT to arrive at a second more reliable set of atmospheric parameters. This allowed us to derive the metallicity with accuracy, and we confirm the extremely metal-poor nature in most cases. In this second step we also employed FERRE, but we took a running mean to normalize both the observed and the synthetic spectra, and therefore the final parameters do not rely on having an accurate flux calibration or continuum placement. We have analyzed with the same tools and following the same procedure six well-known metal-poor stars, five of them at [Fe/H] <-4 to verify our results. This showed that our methodology is able to derive accurate metallicity determinations down to [Fe/H] <-5.0. Results: The results for these six reference stars give us confidence on the metallicity scale for the rest of the sample. In addition, we present 12 new extremely metal-poor candidates: 2 stars at [Fe/H] ≃-4, 6 more in the range -4 < [Fe / H] < -3.5, and 4 more at -3.5 < [Fe / H] < -3.0. Conclusions: We conclude that we can reliably determine metallicities for extremely metal-poor stars with a precision of 0.2 dex from medium-resolution spectroscopy with our improved methodology. This provides a highly

  5. Changes observed in diabetic retinopathy: eight-year follow-up of a Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro; de la Riva-Fernandez, Sofia; Valls-Mateu, Aida; Sagarra-Alamo, Ramon; Moreno-Ribas, Antonio; Soler, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims To determine the changes in the incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), diabetic macular oedema (DMO) and their risk factors in a population-based study of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) referred to our 16 Primary Health Care Areas (HCAs). Methods Prospective population-based study of a total of 15 396 Caucasian patients with DM, who represent 86.53% of the total patients with DM in our HCAs, were studied over an 8-year follow-up period. All patients were screened with a mean follow-up of 3.18±1.11 times for each patient over the 8 years. Results The yearly mean value of any DR was 8.37±2.19% (8.09%–8.99%); of advanced DR yearly mean value of 0.46±0.22% (0.03–0.78); and of DMO a yearly mean value of 2.19±0.18% (2%–2.49%). A clear increase was observed in the last 3 years, any DR increased from 8.09% in 2007 to 8.99% in 2014, and DMO from 2% in 2007 to 2.49% in 2014. These increases were more evident in some age groups. For patients with any DR aged 41–50 and 51–60 and for patients with advanced DR aged 41–50, 51–60 and 61–70, the increase was more marked, related to an increase in HbA1c values or to patients treated with insulin. Conclusions An increase in the incidence of DR and DMO was observed, especially in the younger patients aged between 31 and 70 years. This is linked to bad metabolic control of DM. Our results suggest a greater number of ocular complications in the near future, such as neovascular glaucoma, if these current findings are not addressed. PMID:26769672

  6. High-Energy Observation of GRB 090217 with Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Cutini, S.; Piron, F.

    2010-03-26

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more then 7 decades of energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here we report on the observation of long GRB 090217 which triggered the GBM and as been independently detected by the on-ground blind search LAT algorithm. We present the GBM and LAT observations, including a temporal profile and time-resolved spectral analysis from 8 keV up to approx1 GeV. The time-averaged and time-resolved spectra are well reproduced by a Band model, with no substantial spectral evolution. We compare these observations to the other LAT detections of long bursts, and discuss some theoretical implications on GRB high-energy emission.

  7. Spectroscopic Observations of the Bright Afterglow of GRB021004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona

    2001-09-01

    One of the holy grails of gamma-ray burst research is to detect X-ray line signatures from an afterglow with high statistical significance. Of all possible observations, this perhaps offers the best chance of constraining the GRB mechanism and environment, and could provide the "smoking gun" signature connecting GRBs to massive stellar deaths. In order to accomplish this, we know long observations within one day of the event are necessary.

  8. [Osteoarthritis in the neonate. Radiologic diagnosis and follow-up observations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weigel, W; Hayek, W H; Bens, G

    1979-01-01

    A fatally ending index case of septic osteoarthritis that was diagnosed retrospectively initiated this report. This patient had severe, asymmetrically distributed metaphyseal growth disturbances at many long bones. In order to determine the features of early radiologic diagnosis we report the findings of 7 further patients with neonatal septic osteoarthritis with clinical and radiological follow-up. The most important observation for early radiologic diagnosis of osteoarthritis is the displacement of fat layers along the metaphysis. Other findings of the soft tissues have the same diagnostic value as bone destruction and subperiosteal new bone formation found one to three weeks later on roentgenfilms. Detecting early signs of osteoarthritis helps in localizing the focus for bacteriologic diagnosis, which is said to be more successful than blood cultures. Diagnosing a joint empyema initiates surgical intervention for pressure relief in order to avoid necrosis of the epiphysis as seen in the femoral head in septic arthritis of the hip joint. Early diagnosis and treatment prior to destruction of the growing cartilage is necessary to avoid growth disturbances and length discrepancies of long bones. In cases of sepsis a so called "babygram" and a repeat examination 10 to 14 days later is mandatory.

  9. X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2008-12-24

    A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE {gamma}-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

  10. Systematic Errors in Low-latency Gravitational Wave Parameter Estimation Impact Electromagnetic Follow-up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.; Farr, Ben; Coughlin, Scott; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-03-01

    Among the most eagerly anticipated opportunities made possible by Advanced LIGO/Virgo are multimessenger observations of compact mergers. Optical counterparts may be short-lived so rapid characterization of gravitational wave (GW) events is paramount for discovering electromagnetic signatures. One way to meet the demand for rapid GW parameter estimation is to trade off accuracy for speed, using waveform models with simplified treatment of the compact objects’ spin. We report on the systematic errors in GW parameter estimation suffered when using different spin approximations to recover generic signals. Component mass measurements can be biased by \\gt 5σ using simple-precession waveforms and in excess of 20σ when non-spinning templates are employed. This suggests that electromagnetic observing campaigns should not take a strict approach to selecting which LIGO/Virgo candidates warrant follow-up observations based on low-latency mass estimates. For sky localization, we find that searched areas are up to a factor of ∼ 2 larger for non-spinning analyses, and are systematically larger for any of the simplified waveforms considered in our analysis. Distance biases for the non-precessing waveforms can be in excess of 100% and are largest when the spin angular momenta are in the orbital plane of the binary. We confirm that spin-aligned waveforms should be used for low-latency parameter estimation at the minimum. Including simple precession, though more computationally costly, mitigates biases except for signals with extreme precession effects. Our results shine a spotlight on the critical need for development of computationally inexpensive precessing waveforms and/or massively parallel algorithms for parameter estimation.

  11. Spitzer Observations of GRB Hosts: A Legacy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel; Tanvir, Nial; Hjorth, Jens; Berger, Edo; Laskar, Tanmoy; Michalowski, Michal; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Fynbo, Johan; Levan, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The host galaxies of long-duration GRBs are drawn from uniquely broad range of luminosities and redshifts. Thus they offer the possibility of studying the evolution of star-forming galaxies without the limitations of other luminosity-selected samples, which typically are increasingly biased towards the most massive systems at higher redshift. However, reaping the full benefits of this potential requires careful attention to the selection biases affecting host identification. To this end, we propose observations of a Legacy sample of 70 GRB host galaxies (an additional 70 have already been observed by Spitzer), in order to constrain the mass and luminosity function in GRB-selected galaxies at high redshift, including its dependence on redshift and on properties of the afterglow. Crucially, and unlike previous Spitzer surveys, this sample is carefully designed to be uniform and free of optical selection biases that have caused previous surveys to systematically under-represent the role of luminous, massive hosts. We also propose to extend to larger, more powerfully constraining samples the study of two science areas where Spitzer observations have recently shown spectacular success: the hosts of dust-obscured GRBs (which promise to further our understanding of the connection between GRBs and star-formation in the most luminous galaxies), and the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation at z>2 (for which GRB host observations provide particularly powerful constraints on high-z chemical evolution).

  12. Recent Results from Follow-up Astrometric Observations of KBOs and NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholen, D. J.; Connelley, M. S.

    2001-11-01

    As of the abstract deadline, 481 Kuiper belt objects have been discovered, but only 50 have four-opposition or greater orbits. Historically, some of the three-opposition orbits still had assumed eccentricities, indicating the relative level of inaccuracy in the orbit determination. Meanwhile, several authors have published eccentricity versus semimajor axis plots for Kuiper belt objects without attaching error bars to the symbols. Caution should therefore be exercised when looking at the relative populations of resonant, classical, and scattered objects, or when reaching conclusions about mechanisms at work that shape the Kuiper belt. We have been working to ameliorate this situation by securing follow-up astrometric observations of Kuiper belt objects with shorter arc orbit solutions, thereby extending the arcs and improving the accuracy of their semimajor axis and eccentricity determinations. Approximately 30 objects have been recovered to date, including a serendipitous observation of the satellite of 1998 WW31. We will be presenting improved estimates of the relative populations of resonant, classical, and scattered objects at the DPS meeting. Emphasis has also been given to astrometric observations of faint near-Earth objects to prevent their ephemeris uncertainties from growing large enough to warrant being tagged as "lost". In some cases, arcs have been extended by a factor of more than sixty. Virtually all of our observations are the last available for these objects. The number one reason for failure to recover an object has been low galactic latitude, where the field star density is so high that after non-sidereal tracking is taken into account, the field of view is nearly completely covered by star trails. Notable recoveries include 2000 SG344 at magnitude 26 in 2001 August using the CFHT (this object had been identified as having a 1 in 1000 chance of colliding with the Earth in 2071), 2000 GD147 at magnitude 24.5 in 2001 September using the UH 2.24-m

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler follow-up observation program. I. Imaging (Furlan+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Ciardi, D. R.; Everett, M. E.; Saylors, M.; Teske, J. K.; Horch, E. P.; Howell, S. B.; van Belle, G. T.; Hirsch, L. A.; Gautier, T. N.; Adams, E. R.; Barrado, D.; Cartier, K. M. S.; Dressing, C. D.; Dupree, A. K.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lillo-Box, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Wang, J.

    2017-07-01

    We present results from six years of follow-up imaging observations of KOI host stars, including work done by teams from the Kepler Community Follow-up Observation Program (CFOP; https://exofop.ipac.caltech.edu/cfop.php) and by other groups. Several observing facilities were used to obtain high-resolution images of KOI host stars. Table1 lists the various telescopes, instruments used, filter bandpasses, typical Point Spread Function (PSF) widths, number of targets observed, and main references for the published results. The four main observing techniques employed are adaptive optics (Keck, Palomar, Lick, MMT), speckle interferometry (Gemini North, WIYN, DCT), lucky imaging (Calar Alto), and imaging from space with HST. A total of 3557 KOI host stars were observed at 11 facilities with 9 different instruments, using filters from the optical to the near-infrared. In addition, 10 of these stars were also observed at the 8m Gemini North telescope by Ziegler et al. 2016 (AJ accepted, arXiv:1605.03584) using laser guide star adaptive optics. The largest number of KOI host stars (3320) were observed using Robo-AO at the Palomar 1.5m telescope (Baranec et al. 2014ApJ...790L...8B; Baranec et al. 2016, Cat. J/AJ/152/18; Law et al. 2014, Cat. J/ApJ/791/35; Ziegler et al. 2016, AJ accepted, arXiv:1605.03584). A total of 8332 observations were carried out from 2009 September to 2015 October covering 3557 stars. We carried out observations at the Keck, Palomar, and Lick Observatory using the facility adaptive optics systems and near-infrared cameras from 2009 to 2015. At Keck, we observed with the 10m Keck II telescope and Near-Infrared Camera, second generation (NIRC2). The pixel scale of NIRC2 was 0.01''/pixel, resulting in a field of view of about 10''*10''. We observed our targets in a narrow K-band filter, Brγ, which has a central wavelength of 2.1686μm. In most cases, when a companion was detected, we also observed the target in a narrow-band J filter, Jcont, which is

  14. Follow-up observations of extremely metal-poor stars identified from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, D. S.; Allende Prieto, C.; González Hernández, J. I.; Carrera, R.; Rebolo, R.; Shetrone, M.; Lambert, D. L.; Fernández-Alvar, E.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The most metal-poor stars in the Milky Way witnessed the early phases of formation of the Galaxy, and have chemical compositions that are close to the pristine mixture from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, polluted by one or few supernovae. Aims: Only two dozen stars with ([Fe/H] < -4) are known, and they show a wide range of abundance patterns. It is therefore important to enlarge this sample. We present the first results of an effort to identify new extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo. Methods: Our targets have been selected from low-resolution spectra obtained as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and followed-up with medium resolution spectroscopy on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope and, in a few cases, at high resolution on the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Stellar parameters and the abundances of magnesium, calcium, iron, and strontium have been inferred from the spectra using classical model atmospheres. We have also derived carbon abundances from the G band. Results: We find consistency between the metallicities estimated from SDSS and those from new data at the level of 0.3 dex. The analysis of medium resolution data obtained with ISIS on the WHT allows us to refine the metallicities and in some cases measure other elemental abundances. Our sample contains 11 new metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < -3.0, one of them with an estimated metallicity of [Fe/H] ~ -4.0. We also discuss metallicity discrepancies of some stars in common with previous works in the literature. Only one of these stars is found to be C-enhanced at about [C/Fe] ~ + 1, whereas the other metal-poor stars show C abundances at the level of [C/Fe] ~ + 0.45. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.The reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at

  15. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizouard, M. A.; Dietz, A.; Guidi, G. M.; Was, M.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.; Blackburn, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at the distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed gamma-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30. we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with > 99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81 our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it the most distant extragalactic magnetar observed to date.

  16. Fluctuations of suicidality in the aftermath of a marital separation: 6-month follow-up observations.

    PubMed

    Kõlves, Kairi; Ide, Naoko; De Leo, Diego

    2012-12-15

    There is a lack of understanding of how the changing nature of the separation process impacts on suicidality. This paper aims to identify factors contributing to fluctuations in suicidality during the process of marital/de facto separation along a 6-month follow-up. Separated persons who had contacted relationship-counselling services, help-line services, and variety of support and self-help groups were asked to participate in the first assessment. A 'Follow-Up Questionnaire' was sent 6 months later. Participants were required to be 18 years or older and separated from their married/de facto partner within the previous 18 months but not yet divorced. Overall, in the first assessment, separated females presented lower levels of suicidality than males. During the follow-up suicidality decreased. There were some gender differences in terms of predictors of changes in suicidality. Separated males who showed an increase or stability in suicidality were more affected by stressful experiences such as legal negotiations on obtaining a divorce, feelings of loss and loneliness, loss of social networks and financial difficulties than males who were not suicidal in either assessment. Separated males and females who remained suicidal were more likely to report different mental and physical illnesses. Relatively low response rates of the follow-up (60%) limited our statistical analyses as some of the groups were too small and did not enable modelling. Suicidality decreased, which seems to indicate that individuals adjusted to their new life circumstances. However, persons whose suicidality remained or increased reported more frequently stressful life events, physical and mental illnesses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radio Observations Of GRB 100418a: Test Of An Energy Injection Model Explaining Long-Lasting GRB Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Aquib; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J.; Tingay, S.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Wang, Z.; Reynolds, C.; Phillips, C.

    2014-01-01

    I will highlight the results of our radio observational campaign on GRB 100418a, for which the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Very Large Array (VLA) and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) were used. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism, which powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  18. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Reynolds, C.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Phillips, C. J.

    2013-12-20

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  19. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  20. Obstetric sphincter tears and anal incontinence: an observational follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zetterström, Jan; López, Annika; Holmström, Bo; Nilsson, Bengt Y; Tisell, Ake; Anzén, Bo; Mellgren, Anders

    2003-10-01

    Persistent defects after primary sphincter repair and occult sphincter tears are common after vaginal deliveries. Anal incontinence may be associated with these morphological defects. Forty-six primiparous women were evaluated with ultrasonography, manometry and electrophysiology. Twenty-four women had undergone primary repair of obstetric sphincter tears (sphincter group), 16 women had no clinical sphincter tear but developed anal incontinence postpartum (symptom group), and six were delivered by elective cesarean section (cesarean group). In the sphincter group, 50% had anal incontinence at follow-up. At ultrasonography, 70% had injuries anteriorly in the midanal canal. At manometry, 4% had decreased resting pressure and 50% decreased squeeze pressure. At electrophysiology, 19% had pathologic pudendal latency and 25% pathologic fiber density. In the symptom group, 44% had injuries anteriorly in the midanal canal at ultrasonography. At manometry, all women had normal resting pressure and 19% had a decreased squeeze pressure. At electrophysiology, 46% had pathologic pudendal latency and 29% pathologic fiber density. In the cesarean group, 33% had mild anal incontinence at follow-up. Ultrasonography and manometry were normal in all women. At electrophysiology, 33% had pathologic pudendal latency and 17% pathologic fiber density. Anal sphincter injuries at childbirth are often inadequately diagnosed and primary repair frequently results in persisting defects in the anal sphincter. Anatomic injuries to the anal sphincter play an important role in the development of anal incontinence after delivery, but a significant proportion of symptomatic women also demonstrate neurologic impairment at electrophysiologic testing.

  1. Anemia after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: Long-term follow-up observational study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Won Chul; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Song, Kyo-Young; Jeon, Hae Myung; Park, Cho-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify the incidence and etiology of anemia after gastrectomy in patients with long-term follow-up after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. METHODS: The medical records of those patients with early gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent curative gastrectomy between January 2006 and October 2007 were reviewed. Patients with anemia in the preoperative workup, cancer recurrence, undergoing systemic chemotherapy, with other medical conditions that can cause anemia, or treated during follow up with red cell transfusions or supplements for anemia were excluded. Anemia was defined by World Health Organization criteria (Hb < 12 g/dL in women and < 13 g/dL in men). Iron deficiency was defined as serum ferritin < 20 μg/dL. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as serum vitamin B12 < 200 pg/mL. Iron deficiency anemia was defined as anemia with concomitant iron deficiency. Anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as megaloblastic anemia (mean cell volume > 100 fL) with vitamin B12 deficiency. The profile of anemia over 48 mo of follow-up was analyzed. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one patients with gastrectomy for early gastric cancer were analyzed. The incidence of anemia was 24.5% at 3 mo after surgery and increased up to 37.1% at 48 mo after surgery. The incidence of iron deficiency anemia increased during the follow up and became the major cause of anemia at 48 mo after surgery. Anemia of chronic disease and megaloblastic anemia were uncommon. The incidence of anemia in female patients was significantly higher than in male patients at 12 (40.0% vs 22.0%, P = 0.033), 24 (45.0% vs 25.0%, P = 0.023), 36 (55.0% vs 28.0%, P = 0.004), and 48 mo (52.0% vs 31.0%, P = 0.022) after surgery. Patients with total gastrectomy showed significantly higher incidence of anemia than patients with subtotal gastrectomy at 48 mo after surgery (60.7% vs 31.3%, P = 0.008). The incidence of iron deficiency was significantly higher in female patients than in male patients at 6 (35.4% vs

  2. Follow-up results of children with melamine induced urolithiasis: a prospective observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Xu, Hong; Kuang, Xin-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yan; Zhao, Nai-Qing; Rao, Jia; Qian, Qiang-Ying; Cheng, Xian-Ying; Feng, Zhi-Min; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Xiang

    2011-08-01

    Melamine-contaminated milk powder was the cause of the 2008 outbreak of urolithiasis in young children and infants in China, but the prognosis of these children remains unknown. We hypothesized that urolithiasis induced by melamine-contaminated milk powder may be associated with secondary renal injury. A total of 8335 children (≤6 years old) with a history of consuming melamine-contaminated milk powder were screened. Urine analysis and urinary system ultrasonography were performed. For children with urolithiasis, the basic information and the results of examination were recorded, and effective therapy was given. They were followed up for 6 months after the original diagnosis, and urinary microprotein profiles were measured. Of the 8335 children, 105 (1.26%) were diagnosed with melamine-contaminated milk powder-associated urolithiasis. The size of the stone was correlated with the duration of exposure to melamine. Six months later, 69.8% (67) of the children with urolithiasis passed stones (follow-up rate: 91.4%). Of the 67 children, 28 passed stones within 2 months. The higher possibility of passing a stone was correlated with the smaller diameter of the stone (P<0.001). The detection rate of abnormal urinary microprotein excretion (microalbumin, immunoglobulin G, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosidase) was 52.4% in children with persistent stones and 38.2% in those who passed their stones. The detection rate was lower in children who passed stones within 2 months (31.8%) than in those who passed stones in 2 to 6 months (50.0%). The levels of microalbumin/creatinine and immunoglobulin G/creatinine were significantly higher in children with persistent stones than in those who passed their stones. Early passage of a stone may reduce the renal injury induced by melamine-contaminated milk powder-associated urolithiasis.

  3. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Gehrels, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  4. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; ...

    2013-11-21

    The Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources using the observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A. We found that GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  5. Clinical, imaging, and follow-up observations of patients with anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Song; Zhang, Yin-Xi; Zhang, Bi-Jun; Lu, Ru-Yi; Lai, Qi-Lun; Chen, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jiong

    2017-05-01

    Anti-gamma-aminobutyric acid B (anti-GABAB) receptor encephalitis is a newly described type of autoimmune encephalitis. We report a case series of patients diagnosed with anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis in China, focusing on their presentations, laboratory and imaging results, and outcomes, as well as the treatment strategies which were employed. Data from patients diagnosed with anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis in the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, from January 2014 to June 2015 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on specific diagnostic criteria, seven cases were included. Six of the seven patients were males, and a median age at presentation of 56 years (range: 4-71 years). Seizures were the most common initial symptom, and all patients developed symptoms of typical limbic encephalitis during their disease course. Additional types of autoantibodies were identified in four patients. After presentation, three patients were found to have small cell lung cancer and one patient was eventually diagnosed with thymoma. All patients accepted first-line immune therapy, but only one chose tumor treatment. The three tumor-free patients had a good outcome, whereas those with tumors had a poor one. Finally, there were no relapses during follow-up. Anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis is a rare, unique autoimmune disease, and is often associated with tumors. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis for middle and senior-aged patients who present with predominantly limbic encephalitis symptoms. Importantly, earlier recognition of this potentially treatable condition could improve its overall prognosis.

  6. Chandra follow-up observations of Swift/BAT unidentified sources: Searching for obscured type II quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predehl, Peter

    2007-09-01

    We propose 5 Chandra follow-up observations, of 5 ks each, of BAT unidentified survey sources. These sources are detected in the ongoing BAT survey using the Maximum Likelihood method (Ajello et al. 2007a, 2007b and Rau et al. 2007).

  7. [Results from the X-ray and Optical Follow-up Observations of the Swift BAT AGN Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift BAT ACN survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type and how they will influence the design of XO.

  8. [Results from the X-ray and Optical Follow-up Observations of the Swift BAT AGN Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift BAT ACN survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type and how they will influence the design of XO.

  9. The status of the AGILE GRB observations and the noticeable case of GRB 080514B

    SciTech Connect

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Argan, A.; Feroci, M.; Pucella, G.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Fornari, F.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Vercellone, S.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2009-05-25

    Since Summer 2007, the AGILE mission is successfully detecting and localizing Gamma Ray Bursts by using its wide-field hard X-ray monitor SuperAGILE (17-60 keV) and its CsI Minicalorimeter (0.3-20 MeV). Moreover, all the events with a known localization in the field of view of the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector are searched for in the 30 MeV-50 GeV energy range. Among the several bursts occurred in the field of view of the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector during more than one year of operations, at the time of writing the remarkable GRB 080514B is detected at high significance and GRB 080721 and GRB 081001 are detected at low significance. GRB 080514B is the first Gamma Ray Burst showing a significant emission above 20 MeV after EGRET, and the first ever associated with an afterglow, measured at X-rays and in the IR/Optical/UV. Significant upper limits are derived for the other GRBs. In this paper we report about the status and the scientific performances of the AGILE instrumentation in the study of GRBs and we discuss the properties of GRB 080514B in the context of the long Gamma Ray Bursts.

  10. GRB 050117: Simultaneous Gamma-ray and X-ray Observations with the Swift Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.; Morris, D. C.; Sakamoto, T.; Sato, G.; Burrows, D. N.; Angelini, L.; Pagani, C.; Moretti, A.; Abbey, A. F.; Barthelmy, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer performed its first autonomous, X-ray follow-up to a newly detected GRB on 2005 January 17, within 193 seconds of the burst trigger by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. While the burst was still in progress, the X-ray Telescope obtained a position and an image for an un-catalogued X-ray source; simultaneous with the gamma-ray observation. The XRT observed flux during the prompt emission was 1.1 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s in the 0.5-10 keV energy band. The emission in the X-ray band decreased by three orders of magnitude within 700 seconds, following the prompt emission. This is found to be consistent with the gamma-ray decay when extrapolated into the XRT energy band. During the following 6.3 hours, the XRT observed the afterglow in an automated sequence for an additional 947 seconds, until the burst became fully obscured by the Earth limb. A faint, extremely slowly decaying afterglow, alpha=-0.21, was detected. Finally, a break in the lightcurve occurred and the flux decayed with alpha<-1.2. The X-ray position triggered many follow-up observations: no optical afterglow could be confirmed, although a candidate was identified 3 arcsecs from the XRT position.

  11. Gamma-Ray Burst Follow Up Observations with BOOTES in 1998--2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón, J. M. Castro; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Hudec, R.; Soldán, J.; Bernas, M.; Páta, P.; Sanguino, T. J. Mateo; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Berná, J. Á.; Nekola, M.; Gorosabel, J.; Morena, B. A. De La; Más-Hesse, J. M.; Giménez, Á.; Riera, J. Torres

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System (BOOTES) provides an automated realtime observing response to the detection of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Error box size depending, it uses wide field cameras attached to small robotic telescopes or the telescopes themselves. To date we have acquired photometry for about 30 events with the Ultra Wide (UWFC) and the Narrow Field Cameras (NFC) and about 50 events with the Wide Field Camera (WFC).

  12. Follow-up assessment of a faculty peer observation and evaluation program.

    PubMed

    DiVall, Margarita; Barr, Judith; Gonyeau, Michael; Matthews, S James; Van Amburgh, Jenny; Qualters, Donna; Trujillo, Jennifer

    2012-05-10

    To assess a previously described peer observation and evaluation program 2 years after implementation. An pre-implementation survey assessed faculty needs and attitudes related to peer evaluation. Two years after implementation, the survey was repeated and additional questions asked regarding adherence to peer observation and evaluation policies and procedures, feedback received, and impact on teaching. Faculty attitudes towards peer evaluation stayed the same or improved post-implementation. Adherence to the initial 3 steps of the process was high (100%, 100%, and 94%, respectively); however, step 4, which required a final discussion after student assessments were finished, was completed by only 47% of the respondents. All faculty members reported receiving a balance of positive and constructive feedback; 78% agreed that peer observation and evaluation gave them concrete suggestions for improving their teaching; and 89% felt that the benefits of peer observation and evaluation outweighed the effort of participating. Faculty members adhered to the policies and procedures of peer observation and evaluation and found peer feedback was beneficial.

  13. Photometric follow-up observations of the new FUor candidate HBC 722

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E.; Peneva, S.

    2010-08-01

    We report results from photometric observations of the new FUor candidate HBC 722 discovered in the region of NGC 7000/IC 5070 (ATEL #2801 and #2808). Our observations were performed with the 50/70 cm Schmidt telescopes of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen (Bulgaria) and the 1.3 m RC telescope of the Skinakas Observatory of the Institute of Astronomy, University of Crete (Greece). Our resent data suggest that the rise in brightness continue and a small reflection nebula around HBC 722 became visible.

  14. The photometric follow-up observations for transiting exoplanet XO-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sheng-hong; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Wang, Xiao-bin; Fang, Xiang-song; Cao, Dong-tao; Zhang, Li-yun

    2011-11-01

    Four new transit light curves of XO-2b obtained in 2008 and 2009, are analyzed by using MCMC algorithm, and the system parameters are derived. The result demonstrates that the orbital period of the system obtained from new observations is almost the same as Burke et al.'s one (2007), which does not confirm the result of Fernandez et al. (2009).

  15. Target Charaterization and Follow-Up Observations in Support of the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, David W.

    2004-01-01

    This report covers work carried out at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory during the period 1 December 2003 to 30 November 2004 to support efforts to prepare the Kepler Input Catalog. The Catalog will be used to select the targets observed for planetary transits by Kepler.

  16. Prediction of imminent impactors: Announcement policy and need of follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, F.; Milani, A.; Spoto, F.; Tommei, G.

    2014-07-01

    The detection of imminent impactors poses some delicate questions regarding the announcement policy. In fact, having very few observations, the impact probability computation is a difficult task and it strongly depends on: - the intrinsic astrometric errors of the observations; - the assumed population model - the minimum size of impactors We present a new web based automatic tool which computes the risk assesment within few minutes from the posting of new observations of a recently detected object on the MPC-NEOCP list. The aim of this imminent impactors tool is to raise awareness of the professional and amateur astronomical community on the possibility of the existence of an impact, within few days or hours, of objects posted on the NEOCP list of the MPC. Therefore astronomers can be triggered in a short time to follow these kind of objects, in order to improve the knowledge of the impact occurrence and location. It is important to stress that the minimal information from the observations provides a considerable number of spurious cases. This is a main difference with the classical impact monitoring activities of CLOMON2-NEODyS, because the need of a rapid response of the observers requires an automatic procedure while for CLOMON2 an operator decides if the output of the computation is reliable to be posted. In this presentation we will discuss the methods to filter the reliable cases and the announcement policy that we want to implement in the NEODyS system, taking into account the need of a feedback from the community of scientists.

  17. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club Follow-up Observations of Known Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Lindsay; Pearson, K.; Turner, J.; Biddle, L. I.; Nguyen, C.; Watson, Z.; Mango, D.; Romine, J. M.; Hume, J.; Sinor, K.; Amaya, H.; Stanford-Jones, C.; Qu, D.; Liu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We observed the primary transits of GJ-1214b and Kelt-1b using the I and R photometric filters on the Kuiper 61" telescope. GJ-1214b is a super earth and Kelt-1b is a hot Jupiter. GJ-1214b has a flat transmission spectrum, which is most likely due to clouds in tis atmosphere. Kelt-1b was the first planet discovered by the KELT survey, and it also has a brown dwarf companion. Because of this, we can expect to observe a timing transit variation. A major component of this project is to give students a learning experience beyond the classroom by getting them involved in an introductory astronomy project. Undergraduates have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience doing data reduction and analysis while still being able to contribute updated planetary parameters for both these systems.

  18. Spitzer Follow-up of HST Observations of Star Formation in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jeff; Bally, John; Desch, Steve; Healy, Kevin; Snider, Keely

    2005-06-01

    Images of regions of star formation taken with HST have given us an extraordinary view of young stellar objects and their natal environments. These views differ tremendously between low-mass YSOs seen in regions of isolated low-mass star formation such as Taurus-Auriga, and the proplyds, EGGs, and other structures seen in regions of massive star formation. While YSOs in Taurus spend their adolescence buried in the dark interiors of molecular clouds, YSOs near massive stars quickly find themselves overrun by ionization fronts and exposed to the intense UV radiation from nearby massive stars. This difference in environment has a profound effect on the way in which the protoplanetary disk around a star evolves -- a fact that is of great importance to us, given the strength of the evidence suggesting that the Sun formed near a massive star. But HST while HST can inform us about the evolution of YSOs in HII region environments once they are overrun by ionization fronts, it cannot show us the birth of the stars themselves. These remain hidden in the dense molecular material beyond the ionized volumes of these regions. Only Spitzer can show us the properties of the YSOs that lie hidden in the dark shadows of HST images of HII regions, and only Spitzer can provide us with information about PDRs, warm dust, and other tracers of the interaction of massive stars with their surroundings. The combination of HST and Spitzer observations of star forming regions is far greater than the sum of its parts. If we are to build a complete picture of low-mass star formation and the evolution of disks near massive stars, we need to combine HST and Spitzer observations of the same regions. In this proposal we request time to obtain both IRAC and MIPS 24 micron images of each HII region that has been observed by HST, but has yet to be observed with Spitzer. Together with previous images obtained from the archives, this will comprise an indispensible data set for testing hypotheses about

  19. Follow-up observations of MASTER J113122.95-075714.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.

    2012-02-01

    The rapid transient MASTER J113122.95-075714.5 was found on two synchronous images at 17.6 mag (white light) on Jan. 30, 2012 00:05 UT, with non-detections (fainter than 19.4) about 45 min earlier (Balanutsa et al. 2012, ATel #3898). We observed MASTER J113122.95-075714.5 simultaneously in g'r'i'z'JHK with GROND (Greiner et al. 2008, PASP 120, 405) mounted at the 2.2 m MPI/ESO telescope at La Silla (Chile).

  20. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageron, Michel; Al Samarai, Imen; Akerlof, Carl; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien; Klotz, Alain; Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand; Vecchi, Manuela; Zheng, Weikang

    2012-11-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5°. Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  1. Follow-up observations of Planck cold clumps with ground-based telescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie

    2015-08-01

    Stars form in dense regions within molecular clouds, called pre-stellar cores (PSCs), which provide information on the initial conditions in the process of star formation. The low dust temperature (<14 K) of Planck cold clumps/cores makes them likely to be pre-stellar objects or at the very initial stage of protostellar collapse. We are conducting a legacy survey of Planck cold clumps with the JCMT, the TRAO 14-m, the KVN and TianMa 65-m telescopes. We aim to statistically study the initial conditions of star formation and cloud evolution in various kinds of environments. We have conducted some pilot observations with ground-based telescopes (JCMT, IRAM, PMO 14m, APEX, Mopra, Effelsberg 100 m, CSO and SMA). I will discuss the progress and the plans of this internationally collaborating project.

  2. Follow-Up Observations of SN1999GI in NGC 3184

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Eric

    1999-09-01

    Type II supernovae may all be X-ray sources but differences in behavior are becoming visible: normal SN II's fade quickly while the abnormal SN IIn's last for months, perhaps years. These suppositions are based upon very limited statistics: 2 normal SN II's and about 4-6 SN IIn's. The turn-on times are unknown, as are the half-lives. Two normal SN II's observed in the X-ray band are SN1980K (Canizares et al. 1982) and SN1999em (Fox & Lewin 1999, IAU Circ 7318). The turn-on time of these SNe appear to be nearly immediate. Radio and X-ray emission should be correlated, yet are not: SN1980K was an early radio source; SN1999em has not yet been detected. But a correlation with radio emission must be suspect with so little data. SN1999gi,the target of this TOO, represents a potential third norm

  3. Follow-Up Chandra Observations of Three Candidate Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Gezari, S.; Komossa, S.

    2004-04-01

    Large-amplitude, high-luminosity soft X-ray flares were detected by the ROSAT All-Sky Survey in several galaxies with no evidence of Seyfert activity in their ground-based optical spectra. These flares had the properties predicted for a tidal disruption of a star by a central supermassive black hole. We report Chandra observations of three of these galaxies taken a decade after their flares that reveal weak nuclear X-ray sources that are from 240 to 6000 times fainter than their luminosities at peak, supporting the theory that these were special events and not ongoing active galactic nucleus (AGN) variability. The decline of RX J1624.9+7554 by a factor of 6000 is consistent with the (t-tD)-5/3 decay predicted for the fallback phase of a tidal disruption event, but only if ROSAT was lucky enough to catch the event exactly at its peak in 1990 October. RX J1242.6-1119A has declined by a factor of 240, also consistent with (t-tD)-5/3. In the H II galaxy NGC 5905 we find only resolved, soft X-ray emission that is undoubtedly associated with starburst activity. When accounting for the starburst component, the ROSAT observations of NGC 5905, as well as the Chandra upper limit on its nuclear flux, are consistent with a (t-tD)-5/3 decay by at least a factor of 1000. Although we found weak Seyfert 2 emission lines in Hubble Space Telescope spectra of NGC 5905, indicating that a low-luminosity AGN was present prior to the X-ray flare, we favor a tidal disruption explanation for the flare itself.

  4. First gravitational-wave burst GW150914: MASTER optical follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Kornilov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Greiner, J.; Vladimirov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Chazov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Gabovich, A.; Potter, S. B.; Kniazev, A.; Crawford, S.; Rebolo Lopez, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Lodieu, N.; Gress, O.; Budnev, N.; Ivanov, K.; Poleschuk, V.; Yazev, S.; Tlatov, A.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Dormidontov, D.; Parkhomenko, A.; Sergienko, Yu.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Lopez, C.; Saffe, C.; Podesta, F.; Mallamaci, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced LIGO observatory recently reported the first direct detection of the gravitational waves (GWs) predicted by Einstein & Sitzungsber. We report on the first optical observations of the GW source GW150914 error region with the Global MASTER Robotic Net. Between the optical telescopes of electromagnetic support, the covered area is dominated by MASTER with an unfiltered magnitude up to 19.9 mag (5σ). We detected several optical transients, which proved to be unconnected with the GW event. The main input to investigate the final error box of GW150914 was made by the MASTER-SAAO robotic telescope, which covered 70 per cent of the final GW error box and 90 per cent of the common localization area of the LIGO and Fermi events. Our result is consistent with the conclusion (Abbott et al. 2016a) that GWs from GW150914 were produced in a binary black hole merger. At the same time, we cannot exclude that MASTER OT J040938.68-541316.9 exploded on 2015 September 14.

  5. SOFIA Follow-up to Spitzer Observations of the North America Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, David M.; Rebull, L.

    2012-05-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding star-forming patterns and circumstellar disk evolution derives from study of molecular cloud complexes within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun, such as Taurus (140 pc) or Orion (400 pc). Studies of these two regions are the primary touchstones that inform our understanding of how stars form. However, the environments of the two regions are different in many ways. Because the environment does matter, for a comprehensive understanding of star formation it is important that we study more than just the nearest examples of the extrema of star formation modes. A good example of "mixed-mode" star formation is the relatively nearby ( 520 pc) North America (NGC 7000) and Pelican (IC 5070) Nebulae complex (hereafter NAN). We observed the NAN with Spitzer (3.6 to 160 um), revealing a complex ISM distribution and more than 700,000 point sources. In particular, the "Gulf of Mexico" off "North America" is revealed to be a dramatic cluster of 100s of objects, many seen only at 24 microns. We obtained SOFIA data of the most confused portion of the Gulf cluster, using its higher spatial resolution at 24um to reveal more sources, and the addition of 35um data to better define the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of several of these young stellar objects (YSOs). This should help us characterize the properties of the many YSOs here and give us insight into some of the youngest objects in the NAN, as well as improve our understanding of the star formation process in dense regions such as this.

  6. Characterisation of candidate members of (136108) Haumea's family. II. Follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carry, B.; Snodgrass, C.; Lacerda, P.; Hainaut, O.; Dumas, C.

    2012-08-01

    Context. From a dynamical analysis of the orbital elements of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), Ragozzine & Brown (2007, AJ, 134, 2160) reported a list of candidate members of the first collisional family found among this population, associated with (136 108) Haumea (a.k.a. 2003 EL61). Aims: We aim to distinguish the true members of the Haumea collisional family from interlopers. We search for water ice on their surfaces, which is a common characteristic of the known family members. The properties of the confirmed family are used to constrain the formation mechanism of Haumea, its satellites, and its family. Methods: Optical and near-infrared photometry is used to identify water ice. We use in particular the CH4 filter of the Hawk-I instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope as a short H-band (HS), the (J - HS) colour being a sensitive measure of the water ice absorption band at 1.6 μm. Results: Continuing our previous study headed by Snodgrass, we report colours for 8 candidate family members, including near-infrared colours for 5. We confirm one object as a genuine member of the collisional family (2003 UZ117), and reject 5 others. The lack of infrared data for the two remaining objects prevent any conclusion from being drawn. The total number of rejected members is therefore 17. The 11 confirmed members represent only a third of the 36 candidates. Conclusions: The origin of Haumea's family is likely to be related to an impact event. However, a scenario explaining all the peculiarities of Haumea itself and its family remains elusive. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla & Paranal, Chile - 81.C-0544 & 82.C-0306 & 84.C-0594.

  7. Spectral lag features of GRB 060814 from swift bat and Suzaku observations

    SciTech Connect

    Roychoudhury, Arundhati; Sarkar, Samir K.; Bhadra, Arunava E-mail: samirksarkar@rediffmail.com

    2014-02-20

    This work reports a study on the spectral lag of the prompt emission spectrum of a multi-pulse gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 060814 (z = 0.84) using the observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope and the Suzaku Wide Area Monitor. We found that the spectral lag for GRB 060814 is positive for the first two and the fourth pulses, while the third pulse exhibits negative lag. However, the time variation of the E {sub peak} of all the stated pulses shows a similar trend. The leading models for spectral lags in GRBs are thus found inadequate to explain the observed spectral lag features of GRB 060814. Probable causes of the spectral lag characteristics of GRB 060814 are discussed.

  8. EARLY-TIME VLA OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND AFTERGLOW ANALYSIS OF THE FERMI/LAT DETECTED GRB 130907A

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A{sub *}), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  9. Results of optical follow-up observations of advanced LIGO triggers from O1 in the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beroiz, Martin; Colazo, Carlos; Diaz, Mario; Dominguez, Mariano; Garcia Lambas, Diego; Gurovich, Sebastian; Lares, Marcelo; Macri, Lucas; Penuela, Tania; Rodriguez, Horacio; Sanchez, Bruno; Toros Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We report on observations related to the follow-up of LIGO VIRGO collaboration triggers released to participating astronomers during the First Observation Run 1 (O1) from September 18, 2015 to January 12, 2016, performed by the TOROS collaboration. The Transient Optical Robotic Observatory of the South (TOROS) collaboration operated telescopes located in two different sites in Argentina: one at the Estación Astrofísica Bosque Alegre in Cordoba, and the other one located in Cordón Macón, Salta. In this communication we describe the main characteristics of the campaign sustained during O1 and the plans for continuing observation in the future.

  10. HST Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A.; Pian, E.

    1998-08-01

    The field of GRB970508 was imaged by HST with the STIS CCD in open filter mode (50CCD) on 1998 August 5.78-6.03 for a total exposure time of 11,568 seconds. An extended object, which we believe to be the host galaxy of GRB970508, was detected at the astrometric position of the optical transient of GRB970508. The galaxy has high signal-to-noise in our data and is clearly resolved, with a major axis of approximately 0."5 .

  11. NIBLES - an HI census of stellar mass selected SDSS galaxies. II. Arecibo follow-up HI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Z.; Schneider, S.; van Driel, W.; Lehnert, M. D.; Minchin, R.

    2016-11-01

    We obtained Arecibo Hi line follow-up observations of 154 of the 2600 galaxies in the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) sample. These observations are on average four times more sensitive than the original observations at the Nançay Radio Telescope. The main goal of this survey is to characterize the underlying Hi properties of the NIBLES galaxies which were undetected or marginally detected at Nançay. Of the Nançay non-detections, 85% were either clearly or marginally detected at Arecibo, while 89% of the Nançay marginal detections were clearly detected. Based on the statistics of the detections relative to g-i color and r-band luminosity (Lr) distribution among our Arecibo observations, we anticipate 60% of our 867 Nançay non-detections and marginal detections could be detected at the sensitivity of our Arecibo observations. Follow-up observations of our low luminosity (Lr < 108.5L⊙) blue sources indicate that they have, on average, more concentrated stellar mass distributions than the Nançay detections in the same luminosity range, suggesting we may be probing galaxies with intrinsically different properties. These follow-up observations enable us to probe Hi mass fractions, log(MHI/M⋆) 0.5 dex and 1 dex lower, on average, than the NIBLES and ALFALFA surveys respectively. Reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A60

  12. The OmegaWhite survey for short-period variable stars - III: follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, S. A.; Woudt, P. A.; Groot, P. J.; Ramsay, G.; Toma, R.; Motsoaledi, M.; Crause, L. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; O'Donoghue, D.; Potter, S. B.; Sickafoose, A. A.; van Gend, C.; Worters, H. L.

    2017-02-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of short-period variables discovered in the OmegaWhite survey, a wide-field high-cadence g-band synoptic survey targeting the Galactic Plane. We have used fast photometry on the SAAO 1.0- and 1.9-m telescopes to obtain light curves of 27 variables, and use these results to validate the period and amplitude estimates from the OmegaWhite processing pipeline. Furthermore, 57 sources (44 unique, 13 with new light curves) were selected for spectroscopic follow-up using either the SAAO 1.9-m telescope or the Southern African Large Telescope. We find that many of these variables have spectra which are consistent with being δ Scuti-type pulsating stars. At higher amplitudes, we detect four possible pulsating white dwarf/subdwarf sources and an eclipsing cataclysmic variable. Due to their rarity, these targets are ideal candidates for detailed follow-up studies. From spectroscopy, we confirm the symbiotic binary star nature of two variables identified as such in the SIMBAD database. We also report what could possibly be the first detection of the `Bump Cepheid' phenomena in a δ Scuti star, with OW J175848.21-271653.7 showing a pronounced 22 per cent amplitude dip lasting 3 min during each pulsational cycle peak. However, the precise nature of this target is still uncertain as it exhibits the spectral features of a B-type star.

  13. The XXL Survey I. Scientific Motivations - Xmm-Newton Observing Plan - Follow-up Observations and Simulation Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Adami, C.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bremer, M. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The quest for the cosmological parameters that describe our universe continues to motivate the scientific community to undertake very large survey initiatives across the electromagnetic spectrum. Over the past two decades, the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories have supported numerous studies of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the X-ray background. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey; it comes at a time when the Planck mission results are being finalized. Aims. We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 15) erg/s/sq cm in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The surveys main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time-distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programs. Methods. We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi- and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. Results. The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. Conclusions. The XXL multi- data set will have a unique lasting legacy value for

  14. The XXL Survey. I. Scientific motivations - XMM-Newton observing plan - Follow-up observations and simulation programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Adami, C.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Brusa, M.; Butler, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Coupon, J.; De Breuck, C.; Democles, J.; Desai, S.; Delhaize, J.; Devriendt, J.; Dubois, Y.; Eckert, D.; Elyiv, A.; Ettori, S.; Evrard, A.; Faccioli, L.; Farahi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Finet, F.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fourmanoit, N.; Gandhi, P.; Gastaldello, F.; Gastaud, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Giles, P.; Guennou, L.; Guglielmo, V.; Horellou, C.; Husband, K.; Huynh, M.; Iovino, A.; Kilbinger, M.; Koulouridis, E.; Lavoie, S.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; Le Fevre, J. P.; Lidman, C.; Lieu, M.; Lin, C. A.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B. J.; Maurogordato, S.; McCarthy, I. G.; McGee, S.; Melin, J. B.; Melnyk, O.; Menanteau, F.; Novak, M.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Pomarede, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Ramos-Ceja, M. E.; Ranalli, P.; Rapetti, D.; Raychaudury, S.; Reiprich, T. H.; Rottgering, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Santos, J.; Sauvageot, J. L.; Schimd, C.; Sereno, M.; Smith, G. P.; Smolčić, V.; Snowden, S.; Spergel, D.; Stanford, S.; Surdej, J.; Valageas, P.; Valotti, A.; Valtchanov, I.; Vignali, C.; Willis, J.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The quest for the cosmological parameters that describe our universe continues to motivate the scientific community to undertake very large survey initiatives across the electromagnetic spectrum. Over the past two decades, the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories have supported numerous studies of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the X-ray background. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey; it comes at a time when the Planck mission results are being finalised. Aims: We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of ~5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The survey's main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programmes. Methods: We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi-λ and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. Results: The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-λ associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. Conclusions: The XXL multi-λ data set will have a unique lasting legacy

  15. Implications for the Origin of GRB 070201 from LIGO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; MowLowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Hurley, K. C.

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed the available LIGO data coincident with GRB 070201, a short-duration, hard-spectrum γ-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral arms of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Possible progenitors of such short, hard GRBs include mergers of neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, or soft γ-ray repeater (SGR) flares. These events can be accompanied by gravitational-wave emission. No plausible gravitational-wave candidates were found within a 180 s long window around the time of GRB 070201. This result implies that a compact binary progenitor of GRB 070201, with masses in the range 1 M⊙ < m1 < 3 M⊙ and 1 M⊙ < m2 < 40 M⊙, located in M31 is excluded at >99% confidence. If the GRB 070201 progenitor was not in M31, then we can exclude a binary neutron star merger progenitor with distance D < 3.5 Mpc, assuming random inclination, at 90% confidence. The result also implies that an unmodeled gravitational-wave burst from GRB 070201 most probably emitted less than 4.4 × 10-4 M⊙c2 (7.9 × 1050 ergs) in any 100 ms long period within the signal region if the source was in M31 and radiated isotropically at the same frequency as LIGO's peak sensitivity (f ≈ 150 Hz). This upper limit does not exclude current models of SGRs at the M31 distance.

  16. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  17. The Detection of a Type IIn Supernova in Optical Follow-up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fuchs, T.; Glagla, M.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Gross, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfe, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vanheule, S.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel A.; Barlow, Tom; Horesh, Assaf; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, Ben; PTF Collaboration; Evans, Phil A.; Kennea, Jamie A.; Swift Collaboration; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Waters, C.; Flewelling, H.; Tonry, J. L.; Rest, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.°2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0.°54. It has a redshift of z = 0.0684, corresponding to a luminosity distance of about 300 Mpc and the Pan-STARRS1 survey shows that its explosion time was at least 158 days (in host galaxy rest frame) before the neutrino alert, so that a causal connection is unlikely. The a posteriori significance of the chance detection of both the neutrinos and the SN at any epoch is 2.2σ within IceCube's 2011/12 data acquisition season. Also, a complementary neutrino analysis reveals no long-term signal over the course of one year. Therefore, we consider the SN detection coincidental and the neutrinos uncorrelated to the SN. However, the SN is unusual and interesting by itself: it is luminous and energetic, bearing strong resemblance to the SN IIn 2010jl, and shows signs of interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense circumstellar medium. High-energy neutrino emission is expected in models of diffusive shock acceleration, but at a low, non-detectable level for this specific SN. In this paper, we describe the SN PTF12csy and present both the neutrino and electromagnetic data, as well as their analysis.

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Don Frederic; Depoy, D.L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Craig, Hogan, J.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Apache Point Observ. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  19. Results of long-term follow-up observations of blepharoptosis correction using the palmaris longus tendon.

    PubMed

    Park, SangKeun; Shin, YongHo

    2008-07-01

    The frontalis sling procedure is a useful approach for correcting severe blepharoptosis. However, blepharoptosis often recurs after corrective surgery using the tensor fascia lata. Good results without recurrence after a modified Fox method were obtained using the palmaris longus tendon. This study examined the safety and validity of the surgical method using the palmaris longus tendon through long-term follow-up observations. To reduce the rate of recurrence, the highest point on the pentagon of the Fox method was fixed to the frontalis fascia and frontalis muscle. It was fixed once again to the area 1 cm above the highest point. This approach remarkably reduces the incidence of recurrence by fixing the pentagon of the Fox method not only to the palmaris longus tendon but also to the frontalis fascia and again to the frontalis muscle. A modified Fox method using the palmaris longus tendon was used to treat 16 eyelids of 10 patients. A senior surgeon performed the procedure in all cases under local anesthesia. The mean follow-up period was 51 months (range = 18-86 months). There was no case of blepharoptosis recurrence and a good field of view was secured after surgery. Long-term follow-up revealed that the visual field had been well secured with a mean MRD1 of 3.1 mm. The eyelids were well maintained without any postoperative adverse reaction such as exposure keratitis. The palmaris longus tendon as useful donor material does not lead to recurrence of blepharoptosis, which is often encountered when the tensor fascia lata is used. The modified Fox method using the palmaris longus tendon can be an effective and valid surgical approach that produces both immediate and long-term results.

  20. Results of Long-Term Follow-Up Observations of Blepharoptosis Correction Using the Palmaris Longus Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shin, YongHo

    2008-01-01

    Background The frontalis sling procedure is a useful approach for correcting severe blepharoptosis. However, blepharoptosis often recurs after corrective surgery using the tensor fascia lata. Good results without recurrence after a modified Fox method were obtained using the palmaris longus tendon. This study examined the safety and validity of the surgical method using the palmaris longus tendon through long-term follow-up observations. Methods To reduce the rate of recurrence, the highest point on the pentagon of the Fox method was fixed to the frontalis fascia and frontalis muscle. It was fixed once again to the area 1 cm above the highest point. This approach remarkably reduces the incidence of recurrence by fixing the pentagon of the Fox method not only to the palmaris longus tendon but also to the frontalis fascia and again to the frontalis muscle. A modified Fox method using the palmaris longus tendon was used to treat 16 eyelids of 10 patients. A senior surgeon performed the procedure in all cases under local anesthesia. Results The mean follow-up period was 51 months (range = 18–86 months). There was no case of blepharoptosis recurrence and a good field of view was secured after surgery. Long-term follow-up revealed that the visual field had been well secured with a mean MRD1 of 3.1 mm. The eyelids were well maintained without any postoperative adverse reaction such as exposure keratitis. Conclusion The palmaris longus tendon as useful donor material does not lead to recurrence of blepharoptosis, which is often encountered when the tensor fascia lata is used. The modified Fox method using the palmaris longus tendon can be an effective and valid surgical approach that produces both immediate and long-term results. PMID:18446402

  1. FERMI Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080825C

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; ...

    2009-11-24

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here in this paper, we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. Finally, we also present some theoretical interpretation ofmore » GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.« less

  2. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 080825C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: j.granot@herts.ac.u

    2009-12-10

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  3. Observations of the Prompt Optical Emission of GRB 160625B with Mini-MegaTORTORA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Orekhova, N.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2017-06-01

    Here we report our observations of bright optical flash coincident with Fermi GRB160625B using Mini-MegaTORTORA wide-field monitoring system. The prompt optical emission is correlated with gamma one and lags behind it for about 3 seconds, that suggests that optical and gamma emission are formed in different regions of the burst. The multiwavelength properties of this burst are very similar to ones of Naked-Eye Burst, GRB080319B, we detected earlier with TORTORA camera.

  4. Probing a Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitor at a Redshift of z = 2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226 including VLT spectroscopy, VLT polarimetry, and Chandra X-ray observations. In addition, we present BOOTES-1 wide-field observations at the time of the occurrence of the burst. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the event when the gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately 19 and continued until the afterglow had faded below the detection threshold (R greater than 26). No underlying host galaxy was found. The optical light curve shows a break around 0.8 days after the burst, which is achromatic within the observational errors, supporting the view that it was due to a jetted explosion. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, which favors a uniform-jet model rather than a structured one. VLT spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 plus or minus 0.001 and 1.986 plus or minus 0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. We emphasize that the kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds responsible for these line systems are very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004. This corroborates the picture in which at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  5. Probing a Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitor at a Redshift of z = 2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226 including VLT spectroscopy, VLT polarimetry, and Chandra X-ray observations. In addition, we present BOOTES-1 wide-field observations at the time of the occurrence of the burst. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the event when the gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately 19 and continued until the afterglow had faded below the detection threshold (R greater than 26). No underlying host galaxy was found. The optical light curve shows a break around 0.8 days after the burst, which is achromatic within the observational errors, supporting the view that it was due to a jetted explosion. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, which favors a uniform-jet model rather than a structured one. VLT spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 plus or minus 0.001 and 1.986 plus or minus 0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. We emphasize that the kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds responsible for these line systems are very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004. This corroborates the picture in which at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  6. Five-year follow-up of oral health and seizure condition of patients with epilepsy: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Károlyházy, K; Kivovics, P; Hermann, P; Fejérdy, P; Arányi, Z

    2010-12-01

    A five-year follow up of patients with epilepsy to examine the change in their oral health and seizure condition. A prospective observational controlled epidemiologic study under natural treatment settings. The epilepsy group consisted wholly of patients participating in an epidemiologic survey performed five years previously. The gender- and age-matched control (non-epilepsy) group consisted partly of subjects recovered from the previous study, and partly of new subjects. Data pertaining to the disease were collected and a thorough dental examination was performed. Indices quantifying oral hygiene, the number and condition of the remaining teeth and periodontium, and the degree of prosthetic treatment were measured. Statistical comparison was performed between the patient and the control group of the present study, and pair wise between the previous and the present survey. The epileptic condition of the patients showed significant improvement upon follow-up, in contrast to a significant deterioration in their oral health as compared to the control group. Concerning oral health, dental indices describing oral hygiene and periodontal condition showed the most pronounced decline. The improvement in the epileptic condition of patients is attributed to changes in treatment strategies. As the epileptic condition and oral health of patients changed in opposite directions, socioeconomic and educational factors appear to play a more important role in the poor oral health of these patients than disease-specific factors (e.g. oral cavity injuries, increased exertion on the teeth, antiepileptic drug effects). Furthermore, the periodontal condition seems to be main factor responsible for the unfavourable dental status.

  7. On the constraining observations of the dark GRB 001109 and the properties of a z = 0.398 radio selected starburst galaxy contained in its error box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Cerón, J. M.; Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Sokolov, V. V.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Dodonov, S. N.; Komarova, V. N.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Postnov, K. A.; Lisenfeld, U.; Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pedersen, H.; Rol, E.; Fliri, J.; Feldt, M.; Feulner, G.; Andersen, M. I.; Jensen, B. L.; Pérez Ramírez, M. D.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Israelian, G.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2004-09-01

    We present optical and NIR (near infrared) follow up observations of the GRB 001109 from 1 to 300 days after the burst. No transient emission was found at these wavelengths within this GRB's (Gamma Ray Burst) 50 arcsec radius BeppoSAX error box. Strong limits (3σ) are set with: R ⪆ 21, 10.2 h after the GRB; I ⪆ 23, 11.4 h after the GRB; H ⪆ 20.7, 9.9 h after the GRB; and KS⪆ 20, 9.6 h after the GRB. We discuss whether the radio source found in the GRB's error box (\\cite{taylor00}) might be related to the afterglow. We also present a multiwavelength study of a reddened starburst galaxy, found coincident with the potential radio and the X-ray afterglow. We show that our strong I band upper limit makes of the GRB 001109 the darkest one localised by the BeppoSAX's NFI (Narrow Field Instrument), and it is one of the most constraining upper limits on GRB afterglows to date. Further to it, the implications of these observations in the context of dark GRBs are considered. Based on observations made with telescopes at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (1.23 m + 3.50 m), at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (NOT + WHT), at the United States Naval Observatory (1.00 m) and at the Russian Academy of Sciences's Special Astrophysical Observatory (6.05 m). The NOT is operated on the island of San Miguel de la Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, in Spain's Observatorio del Roque de los Muchahos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. The Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán is operated in Calar Alto by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie of Heidelberg, jointly with Spain's Comisión Nacional de Astronomía.

  8. GRT: Goddard Robotic Telescope, Optical Follow-up of the GRBs and Optical Coordinated Observation of the AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Takashi; Sakamoto, T.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Ukwatta, T.; Urata, Y.

    2008-03-01

    We are constructing the 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope is 1) to follow-up the Swift/GLAST GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of the GLAST AGNs. Our telescope system consists of the 14" Celestron OTA, the Astro-Physics 1200GTO mount, the Apogee U47 CCD camera, the JIM's electronic focuser, and the Finger Lake Instrumentation's color filter wheel with U, B, V, R, and I filters. With the focal reducer, 18' x 18' field of view has been achieved. The observatory dome is the Astro Haven's 7ft clam-shell dome. We will start the scientific observations on April 2008. While not observing our primary targets (GRBs and AGNs), we are planning to open our telescope time to the public for having a wider use of our telescope in both a different research field and an educational purpose.

  9. Pamidronate versus observation in asymptomatic myeloma: final results with long-term follow-up of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Gobbi, Paolo G; Broglia, Chiara; Sacchi, Stefano; Quarta, Giovanni; Baldini, Luca; Iannitto, Emilio; Falcone, Antonietta; Guariglia, Roberto; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Villani, Oreste; Martorelli, Maria Carmen; Mansueto, Giovanna; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Cascavilla, Nicola; Musto, Pellegrino

    2011-05-01

    A prospective, multicenter, randomized trial comparing pamidronate administration (60-90 mg once a month for 1 year) versus simple observation in 177 patients with asymptomatic myeloma was performed to explore whether the administration of this drug reduces the rate of and/or the time to progression to overt, symptomatic disease. No relevant side effects were recorded in pamidronate-treated patients. With a minimum follow-up of 5 years for live patients, there were 56/89 (62.9%) progressions in the pamidronate-treated group and 55/88 (62.5%) within the controls (p = NS). Median time to progression was 46 and 48 months, respectively (p = NS). Overall survival was also similar between the two groups. Skeletal-related events at the time of progression were observed in 40/55 (72.7%) controls, but only in 22/56 (39.2%) pamidronate-treated patients (p = 0.009). In conclusion, the administration of pamidronate in asymptomatic myeloma, while reducing bone involvement at progression, did not decrease the risk of transformation and the time to progression into overt myeloma.

  10. Follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B: A new white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Dinçel, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report on our follow-up spectroscopy of HD 1071478 B, a recently detected faint co-moving companion of the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A. The companion is separated from its primary star by about 35 arcsec (or 1790 AU of projected separation) and its optical and near infrared photometry is consistent with a white dwarf, located at the distance of HD 107148 A. In order to confirm the white dwarf nature of the co-moving companion, we obtained follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B with CAFOS at the CAHA 2.2 m telescope. According to our CAFOS spectroscopy HD 107148 B is a DA white dwarf with an effective temperature in the range between 5900 and 6400 K. The properties of HD 107148 B can further be constrained with the derived effective temperature and the known visual and infrared photometry of the companion, using evolutionary models of DA white dwarfs. We obtain for HD 107148 B a mass of 0.56±0.05 M_⊙, a luminosity of (2.0±0.2)×10-4 L_⊙, log g [cm s-2])=7.95±0.09, and a cooling age of 2100±270 Myr. With its white dwarf companion the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A forms an evolved stellar system, which hosts at least one exoplanet. So far, only few of these evolved systems are known, which represent only about 5 % of all known exoplanet host multiple stellar systems. HD 107148 B is the second confirmed white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star with a projected separation to its primary star of more than 1000 AU. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  11. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program. I. A Catalog of Companions to Kepler Stars from High-Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Ciardi, D. R.; Everett, M. E.; Saylors, M.; Teske, J. K.; Horch, E. P.; Howell, S. B.; van Belle, G. T.; Hirsch, L. A.; Gautier, T. N., III; Adams, E. R.; Barrado, D.; Cartier, K. M. S.; Dressing, C. D.; Dupree, A. K.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lillo-Box, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Wang, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present results from high-resolution, optical to near-IR imaging of host stars of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), identified in the original Kepler field. Part of the data were obtained under the Kepler imaging follow-up observation program over six years (2009–2015). Almost 90% of stars that are hosts to planet candidates or confirmed planets were observed. We combine measurements of companions to KOI host stars from different bands to create a comprehensive catalog of projected separations, position angles, and magnitude differences for all detected companion stars (some of which may not be bound). Our compilation includes 2297 companions around 1903 primary stars. From high-resolution imaging, we find that ∼10% (∼30%) of the observed stars have at least one companion detected within 1″ (4″). The true fraction of systems with close (≲4″) companions is larger than the observed one due to the limited sensitivities of the imaging data. We derive correction factors for planet radii caused by the dilution of the transit depth: assuming that planets orbit the primary stars or the brightest companion stars, the average correction factors are 1.06 and 3.09, respectively. The true effect of transit dilution lies in between these two cases and varies with each system. Applying these factors to planet radii decreases the number of KOI planets with radii smaller than 2 {R}\\oplus by ∼2%–23% and thus affects planet occurrence rates. This effect will also be important for the yield of small planets from future transit missions such as TESS.

  12. Optical polarimetric observations of GRB prompt emissions by MASTER robots-telescopes net.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, Evgeny; Lipunov, Vladimir; Kornilov, Victor; Shatskij, Nikolaj; Kuvshi-Nov, Dmitry; Tyurina, Nataly; Belinski, Alexander; Krylov, Alexander; Balanutsa, Pavel; Chazov, Vadim; Kuznetsov, Artem; Zimnuhov, Dmitry; Balanutsa, Pavel; Kortunov, Petr; Sankovich, Anatoly; Tlatov, An-Drey; Parkhomenko, A.; Krushinsky, Vadim; Zalozhnyh, Ivan; Popov, A.; Kopytova, Taisia; Ivanov, Kirill; Yazev, Sergey; Yurkov, Vladimir

    The main goal of the MASTER-Net project is to produce a unique fast sky survey with all sky observed over a single night down to a limiting magnitude of 19 -20mag. Such a survey will make it possible to address a number of fundamental problems: search for dark energy via the discovery and photometry of supernovas (including SNIa), search for exoplanets, microlensing effects, discovery of minor bodies in the Solar System and space-junk monitoring. All MASTER telescopes can be guided by alerts, and we plan to observe prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts synchronously in several filters and in several polarization planes. Observations on telescopes capable to observ polarisation of GRB prompt emission have been begun in the summer of 2009. Since summer of 2009 an observations of several GRB have been made. In particular for GRB0910 and GRB091127 optical polarisation has been measured. So, for GRB091127 which supervision have begun all through 91 sec polarisation at level of several tens percent has been registered. (GCN 10231, GCN 10052, GCN 10203)

  13. Trypanosoma-Cruzi Cross-Reactive Antibodies Longitudinal Follow-Up: A Prospective Observational Study in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Esber S.; Gueyffier, Lucie; Danjoy, Marie-Laure; Vanhems, Philippe; Pozzetto, Bruno; Sobh, Mohamad; Pottel, Hans; Michallet, Mauricette; Zrein, Maan A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies named TcCRA “Trypanosoma cruzi Cross Reactive Antibodies” were detected in 47% of blood donors from French population unexposed to the parasite. In order to evaluate the passive or active transmissibility of TcCRA and further characterize its role and etiology, we have conducted a study in a cohort of 47 patients who underwent allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantations (allo-HSCT). Donors and recipients were tested for TcCRA prior to transplantation. Recipients were further tested during follow-up after transplantation. Demographical, clinical and biological data were collected. Our primary end-point was to assess the risk of TcCRA acquisition after transplantation. During this initial analysis, we observed no seroconversion in patients receiving cells from TcCRA negative donors (n = 23) but detected seroconversion in 4 out of 24 patients who received hematopoietic stem cells from positive donors. Here, we are discussing possible scenarios to explain TcCRA-immune status in recipient after transplantation. PMID:26351849

  14. Prediction of Future Osteoporotic Fracture Occurrence by Genetic Profiling: A 6-Year Follow-Up Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hun; Cho, Eun-Hee; Ahn, Seong Hee; Kim, Hyeon-Mok; Lim, Kyeong-Hye; Kim, Beom-Jun; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Kim, Ghi Su; Kang, Moo Il; Koh, Jung-Min

    2016-03-01

    Heredity is an important risk factor for osteoporotic fracture, but it remains unclear whether genetic factors improve the predictability of future fracture occurrence. To compare an integration model of genetic profiling with the current model for predicting future fracture occurrence. A retrospective observational cohort study. Postmenopausal women aged 45-93 years who were untreated (n = 117), hormone-treated (n = 491), or bisphosphonate (BP)-treated (n = 415), with a mean 6.1-year follow-up. The main outcome was incident fractures. Ninety-five single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped. We calculated the Korean-specific genetic risk score 35 (GRS35) from 35 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with osteoporosis-related traits at the baseline visit. Osteoporotic fracture occurred more frequently in the highest GRS35 tertile group than in the lower two tertile groups after adjustments for confounders (hazard ratio [HR], 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.55). The associations of the GRS35 with incident fracture were only significant in the BP group (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.28-3.95) and not in the untreated (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.34-4.66) and hormone-treated (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.62-2.36) groups. Integration of the GRS35 into the current model further improved its predictability for incident fracture occurrence by 6.3% (P = .010). Genetic profiling can more accurately predict future fracture risk, especially in individuals taking BPs.

  15. LOW FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER CANDIDATES ESTIMATED FROM A COMBINATION OF SPITZER AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Latham, David W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  16. Low False Positive Rate of Kepler Candidates Estimated From A Combination Of Spitzer And Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Bryson, Stephen T.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  17. Organizational predictors of colonoscopy follow-up for positive fecal occult blood test results: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Partin, Melissa R.; Burgess, Diana J.; Burgess, James F.; Gravely, Amy; Haggstrom, David; Lillie, Sarah E; Nugent, Sean; Powell, Adam A; Shaukat, Aasma; Walter, Louise C.; Nelson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study assessed the contribution of organizational structures and processes identified from facility surveys to follow-up for positive Fecal Occult Blood Tests (FOBT+). Methods We identified 74,104 patients with FOBT+ results from 98 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities between 8/16/09-3/20/11 and followed them until 9/30/11 for completion of colonoscopy. We identified patient characteristics from VHA administrative records, and organizational factors from facility surveys completed by Primary Care and Gastroenterology Chiefs. We estimated predictors of colonoscopy completion within 60 days and 6 months using hierarchical logistic regression models. Results 30% of patients with FOBT+ results received colonoscopy within 60 days and 49% within 6 months. Having Gastroenterology or Laboratory staff notify Gastroenterology providers directly about FOBT+ cases was a significant predictor of 60-day (odds ratio (OR)=1.85, p=0.01) and 6-month follow-up (OR 1.25, p=0.008). Additional predictors of 60-day follow-up included adequacy of colonoscopy appointment availability (OR 1.43, p=0.01) and frequent individual feedback to Primary Care providers about FOBT+ referral timeliness (OR 1.79, p=0.04). Additional predictors of 6-month follow-up included using guideline-concordant surveillance intervals for low-risk adenomas (OR 1.57, p=0.01) and using group appointments and combined verbal-written methods for colonoscopy preparation instruction (OR 1.48, p=0.0001). Conclusion Directly notifying Gastroenterology providers about FOBT+ results, employing guideline-concordant adenoma surveillance intervals, and using colonoscopy preparations instruction methods that provide both verbal and written information may increase overall follow-up rates. Enhancing follow-up within 60-days may require increased colonoscopy capacity and feedback to Primary Care providers. Impact These findings may inform organizational-level interventions to improve FOBT+ follow-up

  18. Observed communication in couples two years after integrative and traditional behavioral couple therapy: outcome and link with five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Katherine J W; Sevier, Mia; Eldridge, Kathleen A; Doss, Brian D; Christensen, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    To examine changes in observed communication after therapy termination in distressed couples from a randomized clinical trial. A total of 134 distressed couples were randomly assigned to either traditional behavioral couple therapy (TBCT; Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) or integrative behavioral couple therapy (IBCT; Jacobson & Christensen, 1998). Videotaped samples of each couple's interactions were coded from pre-therapy, post-therapy, and 2-year follow-up assessments. At these 3 time points, each partner chose 1 current relationship problem to discuss. Relationship satisfaction was assessed at 2-year follow-up, and clinically significant treatment response and marital status were assessed 5 years after treatment. Observed negativity and withdrawal decreased from therapy termination through the 2-year follow-up as expected, but problem solving did not change, and observed positivity decreased. IBCT produced superior changes from post-therapy to the 2-year follow-up assessment compared with TBCT. Post-therapy levels and changes in communication over follow-up were associated with wife satisfaction at 2-year follow-up; only post-therapy to 2-year follow-up changes in communication were associated with husband satisfaction at 2-year follow-up. Post-therapy levels of problem solving and changes in wives' positivity from pre-therapy to post-therapy were associated with 5-year relationship outcomes. We found some counterintuitive results with positivity, but they were no longer significant after controlling for withdrawal. We found support for improvements in observed communication following treatment termination, with IBCT demonstrating greater maintenance of communication improvement over follow-up. We found limited evidence of associations between communication and relationship outcomes at 5-year follow-up.

  19. The Acupuncture on Hot Flashes Among Menopausal Women study: observational follow-up results at 6 and 12 months.

    PubMed

    Borud, Einar Kristian; Alraek, Terje; White, Adrian; Grimsgaard, Sameline

    2010-03-01

    The previously published Acupuncture on Hot Flashes Among Menopausal Women study compared the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture treatment plus self-care versus self-care alone on hot flashes and health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women. This article reports on the observational follow-up results at 6 and 12 months. The Acupuncture on Hot Flashes Among Menopausal Women study was a pragmatic, multicenter randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms, conducted in 2006 to 2007. The 267 participants were postmenopausal women experiencing, on average, 12.6 hot flashes per 24 h. The acupuncture group received 10 individualized acupuncture treatments during 12 weeks and advice on self-care, whereas the control group received only advice on self-care. Hot flash frequency and intensity (0-10 scale) and hours of sleep per night were registered in a diary. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the Women's Health Questionnaire. From baseline to 6 months, the mean reduction in hot flash frequency per 24 hours was 5.3 in the acupuncture group and 5.0 in the control group, a nonsignificant difference of 0.3. At 12 months, the mean reduction in hot flash frequency was 6.0 in the acupuncture group and 5.8 in the control group, a nonsignificant difference of 0.2. Differences in quality-of-life scores were not statistically significant at 6 and 12 months. The statistically significant differences between the study groups found at 12 weeks were no longer present at 6 and 12 months. Acupuncture can contribute to a more rapid reduction in vasomotor symptoms and increase in health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women but probably has no long-term effects.

  20. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection in lumbar spinal stenosis: an observational study with two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Davis, Niel; Hourigan, Patrick; Clarke, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is recognised as a treatment for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, whilst surgical decompression is generally thought to be the most effective treatment option for lumbar spinal stenosis. There is little available literature examining the effect of TFESI on symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. To evaluate the use of TFESI as an alternative to surgery in patients with symptomatic stenosis. An observational study which took place between May 2010 and July 2013. All patients were seen by the Extended Scope Physiotherapist (ESP) injection service. A total of 68 consecutive patients were included. Thirty-one were male and 37 were female. The average age was 75 years. The primary outcome measure was the avoidance of decompressive surgery. Patients with radicular leg pain were seen by an ESP in an Outpatient setting. Concordant clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging were required for diagnosis. Peri-radicular bupivacaine hydrochloride 0.25% (3 ml) and triamcinolone (40 mg) were then injected. Outcome measures were recorded at 6 weeks, 1 year and 2 years. Of 68 patients with spinal stenosis, 22 (32%) had opted for surgery at two year follow-up. Thirty (44%) patients were satisfied with non-surgical management at 2 years, required no further treatment, and were discharged. Of the remaining 24%, nine patients were referred for further injection, four declined surgery but were referred to the Pain Relief Clinic, two still had a similar level of pain but declined surgery and one had died. Our study reports a considerably lower percentage patients opting for surgery than previously demonstrated by the available literature. TFESI is a reasonable treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis and can result in long-term relief from symptoms in a high proportion of patients.

  1. VI-Band Follow-Up Observations of Ultra-Long-Period Cepheid Candidates in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I.-Ling; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-long-period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding ≈ 80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ˜ 1 to ˜ 3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color-magnitude diagram and the Period-Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be {{μ }M31,ULPC}=24.30+/- 0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.

  2. VI-band follow-up observations of ultra-long-period Cepheid candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I-Ling; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Kanbur, Shashi M.

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-long-period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding ≈80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ∼1 to ∼3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color–magnitude diagram and the Period–Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be μ{sub M31,ULPC}=24.30±0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the Period–Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Follow-up observations of SNIa ASASSN-14lp (Shappee+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, B. J.; Piro, A. L.; Holoien, T.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Contreras, C.; Itagaki, K.; Burns, C. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Alper, E.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Conseil, E.; Danilet, A. B.; Dong, S.; Falco, E.; Grupe, D.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Morrell, N.; Nicolas, J.; Phillips, M. M.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G.; Stritzinger, M.; Szczygiel, D. M.; Taddia, F.; Thompson, T. A.; Thorstensen, J.; Wagner, M. R.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-09-01

    The All-sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, or "Assassin"; Shappee et al. 2014ApJ...788...48S) scans the entire extragalactic sky in both the northern and southern hemispheres roughly once every 2-3 nights in the V band to depths of 16.5-17.3mag depending on lunation (Shappee et al. 2016, in preparation). We discovered a new source (ASASSN-14lp; V~14.9mag) on 2014 December 9.61 (JDtdisc=2457001.112) at RA=12:45:09.10, DE=-00:27:32.5 (J2000). There are no pre-explosion images of this site available in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Archive. Previous observations were obtained by ASAS-SN 1.25, 7.98, 10.98, 11.97, 15.96, and 18.96 days before discovery (see Table 1 and Figure 1 for details). The second set of prediscovery images were obtained by K. Itagaki from 2014 November 13 to 2015 January 09 at the Itagaki Astronomical Observatory, Japan. After the detection of ASASSN-14lp, we began a multiwavelength, ground- and space-based follow-up campaign from the X-ray to the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Swift/UVOT observations were obtained in V (5468Å), B (4392Å), U (3465Å), UVW1 (2600Å), UVM2 (2246Å), and UVW2 (1928Å). These observations span more than 30days. Optical ground-based images were obtained with the LCOGT 1m network of telescopes (gri), the 2m Liverpool telescope (LT) (gri), and the 40-inch Swope telescope (ugri) as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project II (CSPII; Hsiao et al. 2013ApJ...766...72H). We obtained an extensive sample of low- and medium-resolution optical spectra of ASASSN-14lp spanning more than 3 months between 2014 December 10 and 2015 March 16 (see table 2). (2 data files).

  4. Steep extinction towards GRB 140506A reconciled from host galaxy observations: Evidence that steep reddening laws are local

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, K. E.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.; Krühler, T.; Christensen, L.; Watson, D.; Ledoux, C.; Noterdaeme, P.; Perley, D. A.; Rhodin, H.; Selsing, J.; Schulze, S.; Tanvir, N. R.; Møller, P.; Goldoni, P.; Xu, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.

    2017-05-01

    We present the spectroscopic and photometric late-time follow-up of the host galaxy of the long-duration Swift γ-ray burst GRB 140506A at z = 0.889. The optical and near-infrared afterglow of this GRB had a peculiar spectral energy distribution (SED) with a strong flux-drop at 8000 Å (4000 Å rest-frame) suggesting an unusually steep extinction curve. By analysing the contribution and physical properties of the host galaxy, we here aim at providing additional information on the properties and origin of this steep, non-standard extinction. We find that the strong flux-drop in the GRB afterglow spectrum at <8000 Å and rise at <4000 Å (observers frame) is well explained by the combination of a steep extinction curve along the GRB line of sight and contamination by the host galaxy light at short wavelengths so that the scenario with an extreme 2175 Å extinction bump can be excluded. We localise the GRB to be at a projected distance of approximately 4 kpc from the centre of the host galaxy. Based on emission-line diagnostics of the four detected nebular lines, Hα, Hβ, [O ii] and [O iii], we find the host to be a modestly star forming (SFR = 1.34 ± 0.04 M⊙ yr-1) and relatively metal poor (Z=0.35+0.15-0.11 Z⊙) galaxy with a large dust content, characterised by a measured visual attenuation of AV = 1.74 ± 0.41 mag. We compare the host to other GRB hosts at similar redshifts and find that it is unexceptional in all its physical properties. We model the extinction curve of the host-corrected afterglow and show that the standard dust properties causing the reddening seen in the Local Group are inadequate in describing the steep drop. We thus conclude that the steep extinction curve seen in the afterglow towards the GRB is of exotic origin and issightline-dependent only, further confirming that this type of reddening is present only at very local scales and that it is solely a consequence of the circumburst environment. Based on observations carried out under

  5. Observational Follow-up Study on a Cohort of Children with Severe Pneumonia after Discharge from a Day-care Clinic in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H.; Chisti, Mohammod J.; Salam, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compliance, morbidity, mortality, and hospitalization during fortnightly follow-up were evaluated by an observational study on a cohort of children with severe and very severe pneumonia after day-care treatment at an urban clinic. The primary outcome measures were proportions of success (compliance) and failure (non-compliance) of follow-up visits at the day-care clinic. In total, 251 children were followed up, with median (IQR) age of 5.0 (3.0-9.0) months, and their compliance dropped from 92% at the first to 85% at the sixth visit. Cough (28%), fever (20%), and rapid breathing (13%) were common morbidities. Successful follow-up visits were possible in 180 (95.2%) and 56 (90.3%) of the children with severe and very severe pneumonia respectively. Eleven (4.4%) needed hospitalization, and four (1.6%) died. Majority (≈90%) of the children could be successfully followed up; some failed to attend their scheduled follow-up visits due to hospitalization and death. The common morbidities indicate the importance of follow-up for detecting medical problems and early treatment, thus reducing risk of death. PMID:25076656

  6. Chandra Observations of the X-ray Environs of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Woosley, S. E.; Patel, S. K.; Levan, A.; Blandford, R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tennant, A.; Pian, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report X-ray studies of the environs of SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory 1281 days after the gamma-ray burst (GRB). Eight X-ray point sources were localized, three and five each in the original error boxes, S1 and S2, assigned for variable X-ray counteparts to the GRB by BeppoSAX. The sum of the discrete X-ray sources plus continuous emission in S2 observed by Chandra on day 1281 is within a factor of 1.5 of the maximum and the upper limits seen by BeppoSAX. We conclude that S2 is the sum of several variable sources that have not disappeared and therefore is not associated with the GRB. Within S1, clear evidence is seen for a decline of approximately a factor of 12 between day 200 and day 1281. One of the sources in S 1, S 1 a, is coincident with the well-determined radio location of SN 1998bw and is certainly the remnant of that explosion. The nature of the other sources is also discussed. Combining our observation of the supernova with others of the GRB afterglow, a smooth X-ray light curve, spanning approx. 1400 days, is obtained by assuming that the burst and supernova were coincident at 35.6 Mpc. When this X-ray light curve is compared with those of the X-ray af "erglows" of ordinary GRBs, X-ray flashes, and ordinary supernovae, evidence emerges for at least two classes of light curves, perhaps bounding a continuum. By 3-10 yr, all these phenomena seem to converge on a common X-ray luminosity, possibly indicative of the supernova underlying them all. This convergence strengthens the conclusion that SN 1998 bw aid GRB 980425 took place in the same object.One possible explanation for the two classes is that a (nearly) standard GRB was observed at different angles, in which case X-ray afterglows with intermediate luminosities should eventually be discovered. Finally, we comment on the contribution of GRB afterglows to the ultraluminous X-ray source population.

  7. FERMI observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 090217A

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2010-06-22

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9σ. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to ~1 GeV. All spectra are wellmore » reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.« less

  8. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 090217A

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M. E-mail: piron@lpta.in2p3.f

    2010-07-10

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9{sigma}. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to {approx}1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  9. GROND observations of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schady, P.; Kann, D. A.; Greiner, J.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the field of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103 (Swift trigger 700791; D'Ai et al., GCN #19547. ATel #9180) simultaneously in g'r'i'z'JHK with GROND (Greiner et al. 2008, PASP 120, 405) mounted at the 2.2 m MPG telescope at ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile).

  10. Long-term follow-up after dilation in symptomatic esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis: an observational study in 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Bechtler, Matthias; Vollmer, Heiko; Vetter, Stephan; Fuchs, Erik-Sebastian; Weickert, Uwe; Jakobs, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Endoscopic bougienage seems to be the most effective therapy for dysphagia in esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD), but nothing is known about the long-term success of this treatment option. This report presents long-term results for 21 of 22 patients with EIPD who were treated with bougienage. A total of 103 sessions of bougienage up to a diameter of 18 mm were performed, without major complications and with 100 % clinical success. During follow-up, symptom recurrence with further bougienage occurred in 12 /21 patients (57 %), who had variable symptom-free intervals (range 1.5 - 96 months). Symptom recurrence was associated with concomitant reflux esophagitis. Although this series demonstrates that bougienage is an effective method for relieving dysphagia in EIPD, the long-term effectiveness is limited.

  11. The Wasilewski sample of emission-line galaxies - Follow-up CCD imaging and spectroscopic and IRAS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Schmitz, Mark; Halpern, Jules P.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Impey, Chris

    1989-01-01

    The results of an extensive imaging and spectroscopic follow-up of the objective prism-selected emission line galaxy (ELG) sample of Wasilewski (1982) are presented. Fluxes at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns were also obtained from the coadded IRAS survey data. ELGs found by objective prism surveys are found to be generally small and underluminous galaxies which usually have higher than average optical surface brightness. The Seyfert detection rate in objective prism surveys is roughly 10 percent and the ratio of the space densities of Seyfert 2 to Seyfert 1 galaxies is significantly larger than unity. Most of the galaxies selected by objective prism surveys are star-forming, late-type spirals which often show disturbed morphology. About 25 percent of the galaxies detected by the surveys are faint, high-excitation metal-poor compact H II regions.

  12. Chandra Observations of the X-Ray Environs of SN 1998BW / GRB 980425

    SciTech Connect

    Kouveliotou , C.

    2004-07-14

    We report X-ray studies of the environs of SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory 1281 days after the GRB. Eight X-ray point sources were localized, three and .ve each in the original error boxes--S1 and S2--assigned for variable X-ray counterparts to the GRB by BeppoSAX. The sum of the discrete X-ray sources plus continuous emission in S2 observed by CXO on day 1281 is within a factor of 1.5 of the maximum and the upper limits seen by BeppoSAX. We conclude that S2 is the sum of several variable sources that have not disappeared, and therefore is not associated with the GRB. Within S1, clear evidence is seen for a decline of approximately a factor of 12 between day 200 and day 1281. One of the sources in S1, S1a, is coincident with the well-determined radio location of SN 1998bw, and is certainly the remnant of that explosion. The nature of the other sources is also discussed. Combining our observation of the supernova with others of the GRB afterglow, a smooth X-ray light curve, spanning {approx} 1300 days, is obtained by assuming the burst and supernova were coincident at 35.6 Mpc. When this X-ray light curve is compared with those of the X-ray ''afterglows'' of ordinary GRBs, X-ray Flashes, and ordinary supernovae, evidence emerges for at least two classes of lightcurves, perhaps bounding a continuum. By three to ten years, all these phenomena seem to converge on a common X-ray luminosity, possibly indicative of the supernova underlying them all. This convergence strengthens the conclusion that SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 took place in the same object. One possible explanation for the two classes is a (nearly) standard GRB observed at different angles, in which case X-ray afterglows with intermediate luminosities should eventually be discovered. Finally, we comment on the contribution of GRBs to the ULX source population.

  13. Chandra Observations of the X-ray Environs of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Woosley, S. E.; Patel, S. K.; Levan, A.; Blandford, R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tennant, A.; Pian, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report X-ray studies of the environs of SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory 1281 days after the GRB. Eight X-ray point sources were localized, three and five each in the original error boxes - S1 and S2 - assigned for variable X-ray counterparts to the GRB by BeppoSAX. The sum of the discrete X-ray sources plus continuous emission in S2 observed by CXO on day 1281 is within a factor of 1.5 of the maximum and the upper limits seen by BeppoSAX. We conclude that S2 is the sum of several variable sources that have not disappeared, and therefore is not associated with the GRB. Within S1, clear evidence is seen for a decline of approximately a factor of 12 between day 200 and day 1281. One of the sources in S1, Sla, is coincident with the well-determined radio location of SN 1998bw, and is certainly the remnant of that explosion. The nature of the other sources is also discussed. Combining our observation of the supernova with others of the GRB afterglow, a smooth X-ray light curve, spanning approximately 1300 days, is obtained by assuming the burst and supernova were coincident at 35.6 Mpc. When this X-ray iight curve is compared with those of the X-ray afterglows of ordinary GRBs, X-ray Flashes, and ordinary supernovae, evidence emerges for at least two classes of lightcurves, perhaps bounding a continuum. By three to ten years, all these phenomena seem to converge on a common X-ray luminosity, possibly indicative of the supernova underlying them all. This convergence strengthens the conclusion that SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 took place in the same object. One possible explanation for the two classes is a (nearly) standard GRB observed at different angles, in which case X-ray afterglows with intermediate luminosities should eventually be discovered. Finally, we comment on the contribution of GRBs to the ULX source population.

  14. Towards understanding magnetic field generation in relativistic shocks with GRB afterglow observations and the GRB radiation mechanism with photospheric simulations and the X-ray flare radiation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Rodolfo

    2015-12-01

    In this thesis, we present three projects on open questions in the Gammaray Burst (GRB) field. In the first project, we used X-ray and optical observations to determine the amount of amplification of the ISM magnetic field needed to explain the GRB afterglow observations. We determined that mild amplification is required, at a level stronger than shock-compression but weaker than predicted by the Weibel mechanism. In the second project, we present a Monte Carlo code we wrote from scratch to perform realistic simulations of the photospheric process, one of the mechanisms considered to explain the GRB gamma-ray emission. We determined that photospheric emission can explain the GRB gamma-ray spectrum above the peak-energy if the photons are taken to have a temperature much smaller than the electron temperature and if the interactions between photons and electrons take place at a large optical depth. In the third project, we used multi-wavelength observations to constrain the X-ray flare radiation mechanism. We determined that synchrotron from a Poynting jet and the Photospheric process are the best candidates to explain the X-ray flare observations.

  15. Findings of an observational investigation of pure remote follow-up of pacemaker patients: is the in-clinic device check still needed?

    PubMed

    Facchin, D; Baccillieri, M S; Gasparini, G; Zoppo, F; Allocca, G; Brieda, M; Verlato, R; Proclemer, A

    2016-10-01

    Device follow-up is mandatory in the care of patients with a pacemaker. However, in most cases, device checks appear to be mere technical, time-consuming procedures. The aim of this research is to evaluate whether remote follow-up can replace in-clinic device checks by assessing clinical outcomes for pacemaker patients followed only via remote follow-up. Consecutive pacemaker patients followed with remote monitoring were prospectively included by 6 Italian cardiology centers in an observational investigation. The workflow for remote monitoring included an initial assessment by nursing staff and, when necessary, by a responsible physician for medical decisions. No in-person visits were scheduled after the start of remote monitoring. One-thousand and two-hundred and fifty one patients (30% female, 75±11years old) were followed for a median observation period of 15months. Out of 4965 remote transmissions, 1882 (38%) had at least one clinically relevant event to be investigated further, but, only after 137 transmissions (2.8%), the patients were contacted for an in-clinic visit or hospitalization. Sixty-nine patients died and 124 were hospitalized for various reasons. Atrial fibrillation episodes were the most common clinical events discovered by remote transmissions, occurring in 1339 (26%) transmissions and 471 (38%) patients. Our experience shows that remote monitoring in a pacemaker population can safely replace in-clinic follow-up, avoiding unnecessary in-hospital device follow-up. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE SHAPES: GRB PULSE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION CLARIFIED

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkila, Jon; Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Morris, David; Neff, James E.; Giblin, Timothy W.

    2015-12-20

    Isolated Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses, like their higher-energy BATSE counterparts, emit the bulk of their pulsed emission as a hard-to-soft component that can be fitted by the Norris et al. empirical pulse model. This signal is overlaid by a fainter, three-peaked signal that can be modeled by the residual fit of Hakkila and Preece: the two fits combine to reproduce GRB pulses with distinctive three-peaked shapes. The precursor peak appears on or before the pulse rise and is often the hardest component, the central peak is the brightest, and the decay peak converts exponentially decaying emission into a long, soft, power-law tail. Accounting for systematic instrumental differences, the general characteristics of the fitted pulses are remarkably similar. Isolated GRB pulses are dominated by hard-to-soft evolution; this is more pronounced for asymmetric pulses than for symmetric ones. Isolated GRB pulses can also exhibit intensity tracking behaviors that, when observed, are tied to the timing of the three peaks: pulses with the largest maximum hardnesses are hardest during the precursor, those with smaller maximum hardnesses are hardest during the central peak, and all pulses can re-harden during the central peak and/or during the decay peak. Since these behaviors are essentially seen in all isolated pulses, the distinction between “hard-to-soft and “intensity-tracking” pulses really no longer applies. Additionally, the triple-peaked nature of isolated GRB pulses seems to indicate that energy is injected on three separate occasions during the pulse duration: theoretical pulse models need to account for this.

  17. Agomelatine versus Sertraline: An Observational, Open-labeled and 12 Weeks Follow-up Study on Efficacy and Tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Akpınar, Esma; Cerit, Cem; Talas, Anıl; Tural, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this open-labeled, 12 weeks follow-up study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of agomelatine with sertraline Methods The outpatients of adult psychiatry clinic who have a new onset of depression and diagnosed as ‘major depressive episode’ by clinician according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition and prescribed agomelatine (25 mg/day) or sertraline (50 mg/day) were included in the study. Results The decline of mean Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores of agomelatine group was significantly higher than the sertraline group at the end of 2nd week; however, the difference was not significant at the end of 3 months. Mean Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale (CGI-I) scores of agomelatine group was lower than sertraline group at first week. Mean CGI-Severity scale and CGI-I scores were favour to sertraline group at the end of the study. Remission rates were 46.7% for sertraline group and 33.3% for agomelatine group while response rates were 76.7% for both groups. Any patient from agomelatine group dropped-out due to adverse effects. The amount of side effects was also less with agomelatine. Conclusion Agomelatine has a rapid onset efficacy on depressive symptoms and this can be beneficial for some critical cases. Considering MADRS scores, agomelatine seems to have similar efficacy with sertraline but we also point the need for long term studies since CGI scores were favour to sertraline group at the end of the study. Agomelatine has a favourable tolerability profile both in terms of discontinuation and the amount of side effects compared to sertraline. PMID:27776387

  18. Prospective observation of CAD/CAM titanium-ceramic-fixed partial dentures: 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Boeckler, Arne F; Lee, Heeje; Psoch, Andrea; Setz, Juergen M

    2010-12-01

    There is lack of knowledge about the clinical performance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) titanium-ceramic-fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate CAD/CAM titanium-ceramic FPDs after 3 years in function. Thirty-one FPDs were fabricated for 23 patients. The Ti frameworks were completely fabricated using CAD/CAM technology, and the low-fusing porcelain was veneered. After confirming there were no mechanical or biological complications, the FPDs were cemented using zinc phosphate cement. The patients were recalled at 12, 24, and 36 months after cementation to examine for the presence of any mechanical complications, such as fractures of the veneering porcelain or the supportive framework, or biological complications, including caries, gingivitis, or periodontitis. The periodontal condition was measured using probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and plaque index (PI). Success and survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. There were four cohesive and three adhesive porcelain fractures, but no framework fractured. The Kaplan-Meier cumulative success rate of the CAD/CAM titanium-ceramic crown with regard to mechanical complications was 76.4%, and the cumulative survival rate was 96.8% after 3 years of use. One patient developed caries, but the condition was not associated with marginal discrepancy. No other biological complications were reported. The periodontal parameters demonstrated a tendency that slightly increased up to 24 months and was maintained by 36 months. At the end of the follow-up, PD was 2.86 mm, percentile of surface with BOP was 23.5, and PI was 0.45. The CAD/CAM titanium-ceramic FPDs survived in the mouths of patients without major complications for 3 years, although the risk of porcelain fracture appeared to be relatively high. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. The FRAX ® as a predictor of mortality in Japanese incident hemodialysis patients: an observational, follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshihide; Joki, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Yuri; Iwasaki, Masaki; Kubo, Shun; Asakawa, Takasuke; Matsukane, Ai; Takahashi, Yasunori; Imamura, Yoshihiko; Hirahata, Koichi; Hase, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    The World Health Organization Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(®)) was recently developed to estimate the 10-year absolute risk of osteoporotic fracture among the general population. However, the evidence for its use in chronic kidney disease patients has been lacking, and the association between the FRAX(®) and mortality is unknown. Therefore, a hospital-based, prospective, cohort study was conducted to evaluate the predictive ability of the FRAX(®) for mortality in hemodialysis patients. A total of 252 patients who had been started on maintenance hemodialysis, 171 men and 81 women, with a mean age of 67 ± 14 years, was studied. The endpoint was defined as all-cause death. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95 % confidence intervals. During the mean follow-up period of 3.4 ± 2.7 years, 61 deaths occurred. The median (interquartile range) of the FRAX(®) for major osteoporotic fracture was 6.9 (4.6-12.0) % in men and 19.0 (7.6-33.0) % in women. Cumulative survival rates at 5 years after starting dialysis, with the FRAX(®) levels above and below the median, were 51.9 and 87.9 %, respectively, in men and 67.4 and 83.7 %, respectively, in women. Overall, in men, the multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that the log-transformed FRAX(®) remained an independent predictor of death after adjusting by confounding variables. However, in women, the significant association between the FRAX(®) value and the outcome was eliminated if age was put into these models. Among Japanese hemodialysis patients, the FRAX(®) seems to be useful for predicting death, especially in men.

  20. Jumper's knee treatment with extracorporeal shock wave therapy: a long-term follow-up observational study.

    PubMed

    Vulpiani, M C; Vetrano, M; Savoia, V; Di Pangrazio, E; Trischitta, D; Ferretti, A

    2007-09-01

    Jumper's knee affects more frequently athletes participating in jumping activities. This pathology is very difficult to treat: various therapeutic treatments are used, often based on the physician's personal experience rather than clinical evidence. The aim of this prospective study is to present our experience with the treatment of jumper's knee using extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in a group of patients followed up for 2 years after treatment. In this study, we included 73 sports patients (83 knees), 54 males and 19 females, aged between 15 and 69 years (mean age: 32 years). All patients underwent clinical and instrumental diagnosis (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and X-rays) in order to identify presence, location and seriousness of the specific tendinopathy. The symptomatology was classified using the visual analogical scale and according to a 6-stage clinical evaluation range. Shock wave treatment was applied with an electromagnetic shock wave generator. The protocol consisted in an average of 4 sessions (minimum 3, maximum 5), at a 2/7-day interval. In each sessions, 1,500-2,500 impulses were administered with an energy varying between 0.08 and 0.44 mJ/mm(2). We obtained satisfactory results in 73.5% of cases (54.2% excellent results and 19.3 good results). In performing athletes (16 tendons), treatment was satisfactory in 87.5% of cases, with an average time of resuming sport of approximately 6 weeks. The outcome of the described shock wave treatment appears to be satisfactory and confirms the role of this alternative treatment in the management of the tendon disorders.

  1. Addition of oral iron to plasma transfusion in human congenital hypotransferrinemia: A 10-year observational follow-up with the effects on hematological parameters and growth.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Deniz

    2017-09-12

    Congenital hypotransferrinemia (OMIM 209300) is an extremely rare disorder of inherited iron metabolism. Since its description in 1961, only 16 cases have been reported. The defective gene and molecular defect causing this disorder and clinicolaboratory findings seen in the homozygous and heterozygous states have been documented in both humans and mice. However, due to the lack of follow-up studies of the described cases, the long-term prognosis remains unknown. We present a 10-year observational follow-up of a patient previously diagnosed on a molecular basis who was treated with a unique therapy of plasma transfusion fortified with oral iron, with satisfactory clinicolaboratory responses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clinical and economic impact of remote monitoring on the follow-up of patients with implantable electronic cardiovascular devices: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Costa, Paulo Dias; Reis, A Hipólito; Rodrigues, Pedro P

    2013-02-01

    Traditional follow-up of patients with cardiovascular devices is still an activity that, in addition to serving an increasing population, requires a considerable amount of time and specialized human and technical resources. Our aim was to evaluate the applicability of the CareLink(®) (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) remote monitoring system as a complementary option to the follow-up of patients with implanted devices, between in-office visits. Evaluated outcomes included both clinical (event detection and time to diagnosis) and nonclinical (patient's satisfaction and economic costs) aspects. An observational, longitudinal, prospective study was conducted with patients from a Portuguese central hospital sampled by convenience during 1 week (43 patients). Data were collected in four moments: two in-office visits and two remote evaluations, reproducing 1 year of clinical follow-up. Data sources included health records, implant reports, initial demographic data collection, follow-up printouts, and a questionnaire. After selection criteria were verified, 15 patients (11 men [73%]) were included, 63.4±10.8 years old, representing 14.0±6.3 implant months. Clinically, 15 events were detected (9 by remote monitoring and 6 by patient-initiated activation), of which only 9 were symptomatic. We verified that remote monitoring could detect both symptomatic and asymptomatic events, whereas patient-initiated activation only detected symptomatic ones (p=0.028). Moreover, the mean diagnosis anticipation in patients with events was approximately 58 days (p<0.001). In nonclinical terms, we observed high or very high satisfaction (67% and 33%, respectively) with using remote monitoring technology, but still 8 patients (53%) stated they preferred in-office visits. Finally, the introduction of remote monitoring technology has the ability to reduce total follow-up costs for patients by 25%. We conclude that the use of this system constitutes a viable complementary option to the follow-up

  3. GRB 011121: Jet, wind and supernova -- all in one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Scholz, R. D.; Sterken, C.; Gorosabel, J.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A.; Grinkov, V.; Andersen, M. I.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fruchter, A.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Kaper, L.; Kouveliotou, C.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Salamanca, I.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van den Heuvel, E.

    2004-06-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of ˜9°. The jet origin of this break is supported by the achromatic spectral energy distribution. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law decline, interpreted as light from an underlying supernova. The deduced parameters for the decay slope as well as the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e. an outflow into a circum-burst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive GRB progenitor. Due to its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 is the so far best example for the GRB-supernova connection, and provides compelling evidence for a circum-burster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star.

  4. Follow-up Observations and Analysis of V530 Andromedae: A Totally Eclipsing Shallow Contact Solar Type Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Heather; Samec, Ronald G.; Caton, Daniel B.; Faulkner, Danny R.; Clark, Jeremy; Shebs, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We follow up on early, single coverage, UBVRcIc light curves (2013) and analyses. These early curves were taken in September 27 and 29 2011. Our present, BVRcIc, but full coverage light curves were taken on 6 nights: October 1,2,9, November 4,5, 2013 and January 4, 2014 by RGS, DBC, JDC, TS with the Dark Sky Observatory 0.81-m reflector of Appalachian State University and a (-40ºC) 2KX2K Apogee Alta CCD. Our present curves reveal V530 Andromedae as a totally eclipsing, shallow contact solar type binary rather than semidetached, near contact one. The newly determined times of minima include:HJD MinI = 2456566.84275 ±0.00007HJD MinII = 2456598.881995±0.0004, 24556600.6111±0.0002, 2456601.76665±0.00046.Using a new method of obtaining minima from earlier patrol light curves, in this case, NSVS, nine low weight timings of minimum light were added to the period study. Including these additional timings, we uncovered a period change. In our now, extended, period study over 9000 epochs, a 14.25 year interval, we find that the period is decreasing. This fits the scenario of magnetic breaking for solar type binaries. The temperatures of the primary and secondary components are estimated at 7000 and 6300 K, respectively, a large temperature difference for a contact binary. The fill-out, however, is a mere 4%. (Our earlier scant light curves modeled very nearly in contact.) The mass ratio, M2/M1, was found to be 0.385, almost identical with our first curves solution. The two star spots, probably magnetic in origin, were determined. A hot spot was modeled by the iterative process on the polar region of the smaller star. A cool spot is on the larger star facing the smaller star. The spot parameters have changed appreciably over the course of the two intervening years. We believe the binary has recently come into contact and thermal contact has not yet been achieved.

  5. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Arimoto, M.; ...

    2009-02-19

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. Finally, the known distance of the burstmore » enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.« less

  6. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Arimoto, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogaert, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, D.; Busetto, G.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Celotti, A.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; DeKlotz, M.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Edmonds, Y.; Evans, P. A.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Finke, J.; Fishman, G.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Haller, G.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hernando Morat, J. A.; Hoover, A.; Hughes, R. E.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kavelaars, A.; Kawai, N.; Kelly, H.; Kennea, J.; Kerr, M.; Kippen, R. M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lavalley, C.; Lee, B.; Lee, S. -H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lichti, G. G.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Meszaros, P.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mirizzi, N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nelson, D.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Perri, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Raino, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rando, R.; Rapposelli, E.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Segal, K. N.; Sgro, C.; Shimokawabe, T.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Starck, J. -L.; Stecker, F. W.; Steinle, H.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tenze, A.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Turri, M.; Tuvi, S.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vigiani, L.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Williams, D. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-02-19

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. Finally, the known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  7. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission From Onset to Afterglow

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; ...

    2013-01-09

    In this paper, we report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for whichmore » simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. Lastly, the observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.« less

  8. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission From Onset to Afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-01-09

    In this paper, we report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. Lastly, the observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  9. Optical and Near-Infrared Observations of SN 2013DX Associated with GRB 130702A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, V. L.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Bersier, D.; Perley, D. A.; Margutti, R.; Bellm, E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and optical spectra of SN 2013dx, associated with the nearby (redshift 0.145) gamma-ray burst GRB 130702A. The prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy released from GRB 130702A is measured to be E(sub gamma, iso) = 6.4(+1.3/-1.0) x 10(exp 50) erg (1 keV to 10 MeV in the rest frame), placing it intermediate between low-luminosity GRBs like GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the broader cosmological population. We compare the observed g'r'i'z' light curves of SN 2013dx to a SN 1998bw template, finding that SN 2013dx evolves approx. 20% faster (steeper rise time), with a comparable peak luminosity. Spectroscopically, SN 2013dx resembles other broad-lined SNe Ic, both associated with (SN 2006aj and SN 1998bw) and lacking (SN 1997ef, SN 2007I, and SN 2010ah) gamma-ray emission, with photospheric velocities around peak of approx. 21,000 km/s. We construct a quasi-bolometric (g'r'z'yJ) light curve for SN 2013dx, only the fifth GRB-associated SN with extensive NIR coverage and the third with a bolometric light curve extending beyond (Delta)t > 40 days. Together with the measured photospheric velocity, we derive basic explosion parameters using simple analytic models. We infer a Ni-56 mass of M(sub Ni) = 0.37+/- 0.01 Stellar Mass, an ejecta mass of M(sub ej) = 3.1+/- 0.1 Stellar Mass, and a kinetic energy of E(sub K) = (8.2+/- 0.43) x 10(exp 51) erg (statistical uncertainties only), consistent with previous GRB-associated supernovae. When considering the ensemble population of GRB-associated supernovae, we find no correlation between the mass of synthesized Ni-56 and high-energy properties, despite clear predictions from numerical simulations that M(sub Ni) should correlate with the degree of asymmetry. On the other hand, M(sub Ni) clearly correlates with the kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta across a wide range of core-collapse events.

  10. Optical and Near-infrared Observations of SN 2013dx Associated with GRB 130702A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, V. L.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Bersier, D.; Perley, D. A.; Margutti, R.; Bellm, E.; Bloom, J. S.; Cao, Y.; Capone, J. I.; Clubb, K.; Corsi, A.; De Cia, A.; de Diego, J. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fox, O. D.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gehrels, N.; Georgiev, L.; González, J. J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kelly, P. L.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Lee, W. H.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Singer, L.; Stern, D.; Troja, E.; Veilleux, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and optical spectra of SN 2013dx, associated with the nearby (redshift 0.145) gamma-ray burst GRB 130702A. The prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy released from GRB 130702A is measured to be Eγ ,iso=6.4-1.0+1.3× 1050 erg (1 keV to 10 MeV in the rest frame), placing it intermediate between low-luminosity GRBs like GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the broader cosmological population. We compare the observed g'r'i' z' light curves of SN 2013dx to a SN 1998bw template, finding that SN 2013dx evolves ˜20% faster (steeper rise time), with a comparable peak luminosity. Spectroscopically, SN 2013dx resembles other broad-lined SNe Ic, both associated with (SN 2006aj and SN 1998bw) and lacking (SN 1997ef, SN 2007I, and SN 2010ah) gamma-ray emission, with photospheric velocities around peak of ˜ 21,000 km s-1. We construct a quasi-bolometric (g'r'i'z'y) light curve for SN 2013dx, only the fifth GRB-associated SN with extensive NIR coverage and the third with a bolometric light curve extending beyond Δ t> 40 days. Together with the measured photospheric velocity, we derive basic explosion parameters using simple analytic models. We infer a 56Ni mass of MNi=0.37+/- 0.01 M⊙ , an ejecta mass of Mej=3.1+/- 0.1 M⊙ , and a kinetic energy of EK=(8.2+/- 0.43)× 1051 erg (statistical uncertainties only), consistent with previous GRB-associated supernovae. When considering the ensemble population of GRB-associated supernovae, we find no correlation between the mass of synthesized 56Ni and high-energy properties, despite clear predictions from numerical simulations that MNi should correlate with the degree of asymmetry. On the other hand, MNi clearly correlates with the kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta across a wide range of core-collapse events.

  11. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6+/-0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  12. COMPTEL Observation of GRB941017 with Distinct High-Energy Component

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Y.; Preece, R.D.; Briggs, M.S.; Gonzalez, M.M.; Dingus, B.L.

    2004-09-28

    The joint spectral analysis of GRB941017 with BATSE and EGRET data revealed the existence of a distinct MeV spectral component that decayed slower than the lower energy component. The event was also observed with COMPTEL burst modules, which provides burst spectra in the energy range of 300 keV to 10 MeV. Due to the limited energy overlap between the BATSE Large Area Detector and the EGRET Total Absorption Shower Counter spectra, the relative normalization between the two instruments is poorly constrained. The COMPTEL spectra complement the energy ranges of the BATSE and EGRET data and are used herein to confirm and improve upon the previous analysis. Using the data from all three instruments, we present the result of joint spectral analysis for GRB941017. Including the COMPTEL data improved the statistics for the time interval in which the high energy component is more apparent.

  13. GRB 050717: A Long, Short-Lag Burst Observed by Swift and Konus

    SciTech Connect

    Krimm, H. A.; Hurkett, C.; Osborne, J. P.; Pal'shin, V.; Golenetskii, S.; Norris, J. P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A. M.; Zhang, B.; Burrows, D. N.; Perri, M.

    2006-05-19

    The long burst GRB 050717 was observed simultaneously by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift and the Konus instrument on Wind. Significant hard to soft spectral evolution was seen. Early gamma-ray and X-ray emission was detected by both BAT and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Swift. The XRT continued to observe the burst for 7.1 days and detect it for 1.4 days. The X-ray light curve showed a classic decay pattern including evidence of the onset of the external shock emission at {approx} 45 s after the trigger; the afterglow was too faint for a jet break to be detected. No optical, infrared or ultraviolet counterpart was discovered despite deep searches within 14 hours of the burst. The spectral lag for GRB 050717 was determined to be 2.5 {+-} 2.6 ms, consistent with zero and unusually short for a long burst. This lag measurement suggests that this burst has a high intrinsic luminosity and hence is at high redshift (z > 2.7). GRB 050717 provides a good example of classic prompt and afterglow behavior for a gamma-ray burst.

  14. Radio and X-ray observations of the Ultra-long GRB 150518A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Louis; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita; Supernova Forensics

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 150518A, discovered on 2015 May 18 by the MAXI and KONUS-Wind satellites, lasted for about 1000s, making it an important addition to the recently established class of very long duration GRBs. We report on the JVLA radio observations of the afterglow of GRB 150518A. Additionally, we report the analysis of Xray afterglow observations by Swift-XRT. Multi-band light curves of the radio afterglow display an unusual, conspicuous rise around 10 days after the burst, possibly due to enhanced mass-loss from the progenitor in the final stages of evolution before the GRB. The X-ray afterglow spectrum is significantly soft (photon index Γx > 3) and heavily absorbed (NHx,i > 8 × 10^{21}/cm^2). These properties suggest peculiar behavior that is different from the predictions of the standard fireball model of GRBs. In the light of these properties, we compare different models of progenitors for very long duration GRBs. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  15. FERMI Observations of GRB 090902B: A Distinct Spectral Component in the Prompt and Delayed Emission

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2009-11-03

    Here, we report on the observation of the bright, long gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090902B, by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on-board the Fermi observatory. This was one of the brightest GRBs to have been observed by the LAT, which detected several hundred photons during the prompt phase. With a redshift of z = 1.822, this burst is among the most luminous detected by Fermi. Time-resolved spectral analysis reveals a significant power-law component in the LAT data that is distinct from the usual Band model emission that is seen in the sub-MeV energy range.more » This power-law component appears to extrapolate from the GeV range to the lowest energies and is more intense than the Band component, both below ~50 keV and above 100 MeV. The Band component undergoes substantial spectral evolution over the entire course of the burst, while the photon index of the power-law component remains constant for most of the prompt phase, then hardens significantly toward the end. After the prompt phase, power-law emission persists in the LAT data as late as 1 ks post-trigger, with its flux declining as t–1.5. The LAT detected a photon with the highest energy so far measured from a GRB, 33.4+2.7 –3.5 GeV. This event arrived 82 s after the GBM trigger and ~50 s after the prompt phase emission had ended in the GBM band. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of these results for models of GRB emission and for constraints on models of the extragalactic background light.« less

  16. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 090902B: A DISTINCT SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE PROMPT AND DELAYED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.

    2009-11-20

    We report on the observation of the bright, long gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090902B, by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on-board the Fermi observatory. This was one of the brightest GRBs to have been observed by the LAT, which detected several hundred photons during the prompt phase. With a redshift of z = 1.822, this burst is among the most luminous detected by Fermi. Time-resolved spectral analysis reveals a significant power-law component in the LAT data that is distinct from the usual Band model emission that is seen in the sub-MeV energy range. This power-law component appears to extrapolate from the GeV range to the lowest energies and is more intense than the Band component, both below approx50 keV and above 100 MeV. The Band component undergoes substantial spectral evolution over the entire course of the burst, while the photon index of the power-law component remains constant for most of the prompt phase, then hardens significantly toward the end. After the prompt phase, power-law emission persists in the LAT data as late as 1 ks post-trigger, with its flux declining as t {sup -1.5}. The LAT detected a photon with the highest energy so far measured from a GRB, 33.4{sup +2.7}{sub -3.5} GeV. This event arrived 82 s after the GBM trigger and approx50 s after the prompt phase emission had ended in the GBM band. We discuss the implications of these results for models of GRB emission and for constraints on models of the extragalactic background light.

  17. Fireballs and cannonballs confront GRB 991208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; de Rújula, A.

    2003-06-01

    The broad band afterglow of GRB 991208 provides a good case for a three-sided confrontation: the data, the generally-accepted fireball models of GRBs, and the cannonball (CB) model. Follow-up radio measurements for this GRB have been recently reported. These new data challenge the fireball models and disagree with their predictions, based on earlier broad-band observations, but they are in very good agreement with the predictions of the CB model, based on the same earlier data, and involving many fewer parameters.

  18. Update on Swift follow-up observations of the GeV flaring blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Puccetti, S.; Perri, M.; Tavani, M.

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of the quick look analysis of 4 Swift target of opportunity observations performed on 2015, June 16-17, following the gamma-ray flare of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 detected by AGILE (ATel #7631).

  19. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. IV. RESULTS OF THE 2014 FOLLOW-UP CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, F.; Massaro, F.; Landoni, M.; D’Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Stern, D.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.

    2015-05-15

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by the emission arising from blazars, one of the most peculiar classes of radio-loud active galaxies. Since the launch of Fermi several methods were developed to search for blazars as potential counterparts of unidentified γ-ray sources (UGSs). To confirm the nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic observations are necessary. In 2013 we started a spectroscopic campaign to investigate γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to different procedures. The main goals of our campaign are: (1) to confirm the nature of these candidates, and (2) whenever possible, determine their redshifts. Optical spectroscopic observations will also permit us to verify the robustness of the proposed associations and check for the presence of possible source class contaminants to our counterpart selection. This paper reports the results of observations carried out in 2014 in the northern hemisphere with Kitt Peak National Observatory and in the southern hemisphere with the Southern Astrophysical Research telescopes. We also report three sources observed with the Magellan and Palomar telescopes. Our selection of blazar-like sources that could be potential counterparts of UGSs is based on their peculiar infrared colors and on their combination with radio observations both at high and low frequencies (i.e., above and below ∼1 GHz) in publicly available large radio surveys. We present the optical spectra of 27 objects. We confirm the blazar-like nature of nine sources that appear to be potential low-energy counterparts of UGSs. Then we present new spectroscopic observations of 10 active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources, classifying all of them as blazars. In addition, we present the spectra for five known γ-ray blazars with uncertain redshift estimates and three BL Lac candidates that were observed during our campaign. We also report the case for WISE J173052.85−035247.2, candidate counterpart of the

  20. FERMI Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080825C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, L.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Komin, N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-11-24

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here in this paper, we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. Finally, we also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  1. Swift Follow up observation of the transient source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    On February 25, 2016, Swift carried out a 2ks target of opportunity observation of the transient Fermi J1654-1055 (see ATel #8721). Only one source is clearly detected, within the LAT error circle, by the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) at RA, Dec= 16h 32m 49.9s, -10d 52' 30.1" (J2000) with a 90 % uncertainty radius of 6.3 arcsec.

  2. Ground-Based BVRI Time-Series Follow-Up Observations for the RR Lyrae stars in Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Young-Beom; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Nemec, James M.

    2015-09-01

    Time series observations for the 41 RR Lyrae stars in Kepler's fields were carried out in 2010 to 2013 using a number of meter class (or smaller) telescopes. These telescopes include the 1-m and 41-cm telescopes of Lulin Observatory (LOT and SLT respectively, Taiwan), the 81-cm telescope of Tenagra-II Observatory (TNG, Arizona, USA), the 1-m telescope at the Mt. Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory (LOAO, Arizona, USA), the 1.8-m and 15-cm telescopes at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO, Korea), and the 61-cm telescope at the Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO, Korea). All of these telescopes were equipped with commercial available CCD imagers, and the observations were done in standard BVRI filters. Photometric calibration of the RR Lyrae light curves was done with standard stars listed in Landolt standard stars [1]. Observations of selected Landolt standard stars (centered on SA 107-456 & SA 110-232) in Johnson-Kron-Cousins BVRI filters, spanning three distinct airmasses, were done with the 81-cm Tenagra II telescope on 25 June 2011. Raw imaging data were reduced with IRAF in the same manner as in the case of the RR Lyrae, and astrometric calibrated with astrometry.net [2]. We calibrated BVRI magnitudes for 40 RR Lyrae stars.

  3. Clinical and economic benefits observed when follow-up triglyceride levels are less than 500 mg/dL in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Christian, Jennifer B; Arondekar, Bhakti; Buysman, Erin K; Johnson, Susan L; Seeger, John D; Jacobson, Terry A

    2012-01-01

    Increased levels of triglycerides are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and pancreatitis. In this study we investigated the association between patients with severely increased triglycerides whose follow-up triglyceride levels were <500 mg/dL and reduction of important clinical events and associated health care costs. By using two large U.S. health care claims databases, we identified an initial cohort of 41,210 patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia between June 2001 and September 2010 who had a follow-up laboratory test result 6 to <24 weeks after the initial severe hypertriglyceridemia laboratory value. Of these, 8493 patients' follow-up triglyceride levels remained elevated (≥500 mg/dL) whereas 32,717 were <500 mg/dL. After their qualifying follow-up triglyceride level, patients' cardiovascular events, diabetes-related events, pancreatitis episodes, kidney disease, and related costs were identified. Adjusted incidence rate ratios with the use of Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each outcome. Patients whose triglycerides remained ≥500 mg/dL had a greater rate of pancreatitis episodes (hazard ratio [HR]1.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.47-2.18), cardiovascular events (HR1.19; 95% CI 1.10-1.28), diabetes-related events (HR1.42; 95% CI 1.27-1.59), and kidney disease (HR1.13; 95% CI 1.04-1.22) compared with patients whose follow-up triglycerides were <500 mg/dL, after we adjusted for important confounders. Adjusted all-cause total and cardiovascular-related costs were significantly lower in the first 3 years in patients whose follow-up triglyceride levels were <500 mg/dL compared with those whose triglyceride levels remained increased. When follow-up triglyceride levels were <500 mg/dL, we observed an associated reduction in the risk of clinical events and decrease in health care resource use and costs. Copyright © 2012 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Observational follow-up study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia after discharge from day care clinic/hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the features of relapse, morbidity, mortality and re-hospitalisation following successful discharge after severe pneumonia in children between a day care group and a hospital group and to explore the predictors of failures during 3 months of follow-up. Design An observational study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia for 3 months after discharge from hospital/clinic. Setting Day care was provided at the Radda Clinic and hospital care at a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Participants Children aged 2–59 months with severe pneumonia attending the clinic/hospital who survived to discharge. Intervention No intervention was done except providing some medications for minor illnesses, if indicated. Primary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were the proportion of successes and failures of day care at follow-up visits as determined by estimating the OR with 95% CI in comparison to hospital care. Results The authors enrolled 360 children with a mean (SD) age of 8 (7) months, 81% were infants and 61% were men. The follow-up compliance dropped from 95% at first to 85% at sixth visit. The common morbidities during the follow-up period included cough (28%), fever (17%), diarrhoea (9%) and rapid breathing (7%). During the follow-up period, significantly more day care children (n=22 (OR 12.2 (95% CI 8.2–17.8))) required re-hospitalisation after completion of initial day care compared with initial hospital care group (n=11 (OR 6.1 (95% CI 3.4–10.6))). The predictors for failure were associated with tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypoxaemia on admission and prolonged duration of stay. Conclusions There are considerable morbidities in children discharged following treatment of severe pneumonia like cough, fever, rapid breathing and diarrhoea during 3-month period. The findings indicate the importance of follow-up for early detection of medical problems and their management to reduce the risk of death. Establishment of an

  5. Constraining Parameters in Pulsar Models of Repeating FRB 121102 with High-energy Follow-up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a precise (sub-arcsecond) localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 led to the discovery of persistent radio and optical counterparts, the identification of a host dwarf galaxy at a redshift of z = 0.193, and several campaigns of searches for higher-frequency counterparts, which gave only upper limits on the emission flux. Although the origin of FRBs remains unknown, most of the existing theoretical models are associated with pulsars, or more specifically, magnetars. In this paper, we explore persistent high-energy emission from a rapidly rotating highly magnetized pulsar associated with FRB 121102 if internal gradual magnetic dissipation occurs in the pulsar wind. We find that the efficiency of converting the spin-down luminosity to the high-energy (e.g., X-ray) luminosity is generally much smaller than unity, even for a millisecond magnetar. This provides an explanation for the non-detection of high-energy counterparts to FRB 121102. We further constrain the spin period and surface magnetic field strength of the pulsar with the current high-energy observations. In addition, we compare our results with the constraints given by the other methods in previous works and expect to apply our new method to some other open issues in the future.

  6. Astrometric follow-up observations of directly imaged sub-stellar companions to young stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.; Vogt, N.; Errmann, R.; Berndt, A.

    2014-11-01

    The formation of massive planetary or brown dwarf companions at large projected separations from their host star is not yet well understood. In order to put constraints on formation scenarios, we search for signatures in the orbit dynamics of the systems. We are specifically interested in the eccentricities and inclinations since those parameters might tell us about the dynamic history of the systems and where to look for additional low-mass sub-stellar companions. For this purpose, we utilized VLT/NACO to take several well-calibrated high-resolution images of six target systems and analyse them together with available literature data points of those systems as well as Hubble Space Telescope archival data. We used a statistical least-squares Monte Carlo approach to constrain the orbit elements of all systems that showed significant differential motion of the primary star and companion. We show for the first time that the GQ Lup system shows significant change in both separation and position angle. Our analysis yields best-fitting orbits for this system, which are eccentric (e between 0.21 and 0.69), but cannot rule out circular orbits at high inclinations. Given our astrometry, we discuss formation scenarios of the GQ Lup system. In addition, we detected an even fainter new companion candidate to GQ Lup, which is most likely a background object. We also updated the orbit constraints of the PZ Tel system, confirming that the companion is on a highly eccentric orbit with e > 0.62. Finally, we show with a high significance, that there is no orbital motion observed in the cases of the DH Tau, HD 203030 and 1RXS J160929.1-210524 systems, and give the most precise relative astrometric measurement of the UScoCTIO 108 system to date.

  7. Clinical success of stainless steel crowns placed under general anaesthesia in primary molars: an observational follow up study.

    PubMed

    Schüler, I M; Hiller, M; Roloff, T; Kühnisch, J; Heinrich-Weltzien, R

    2014-11-01

    Quality assessment of stainless steel crowns (SSCs) placed in primary molars of high caries risk children after 1, 3 and 5 years of service time. Out of 1149 SSCs placed 1, 3 or 5 years before the evaluation period in 558 children, 428 (37.2%) SSCs were clinically evaluated in 171 (30.6%) children aged between 1.1 and 8.6 years. Marginal adaptation, extension and proximal contacts of SSCs, plaque and gingival bleeding at SSC were assessed. Caries experience was recorded by WHO standards. Caries experience was 7.8 dmft/18.4 dmfs before treatment. The overall success rate of SSCs was 97.2%, regardless of the extent of carious lesions or pulp treatment of the tooth. Loss of SSCs (1.9%), pathological tooth mobility (0.7%) and perforation of the crown (0.2%) were scored as clinical failures. The majority of SSCs had sealed margins and the marginal extension reached sub-gingival level. Open proximal contacts occurred mesially and distally (21.7%, 20%). All qualitative defects increased with service time. Secondary caries was not diagnosed. Of the SSCs, 46.4% were free of dental plaque. Gingival bleeding after probing was observed in 72.1% of all SSCs. Gingivitis was significantly associated with increased dmft-values (OR=1.108, 95%CI: 1.03-1.19) and plaque at SSCs (OR=0.29, 95%CI: 0.18-0.47). Children with migration background exhibited significantly more often insufficient oral hygiene and higher rates of gingival bleeding and caries experience than did German children. SSCs are clinically successful restorations in primary molars of high caries risk children. High caries prevalence and insufficient oral hygiene were greater determining factors for the occurrence of gingivitis than the quality of the SSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigating the Impact of Optical Selection Effects on Observed Rest-frame Prompt GRB Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, D.; Heussaff, V.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Atteia, J.-L.; Klotz, A.; Dornic, D.

    2016-11-01

    Measuring gamma-ray burst (GRB) properties in their rest frame is crucial for understanding the physics at work in GRBs. This can only be done for GRBs with known redshifts. Since redshifts are usually measured from the optical spectrum of the afterglow, correlations between prompt and afterglow emissions may introduce biases into the distribution of the rest-frame properties of the prompt emission, especially considering that we measure the redshift of only one-third of Swift GRBs. In this paper, we study the optical flux of GRB afterglows and its connection to various intrinsic properties of GRBs. We also discuss the impact of the optical selection effect on the distribution of rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs. Our analysis is based on a sample of 90 GRBs with good optical follow-up and well-measured prompt emission. Seventy-six of them have a measure of redshift and 14 have no redshift. We compare the rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs with different afterglow optical fluxes in order to check for possible correlations between the promt properties and the optical flux of the afterglow. The optical flux is measured two hours after the trigger, which is a typical time for the measure of the redshift. We find that the optical flux of GRB afterglows in our sample is mainly driven by their optical luminosity and depends only slightly on their redshift. We show that GRBs with low and high afterglow optical fluxes have similar E {}{{pi}}, E {}{{iso}}, and L {}{{iso}}, indicating that the rest-frame distributions computed from GRBs with a redshift are not significantly distorted by optical selection effects. However, we found that the {T}90{rest} distribution is not immune to optical selection effects, which favor the selection of GRBs with longer durations. Finally, we note that GRBs well above the E {}{{pi}}-E {}{{iso}} relation have lower optical fluxes and we show that optical selection effects favor the detection of GRBs with bright optical afterglows located

  9. Rapid GRB Afterglow Response With SARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, K. V.; Homewood, A. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Riddle, C.; Fuller, S.; Manning, A.; McIntyre, T.; Henson, G.

    2006-05-01

    The Clemson GRB Follow-Up program utilizes the SARA 0.9-m telescope to observe optical afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts. SARA is not yet robotic; it operates under direct and Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) interrupt modes. To facilitate rapid response and timely reporting of data analysis results, we developed a software suite that operates in two phases: first, to notify observers of a burst and assist in data collection, and second, to quickly analyze the images.

  10. PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEXTBOOK GRB 110205A: CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF PROMPT EMISSION AND AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Pozanenko, A.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E. E-mail: rfshen@astro.utoronto.ca; and others

    2012-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long-duration (T{sub 90} {approx} 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb, and BOOTES telescopes when the gamma-ray burst (GRB) was still radiating in the {gamma}-ray band, with optical light curve showing correlation with {gamma}-ray data. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray, to {gamma}-ray (1 eV to 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission phase. In particular, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Shortly after prompt emission ({approx}1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ({alpha} {approx} 5.5) was observed, which we interpret as the reverse shock (RS) emission. It is the first time that the rising phase of an RS component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow light curves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high-quality prompt and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball model to extract valuable information, including the radiation mechanism (synchrotron), radius of prompt emission (R{sub GRB} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm), initial Lorentz factor of the outflow ({Gamma}{sub 0} {approx} 250), the composition of the ejecta (mildly magnetized), the collimation angle, and the total energy budget.

  11. Panchromatic Observations of the Textbook GRB 110205A: Constraining Physical Mechanisms of Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Zhang, B.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T(sub 90) approx. 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Thanks to its long duration, nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray (1 eV - 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. In particular, by fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/ -ray spectra, it traces the -ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (approx. 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ( alpha approx. 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed.

  12. Rapid, Machine-learned Resource Allocation: Application to High-redshift Gamma-Ray Burst Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, A. N.; Long, James; Richards, Joseph W.; Broderick, Tamara; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-02-01

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation—based on the available telescope time—of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that ~56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and ~84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top ~40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  13. RAPID, MACHINE-LEARNED RESOURCE ALLOCATION: APPLICATION TO HIGH-REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A. N.; Richards, Joseph W.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Long, James; Broderick, Tamara

    2012-02-20

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation-based on the available telescope time-of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that {approx}56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and {approx}84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top {approx}40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  14. GRB 980326 and GRB 980329

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Michael S.; Richardson, Georgia A.; Kippen, Richard M.; Woods, Peter

    1998-01-01

    M. S. Briggs, G. Richardson, R. M. Kippen, and p. M. woods, University of Alabama in Huntsville, report on behalf of the BATSE team: GRB 980326 (IAUC 6851) was observed with BATSE on Mar. 26.88811 UT as trigger 6660. The event lasted about 5 s and exhibited three narrow pulses. Its peak flux (integrated over 0.5 s) and fluence (50-300 keV) are 8 x l0(exp -7) erg /sq cm sE-1 and 1 x 10(exp -6) erg/sq cm, respectively. GRB 980329 (IAUC 6853) was observed with BATSE on Mar. 29.15600 as trigger 6665; the event was very intense and lasted about 55 s, exhibiting a 10-s-long, highly structured peak. Its peak flux (integrated over 0.5 s) and fluence (50-300 keV) are 8 x 10(exp -6) erg/ sq cm sE-1 and 5 x l0(exp -5) erg/ sq cm, respectively. The BATSE locations are consistent with the locations of the reported optical transient for GRB 980326 (IAUC 6852) and the SAX/NFI x-ray counterpart for GRB 980329 (IAUC 6854). Location maps can be found at http://www.batse.msfc.nasa.gov/-kippen/batsebr.

  15. Managing GRB afterglows optical/IR observations in the web 2.0 era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, D.; Nicastro, L.

    2013-07-01

    We present an overview of top internet technologies that can be used to build webtools and rich internet applications for astronomy. The aim is to simplify the data handling, reduction and access, in particular of optical/infrared images collected by traditional, automatic or robotic telescopes. These tools are particularly suitable for real-time management of GRB afterglow observations. Using these technologies we are developing a web-based images database management system. We present available features and discuss further improvements to the mentioned system.

  16. J-GEM follow-up observations to search for an optical counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Abe, Fumio; Tristram, Paul J.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Saito, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yoichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Uemura, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-08-01

    We present our optical follow-up observations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914 in the framework of the Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up (J-GEM), which is an observing group utilizing optical and radio telescopes in Japan, as well as in New Zealand, China, South Africa, Chile, and Hawaii. We carried out a wide-field imaging survey with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC) on the 1.05 m Kiso Schmidt telescope in Japan and a galaxy-targeted survey with Tripole5 on the B&C 61 cm telescope in New Zealand. Approximately 24 deg2 regions in total were surveyed in i-band with KWFC and 18 nearby galaxies were observed with Tripole5 in g-, r-, and i-bands 4-12 days after the gravitational wave detection. Median 5 σ depths are i ˜ 18.9 mag for the KWFC data and g ˜ 18.9 mag, r ˜ 18.7 mag, and i ˜ 18.3 mag for the Tripole5 data. The probability for a counterpart to be in the observed area is 1.2% in the initial skymap and 0.1% in the final skymap. We do not find any transient source associated to an external galaxy with spatial offset from its center, which is consistent with the local supernova rate.

  17. GRB 971214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Bloom, J.; Djorgovski, S.; Goodrich, R.; Frail, D.

    1998-01-01

    The optical transient (IAUC #6788) of GRB 971214 (IAUC #6787; IAUC #6792) was observed by J. Aycock using the LRIS instrument on Keck II. The observations were conducted between 1400--1600 UT of January 10, 1998 and images were obtained in the R band. The seeing was consistently 0.86 arcsec and 12 frames each of five minute duration were obtained. A source is clearly detected at the position of the OT.

  18. Observing GRBs with INTEGRAL

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Christoph

    1998-05-16

    The International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory INTEGRAL is dedicated to the fine spectroscopy and fine imaging of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy range 15 keV to 10 MeV. This paper summarizes the GRB detection and observation capabilities of the INTEGRAL instruments and describes the dissemination of INTEGRAL GRB alerts to the science community to enable rapid follow-up observations of GRB error boxes for counterpart searches and subsequent investigations.

  19. GRB 050717: A Long, Short-Lag Burst Observed by Swift and Konus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Hurkett, C.; Pal'shin, V.; Norris, J. P.; Zhang, B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Golenetskii, S.; Osborne, J. P.; Parsons, A. M.; Perri, M.; Willingale, R.

    2005-01-01

    The long burst GRB 050717 was observed simultaneously by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift and the Konus instrument on Wind. Significant hard to soft spectral evolution was seen. Early gamma-ray and X-ray emission was detected by both BAT and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Swift. The XRT continued to observe the burst for 7.1 days and detect it for 1.4 days. The X-ray light curve showed a classic decay pattern including evidence of the onset of the external shock emission at approx. 50 s after the trigger; the afterglow was too faint for a jet break to be detected. No optical, infrared or ultraviolet counterpart was discovered despite deep searches within 14 hours of the burst. The spectral lag for GRB 050717 was determined to be 2.5 +/- 2.6 ms, consistent, with zero and unusually short for a long burst. This lag measurement suggests that this burst has a high intrinsic luminosity and hence is at high redshift (z > 2.7). 050717 provides a good example of classic prompt and afterglow behavior for a gamma-ray burst.

  20. Stirring the Embers: High-Sensitivity VLBI Observations of GRB 030329

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlstrom, Y.M.; Taylor, G.B.; Granot, J.; Doeleman, S.; /MIT, Haystack Observ.

    2007-09-24

    We present high-sensitivity Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations 806 days after the {gamma}-ray burst of 2003 March 29 (GRB 030329). The angular diameter of the radio afterglow is measured to be 0:347 {+-} 0:09 mas, corresponding to 0:99 {+-} 0:26 pc at the redshift of GRB 030329 (z = 0:1685). The evolution of the image size favors a uniform external density over an R{sup -2} windlike density profile (at distances of R {approx}> 10{sup 18} cm from the source), although the latter cannot be ruled out yet. The current apparent expansion velocity of the image size is only mildly relativistic, suggesting a nonrelativistic transition time of tNR {approx} 1 yr. A rebrightening, or at least a significant flattening in the flux decay, is expected within the next several years as the counterjet becomes visible (this has not yet been observed). An upper limit of <1.9c is set on the proper motion of the flux centroid.

  1. Observation of an Unexpected Hardening in the Spectrum of GRB 021206

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigger, C.; Wigger, O.; Bellm, E.; Hajdas, W.

    2008-03-01

    GRB 021206 is one of the brightest GRBs ever observed. Its prompt emission, as measured by RHESSI, shows an unexpected spectral feature. The spectrum has a peak energy of about 700 keV and can be described by a Band function up to 4.5 MeV. Above 4.5 MeV, the spectrum hardens again, so the Band function fails to fit the whole RHESSI energy range up to 17 MeV. Nor does the sum of a blackbody function plus a power law, even though such a function can describe a spectral hardening. The cannonball model, on the other hand, predicts such a hardening, and we found that it fits the spectrum of GRB 021206 perfectly. We also analyzed other strong GRBs observed by RHESSI, namely, GRBs 020715, 021008, 030329, 030406, 030519B, 031027, and 031111. We found that all their spectra can be fit by the cannonball model, as well as by a Band function.

  2. Swift observations of GRB 060614: an anomalous burst with a well behaved afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, V.; Holland, S. T.; Malesani, D.; Troja, E.; Chincarini, G.; Zhang, B.; La Parola, V.; Brown, P. J.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Capalbi, M.; Cusumano, G.; Della Valle, M.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Grupe, D.; Guidorzi, C.; Mineo, T.; Moretti, A.; Osborne, J. P.; Pandey, S. B.; Perri, M.; Romano, P.; Roming, P. W. A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2007-07-01

    GRB 060614 is a remarkable gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by Swift with puzzling properties, which challenge current progenitor models. In particular, the lack of any bright supernova (SN) down to very strict limits and the vanishing spectral lags during the whole burst are typical of short GRBs, strikingly at odds with the long (102 s) duration of this event. Here we present detailed spectral and temporal analysis of the Swift observations of GRB 060614. We show that the burst presents standard optical, ultraviolet and X-ray afterglows, detected beginning 4 ks after the trigger. An achromatic break is observed simultaneously in the optical and X-ray bands, at a time consistent with the break in the R-band light curve measured by the VLT. The achromatic behaviour and the consistent post-break decay slopes make GRB 060614 one of the best examples of a jet break for a Swift burst. The optical and ultraviolet afterglow light curves have also an earlier break at 29.7 ± 4.4 ks, marginally consistent with a corresponding break at 36.6 ± 2.4 ks observed in the X-rays. In the optical, there is strong spectral evolution around this break, suggesting the passage of a break frequency through the optical/ultraviolet band. The very blue spectrum at early times suggests this may be the injection frequency, as also supported by the trend in the light curves: rising at low frequencies, and decaying at higher energies. The early X-ray light curve (from 97 to 480 s) is well interpreted as the X-ray counterpart of the burst extended emission. Spectral analysis of the BAT and XRT data in the ~80 s overlap time interval show that the peak energy of the burst has decreased to as low as 8 keV at the beginning of the XRT observation. Spectral analysis of following XRT data shows that the peak energy of the burst continues to decrease through the XRT energy band and exits it at about 500 s after the trigger. The average peak energy Ep of the burst is likely below the BAT energy band (<24

  3. Observed changes in cardiovascular risk factors among high-risk middle-aged men who received lifestyle counselling: a 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Siren, Reijo; Eriksson, Johan G.; Vanhanen, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the long-term impact of health counselling among middle-aged men at high risk of CVD. Design An observational study with a 5-year follow-up. Setting and intervention All men aged 40 years in Helsinki have been invited to a visit to evaluate CVD risk from 2006 onwards. A modified version of the North Karelia project risk tool (CVD risk score) served to assess the risk. High-risk men received lifestyle counselling based on their individual risk profile in 2006 and were invited to a follow-up visit in 2011. Subjects Of the 389 originally high-risk men, 159 participated in the follow-up visits in 2011. Based on their follow-up in relation the further risk communication, we divided the participants into three groups: primary health care, occupational health care and no control visits. Main outcome measures Lifestyle and CVD risk score change. Results All groups showed improvements in lifestyles. The CVD risk score decreased the most in the group that continued the risk communication visits in their primary health care centre (6.1 to 4.8 [95% CI −1.6 to −0.6]) compared to those who continued risk communication visits in their occupational health care (6.0 to 5.4 [95% CI −1.3 to 0.3]), and to those with no risk communication visits (6.0 to 5.9 [95% CI −0.5 to 0.4]). Conclusions These findings indicate that individualized lifestyle counselling improves health behaviour and reduces total CVD risk among middle-aged men at high risk of CVD. Sustained improvement in risk factor status requires ongoing risk communication with health care providers. KEY POINTSStudies of short duration have shown that lifestyle changes reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among high-risk individuals.Sustaining these lifestyle changes and maintaining the lower disease risk attained can prove challenging.Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment and individualized health counselling for high-risk men, when implemented in primary health care, have the potential

  4. BATSE observations of the very intense gamma-ray burst GRB 930131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Preece, Robert; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Horack, John M.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Band, David

    1994-01-01

    Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) observed its most intense gamma-ray burst on 1993 January 31. The event reached count rates is approximately greater than 2 x 10(exp 6) counts/s with most of the flux emitted in an extremely short (is approximately less than 0.1 s) interval followed by a long tail, lasting about 50 s. Most of this initial pulse was recorded by our instrument with unique, very high temporal resolution (1 ms). We were thus able to show large changes in spectral hardness on 2 ms timescales throughout this initial complex. Photons as low as 25 keV and extending up to greater than 4 MeV in energy were recorded by BATSE during this first interval. The burst spectrum is best fitted by a broken power law with a break energy of 170 +/- 27 keV. The low-energy spectral index is -1.30 +/- 0.05, while a softer spectral index of -1.9 fits the spectrum between 170 keV and 2 MeV. Our data provide the only low-energy spectrum for this event; the combination of our spectrum with the one reported for GRB 930131 by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) group extends the total energy spectrum of a GRB for the first time over five decades, up to the GeV range.

  5. The GRB luminosity function: predictions from the internal shock model and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovich, R.; Zerguini, T. H.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the context of the internal shock model. We assume that GRB central engines generate relativistic outflows characterized by the respective distributions of injected kinetic power and contrast in Lorentz factor κ = Γmax/Γmin. We find that if the distribution of contrast extends down to values close to unity (i.e. if both highly variable and smooth outflows can exist), then the luminosity function has two branches. At high luminosity it follows the distribution of while at low luminosity it is close to a power law of slope -0.5. We then examine if existing data can constrain the luminosity function. Using the logN-logP curve, the Ep distribution of bright Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) bursts and the X-ray flash (XRF)/GRB ratio obtained by High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), we show that single and broken power laws can provide equally good fits of these data. Present observations are therefore unable to favour one form or the other. However, when a broken power law is adopted they clearly indicate a low-luminosity slope ~= -0.6 +/- 0.2, compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  6. Broadband observations of the naked-eye gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B.

    PubMed

    Racusin, J L; Karpov, S V; Sokolowski, M; Granot, J; Wu, X F; Pal'shin, V; Covino, S; van der Horst, A J; Oates, S R; Schady, P; Smith, R J; Cummings, J; Starling, R L C; Piotrowski, L W; Zhang, B; Evans, P A; Holland, S T; Malek, K; Page, M T; Vetere, L; Margutti, R; Guidorzi, C; Kamble, A P; Curran, P A; Beardmore, A; Kouveliotou, C; Mankiewicz, L; Melandri, A; O'Brien, P T; Page, K L; Piran, T; Tanvir, N R; Wrochna, G; Aptekar, R L; Barthelmy, S; Bartolini, C; Beskin, G M; Bondar, S; Bremer, M; Campana, S; Castro-Tirado, A; Cucchiara, A; Cwiok, M; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Valle, M Della; de Ugarte Postigo, A; Dominik, W; Falcone, A; Fiore, F; Fox, D B; Frederiks, D D; Fruchter, A S; Fugazza, D; Garrett, M A; Gehrels, N; Golenetskii, S; Gomboc, A; Gorosabel, J; Greco, G; Guarnieri, A; Immler, S; Jelinek, M; Kasprowicz, G; La Parola, V; Levan, A J; Mangano, V; Mazets, E P; Molinari, E; Moretti, A; Nawrocki, K; Oleynik, P P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Pandey, S B; Paragi, Z; Perri, M; Piccioni, A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Roming, P W A; Steele, I A; Strom, R G; Testa, V; Tosti, G; Ulanov, M V; Wiersema, K; Wijers, R A M J; Winters, J M; Zarnecki, A F; Zerbi, F; Mészáros, P; Chincarini, G; Burrows, D N

    2008-09-11

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release copious amounts of energy across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and so provide a window into the process of black hole formation from the collapse of massive stars. Previous early optical observations of even the most exceptional GRBs (990123 and 030329) lacked both the temporal resolution to probe the optical flash in detail and the accuracy needed to trace the transition from the prompt emission within the outflow to external shocks caused by interaction with the progenitor environment. Here we report observations of the extraordinarily bright prompt optical and gamma-ray emission of GRB 080319B that provide diagnostics within seconds of its formation, followed by broadband observations of the afterglow decay that continued for weeks. We show that the prompt emission stems from a single physical region, implying an extremely relativistic outflow that propagates within the narrow inner core of a two-component jet.

  7. An observational study of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells transplantation in seven patients with nervous system diseases: a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chao; Geng, Run-lu; Ge, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Hao; Wan, Mei-Rong; Geng, De-Qin

    2014-05-01

    Currently, autologous bone marrow-derived stem cell is one of the most innovative areas of stem cells research. Previous studies on animal models of nervous system diseases have shown that these cells have a good effect on nervous system disorders. The alternative treatment with stem cells for the nervous system diseases has also gradually reached to clinical application stage. The prospect is captivating, but the safety and efficacy of this procedure need further research. To observe the clinical efficacy and side effects of the treatment for autologous mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem/progenitor cells which are in differentiated form by inducing with cerebrospinal fluid in the patients with nervous system diseases, thirty patients were selected from our hospital (2009-10 to 2012-07) and were followed at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the treatment with autologous mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem/progenitor cells in differentiated form was introduced. In this paper, we will introduce the process to make cells accessible for the clinical application by the description of the changes observed in 7 cases were followed for 2 years. The time for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells could be available for clinical needs is as early as 5 days, not later than 10 days, and the median time is 8 days, while neural stem/progenitor cells in differentiated form can be available for clinical needs in as early as 12 days, not later than 15 days, and the median time is 13.5 days (statistical explanation: Case 5 only uses autologous mesenchymal stem cells, and Case 7 has two times bone marrow punctures). The neurological function of the patients was improved in 1-month follow-up, and the patients have a better discontinuous trend (statistical explanation: sometimes the neurological function of the patients between two adjacent follow-ups does not change significantly). After transplantation, four patients appeared to have transient fever, but it was

  8. FERMI observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 090217A

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H.; Garde, M. Llena; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ripken, J.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-22

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9σ. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to ~1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  9. Pain, disability and health-related quality of life in osteoarthritis-joint matters: an observational, multi-specialty trans-national follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Montero, Antonio; Mulero, Juan-Francisco; Tornero, Carlos; Guitart, Jordi; Serrano, Mar

    2016-09-01

    The authors aimed to test potential relations between osteoarthritis (OA) features, disability and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) at different body locations. Outpatients consulting for pain associated to self-reported OA at varied healthcare settings were evaluated in a 3-month observational non-controlled follow-up study. Socio-demographic/anthropometric and medical data were collected at three time points. Lequesne's indices, quick-disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) and Oswestry questionnaires provided measures of physical function and disability. HR-QoL measures were obtained with EuroQol-5 Dimensions. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the differences of pain severity across body regions and the correlates of disability and HR-QoL. Six thousand patients were evaluated. Pain lasted 2 years or more in 3995 patients. The mean pain severity at baseline was moderate (6.4 points). On average, patients had pain in 1.9 joints/areas. The pain was more severe when OA involved the spine or all body regions. Pain severity explained much of the variance in disability and HR-QoL; this association was less relevant in patients with OA in the upper limbs. There were considerable improvements at follow up. Pain severity improved as did disability, which showed particularly strong associations with HR-QoL improvements. Pain severity is associated with functional limitations, disability and poor HR-QoL in patients with self-reported OA. Functional limitations might have particular relevance when OA affects the upper limbs. Improvements are feasible in many patients who consult because of their pain.

  10. Multi-wavelength Observations of GRB 111228A and Implications for the Fireball and its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Lin, Ting-Ting; Liang, En-Wei; Lü, Hou-Jun; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Urata, Yuji; Zhao, Xiao-Hong; Wu, Chao; Wei, Jian-Yan; Huang, Kui-Yun; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song

    2016-02-01

    Observations of very early multi-wavelength afterglows are critical to reveal the properties of the radiating fireball and its environment as well as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We report our optical observations of GRB 111228A from 95 s to about 50 hr after the burst trigger and investigate its properties of the prompt gamma-rays and the ambient medium using our data and the data from the Swift and Fermi missions. Our joint optical and X-ray spectral fits to the afterglow data show that the ambient medium features a low dust-to-gas ratio. Incorporating the energy injection effect, our best fit to the afterglow light curves with the standard afterglow model via the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique shows that {ɛ }e=(6.9+/- 0.3)× {10}-2, {ɛ }B=(7.73+/- 0.62)× {10}-6,{E}K=(6.32+/- 0.86)× {10}53 {erg}, n=0.100+/- 0.014 cm-3. The low medium density likely implies that the afterglow jet may be in a halo or in a hot ISM. A chromatic shallow decay segment observed in the optical and X-ray bands is well explained with the long-lasting energy injection from the central engine, which would be a magnetar with a period of about 1.92 ms inferred from the data. The Ep of its time-integrated prompt gamma-ray spectrum is ˜26 KeV. Using the initial Lorentz factor ({{{Γ }}}0={476}-237+225) derived from our afterglow model fit, it is found that GRB 111228A satisfies the {L}{{iso}}-{E}p,z-{{{Γ }}}0 relation and bridges the typical GRBs and low luminosity GRBs in this relation.

  11. Photometric Observations of Supernova 2013cq Associated with GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, R. L.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Fraija, N.; Butler, N. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Capone, J. I.; Cucchiara, A.; de Diego, J. A.; Fox, O. D.; Gehrels, N.; Georgiev, L. N.; González, J. J.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Littlejohns, O. M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Toy, V. L.; Troja, E.

    2017-03-01

    We observed the afterglow of GRB 130427A with the Reionization and Transients Infrared Camera (RATIR) instrument on the 1.5 m Harold L. Johnson telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir. Our homogenous griZY JH photometry extends from the night of the burst to three years later. We fit a model for the afterglow. There is a significant positive residual that matches the behavior of SN 1998bw in the griZ filters; we suggest that this is a photometric signature of the supernova SN 2013cq associated with the Gamma-ray burst. The peak absolute magnitude of the supernova is {M}r=-18.43+/- 0.11.

  12. INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton Observations of the Weak Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030227

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, S.; Götz, D.; Tiengo, A.; Beckmann, V.; Borkowski, J.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; von Kienlin, A.; Schoenfelder, V.; Roques, J. P.; Bouchet, L.; Ubertini, P.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Lebrun, F.; Paul, J.; Lund, N.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Hermsen, W.; den Hartog, P. R.; Winkler, C.

    2003-06-01

    We present International Gamma-Ray Astrophysical Laboratory (INTEGRAL) and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt γ-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB 030227, the first gamma-ray burst for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System has led to the discovery of X-ray and optical afterglows. GRB 030227 had a duration of about 20 s and a peak flux of ~1.1 photons cm-2 s-1 in the 20-200 keV energy range. The time-averaged spectrum can be fitted by a single power law with photon index ~2, and we find some evidence for a hard-to-soft spectral evolution. The X-ray afterglow has been detected starting only 8 hr after the prompt emission, with a 0.2-10 keV flux decreasing as t-1 from 1.3×10-12 to 5×10-13 ergs cm-2 s-1. The afterglow spectrum is well described by a power law with photon index 1.94+/-0.05 modified by a redshifted neutral absorber with column density of several 1022 cm-2. A possible emission line at 1.67 keV could be due to Fe for a redshift z~3, consistent with the value inferred from the absorption. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, and Spain), the Czech Republic, and Poland and with the participation of Russia and the US, and XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and the US.

  13. Galaxy Survey On the Fly: Prospects of Rapid Galaxy Cataloging to Aid the Electromagnetic Follow-Up of Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, I.; Crotts, A. P. S.; Márka, S.

    2015-03-01

    Galaxy catalogs are essential for efficient searches of the electromagnetic counterparts of extragalactic gravitational wave (GW) signals with highly uncertain localization. We show that one can efficiently catalog galaxies within a short period of time with 1-2 m class telescopes such as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) or MDM, in response to an observed GW signal from a compact binary coalescence. We find that a rapid galaxy survey is feasible on the relevant time scale of ≲ 1 week, with a maximum source distance of \\gt 200 Mpc and a sky area of 100 deg2. With PTF-like telescopes, even 1 day is sufficient for such a survey. This catalog can then be provided to other telescopes to aid electromagnetic follow-up observations to find kilonovae from binary coalescences, as well as other sources. We consider Hα observations, which track the star formation rate (SFR) and are therefore correlated with the rate of compact binary mergers. Hα surveys are also able to filter out galaxies that are farther away than the maximum GW source distance. Rapid galaxy surveys that follow GW triggers could achieve ˜90% completeness with respect to SFR, which is currently unavailable. This will significantly reduce the required effort and enhance the immediate availability of catalogs compared to possible future all-sky surveys.

  14. Transiting Primary Eclipse Photometric Follow-up Observations and Transit Timing Variations Studies of WASP-43 b and TrES-3 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Ji, J. H.; Dong, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Two photometric follow-up observations for transiting primary eclipse of WASP-43 b and four for TrES-3 b are performed using the Xuyi Near-Earth Object Survey Telescope. After differential photometry and light curve analysis, physical parameters of the two systems are obtained and are in good match with the literatures. Combining with transit data from many literatures, the residuals (O-C) of observations of both systems transits are fitted with the linear and quadratic terms. With the linear fitting, the periods and transit timing variations (TTVs) of the planets are obtained, and no obvious periodic TTV signal is found in either system after analysis. The maximum mass of perturbing planet located at 1:2 mean motion resonance (MMR) of WASP-43 b and TrES-3 b are estimated to be 1.826 and 1.504 Earth mass, respectively. By quadratic fitting, it is confirmed that WASP-43 b may have long-term TTV which means an orbital decay. The decay rate is shown to be dot{P} =(-0.005248 ± 0.001714) s\\cdotyr^{-1}, and is compared with the previous results. Based on this, the lower limit of the stellar tidal quality parameter of WASP-43 is calculated to be Q'_{*} ≥ 1.5×10^5, and the remaining lifetime of the planets of both systems is presented for different Q'_{*} values accordingly.

  15. Infrared and Optical Observations of GRB 030115 and its Extremely Red Host Galaxy: Implications for Dark Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Rhoads, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Tanvir, Nial; Gorosabel, Javier; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; DellAntonio, Ian; Merrill, Javier

    2004-01-01

    We present near-infrared (a) and optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 030115. Discovered in an infrared search at Kitt Peak 5 hours after the burst trigger, this afterglow is the faintest ever observed in the R-band at such an early epoch, and exhibits very red colors, with R-K approximately equal to 6. The magnitude of the optical afterglow of GRB 030115 is fainter than many upper limits for other bursts, suggesting that without early nIR observations it would have been classified as a "dark" burst. Both the color and optical magnitude of the afterglow are likely due to dust extinction and indicate that at least some optical afterglows are observations were also taken of the host galaxy and the surrounding field. Photometric redshifts imply that the host, and a substantial number of faint galaxies in the field are at z approximately 2.5. The overdensity of galaxies is sufficiently great that GRB 030115 may have occurred in a rich high-redshift cluster. The host galaxy shows extremely red colors (R-K=5) and is the first GRB host to be classified as an Extreme Red Object (ERO). Some of the galaxies surrounding the host also show very red colors, while the majority of the cluster are much bluer, indicating ongoing unobscured star formation. As it is thought that much of high redshift star formation occurs in highly obscured environments it may well be that GRB 030115 represents a transition object, between the relatively unobscured afterglows seen to date and a population which are very heavily extinguished, even in the nIR.

  16. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Cenko, S. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Misra, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova, and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E iso > 1054 erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v ph ~ 15, 000 km s-1). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v ph ~ 30, 000 km s-1), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M ⊙ yr-1), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  18. Infrared and Optical Observations of GRB 030115 and its ExtremelyRed Host Galaxy: Implications for Dark Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Rhoads, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Tanvir, Nial; Gorosabel, Javier; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Merrill, Michael; Bergeron, Eddie; Castro Ceron, JosMar a; Masetti, Nicola; Vreeswijk, Paul; Antonelli, Angelo; Bersier,David; Castro-Tirado, Alberto; Fynbo, Johan; Garnavich, Peter; Holland,Stephen; Hjorth, Jens; Nugent, Peter; Pian, Elena; Smette, Alain; Thomsen, Bjarne; Thorsett, Stephen E.; Wijers, Ralph

    2006-05-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) and optical observations ofthe afterglow of GRB 030115. Discovered in aninfrared search at Kitt Peak5 hr after the burst trigger, this afterglow is the faintest everobserved in the R band at such an early epoch and exhibits very redcolors, with R-K~;6. The optical magnitude of the afterglow of GRB 030115is fainter than many upper limits for other bursts, suggesting thatwithout early NIR observations it would have been classified as a "dark"burst. Both the color and optical magnitude of the afterglow are likelydue to dust extinction atmoderate redshift z>2 and indicate that atleast some optical afterglows are very faint due to dust along the lineof sight.Multicolor Hubble Space Telescope observations were also takenof the host galaxy and the surrounding field. Photometric redshifts implythat the host and a substantial number of faint galaxies in the field areat z 2:5. The overdensity of galaxies is sufficiently great that GRB030115 may have occurred in a rich high-redshift cluster. The host galaxyshows extremely red colors (R-K = 5) and is the first GRB host to beclassified as an extremely red object (ERO). Some of the galaxiessurrounding the host also show very red colors, while the majority of theclusterare much bluer, indicating ongoing unobscured star formation. Asit is thought that much of high-redshift starformation occurs in highlyobscured environments, it may well be that GRB 030115 represents atransition object, between the relatively unobscured afterglows seen todate and a population of objects that are very heavily extinguished, evenin the NIR.

  19. Long-term follow-up of antithrombotic management patterns in patients with acute coronary syndrome in Russia: an observational study (EPICOR-RUS study).

    PubMed

    Ruda, Mikhail Ya; Averkov, Oleg V; Khomitskaya, Yunona V

    2017-07-01

    This study sought to describe the short- and long-term (up to 2 years) antithrombotic management patterns in a real-life setting for patients hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event, and to document clinical outcomes. EPICOR-RUS was a multicenter (34 centers), prospective, observational, longitudinal cohort study conducted across Russia on antithrombotic management in hospitalized (within 24 hours of symptom onset) ACS patients with 2 year follow-up. NCT01373957. A total of 600 ACS patients (71.1% male, mean age 60 years) were enrolled; 599 were included for analysis. Diagnosis comprised STEMI (n = 375, 62.6%), NSTEMI (n = 147, 24.5%), and unstable angina (UA) (n = 77, 12.9%). Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was conducted in 64.3% of patients with STEMI (with or without thrombolysis), 36.7% with NSTEMI, and 58.4% with UA. There was undertreatment with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for STEMI, NSTEMI, and UA: 14.7%, 25.9% and 16.9% of patients, respectively, were not receiving DAPT during hospitalization, and 10.1%, 21.8% and 16.9% at discharge. Post-discharge, of the STEMI group, only 72.4% of patients who were managed by PCI and 39.8% of conservatively treated patients received DAPT at 12 months. The respective figures in the NSTEMI group were 77.3% and 26.4%. In the STEMI cohort the cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality was 3.2% at 1 year and 5.1% at 2 years of follow-up; in the NSTEMI cohort this was 2.7% and 4.8%, respectively. There were no deaths by 12 months and one death by 24 months (1.3%) in the UA population. Despite evidence-based guidelines for the management of ACS, the real-world setting in Russia shows discrepancies in clinical practice, highlighting the need for improvements for the optimal management of high-risk patients with ACS.

  20. Providing Information About Late Effects During Routine Follow-Up Consultations Between Pediatric Oncologists and Adolescent Survivors: A Video-Based, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Mellblom, Anneli V; Korsvold, Live; Finset, Arnstein; Loge, Jon; Ruud, Ellen; Lie, Hanne C

    2015-12-01

    Information about late effects is a prerequisite for survivors of childhood cancers to engage in self-management of their health. Yet, many lack such knowledge. This study investigated to what extent: (1) potential late effects were discussed with adolescent and young adult (AYA)-aged survivors (of pediatric cancer), and (2) information about late effects was provided by the pediatric oncologists (POs) during routine follow-up consultations. Consultations were recorded with 10 POs and 66 adolescents, aged 12-20 years, treated for leukemia (72.7%) or lymphoma (21.2%), or who had received hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for a benign disease (7.6%). Discussions of potential late effects were identified and coded, and then the amount of information about late effects provided was categorized into three levels: none, basic, and extended information. Potential late effects were discussed in 85% of the consultations. Of these, 71% were PO initiated, and 60% concerned existing health problems. The POs provided none, basic, and extended information about late effects in 41%, 30%, and 29% of these discussions. Patients' age, time since treatment, and risk of late effects were not associated with amount of potential late effects discussed, but the type of potential late effect (physical vs. psychosocial and current vs. future risk) and PO were. Potential late effects were frequently discussed, thus providing ample opportunity to provide information about late effects to adolescent cancer survivors. The observed PO variability in providing such information indicates a need for standardization of information practices.

  1. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%.

  2. A follow-up of in-orbit observations of radiation-induced effects in commercial of the shelf memories on-board Alsat-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentoutou, Y.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a follow-up of the results of an 8-year study on radiation effects in commercial off the shelf (COTS) memory devices operating within the on-board data handling system of the Algerian micro-satellite Alsat-1 in a Low-Earth Orbit (LEO). A statistical analysis of single-event upset (SEU) and multiple-bit upset (MBU) activity in commercial memories on-board the Alsat-1 primary On-Board Computer (OBC-386) is given. The OBC-386 is an Intel 80C386EX based system that plays a dual role for Alsat-1, acting as the key component of the payload computer as well as the command and control computer for the micro-satellite. The in-orbit observations show that the typical SEU rate at Alsat-1's orbit is 4.04 × 10 -7 SEU/bit/day, where 98.6% of these SEUs cause single-bit errors, 1.22% cause double-byte errors, and the remaining SEUs result in multiple-bit and severe errors.

  3. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  4. GRB 011121: A Collimated Outflow into Wind-blown Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Scholz, R. D.; Sterken, C.; Gorosabel, J.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A.; Grinkov, V.; Andersen, M. I.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fruchter, A.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Kaper, L.; Kouveliotou, C.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van den Heuvel, E.

    2003-12-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121 collected predominantly at ESO telescopes in Chile. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of about 9°. The jet origin of this break is supported by the fact that the spectral energy distribution is achromatic during the first 4 days. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law, which we interpret as additional light from an underlying supernova. In particular, the spectral energy distribution of the optical transient approximately 2 weeks after the burst is clearly not of power-law type but can be presented by a blackbody with a temperature of ~6000 K. The deduced parameters for the decay slope and the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e., an outflow into a circumburst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor. Because of its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 has been the best example for the GRB-supernova connection until GRB 030329 and provides compelling evidence for a circumburster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla and Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme 165.H-0464).

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connaughton, V.; Cui, W.; Falcone, A. E-mail: sjzhu@umd.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ∼70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ∼71 ks (∼20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. The non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Biteau, J.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connaughton, V.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; McEnery, J. E.; Perkins, J. S.; Veres, P.; Zhu, S.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ~70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ~71 ks (~20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. In conclusion, the non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.

  7. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    DOE PAGES

    Aliu, E.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; ...

    2014-10-10

    In this study, prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ~70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is alsomore » evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ~71 ks (~20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. In conclusion, the non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.« less

  8. GRB980109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Martin

    1998-01-01

    GRB980109 field was observed by the OGLE collaboration with the 1.3-m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile on Jan. 10.06, 10.18, 11.05, 12.05 and 16.05, 1998. Ten 900 sec I-band exposures were collected. The field size was 14.2 by 14.2 arcmins covering almost entire error box. None fading or variable stellar-like object was detected up to detection limit of I ~ 21 mag and variability threshold of 0.4 mag.

  9. FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION OF GRB 081006A FROM FERMI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; Pandey, Shashi B.; McKay, Timothy A.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing

    2012-01-20

    Since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument has firmly detected more than 20 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV. Using the matched filter technique, three more GRBs have also shown evidence of correlation with high-energy photon emission as demonstrated by Akerlof et al. In this paper, we present another GRB, GRB 081006A, unambiguously detected by the matched filter technique. This event is associated with more than 13 high-energy photons above 100 MeV. The likelihood analysis code provided by the Fermi Science Support Center generated an independent verification of this detection using a comparison of the test statistics value with similar calculations for random LAT data fields. We have performed detailed temporal and spectral analysis of photons from 8 keV up to 0.8 GeV from the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the LAT. The properties of GRB 081006A can be compared to those of the other two long-duration GRBs detected at similar significance, GRB 080825C and GRB 090217A. We find that GRB 081006A is more similar to GRB 080825C with comparable appearances of late high-energy photon emission. As demonstrated previously, there appears to be a surprising dearth of faint LAT GRBs, with only one additional GRB identified in a sample of 74. In this unique period when both Swift and Fermi are operational, there is some urgency to explore this aspect of GRBs as fully as possible.

  10. HAT-P-56b: An Inflated Massive Hot Jupiter Transiting a Bright F Star Followed Up with K2 Campaign 0 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bhatti, W.; Bieryla, A.; de Val-Borro, M.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Béky, B.; Falco, E.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M. L.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F-type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph on the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.5 m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of 2.18 {M}{{J}}, radius of 1.47 {R}{{J}}, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of 2.7908 day. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with {M}p\\gt 2 {M}{{J}}. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 {M}⊙ , and radius of 1.43 {R}⊙ . The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests that the star is a γ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the accuracy of the planetary parameters. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. Based in part on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. Based in part on observations obtained with the Kepler Space Craft in the K2 Campaign 0 Mission.

  11. GRB 011121: A Collimated Outflow into Wind-Blown Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Fruchter, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121 collected predominantly at ESO telescopes in Chile. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of about 9 deg. The jet origin of this break is supported by the fact that the spectral energy distribution is achromatic during the first four days. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law, which we interpret as additional light from an underlying supernova. In particular, the spectral energy distribution of the optical transient approximately 2 weeks after the burst is clearly not of power-law type, but can be presented by a black body with a temperature of approx. 6000 K. The deduced parameters for the decay slope as well as the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e. an outflow into a circum-burst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive GRB progenitor. Due to its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 has been the best example for the GRB-supernova connection until GRB 030329, and provides compelling evidence for a circum-burster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star.

  12. An observational study on surgically treated adult idiopathic scoliosis patients' quality of life outcomes at 1- and 2-year follow-ups and comparison to controls.

    PubMed

    Theis, Jennifer C; Grauers, Anna; Diarbakerli, Elias; Savvides, Panayiotis; Abbott, Allan; Gerdhem, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Prospective data on health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated surgically as adults is needed. We compared preoperative and 1- and 2-year follow-up data in surgically treated adults with idiopathic scoliosis with juvenile or adolescent onset. Results were compared to untreated adults with scoliosis and population normative data. A comparison of preoperative and 1- and 2-year follow-up data of 75 adults surgically treated for idiopathic scoliosis at a mean age of 28 years (range 18 to 69) from a prospective national register study, as well as a comparison with age- and sex-matched data from 75 untreated adults with less severe scoliosis and 75 adults without scoliosis, was made. Outcome measures were EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D) and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22r questionnaire. In the surgically treated, EQ-5D and SRS-22r scores had statistically significant improvements at both 1- and 2-year follow-ups (all p  < 0.015). The effect size of surgery on EQ-5D at 1-year follow-up was large (r = -0.54) and small-medium (r = -0.20) at 2-year follow-up. The effect size of surgery on SRS-22r outcomes was medium-large at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (r = -0.43 and r = -0.42 respectively). At the 2-year follow-up, the EQ-5D score and the SRS-22r subscore were similar to the untreated scoliosis group (p = 0.56 and p = 0.91 respectively), but lower than those in the adults without scoliosis (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). Adults with idiopathic scoliosis experience an increase in health-related quality of life following surgery at 2-year follow-up, approaching the health-related quality of life of untreated individuals with less severe scoliosis, but remain lower than normative population data.

  13. Providing Information About Late Effects During Routine Follow-Up Consultations Between Pediatric Oncologists and Adolescent Survivors: A Video-Based, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Korsvold, Live; Finset, Arnstein; Loge, Jon; Ruud, Ellen; Lie, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Information about late effects is a prerequisite for survivors of childhood cancers to engage in self-management of their health. Yet, many lack such knowledge. This study investigated to what extent: (1) potential late effects were discussed with adolescent and young adult (AYA)-aged survivors (of pediatric cancer), and (2) information about late effects was provided by the pediatric oncologists (POs) during routine follow-up consultations. Methods: Consultations were recorded with 10 POs and 66 adolescents, aged 12–20 years, treated for leukemia (72.7%) or lymphoma (21.2%), or who had received hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for a benign disease (7.6%). Discussions of potential late effects were identified and coded, and then the amount of information about late effects provided was categorized into three levels: none, basic, and extended information. Results: Potential late effects were discussed in 85% of the consultations. Of these, 71% were PO initiated, and 60% concerned existing health problems. The POs provided none, basic, and extended information about late effects in 41%, 30%, and 29% of these discussions. Patients' age, time since treatment, and risk of late effects were not associated with amount of potential late effects discussed, but the type of potential late effect (physical vs. psychosocial and current vs. future risk) and PO were. Conclusion: Potential late effects were frequently discussed, thus providing ample opportunity to provide information about late effects to adolescent cancer survivors. The observed PO variability in providing such information indicates a need for standardization of information practices. PMID:26697269

  14. Longer term effects of very low energy diet on obstructive sleep apnoea in cohort derived from randomised controlled trial: prospective observational follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Hemmingsson, Erik; Harlid, Richard; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Granath, Fredrik; Rössner, Stephan; Neovius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether initial improvements in obstructive sleep apnoea after a very low energy diet were maintained after one year in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea. Design Single centre, prospective observational follow-up study. Setting Outpatient obesity clinic in a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Participants 63 men aged 30-65 with body mass index (BMI) 30-40 and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index ≥15 (events/hour), all treated with continuous positive airway pressure. Intervention A one year weight loss programme, consisting of an initial very low energy diet for nine weeks (seven weeks of 2.3 MJ/day and two weeks of gradual introduction of normal food) followed by a weight loss maintenance programme. Main outcome measure Apnoea-hypopnoea index, the main index for severity of obstructive sleep apnoea. Data from all patients were analysed (baseline carried forward for missing data). Results Of 63 eligible patients, 58 completed the very low energy diet period and started the weight maintenance programme and 44 completed the full programme; 49 had complete measurements at one year. At baseline the mean apnoea-hypopnoea index was 36 events/hour. After the very low energy diet period, apnoea-hypopnoea index was improved by −21 events/hour (95% confidence interval −17 to −25) and weight by −18 kg (−16 to −19; both P<0.001). After one year the apnoea-hypopnoea index had improved by −17 events/hour (−13 to −21) and body weight by −12 kg (−10 to −14) compared with baseline (both P<0.001). Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea at baseline had greater improvements in apnoea-hypopnoea index (−25 events/hour) compared with patients with moderate disease (−7 events/hour, P<0.001). At one year, 30/63 (48%, 95% confidence interval 35% to 60%) no longer required continuous positive airway pressure and 6/63 (10%, 2% to 17%) had total remission of

  15. X-RAY AND RADIO FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT BLAZAR CANDIDATES IN THE FERMI-LAT UNASSOCIATED SOURCE POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Maeda, K.; Niinuma, K.; Honma, M.; Inoue, Y.; Totani, T.; Inoue, S.

    2013-08-10

    We report on the results of X-ray and radio follow-up observations of two GeV gamma-ray sources 2FGL J0923.5+1508 and 2FGL J1502.1+5548, selected as candidates for high-redshift blazars from unassociated sources in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog. We utilize the Suzaku satellite and the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) telescopes for X-ray and radio observations, respectively. For 2FGL J0923.5+1508, a possible radio counterpart NVSS J092357+150518 is found at 1.4 GHz from an existing catalog, but we do not detect any X-ray emission from it and derive a flux upper limit F{sub 2-8{sub keV}} < 1.37 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Radio observations at 6.7 GHz also result in an upper limit of S{sub 6.7{sub GHz}} < 19 mJy, implying a steep radio spectrum that is not expected for a blazar. On the other hand, we detect X-rays from NVSS J150229+555204, the potential 1.4 GHz radio counterpart of 2FGL J1502.1+5548. The X-ray spectrum can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model with a photon index {gamma} = 1.8{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2} and the unabsorbed flux is F{sub 2-8{sub keV}} = 4.3{sup +1.1}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Moreover, we detect unresolved radio emission at 6.7 GHz with flux S{sub 6.7{sub GHz}} = 30.1 mJy, indicating a compact, flat-spectrum radio source. If NVSS J150229+555204 is indeed associated with 2FGL J1502.1+5548, then we find that its multiwavelength spectrum is consistent with a blazar at redshift z {approx} 3-4.

  16. SUZAKU X-RAY FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF SEVEN UNASSOCIATED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Maeda, K.; Makiya, R.; Totani, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.

    2012-03-01

    We report on our second-year campaign of X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 Degree-Sign ) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on board the Suzaku X-ray Observatory. In this second year of the project, seven new targets were selected from the First Fermi-LAT Catalog, and studied with 20-40 ks effective Suzaku exposures. We detected an X-ray point source coincident with the position of the recently discovered millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J2302+4442 within the 95% confidence error circle of 1FGL J2302.8+4443. The X-ray spectrum of the detected counterpart was well fit by a blackbody model with temperature of kT {approx_equal} 0.3 keV, consistent with an origin of the observed X-ray photons from the surface of a rotating magnetized neutron star. For four other targets that were also recently identified with a normal pulsar (1FGL J0106.7+4853) and MSPs (1FGL J1312.6+0048, J1902.0-5110, and J2043.2+1709), only upper limits in the 0.5-10 keV band were obtained at the flux levels of {approx_equal} 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A weak X-ray source was found in the field of 1FGL J1739.4+8717, but its association with the variable {gamma}-ray emitter could not be confirmed with the available Suzaku data alone. For the remaining Fermi-LAT object 1FGL J1743.8-7620 no X-ray source was detected within the LAT 95% error ellipse. We briefly discuss the general properties of the observed high Galactic-latitude Fermi-LAT objects by comparing their multiwavelength properties with those of known blazars and MSPs.

  17. GRB110715A: Multifrequency study of the first gamma-ray burst observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Hankcock, P.; Murphy, T.; Lundgren, A.; Kann, D. A.; de Gregorio Monsalvo, I.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Martín, S.; Kamble, A.; Kuin, M. P. M.; Oates, S. R.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Greiner, J.

    2013-05-01

    GRB 110715A had a bright afterglow that was obscured by a high Galactic extinction. We discovered the submillimetre counterpart with APEX and followed it in radio with ATCA for over 2 months. Additional submillimetre observations were performed with ALMA as a test of the ToO procedures during commissioning. UV, optical and NIR observations were performed with UVOT/Swift and GROND at the 2.2 m telescope in La Silla and X-ray data was obtained by XRT/Swift. The dataset is complemented with spectroscopic data from the X-shooter spectrograph at the VLT. From a broadband model we derive a peculiar density profile in the environment of the progenitor, with a discontinuity that produces a break in the light curve at ˜1 day after the burst onset. The absorption features present in the intermediate resolution optical/nIR spectra reveal a redshift of 0.8224 and a host galaxy environment with low ionisation and no velocity components beyond 30 km s^{-1}. These preliminary results will be published elsewhere Sanchez-Ramirez et al. (in preparation).

  18. Methodological challenges in the coding and adjudication of sudden deaths in a large simple trial with observational follow-up: the ziprasidone observational study of cardiac outcomes (ZODIAC).

    PubMed

    Geier, Jamie L; Karayal, Onur N; Lewis, Michael; Camm, John A; Keane, Martin; Kremer, Charlotte M E; Kolluri, Sheela; Reynolds, Robert; Eng, Sybil; Strom, Brian L

    2011-11-01

    The Ziprasidone Observational study of car DIAC Outcomes (ZODIAC), a large simple trial comparing ziprasidone versus olanzapine in real-world use, showed no difference in risk of sudden death. Upon the request of the US Food and Drug Administration, 205 fatal events were readjudicated applying ICD-10 coding rules for sudden death. A readjudication committee coded three domains (witness to death, time of symptom onset to death, and most likely cause of death) for use within algorithms consistent with ICD-10 rules. Relative risks (RR) and corresponding 95%CI were calculated for persons randomized to ziprasidone versus olanzapine, comparing 1-year incidence of sudden death, using multiple definitions. Data on symptom onset to death and diagnosis of specific cardiac arrhythmias required by the ICD-10 rules were often lacking. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore the impact of cases suggestive of cardiac origin but missing data required by ICD-10 sudden death codes. Overall, the readjudicated data matched the study's initial findings, with no significant difference in 1-year mortality between ziprasidone and olanzapine for sudden death not otherwise specified and sudden cardiac death (R96.0 or R96.1 or I46.1; RR = 1.11, 95%CI 0.45- 2.77). After outcome readjudication, ZODIAC found no difference in the risk of sudden death among those randomized to ziprasidone versus olanzapine. However, unlike hospital-based studies, fatal events in general population studies often occur outside hospital and often lack the clinical detail needed for the exact determination of symptom onset and event. Epidemiological evaluations of sudden death need to consider the limitations of the available data. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. X-Ray Spectral Components Observed in the Afterglow of GRB 130925A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steven E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Horesh, Assaf; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Madsen, Kristin K.; Miller, Jon M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at greater than 4 less than 1 significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 x 10 (sup 5) and 10 (sup 6) seconds after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several kiloelectronvolts width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10 (sup 8) centimeters), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  20. Long-term follow-up of trauma patients before and after implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Funder, Kamilia S; Rasmussen, Lars S; Lohse, Nicolai; Siersma, Volkert; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The first Danish Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was introduced May 1st 2010. The implementation was associated with lower 30-day mortality in severely injured patients. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effects of HEMS on labour market affiliation and mortality of trauma patients. Prospective, observational study with a maximum follow-up time of 4.5 years. Trauma patients from a 5-month period prior to the implementation of HEMS (pre-HEMS) were compared with patients from the first 12 months after implementation (post-HEMS). All analyses were adjusted for sex, age and Injury Severity Score. Of the total 1994 patients, 1790 were eligible for mortality analyses and 1172 (n=297 pre-HEMS and n=875 post-HEMS) for labour market analyses. Incidence rates of involuntary early retirement or death were 2.40 per 100 person-years pre-HEMS and 2.00 post-HEMS; corresponding to a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-1.17; p=0.18). The HR of involuntary early retirement was 0.79 (95% CI 0.44-1.43; p=0.43). The prevalence of reduced work ability after three years were 21.4% vs. 17.7%, odds ratio (OR)=0.78 (CI 0.53-1.14; p=0.20). The proportions of patients on social transfer payments at least half the time during the three-year period were 30.5% vs. 23.4%, OR=0.68 (CI 0.49-0.96; p=0.03). HR for mortality was 0.92 (CI 0.62-1.35; p=0.66). The implementation of HEMS was associated with a significant reduction in time on social transfer payments. No significant differences were found in involuntary early retirement rate, long-term mortality, or work ability. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Very late follow-up of a passive defibrillator lead under recall: do failure rates increase during long-term observation.

    PubMed

    Frey, Simon Martin; Sticherling, Christian; Kraus, Regula; Ammann, Peter; Kühne, Michael; Osswald, Stefan; Schaer, Beat

    2015-03-01

    The Medtronic Sprint Fidelis lead (SFL; Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) has a significantly impaired long-term survival, and active fixation leads fare worse than passive leads. The goal of this study was to present data of a series of passive SFL only with very long mean follow-up of more than 6 years. Patients in whom a passive SFL was implanted in two large Swiss centers were followed. We excluded eight (5.5%) patients with a follow-up of <6 months. Patients who died or were lost during follow-up were censored at death or last device check, all others on January 31, 2014. We employed two different definitions of failure: strict = fracture with inappropriate discharge; sudden increase in impedance >1,500 or high-voltage impedance >100 Ohm; >300 nonphysiological short interventricular-intervals. Lenient = any of the above plus a linear increase in impedance >1,500 Ohm or a linear decrease in sensing to a level that treating cardiologists considered inappropriate. We included 137 patients. Age was 60 ± 12 years. Mean and median follow-up were 6.2 ± 2.1 and 6.8 (interquartile range 4.8-7.8) years. Applying the strict definition, 12 leads (8.8%) were replaced after 4.9 ± 2.4 years (range 1.2-8.1). Applying the lenient definition, 14 leads (10.2%) failed. Cumulative lead survival was 98.5% at 3, 96.9% at 4, 94.2% at 5, and 93.1% at 6 years. Leads "at risk" were: n = 122 (89%), 115 (84%), 101 (74%), and 88 (64%). In this population with passive SFLs, 5-year lead survival is impaired with 94.2% based on 74% of leads "at risk" at this time point. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  3. Use of Implant-Derived Minimally Invasive Sinus Floor Elevation: A Multicenter Clinical Observational Study With 12- to 65-Month Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Mijiritsky, Eitan; Barbu, Horia; Lorean, Adi; Shohat, Izhar; Danza, Matteo; Levin, Liran

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of implant-derived minimally invasive sinus floor elevation. A multicenter retrospective study was performed in 5 dental clinics. Patients requiring sinus augmentation for single implant placement were recorded and followed up. The dental implant used in this trial was a self-tapping endosseous dental implant that contains an internal channel to allow the introduction of liquids through the implant body into the maxillary sinus; those liquids include saline and a flowable bone grafting material. Overall, 37 implants were installed in 37 patients. The age range of the patients was 37-75 years (mean: 51.2 years). The average residual bone height prior to the procedure was 5.24 ± 1 mm. Of all cases, 25 implants replaced the maxillary first molar and 12 replaced the maxillary second premolar. All surgeries were uneventful with no apparent perforation of the sinus membrane. The mean follow-up time was 24.81 ± 13 months ranging from 12 to 65 months. All implants integrated and showed stable marginal bone level. No adverse events were recorded during the follow-up period. The presented method for transcrestal sinus floor elevation procedure can be accomplished using a specially designed dental implant. Further long-term studies are warranted to reaffirm the results of this study.

  4. Timing Analysis of Unusual GRB 090709A Observed by Suzaku Wide-band All sky Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakiri, W.; Terada, Y.; Tashiro, M. S.; Ohno, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Makishima, K.

    2010-10-15

    A result of a joint timing analysis is presented for prompt emission of long-duration (T90 = 81 s) GRB 090709A with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (Suzaku/WAM) and Konus-Wind over an energy range from 15 keV to 5 MeV. It was reported that multi-peaked GRB 090709A exhibited a possible periodic behavior with a period of about 8 s which is comparable to typical time scale of soft gamma-ray repeaters. However, the periodicity is still marginal in detailed analysis with Swift/BAT and GRB090709A exhibited a typical afterglow[1][2]. To investigate significance of the periodicity more quantitatively, we performed a detailed timing analysis on all the lightcurves obtained with Suzaku/WAM, Swift/BAT, and Konus-Wind evaluating their underlying trend, red noise and white noise.

  5. AstroSat CZT Imager Observations of GRB 151006A: Timing, Spectroscopy, and Polarization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Chand, Vikas; Hingar, M. K.; Iyyani, S.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Paul, D.; Bhalerao, V. B.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A. M.; Chattopadhyay, T.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Basak, R.; Pradeep, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Navalgund, K. H.; Pandiyan, R.; Sarma, K. S.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2016-12-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that the CZT Imager can localize this GRB correctly to about a few degrees, and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to those obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence, the CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localization for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: the CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarization information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows hints of a polarization signal at 100-300 keV (though at a low significance level). We point out that the CZT Imager should provide significant time resolved polarization measurements for GRBs that have fluence three times higher than that of GRB 151006A. We estimate that the number of such bright GRBs detectable by the CZT Imager is five to six per year. The CZT Imager can also act as a good hard X-ray monitoring device for possible electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events.

  6. FERMI Observations of GRB 090902B: A Distinct Spectral Component in the Prompt and Delayed Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. M.; Burrows, D. N.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; d’Elia, V.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Fishman, G.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Komin, N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roming, P. W. A.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Stratta, G.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Swenson, C. A.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yamazaki, R.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-11-03

    Here, we report on the observation of the bright, long gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090902B, by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on-board the Fermi observatory. This was one of the brightest GRBs to have been observed by the LAT, which detected several hundred photons during the prompt phase. With a redshift of z = 1.822, this burst is among the most luminous detected by Fermi. Time-resolved spectral analysis reveals a significant power-law component in the LAT data that is distinct from the usual Band model emission that is seen in the sub-MeV energy range. This power-law component appears to extrapolate from the GeV range to the lowest energies and is more intense than the Band component, both below ~50 keV and above 100 MeV. The Band component undergoes substantial spectral evolution over the entire course of the burst, while the photon index of the power-law component remains constant for most of the prompt phase, then hardens significantly toward the end. After the prompt phase, power-law emission persists in the LAT data as late as 1 ks post-trigger, with its flux declining as t–1.5. The LAT detected a photon with the highest energy so far measured from a GRB, 33.4+2.7 –3.5 GeV. This event arrived 82 s after the GBM trigger and ~50 s after the prompt phase emission had ended in the GBM band. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of these results for models of GRB emission and for constraints on models of the extragalactic background light.

  7. Effect of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination on pregnancy outcomes: long term observational follow-up in the Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Befano, Brian L; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiller, John T; Kreimer, Aimée R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan; Wilcox, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on miscarriage. Design Observational long term follow-up of a randomized, double blinded trial combined with an independent unvaccinated population based cohort. Setting Single center study in Costa Rica. Participants 7466 women in the trial and 2836 women in the unvaccinated cohort enrolled at the end of the randomized trial and in parallel with the observational trial component. Intervention Women in the trial were assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (n=3727) or the control hepatitis A vaccine (n=3739). Crossover bivalent HPV vaccination occurred in the hepatitis A vaccine arm at the end of the trial. Women in the unvaccinated cohort received (n=2836) no vaccination. Main outcome measure Risk of miscarriage, defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as fetal loss within 20 weeks of gestation, in pregnancies exposed to bivalent HPV vaccination in less than 90 days and any time from vaccination compared with pregnancies exposed to hepatitis A vaccine and pregnancies in the unvaccinated cohort. Results Of 3394 pregnancies conceived at any time since bivalent HPV vaccination, 381 pregnancies were conceived less than 90 days from vaccination. Unexposed pregnancies comprised 2507 pregnancies conceived after hepatitis A vaccination and 720 conceived in the unvaccinated cohort. Miscarriages occurred in 451 (13.3%) of all exposed pregnancies, in 50 (13.1%) of the pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from bivalent HPV vaccination, and in 414 (12.8%) of the unexposed pregnancies, of which 316 (12.6%) were in the hepatitis A vaccine group and 98 (13.6%) in the unvaccinated cohort. The relative risk of miscarriage for pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from vaccination compared with all unexposed pregnancies was 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.34, one sided P=0.436) in unadjusted analyses. Results were similar after adjusting for age at

  8. Effect of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination on pregnancy outcomes: long term observational follow-up in the Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Orestis A; Befano, Brian L; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiller, John T; Kreimer, Aimée R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan; Wilcox, Allen J; Wacholder, Sholom

    2015-09-07

    To examine the effect of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on miscarriage. Observational long term follow-up of a randomized, double blinded trial combined with an independent unvaccinated population based cohort. Single center study in Costa Rica. 7466 women in the trial and 2836 women in the unvaccinated cohort enrolled at the end of the randomized trial and in parallel with the observational trial component. Women in the trial were assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (n=3727) or the control hepatitis A vaccine (n=3739). Crossover bivalent HPV vaccination occurred in the hepatitis A vaccine arm at the end of the trial. Women in the unvaccinated cohort received (n=2836) no vaccination. Risk of miscarriage, defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as fetal loss within 20 weeks of gestation, in pregnancies exposed to bivalent HPV vaccination in less than 90 days and any time from vaccination compared with pregnancies exposed to hepatitis A vaccine and pregnancies in the unvaccinated cohort. Of 3394 pregnancies conceived at any time since bivalent HPV vaccination, 381 pregnancies were conceived less than 90 days from vaccination. Unexposed pregnancies comprised 2507 pregnancies conceived after hepatitis A vaccination and 720 conceived in the unvaccinated cohort. Miscarriages occurred in 451 (13.3%) of all exposed pregnancies, in 50 (13.1%) of the pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from bivalent HPV vaccination, and in 414 (12.8%) of the unexposed pregnancies, of which 316 (12.6%) were in the hepatitis A vaccine group and 98 (13.6%) in the unvaccinated cohort. The relative risk of miscarriage for pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from vaccination compared with all unexposed pregnancies was 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.34, one sided P=0.436) in unadjusted analyses. Results were similar after adjusting for age at vaccination (relative risk 1.15, one sided P=0.17), age at conception (1.03, P=0

  9. Non-variability of intervening absorbers observed in the UVES spectra of the `naked-eye' GRB080319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Fiore, F.; Goldoni, P.; D'Odorico, V.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Norci, L.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the properties of the intervening absorbers lying along the line of sight of GRB080319B through the analysis of its optical absorption features. For this purpose, we analyse Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES)/Very Large Telescope multi-epoch, high-resolution spectroscopic observations (R = 40000, corresponding to 7.5 kms-1) of the optical afterglow of GRB080319B (z = 0.937), detected by Swift. Thanks to the rapid response mode (RRM), we observed the afterglow just 8min 30s after the gamma-ray burst (GRB) onset when the magnitude was R ~ 12. This allowed us to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), high-resolution spectrum of a GRB afterglow ever (S/N per resolution element of ~50). Two further RRM and target of opportunity observations were obtained starting 1.0 and 2.4 h after the event, respectively. Four MgII absorption systems lying along the line of sight to the afterglow have been detected in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8, most of them showing a complex structure featuring several components. Absorptions due to FeII, MgI and MnII are also present; they appear in four, two and one intervening absorbers, respectively. One out of four systems show an MgII λ2796 rest-frame-equivalent width larger than 1 Å. This is in agreement with the excess of strong MgII absorbers compared to quasars, with dn/dz = 0.9, approximately four times larger than the value observed along quasar lines of sight. In addition, the analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution spectra allowed us to exclude a significant variability in the column density of the single components of each absorber. In particular, 17 out of 21 MgII components belonging to the four absorbers do not vary at the 3σ confidence level, and the column densities of the remaining four are saturated and cannot be reliably measured. Combining this result with estimates of the size of the emitting region, we can reject the hypothesis that the difference

  10. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fynbok J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  11. Long-term follow-up after epilepsy surgery in infancy and early childhood--a prospective population based observational study.

    PubMed

    Reinholdson, Jesper; Olsson, Ingrid; Edelvik, Anna; Hallböök, Tove; Lundgren, Johan; Rydenhag, Bertil; Malmgren, Kristina

    2015-08-01

    To describe 2-year and long-term outcomes (five or ten years) after resective epilepsy surgery in children operated before the age of four years. This prospective, population based, longitudinal study is based on data from the Swedish National Epilepsy Surgery Register 1995-2010. The following variables were analysed: seizure frequency, antiepileptic drug treatment (AED), neurological deficits, type of operation, histopathological diagnosis and perioperative complications. During the study period 47 children under four years had resective surgery. A majority had seizure onset within the first year of life, and the median age at surgery was two years and one month. Two thirds had neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Temporal lobe resection, frontal lobe resection and hemispherotomy predominated. A majority had malformations of cortical development. There was one major perioperative complication. At the 2-year follow-up, 21/47 children (45%) were seizure free, eight of whom were off medication. At the long-term follow-up, 16/32 (50%) were seizure-free and 11 of them off medication. Another ten (31%) had ≥75% reduction in seizure frequency. Fourteen children (44%) had sustained seizure freedom from surgery to the long-term follow-up. This is the first prospective, population based, longitudinal study to show that a favourable seizure outcome is achievable in a majority of infants and young children undergoing resective epilepsy surgery and that the improvements are consistent over time. Many can also stop taking AEDs. The findings emphasise the importance of early referral to epilepsy surgery evaluation in cases of medically intractable epilepsy in infants and young children. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long term effects of dietary sodium reduction on cardiovascular disease outcomes: observational follow-up of the trials of hypertension prevention (TOHP).

    PubMed

    Cook, Nancy R; Cutler, Jeffrey A; Obarzanek, Eva; Buring, Julie E; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Kumanyika, Shiriki K; Appel, Lawrence J; Whelton, Paul K

    2007-04-28

    To examine the effects of reduction in dietary sodium intake on cardiovascular events using data from two completed randomised trials, TOHP I and TOHP II. Long term follow-up assessed 10-15 years after the original trial. 10 clinic sites in 1987-90 (TOHP I) and nine sites in 1990-5 (TOHP II). Central follow-up conducted by post and phone. Adults aged 30-54 years with prehypertension. Dietary sodium reduction, including comprehensive education and counselling on reducing intake, for 18 months (TOHP I) or 36-48 months (TOHP II). Cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularisation, or cardiovascular death). 744 participants in TOHP I and 2382 in TOHP II were randomised to a sodium reduction intervention or control. Net sodium reductions in the intervention groups were 44 mmol/24 h and 33 mmol/24 h, respectively. Vital status was obtained for all participants and follow-up information on morbidity was obtained from 2415 (77%), with 200 reporting a cardiovascular event. Risk of a cardiovascular event was 25% lower among those in the intervention group (relative risk 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 0.99, P=0.04), adjusted for trial, clinic, age, race, and sex, and 30% lower after further adjustment for baseline sodium excretion and weight (0.70, 0.53 to 0.94), with similar results in each trial. In secondary analyses, 67 participants died (0.80, 0.51 to 1.26, P=0.34). Sodium reduction, previously shown to lower blood pressure, may also reduce long term risk of cardiovascular events.

  13. CO OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 000418 AT z = 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsukade, B.; Ohta, K.; Kohno, K.; Endo, A.; Nakanishi, K.

    2011-09-01

    We performed CO (J = 2-1) observations of the host galaxy of GRB 000418 at z = 1.1181 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Previous studies show that the host galaxy has properties similar to those of an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG). The star formation rate (SFR) of the host galaxy as derived from submillimeter and radio continuum emission is a few 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, which is an order of magnitude greater than the SFR derived from optical line emission. The large discrepancy between the SFRs derived from different observing wavelengths indicates the presence of a bulk of dust-obscured star formation and molecular gas that is enough to sustain the intense star formation. We failed to detect CO emission and derived 2{sigma} upper limits on the velocity-integrated CO (2-1) luminosity of L'{sub CO} < 6.9 x 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} and the molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.5x10{sup 9} M{sub sun} by adopting a velocity width of 300 km s{sup -1} and a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of {alpha}{sub CO} = 0.8 M{sub sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}, which are standard values for ULIRGs. The lower limit on the ratio of far-infrared luminosity to CO luminosity, a measure of the star formation efficiency, is higher compared to that of other gamma-ray burst hosts and other galaxy populations, which is consistent with active star formation taking place in this galaxy.

  14. Adult height after long term treatment with recombinant growth hormone for idiopathic isolated growth hormone deficiency: observational follow up study of the French population based registry

    PubMed Central

    Carel, Jean-Claude; Ecosse, Emmanuel; Nicolino, Marc; Tauber, Maïté; Leger, Juliane; Cabrol, Sylvie; Bastié-Sigeac, Irène; Chaussain, Jean-Louis; Coste, Joël

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of recombinant growth hormone for increasing adult height in children treated for idiopathic isolated growth hormone deficiency. Design Observational follow up study. Setting Population based registry. Participants All 2852 French children diagnosed as having isolated idiopathic growth hormone deficiency whose treatment started between 1987 and 1992 and ended before 1996. Main outcome measures Change in height between the start of treatment and adulthood; classification of patients according to whether treatment was completed as scheduled or stopped early. Results Adult height was obtained for 2165 (76%) patients. The mean dose of growth hormone at start of treatment was 0.42 IU/kg/week. Height gain was 1.1 (SD 0.9) standard deviation (SD) scores, resulting in an adult height of –1.6 (0.9) SD score (girls, 154 (5) cm; boys, 167 (6) cm). Patients who completed the treatment gained 1.0 (0.7) SD score of height in 3.6 (1.4) years. Patients with treatments stopped early gained 0.6 (0.6) SD score in 2.7 (1.4) years while receiving treatment and a further 0.4 (0.9) SD score after the end of treatment. Most of the variation in height gain was explained by regression towards the mean, patients' characteristics, and delay in starting puberty. Severe growth hormone deficiency was associated with better outcome. Each year of treatment was associated with a gain of 0.2 SD score(1.3 cm). Conclusion The effect of growth hormone is unclear in many patients treated for so called idiopathic isolated growth hormone deficiency. Most of the patients have pubertal delay and a spontaneous growth potential, which must be taken into account when measuring the effect and cost effectiveness of treatments. Growth hormone deficiency should be clearly distinguished from pubertal delay, and criteria should restrict the definition to patients with severely and permanently altered growth hormone secretion as our results support the use of growth hormone in

  15. MASTERS-D Study: A Prospective, Multicenter, Pragmatic, Observational, Data-Monitored Trial of Minimally Invasive Fusion to Treat Degenerative Lumbar Disorders, One-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Neil; Buzek, David; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Rosenberg, Wout; Pereira, Paulo; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Lam, Khai; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Durny, Peter; Lidar, Zvi; Scheufler, Kai; Senker, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess effectiveness and safety of minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) for degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) in daily surgical practice and follow up with patients for one year after surgery. A prospective, multicenter, pragmatic, monitored, international outcome study in patients with DLD causing back/leg pain was conducted (19 centers). Two hundred fifty-two patients received standard of care available in the centers. Patients were included if they were aged >18 years, required one- or two-level lumbar fusion for DLD, and met the criteria for approved device indications. Primary endpoints: time to first ambulation (TFA) and time to surgery recovery (TSR). Secondary endpoints: patient-reported outcomes (PROs)--back and leg pain (visual analog scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index (ODI)), health status (EQ-5D), fusion rates, reoperation rates, change in pain medication, rehabilitation, return to work, patient satisfaction, and adverse events (AEs). Experienced surgeons (≥30 surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF and patients were evaluated for one year (NCT01143324). At one year, 92% (233/252) of patients remained in the study. Primary outcomes: TFA, 1.3 ±0.5 days and TSR, 3.2 ±2.0 days. Secondary outcomes: Most patients (83.3%) received one level MILIF; one (two-level) MILIF mean surgery duration, 128 (182) min; fluoroscopy time, 115 (154) sec; blood loss, 164 (233) mL; at one year statistically significant (P<.0001) and clinically meaningful changes from baseline were reported in all PROs--reduced back pain (2.9 ±2.5 vs. 6.2 ±2.3 at intake), reduced leg pain (2.2 ±2.6 vs. 5.9 ±2.8), and ODI (22.4% ± 18.6 vs. 45.3% ± 15.3), as well as health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index: 0.71 ±0.28 vs. 0.34 ±0.32). More of the professional workers were working at one year than those prior to surgery (70.3% vs. 55.2%). Three AEs and one serious AE were considered

  16. Realtime GRB Followup with LOTIS/Super-LOTIS/LITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H. S.; Ables, E.; Porrata, R. A.; Ziock, K.; Williams, G. G.; Bradshaw, M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Nemiroff, R.; Pereira, W.; Perez, D.

    2001-05-01

    Even though many GRBs are now identified with late time afterglows, very few measurements are available on their prompt properties. Unlike delayed afterglows, early-time follow-up measurements will contain information about the GRB progenitors. These measurements are possible via automatic observations triggered by the GRB satellites. We have been operating automatic and rapidly slewing telescope systems, LOTIS (0.11 m aperture; 4 simultaneous astronomical filters) and Super-LOTIS (0.6 m aperture), to detect very prompt optical emission occurring within seconds of a GRB. This paper will present results from our attempts to follow-up observations of HETE2 triggers. We also present our plan to replace the current optical CCD camera on the Super-LOTIS to a near infrared camera to be able to probe dusty GRB environment. This research is supported under NASA contract numbers S-03975G and S-57797F and under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  17. Degenerative Changes in the Knee 2 Years After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture and Related Risk Factors: A Prospective Observational Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    van Meer, Belle L; Oei, Edwin H G; Meuffels, Duncan E; van Arkel, Ewoud R A; Verhaar, Jan A N; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Reijman, Max

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a well-known risk factor for development of knee osteoarthritis. Early identification of those patients at risk and early identification of the process of ACL rupture leading to osteoarthritis may aid in preventing the onset or progression of osteoarthritis. To identify early degenerative changes as assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after 2-year follow-up in patients with a recent ACL rupture and to evaluate which determinants are related to these changes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Included in this study were 154 adults aged between 18 and 45 years with acute ACL rupture diagnosed by physical examination and MRI, without previous knee trauma or surgery, and without osteoarthritic changes on radiographs. A total of 143 patients completed the 2-year follow-up, and the results in this study apply to these 143 patients. All patients were treated according to the Dutch guideline on ACL injury. Of the 143 patients, 50 patients were treated nonoperatively during the 2-year follow-up period. Main outcome was early degenerative changes assessed on MRI defined as progression of cartilage defects and osteophytes in tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compartments. Patient characteristics, activity level, functional instability, treatment type, and trauma-related variables were evaluated as determinants. The median time between MRI at baseline and MRI at 2-year follow-up was 25.9 months (interquartile range, 24.7-26.9 months). Progression of cartilage defects in the medial and lateral tibiofemoral compartments was present in 12% and 27% of patients, and progression of osteophytes in tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compartments was present in 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. The following determinants were positively significantly associated with early degenerative changes: male sex (odds ratio [OR], 4.43; 95% CI, 1.43-13.66; P = .010), cartilage defect in the medial tibiofemoral compartment at baseline (OR, 3

  18. Thallium-201 washout rate of stress myocardial perfusion imaging as a predictor of mortality in diabetic kidney disease patients initiating hemodialysis: an observational, follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshihide; Joki, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Yuri; Iwasaki, Masaki; Kubo, Shun; Matsukane, Ai; Takahashi, Yasunori; Imamura, Yoshihiko; Hirahata, Koichi; Hase, Hiroki

    2017-04-21

    Thallium-201 washout rate of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been reported to correlate with coronary flow reserve which is a parameter of myocardial microcirculation. However, the evidence for its use in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) has been lacking, and the association between thallium-201 washout rate and adverse outcomes including death is unknown. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate the predictive ability of thallium-201 washout rate for mortality in DKD patients initiating hemodialysis. A total of 96 patients with type 2 diabetes who had been started on maintenance hemodialysis undergoing stress MPI with thallium-201 within 1 year, 72 men and 24 women, with a median age of 67 years, were studied. The endpoint was defined as all-cause death. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). During the mean follow-up period of 3.4 ± 2.1 years, 18 (18.8%) deaths occurred. Cumulative survival rates during the follow-up period, with thallium-201 washout rate levels in the lowest tertile (3.1-36.2%), the middle tertile (36.5-46.3%), and the highest tertile (46.4-66.2%), were 51.0, 86.5, and 85.3%, respectively. Overall, the multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that thallium-201 washout rate remained an independent predictor of death after adjusting by confounding variables (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.85-0.97). Among DKD patients initiating hemodialysis, thallium-201 washout rate seems to be useful for predicting death.

  19. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB 970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A. S.; Pian, E.; Gibbons, R.; Thorsett, S. E.; Ferguson, H.; Petro, L.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Caraveo, P.; Frontera, F.; Kouveliotou, C.; Macchetto, D.; Palazzi, E.; Pedersen, H.; Tavani, M.; van Paradijs, J.

    2000-12-01

    We report on observations of the field of GRB 970508 made in 1998 early August, 454 days after outburst, with the STIS CCD camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The images, taken in open filter (50CCD) mode, clearly reveal the presence of a galaxy that was overwhelmed in earlier (1997 June) HST images by emission from the optical transient (OT). The galaxy is regular in shape: after correcting for the HST/STIS PSF, it is well fitted by an exponential disk with a scale length of 0.046"+/-0.006" and an ellipticity of 0.70+/-0.07. All observations are marginally consistent with a continuous decline in OT emission as t-1.3 beginning 2 days after outburst; however, we find no direct evidence in the late-time HST image for emission from the OT, and the surface brightness profile of the galaxy is most regular if we assume that the OT emission is negligible, suggesting that the OT may have faded more rapidly at late times than is predicted by the power-law decay. Due to the wide bandwidth of the STIS clear mode, the estimated magnitude of the galaxy is dependent on the galaxy spectrum that is assumed. Using colors obtained from late-time ground-based observations to constrain the spectrum, we find V=25.4+/-0.15, a few tenths of a magnitude brighter than earlier ground-based estimates that were obtained by observing the total light of the galaxy and the OT and then subtracting the estimated OT brightness, assuming that it fades as a single power law. This again suggests that the OT may have faded faster at late time than the power law predicts. The position of the OT agrees with that of the isophotal center of the galaxy to 0.01", which, at the galaxy redshift z=0.83, corresponds to an offset from the center of the host of <~70 pc. This remarkable agreement raises the possibility that the gamma-ray burst may have been associated with either an active galactic nucleus or a nuclear starburst.

  20. Multi-wavelength follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2015-10-01

    Transient sources are often associated with the most violent phenomena in the Universe, where the acceleration of hadrons may occur. Such sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN) or core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and are promising candidates for the production of high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The ANTARES telescope, located in the Mediterranean sea, aims at detecting these high energy neutrinos, which could reveal the presence of a cosmic ray accelerator. However, to enhance the sensitivity to transient sources, a method based on multi-wavelength follow-up of neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection. The telescopes start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect a possible electromagnetic counterpart to the neutrino event. The work presented in this thesis covers the development and implementation of an optical image analysis pipeline, as well as the analysis of optical and X-ray data to search for fast transient sources, such as GRB afterglows, and slowly varying transient sources, such as CCSNe.

  1. Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Treated with Infliximab for Ulcerative Colitis: Predictive Factors of Response-An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    García-Bosch, Orlando; Aceituno, Montserrat; Ordás, Ingrid; Etchevers, Josefina; Sans, Miquel; Feu, Faust; Panés, Julián; Ricart, Elena

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the early and long-term efficacy of infliximab in ulcerative colitis and to determine predictors of response and colectomy. This is an ambidirectional cohort study in a tertiary referral center including patients who started infliximab within 2005 and 2008 and monitored until 2014. Efficacy was evaluated by partial Mayo scores at weeks 2, 4, 8, 30, and 54. Long-term treatment maintenance with infliximab and colectomy requirements were recorded. Fifty-three patients were included with a median follow-up of 69.5 months. Clinical remission at the time point assessments was 40.8, 47.2, 54.7, 54.7, and 49.1 %. At the time of maximal follow-up, the proportion of patients under infliximab maintenance was 24.5 %. A higher level of albumin (OR 1.4, CI 95 % 1.06-1.8; p = 0.017) was predictive of a higher remission rate at week 8. Concomitant immunomodulators beyond 6 months were predictive of infliximab's long-term maintenance (OR 15.8, CI 95 % 1.8-135.4; p = 0.012). Colectomy was required in 41.5 %. Factors associated with a higher rate of colectomy at week 54 were previous treatment with cyclosporine (OR 3.4, CI 95 % 1.2-9.7; p = 0.012), absence of response at week 8 (OR 10.3, CI 95 % 3.3-31.7; p < 0.001), and not receiving concomitant immunomodulators (OR 4.1, CI 95 % 1.8-9; p = 0.002). Colectomy rates within the first 54 weeks were closely dependent on the number of variables present: none (0 %), 1 (26.3 %), 2 (71.4 %), or 3 (100 %) of them (log rank <0.0001). Low albumin, previous treatment with cyclosporine, absence of a concomitant immunomodulator, and lack of response at week 8 negatively affected the efficacy of infliximab in ulcerative colitis.

  2. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB 980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, T. W.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Connaughton, V.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. D.; Fishman, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter, we present the first evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a gamma-ray burst, GRB 980923. The event consists of rapid variability lasting approximately 40 s followed by a smooth power-law emission tail lasting approximately 400 s. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for gamma-ray bursts. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB 990123.

  3. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB 980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, T. W.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Connaughton, V.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. D.; Fishman, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter, we present the first evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a gamma-ray burst, GRB 980923. The event consists of rapid variability lasting approximately 40 s followed by a smooth power-law emission tail lasting approximately 400 s. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for gamma-ray bursts. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB 990123.

  4. Observation on therapeutic efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid in Chinese patients with primary biliary cirrhosis: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiangyi; Shi, Yongquan; Zhou, Xinmin; Li, Zengshan; Huang, Xiaofeng; Han, Zheyi; Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Ruian; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Han, Ying; Fan, Daiming

    2013-06-01

    The efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on long-term outcome of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has been less documented in Chinese cohort. We aimed to assess the therapeutic effect of UDCA on Chinese patients with PBC. In the present study, 67 patients with PBC were treated with UDCA (13-15 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) and followed up for 2 years to evaluate the changes of symptoms, laboratory values and histological features. As the results indicated, fatigue and pruritus were obviously improved by UDCA, particularly in patients with mild or moderate symptoms. The alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transpetidase levels significantly declined at year 2 comparing to baseline values, with the most profound effects achieved in patients at stage 2. The levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase significantly decreased whereas serum bilirubin and immunoglobulin M levels exhibited no significant change. Histological feature was stable in patients at stages 1-2 but still progressed in patients at stages 3-4. The biochemical response of patients at stage 2 was much better than that of patients at stages 3-4. These data suggest that, when treated in earlier stage, patients in long-term administration of UDCA can gain favorable results not only on symptoms and biochemical responses but also on histology. It is also indicated that later histological stage, bad biochemical response and severe symptom may be indicators of poor prognosis for UDCA therapy.

  5. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Tim; vanParadijs, Jan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Connaughton, Valerie; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Fishman, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    In this letter, we present for the first time evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), GRB980923. The event ranks third highest in fluence (>25 keV) in the BATSE catalog and consists of a period of rapid variability lasting about 40 s followed by a smooth power law emission tail lasting about 400 s beyond the trigger time. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for GRBS. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the primary gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB990123.

  6. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Tim; vanParadijs, Jan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Connaughton, Valerie; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Fishman, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    In this letter, we present for the first time evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), GRB980923. The event ranks third highest in fluence (>25 keV) in the BATSE catalog and consists of a period of rapid variability lasting about 40 s followed by a smooth power law emission tail lasting about 400 s beyond the trigger time. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for GRBS. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the primary gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB990123.

  7. What Contributes to the Regularity of Patients with Hypertension or Diabetes Seeking Health Services? A Pilot Follow-Up, Observational Study in Two Sites in Hubei Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Da; Serrano, Ray; Ye, Ting; Tang, Shangfeng; Duan, Lei; Xu, Yuan; Yang, Jian; Liang, Yuan; Chen, Shanquan; Feng, Zhanchun; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Regular maintenance of non-communicable chronic diseases can constrain disease progression in diabetic and hypertensive patients. To identify the individual and social factors that are associated with positive health-seeking behaviors and regular maintenance of chronic diseases, we have conducted a follow up study in 2015 on diabetic and hypertensive patients in Hubei Province. We used binary logistic regression models to determine specific factors associated with diabetic and hypertensive patients that sought healthcare services for their conditions in accordance with current Chinese Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) guidelines. Our findings show that 42.16% of 510 people living with chronic conditions (PLCDs) sought health services in line with existing guidelines. Findings also show a higher probability (8.418 times) for PLCDs seeking healthcare services at higher-tiered hospitals (secondary and tertiary hospitals) than for PLCDs seeking care at primary hospitals (odds ratio (OR) = 8.418, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.82, 14.27, p < 0.001). These analyses underscore the importance of having patient advocates who can provide support, where necessary, and encourage positive health-seeking behavior. The study also shows a negative impact on regular maintenance for PLCDs in households with high financial constraints. In contrast, the study shows positive impacts for increased household income, age, and residency in rural locations. In sum, this study underscores the importance of primary hospitals as key points of care and critical players in care coordination for PLCDs. The study provides more evidence for Chinese policymakers seeking to contain costs and improve population health. The findings also underscore the need for community-based interventions, specifically interventions that link local primary hospitals, friends/family members, and PLCDs. PMID:28009850

  8. DISCERNING THE PHYSICAL ORIGINS OF COSMOLOGICAL GAMMA-RAY BURSTS BASED ON MULTIPLE OBSERVATIONAL CRITERIA: THE CASES OF z = 6.7 GRB 080913, z = 8.2 GRB 090423, AND SOME SHORT/HARD GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bing; Zhang Binbin; Virgili, Francisco J.; Proga, Daniel; Liang, E.-W.; Lv, H.-J.; Kann, D. Alexander; Wu Xuefeng; Toma, Kenji; Meszaros, Peter; Burrows, David N.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Gehrels, Neil

    2009-10-01

    The two high-redshift gamma-ray bursts, GRB 080913 at z = 6.7 and GRB 090423 at z = 8.2, recently detected by Swift appear as intrinsically short, hard GRBs. They could have been recognized by BATSE as short/hard GRBs should they have occurred at z <= 1. In order to address their physical origin, we perform a more thorough investigation on two physically distinct types (Type I/II) of cosmological GRBs and their observational characteristics. We reiterate the definitions of Type I/II GRBs and then review the following observational criteria and their physical motivations: supernova (SN) association, specific star-forming rate (SFR) of the host galaxy, location offset, duration, hardness, spectral lag, statistical correlations, energetics and collimation, afterglow properties, redshift distribution, luminosity function, and gravitational wave signature. Contrary to the traditional approach of assigning the physical category based on the gamma-ray properties (duration, hardness, and spectral lag), we take an alternative approach to define the Type I and Type II Gold Samples using several criteria that are more directly related to the GRB progenitors (SN association, host galaxy type, and specific SFR). We then study the properties of the two Gold Samples and compare them with the traditional long/soft and short/hard samples. We find that the Type II Gold Sample reasonably tracks the long/soft population, although it includes several intrinsically short (shorter than 1 s in the rest frame) GRBs. The Type I Gold Sample only has five GRBs, four of which are not strictly short but have extended emission. Other short/hard GRBs detected in the Swift era represent the BATSE short/hard sample well, but it is unclear whether all of them belong to Type I. We suggest that some (probably even most) high-luminosity short/hard GRBs instead belong to Type II. Based on multiple observational criteria, we suggest that GRB 080913 and GRB 090423 are more likely Type II events. In

  9. Breast cancer in young women after treatment for Hodgkin's disease during childhood or adolescence--an observational study with up to 33-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Schellong, Günther; Riepenhausen, Marianne; Ehlert, Karoline; Brämswig, Jürgen; Dörffel, Wolfgang; Schmutzler, Rita K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Bick, Ulrich

    2014-01-06

    The treatment of Hodgkin's disease (HD; also called Hodgkin's lymphoma) in children and adolescents with radiotherapy and chemotherapy leads to high survival rates but has a number of late effects. The most serious one is the development of a secondary malignant tumor, usually in the field that was irradiated. In women, breast cancer can arise in this way. Data on the occurrence of secondary breast cancer (sBC) were collected from 590 women who were treated in five consecutive pediatric HD treatment studies in the years 1978-1995 and then re-evaluated in a late follow-up study after a median interval of 17.8 years (maximum, 33.7 years). Information was obtained from 1999 onward by written inquiry to the participants and their treating physicians. The cumulative incidence of sBC was calculated by the Gooley method. By July 2012, sBC had been diagnosed in 26 of 590 female HD patients; the breast cancer was in the irradiated field in 25 of these 26 patients. Their age at the time of treatment for HD was 9.9 to 16.2 years (the pubertal phase), and sBC was discovered with a median latency of 20.7 years after HD treatment (shortest latency, 14.3 years) and at a median age of 35.3 years (youngest age, 26.8 years). The radiation dose to the supradiaphragmatic fields ranged from 20 to 45 Gy. The cumulative incidence for sBC 30 years after treatment for HD was 19% (95% confidence interval, 12% to 29%). For women aged 25 to 45 in this series, the frequency of breast cancer was 24 times as high as in the corresponding normal population. Women who were treated for HD in childhood or adolescence have an increased risk of developing breast cancer as young adults. The risk is associated with prior radiotherapy and with the age at which it was administered (the pubertal phase). Because of these findings, a structured breast cancer screening project for this high-risk group has been initiated in collaboration with the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

  10. XMM-XXL Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    XMM-XXL survey will cover 20 square degrees in two selected areas. Chandra follow-up observations of selected clusters identified with XMM will help to separate AGN emission from the cluster emission to improve estimates of cluster properties, especially the temperature and mass.

  11. NuSTAR observations of GRB 130427A establish a single component synchrotron afterglow origin for the late optical to multi-GEV emission

    DOE PAGES

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, J.; Racusin, J. L.; ...

    2013-11-21

    Here, GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (~1.5 and 5 days). This range, where afterglow observations were previously not possible, bridges an important spectral gap. Combined with Swift, Fermi, and ground-based optical data, NuSTAR observations unambiguously establish a single afterglow spectral component from optical to multi-GeV energies a day after the event, which is almost certainly synchrotron radiation. Suchmore » an origin of the late-time Fermi/Large Area Telescope >10 GeV photons requires revisions in our understanding of collisionless relativistic shock physics.« less

  12. NuSTAR observations of GRB 130427A establish a single component synchrotron afterglow origin for the late optical to multi-GEV emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, J.; Racusin, J. L.; Bellm, E.; Vianello, G.; Oates, S.; Fryer, C. L.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Dermer, C. D.; Gehrels, N.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Melandri, A.; McEnery, J. E.; Mundell, C. G.; Stern, D. K.; Tagliaferri, G.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-11-21

    Here, GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (~1.5 and 5 days). This range, where afterglow observations were previously not possible, bridges an important spectral gap. Combined with Swift, Fermi, and ground-based optical data, NuSTAR observations unambiguously establish a single afterglow spectral component from optical to multi-GeV energies a day after the event, which is almost certainly synchrotron radiation. Such an origin of the late-time Fermi/Large Area Telescope >10 GeV photons requires revisions in our understanding of collisionless relativistic shock physics.

  13. Synchrotron Radiation from Ultra-High Energy Protons and the Fermi Observations of GRB 080916C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    when photopion processes are important, which will require IceCube neutrino detections [40] to establish. In GRB 080916C, where multi-GeV radiation...energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts. Phys Rev Lett 2003; 91: 071102. [26] Asano K, Guiriec S, Mészáros P. Hadronic models for the extra spectral...of gamma-ray burst high-energy lags. Astrophys J 2009; 707: 404-16. [37] Murase K, Ioka K, Nagataki S, Nakamura T. High-Energy neutrinos and cosmic

  14. Follow-up Observations of PTFO 8-8695: A 3 Myr Old T-Tauri Star Hosting a Jupiter-mass Planetary Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, David R.; van Eyken, Julian C.; Barnes, Jason W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Carey, Sean J.; Crockett, Christopher J.; Eastman, Jason; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Howell, Steve B.; Kane, Stephen R.; . Mclane, Jacob N.; Plavchan, Peter; Prato, L.; Stauffer, John; van Belle, Gerard T.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2015-08-01

    We present Spitzer 4.5 μm light curve observations, Keck NIRSPEC radial velocity observations, and LCOGT optical light curve observations of PTFO 8-8695, which may host a Jupiter-sized planet in a very short orbital period (0.45 days). Previous work by van Eyken et al. and Barnes et al. predicts that the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbital plane should precess with a period of 300-600 days. As a consequence, the observed transits should change shape and depth, disappear, and reappear with the precession. Our observations indicate the long-term presence of the transit events (\\gt 3 years), and that the transits indeed do change depth, disappear and reappear. The Spitzer observations and the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations (with contemporaneous LCOGT optical light curve data) are consistent with the predicted transit times and depths for the {M}\\star =0.34 {M}⊙ precession model and demonstrate the disappearance of the transits. An LCOGT optical light curve shows that the transits do reappear approximately 1 year later. The observed transits occur at the times predicted by a straight-forward propagation of the transit ephemeris. The precession model correctly predicts the depth and time of the Spitzer transit and the lack of a transit at the time of the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations. However, the precession model predicts the return of the transits approximately 1 month later than observed by LCOGT. Overall, the data are suggestive that the planetary interpretation of the observed transit events may indeed be correct, but the precession model and data are currently insufficient to confirm firmly the planetary status of PTFO 8-8695b.

  15. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  16. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SYNCHROTRON SHOCK MODEL FOR THE FERMI GRB 090820A OBSERVED BY GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Guiriec, Sylvain; Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Baring, Matthew G.; Meegan, Charles A.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Fishman, Gerald J.; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty E-mail: baring@rice.edu

    2011-11-01

    Discerning the radiative dissipation mechanism for prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires detailed spectroscopic modeling that straddles the {nu}F{sub {nu}} peak in the 100 keV-1 MeV range. Historically, empirical fits such as the popular Band function have been employed with considerable success in interpreting the observations. While extrapolations of the Band parameters can provide some physical insight into the emission mechanisms responsible for GRBs, these inferences do not provide a unique way of discerning between models. By fitting physical models directly, this degeneracy can be broken, eliminating the need for empirical functions; our analysis here offers a first step in this direction. One of the oldest, and leading, theoretical ideas for the production of the prompt signal is the synchrotron shock model. Here we explore the applicability of this model to a bright Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) burst with a simple temporal structure, GRB 090820A. Our investigation implements, for the first time, thermal and non-thermal synchrotron emissivities in the RMFIT forward-folding spectral analysis software often used in GBM burst studies. We find that these synchrotron emissivities, together with a blackbody shape, provide at least as good a match to the data as the Band GRB spectral fitting function. This success is achieved in both time-integrated and time-resolved spectral fits.

  17. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club Follow-Up Observations of Transiting Extrasolar Planets TrES-3b and TrES-4b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker-LaFollette, Amanda; Turner, J. D.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Smart, B. M.; Crawford, B. E.; Carleton, T. M.; Guvenen, B. C.; Towner, A. P. M.; Smith, C. W.; Small, L. C.; McGraw, A. M.; Wilson, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested by Vidotto et. al. (2011) that it is possible to detect the magnetic field of a transiting exoplanet by comparing near-UV and optical light curve asymmetries. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has observed the primary transits of extrasolar planets TrES-3b and TrES-4b using near-UV and optical filters in order to detect this phenomenon. One of the goals of this project is to involve undergraduates in observational astronomy research and give them practical experience using IRAF and a research-class telescope. In addition to magnetic field observations, we have refined previously published values for the characteristic parameters of these planets.

  18. Observed Communication in Couples Two Years after Integrative and Traditional Behavioral Couple Therapy: Outcome and Link with Five-Year Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baucom, Katherine J. W.; Sevier, Mia; Eldridge, Kathleen A.; Doss, Brian D.; Christensen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine changes in observed communication after therapy termination in distressed couples from a randomized clinical trial. Method: A total of 134 distressed couples were randomly assigned to either traditional behavioral couple therapy (TBCT; Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) or integrative behavioral couple therapy (IBCT; Jacobson &…

  19. DESAlert: Enabling real-time transient follow-up with Dark Energy Survey data

    SciTech Connect

    Poci, A.

    2015-04-12

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is currently undertaking an observational program imaging 1/4 of the southern hemisphere sky with unprecedented photometric accuracy. In the process of observing millions of faint stars and galaxies to constrain the parameters of the dark energy equation of state, the DES will obtain pre-discovery images of the regions surrounding an estimated 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) over five years. Once GRBs are detected by, e.g., the Swift satellite, the DES data will be extremely useful for follow-up observations by the transient astronomy community. We describe a recently-commissioned suite of software that listens continuously for automated notices of GRB activity, collates useful information from archival DES data, and promulgates relevant data products back to the community in near-real-time. Of particular importance are the opportunities that DES data provide for relative photometry of GRBs or their afterglows, as well as for identifying key characteristics (e.g., photometric redshifts) of potential GRB host galaxies. We provide the functional details of the DESAlert software as it presently operates, as well as the data products that it produces, and we show sample results from the application of DESAlert to several previously-detected GRBs.

  20. Do maternal perceptions of child eating and feeding help to explain the disconnect between reported and observed feeding practices?: A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bergmeier, Heidi J; Skouteris, Helen; Hetherington, Marion M; Rodgers, Rachel F; Campbell, Karen J; Cox, Rachael

    2017-02-08

    Research demonstrates a mismatch between reported and observed maternal feeding practices. This mismatch may be explained by maternal cognitions, attitudes, and motivations relating to dyadic parent-child feeding interactions. These complex constructs may not be apparent during observations nor evidenced in self-report questionnaire. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a qualitative approach to gain a more nuanced and contextualized understanding of (a) maternal perceptions of children's food intake control; (b) how parent-child mealtime interactions influence maternal feeding practices; and (c) ways in which mothers may promote healthy child eating and weight outcomes. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 23 mothers (M = 38.4 ± 3.7 years of age) of preschool-aged children (M = 3.8 ± 0.6 years of age, 19 were normal weight, 14 were girls), who had previously completed child feeding questionnaire and participated in two home-based mealtime observations, 12 months apart. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and themes extracted to create the database. Four major themes emerged: (a) Maternal confidence in children's ability to regulate food intake is variable; (b) Implementing strategies for nurturing healthy relationships with food beyond the dining table; (c) Fostering positive mealtime interactions is valued above the content of what children eat; and (d) Situation-specific practices and inconsistencies. Findings indicate that maternal feeding practices are shaped by both parent and child influences, and child feeding is mostly guided by controlling the family food environment, rather than by directly pressuring or restricting their child's eating. Results also highlighted the need for research to consider both parent and child influences on child feeding.

  1. Respiratory physiotherapy and incidence of pulmonary complications in off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: an observational follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Yánez-Brage, Isabel; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Juffé-Stein, Alberto; Martínez-González, Ursicino; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia; Mauleón-García, Angeles

    2009-07-28

    Heart surgery is associated with an occurrence of pulmonary complications. The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-surgery respiratory physiotherapy reduces the incidence of post-surgery pulmonary complications. Observational study of 263 patients submitted to off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery at the A Coruña University Hospital (Spain). 159 (60.5%) patients received preoperative physiotherapy. The fact that patients received preoperative physiotherapy or not was related to whether they were admitted to the cardiac surgery unit or to an alternative unit due to a lack of beds. A physiotherapist provided a daily session involving incentive spirometry, deep breathing exercises, coughing and early ambulation. A logistic regression analysis was carried out in order to identify variables associated with pulmonary complications. Both groups of patients (those that received physiotherapy and those that did not) were similar in age, sex, body mass index, creatinine, ejection fraction, number of affected vessels, O2 basal saturation, prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, exposure to tobacco, age at smoking initiation, number of cigarettes/day and number of years as a smoker. The most frequent postoperative complications were hypoventilation (90.7%), pleural effusion (47.5%) and atelectasis (24.7%). In the univariate analysis, prophylactic physiotherapy was associated with a lower incidence of atelectasis (17% compared to 36%, p = 0.01). After taking into account age, sex, ejection fraction and whether the patients received physiotherapy or not, we observed that receiving physiotherapy is the variable with an independent effect on predicting atelectasis. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy is related to a lower incidence of atelectasis.

  2. Respiratory physiotherapy and incidence of pulmonary complications in off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: an observational follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Yánez-Brage, Isabel; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Juffé-Stein, Alberto; Martínez-González, Ursicino; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia; Mauleón-García, Ángeles

    2009-01-01

    Background Heart surgery is associated with an occurrence of pulmonary complications. The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-surgery respiratory physiotherapy reduces the incidence of post-surgery pulmonary complications. Methods Observational study of 263 patients submitted to off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery at the A Coruña University Hospital (Spain). 159 (60.5%) patients received preoperative physiotherapy. The fact that patients received preoperative physiotherapy or not was related to whether they were admitted to the cardiac surgery unit or to an alternative unit due to a lack of beds. A physiotherapist provided a daily session involving incentive spirometry, deep breathing exercises, coughing and early ambulation. A logistic regression analysis was carried out in order to identify variables associated with pulmonary complications. Results Both groups of patients (those that received physiotherapy and those that did not) were similar in age, sex, body mass index, creatinine, ejection fraction, number of affected vessels, O2 basal saturation, prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, exposure to tobacco, age at smoking initiation, number of cigarettes/day and number of years as a smoker. The most frequent postoperative complications were hypoventilation (90.7%), pleural effusion (47.5%) and atelectasis (24.7%). In the univariate analysis, prophylactic physiotherapy was associated with a lower incidence of atelectasis (17% compared to 36%, p = 0.01). After taking into account age, sex, ejection fraction and whether the patients received physiotherapy or not, we observed that receiving physiotherapy is the variable with an independent effect on predicting atelectasis. Conclusion Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy is related to a lower incidence of atelectasis. PMID:19638209

  3. Live Donors of the Initial Observational Study of Uterus Transplantation-Psychological and Medical Follow-Up Until 1 Year After Surgery in the 9 Cases.

    PubMed

    Kvarnström, Niclas; Järvholm, Stina; Johannesson, Liza; Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla; Olausson, Michael; Brännström, Mats

    2017-03-01

    The first prospective observational study of uterus transplantation was initiated in 2013 with live donation to 9 women with absolute uterine factor infertility. We explored the medical complications and psychosocial wellbeing of the donors during the first postoperative year. Complications were registered and graded according to the Clavien-Dindo (C-D) classification. Symptoms related to the surgery were registered. Data on length of hospital stay, sick leave, socioeconomic parameters, and life events were obtained. Psychological evaluations (Psychological General Well-Being, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS], SF-36) questionnaires focusing on quality of life, mood, and relationship, were conducted at inclusion and at 3, 6, and 12 months after uterus donation. One major surgical complication (C-D IIIb) occurred. A ureteric-vaginal fistula developed 2 weeks after uterus procurement. The fistula was surgically repaired. Two self-reported and transient complications (C-D I) were noted (nocturia, meralgia paresthetica). Hospital stays of all donors were 6 days and median sick leave was 56 days (range, 14-132). At inclusion, median scores exceeded the normative values of the Swedish population in Psychological General Well-Being and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. HADS-Anxiety was detected preoperatively in 1 donor. Two donors exceeded 10-point declines in SF-36 summary scores and increased their HADS scores by 6 points during the observation period. All donors returned to their predonation levels of physical health. The results support that it is feasible to retrieve a uterus safely from a live donor. Further studies are needed to better evaluate the method.

  4. [A follow-up study on pulmonary functions of workers exposed to various forms of dust. Observation on the workers of pneumoconiosis in Kitakyushu].

    PubMed

    Baba, Y; Iwao, S; Kodama, Y

    1983-09-01

    Serial spirograms of 121 dust workers whose chest X-rays were found to be "class 1" of the diagnostic criteria for pneumoconiosis were obtained during 1978-80. Yearly changes of pulmonary function variables (%VC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC%,V25/H, and V50/V25) by age, smoking habit, total years of exposure to dust, and work history were evaluated. The average age of the dust workers was 48.0 +/- 5.5 years, and the average years of exposure to dust was 21.6 +/- 6.8 years in 1978. Eighty-two dust workers smoked with the mean smoking history of 24.7 pack-years. No significant differences of spirograms were found between the smoking and non-smoking groups. Among the smokers, however, linear regression of FEV1/FVC% by age gradually decreased during 1978-80. All the pulmonary function variables showed no correlation with smoking history as well as total years of dust exposure. All the dust workers were classified into eight types of work by their histories; crushing and quarrying operators, brick mason, foundry and grinding operators, asbestos workers, underground miners, refractory material workers, pyrites roasters, and welders. The underground miners showed lower FEV1/FVC% and V25 than the average. However, the difference of such pulmonary function variables by eight types of work was not significant by analysis of variance. Since aging is the most dominant factor for pulmonary dysfunction, a longer observation on this group will be needed.

  5. Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis: Report of a Case with Observations on Clinical Manifestations, Radiology, and Pathology with a Late Follow-Up of Eight Years

    PubMed Central

    Aymore, Ierecê Lins; Amoedo, Armando Rocha; Hemais, Paulo Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study was to investigate clinical manifestations, roentgen images, histopathological studies, and evolution of the disease in patient displaying infantile cortical hyperostosis. Methods. Roentgenograms were made to evaluate a neonatal patient presenting multiple soft-tissue swellings. The initial radiographs insinuated that the disease had been present for some time in utero. Bone puncture biopsy of the tibia for histopathological observation and diagnosis conclusions was performed. Results. The disease was demonstrated radiographically by massive cortical diaphyseal thickening and also extensive periosteal new bone formation surrounding several bones. Results in blood count were as follows: discrete anemia, moderate leukocytosis, and elevated sedimentation rate. Histological pattern of tissue removed from tibia showed lamellar cortical bones and hyperplasia. Biopsy studies disclosed no evidence of neoplasia as well as of bacterial infection. Comments. Clinical manifestations in a neonatal patient displaying infantile cortical hyperostosis have gradually decreased. Radiograph findings have demonstrated complete recovery of bones manifested by the disease. The pathologic findings are in accordance with previous microscopic examination summarized by the literature. Total patient cure, without sequels, could be demonstrated. PMID:28050300

  6. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 3,500 targets and reported more than 16,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center (MPC).The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet is planned for 2017-2018.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA ARM list. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCOGT Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have recently extended the NEOexchange software to include automated data reduction to re-compute the astrometric solution, determine the photometric zeropoint and find moving objects and present these results to the user via

  7. The supernova associated with GRB 020405

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, S.; Dar, A.; De Rújula, A.

    2002-10-01

    We use the very simple and successful Cannonball (CB) model of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows (AGs) to analyze the observations of the mildly extinct optical AG of the relatively nearby GRB 020405. We show that GRB 020405 was associated with a 1998bw-like supernova (SN) at the GRB's redshift that appeared dimmer and redder than SN1998bw because of extinction in the host and our Galaxy. The case for the SN/GRB association - advocated in the CB model - is becoming indubitable. We discuss the extent to which the GRB/SN connection is model-dependent.

  8. Outcomes for bipolar patients assessed in the French expert center network: A 2-year follow-up observational study (FondaMental Advanced Centers of Expertise for Bipolar Disorder [FACE-BD]).

    PubMed

    Henry, Chantal; Godin, Ophelia; Courtet, Philippe; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Gard, Sébastien; Bellivier, Frank; Polosan, Mircea; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Paul; Aubin, Valerie; Costagliola, Dominique; Leboyer, Marion; Etain, Bruno

    2017-09-12

    A new health care system for patients with bipolar disorders was established in France under the auspices of Fondation FondaMental, based on thorough clinical assessment of patients and on close collaborations between expert centers and referring practitioners. We report the results of outcomes after 2 years of observational follow-up of adult patients assessed within the network. A total of 984 patients were included in the study. We compared several parameters (e.g., mood episodes and hospitalization) 1 year before inclusion and after 2 years of observational follow-up using the patient as his or her own control. Other outcomes were compared at baseline and during follow-up. We estimated the evolution of these parameters over a period of 2 years using mixed models for continuous parameters and a generalized estimating equation (GEE) model for categorical variables, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Mean age was 42.7 (±12.5) years and 58.8% were women. The number of hospitalization days decreased by 55% when comparing 1 year before inclusion vs the follow-up period. In addition, patients showed a clear functional improvement associated with a reduction of residual mood symptoms, diminished psychiatric comorbidities, improvement of sleep and a better adherence to treatment. This study demonstrates an overall improvement of patients followed for 2 years after an assessment in expert centers for bipolar disorders. This new organization based on a thorough clinical assessment and on personalized recommendations (drug treatments, psycho-social strategies and lifestyle measures) sent to health care professionals, and actively involving patients and families, improves the prognosis of BD patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. CALORIMETRY OF GRB 030329: SIMULTANEOUS MODEL FITTING TO THE BROADBAND RADIO AFTERGLOW AND THE OBSERVED IMAGE EXPANSION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.

    2013-09-01

    We perform calorimetry on the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 by fitting simultaneously the broadband radio afterglow and the observed afterglow image size to a semi-analytic MHD and afterglow emission model. Our semi-analytic method is valid in both the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes, and incorporates a model of the interstellar scintillation that substantially effects the broadband afterglow below 10 GHz. The model is fitted to archival measurements of the afterglow flux from 1 day to 8.3 yr after the burst. Values for the initial burst parameters are determined and the nature of the circumburst medium is explored. Additionally, direct measurements of the lateral expansion rate of the radio afterglow image size allow us to estimate the initial Lorentz factor of the jet.

  10. X-ray flares in early GRB afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Falcone, A; Chincarini, G; Morris, D; Romano, P; Hill, J E; Godet, O; Moretti, A; Krimm, H; Osborne, J P; Racusin, J; Mangano, V; Page, K; Perri, M; Stroh, M

    2007-05-15

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has discovered that flares are quite common in early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being observed in roughly 50% of afterglows with prompt follow-up observations. The flares range in fluence from a few per cent to approximately 100% of the fluence of the prompt emission (the GRB). Repetitive flares are seen, with more than four successive flares detected by the XRT in some afterglows. The rise and fall times of the flares are typically considerably smaller than the time since the burst. These characteristics suggest that the flares are related to the prompt emission mechanism, but at lower photon energies. We conclude that the most likely cause of these flares is late-time activity of the GRB central engine.

  11. Multiwavelength observations of the energetic GRB 080810: detailed mapping of the broad-band spectral evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Willingale, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Holland, S. T.; McBreen, S.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rol, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.; Aceituno, F. J.; Akerlof, C.; Beardmore, A. P.; Briggs, M. S.; Burrows, D. N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Connaughton, V.; Evans, P. A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gehrels, N.; Guidorzi, C.; Howard, A. W.; Kennea, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pagani, C.; Preece, R.; Perley, D.; Steele, I. A.; Yuan, F.

    2009-11-01

    GRB 080810 was one of the first bursts to trigger both Swift and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It was subsequently monitored over the X-ray and UV/optical bands by Swift, in the optical by Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and a host of other telescopes, and was detected in the radio by the Very Large Array. The redshift of z = 3.355 +/- 0.005 was determined by Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) and confirmed by RTT150 and NOT. The prompt gamma/X-ray emission, detected over 0.3-103 keV, systematically softens over time, with Epeak moving from ~600 keV at the start to ~40 keV around 100s after the trigger; alternatively, this spectral evolution could be identified with the blackbody temperature of a quasi-thermal model shifting from ~60 to ~3keV over the same time interval. The first optical detection was made at 38s, but the smooth, featureless profile of the full optical coverage implies that this is originated from the afterglow component, not from the pulsed/flaring prompt emission. Broad-band optical and X-ray coverage of the afterglow at the start of the final X-ray decay (~8ks) reveals a spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands in the range of 1015-2 × 1016Hz. The decay profiles of the X-ray and optical bands show that this break initially migrates blueward to this frequency and then subsequently drifts redward to below the optical band by ~3 × 105s. GRB 080810 was very energetic, with an isotropic energy output for the prompt component of 3 × 1053 and 1.6 × 1052 erg for the afterglow; there is no evidence for a jet break in the afterglow up to 6d following the burst. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Martin Turner, who sadly passed away during its writing. Martin was an influential figure in X-ray Astronomy and an excellent PhD supervisor. He will be greatly missed. E-mail: kpa@star.le.ac.uk ‡ NASA postdoctoral program fellow.

  12. Investigating the nature of the INTEGRAL gamma-ray bursts and sub-threshold triggers with Swift follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, A. B.; Starling, R. L. C.; Götz, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Wiersema, K.; Maccarone, T.; Osborne, J. P.; Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Bird, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Gehrels, N.

    2017-09-01

    We explore the potential of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) to improve our understanding of the low-fluence regime for explosive transients, such as Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). We probe the nature of the so-called 'WEAK' INTEGRAL triggers, when the gamma-ray instruments record intensity spikes that are below the usual STRONG significance thresholds. In a targeted Swift follow-up campaign, we observed 15 WEAK triggers. We find six of these can be classified as GRBs. This includes GRB 150305A, a GRB discovered from our campaign alone. We also identified a source coincident with one trigger, IGRW 151019, as a candidate active galactic nucleus. We show that real events such as GRBs exist within the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS) WEAK trigger population. A comparison of the fluence distributions of the full INTEGRAL IBAS and Swift-BAT GRB samples showed that the two are similar. We also find correlations between the prompt gamma-ray and X-ray properties of the two samples, supporting previous investigations. We find that both satellites reach similar, low fluence levels regularly, although Swift is more sensitive to short, low-fluence GRBs.

  13. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim A.; Greenstreet, S.; Gomez, E.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network size of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and additionally for the discovery of new objects. We are using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1&2) and several hundred targets are now being followed per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO follow-up portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  14. Long-term outcomes of anthroposophic treatment for chronic disease: a four-year follow-up analysis of 1510 patients from a prospective observational study in routine outpatient settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthroposophic treatment includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We here report an update to a previously published study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases, including more patients and a longer follow up. The Anthroposophic Medicine Outcomes Study (AMOS) was a prospective observational cohort study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic indications in routine outpatient settings in Germany. Anthroposophic treatment was associated with improvements of symptoms and quality of life. Previous follow-up-analyses have been performed after 24 months or, in subgroups of patients enrolled in the period 1999-2001, after 48 months. We conducted a 48-month follow-up analysis of all patients enrolled in AMOS in the period 1999-2005. Methods 1,510 outpatients aged 1-75 years, starting anthroposophic treatment for chronic conditions in routine German outpatient settings, participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were Symptom Score (primary outcome, mean symptom severity on numerical rating scales), SF-36 Physical and Mental Component scores in adults, and disease-specific outcomes in the six most common diagnosis groups: asthma, anxiety disorders and migraine (numerical rating scales), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms (FBB-HKS Total score), and low back pain (Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire, Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Results Median disease duration at baseline was 3.5 years. From baseline to 48-month follow-up all ten outcomes improved significantly (p < 0.001 for all pre-post comparisons). Standardised Response Mean effect sizes were large (range 0.84-1.24 standard deviations) for seven comparisons, medium for two comparisons (SF-36 Mental Component: 0.60, Low Back Pain Rating Scale: 0.55), and small for one comparison (SF-36 Physical Component: 0.39). Symptom Score improved significantly with large effect

  15. Long-term outcomes of anthroposophic treatment for chronic disease: a four-year follow-up analysis of 1510 patients from a prospective observational study in routine outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Hamre, Harald Johan; Kiene, Helmut; Glockmann, Anja; Ziegler, Renatus; Kienle, Gunver Sophia

    2013-07-13

    Anthroposophic treatment includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We here report an update to a previously published study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases, including more patients and a longer follow up. The Anthroposophic Medicine Outcomes Study (AMOS) was a prospective observational cohort study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic indications in routine outpatient settings in Germany. Anthroposophic treatment was associated with improvements of symptoms and quality of life. Previous follow-up-analyses have been performed after 24 months or, in subgroups of patients enrolled in the period 1999-2001, after 48 months. We conducted a 48-month follow-up analysis of all patients enrolled in AMOS in the period 1999-2005. 1,510 outpatients aged 1-75 years, starting anthroposophic treatment for chronic conditions in routine German outpatient settings, participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were Symptom Score (primary outcome, mean symptom severity on numerical rating scales), SF-36 Physical and Mental Component scores in adults, and disease-specific outcomes in the six most common diagnosis groups: asthma, anxiety disorders and migraine (numerical rating scales), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms (FBB-HKS Total score), and low back pain (Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire, Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Median disease duration at baseline was 3.5 years. From baseline to 48-month follow-up all ten outcomes improved significantly (p < 0.001 for all pre-post comparisons). Standardised Response Mean effect sizes were large (range 0.84-1.24 standard deviations) for seven comparisons, medium for two comparisons (SF-36 Mental Component: 0.60, Low Back Pain Rating Scale: 0.55), and small for one comparison (SF-36 Physical Component: 0.39). Symptom Score improved significantly with large effect sizes in adults and children

  16. GRB 971214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Adelberger, K. L.; Bloom, J. S.; Kundic, T.; Lubin, L.

    1998-01-01

    On December 28, 1997, Kundic and Lubin obtained spectra of the optical transient of GRB 971214 (IAUC #6788) with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (LRIS) mounted on the Keck II telescope. The seeing conditions were excellent. If the transient continued the power-law decay as indicated by the data from Halpern et al. (IAUC #6788) then by this epoch the light at this position should be dominated by the host (cf. Kulkarni et al. GCN #27; ATEL #5).

  17. Understanding Grb Physics With Multi-Wavelength Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    The study of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has entered a full multi-wavelength era. A rich trove of data from NASA GRB missions and ground-based follow up observations have been collected. Careful data mining with well-defined scientific objectives holds the key to address open questions in GRB physics, such as jet composition, radiation mechanism, progenitor and central engine physics. We propose to perform data analyses in the following three directions. 1. The time resolved GRB spectra have a dominant component that can be fit with a phenomenological ``Band'' function. The physical meaning of this function remains unclear. Recently we made a breakthrough in theoretical modeling, and showed that fast-cooling synchrotron radiation of electrons in a decreasing magnetic field can mimic the Band function in detector's bandpass, but differs from Band function slightly. We propose to apply this physically-motivated model to systematically fit the GRB prompt emission data collected by Fermi GBM and LAT, and test whether the dominant GRB emission mechanism is fast cooling synchrotron radiation. We will also fit time-dependent spectra with a time-dependent model to investigate whether a quasi- thermal "photosphere'' emission component is indeed needed to fit the observed spectra. This would shed light onto the unknown composition of GRB jets. By fitting the time resolved spectra, we will also constrain important physical parameters of GRB prompt emission, such as the emission site of GRBs, the strength of magnetic fields, as well as their evolution with radius. 2. Recent GRB multi-wavelength observations suggest that it is not straightforward to define the physical category of a GRB based on the traditional classification in the "duration''-"hardness'' domain. Some long-duration GRBs may not have a massive star origin, while some short-duration GRBs may instead have a massive star origin. We propose to systematically study the gamma-ray Swift/BAT, Fermi/GBM- LAT), X-ray (Swift

  18. Baseline and 1-year interim follow-up assessment of Japanese patients initiating insulin therapy who were enrolled in the cardiovascular risk evaluation in people with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy study: an international, multicenter, observational study.

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Ryuzo; Node, Koichi; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Atsumi, Yoshihito; Naito, Yusuke; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2013-09-08

    The Cardiovascular Risk Evaluation in people with type 2 Diabetes on Insulin Therapy (CREDIT) study is an international, multicenter, observational study designed to assess metabolic parameters and cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on insulin therapy. The present report summarizes results at baseline and 1-year follow-up for the cohort of Japanese patients. Male and female patients (n = 511), aged >40 years, with T2DM for >1 year, treated with insulin therapy for ≥1 month and <6 months were eligible for participation in the study. Glycemic and lipid parameters, duration of diabetes, diabetic complications, oral antidiabetic medications, and all hypoglycemic episodes were recorded. Effectiveness was assessed based on changes in clinical parameters and attainment of target HbA1c levels. Safety was evaluated based on episodes of hypoglycemia and weight gain. At baseline, the mean ± SD duration of diabetes was 11.8 ± 8.8 years. Microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications were present in 83.4% and 25.1% of patients, respectively. At the 1-year follow-up, significant improvements were observed in mean HbA1c (10.3 ± 2.0% vs. 7.5 ± 1.3%, P < .001), fasting plasma glucose (217.3 ± 80.8 mg/dL vs. 139.0 ± 48.7 mg/dL, P < .001), and postprandial plasma glucose levels (296.1 ± 96.0 mg/dL vs. 178.2 ± 68.6 mg/dL, P < .001) compared with baseline. Mean total cholesterol (P < .001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < .001), triglycerides (P < .01), and diastolic blood pressure (P < .01) also significantly decreased. Good glycemic control (HbA1c < 7.0%) was achieved in 40% of patients at the 1-year follow-up. Glycemic control tended to be better in patients with lower baseline HbA1c levels (P < .01). Patients with a shorter duration of diabetes were more likely to achieve glycemic control and discontinue insulin for diabetes control at the 1-year follow-up (P < .05 for trend). Symptomatic hypoglycemic episodes occurred in

  19. RAPTOR: Closed-Loop monitoring of the night sky and the earliest optical detection of GRB 021211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Borozdin, K.; Casperson, D. J.; Fenimore, E.; Galassi, M.; McGowan, K.; Starr, D.; White, R. R.; Wozniak, P.; Wren, J.

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the RAPTOR (Rapid Telescopes for Optical Response) sky monitoring system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RAPTOR is a fully autonomous robotic system that is designed to identify and make follow-up observations of optical transients with durations as short as one minute. The RAPTOR design is based on Biomimicry of Human Vision. The sky monitor is composed of two identical arrays of telescopes, separated by 38 kilometers, which stereoscopically monitor a field of about 1300 square-degrees for transients. Both monitoring arrays are carried on rapidly slewing mounts and are composed of an ensemble of wide-field telescopes clustered around a more powerful narrow-field telescope called the ``fovea'' telescope. All telescopes are coupled to real-time analysis pipelines that identify candidate transients and relay the information to a central decision unit that filters the candidates to find real celestial transients and command a response. When a celestial transient is found, the system can point the fovea telescopes to any position on the sky within five seconds and begin follow-up observations. RAPTOR also responds to Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) alerts generated by GRB monitoring spacecraft. Here we present RAPTOR observations of GRB 021211 that constitute the earliest detection of optical emission from that event and are the second fastest achieved for any GRB. The detection of bright optical emission from GRB021211, a burst with modest gamma-ray fluence, indicates that prompt optical emission, detectable with small robotic telescopes, is more common than previously thought. Further, the very fast decline of the optical afterglow from GRB 021211 suggests that some so-called ``optically dark'' GRBs were not detected only because of the slow response of the follow-up telescopes.

  20. Spectroscopic Follow Up of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L.; Endl, M.; Isaacson, H.; Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations, showing examples of the types of false positives found and ending with a presentation of the characteristics of a confirmed planet.

  1. GRB off-axis afterglows and the emission from the accompanying supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are likely produced in the shock that is driven as the GRB jet interacts with the external medium. Long-duration GRBs are also associated with powerful supernovae (SNe). We consider the optical and radio afterglows of long GRBs for both blasts viewed along the jet axis (`on-axis' afterglows) and misaligned observes (`off-axis' afterglows). Comparing the optical emission from the afterglow with that of the accompanying SN, using SN 1998bw as an archetype, we find that only a few per cent of afterglows viewed off-axis are brighter than the SN. For observable optical off-axis afterglows, the viewing angle is at most twice the half-opening angle of the GRB jet. Radio off-axis afterglows should be detected with upcoming radio surveys within a few hundred Mpc. We propose that these surveys will act as `radio triggers', and that dedicated radio facilities should follow-up these sources. Follow-ups can unveil the presence of the radio SN remnant, if present. In addition, they can probe the presence of a mildly relativistic component, either associated with the GRB jet or the SN ejecta, expected in these sources.

  2. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  3. Prospect Follow Up Pays Dividends in Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassom, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Describes a follow-up program for enrolling day care center prospects. Follow-up within the center utilizes contact management software and a prospect profile system to record information about potential customers. External follow-up includes a telephone call to confirm an appointment to the center or to provide additional information to the…

  4. Prospect Follow Up Pays Dividends in Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassom, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Describes a follow-up program for enrolling day care center prospects. Follow-up within the center utilizes contact management software and a prospect profile system to record information about potential customers. External follow-up includes a telephone call to confirm an appointment to the center or to provide additional information to the…

  5. GRB 110715A: the peculiar multiwavelength evolution of the first afterglow detected by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Hancock, P. J.; Jóhannesson, G.; Murphy, Tara; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Kann, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Oates, S. R.; Japelj, J.; Thöne, C. C.; Lundgren, A.; Perley, D. A.; Malesani, D.; de Gregorio Monsalvo, I.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hu, Y.-D.; Jelínek, M.; Jeong, S.; Kamble, A.; Klose, S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Llorente, A.; Martín, S.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rossi, A.; Schady, P.; Sparre, M.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tello, J. C.; Updike, A.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2017-02-01

    We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 s after the burst and extending up to 74 d later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use the optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host-galaxy environment with low ionization, column density, and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broad-band afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best-fitting parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multiwavelength broad-band afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.

  6. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  7. GNAT Student Follow-Up Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Noll S.; Jaggi, N.; Milne, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Global Network of Astronomical Telescopes (GNAT) has discovered some 25,000 new variable star candidates along an equatorial strip of the sky with a non-moving (drift scan) telescope. With three closely spaced observations of any given star being made on the order of 100 nights spread over three years, GNAT could not determine the types of variability and periods of the short period, aliased light curve stars in their MG-1 Variable Star Catalog. Such determinations typically require, for each star, hundreds of closely spaced observations over a number of nights with a modest-aperture tracking telescope equipped for CCD photometry. Many college and amateur observatories are capable of making such observation. At Cuesta College we have initiated a GNAT follow-up pilot program to determine how students at small observatories could efficiently make such determinations in a single-semester research course. We used a 10” Meade LX-200 telescope equipped with a SBIG ST-8XE camera to observe nine GNAT candidates, looking for short-term variability. We found two of the nine to be very short-term variables. We obtained 1397 one-minute integrations on the GNAT star GM1-15036 (GSC 13:95) over seven nights. We determined its period to be about 0.16 days. Its sinusoidal waveform has a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.2 magnitudes. This star is most likely an RR Lyrae pulsating variable. The second short-term variable star is now being repeatedly observed and, in parallel, we are examining a second batch of nine candidates for short-term variability. At the end of the fall 2006 semester, we will summarize what have learned about one-semester GNAT student follow-up observations. We are pleased to acknowledge the assistance of Eric Craine from GNAT, Russell Genet from Cuesta College and Orion Observatory, and Thomas Smith from Dark Ridge Observatory.

  8. Graduate Follow-Up Studies: How Useful Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedley, Rande H.; Olson, George H.

    Follow-up surveys may fall prey to several sources of bias and error, among them lack of control over independent variables, lack of item validity and reliability, sampling biases, and observation bias. Two follow-up studies have been dissected to expose inherent limitations: the Texas Education Product Study (TEPS) and Project TALENT. The…

  9. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Ryde, Felix; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  10. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Norris, Jay; Ryde, Felix

    2007-05-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  11. Long-term immunogenicity and safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in 10- to 14-year-old girls: open 6-year follow-up of an initial observer-blinded, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tino F; Huang, Li-Min; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Wittermann, Christoph; Panzer, Falko; Valencia, Alejandra; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju V; Lin, Lan; Descamps, Dominique

    2014-12-01

    Immunogenicity and safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine were evaluated up to 6 years postvaccination (month 72) in preteen/adolescent girls. Participants, who had received 3 HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine doses at 10-14 years of age in an initial controlled, observer-blinded, randomized study (NCT00196924) and participated in the open 3-year follow-up (NCT00316706), were invited to continue the follow-up for up to 10 years postvaccination (NCT00877877). Anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibody titers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at yearly visits and were used to fit the modified power-law and piecewise models, predicting long-term immunogenicity. Serious adverse events (SAEs) and pregnancy information were recorded. In the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort, all participants (N = 505) with data available remained seropositive for anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies at month 72. In initially seronegative participants, anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibody geometric mean titers were 65.8- and 33.0-fold higher than those associated with natural infection (NCT00122681) and 5.0- and 2.5-fold higher than those measured at month 69-74 in a study demonstrating vaccine efficacy in women aged 15-25 years (NCT00120848). Exploratory antibody modeling, based on the 6-year data, predicted that vaccine-induced population anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibody geometric mean titers would remain above those associated with natural infection for at least 20 years postvaccination. The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine safety profile was clinically acceptable. In preteen/adolescent girls, the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine induced high anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibody levels up to 6 years postvaccination, which were predicted to remain above those induced by natural infection for at least 20 years.

  12. Two-year follow-up data from the STEPP-AMI study: A prospective, observational, multicenter study comparing tenecteplase-facilitated PCI versus primary PCI in Indian patients with STEMI.

    PubMed

    Victor, Suma M; Vijayakumar, S; Alexander, Thomas; Bahuleyan, C G; Srinivas, Arun; Selvamani, S; Priya, S Marutha; Kamaleswari, K; Mullasari, Ajit S

    2016-01-01

    A pharmacoinvasive strategy may alleviate the logistical and geographical barriers in timely reperfusion of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), especially in a developing country like India. To assess the safety and efficacy of pharmacoinvasive strategy versus primary PCI in STEMI patients at 2 years. Patients enrolled in STEPP-AMI, an observational, multicenter, prospective study of 200 patients presenting with STEMI, were followed up for 2 years. Group 'A' comprised of patients with pharmacoinvasive strategy (n=45), and patients who underwent primary PCI (n=155) formed group 'B'. Primary endpoint was composite of death, cardiogenic shock, reinfarction, repeat revascularization of the culprit artery, or congestive heart failure at 30 days, with follow-up till 2 years. The primary endpoint occurred in 11.1% and 17.8% in group A and in 3.9% and 13.6% in group B, at 30 days and 2 years, respectively (p=0.07, RR=2.87; 95% CI: 0.92-8.97 at 30 days and p=0.47, RR=1.31; 95% CI: 0.62-2.76). There was no difference in bleeding risk between groups, 2.2% in group A and 0.6% in group B ('p'=0.4). The infarct-related artery patency varied at angiogram; it was 82.2% in arm A and 22.6% in arm B ('p'<0.001). In group A, failed fibrinolysis occurred in 12.1%. A pharmacoinvasive strategy resulted in outcomes that were comparable with primary PCI at 2 years, suggesting it might be a viable option in India. Larger studies are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A: Faint High-energy Gamma-Ray Photon Emission from Fermi-LAT Observations and Demographic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, WeiKang; Akerlof, Carl W.; Pandey, Shashi B.; McKay, Timothy A.; Zhang, BinBin; Zhang, Bing; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Launched on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided a rare opportunity to study high-energy photon emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although the majority of such events (27) have been identified by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, four were uncovered by using more sensitive statistical techniques. In this paper, we continue our earlier work by finding three more GRBs associated with high-energy photon emission, GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A. To systematize our matched filter approach, a pipeline has been developed to identify these objects in nearly real time. GRB 120107A is the first product of this analysis procedure. Despite the reduced threshold for identification, the number of GRB events has not increased significantly. This relative dearth of events with low photon number prompted a study of the apparent photon number distribution. We find an extremely good fit to a simple power law with an exponent of -1.8 ± 0.3 for the differential distribution. As might be expected, there is a substantial correlation between the number of lower energy photons detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the number observed by LAT. Thus, high-energy photon emission is associated with some but not all of the brighter GBM events. Deeper studies of the properties of the small population of high-energy emitting bursts may eventually yield a better understanding of these entire phenomena.

  14. GRB 110709A, 111117A, AND 120107A: FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION FROM FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS AND DEMOGRAPHIC IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; McKay, Timothy A.; Pandey, Shashi B.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Launched on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided a rare opportunity to study high-energy photon emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although the majority of such events (27) have been identified by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, four were uncovered by using more sensitive statistical techniques. In this paper, we continue our earlier work by finding three more GRBs associated with high-energy photon emission, GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A. To systematize our matched filter approach, a pipeline has been developed to identify these objects in nearly real time. GRB 120107A is the first product of this analysis procedure. Despite the reduced threshold for identification, the number of GRB events has not increased significantly. This relative dearth of events with low photon number prompted a study of the apparent photon number distribution. We find an extremely good fit to a simple power law with an exponent of -1.8 {+-} 0.3 for the differential distribution. As might be expected, there is a substantial correlation between the number of lower energy photons detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the number observed by LAT. Thus, high-energy photon emission is associated with some but not all of the brighter GBM events. Deeper studies of the properties of the small population of high-energy emitting bursts may eventually yield a better understanding of these entire phenomena.

  15. Follow-up Cost Study. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Ronald C.

    This report presents data on the costs of follow-up studies, based on 29 separate follow-up studies conducted by eight public community/junior colleges in Texas. The purpose of this study, conducted by Navarro College as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, was to provide data and information regarding the cost of follow-up studies that would be…

  16. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  17. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Retief, Francois

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  18. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  19. Effectiveness and Persistence with Liraglutide Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Routine Clinical Practice--EVIDENCE: A Prospective, 2-Year Follow-Up, Observational, Post-Marketing Study.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Jean-Francois; Martinez, Luc; Penfornis, Alfred; Eschwège, Eveline; Charpentier, Guillaume; Huret, Benoît; Madani, Suliya; Gourdy, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the efficacy of liraglutide observed in randomized controlled trials translates into therapeutic benefits in the French population during routine clinical practice. This observational, prospective, multicenter study included 3152 adults with type 2 diabetes who had recently started or were about to start liraglutide treatment. During 2 years of follow-up, an evaluation of the reasons for prescribing liraglutide, maintenance dose of liraglutide, changes in combined antidiabetic treatments, level of glycemic control, change in body weight and body mass index (BMI), patient satisfaction with diabetes treatment and safety of liraglutide were investigated. The primary study endpoint was the proportion of patients still receiving liraglutide and presenting with HbA1c <7.0% after 2 years of follow-up. At the end of the study, 29.5% of patients maintained liraglutide treatment and reached the HbA(1c) target. Mean (±SD) HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose concentration, body weight and BMI were significantly reduced from baseline [8.46% (±1.46) to 7.44% (±1.20); 180 (±60) to 146 (±44) mg/dL; 95.2 (±20.0) to 91.1 (±19.6) kg; 34.0 (±7.2) to 32.5 (±6.9) kg/m(2); respectively, all P < 0.0001]. Patient treatment satisfaction increased, with the mean diabetes treatment satisfaction questionnaire status version score increasing from 22.17 (±7.64) to 28.55 (±5.79), P < 0.0001. The main adverse event type was gastrointestinal, with a frequency of 10.9%, and the percentage of patients suffering ≥1 hypoglycemic episode decreased from 6.9% to 4.4%. The results of the EVIDENCE study suggest that the effectiveness of liraglutide in real-world clinical practice is similar to that observed in randomized controlled trials. Novo Nordisk A/S. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01226966.

  20. Is the radiographic subsidence of stand-alone cages associated with adverse clinical outcomes after cervical spine fusion? An observational cohort study with 2-year follow-up outcome scoring.

    PubMed

    Zajonz, Dirk; Franke, Anne-Catherine; von der Höh, Nicolas; Voelker, Anna; Moche, Michael; Gulow, Jens; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The stand-alone treatment of degenerative cervical spine pathologies is a proven method in clinical practice. However, its impact on subsidence, the resulting changes to the profile of the cervical spine and the possible influence of clinical results compared to treatment with additive plate osteosynthesis remain under discussion until present. This study was designed as a retrospective observational cohort study to test the hypothesis that radiographic subsidence of cervical cages is not associated with adverse clinical outcomes. 33 cervical segments were treated surgically by ACDF with stand-alone cage in 17 patients (11 female, 6 male), mean age 56 years (33-82 years), and re-examined after eight and twenty-six months (mean) by means of radiology and score assessment (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (MOS-SF 36), Oswestry Neck Disability Index (ONDI), painDETECT questionnaire and the visual analogue scale (VAS)). Subsidence was observed in 50.5% of segments (18/33) and 70.6% of patients (12/17). 36.3% of cases of subsidence (12/33) were observed after eight months during mean time of follow-up 1. After 26 months during mean time of follow-up 2, full radiographic fusion was seen in 100%. MOS-SF 36, ONDI and VAS did not show any significant difference between cases with and without subsidence in the two-sample t-test. Only in one type of scoring (painDETECT questionnaire) did a statistically significant difference in t-Test emerge between the two groups (p = 0.03; α = 0.05). However, preoperative painDETECT score differ significantly between patients with subsidence (13.3 falling to 12.6) and patients without subsidence (7.8 dropped to 6.3). The radiological findings indicated 100% healing after stand-alone treatment with ACDF. Subsidence occurred in 50% of the segments treated. No impact on the clinical results was detected in the medium-term study period.

  1. The dangers of "follow-up" feeds.

    PubMed

    Greiner, T

    1991-09-01

    Artificial feeds constituted with contaminated water and unclean bottles are the leading cause of diarrhea in infants. Companies market artificial feeds globally as infant formula (a substitute for breast milk) and follow-up formula (a complement to breast milk). Breast milk is best for all 0-12 month old infants. Breast-fed infants do not need any formula even follow-up formula. Indeed 6-month old infants require solid healthful foods and breast milk. Like infant formulas, follow-up formula made with contaminated water or bottles can cause the infant to become ill with an infection, and offering follow-up formulas to infants impedes weaning and is costly. Follow-up formulas do not complement breast milk, but instead tend to replace it. The 1986 WHO World Health Assembly has even declared that, in some countries, provision of follow-up formula is not necessary. WHO fears mothers could use follow-up formula instead of infant formula because it has a higher protein and mineral content thus increasing the risk of dehydration during diarrhea. Follow-up formula can result in an unbalanced diet. Since the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes does not address formulas marketed as a complement to breast milk, formula companies market follow-up formulas in both developed and developing countries. Most mothers do not know the risks of using follow-up formulas, however. Governments have several alternatives to stop the marketing of these formulas. They can design and implement a code that defines breast-milk substitutes as any formula perceived and used as a breast milk option even if promoted as a breast-milk complement. They can also amend an existing code. WHO offers technical assistance to any member government who wishes to design, implement, and monitor such a code.

  2. GRB 150101B/Swift J123205.1-105602: Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, E.; Sakamoto, T.; Lien, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Gehrels, N.

    2015-01-01

    We observed the field of the transient Swift J123205.1-105602 (Cummings; GCN 17267) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory beginning on 2015 Jan 09.48 UT (7.83 days post-burst) for a total exposure of 14.9 ks.

  3. A nearby GRB host galaxy: VLT/X-shooter observations of HG 031203

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), which release enormous amounts of energy into the interstellar medium, occur in galaxies of generally low metallicity. For a better understanding of this phenomenon, detailed observations of the specific properties of the host galaxies (HG) and the environment near the LGRBs are mandatory. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic analysis of HG 031203, the host galaxy of a LRGB burst, to obtain its properties. Our results will be compared with those of previous studies and the properties of a sample of luminous compact emission-line galaxies (LCGs) selected from SDSS DR7. Methods: Based on VLT/X-shooter spectroscopic observations taken from commissioning mode in the wavelength range ~λλ3200-24 000 Å, we use standard direct methods to evaluate physical conditions and element abundances. The resolving power of the instrument also allowed us to trace the kinematics of the ionised gas. Furthermore, we use X-shooter data together with Spitzer observations in the mid-infrared range for testing hidden star formation. Results: We derive an interstellar oxygen abundance of 12 + log O/H = 8.20 ± 0.03 for HG 031203. The observed fluxes of hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value C(Hβ) = 1.67. We produce the CLOUDY photoionisation H ii region model that reproduces observed emission-line fluxes of different ions in the optical range. This model also predicts emission-line fluxes in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) ranges that agree well with the observed ones. This implies that the star-forming region observed in the optical range is the only source of ionisation and there is no additional source of ionisation seen in the NIR and MIR ranges that is hidden in the optical range. We find the composite kinematic structure from profiles of the strong emission lines by decomposing them into two Gaussian narrow and broad components. These components

  4. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  5. The latest two GRB detected by Hete-2: GRB 051022 and GRB 051028

    SciTech Connect

    Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jelinek, M.; Pandey, S. B.; Ugarte Postigo, A. de; Gorosabel, J.; McBreen, S.; Bremer, M.; Guziy, S.; Bihain, G.; Caballero, J. A.; Ferrero, P.; Jong, J de; Misra, K.; Sahu, D. K.

    2006-05-19

    We present multiwavelength observations of the latest two GRB detected by Hete-2 in 2005. For GRB 051022, no optical/nIR afterglow has been detected, in spite of the strong gamma-ray emission and the reported X-ray afterglow discovered by Swift. A mm afterglow was discovered at PdB confirming the association of this event with a luminous (MV = - 21.5) galaxy within the X-ray error box. Spectroscopy of this galaxy shows strong a strong [O II] emission line at z = 0.807, besides weaker [O III] emission. The X-ray spectrum showed evidence of considerable absorption by neutral gas with NH,X-ray = 4.5 x 1022 cm2 (at rest frame). ISM absorption by dust in the host galaxy at z = 0.807 cannot certainly account for the non-detection of the optical afterglow, unless the dust-to-gas ratio is quite different than that seen in our Galaxy. It is possible then that GRB 051022 was produced in an obscured, stellar forming region in its parent host galaxy.For GRB 051028, the data can be interpreted by collimated emission (a jet model with p = 2.4) moving in an homogeneous ISM and with a cooling frequency vc still above the X-rays at 0.5 days after the burst onset. GRB 051028 can be classified as a 'gray' or 'potentially dark' GRB. The Swift/XRT data are consistent with the interpretation that the reason for the optical dimness is not extra absorption in the host galaxy, but rather the GRB taking place at high-redshift.

  6. Constraints on binary neutron star merger product from short GRB observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Lü, Hou-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are strong gravitational-wave (GW) sources and the leading candidates to interpret short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Under the assumptions that SGRBs are produced by double neutron star mergers and that the x-ray plateau followed by a steep decay as observed in SGRB x-ray light curves marks the collapse of a supramassive neutron star to a black hole (BH), we use the statistical observational properties of Swift SGRBs and the mass distribution of Galactic double neutron star systems to place constraints on the neutron star equation of state (EoS) and the properties of the post-merger product. We show that current observations already impose the following interesting constraints. (1) A neutron star EoS with a maximum mass close to a parametrization of Mmax=2.37 M⊙(1 +1.58 ×10-10P-2.84) is favored. (2) The fractions for the several outcomes of NS-NS mergers are as follows: ˜40 % prompt BHs, ˜30 % supramassive NSs that collapse to BHs in a range of delay time scales, and ˜30 % stable NSs that never collapse. (3) The initial spin of the newly born supramassive NSs should be near the breakup limit (Pi˜1 ms ), which is consistent with the merger scenario. (4) The surface magnetic field of the merger products is typically ˜1015 G . (5) The ellipticity of the supramassive NSs is ɛ ˜(0.004 -0.007 ), so that strong GW radiation is released after the merger. (6) Even though the initial spin energy of the merger product is similar, the final energy output of the merger product that goes into the electromagnetic channel varies in a wide range from several 1049 to several 1052 erg , since a good fraction of the spin energy is either released in the form of GWs or falls into the black hole as the supramassive NS collapses.

  7. Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up Updated:Sep 14,2016 ... Surgery Milestones • Personal Stories Video: Preparing For Your Surgery Find helpful tips from others who have successfully ...

  8. E3 Sample Follow-up Email

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sample follow-up email to assist in identifying and nominating those suppliers who you think could benefit most from joining the Green Suppliers Network; your role is to facilitate supplier selection and engagement.

  9. GRB Discoveries with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This brief presentation presents Swift Observatory recordings of gamma ray burst (GRB) activity. Long and short GRBs and afterglows are highlighted. Recordings of GRB emission, afterglow, optical/IR brightness, and flux density are presented. The time structure and current status of short GRB structures is also included.

  10. The transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Casper, Anne S.; Sternberg, Alice L.; Holbrook, Janet T.; Jenkins, Gabrielle; Meinert, Curtis L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigators may elect to extend follow-up of participants enrolled in a randomized clinical trial after the trial comes to its planned end. The additional follow-up may be initiated to learn about longer term effects of treatments including adverse events, costs related to treatment, or for reasons unrelated to treatment such as to observe the natural course of the disease using the established cohort from the trial. Purpose We examine transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies when the goal of additional follow-up is to observe longer term treatment effects. Methods We conducted a literature search in selected journals from 2000–2012 to identify trials that extended follow-up for the purpose of studying longer term treatment effects and extracted information on the operational and logistical issues in the transition. We also draw experience from three trials coordinated by the Johns Hopkins Coordinating Centers that made transitions to extended followup: the Alzheimer’s Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT); Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) trial; and Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Results Transitions are not uncommon in multicenter clinical trials, even in trials that continued to the planned end of the trial. Transitioning usually necessitates new participant consents. If study infrastructure is not maintained during the transition, participants will be lost and re-establishing the staff and facilities will be costly. Merging data from the trial and follow-up study can be complicated by changes in data collection measures and schedules. Limitations Our discussion and recommendations are limited to issues that we have experienced in transitions from trials to follow-up studies. Discussion We discuss issues such as maintaining funding, IRB and consent requirements, contacting participants, and combining data from the trial and follow-up phases. We conclude with a list of recommendations to

  11. Clinical evaluation of 860 anterior and posterior lithium disilicate restorations: retrospective study with a mean follow-up of 3 years and a maximum observational period of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Giacomo; Zarone, Fernando; Dellificorelli, Gianluca; Cannistraro, Giorgio; De Lorenzi, Marco; Mosca, Alberto; Sorrentino, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the clinical performance of lithium disilicate restorations supported by natural teeth or implants. Eight hundred sixty lithium disilicate adhesive restorations, including crowns on natural teeth and implant abutments, veneers, and onlays, were made in 312 patients. Parafunctional patients were included, but subjects with uncontrolled periodontitis and gingival inflammation were excluded. Veneers up to 0.5 mm thick were luted with flowable composite resin or light curing cements, while dual-curing composite systems were used with veneers up to 0.8 mm thick. Onlays up to 2 mm in thickness were luted with flowable composite resins or dual-curing composite cements. Crowns up to 1 mm in thickness were cemented with self-adhesive or dual-curing resin cements. The observational period ranged from 12 to 72 months, with a mean follow-up of 3 years. The mechanical and esthetic outcomes of the restorations were evaluated according to the modified California Dental Association (CDA) criteria. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Twenty-six mechanical complications were observed: 17 porcelain chippings, 5 fractures, and 4 losses of retention. Structural drawbacks occurred mainly in posterior segments, and monolithic restorations showed the lowest number of mechanical complications. The clinical ratings of the successful restorations, both monolithic and layered, were satisfactory according to the modified CDA criteria for color match, porcelain surface, and marginal integrity. The cumulative survival rates of lithium disilicate restorations ranged from 95.46% to 100%, while cumulative success rates ranged from 95.39% to 100%. All restorations recorded very high survival and success rates. The use of lithium disilicate restorations in fixed prosthodontics proved to be effective and reliable in the short- and medium-term.

  12. The Fermi GBM and LAT follow-up of GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissaldi, E.; Connaughton, V.; Omodei, N.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Vianello, G.

    2017-03-01

    As the first detection of Gravitation Wave (GW) event arising from the coalescence of two stellar-mass Black Holes (BH) was announced by LIGO, a new era for astronomy began. Searches for electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of GW events is of fundamental importance, as they increase the confidence in the GW detection and help characterize the parameters of the merger. The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has the best sensitivity to simultaneously observe a large fraction of the sky from 10 keV to more than 300 GeV, providing the unique capability of rapidly covering the entire probability region from a LIGO candidate. Here we present observations by the Fermi Gamma-Ray BurstMonitor (GBM) [1] and by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) [2] of the LIGO Gravitational Wave event GW150914, which has been associated to the merger of two stellar-mass BHs. We report the presence of a weak transient event in GBM data, close in time to the LIGO one. We discuss the characteristics of this GBM transient, which are consistent with a weak short GRB arriving at a large angle to the direction in which Fermi was pointing. Furthermore, we report LAT upper limits (ULs) for GW150914, and we present the strategy for follow-up observations of GW events with the LAT.

  13. ALMA observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23: deep limits on obscured star formation 630 million years after the big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Chary, R.-R.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Davies, J. E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Stanway, E. R.; Levan, A. J.; Levesque, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) and optical observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23 from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Spitzer Space Telescope, respectively. The host remains undetected to 3σ limits of F {sub ν}(222 GHz) ≲ 33 μJy and F {sub ν}(3.6 μm) ≲ 81 nJy. The FIR limit is about 20 times fainter than the luminosity of the local ULIRG Arp 220 and comparable to the local starburst M 82. Comparing this with model spectral energy distributions, we place a limit on the infrared (IR) luminosity of L {sub IR}(8-1000 μm) ≲ 3 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}, corresponding to a limit on the obscured star formation rate of SFR{sub IR}≲5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. For comparison, the limit on the unobscured star formation rate from Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) observations is SFR{sub UV} ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We also place a limit on the host galaxy stellar mass of M {sub *} ≲ 5 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} (for a stellar population age of 100 Myr and constant star formation rate). Finally, we compare our millimeter observations to those of field galaxies at z ≳ 4 (Lyman break galaxies, Lyα emitters, and submillimeter galaxies) and find that our limit on the FIR luminosity is the most constraining to date, although the field galaxies have much larger rest-frame UV/optical luminosities than the host of GRB 090423 by virtue of their selection techniques. We conclude that GRB host galaxies at z ≳ 4, especially those with measured interstellar medium metallicities from afterglow spectroscopy, are an attractive sample for future ALMA studies of high redshift obscured star formation.

  14. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kupcu-Yoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, E.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  15. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Data Processing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. The result of this project was a student information system (TEX-SIS) consisting of seven subsystems: (1) Student's Educational Intent, (2) Nonreturning Student Follow-up, (3)…

  16. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Data Processing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. The result of this project was a student information system (TEX-SIS) consisting of seven subsystems: (1) Student's Educational Intent, (2) Nonreturning Student Follow-up, (3)…

  17. Effectiveness and Persistence of Liraglutide Treatment Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated in Primary Care and Specialist Settings: A Subgroup Analysis from the EVIDENCE Study, a Prospective, 2-Year Follow-up, Observational, Post-Marketing Study.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luc; Penfornis, Alfred; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Eschwège, Eveline; Charpentier, Guillaume; Bouzidi, Amira; Gourdy, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this subgroup analysis is to investigate the effectiveness of liraglutide in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated within the primary care physician (PCP) and specialist care settings. EVIDENCE is a prospective, observational study of 3152 adults with T2D recently starting or about to start liraglutide treatment in France. We followed patients in the PCP and specialist settings for 2 years to evaluate the effectiveness of liraglutide in glycemic control and body weight reduction. Furthermore, we evaluated the changes in combined antihyperglycemic treatments, the reasons for prescribing liraglutide, patient satisfaction, and safety of liraglutide in these two treatment settings. After 2 years of follow-up, 477 out of 1209 (39.0%) of PCP and 297 out of 1398 (21.2%) of specialist-treated patients still used liraglutide and maintained the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) target of <7.0%. Significant reductions from baseline were observed in both PCP- and specialist-treated cohorts in mean HbA1c (-1.22% and -0.8%, respectively), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) concentration (-39 and -23 mg/dL), body weight (-4.4 and -3.8 kg), and body mass index (BMI) (-1.5 and -1.4 kg/m(2)), all p < 0.0001. Reductions in HbA1c and FPG were significantly greater among PCP- compared with specialist-treated patients, p < 0.0001 for both. Patient treatment satisfaction was also significantly increased in both cohorts. Reported gastrointestinal adverse events were less frequent among PCP-treated patients compared with specialist-treated patients (4.5% vs. 16.1%). Despite differences in demography and clinical characteristics of patients treated for T2D in PCP and specialty care, greater reduction in HbA1c and increased glycemic control durability were observed with liraglutide in primary care, compared with specialist care. These data suggest that liraglutide treatment could benefit patients in primary care by delaying the need for further treatment intensification

  18. [Lyme borreliosis: follow up criteria after antibiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Christmann, D

    2007-01-01

    The post therapeutic follow-up of Lyme borreliosis is managed according to clinical and serological data. The evolution of antibody rates is such that it doesn't constitute the best element to rely on for follow-up. Indeed, after a sometimes transitory increase of this rate during or after antibiotherapy, the decrease is very slow, sometimes several months, and often incomplete. The follow-up should thus be made according to clinical symptoms and their resolution. Resolution of some but not all symptoms must lead to discussing two options. The first is that of administrating a complementary antibiotherapy with a different mode of action than the first antibiotic used. The second is that this may be due to recontamination, especially in highly endemic zones, given that antibodies present have no protecting effect. In this case, a new antibiotherapy must of course be initiated.

  19. Lenalidomide plus dexamethasone versus observation in patients with high-risk smouldering multiple myeloma (QuiRedex): long-term follow-up of a randomised, controlled, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Mateos, María-Victoria; Hernández, Miguel-Teodoro; Giraldo, Pilar; de la Rubia, Javier; de Arriba, Felipe; Corral, Lucía López; Rosiñol, Laura; Paiva, Bruno; Palomera, Luis; Bargay, Joan; Oriol, Albert; Prosper, Felipe; López, Javier; Arguiñano, José-María; Quintana, Nuria; García, José-Luis; Bladé, Joan; Lahuerta, Juan-José; Miguel, Jesús-F San

    2016-08-01

    The standard of care for smouldering multiple myeloma is observation. We did the QuiRedex study to compare early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone with observation in patients with high-risk smouldering multiple myeloma. Here we report the long-term follow-up results of the trial. We did this open-label, randomised, controlled phase 3 study at 19 centres in Spain and three centres in Portugal. Patients aged 18 years or older with high-risk smouldering multiple myeloma were randomly assigned (1:1), via a computerised random number generator, to receive either early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone or observation, with dynamic balancing to maintain treatment balance within the two groups. Randomisation was stratified by time from diagnosis of smouldering multiple myeloma to study enrolment (≤6 months vs >6 months). Patients in the treatment group received nine 4-week induction cycles (lenalidomide 25 mg per day on days 1-21, plus dexamethasone 20 mg per day on days-1-4 and days 12-15), followed by maintenance therapy (lenalidomide 10 mg per day on days 1-21 of each 28-day cycle) up to 2 years. Group allocation was not masked from study investigators or patients. The primary endpoint was time from randomisation to progression to symptomatic myeloma. The primary analysis was based on the per-protocol population, restricted to patients who fulfilled the protocol in terms of eligibility. Safety assessments were based on the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00480363. Between Nov 8, 2007, and June 9, 2010, 125 patients were enrolled and underwent randomisation. 119 patients comprised the per-protocol population and were randomly assigned to receive either lenalidomide plus dexamethasone (n=57) or observation (n=62). The cutoff date for this update was June 30, 2015. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 75 months (IQR 67-85). Lenalidomide plus dexamethasone continued to provide a

  20. Concluding Remarks: The Current Status and Future Prospects for GRB Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We are in a remarkable period of discovery in GRB astronomy. The current satellites including Swift, Fermi. AGILE and INTEGRAL are detecting and observing bursts of all varieties. Increasing capabilities for follow-up observations on the ground and in space are leading to rapid and deep coverage across the electromagnetic spectrum, The future will see continued operation of the current experiments and with future missions like SVOM plus possible rni_Ssions like JANUS and EXIST. An exciting expansion of capabilities is occurring in areas of gravitational waves and neutrinos that could open new windows on the GRB phenomenon. Increased IR capabilities on the ground and with missions like JWST will enable further exploration of high redshift bursts. The future is bright.

  1. Concluding Remarks: The Current Status and Future Prospects for GRB Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We are in a remarkable period of discovery in GRB astronomy. The current satellites including Swift, Fermi. AGILE and INTEGRAL are detecting and observing bursts of all varieties. Increasing capabilities for follow-up observations on the ground and in space are leading to rapid and deep coverage across the electromagnetic spectrum, The future will see continued operation of the current experiments and with future missions like SVOM plus possible rni_Ssions like JANUS and EXIST. An exciting expansion of capabilities is occurring in areas of gravitational waves and neutrinos that could open new windows on the GRB phenomenon. Increased IR capabilities on the ground and with missions like JWST will enable further exploration of high redshift bursts. The future is bright.

  2. Rapid searches for counterparts of GRB 930131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Palmer, David M.; Cline, Thomas L.; Hurley, Kevin C.; Sommer, Michael; Boer, Michel; Niel, Michel; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    1994-01-01

    A fading counterpart to a gamma-ray burst (GRB) would appear as a point source inside a GRB error region soon after the burst which dims on a timescale from minutes to days. The favorable circumstances of the burst GRB 930131 allowed for an international campaign to search for fading counterparts starting 6.8 hr after the burst. We report observations from many optical sites, two radio telescopes, and archival ROSAT data, including deep Schmidt exposures 35, 44, and 64 hr after the burst. No fading counterparts were detected with our observations.

  3. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  4. WCTC Graduate Follow-Up Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waukesha County Technical Coll., Pewaukee, WI.

    This paper reports on a survey of 2001-02 graduates of Waukesha County Technical College (WCTC), Wisconsin. The report indicates 1,257 students were awarded Associate's Degrees, technical diplomas, and apprenticeship certificates by WCTC in 2001-02. Of those graduates, 702 (56%) responded to the Graduate Follow-up Survey. Also, 84% of all…

  5. Facilitating Follow-Up in ELT INSET

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Alan

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that ELT INSET does not always result in the desired level of "follow-up," i.e. impact on teachers' classroom practices. Nevertheless, little research appears to have been carried out concerning how the design of INSET systems affects such outcomes. This paper therefore attempts to throw light on some of the factors…

  6. An optical study of the GRB 970111 field beginning 19 hours after the gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Wolf, C.; Heidt, J.; Seitz, T.; Thommes, E.; Bartolini, C.; Guarnieri, A.; Masetti, N.; Piccioni, A.; Larsen, S.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Palazzi, E.; Lund, N.

    1998-11-01

    We present the results of the monitoring of the GRB 970111 field that started 19 hours after the event. This observation represents the fastest ground-based follow-up performed for GRB 970111 in all wavelengths. As soon as the detection of the possible GRB 970111 X-ray afterglow was reported by Feroci et al. (1998) we reanalyzed the optical data collected for the GRB 970111 field. Although we detect small magnitude variability in some objects, no convincing optical counterpart is found inside the WFC error box. Any change in brightness 19 hours after the GRB is less than 0.2 mag for objects with B < 21 and R < 20.8. The bluest object found in the field is coincident with 1SAX J1528.8+1937. Spectroscopic observations revealed that this object is a Seyfert-1 galaxy with redshift z=0.657, which we propose as the optical counterpart of the X-ray source. Further observations allowed to perform multicolour photometry for objects in the GRB 970111 error box. The colour-colour diagrams do not show any object with unusual colours. We applied a photometric classification method to the objects inside the GRB error box, that can distinguish stars from galaxies and estimate redshifts. We were able to estimate photometric redshifts in the range 0.2 < z < 1.4 for several galaxies in this field and we did not find any conspicuous unusual object. We note that GRB 970111 and GRB 980329 could belong to the same class of GRBs, which may be related to nearby sources (z ~ 1) in which high intrinsic absorption leads to faint optical afterglows. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg, jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy.Based on observations carried out at the Danish 1.54-m Telescope on the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, ChileBased on observations at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Loiano, Italy.

  7. Internet of things and bariatric surgery follow-up: Comparative study of standard and IoT follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Fort, José Manuel; Boleko, Maria Angeles; Hidalgo, Marta; Armengol, Manel

    2013-09-01

    Follow-up of obese patient is difficult. There is no literature related to patient follow-up that incorporates the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), use of WiFi, Internet, or portable devices for this purpose. This prospective observational study commenced in June 2011. Patients were prospectively offered to participate in the IoT study group, in which they received a WiFi scale (Withing®, Paris) that provides instant WiFi data to the patient and surgeon. Other patients were admitted to the standard follow-up group at the outpatient clinic. A total of 33 patients were included in our study (ten in the IoT group). Twelve patients did not have WiFi at home, ten lacked of computer knowledge, and seven preferred standard for follow-up. All patients underwent different surgical procedures. There were no complications. Excess weight loss (EWL) was similar in both groups. More than 90% of patients were satisfied. In the IoT group, patients considered it valuable in saving time, and considered seeing their evolution graphics extremely motivating. IoT technology can monitor medical parameters remotely and collect data. A WiFi scale can facilitate preoperative and follow-up. Standard follow-up in a classical outpatient clinic setting with the surgeon was preferred globally.

  8. Apparent brightness distribution of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Rácz, István I.; Balázs, Lajos G.; Horváth, István; Tóth, L. Viktor

    We studied the unbiased optical brightness distribution which was calculated from the survival analysis of host galaxies (HGs) data and its relationship with the Swift GRB data of the host galaxies observed by the Keck telescope. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we also studied the dependence of this distribution on the GRB's data. Finally, we compared the HGs distribution with standard galaxies distribution of the DEEP2 redshift survey and checked the result with the VIPERS catalogue too.

  9. [Nutritional follow-up after gastric bypass].

    PubMed

    Gasteyger, C; Giusti, V

    2006-03-29

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has become one of the main bariatric procedures. This surgical operation shows excellent results in weight evolution and quality of life and allows a decrease of mortality. However, it leads, relatively often, to nutritional deficiencies which need an effective post-operative follow-up. This follow-up includes not only medical and dietetic encounters but also regular blood analyses made every 3 months during the first post-operative year, every 6 months the second year, then each year. The most frequent deficiencies are those in vitamin B12, iron and folic acid. The secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by an increase of PTH associated to a low vitamin D and a normal calcium, is quite frequent.

  10. [Follow-up of encopresis in children].

    PubMed

    Steinmüller, A; Steinhausen, H C

    1990-03-01

    The course of encopresis in 41 children who had been presented at a child and adolescent university clinic was examined by means of a follow-up interview which took place on an average of 3;6 years after the initial visit. The symptoms in this sample diminished considerably: 76% of the children were free of symptoms at the time of the follow-up interview, whereby most of these children had experienced a spontaneous remission. Eighty-one percent of the children were evaluated as having improved in regards to their whole development while in about one third of all the children new problems arose. Remission occurred within the first two years of the initial consultation in 81% of the sample. An examination of the prognostic factors yielded the following relationships: the total remission of symptoms was considerably greater if the frequency of encopresis had been low, if the subjects were male, and if there had not been any therapeutic intervention. However, treatment was usually reserved for relatively serious cases. Favorable outcome tended to be marked by the following factors: normal psychosocial conditions, higher intelligence, the absence of constipation, a concurrently presenting enuresis, and a low degree of behavioral disorders as evaluated by a parental questionnaire. A comparison of the behavioral disorders at the time of the initial consultation and at follow-up revealed a significant reduction of emotional disturbances and hyperactivity. This favorable development was not evident for conduct disorders.

  11. MAGIC electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lotto, Barbara; Ansoldi, Stefano; Antonelli, Angelo; Berti, Alessio; Carosi, Alessandro; Longo, Francesco; Stamerra, Antonio

    The year 2015 witnessed the first direct observations of a transient gravitational-wave (GW) signal from binary black hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) Collaboration with the Virgo Collaboration. The MAGIC two 17m diameter Cherenkov telescopes system joined since 2014 the vast collaboration of electromagnetic facilities for follow-up of gravitational wave alerts. During the 2015 LIGO-Virgo science run we set up the procedure for GW alerts follow-up and took data following the last GW alert. MAGIC results on the data analysis and prospects for the forthcoming run are presented.

  12. Gamma Ray Burst Follow-Ups with Bootes-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guziy, Sergey; Castro-Tirado, Guziy, Alberto J.; Jelinek, Martin; Gorosabel, Javier; Kubanek, Petr; Cunniffe, Ronan; Lara-Gil, Oscar; Tello, Juan C.; Jeong, Soomin; Oates, Samantha R.; Xu, Youdong; Perez-Ramirez, Dolores; Cui, Chenzou; Fan, Yufeng; Wan, Chuanjun; Bai, Jinming; Kheyfets, I.

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System (BOOTES), is a global robotic observatory network, which started in 1998 with Spanish leadership devoted to study optical emissions from gamma ray bursts (GRBs) that occur in the Universe. We present shot history and current status of BOOTES-4 telescope. Some details of 38 GRBs followed-up with BOOTES-4 are discussed.

  13. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  14. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  15. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  16. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Ibar, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Van der Horst, A. J.; and others

    2012-08-20

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  17. Discovery and Redshift of an Optical Afterglow in 71 deg2: iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Leo P.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Perley, Daniel A.; Ofek, Eran O.; Brown, Duncan A.; Nugent, Peter E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Bellm, Eric; Mulchaey, John; Arcavi, Iair; Barlow, Tom; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cao, Yi; Gehrels, Neil; Horesh, Assaf; Masci, Frank J.; McEnery, Julie; Rau, Arne; Surace, Jason A.; Yaron, Ofer

    2013-10-01

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the γ-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 deg2 surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the Very Large Array confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200 inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z = 0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt γ-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ~10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step toward overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.

  18. Neonatal follow-up programs and follow-up studies: Historical and current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sauve, Reg; Lee, Shoo K

    2006-01-01

    The present report reviews some highlights in the history of neonatal intensive care and neonatal follow-up programs, particularly developments and reports that were based on experiences in Canada. Early outcomes reported from ‘preemie baby units’ were distressing, but attention has consistently been paid to preterm infant outcomes, even from the early days of neonatal intensive care units. Most current follow-up programs have goals related to ‘audit’ functions, education and clinical roles, but existing literature related to these functions is limited. Several reports have provided guidance in terms of neonatal follow-up research issues, and these strengthen the place of follow-up studies in outcomes research. PMID:19030284

  19. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maselli, A.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Mundell, C. G.; Kawai, N.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Ghirlander, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuin, P.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Marshall, F.; Wiegand, B.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L approx. 3 x 10(exp 53) ergs/s and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  20. GRB 130427A: a nearby ordinary monster.

    PubMed

    Maselli, A; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Mundell, C G; Kawai, N; Campana, S; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; Cusumano, G; Evans, P A; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Guidorzi, C; Kobayashi, S; Kuin, P; La Parola, V; Mangano, V; Oates, S; Sakamoto, T; Serino, M; Virgili, F; Zhang, B-B; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A; Bernardini, M G; Bersier, D; Burrows, D; Calderone, G; Capalbi, M; Chiang, J; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; De Pasquale, M; Fugazza, D; Gehrels, N; Gomboc, A; Harrison, R; Hanayama, H; Japelj, J; Kennea, J; Kopac, D; Kouveliotou, C; Kuroda, D; Levan, A; Malesani, D; Marshall, F; Nousek, J; O'Brien, P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Page, K L; Page, M; Perri, M; Pritchard, T; Romano, P; Saito, Y; Sbarufatti, B; Salvaterra, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N; Vianello, G; Wiegand, B; Weigand, B; Wiersema, K; Yatsu, Y; Yoshii, T; Tagliaferri, G

    2014-01-03

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L ~ 3 × 10(53) ergs per second) and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the γ-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  1. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Mundell, C. G.; Kawai, N.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuin, P.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Sakamoto, T.; Serino, M.; Virgili, F.; Zhang, B.-B.; Barthelmy, S.; Beardmore, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bersier, D.; Burrows, D.; Calderone, G.; Capalbi, M.; Chiang, J.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; De Pasquale, M.; Fugazza, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gomboc, A.; Harrison, R.; Hanayama, H.; Japelj, J.; Kennea, J.; Kopac, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuroda, D.; Levan, A.; Malesani, D.; Marshall, F.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K. L.; Page, M.; Perri, M.; Pritchard, T.; Romano, P.; Saito, Y.; Sbarufatti, B.; Salvaterra, R.; Steele, I.; Tanvir, N.; Vianello, G.; Weigand, B.; Wiersema, K.; Yatsu, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L ˜ 3 × 1053 ergs per second) and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the γ-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  2. The Grb2 adaptor.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Cussac, D; Maignan, S; Ducruix, A

    1995-08-01

    Grb2 is an 'adaptor' protein made of one SH2 and two SH3 domains. The SH3 domains bind to prolinerich motifs in the C-terminal part of the ras exchange factor Sos. Binding of the Grb2 SH2 domain to phosphotyrosine motifs on receptors, or other adaptor proteins such as Shc, recruits this Grb2/Sos complex at the plasma membrane where Sos stimulates nucleotide exchange on ras, then ras activates raf and leads to MAP kinase activation. The structure of Grb2, the precise motifs recognised by its SH2 and SH3 domains, the way Grb2 performs its function, a possible regulation of its association with Sos, and its ability to complex with other proteins in vivo, are discussed.

  3. The SEDs and host galaxies of the dustiest GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krühler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Küpcü-Yoldaş, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, F.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe. Until recently, however, the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows, biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims: Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (AVGRB ≳ 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry, and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies, and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods: This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line and galaxy-integrated characteristics such as the host's stellar mass, luminosity, color-excess, and star-formation rate. Results: For the eight afterglows considered in this study, we report for the first time the redshift of GRB 081109 (z = 0.9787 ± 0.0005), and the visual extinction towards GRBs 081109 (AVGRB = 3.4-0.3+0.4 mag) and 100621A (AVGRB = 3.8±0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs, there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metal-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder (⟨ (R - K)AB ⟩ ~ 1.6 mag), more luminous (⟨ L ⟩ ~ 0.9 L∗), and massive (⟨ log M∗ [M⊙] ⟩ ~ 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. Hence, we probe a different galaxy population, suggesting that previous host samples miss most of the

  4. [Allogeneic parathyroid: 2-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Hermosillo-Sandoval, José Manuel; Leonher-Ruezga, Karla Lisseth; Jiménez-Gómez, José Alfredo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Ramírez-González, Luis Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is one of the most frequent complications of neck surgery. The treatment is currently medical; however this involves several complications secondary to high doses of calcium and vitamin D, thus making parathyroid allotransplantation a good management option. Patients with hypoparathyroidism were selected in the April-December period of 2011 in the general surgical clinic. They were between 16 and 65 years, and ingested high doses of calcium. The donors were patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and the transplants were performed in relation to blood group and human leucocyte antigen. Five parathyroid allografts were performed. All the patients had iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism, all women with a mean age of 49.8 years. The graft was implanted under local anaesthesia in the non-dominant forearm. Four of the patients are so far considered functional due to the increase in paratohormone, and demonstrating its function by scintigraphy with sestamibi. One of the patients showed no increase in paratohormone or imaging studies that demonstrate its functionality. After a two year follow up the graft remains functional but with with oral calcium intake at a lower dose than before transplantation. None of the patients had immunosuppression side effects. In this study, allogeneic unrelated living parathyroid transplant with an immunosuppressive regimen of six months has proven to be a safe alternative treatment to improve quality of life by decreasing the excessive calcium intake and improving physical activity with adequate graft survival at 24 months follow up. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis at two-piece zirconium implants: A clinical follow-up observation after up to 3 years.

    PubMed

    John, Gordon; Becker, Jürgen; Schmucker, Andrea; Schwarz, Frank

    2017-07-01

    To assess the long-term clinical outcomes following non-surgical therapy of peri-implant diseases at two-piece zirconium implants. A total of 27 patients suffering from either (i) peri-implant mucositis (n = 24 implants), or (ii) peri-implantitis (n = 16 implants) completed a mean follow-up period of 32.8 ± 2.85 months (median: 34 months). The initial treatment procedures included (i) mechanical debridement + local antiseptic therapy using chlorhexidine digluconate (MD + CXH), or (ii) Er:YAG laser monotherapy (ERL). The primary outcome was disease resolution (i.e. absence of bleeding on probing (BOP) at mucositis sites/absence of BOP and probing pocket depths (PD) ≥6 mm at peri-implantitis sites). Resolution of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis was obtained in 7/14 (50.0%; p = .003) and 5/13 (38.5%; p = .001) of the patients investigated. This corresponded to 54.2% (13/24) and 50.0% (8/16) at the implant level respectively. Both MD + CHX and ERL were effective on the long-term, but failed to achieve a complete disease resolution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The GRB coordinates network (GCN): A status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Marshall, F.; Takeshima, T.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Robinson, C. R.

    1998-05-01

    A review of the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) will be given. The GCN has recently replaced the BATSE Coordinates Distribution Network (BACODINE), maintaining all of BACODINE's original capabilities and services, but also providing new sources of GRB location information. These are: (1) source locations using the MSFC LOCBURST algorithm, (2) the Rossi-XTE detections (PCA and ASM), (3) the Interplanetary Network (IPN) locations, and (4) CGRO-COMPTEL locations. These new sources of locations are available for distribution in the minutes-to-hours-to-days time delay ranges, and they also have increasingly and significantly reduced error boxes, thus providing a broad range of time delays and error box sizes to fit within the observing capabilities of a broad range of follow-up instruments in the radio, optical, and TeV gamma-ray bands. Extreme-UV transients from ALEXIS are also now distributed. For all sources of location information, all the distribution methods are available (Internet Socket, E-mail, Alpha-numeric and Numeric Pagers, and Phone/modem) and several filters. Sites can choose which sources to receive and what filters to be applied. The GCN web site has been expanded to include a globally inclusive table of locations, light-curves, and fluence information which is automatically updated in real-time.

  7. Elevated Patient Body Mass Index Does Not Negatively Affect Self-Reported Outcomes of Thoracolumbar Surgery: Results of a Comparative Observational Study with Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Manson, Neil A; Green, Alana J; Abraham, Edward P

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Quantify the effect of obesity on elective thoracolumbar spine surgery patients. Methods Five hundred consecutive adult patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery to treat degenerative pathologies with minimum follow-up of at least 1 year were included. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scales for back and leg pain, the Short Form 36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary, the modified Oswestry Disability Index, and patient satisfaction scores collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative emergency department presentation, hospital readmission, and revision surgeries. Patients were grouped according to World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) guidelines to isolate the effect of obesity on primary and secondary outcome measures. Results Mean BMI was 30 kg/m(2), reflecting a significantly overweight population. Each BMI group reported statistically significant improvement on all self-reported outcome measures. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, there was no association between BMI group and primary outcome measures. Patients with BMI of 35 to 39.99 visited the emergency department with complaints of pain significantly more often than the other groups. Otherwise, we did not detect any differences in the secondary outcome measures between BMI groups. Conclusions Patients of all levels of obesity experienced significant improvement following elective thoracolumbar spine surgery. These outcomes were achieved without increased risk of postoperative complications such as infection and reoperation. A risk-benefit algorithm to assist with surgical decision making for obese patients would be valuable to surgeons and patients alike.

  8. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  9. Percutaneous vertebroplasty: the follow-up.

    PubMed

    Barbero, S; Casorzo, I; Durando, M; Mattone, G; Tappero, C; Venturi, C; Gandini, G

    2008-02-01

    This article reports on our experience treating vertebral fractures with percutaneous vertebroplasty. A clinical and imaging follow-up designed to identify the early (especially pulmonary embolism of bone cement) and late complications of the technique is proposed. On the basis of the current guidelines, 101 patients were selected: 64 osteoporotic and 37 neoplastic. A total of 173 vertebrae were treated. Procedures were performed with both computed tomography and fluoroscopic guidance. Residual pain was evaluated with a visual analogue scale score immediately after vertebroplasty and 1, 15, 30, 90, 180 and 270 days later. Spine and chest radiographs were obtained 24 h after vertebroplasty; spine radiography was repeated 30 days later. Therapeutic success was obtained in 88% of osteoporotic patients and in 84% of neoplastic patients. Pulmonary cement emboli were identified in four patients, all of whom were asymptomatic. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of osteoporotic and neoplastic vertebral fractures. Clinical and imaging followup allows effective patient monitoring and early detection of possible complications.

  10. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-05-11

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 35.3% at baseline), whereas in diabetes was 32.5 and 37.9% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 20% at baseline). No differences in heart rate were observed. No differences in control rate were observed between the different CCBs regimen. The incidence of drugs related adverse events was 3.6%. These findings provide evidence that: (a) the follow-up of hypertensive patients under therapy increase the rate of blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  11. GRB 081007 and GRB 090424: The Surrounding Medium, Outflows, and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhi-Ping; Covino, Stefano; Della Valle, Massimo; Ferrero, Patrizia; Fugazza, Dino; Malesani, Daniele; Melandri, Andrea; Pian, Elena; Salvaterra, Ruben; Bersier, David; Campana, Sergio; Cano, Zach; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Gomboc, Andreja; Gorosabel, Javier; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Haislip, Joshua B.; Hjorth, Jens; Kobayashi, Shiho; LaCluyze, Aaron P.; Marconi, Gianni; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Mundell, Carole G.; Piranomonte, Silvia; Reichart, Daniel E.; Sánchez-Ramírez, Rubén; Smith, Robert J.; Steele, Ian A.; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tanvir, Nial R.; Valenti, Stefano; Vergani, Susanna D.; Vestrand, Thomas; Walker, Emma S.; Woźniak, Przemek

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be Γ ~ 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of Γ > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  12. GRB 081007 AND GRB 090424: THE SURROUNDING MEDIUM, OUTFLOWS, AND SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Zhiping; Covino, Stefano; Fugazza, Dino; Melandri, Andrea; Campana, Sergio; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Della Valle, Massimo; Ferrero, Patrizia; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Pian, Elena; Salvaterra, Ruben; Bersier, David; Cano, Zach; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Haislip, Joshua B.; and others

    2013-09-10

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be {Gamma} {approx} 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of {Gamma} > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  13. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  14. Postencephalitic pure anomic aphasia: 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Okuda, B; Kawabata, K; Tachibana, H; Sugita, M; Tanaka, H

    2001-06-15

    We report a patient with pure anomic aphasia following encephalitis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral temporal lesions, and subsequent focal atrophy in the left anterior inferior temporal lobe. Over the course of a 2-year follow-up, the patient's naming difficulty persisted without other dysfunction of language or memory. These observations indicate a contribution of the left anterior inferior temporal region to object naming.

  15. Optical follow-up of SN 2017eaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avanzo, P.; Wolter, A.; della Penna, F.; Garofolo, S.; Monteverdi, F.; Moreschi, B. E.; Prato, A.; Salimbeni, M.; Zizioli, M.; Covino, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Tomasi, M.

    2017-05-01

    We carried out optical follow-up of the Type II supernova 2017eaw in the nearby galaxy NGC 6946 (ATel #10372, #10374, #10376, #10377) with the 1.3m Ruths telescope of the INAF-Brera Astronomical Observatory sited in Merate (Lecco, Italy) equipped with an SBIG STL-1001E CCD. The observations, carried out under clear sky and seeing of 3", were taken as part of the Astronomy II classes of the Physics Department of the University of Milan.

  16. Course Withdrawal Follow-Up. TEX-SIS Follow-Up, Volume 3, #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavapai County Community Coll. District, Prescott, AZ.

    In spring 1982, a survey was conducted at Yavapai College to determine reasons for student course withdrawal. A TEX-SIS follow-up questionnaire was mailed to all 525 students who had dropped one or two courses, asking them to indicate their reasons for dropping the course(s) and if they felt discussion with a counselor would have been beneficial,…

  17. GRB090510: a short bright and hard GRB detected by Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, F. de

    2010-03-26

    On 2009 May 10, 00:22:59 UT (T{sub 0}) the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) triggered and located the short and very bright GRB090510. For the first time, this hard GRB, with an Epeak of few MeV, also triggered independently the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Swift detected this GRB and the accurate position provided by the Swift/UVOT made possible a spectroscopic redshift measurement of z = 0.903 with VLT/FORS2. This short GRB exhibits new features for this kind of events such an extra component (power-law) at high energies and a long lasting (few minutes) emission observed by the LAT. These observations allow the derivation of very important physical parameters such as the minimum value of the bulk Lorentz factor and they put some unprecedent limits on the dependence of the speed of photons on their energy.

  18. A GRB tool shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  19. GRB 030329: 3 years of radio afterglow monitoring.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, A J; Kamble, A; Wijers, R A M J; Resmi, L; Bhattacharya, D; Rol, E; Strom, R; Kouveliotou, C; Oosterloo, T; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2007-05-15

    Radio observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are essential for our understanding of the physics of relativistic blast waves, as they enable us to follow the evolution of GRB explosions much longer than the afterglows in any other wave band. We have performed a 3-year monitoring campaign of GRB 030329 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescopes and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Our observations, combined with observations at other wavelengths, have allowed us to determine the GRB blast wave physical parameters, such as the total burst energy and the ambient medium density, as well as to investigate the jet nature of the relativistic outflow. Further, by modelling the late-time radio light curve of GRB 030329, we predict that the Low-Frequency Array (30-240 MHz) will be able to observe afterglows of similar GRBs, and constrain the physics of the blast wave during its non-relativistic phase.

  20. Multiwavelength Follow-up of a Rare Icecube Neutrino Multiplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    IceCube detected three neutrino-induced track events arriving within less than 100s from a similar direction. Expected chance occurrence rate of 1 every 14 years, so not exceptionally rare, but interesting. If astrophysical in nature, the source would have to be relatively nearby or be an exceptional bright neutrino emitter. Follow-up observations by Swift-BAT, Swift-XRT, Master, ASAS-SN, LCOG, Veritas, FACT, and HAWC. The IceCube collaboration wanted to produce a paper summarizing the non-detections and outlining the follow-up network they have assembled. We were asked by Anna Franckowiak to contribute Fermi analysis to their write-up of this event.

  1. Trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome: a 20 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Marianetti, T M; Dall'Asta, L; Torroni, A; Gasparini, G; Pelo, S

    2014-07-01

    Trismus-Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome (TPS) is a rare autosomal syndrome characterised by the inability to open the mouth fully, pseudocamptodactyly, short stature and foot deformities. The maxillofacial feature entails hyperplasia of the coronoid processes which mechanically interfere with the zygomatic processes during mouth opening. A 22-year- old girl affected by a severe form of TPS was followed from the age of three years. Bone reossification was observed after two coronoidotomies of both hyperplasic coronoid processes. After the decision to perform a coronoidectomy, the four-year follow-up showed a favourable outcome. Meanwhile the patient developed an anterior open bite which was treated with a fourth orthognathic surgery. The follow-up underscores how the correction of malformation leads to the generation of EMG activity of the masticatory muscles after many years of passiveness.

  2. A Compact Binary Merger Model for the Short, Hard GRB 050509b

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, William H.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-06-15

    The first X-ray afterglow for a short ({approx}30ms), hard {gamma}-ray burst was detected by Swift on 9 May 2005 (GRB 050509b). No optical or radio counterpart was identified in follow-up observations. The tentative association of the GRB with a nearby giant elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.2248 would imply the progenitor had traveled several tens of kpc from its point of origin, in agreement with expectations linking these events to the final merger of compact binaries driven by gravitational wave emission. We model the dynamical merger of such a system and the time-dependent evolution of the accretion tori thus created. The resulting energetics, variability, and expected durations are consistent with GRB 050509b originating from the tidal disruption of a neutron star by a stellar mass black hole, or of the merger of two neutron stars followed by prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. We discuss how the available {gamma}-ray and X-ray data provides a probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the surrounding medium.

  3. Percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy: six-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dighero, H; Zepeda, F; Sepúlveda, P; Soto, J R; Aranda, W

    2001-12-01

    Percutaneous mitral valvotomy (PMV) is an alternative to the surgical treatment of mitral stenosis. Results obtained with PMV appear to depend on the echocardiographical characteristics of the valvular apparatus. The purpose of this study was to report the immediate and late-term results with PMV. The incidence of late events (restenosis, mitral valve replacement and death), and their correlation with echocardiographic score (Wilkin's score) are also discussed. Between December 1987 and August 1999, a total of 160 PMVs were performed at our institution. Ninety-six patients with a minimum of 6 months follow-up and echocardiographic evaluation of the mitral valve (Wilkin's score) before and after the procedure were selected for this study. Follow-up was available for 99% of the patients, with a mean follow-up of 33 +/- 22 months (range, 6 months to 11 years). Hazard ratio (HR) and Cox's regression were used for statistical analyses. PMV was successfully performed in 97% of the cases; in 84%, the result was considered optimal. The incidence of complications related to the procedure was 10%; no mortality was observed due to PMV. Severe mitral regurgitation was observed in 7% of the patients, but only 3% of the total group developed ventricular dysfunction or worsened their New York Heart Association functional class. Eight-four percent of the patients were free of late events at the end of the follow-up period. A restenosis rate of 34% was observed during follow-up; this rate did not correlate with age, functional class or atrial fibrillation. Restenosis was associated with pulmonary hypertension (HR 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-11.80). Also, Wilkin's score was not useful to predict the development of restenosis or clinical events in the mid- to long-term. In our series, PMV had a high immediate success rate and a low incidence of complications due to the procedure. Incidence of late events was also low and was unrelated to the Wilkin's score; however

  4. Discovery and follow up of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowell, E.; Chernykh, N. S.; Marsden, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    After a summary of the increasing activity in steroid discovery during the past few years, the importance of carefully thought out observing strategy is discussed, in particular with regard to target selection, observing frequency, and the time distribution of observations. Problems of cataloging and orbit linkage are outlined, inasmuch as they affect individual observers and orbit computers, as well as the work of the Minor Planet Center. There is some discussion of appropriate two-way communication between observers and the Minor Planet Center.

  5. Outpatient follow-up of patients hospitalized for acute leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Spichler, Anne; Athanazio, Daniel; Seguro, Antonio C.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective The outcome of leptospirosis after the resolution of acute disease, either spontaneously or after treatment, is not well described. The aim of this study was to assess the possible sequelae of acute leptospirosis after hospital discharge. Methods We report here a prospective study carried out in São Paulo, Brazil in which patients hospitalized for leptospirosis were followed in the outpatient setting. Results Forty-seven patients were serially assessed: 32 severe and 15 mild cases. Early and late complications were not common in either group, but subjective complaints were common in the first few weeks after hospital discharge (53% of severe cases, 40% of mild cases). Two patients had continuing complaints: one had profound general malaise and the other developed new onset panic disorder. The sample analyzed represented 26% of the patients hospitalized with leptospirosis in the city of São Paulo during the study period. The duration of follow-up was an average of approximately 20 days at the first visit, and approximately 40 days at the second visit. Forty-seven patients came for one follow-up visit and 22 of the same patients had two follow-up visits. Conclusions While two of 47 patients reported continuing symptoms after hospitalization for acute leptospirosis, no definitive, objective evidence of chronic sequelae due to this infection was proven. While preliminary, these observations point to the need for a prospective, rigorous and systematic study to definitively determine and characterize late complications and chronic disease after acute leptospirosis. PMID:21616696

  6. GRB 081024B and GRB 140402A: Two Additional Short GRBs from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimuratov, Y.; Ruffini, R.; Muccino, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Primorac, D.; Rueda, J. A.; Wang, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Theoretical and observational evidences for a two-fold classification of short bursts have been recently obtained: (1) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs), with isotropic energy {E}{iso}< {10}52 erg and no black hole (BH) formation, and (2) authentic short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs), with isotropic energy {E}{iso}> {10}52 erg showing evidence of BH formation in the binary neutron star merging process. The signature for BH formation is the onset of high-energy (0.1-100 GeV) emission, coeval to the prompt emission, in all S-GRBs. No GeV emission is expected nor observed in S-GRFs. In this paper, we present two S-GRBs, GRB 081024B and GRB 140402A, in addition to the already identified S-GRBs, GRB 090227B, GRB 090510, and GRB 140619B. We also return to the absence of GeV emission in the S-GRB 090227B, at an angle of 71^\\circ from the Fermi-LAT boresight. All of the correctly identified S-GRBs correlate with high-energy emission, implying no significant presence of beaming in GeV emission. The existence of a common power-law behavior in the GeV luminosities, following the BH formation, when measured in the source rest frame, points to a commonality in the mass and spin of the newly formed BHs in all S-GRBs.

  7. Gas-to-Dust Ratios in GRB Host Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schady, P.; Page, M. J.; De Pasquale, M.; Mason, K. O.; Morris, D. C.; Roming, P. W. A.; Berk, D. E. van den; Oates, S. R.; Immler, S.

    2008-05-22

    An understanding of GRB host galaxy properties is pivotal to determining the progenitor stars, and is critical in identifying the effect of the GRB local environment on our observations. The imprint left by dust and gas absorption on GRB X-ray and optical afterglows provides an effective probe to the immediate surroundings, and for this well-sampled, multi-wavelength afterglow observations are imperative. Swift's capabilities to obtain simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical data make it ideal to study the dust and gas content in the local environment of GRBs. In these proceedings we further the work from [1], and present the results of analysis on the combined Swift and ground-based spectra of 24 GRB afterglows, which is the largest sample of GRB afterglow spectral energy distributions thus far studied.

  8. Search for VHE emission from GRB with Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P.M.

    2005-02-21

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high-energy particles impacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for very high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRB) during the prompt emission phase because of its wide field of view and high duty cycle, monitoring the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. 33 satellite-triggered GRB have occurred within the field of view of Milagro between January 2000 and December 2003. We have searched for counterparts to these GRB and found no significant emission from any of these burst positions. In the case of GRB 010921, the redshift is low enough (0.45) that our upper limit on the fluence places an observational constraint on potential GRB models.

  9. Detection of GRB 060927 at z = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Starling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bersier, D.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Göǧüş, E.; Gorosabel, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Güver, T.; Hjorth, J.; Horns, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Jakobsson, P.; Jensen, B. L.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Ledoux, C.; Levan, A. J.; Marsh, T.; McKay, T.; Melandri, A.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Mundell, C. G.; O'Brien, P. T.; Özel, M.; Phillips, A.; Quimby, R.; Rowell, G.; Rujopakarn, W.; Rykoff, E. S.; Schaefer, B. E.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.; Urata, Y.; Vestrand, W. T.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Watson, D.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wren, J.; Yost, S. A.; Yuan, F.; Zhai, M.; Zheng, W. K.

    2007-11-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture ground-based telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hr after the trigger shows a continuum break at λ~8070 Å, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at z~5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 Å, which we interpret as Si II λ1260 at z=5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Lyα profile with a column density with log(NH/cm-2)=22.50+/-0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: (1) GRB afterglows originating from z>~6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; (2) the presence of large H I column densities in some GRB host galaxies at z>5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; and (3) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at z>5, and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe. Partly based on observations carried out with the ESO telescopes under programs 077.D-0661, 077.A-0667, 078.D-0416, and the large program 177.A-f0591.

  10. On the possible source of GRB 930131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Vahia, M. N.

    1994-07-01

    A series of recent papers (Kouveliotou et al., 1994; Sommer et al., 1994; Ryan et al., 1994) have discussed the localization and properties of GRB930131, the brightest gamma ray burst (GRB) observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). Schaefer et al. (1994) have looked for objects in the neighborhood of this GRB. They have shown that there are to X-ray sources near the CGRO localization, which were identified with the stars HD 106225 and HR 4657. In the present Letter we discuss these two sources in detail. HR 4657 is a visual binary of spectral type F at a distance of 34 pc and it is unlikely to be the source of GRB930131. The object HD 106225 is one of the most active RS CVn type of binaries at a distance of 220 pc and it exhibits surface magnetic activity in all wavelengths from radio to X-rays (Strassmeier et al., 1993). Vahia and Rao (1988) have suggested that the GRBs arise from flares on Magnetically Active Stellar Systems (MASS) consisting of flare stars, RS CVn binaries and cataclysmic variables of which about 300 sources are known. The probability of finding a magnetically active system in the CGRO error box is about 3 10-3. Other properties of the GRB also agree well with our expectations of flares on such a binary.

  11. DISCOVERY AND REDSHIFT OF AN OPTICAL AFTERGLOW IN 71 deg{sup 2}: iPTF13bxl AND GRB 130702A

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Leo P.; Brown, Duncan A.; Bradley Cenko, S.; Gehrels, Neil; McEnery, Julie; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Mulchaey, John; Perley, Daniel A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bellm, Eric; Barlow, Tom; Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Nugent, Peter E.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Masci, Frank J.; and others

    2013-10-20

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the γ-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 deg{sup 2} surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the Very Large Array confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200 inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z = 0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt γ-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ∼10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step toward overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.

  12. Four-year follow-up of effects of toluene diisocyanate exposure on the respiratory system in polyurethane foam manufacturing workers. I. Study design and results of the first cross-sectional observation.

    PubMed

    Omae, K; Nakadate, T; Higashi, T; Nakaza, M; Aizawa, Y; Sakurai, H

    1992-01-01

    A 4-year cohort study was designed to assess the exposure-effect relationship of working in polyurethane foam (PF) manufacturing factories with exposure to toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and its effects on the respiratory system. This paper describes the results of the first cross-sectional observations. The study population included 90 male workers who had been working in PF factories for 0.5-25 years (mean 13.3 years) (PF workers) and 44 reference workers in the same factories. The mean exposure concentration of TDI calculated from 129 personal samples was 3.2 ppb. Peak exposure excursions above 20 ppb occurred in 16 of 129 samples. Pulmonary function and its change during the working day as assessed by examining the forced expiratory flow-volume curve, respiratory impedance, and airway resistance and specific airway conductance were not different in the PF workers from those in the reference workers. Chest X-radiographs did not show any noteworthy radiological changes. Prevalences of "phlegm in winter," "nasal stuffiness or discharge in winter," and "irritation of eye and throat mucous membranes" were significantly higher in the PF workers. The findings indicate that TDI exposure at levels around 3 ppb may not adversely affect the pulmonary function over many years of exposure of those who are not hypersensitive to TDI. The causal chemicals inducing some respiratory and irritative symptoms could not be specifically identified since the PF workers were exposed not only to TDI but also to other irritative agents in the PF manufacturing processes.

  13. Long GRB with Additional High Energy Maxima after the End of the Low Energy T90 Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irene, Arkhangelskaja; Alexander, Zenin; Dmitry, Kirin; Elena, Voevodina

    2013-01-01

    Now GRB high energy γ-emission was observed mostly by detectors onboard Fermi and Agile satellites. During most part of GRB high energy γ-emission registered some later than low energy trigger and lasts several hundreds of seconds, but its maxima are within low energy t90 intervals both for short and long bursts. But GRB090323, GRB090328 and GRB090626 temporal profiles have additional maxima after low energy t90 intervals finished. These bursts temporal profile analysis have shown that faint peaks in low energy bands close to the ends of low energy t90 intervals preceded such maxima. Moreover, these events low energy spectral index β behavior differs from usual GRB one according to preliminary analysis. We suppose that these GRB could be separated as different GRB type. In presented article this new GRB type properties are discussed.

  14. Astrometric Follow Up of Wide Planetary Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkan, Stephen; Janson, Markus; Carson, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The current population of known exoplanets is biased towards close in, short period planets due to the detection rate of transit and radial velocity techniques. However the advancement in direct imaging technologies and image reduction techniques has opened up sensitivity to massive planets at large separations, rapidly expanding the parameter space over which planetary existence and characteristics can be probed. The Spitzer space telescope is ideally suited for the direct imaging of such planets that have peak thermal emission at wavelengths around 4.5 microns. Previous Spitzer data collected under programs 34 and 48 has recently been the subject of a sophisticated principal components analysis reduction technique. This technique has removed stellar PSF to a much greater degree than preceding studies have achieved, the reduced archival Spitzer observations are sensitive to planetary mass companions at a much smaller separations than previously attainable. This reduction technique accompanied by stringent criteria, such as ≥5 sigma significance, realistic visual characteristics and taking into account the predicted spectral energy distribution of Jupiter mass planets, has identified a number of potential planetary companions. These targets must be observed in a 2nd epoch to test for common proper motion to offer a firm confirmation or refutation of the candidate's planetary nature. Here we propose to observe 12 of these targets for which data does not exist in a 2nd epoch to a sufficient degree of sensitivity to recover the potential planetary candidates for astrometric investigation.

  15. The ultraluminous GRB 110918A

    SciTech Connect

    Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, Ph. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V.; Kokomov, A. A.; Hurley, K.; Mangano, V.; Burrows, D. N.; Sbarufatti, B.; Siegel, M. H.; Oates, S.; Cline, T. L.; Krimm, H. A.; Pagani, C.; Mitrofanov, I. G. [Space Research Institute, Profsoyuznaya 84 and others

    2013-12-20

    GRB 110918A is the brightest long gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Konus-WIND during its almost 19 yr of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final Interplanetary Network localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderate peak energy of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z = 0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release E {sub iso} = (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 54} erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity L {sub iso} = (4.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}. A tail of the soft γ-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. The Swift/X-Ray Telescope and the Swift/Ultraviolet Optical Telescope observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and interstellar-medium-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among the multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.°7-3.°4 results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of z ∼ 7.5 for Konus-WIND and z ∼ 12 for the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early

  16. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  17. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  18. Employer Follow-up Data Summary--1976-77. Tex-SIS FOLLOW-UP; Postsecondary Student Follow-up Management Information System. Monograph 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The Tex-SIS Follow-up system Employer Follow-up Survey involved four Texas community colleges, providing a statewide composite of employer data on the competency of occupational/technical graduates. The mailing list for prospective survey participants was derived from occupational/technical graduates' responses to a survey conducted in 1975-76. A…

  19. Employer Follow-up Data Summary--1976-77. Tex-SIS FOLLOW-UP; Postsecondary Student Follow-up Management Information System. Monograph 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The Tex-SIS Follow-up system Employer Follow-up Survey involved four Texas community colleges, providing a statewide composite of employer data on the competency of occupational/technical graduates. The mailing list for prospective survey participants was derived from occupational/technical graduates' responses to a survey conducted in 1975-76. A…

  20. Probing the complex environments of GRB host galaxies and intervening systems: high resolution spectroscopy of GRB050922C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, S.; Vergani, S.; Fiore, F.; D'Elia, V.; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.; Stella, L.

    2009-05-01

    We use high resolution spectroscopic observations of the afterglow of GRB050922C, in order to investigate the environment of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and the interstellar matter of their host galaxies. We found that, as for most high resolution spectra of GRBs, the spectrum of the afterglow of GRB050922C is complex. The detection of lines of neutral elements like MgI and the detection of fine-structure levels of the ions FeII, SiII and CII allows us to separate components in the GRB ISM along the line of sight. GRB afterglow spectra can be used to disentangle the contribution of the different parts of the GRB host galaxy and to study their properties.

  1. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective...

  2. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315...

  3. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discovered as of the date of the follow-up report; (3) The number of units in which corrective action has been completed as of the date of the follow-up report; (4) The number of first purchasers not notified... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15...

  4. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  5. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  6. Follow up observations of SDSS and CRTS candidate cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Szkody, Paula; Vasquez-Soltero, Stephanie; Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Landolt, Arlo U.; Bond, Howard E. E-mail: dsilva@noao.edu E-mail: landolt@rouge.phys.lsu.edu

    2014-10-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of 11 and 35 potential cataclysmic variables, respectively, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, and vsnet alerts. The photometry results include quasi-periodic oscillations during the decline of V1363 Cyg, nightly accretion changes in the likely Polar (AM Herculis binary) SDSS J1344+20, eclipses in SDSS J2141+05 with an orbital period of 76 ± 2 minutes, and possible eclipses in SDSS J2158+09 at an orbital period near 100 minutes. Time-resolved spectra reveal short orbital periods near 80 minutes for SDSS J0206+20, 85 minutes for SDSS J1502+33, and near 100 minutes for CSS J0015+26, RXS J0150+37, SDSS J1132+62, SDSS J2154+15, and SDSS J2158+09. The prominent He II line and velocity amplitude of SDSS J2154+15 are consistent with a Polar nature for this object, while the absence of this line and a low velocity amplitude argue against this classification for RXS J0150+37. Single spectra of 10 objects were obtained near outburst and the rest near quiescence, confirming the dwarf novae nature of these objects.

  7. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  8. Patients lost to follow-up in acromegaly: results of the ACROSPECT study.

    PubMed

    Delemer, B; Chanson, Ph; Foubert, L; Borson-Chazot, F; Chabre, O; Tabarin, A; Weryha, G; Cortet-Rudelli, C; Raingeard, I; Reznik, Y; Reines, C; Bisot-Locard, S; Castinetti, F

    2014-05-01

    The complex management of acromegaly has transformed this disease into a chronic condition, with the risk of patients being lost to follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of acromegalic patients lost to follow-up in France and to determine the impact that abandoning follow-up has on the disease and its management. ACROSPECT was a French national, multicentre, cross-sectional, observational study. Acromegalic patients were considered lost to follow-up if no new information had been entered in their hospital records during the previous 2 years. They were traced where possible, and data were collected by means of a recall visit or questionnaire. In the study population, 21% of the 2392 acromegalic patients initially followed in 25 tertiary endocrinology centres were lost to follow-up. At their last follow-up visit, 30% were uncontrolled, 33% were receiving medical therapy and 53% had residual tumour. Of the 362 traced, 62 had died and 77% were receiving follow-up elsewhere; the leading reason for abandoning follow-up was that they had not been informed that it was necessary. Our analysis of the questionnaires suggests that they were not receiving optimal follow-up. This study underlines the need to better inform acromegalic patients of the need for long-term follow-up, the absence of which could be detrimental to patients' health, and to develop shared care for what must now be regarded as a chronic disease.

  9. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  10. Outpatient follow-up of patients hospitalized for acute leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Spichler, Anne; Athanazio, Daniel; Seguro, Antonio C; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2011-07-01

    The outcome of leptospirosis after the resolution of acute disease, either spontaneously or after treatment, is not well described. The aim of this study was to assess the possible sequelae of acute leptospirosis after hospital discharge. We report here a prospective study carried out in São Paulo, Brazil in which patients hospitalized for leptospirosis were followed in the outpatient setting. Forty-seven patients were serially assessed: 32 severe and 15 mild cases. Early and late complications were not common in either group, but subjective complaints were common in the first few weeks after hospital discharge (53% of severe cases, 40% of mild cases). Two patients had continuing complaints: one had profound general malaise and the other developed new onset panic disorder. The sample analyzed represented 26% of the patients hospitalized with leptospirosis in the city of São Paulo during the study period. The duration of follow-up was an average of approximately 20 days at the first visit, and approximately 40 days at the second visit. Forty-seven patients came for one follow-up visit and 22 of the same patients had two follow-up visits. While two of 47 patients reported continuing symptoms after hospitalization for acute leptospirosis, no definitive, objective evidence of chronic sequelae due to this infection was proven. While preliminary, these observations point to the need for a prospective, rigorous and systematic study to definitively determine and characterize late complications and chronic disease after acute leptospirosis. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A follow-up campaign for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Emily; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Bailes, Matthew; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Keane, Evan; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Caleb, Manisha

    2014-04-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are bright, millisecond-duration radio pulses hypothesized to originate at cosmological distances. To date, no counterpart sources have been associated with FRBs and their origins remain a puzzling mystery. Some have proposed FRBs come from Crab-like pulsar giant pulses or rare bursts from main sequence flare stars in our Galaxy. Both mechanisms would generate observable subsequent FRB-like events. In this proposal we directly test this hypothesis by conducting several follow-up observations on the eight FRBs from the High Time Resolution Universe Survey. This sample represents the majority of the dozen or so known FRB sources. With these observations we will set strict limits on any repetition of FRBs while using the 12 off-source beams of the multi-beam receiver as real-time FRB and transient detectors.

  12. Temporal Constraints on the Size of Gamma-ray Burst Progenitors and Implications for Gravitational Wave Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkhou, V. Zach; Butler, Nathaniel; Littlejohns, Owen

    2017-01-01

    Uncovering the intrinsic variability of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the most energetic explosions since the Big Bang, constrains the size of the GRB emission region, and ejecta velocity, in turn providing hints on the nature of GRBs and their progenitors.We develop a novel method which ties together wavelet and structure-function analyses to measure, for the first time, the actual minimum variability timescale, Δtmin, of GRB light curves. Implementing our technique to the largest sample of GRBs collected by Swift and Fermi instruments, reveals that only less than 10% of GRBs exhibit evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. Investigation on various energy bands of Fermi/GBM (spanning 8 keV-1 MeV) shows that the tightest constraints on progenitor radii derive from timescales obtained from the hardest energy channel of light curves (299 -1000 keV). Our derivations for the minimum Lorentz factor, Γmin, and the minimum emission radius, R = 2 c Γmin2 Δtmin / (1+z), find Γ ≥ 400 which imply typical emission radii R ≈ 1×1014 cm for long-duration GRBs and R ≈ 3×1013 cm for short-duration GRBs (sGRBs). This information is served in an online, publicly-accessible table which is automatically updated upon a new GRB trigger event.Given the possible linkage between sGRBs and Compact Binary Coalescence events, the practical approach to finally detect the Electromagnetic counterparts of LIGO triggers is to focus our follow-up resources on sGRBs. Our sGRB selection methodology, a direct measure of the emission region size, along with the implemented vetting algorithm of extracted transient candidates found by an image subtraction code could optimize efficiently LIGO follow-up with the Ground-based Telescopes.

  13. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H. T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-05-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the 0.3-10 keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of z ~ 0.5, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time (<700 s after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above ~380 GeV of 4.2 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 (95% confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been observed in the other bright X-ray GRB 130427A. A comparison between the H.E.S.S. upper limit and the contemporaneous energy output in X-rays constrains the ratio between the X-ray and VHE gamma-ray fluxes to be greater than 0.4. This value is an important quantity for modelling the afterglow and can constrain leptonic emission scenarios, where leptons are responsible for the X-ray emission and might produce VHE gamma rays.

  14. GRB 091127: The Cooling Break Race on Magnetic Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filgas, R.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Kruhler, T.; Updike, A. C.; Klose, S.; Nardini, M.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Using high-quality, broad-band afterglow data for GRB 091127, we investigate the validity of the synchrotron fireball model for gamma-ray bursts, and infer physical parameters of the ultra-relativistic outflow. Methods. We used multi-wavelength (NIR to X-ray) follow-up observations obtained with GROND simultaneously in the g' r' t' i' z' JH filters and the XRT onboard the Swift satellite in the 0.3 to 10 keY energy range. The resulting afterglow light curve is of excellent accuracy with relative photometric errors as low as 1 %, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) is well-sampled over 5 decades in energy. These data present one of the most comprehensive observing campaigns for a single GRB afterglow and allow us to test several proposed emission models and outflow characteristics in unprecedented detail. Results. Both the multi-color light curve and the broad-band SED of the afterglow of GRB 091127 show evidence of a cooling break moving from high to lower energies. The early light curve is well described by a broken power-law, where the initial decay in the optical/NlR wavelength range is considerably flatter than at X-rays. Detailed fitting of the time-resolved SED shows that the break is very smooth with a sharpness index of 2.2 +/- 0.2, and evolves towards lower frequencies as a power-law with index -1.23 +/- 0.06. These are the first accurate and contemporaneous measurements of both the sharpness of the spectral break and its time evolution. Conclusions. The measured evolution of the cooling break (V(sub c) varies as t(sup -1.2) is not consistent with the predictions of the standard model, wherein V(sub c) varies as t(sup -05) is expected. A possible explanation for the observed behavior is a time dependence of the microphysical parameters, in particular the fraction of the total energy in the magnetic field epsilon(sub Beta). This conclusion provides further evidence that the standard fireball model is too simplistic, and time-dependent micro

  15. [Clinical and sperm follow-up after subinguinal varicocelectomy].

    PubMed

    Vicari, E; Arancio, A; Costanzo, C; Ingrassia, G; Cannizzaro, M A

    2000-06-01

    In order to evaluate the sperm output and the adverse-side-effects after subinguinal varicoceloctomy, a follow-up study of 16 months was performed on 196 selected patients (aged from 22 to 43 years) affected by left varicocele (VR). In the pre-treatment, both Doppler ultrasonography and didymo-epididymal ultrasonography allowed to distinguish two homogeneous patient groups: group A (no. = 136), including patients affected by VR alone and, group B (n. = 60), including patients with VR combined to coincidental didymo-epididymal morphological abnormalities, DEMA). These DEMA lesions (testis size < 12 ml, epididymides abnormalities: increased head- > or = 12 mm- and/or tail- > or = 6 mm-diameter, multiple microcysts, large idrocele) were omolaterally to VR in 30/60 (50%), eterolaterally in 19/60 (31.7%) or bilaterally in 11/60 (18.3%). During sperm follow-up, group A patients showed both a significant temporal change (p < 0.01 ANOVA) of all sperm parameters studied (sperm density, total sperm count, motility and morphology) from month 8 onward and sperm values significantly higher than found in group B patients. On the contrary, the sperm parameters of group B patients did not change significantly during the follow-up observations. As far as the varicocelectomy-mediated clinical symptoms, some patients complained early and transiently (on 1-2-4 weeks following varicocelectomy) the following symptoms: didymal pain (1.5%), didymo-epididymal pain (4.1%) and parasthesiaes on the anterior-medial side of the left thigh (4.1%) or scrotal (3.1%); only four patients (2%) complained permanent paresthesiaes on the anterior-medial side of the left thigh. Furthermore, the clinical follow-up also revealed a low rate of complications: persistent VR (3.6%), hydrocele (1.5%), intrascrotal venous ecstasies (6.1%), epididymitis (0.5%). Some morpho-structural abnormalities at US scans were transient (1-2 weeks): scrotal oedema (6.1%), orchitis (2%), orchi-epididymitis (1%). Subinguinal

  16. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts during the First Advanced LIGO Observing Run and Implications for the Origin of GRB 150906B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernández Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Szolgyen, A.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Hurley, K.; Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Rau, A.; Sanin, A. B.; Svinkin, D. S.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; The IPN Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of the search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with γ-ray bursts detected during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We find no evidence of a GW signal for any of the 41 γ-ray bursts for which LIGO data are available with sufficient duration. For all γ-ray bursts, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source using the optimistic assumption that GWs with an energy of {10}-2{M}⊙ {c}2 were emitted within the 16-500 Hz band, and we find a median 90% confidence limit of 71 Mpc at 150 Hz. For the subset of 19 short/hard γ-ray bursts, we place lower bounds on distance with a median 90% confidence limit of 90 Mpc for binary neutron star (BNS) coalescences, and 150 and 139 Mpc for neutron star-black hole coalescences with spins aligned to the orbital angular momentum and in a generic configuration, respectively. These are the highest distance limits ever achieved by GW searches. We also discuss in detail the results of the search for GWs associated with GRB 150906B, an event that was localized by the InterPlanetary Network near the local galaxy NGC 3313, which is at a luminosity distance of 54 Mpc (z = 0.0124). Assuming the γ-ray emission is beamed with a jet half-opening angle ≤slant 30^\\circ , we exclude a BNS and a neutron star-black hole in NGC 3313 as the progenitor of this event with confidence >99%. Further, we exclude such progenitors up to a distance of 102 Mpc and 170 Mpc, respectively.

  17. The 'Supercritical Pile' GRB Model: Afterglows and GRB, XRR, XRF Unification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present the general notions and observational consequences of the "Supercritical Pile" GRB model; the fundamental feature of this model is a detailed process for the conversion of the energy stored in relativistic protons in the GRB Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) into relativistic electrons and then into radiation. The conversion is effected through the $p \\, \\gamma \\rightarrow p \\, e circumflex + e circumflex -$ reaction, whose kinematic threshold is imprinted on the GRB spectra to provide a peak of their emitted luminosity at energy \\Ep $\\sim 1$ MeV in the lab frame. We extend this model to include, in addition to the (quasi--)thermal relativistic post-shock protons an accelerated component of power law form. This component guarantees the production of $e circumflex +e circumflex- - $pairs even after the RBW has slowed down to the point that its (quasi-) thermal protons cannot fulfill the threshold of the above reaction. We suggest that this last condition marks the transition from the prompt to the afterglow GRB phase. We also discuss conditions under which this transition is accompanied by a significant drop in the flux and could thus account for several puzzling, recent observations. Finally, we indicate that the same mechanism applied to the late stages of the GRB evolution leads to a decrease in \\Ep $\\propto \\Gamma circumflex 2(t)\\propto t circumflex {-3/4}$, a feature amenable to future observational tests.

  18. The GRB Simulator: A System for Testing GOES Rebroadcast (GRB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, K.; Race, R.; Miller, C.; Barnes, K.; Dittberner, G.

    2012-12-01

    GOES Rebroadcast (GRB) signals in the GOES-R era will replace the current legacy GOES Variable (GVAR) signal and will have substantially different characteristics, including a change in data rate from a single 2.1 Mbps stream to two digital streams of 15.5 Mbps each. The GRB Simulator is a portable system that outputs a high-fidelity stream of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) formatted GRB packet data equivalent to live GRB data. The data is used for on-site testing of user ingest and data handling systems known as field terminal sites. The GRB Simulator is a fully self-contained system which includes all hardware units needed for operation. The operator manages configurations to edit preferences, define individual test scenarios, and manage event logs and reports. Simulations are controlled by test scenarios, which are scripts that specify the test data and provide a series of actions for the GRB Simulator to perform when generating GRB output. Scenarios allow for the insertion of errors or modification of GRB packet headers for testing purposes. The GRB Simulator provides a built-in editor for managing scenarios. Data output by the simulator is derived from either proxy data files containing Level 1b (L1b) or GLM L2+ data, test pattern images, or non-image test pattern generation commands specified from within a scenario. The GRB Simulator outputs packets containing both instrument and GRB Information data. Instrument packets contain data simulated from any instrument: the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS), Extreme Ultraviolet Sensor (EUVS) and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (XRS) called EXIS, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), or the Magnetometer. The GRB Information packets contain information such as satellite schedules. The GRB Simulator will provide GRB data as either baseband (digital) or Intermediate Frequency (IF) output to the test system. GRB packet data will be sent

  19. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A 3-year follow-up of hypertension in Delhi.

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, N.; Chadha, S. L.; Shekhawat, S.; Tandon, R.

    1994-01-01

    A follow-up study of hypertension was carried out among adults in Delhi 3 years after an initial community-based epidemiological survey of the same population. The treatment and the severity status of 1115 out of 1749 individuals with hypertension detected in the initial survey were compared with those observed in the follow-up. The proportion of treated cases with controlled blood pressure rose from 10.8% to 60.8%. Among the cohort of 3611 subjects aged 25-64 years who were normotensive in the initial survey, 132 new cases of hypertension, were detected. The annual incidence of hypertension was the same in men and women (12.2 per 1000). Diabetes and regular alcohol consumption were significant risk factors for hypertension, being present in 13 and 7 cases, respectively. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded for 871 of the 1115 cases of hypertension. Abnormal ECGs were exhibited by 307 cases (35.2%), of which 24 (2.7%) had had myocardial infarction, 133 (15.3%) had ischaemic ST-T changes, 54 (6.2%) had left ventricular hypertrophy, and 96 (11.0%) had conduction defects and arrhythmias. PMID:7955019

  1. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; de SOUZA, Karen Regina Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment. PMID:23032213

  2. Significant and variable polarization during the bright prompt optical flash of GRB 160625B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, Eleonora

    2017-08-01

    Measurements of polarized light provide a direct probe of magnetic fields and emission mechanisms in GRB outflows, and can potentially address key open questions in GRB physics. However, due to the unpredictable and short-lived nature of these transients, polarimetric observations during the prompt GRB phase are rare and often inconclusive. In this contribution we report the detection of linear polarization during the bright prompt optical emission of GRB 160625B. Our measurements probe the structure of the magnetic field at an early stage of the GRB jet, and suggest that GRB outflows might be launched as Poynting flux dominated jets whose magnetic energy is rapidly dissipated close to the source, after which they propagate as hot baryonic jets with a relic magnetic field. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the production of ultra high-energy cosmic-rays in GRB jets.

  3. [Impact of follow-up loss over visual deficiency in open-globe ocular trauma].

    PubMed

    Lima-Gómez, Virgilio; García-Rubio, Yatzul Zuhaila; Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros Razo

    2013-01-01

    Open-globe ocular trauma causes visual deficiency; calculating the magnitude of the latter often misses the estimation in patients without follow-up. to identify the modification of the postoperative proportion of visual deficiency in open-globe ocular trauma, which would introduce considering the proportion estimated in patients without follow-up. Non-interventional, retrospective, longitudinal, analytical study. Visual outcome in eyes with open-globe trauma, with and without follow-up, was calculated using the Ocular Trauma Score. The observed postoperative proportion of visual deficiency was identified in eyes with follow-up; in eyes without follow-up, the postoperative proportion of visual deficiency was estimated using an analysis of scenarios: best (Ocular Trauma Score), mean (that of eyes with follow-up) and worst (last observation/no visual improvement). The estimated proportion of visual deficiency was added to that observed in eyes with follow-up, and the resulting proportion was compared with that expected in the sample, using the Ocular Trauma Score (χ(2)). 104 eyes, 70 without follow-up and 34 without it. In eyes with follow-up the expected proportion of visual deficiency was 58.6%, and the observed one was 71.4% (p = 0.1); the estimated proportion of visual deficiency in eyes without follow-up was 76.5%. The resulting postoperative proportion of visual deficiency in the sample would be 73.1%, which would overcome that expected by the Ocular Trauma Score (59.6%, p = 0.04). In open-globe ocular trauma, the efficacy of surgery to reduce the proportion of visual deficiency would decrease with regard to the standard expected by the Ocular Trauma Score, if the deficiency estimated in eyes without follow-up were considered.

  4. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and

  5. Comparing office and telephone follow-up after medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Melissa J; Rounds, Kacie M; Creinin, Mitchell D; Cansino, Catherine; Hou, Melody Y

    2016-08-01

    Compare proportion lost to follow-up, successful abortion, and staff effort in women who choose office or telephone-based follow-up evaluation for medical abortion at a teaching institution. We performed a chart review of all medical abortions provided in the first three years of service provision. Women receiving mifepristone and misoprostol could choose office follow-up with an ultrasound evaluation one to two weeks after mifepristone or telephone follow-up with a scheduled telephone interview at one week post abortion and a second telephone call at four weeks to review the results of a home urine pregnancy test. Of the 176 medical abortion patients, 105 (59.7%) chose office follow-up and 71 (40.3%) chose telephone follow-up. Office evaluation patients had higher rates of completing all required follow-up compared to telephone follow-up patients (94.3% vs 84.5%, respectively, p=.04), but proportion lost to follow-up was similar in both groups (4.8% vs 5.6%, respectively, p=1.0). Medical abortion efficacy was 94.0% and 92.5% in women who chose office and telephone follow-up, respectively. We detected two (1.2%) ongoing pregnancies, both in the office group. Staff rescheduled 15.0% of appointments in the office group. For the telephone follow-up cohort, staff made more than one phone call to 43.9% and 69.4% of women at one week and four weeks, respectively. Proportion lost to follow-up is low in women who have the option of office or telephone follow-up after medical abortion. Women who choose telephone-based evaluation compared to office follow-up may require more staff effort for rescheduling of contact, but overall outcomes are similar. Although women who choose telephone evaluation may require more rescheduling of contact as compared to office follow-up, having alternative follow-up options may decrease the proportion of women who are lost to follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-Wavelength Demographics of GRB Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    We present new VLA observations of 32 Swift and pre-Swift GRB host galaxies, supplemented by new ALMA and Herschel observations. Although our observations are quite deep, we securely detect only a few targets in the sample. Indeed, we rule out several claimed detections of ULIRG-like host galaxies in the previous literature, including every pre-Swift ULIRG-like host: these now appear to have been due to residual afterglow contamination or source confusion. Our results indicate that only a small minority of GRBs (~10%) occur in ULIRG-like galaxies and that intense star-formation does little to directly facilitate GRB production. This suggests in turn that dynamical interactions or ultra-massive stellar progenitors are not likely to be critical ingredients in GRB formation. Every GRB securely associated with a ULIRG is observed to significantly dust-obscured, consistent with the large dust optical depths and covering frations thought to be characteristic of these systems.

  7. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  8. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; hide

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mi