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Sample records for grb follow-up observations

  1. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  2. Radio and Optical Follow-Up Observations and Improved IPN Position of GRB 970111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T. J.; Groot, P. J.; Strom, R. G.; vanParadijs, J.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Heise, J.; intZand, J. J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on Westerbork 840 MHz, 1.4 and 5 GHz radio observations of the improved IPN-WFC error box of the gamma ray burst GRB 970111, between 26.4 hours and 120 days after the event onset. In the approximately 16 sq arcmin area defined by the IPN (BATSE and Ulysses) annulus and the published refined BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera (WFC) error box we detected no steady sources brighter than 0.56 mJy (4sigma), and no varying radio emission, down to 1.0 mJy (4sigma). We also report on B, V, R and I band observations of the error box with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at La Palma. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts - gamma rays: individual (GRB 9701 1 1)

  3. Exploring the first stars with rapid GRB follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino; Cenko, Stephen; Schmidt, Brian; Perley, Daniel; Berger, Edo; Fox, Derek; Fruchter, Andrew; Bloom, Joshua; Prochaska, Jason X.; Lopez, Sebastian; Cobb, Bethany; Roth, Kathy; Levan, Andrew; Tanvir, Nial; Rapoport, Sharon; Yuan, Fang; Chornock, Ryan; Wen-Fai, Fong; Morgan, Adam; Wiersema, Klaas

    2013-02-01

    GRBs provide a unique window on exotic, highly relativistic physics. Our discovery of cosmic explosions like GRB090423 at z=8.2, breaking the record for the most distant known object, also demonstrates the power of using GRBs as lighthouses visible into the epoch of re-ionization, pinpointing the earliest stars and galaxies. Therefore, we intend (i) to observe GRBs at very high-z, in order to explore the IGM during reionization and place fundamental constraints on the early epochs of star-formation; (ii) to study in detail the class of short-duration bursts, especially their electromagnetic signatures in relation to gravitational-wave sources; (iii) to observe exceptionally energetic bursts, such as detected by the Fermi-LAT satellite in order to test theories of quantum gravity; (iv) continue our quest for low-z GRBs associated with supernovae, which, in conjunction with a larger sample of GRB afterglow spectra will provide unique insights into the stellar progenitors and explosion sites of these intriguing phenomena. Gemini, with its flexible schedule and instrumentation suite, represents a cornerstone facility of global GRB research and we will continue to use it in combination with a large network of other facilities.

  4. Optical follow-up observations of Locburst GRB locations with OMC test camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezek, Tomás

    1999-01-01

    The test camera of the Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) experiment for INTEGRAL spacecraft achieving the angular pixel size of 18 arcsec and the field of view 7.5 degx5.1 deg has been succesfully developed and tested at the Astronomical Institute Ondrejov. The test camera is able to provide imaging down to 15 mag over the whole field of view within one exposure of 300 seconds. Although developed primarily to test the OMC performance and help with software development, this device is ideally suitable for the use as ground-based camera for the sites where Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory BATSE Locburst triggers are followed-up in optical waveband and also for widefield sky monitoring in general. The low cost of this camera makes it possible to duplicate the system to a number of observing sites. A chart and a corresponding CCD-image for the BACODINE Locburst Position 6368 taken with OMC test camera at Ondrejov observatory are also presented. The image taken 18 hours after the trigger was computer-blinked with the frame taken 30 days later. No optical activity has been found down to 13.5 mag.

  5. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  6. The Kepler Follow-Up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Dunham, E. W.; Gilliland, R.; Jenkins, J.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Cochran, W. D.; Howell, S.; Koch, D.; Latham, D.; Marcy, G.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission to find Earth-size exoplanets was launched on March 6, 2009, began science observations on May 11, 2009 and is now in full operation. Many planet candidates have been identified and ground based follow-up observations are weeding out false positive planet detections and beginning to confirm true planets. False positive identification techniques planned during the pre-flight phase of Kepler are proving to work well. The fraction of false positive planet detections due to binary stars sent for ground based follow-up appears small.

  7. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95 cm Schmidt telescope to survey >100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, are also expected. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%. In addition, follow-up observations will, where possible, measure the mass of confirmed planets and look for any non-transiting giant planets. The Kepler Project is Funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as a Discovery Mission.

  8. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95-cm Schmidt telescope to survey 100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to ˜ 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1,000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, will also be found. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%.

  9. Follow-Up Observations of Known EC 14026-TYPE Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, G. W.; Reed, M. D.; Zhou, A.-Y.; Terndrup, D. M.; Harms, S. L.; An, D.; Chen, C.-W.; Lin, H.-C.; Zola, S.; Baran, A.; Ogloza, W.; Siwak, M.; Gazeas, K. D.; Niarchos, P. G.; Kilkenny, D.

    We present follow-up observations of pulsating sdB stars as part of our efforts to resolve the pulsation spectra for use in asteroseismological analyses. This paper reports on our overall efforts, but specifically on our results for the pulsating sdB stars KPD 2109+4401 and PG 0154+182.

  10. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  11. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  12. Optical Observations of GRB981226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Przemyslaw R.

    1998-12-01

    An attempt to observe optical transient of GRB981226 was made in BeppoSAX 6' radius region reported by Di Ciolo et al. (IAUCirc 7074). On three nights following the announcement, Dec 27-29, approximately between 1:15 and 2:30 UT I collected 10 and 15-minute frames in I band, with the 1.3 m Warsaw University Observatory Telescope on Las Campanas. This amounted to 70,70,80 minutes of integration each night at 1.4, 1.3 and 1.2" seeing respectively.

  13. Status of the BOOTES-IR Project at OSN for GRB near-IR follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunniffe, R.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jelínek, M.; Gorosabel, J.; Moliné, B.; García-Segura, F.

    2013-07-01

    Bootes-IR (Castro-Tiradoet al. 2005) is a robotic observatory based around a 60 cm alt-az telescope (dubbed T60) that can slew rapidly while carrying heavy instrumentation at the Nasmyth foci. Initially commissioned with an optical camera, with which the optical afterglow to GRB 060707 (http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn3/5290.gcn3) was discovered, we have concentrated our efforts on the near-IR (0.8-2.5 μm) camera (BIRCAM) for which the telescope was specifically designed. The telescope is installed at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada near Granada in Spain, at an altitude of 3000 m and in an area of very low humidity. The telescope, dome, camera and liquid nitrogen generation and refilling systems have all been recently brought back into operation, and routine observations are expected to begin within the next few months.

  14. Discovery and Observations of the Optical Afterglow of GRB 071010B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksanen, A.; Templeton, M.; Henden, A. A.; Kann, D. A.

    2008-06-01

    On 2007 October 10 at 20:45:48 UT, the Swift satellite detected the bright, long-soft gamma-ray burst GRB 071010B in the constellation Ursa Major. Coordinates were automatically distributed via the Gamma-ray Burst Coordinate Network (GCN), and observations were begun by A. Oksanen at the Hankasalmi Observatory in Hankasalmi, Finland, within fifteen minutes of the burst. A previously uncatalogued optical source was detected at R.A. 10h 02m 09.26s, Dec. +45° 43' 50.3'' (J2000) at an unfiltered (R-band calibrated) magnitude of approximately 17.5. Imaging over the following six hours showed that the source faded, indicating that it was likely the optical afterglow of GRB 071010B. The discovery was published via the GCN Circulars, and the coordinates were subsequently used by other major telescope facilities to conduct follow-up photometry and spectroscopy. The discovery of the optical afterglow by A. Oksanen is the first discovery of a GRB afterglow by an amateur astronomer since the discovery of GRB 030725 by L. A. G. Monard in 2003 (Monard 2003). The early detection of this afterglow and subsequent dissemination of coordinates via the GCN has proved very valuable from a scientific standpoint. These data are the earliest available photometry for this burst, enabling the study of the early stages of the GRB optical light. They were also the first localization, and these coordinates were subsequently used by other major optical facilities for their follow-up observations. This burst clearly shows that individual observers still have a role to play in GRB observations even in the era of automated, robotic telescopes, and that the amateur community is an important partner of the professional community in the observation of GRB afterglows.

  15. Follow-up after acute poisoning by substances of abuse: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vallersnes, Odd Martin; Jacobsen, Dag; Ekeberg, Øivind; Brekke, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart follow-up of patients after acute poisoning by substances of abuse, register whether patients referred to specialist health services attended, and whether patients contacted a general practitioner (GP) after the poisoning episode. Design Observational cohort study. Setting A primary care emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo, Norway. Subjects Patients ≥12 years treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included consecutively from October 2011 to September 2012. Main outcome measures Follow-up initiated at discharge, proportion of cases in which referred patients attended within three months, and proportion of cases in which the patient consulted a GP the first month following discharge. Results There were 2343 episodes of acute poisoning by substances of abuse. In 391 (17%) cases the patient was hospitalised, including 49 (2%) in psychiatric wards. In 235 (10%) cases the patient was referred to specialist health services, in 91 (4%) advised to see their GP, in 82 (3%) to contact social services, in 74 (3%) allotted place in a homeless shelter, and in 93 (4%) other follow-up was initiated. In 1096 (47%) cases, the patient was discharged without follow-up, and in a further 324 (14%), the patient self-discharged. When referred to specialist health services, in 200/235 (85%) cases the patient attended within three months. Among all discharges, in 527/1952 (27%) cases the patient consulted a GP within one month. When advised to see their GP, in 45/91 (49%) cases the patient did. Conclusion Attendance was high for follow-up initiated after acute poisoning by substances of abuse. Key Points Despite poor long-term prognosis, patients treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse are frequently not referred to follow-up.Nearly all patients referred to specialist health services attended, indicating the acute poisoning as an opportune moment for intervention.Advising patients to contact their GP was significantly associated with

  16. Swift Follow-up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-wave Transient Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eikenberry, S.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McDaniel, P.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  17. Swift Follow-Up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-Wave Transient Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, J. K.; Camp, J. B.; Kanner, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  18. Leveraging Ensemble Dynamical Properties to Prioritize Exoplanet Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The number of transiting exoplanets now exceeds several thousand, enabling ensemble studies of the dynamical properties of exoplanetary systems. We require a mixture model of dynamical conditions (whether frozen in from formation or sculpted by planet-planet interactions) to recover Kepler's yield of transiting planets. Around M dwarfs, which will be predominate sites of exoplanet follow-up atmospheric study in the next decade, even a modest orbital eccentricity can sterilize a planet. I will describe efforts to link cheap observables, such as number of transiting planets and presence of transit timing variations, to eccentricity and mutual inclination in exoplanet systems. The addition of a second transiting planet, for example, halves the expected orbital eccentricity. For the vast majority of TESS targets, the light curve alone will furnish the sum total of data about the exoplanet. Extracting information about orbital properties from these light curves will help prioritize precious follow-up resources.

  19. Optimal Scheduling for Geosynchronous Space Object Follow-up Observations Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, A.; Fiedler, H.; Schildknecht, T.

    2016-09-01

    Optical observations for space debris in the geosynchronous region have been performed for many years. During this time, observation strategies, processing techniques and cataloguing approaches were successfully developed. Nevertheless, the importance of protecting this orbit region from space debris requires continuous monitoring in order to support collision avoidance operations. So-called follow-up observations providing information for orbit improvement estimations are necessary to maintain high accuracy of the cataloged objects. Those serve a two-fold: For one, the orbits have to be accurate enough to be able to re-observe the object after a time of no observations, that is keeping it in the catalogue, secondly, the importance of protecting active space assets from space debris requires even higher accuracy of the catalogue orbits. Due to limited observation resources and because a space debris object in the geostationary orbit region may only be observed for a limited period of time per the observation night and telescope, efficient scheduling of follow-up observations is a key element. This paper presents an optimal scheduling algorithm for a robotic optical telescope network using a genetic algorithm that has been applied providing optimal solutions for catalogue maintenance. As optimization parameter the information content of the orbit has been used. It is shown that information content utilizing the orbit's covariance and the information gain in an expected update is a useful optimization measure. Finally, simulations with simulated data of space debris objects are used to study the effectivity of the scheduling algorithm.

  20. J-GEM follow-up observations of the gravitational wave source GW151226*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Utsumi, Yousuke; Tominaga, Nozomu; Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Ohta, Kouji; Abe, Fumio; Chimasu, Sho; Furusawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kanda, Yuka; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawabata, Miho; Koshida, Shintaro; Koshimoto, Naoki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Moritani, Yuki; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Nakata, Fumiaki; Nishioka, Tsubasa; Saito, Yoshihiko; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Tristram, Paul J.; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawachi, Akiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Uemura, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi

    2017-02-01

    We report the results of optical-infrared follow-up observations of the gravitational wave (GW) event GW151226 detected by the Advanced LIGO in the framework of J-GEM (Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up). We performed wide-field optical imaging surveys with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC), Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC), and MOA-cam3. The KWFC survey started at 2.26 d after the GW event and covered 778 deg2 centered at the high Galactic region of the skymap of GW151226. We started the HSC follow-up observations from ˜12 d after the event and covered an area of 63.5 deg2 of the highest probability region of the northern sky with limiting magnitudes of 24.6 and 23.8 for the i and z bands, respectively. MOA-cam3 covered 145 deg2 of the skymap with the MOA-red filter ˜2.5 mon after the GW alert. The total area covered by the wide-field surveys was 986.5 deg2. The integrated detection probability for the observed area was ˜29%. We also performed galaxy-targeted observations with six optical and near-infrared telescopes from 1.61 d after the event. A total of 238 nearby (≤100 Mpc) galaxies were observed with a typical I band limiting magnitude of ˜19.5. We detected 13 supernova candidates with the KWFC survey, and 60 extragalactic transients with the HSC survey. Two thirds of the HSC transients were likely supernovae and the remaining one third were possible active galactic nuclei. With our observational campaign, we found no transients that are likely to be associated with GW151226.

  1. Two years of gamma-ray burst follow up observations with BOOTES-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Cerón, José María; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Soldán, Jan; Hudec, René; Bernas, Martin; Páta, Petr; Mateo Sanguino, Tomás De Jesús; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Berná, José Angel; Nekola, Martin; Gorosabel, Javier; de La Morena, Benito A.; Más-Hesse, J. Miguel; Giménez, Alvaro; Torres Riera, José

    2001-09-01

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System exeriment (BOOTES) is designed to provide a real time observing response to the detection of Gamma Ray bursts (GRBs) using wide field cameras imaging in the I, R and V bands and, later on, deeper imaging with small robotic telescopes. It is part, within the framework of a Spanish-Czech collaboration, of a wide ongoing effort to prepare for ESA's satellite INTEGRAL. We provide a brief technical description of BOOTES. Furthermore, a table listing the results for the BOOTES 1B-Narrow Field Camera (1B-NFC), of near simultaneous observations and others, starting 5 minutes after the events, is given since first light (July 98). Additionally we discuss other scientific objectives (regular monitoring of selected objects like variable stars, nearby galaxies and bright QSOs/AGNs for flaring behaviour) and results. To date we have obtained images for about 30 events with the 1B-NFC. In one of the last searches we detected an optical transient, candidate to be the optical counterpart of the GRB 000313, although such relation has not been established to absolute certainty yet.

  2. The sloan digital sky Survey-II supernova survey: search algorithm and follow-up observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Hogan, Craig J.; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Frieman, Joshua A.; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Depoy, D. L.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Dilday, Ben; Kessler, Richard; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; and others

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg{sup 2} region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the type Ia SNe, the main driver for the survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NIBLES II. Arecibo follow-up observations (Butcher+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Z.; Schneider, S.; van Driel, W.; Lehnert, M.; Minchin, R.

    2016-11-01

    HI line observations of the 139 clear or marginally detected sources from the NIBLES Arecibo follow-up observations. Observations were carried out with the Arecibo L-band wideband receiver (L-wide) with the Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor (WAPP) correlator backend using two polarizations with a bandpass of 50MHz across 4096 frequency channels corresponding to a channel separation of approximately 2.6km/s. Spectrum files are the output files from Robert Minchin's CORMEASURE routine from the Arecibo Observatory. Data have been smoothed to approximately 18.7km/s. Velocities are heliocentric in the optical convention in units of km/s and flux density is in Janskys. (6 data files).

  4. XMM FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF THREE SWIFT BAT-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Winter, L. M.

    2011-08-01

    We present XMM-Newton observations of three active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken as part of a hunt to find very heavily obscured Compton-thick AGNs. For obscuring columns greater than 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, AGNs are only visible at energies below 10 keV via reflected/scattered radiation, characterized by a flat power law. We therefore selected three objects (ESO 417-G006, IRAS 05218-1212, and MCG -01-05-047) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray survey catalog with Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) 0.5-10 keV spectra with flat power-law indices as candidate Compton-thick sources for follow-up observations with the more sensitive instruments on XMM-Newton. The XMM spectra, however, rule out reflection-dominated models based on the weakness of the observed Fe K{alpha} lines. Instead, the spectra are well fit by a model of a power-law continuum obscured by a Compton-thin absorber plus a soft excess. This result is consistent with previous follow-up observations of two other flat-spectrum BAT-detected AGNs. Thus, out of the six AGNs in the 22 month BAT catalog with apparently flat Swift XRT spectra, all five that have had follow-up observations are not likely Compton thick. We also present new optical spectra of two of these objects, IRAS 05218-1212 and MCG -01-05-047. Interestingly, though both the AGNs have similar X-ray spectra, their optical spectra are completely different, adding evidence against the simplest form of the geometric unified model of AGNs. IRAS 05218-1212 appears in the optical as a Seyfert 1, despite the {approx}8.5 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} line-of-sight absorbing column indicated by its X-ray spectrum. MCG -01-05-047's optical spectrum shows no sign of AGN activity; it appears as a normal galaxy.

  5. GRB 090902B: AFTERGLOW OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S. B.; Akerlof, C.; McKay, T. A.; Swenson, C. A.; Perley, D. A.; Kleiser, I. K. W.; Guidorzi, C.; Wiersema, K.; Malesani, D.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Bersier, D.; Cano, Z.; Kobayashi, S.; Melandri, A.; Mottram, C. J.; Gomboc, A.; Ilyin, I.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A. J.

    2010-05-01

    The optical-infrared afterglow of the Large Area Telescope (LAT)-detected long-duration burst, GRB 090902B, has been observed by several instruments. The earliest detection by ROTSE-IIIa occurred 80 minutes after detection by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, revealing a bright afterglow and a decay slope suggestive of a reverse shock origin. Subsequent optical-IR observations followed the light curve for 6.5 days. The temporal and spectral behavior at optical-infrared frequencies is consistent with synchrotron fireball model predictions; the cooling break lies between optical and XRT frequencies {approx}1.9 days after the burst. The inferred electron energy index is p = 1.8 {+-} 0.2, which would however imply an X-ray decay slope flatter than observed. The XRT and LAT data have similar spectral indices and the observed steeper value of the LAT temporal index is marginally consistent with the predicted temporal decay in the radiative regime of the forward shock model. Absence of a jet break during the first 6 days implies a collimation-corrected {gamma}-ray energy E{sub {gamma}} > 2.2 x 10{sup 52} erg, one of the highest ever seen in a long-duration gamma-ray bursts. More events combining GeV photon emission with multiwavelength observations will be required to constrain the nature of the central engine powering these energetic explosions and to explore the correlations between energetic quanta and afterglow emission.

  6. Using galaxy formation simulations to optimize LIGO follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Elisa; Caiazzo, Ilaria; Davé, Romeel; Heyl, Jeremy S.

    2017-04-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational radiation from merging black holes poses a challenge of how to organize the electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational-wave events as well as observed bursts of neutrinos. We propose a technique to select the galaxies that are most likely to host the event given some assumptions of whether the particular event is associated with recent star formation, low-metallicity stars or simply proportional to the total stellar mass in the galaxy. We combine data from the 2-MASS Photometric Redshift Galaxy Catalogue with results from galaxy formation simulations to develop observing strategies that potentially reduce the area of sky to search by up to a factor of 2 relative to an unweighted search of galaxies, and a factor of 20 to a search over the entire LIGO localization region.

  7. High-precision follow-up observations of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanjooloo, Yudish; Tholen, David J.; Fohring, Dora; Hung, Denise

    2016-10-01

    We present the latest results of ongoing high-precision astrometric follow-up observations of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) using the University of Hawaii 2.24 metre telescope (currently 7.5 arcmin FOV), the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT; 1 degree FOV) with MegaPrime, and the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (1.5 degree FOV). The combination of excellent observing conditions at Maunakea, and the use of no filter to maximise our throughput efficiency, allows us to recover targets having V < 24, and sometimes V < 25 under ideal conditions. We frequently achieve astrometric accuracy limited by the reference catalog and plan to improve on this capability with the implementation of the GAIA catalog. This work is funded by NASA grant NXX13AI64G.

  8. Follow-Up Discovery Channel Telescope Observations of Transients and Variables from Optical Time Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Suvi; Liu, Tingting; Hung, Tiara

    2017-01-01

    We highlight the capabilities of the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) for follow-up observations of transients and variables discovered by optical time-domain surveys. We present two DCT programs: 1) extended-baseline imaging with the Large Monolithic Imager of periodically variable quasars from the Pan-STARRS1 survey to identify binary supermassive black hole candidates, and 2) spectroscopic classification with the DeVeny spectrograph of nuclear transients from the iPTF survey to identify tidal disruption event candidates. We demonstrate that DCT is well-matched to the magnitude ranges of the transients and variables discovered by these surveys, and has played an important role in their classification and characterization.

  9. Loss to follow-up in the Australian HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Hamish; Petoumenos, Kathy; Brown, Katherine; Baker, David; Russell, Darren; Read, Tim; Smith, Don; Wray, Lynne; Giles, Michelle; Hoy, Jennifer; Carr, Andrew; Law, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss to follow-up (LTFU) in HIV-positive cohorts is an important surrogate for interrupted clinical care which can potentially influence the assessment of HIV disease status and outcomes. After preliminary evaluation of LTFU rates and patient characteristics, we evaluated the risk of mortality by LTFU status in a high resource setting. Methods Rates of LTFU were measured in the Australian HIV Observational Database for a range of patient characteristics. Multivariate repeated measures regression methods were used to identify determinants of LTFU. Mortality by LTFU status was ascertained using linkage to the National Death Index. Survival following combination antiretroviral therapy initiation was investigated using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Of 3,413 patients included in this analysis, 1,632 (47.8%) had at least one episode of LTFU after enrolment. Multivariate predictors of LTFU included viral load (VL)>10,000 copies/ml (Rate ratio (RR) 1.63 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.45–1.84) (ref ≤400)), time under follow-up (per year) (RR 1.03 (95% CI: 1.02–1.04)) and prior LTFU (per episode) (RR 1.15 (95% CI: 1.06–1.24)). KM curves for survival were similar by LTFU status (p=0.484). LTFU was not associated with mortality in Cox proportional hazards models (univariate hazard ratio (HR) 0.93 (95% CI: 0.69–1.26) and multivariate HR 1.04 (95% CI: 0.77–1.43)). Conclusions Increased risk of LTFU was identified amongst patients with potentially higher infectiousness. We did not find significant mortality risk associated with LTFU. This is consistent with timely re-engagement with treatment, possibly via high levels of unreported linkage to other health care providers. PMID:25377928

  10. Identification and Follow-Up Observations of Low-Mass Eclipsing Binaries from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey; Lopez-Morales, M.; Marzoa, R. I.; Harrison, T.; Ule, N.; Hoffman, D.

    2011-01-01

    An outstanding problem in Astronomy for the past 15+ years has been that the radii of low-mass, (M < 1.0 M⊙), main-sequence stars in eclipsing binary systems are consistently about 15% larger than predicted by theoretical models. The main cause is hypothesized to be rapid rotation due to binary spin-up, as all but one of the currently known systems have P < 3.0 days. We present 100+ new low-mass, main-sequence, double-lined eclipsing binaries (LMMS DDEBs) from both our Kepler Guest Observer Program, as well as the initial Kepler public data release. We identify over 25 new systems with P > 10 days, extending the sample of LMMS DDEBs into this completely heretofore unexplored period range. We present the initial results of our intensive observing campaign to obtain ground-based radial-velocity and multi-color photometry follow-up of these long-period systems, in order to determine precise masses and radii. We thank all the hard-working members of the Kepler team, and acknowledge support from the Kepler Guest Observer Program, the New Mexico Space Grant Consortium, and a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  11. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment.

    PubMed

    David, S; Visvikis, D; Roux, C; Hatt, M

    2011-09-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumor volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumor metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using a stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on clinical datasets it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracer datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumor volume definition for radiotherapy applications.

  12. SPECKLE CAMERA OBSERVATIONS FOR THE NASA KEPLER MISSION FOLLOW-UP PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Sherry, William; Horch, Elliott; Ciardi, David R.

    2011-07-15

    We present the first results from a speckle imaging survey of stars classified as candidate exoplanet host stars discovered by the Kepler mission. We use speckle imaging to search for faint companions or closely aligned background stars that could contribute flux to the Kepler light curves of their brighter neighbors. Background stars are expected to contribute significantly to the pool of false positive candidate transiting exoplanets discovered by the Kepler mission, especially in the case that the faint neighbors are eclipsing binary stars. Here, we describe our Kepler follow-up observing program, the speckle imaging camera used, our data reduction, and astrometric and photometric performance. Kepler stars range from R = 8 to 16 and our observations attempt to provide background non-detection limits 5-6 mag fainter and binary separations of {approx}0.05-2.0 arcsec. We present data describing the relative brightness, separation, and position angles for secondary sources, as well as relative plate limits for non-detection of faint nearby stars around each of 156 target stars. Faint neighbors were found near 10 of the stars.

  13. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    PubMed Central

    David, Simon; Visvikis, Dimitris; Roux, Christian; Hatt, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumour volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumour metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets, the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on the clinical datasets, it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracers datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumour volume definition for radiotherapy applications. PMID:21846937

  14. Changes observed in diabetic retinopathy: eight-year follow-up of a Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro; de la Riva-Fernandez, Sofia; Valls-Mateu, Aida; Sagarra-Alamo, Ramon; Moreno-Ribas, Antonio; Soler, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims To determine the changes in the incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), diabetic macular oedema (DMO) and their risk factors in a population-based study of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) referred to our 16 Primary Health Care Areas (HCAs). Methods Prospective population-based study of a total of 15 396 Caucasian patients with DM, who represent 86.53% of the total patients with DM in our HCAs, were studied over an 8-year follow-up period. All patients were screened with a mean follow-up of 3.18±1.11 times for each patient over the 8 years. Results The yearly mean value of any DR was 8.37±2.19% (8.09%–8.99%); of advanced DR yearly mean value of 0.46±0.22% (0.03–0.78); and of DMO a yearly mean value of 2.19±0.18% (2%–2.49%). A clear increase was observed in the last 3 years, any DR increased from 8.09% in 2007 to 8.99% in 2014, and DMO from 2% in 2007 to 2.49% in 2014. These increases were more evident in some age groups. For patients with any DR aged 41–50 and 51–60 and for patients with advanced DR aged 41–50, 51–60 and 61–70, the increase was more marked, related to an increase in HbA1c values or to patients treated with insulin. Conclusions An increase in the incidence of DR and DMO was observed, especially in the younger patients aged between 31 and 70 years. This is linked to bad metabolic control of DM. Our results suggest a greater number of ocular complications in the near future, such as neovascular glaucoma, if these current findings are not addressed. PMID:26769672

  15. Optical Follow-Up Observations of PTF10qts, a Luminous Broad-Lined Type Ic Supernova Found by the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, E. S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Hurley, K.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Poznanski, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Barthelmy, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic-BL) PTF10qts, which was discovered as part of the Palomar Transient Factory. The supernova was located in a dwarf galaxy of magnitude r = 21.1 at a redshift z = 0.0907.We find that the R-band light curve is a poor proxy for bolometric data and use photometric and spectroscopic data to construct and constrain the bolometric light curve. The derived bolometric magnitude at maximum light is Mbol = -18.51 +/- 0.2 mag, comparable to that of SN1998bw (Mbol = -18.7 mag) which was associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). PTF10qts is one of the most luminous SN Ic-BL observed without an accompanying GRB. We estimate the physical parameters of the explosion using data from our programme of follow-up observations, finding that it produced a larger mass of radioactive nickel compared to other SNeIc-BL with similar inferred ejecta masses and kinetic energies. The progenitor of the event was likely a approximately 20 solar mass star.

  16. [Osteoarthritis in the neonate. Radiologic diagnosis and follow-up observations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weigel, W; Hayek, W H; Bens, G

    1979-01-01

    A fatally ending index case of septic osteoarthritis that was diagnosed retrospectively initiated this report. This patient had severe, asymmetrically distributed metaphyseal growth disturbances at many long bones. In order to determine the features of early radiologic diagnosis we report the findings of 7 further patients with neonatal septic osteoarthritis with clinical and radiological follow-up. The most important observation for early radiologic diagnosis of osteoarthritis is the displacement of fat layers along the metaphysis. Other findings of the soft tissues have the same diagnostic value as bone destruction and subperiosteal new bone formation found one to three weeks later on roentgenfilms. Detecting early signs of osteoarthritis helps in localizing the focus for bacteriologic diagnosis, which is said to be more successful than blood cultures. Diagnosing a joint empyema initiates surgical intervention for pressure relief in order to avoid necrosis of the epiphysis as seen in the femoral head in septic arthritis of the hip joint. Early diagnosis and treatment prior to destruction of the growing cartilage is necessary to avoid growth disturbances and length discrepancies of long bones. In cases of sepsis a so called "babygram" and a repeat examination 10 to 14 days later is mandatory.

  17. X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2008-12-24

    A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE {gamma}-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

  18. Systematic Errors in Low-latency Gravitational Wave Parameter Estimation Impact Electromagnetic Follow-up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.; Farr, Ben; Coughlin, Scott; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-03-01

    Among the most eagerly anticipated opportunities made possible by Advanced LIGO/Virgo are multimessenger observations of compact mergers. Optical counterparts may be short-lived so rapid characterization of gravitational wave (GW) events is paramount for discovering electromagnetic signatures. One way to meet the demand for rapid GW parameter estimation is to trade off accuracy for speed, using waveform models with simplified treatment of the compact objects’ spin. We report on the systematic errors in GW parameter estimation suffered when using different spin approximations to recover generic signals. Component mass measurements can be biased by \\gt 5σ using simple-precession waveforms and in excess of 20σ when non-spinning templates are employed. This suggests that electromagnetic observing campaigns should not take a strict approach to selecting which LIGO/Virgo candidates warrant follow-up observations based on low-latency mass estimates. For sky localization, we find that searched areas are up to a factor of ∼ 2 larger for non-spinning analyses, and are systematically larger for any of the simplified waveforms considered in our analysis. Distance biases for the non-precessing waveforms can be in excess of 100% and are largest when the spin angular momenta are in the orbital plane of the binary. We confirm that spin-aligned waveforms should be used for low-latency parameter estimation at the minimum. Including simple precession, though more computationally costly, mitigates biases except for signals with extreme precession effects. Our results shine a spotlight on the critical need for development of computationally inexpensive precessing waveforms and/or massively parallel algorithms for parameter estimation.

  19. Recent Results from Follow-up Astrometric Observations of KBOs and NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholen, D. J.; Connelley, M. S.

    2001-11-01

    As of the abstract deadline, 481 Kuiper belt objects have been discovered, but only 50 have four-opposition or greater orbits. Historically, some of the three-opposition orbits still had assumed eccentricities, indicating the relative level of inaccuracy in the orbit determination. Meanwhile, several authors have published eccentricity versus semimajor axis plots for Kuiper belt objects without attaching error bars to the symbols. Caution should therefore be exercised when looking at the relative populations of resonant, classical, and scattered objects, or when reaching conclusions about mechanisms at work that shape the Kuiper belt. We have been working to ameliorate this situation by securing follow-up astrometric observations of Kuiper belt objects with shorter arc orbit solutions, thereby extending the arcs and improving the accuracy of their semimajor axis and eccentricity determinations. Approximately 30 objects have been recovered to date, including a serendipitous observation of the satellite of 1998 WW31. We will be presenting improved estimates of the relative populations of resonant, classical, and scattered objects at the DPS meeting. Emphasis has also been given to astrometric observations of faint near-Earth objects to prevent their ephemeris uncertainties from growing large enough to warrant being tagged as "lost". In some cases, arcs have been extended by a factor of more than sixty. Virtually all of our observations are the last available for these objects. The number one reason for failure to recover an object has been low galactic latitude, where the field star density is so high that after non-sidereal tracking is taken into account, the field of view is nearly completely covered by star trails. Notable recoveries include 2000 SG344 at magnitude 26 in 2001 August using the CFHT (this object had been identified as having a 1 in 1000 chance of colliding with the Earth in 2071), 2000 GD147 at magnitude 24.5 in 2001 September using the UH 2.24-m

  20. The Observable Signatures of GRB Cocoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-01-01

    As a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet propagates within the stellar atmosphere it creates a cocoon composed of an outer Newtonian shocked stellar material and an inner (possibly relativistic) shocked jet. The jet deposits {10}51{--}{10}52 erg into this cocoon. This is comparable to the energies of the GRB and of the accompanying supernova, yet the cocoon’s signature has been largely ignored. The cocoon radiates a fraction of this energy as it expands, following the breakout from the star, and later as it interacts with the surrounding matter. We explore the possible signatures of this emission and outline a framework to calculate them from the conditions of the cocoon at the time of the jet breakout. The cocoon signature depends strongly on the, currently unknown, mixing between the shocked jet and shocked stellar material. With no mixing the γ-ray emission from the cocoon is so bright that it should have been already detected. The lack of such detections indicates that some mixing must take place. For partial and full mixing the expected signals are weaker than regular GRB afterglows. However, the latter are highly beamed while the former are wider. Future optical, UV, and X-ray transient searches, like LSST, ZTF, ULTRASAT, ISS-Lobster, and others, will most likely detect such signals, providing a wealth of information on the progenitors and jets of GRBs. While we focus on long GRBs, analogous (but weaker) cocoons may arise in short GRBs. Their signatures might be the most promising electromagnetic counterparts for gravitational wave signals from compact binary mergers.

  1. The 80 Ms follow-up of the X-ray afterglow of GRB 130427A challenges the standard forward shock model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; Kann, D. A.; Oates, S. R.; Schulze, S.; Zhang, B.; Cano, Z.; Gendre, B.; Malesani, D.; Rossi, A.; Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Boër, M.; Stratta, G.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-10-01

    GRB 130427A was the brightest gamma-ray burst detected in the last 30 yr. With an equivalent isotropic energy output of 8.5 × 1053 erg and redshift z = 0.34, it uniquely combined very high energetics with a relative proximity to Earth. As a consequence, its X-ray afterglow has been detected by sensitive X-ray observatories such as XMM-Newton and Chandra for a record-breaking baseline longer than 80 million seconds. We present the X-ray light curve of this event over such an interval. The light curve shows a simple power-law decay with a slope α = 1.309 ± 0.007 over more than three decades in time (47 ks-83 Ms). We discuss the consequences of this result for a few models proposed so far to interpret GRB 130427A, and more in general the significance of this outcome in the context of the standard forward shock model. We find that this model has difficulty in explaining our data, in both cases of constant density and stellar-wind circumburst media, and requires far-fetched values for the physical parameters involved.

  2. Follow-up observations of extremely metal-poor stars identified from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, D. S.; Allende Prieto, C.; González Hernández, J. I.; Carrera, R.; Rebolo, R.; Shetrone, M.; Lambert, D. L.; Fernández-Alvar, E.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The most metal-poor stars in the Milky Way witnessed the early phases of formation of the Galaxy, and have chemical compositions that are close to the pristine mixture from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, polluted by one or few supernovae. Aims: Only two dozen stars with ([Fe/H] < -4) are known, and they show a wide range of abundance patterns. It is therefore important to enlarge this sample. We present the first results of an effort to identify new extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo. Methods: Our targets have been selected from low-resolution spectra obtained as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and followed-up with medium resolution spectroscopy on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope and, in a few cases, at high resolution on the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Stellar parameters and the abundances of magnesium, calcium, iron, and strontium have been inferred from the spectra using classical model atmospheres. We have also derived carbon abundances from the G band. Results: We find consistency between the metallicities estimated from SDSS and those from new data at the level of 0.3 dex. The analysis of medium resolution data obtained with ISIS on the WHT allows us to refine the metallicities and in some cases measure other elemental abundances. Our sample contains 11 new metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < -3.0, one of them with an estimated metallicity of [Fe/H] ~ -4.0. We also discuss metallicity discrepancies of some stars in common with previous works in the literature. Only one of these stars is found to be C-enhanced at about [C/Fe] ~ + 1, whereas the other metal-poor stars show C abundances at the level of [C/Fe] ~ + 0.45. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.The reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at

  3. IR and Optical Observations of GRB from Campo Imperatore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziali, R.; D'Alessio, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Paola, A. Di; Burderi, L.; Fiore, F.; Israel, G.; Lorenzetti, D.; Pedichini, F.; Stella, L.; Vitali, F.

    In this poster we present a description of the Campo Imperatore Observatory facilities, suitable for very fast reaction to GRB triggers and multiwavelength observations. Two complementary instruments are available in the Observatory: the AZT-24 (1.1m Ritchey Cretien equipped with the NIR camera SWIRCAM), one of the few IR telescope working in the northern emisphere, and a Schmidt telescope (60/90/180 cm, equipped with a 2Kx2K back illuminated CCD). The IR detection of the GRB 000926, obtained with the AZT-24, is also reported.

  4. ALMA and RATIR observations of GRB 131030A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuiyun; Urata, Yuji; Takahashi, Satoko; Im, Myungshin; Yu, Po-Chieh; Choi, Changsu; Butler, Nathaniel; Watson, Alan M.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lee, William H.; Klein, Chris; Fox, Ori D.; Littlejohns, Owen; Cucchiara, Nino; Troja, Eleonora; González, Jesús; Richer, Michael G.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Bloom, Josh; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Gehrels, Neil; Moseley, Harvey; Georgiev, Leonid; de Diego, José A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    We report on the first open-use based Atacama Large Millimeter/submm Array (ALMA) 345 GHz observation for the late afterglow phase of GRB 131030A. The ALMA observation constrained a deep limit at 17.1 d for the afterglow and host galaxy. We also identified a faint submillimeter source (ALMA J2300-0522) near the GRB 131030A position. The deep limit at 345 GHz and multifrequency observations obtained using Swift and RATIR yielded forward-shock modeling with a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation and described X-ray excess in the afterglow. The excess was inconsistent with the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from the forward shock. The host galaxy of GRB 131030A and optical counterpart of ALMA J2300-0522 were also identified in the Subaru image. Based on the deep ALMA limit for the host galaxy, the 3σ upper limits of IR luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) are estimated as LIR < 1.11 × 1011 L⊙ and SFR <18.7 (M⊙ yr-1), respectively. Although the separation angle from the burst location (3{^''.}5) was rather large, ALMA J2300-0522 may be one component of the GRB 131030A host galaxy, according to previous host galaxy cases.

  5. Probing a GRB Progenitor at a Redshift of z=2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive optical/near-infrared follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226, including VLT spectroscopy and polarimetry, supplemented by Chandra X-ray and BOOTES-1 rapid response observations. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the burst when the afterglow was at a magnitude of R approx. 19. The multi-color light curve of the afterglow, with a break around 1 day after the burst, is achromatic within the observational uncertainties even during episodes of short-term fluctuations. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, consistent with low intrinsic polarization observed in other afterglows. VLT spectra show a foreground absorber of Mg II at a redshift z=1.042 and two absorption line systems at redshifts z=1.962+/-0.001 and at z=1.986+/-0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. The kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds is very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004, supporting the view that at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  6. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF GRB 051103 FROM LIGO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G.; Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A.; Amin, R. S.; Aston, S. M.; Collaboration: LIGO Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-10

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed {gamma}-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30 Degree-Sign , we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  7. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Boyle, M.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummitt, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clara, F.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Culter, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, M.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Finn, L. S.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Graef, C.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Kelner, M.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, N.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Li, J.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Marandi, A.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohanty, S. D.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nolting, D.; Nuttall, L.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Podkaminer, J.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Raymond, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J. H.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Salit, M.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shihan Weerathunga, T.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, R.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stefszky, M.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vallisneri, M.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Villar, A. E.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Collaboration; Bizouard, M. A.; Dietz, A.; Guidi, G. M.; Was, M.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed γ-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30°, we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  8. Spectroscopic Observations of the Bright Afterglow of GRB021004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona

    2001-09-01

    One of the holy grails of gamma-ray burst research is to detect X-ray line signatures from an afterglow with high statistical significance. Of all possible observations, this perhaps offers the best chance of constraining the GRB mechanism and environment, and could provide the "smoking gun" signature connecting GRBs to massive stellar deaths. In order to accomplish this, we know long observations within one day of the event are necessary.

  9. [Results from the X-ray and Optical Follow-up Observations of the Swift BAT AGN Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift BAT ACN survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type and how they will influence the design of XO.

  10. Gamma-Ray Burst Follow Up Observations with BOOTES in 1998--2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón, J. M. Castro; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Hudec, R.; Soldán, J.; Bernas, M.; Páta, P.; Sanguino, T. J. Mateo; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Berná, J. Á.; Nekola, M.; Gorosabel, J.; Morena, B. A. De La; Más-Hesse, J. M.; Giménez, Á.; Riera, J. Torres

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System (BOOTES) provides an automated realtime observing response to the detection of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Error box size depending, it uses wide field cameras attached to small robotic telescopes or the telescopes themselves. To date we have acquired photometry for about 30 events with the Ultra Wide (UWFC) and the Narrow Field Cameras (NFC) and about 50 events with the Wide Field Camera (WFC).

  11. Photometric follow-up observations of the new FUor candidate HBC 722

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E.; Peneva, S.

    2010-08-01

    We report results from photometric observations of the new FUor candidate HBC 722 discovered in the region of NGC 7000/IC 5070 (ATEL #2801 and #2808). Our observations were performed with the 50/70 cm Schmidt telescopes of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen (Bulgaria) and the 1.3 m RC telescope of the Skinakas Observatory of the Institute of Astronomy, University of Crete (Greece). Our resent data suggest that the rise in brightness continue and a small reflection nebula around HBC 722 became visible.

  12. Target Charaterization and Follow-Up Observations in Support of the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, David W.

    2004-01-01

    This report covers work carried out at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory during the period 1 December 2003 to 30 November 2004 to support efforts to prepare the Kepler Input Catalog. The Catalog will be used to select the targets observed for planetary transits by Kepler.

  13. Prediction of imminent impactors: Announcement policy and need of follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, F.; Milani, A.; Spoto, F.; Tommei, G.

    2014-07-01

    The detection of imminent impactors poses some delicate questions regarding the announcement policy. In fact, having very few observations, the impact probability computation is a difficult task and it strongly depends on: - the intrinsic astrometric errors of the observations; - the assumed population model - the minimum size of impactors We present a new web based automatic tool which computes the risk assesment within few minutes from the posting of new observations of a recently detected object on the MPC-NEOCP list. The aim of this imminent impactors tool is to raise awareness of the professional and amateur astronomical community on the possibility of the existence of an impact, within few days or hours, of objects posted on the NEOCP list of the MPC. Therefore astronomers can be triggered in a short time to follow these kind of objects, in order to improve the knowledge of the impact occurrence and location. It is important to stress that the minimal information from the observations provides a considerable number of spurious cases. This is a main difference with the classical impact monitoring activities of CLOMON2-NEODyS, because the need of a rapid response of the observers requires an automatic procedure while for CLOMON2 an operator decides if the output of the computation is reliable to be posted. In this presentation we will discuss the methods to filter the reliable cases and the announcement policy that we want to implement in the NEODyS system, taking into account the need of a feedback from the community of scientists.

  14. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club Follow-up Observations of Known Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Lindsay; Pearson, K.; Turner, J.; Biddle, L. I.; Nguyen, C.; Watson, Z.; Mango, D.; Romine, J. M.; Hume, J.; Sinor, K.; Amaya, H.; Stanford-Jones, C.; Qu, D.; Liu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We observed the primary transits of GJ-1214b and Kelt-1b using the I and R photometric filters on the Kuiper 61" telescope. GJ-1214b is a super earth and Kelt-1b is a hot Jupiter. GJ-1214b has a flat transmission spectrum, which is most likely due to clouds in tis atmosphere. Kelt-1b was the first planet discovered by the KELT survey, and it also has a brown dwarf companion. Because of this, we can expect to observe a timing transit variation. A major component of this project is to give students a learning experience beyond the classroom by getting them involved in an introductory astronomy project. Undergraduates have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience doing data reduction and analysis while still being able to contribute updated planetary parameters for both these systems.

  15. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizouard, M. A.; Dietz, A.; Guidi, G. M.; Was, M.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.; Blackburn, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at the distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed gamma-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30. we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with > 99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81 our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it the most distant extragalactic magnetar observed to date.

  16. Spitzer Follow-up of HST Observations of Star Formation in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jeff; Bally, John; Desch, Steve; Healy, Kevin; Snider, Keely

    2005-06-01

    Images of regions of star formation taken with HST have given us an extraordinary view of young stellar objects and their natal environments. These views differ tremendously between low-mass YSOs seen in regions of isolated low-mass star formation such as Taurus-Auriga, and the proplyds, EGGs, and other structures seen in regions of massive star formation. While YSOs in Taurus spend their adolescence buried in the dark interiors of molecular clouds, YSOs near massive stars quickly find themselves overrun by ionization fronts and exposed to the intense UV radiation from nearby massive stars. This difference in environment has a profound effect on the way in which the protoplanetary disk around a star evolves -- a fact that is of great importance to us, given the strength of the evidence suggesting that the Sun formed near a massive star. But HST while HST can inform us about the evolution of YSOs in HII region environments once they are overrun by ionization fronts, it cannot show us the birth of the stars themselves. These remain hidden in the dense molecular material beyond the ionized volumes of these regions. Only Spitzer can show us the properties of the YSOs that lie hidden in the dark shadows of HST images of HII regions, and only Spitzer can provide us with information about PDRs, warm dust, and other tracers of the interaction of massive stars with their surroundings. The combination of HST and Spitzer observations of star forming regions is far greater than the sum of its parts. If we are to build a complete picture of low-mass star formation and the evolution of disks near massive stars, we need to combine HST and Spitzer observations of the same regions. In this proposal we request time to obtain both IRAC and MIPS 24 micron images of each HII region that has been observed by HST, but has yet to be observed with Spitzer. Together with previous images obtained from the archives, this will comprise an indispensible data set for testing hypotheses about

  17. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageron, Michel; Al Samarai, Imen; Akerlof, Carl; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien; Klotz, Alain; Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand; Vecchi, Manuela; Zheng, Weikang

    2012-11-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5°. Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  18. Follow-Up Observations of SN1999GI in NGC 3184

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Eric

    1999-09-01

    Type II supernovae may all be X-ray sources but differences in behavior are becoming visible: normal SN II's fade quickly while the abnormal SN IIn's last for months, perhaps years. These suppositions are based upon very limited statistics: 2 normal SN II's and about 4-6 SN IIn's. The turn-on times are unknown, as are the half-lives. Two normal SN II's observed in the X-ray band are SN1980K (Canizares et al. 1982) and SN1999em (Fox & Lewin 1999, IAU Circ 7318). The turn-on time of these SNe appear to be nearly immediate. Radio and X-ray emission should be correlated, yet are not: SN1980K was an early radio source; SN1999em has not yet been detected. But a correlation with radio emission must be suspect with so little data. SN1999gi,the target of this TOO, represents a potential third norm

  19. Follow-Up Chandra Observations of Three Candidate Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Gezari, S.; Komossa, S.

    2004-04-01

    Large-amplitude, high-luminosity soft X-ray flares were detected by the ROSAT All-Sky Survey in several galaxies with no evidence of Seyfert activity in their ground-based optical spectra. These flares had the properties predicted for a tidal disruption of a star by a central supermassive black hole. We report Chandra observations of three of these galaxies taken a decade after their flares that reveal weak nuclear X-ray sources that are from 240 to 6000 times fainter than their luminosities at peak, supporting the theory that these were special events and not ongoing active galactic nucleus (AGN) variability. The decline of RX J1624.9+7554 by a factor of 6000 is consistent with the (t-tD)-5/3 decay predicted for the fallback phase of a tidal disruption event, but only if ROSAT was lucky enough to catch the event exactly at its peak in 1990 October. RX J1242.6-1119A has declined by a factor of 240, also consistent with (t-tD)-5/3. In the H II galaxy NGC 5905 we find only resolved, soft X-ray emission that is undoubtedly associated with starburst activity. When accounting for the starburst component, the ROSAT observations of NGC 5905, as well as the Chandra upper limit on its nuclear flux, are consistent with a (t-tD)-5/3 decay by at least a factor of 1000. Although we found weak Seyfert 2 emission lines in Hubble Space Telescope spectra of NGC 5905, indicating that a low-luminosity AGN was present prior to the X-ray flare, we favor a tidal disruption explanation for the flare itself.

  20. First gravitational-wave burst GW150914: MASTER optical follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Kornilov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Greiner, J.; Vladimirov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Chazov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Gabovich, A.; Potter, S. B.; Kniazev, A.; Crawford, S.; Rebolo Lopez, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Lodieu, N.; Gress, O.; Budnev, N.; Ivanov, K.; Poleschuk, V.; Yazev, S.; Tlatov, A.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Dormidontov, D.; Parkhomenko, A.; Sergienko, Yu.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Lopez, C.; Saffe, C.; Podesta, F.; Mallamaci, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced LIGO observatory recently reported the first direct detection of the gravitational waves (GWs) predicted by Einstein & Sitzungsber. We report on the first optical observations of the GW source GW150914 error region with the Global MASTER Robotic Net. Between the optical telescopes of electromagnetic support, the covered area is dominated by MASTER with an unfiltered magnitude up to 19.9 mag (5σ). We detected several optical transients, which proved to be unconnected with the GW event. The main input to investigate the final error box of GW150914 was made by the MASTER-SAAO robotic telescope, which covered 70 per cent of the final GW error box and 90 per cent of the common localization area of the LIGO and Fermi events. Our result is consistent with the conclusion (Abbott et al. 2016a) that GWs from GW150914 were produced in a binary black hole merger. At the same time, we cannot exclude that MASTER OT J040938.68-541316.9 exploded on 2015 September 14.

  1. Characterisation of candidate members of (136108) Haumea's family. II. Follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carry, B.; Snodgrass, C.; Lacerda, P.; Hainaut, O.; Dumas, C.

    2012-08-01

    Context. From a dynamical analysis of the orbital elements of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), Ragozzine & Brown (2007, AJ, 134, 2160) reported a list of candidate members of the first collisional family found among this population, associated with (136 108) Haumea (a.k.a. 2003 EL61). Aims: We aim to distinguish the true members of the Haumea collisional family from interlopers. We search for water ice on their surfaces, which is a common characteristic of the known family members. The properties of the confirmed family are used to constrain the formation mechanism of Haumea, its satellites, and its family. Methods: Optical and near-infrared photometry is used to identify water ice. We use in particular the CH4 filter of the Hawk-I instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope as a short H-band (HS), the (J - HS) colour being a sensitive measure of the water ice absorption band at 1.6 μm. Results: Continuing our previous study headed by Snodgrass, we report colours for 8 candidate family members, including near-infrared colours for 5. We confirm one object as a genuine member of the collisional family (2003 UZ117), and reject 5 others. The lack of infrared data for the two remaining objects prevent any conclusion from being drawn. The total number of rejected members is therefore 17. The 11 confirmed members represent only a third of the 36 candidates. Conclusions: The origin of Haumea's family is likely to be related to an impact event. However, a scenario explaining all the peculiarities of Haumea itself and its family remains elusive. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla & Paranal, Chile - 81.C-0544 & 82.C-0306 & 84.C-0594.

  2. Results of optical follow-up observations of advanced LIGO triggers from O1 in the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beroiz, Martin; Colazo, Carlos; Diaz, Mario; Dominguez, Mariano; Garcia Lambas, Diego; Gurovich, Sebastian; Lares, Marcelo; Macri, Lucas; Penuela, Tania; Rodriguez, Horacio; Sanchez, Bruno; Toros Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We report on observations related to the follow-up of LIGO VIRGO collaboration triggers released to participating astronomers during the First Observation Run 1 (O1) from September 18, 2015 to January 12, 2016, performed by the TOROS collaboration. The Transient Optical Robotic Observatory of the South (TOROS) collaboration operated telescopes located in two different sites in Argentina: one at the Estación Astrofísica Bosque Alegre in Cordoba, and the other one located in Cordón Macón, Salta. In this communication we describe the main characteristics of the campaign sustained during O1 and the plans for continuing observation in the future.

  3. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  4. Radio Observations Of GRB 100418a: Test Of An Energy Injection Model Explaining Long-Lasting GRB Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Aquib; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J.; Tingay, S.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Wang, Z.; Reynolds, C.; Phillips, C.

    2014-01-01

    I will highlight the results of our radio observational campaign on GRB 100418a, for which the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Very Large Array (VLA) and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) were used. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism, which powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  5. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Reynolds, C.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Phillips, C. J.

    2013-12-20

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  6. NIBLES - an HI census of stellar mass selected SDSS galaxies. II. Arecibo follow-up HI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Z.; Schneider, S.; van Driel, W.; Lehnert, M. D.; Minchin, R.

    2016-11-01

    We obtained Arecibo Hi line follow-up observations of 154 of the 2600 galaxies in the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) sample. These observations are on average four times more sensitive than the original observations at the Nançay Radio Telescope. The main goal of this survey is to characterize the underlying Hi properties of the NIBLES galaxies which were undetected or marginally detected at Nançay. Of the Nançay non-detections, 85% were either clearly or marginally detected at Arecibo, while 89% of the Nançay marginal detections were clearly detected. Based on the statistics of the detections relative to g-i color and r-band luminosity (Lr) distribution among our Arecibo observations, we anticipate 60% of our 867 Nançay non-detections and marginal detections could be detected at the sensitivity of our Arecibo observations. Follow-up observations of our low luminosity (Lr < 108.5L⊙) blue sources indicate that they have, on average, more concentrated stellar mass distributions than the Nançay detections in the same luminosity range, suggesting we may be probing galaxies with intrinsically different properties. These follow-up observations enable us to probe Hi mass fractions, log(MHI/M⋆) 0.5 dex and 1 dex lower, on average, than the NIBLES and ALFALFA surveys respectively. Reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A60

  7. The OmegaWhite survey for short-period variable stars - III: follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, S. A.; Woudt, P. A.; Groot, P. J.; Ramsay, G.; Toma, R.; Motsoaledi, M.; Crause, L. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; O'Donoghue, D.; Potter, S. B.; Sickafoose, A. A.; van Gend, C.; Worters, H. L.

    2017-02-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of short-period variables discovered in the OmegaWhite survey, a wide-field high-cadence g-band synoptic survey targeting the Galactic Plane. We have used fast photometry on the SAAO 1.0- and 1.9-m telescopes to obtain light curves of 27 variables, and use these results to validate the period and amplitude estimates from the OmegaWhite processing pipeline. Furthermore, 57 sources (44 unique, 13 with new light curves) were selected for spectroscopic follow-up using either the SAAO 1.9-m telescope or the Southern African Large Telescope. We find that many of these variables have spectra which are consistent with being δ Scuti-type pulsating stars. At higher amplitudes, we detect four possible pulsating white dwarf/subdwarf sources and an eclipsing cataclysmic variable. Due to their rarity, these targets are ideal candidates for detailed follow-up studies. From spectroscopy, we confirm the symbiotic binary star nature of two variables identified as such in the SIMBAD database. We also report what could possibly be the first detection of the `Bump Cepheid' phenomena in a δ Scuti star, with OW J175848.21-271653.7 showing a pronounced 22 per cent amplitude dip lasting 3 min during each pulsational cycle peak. However, the precise nature of this target is still uncertain as it exhibits the spectral features of a B-type star.

  8. The XXL Survey. I. Scientific motivations - XMM-Newton observing plan - Follow-up observations and simulation programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Adami, C.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Brusa, M.; Butler, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Coupon, J.; De Breuck, C.; Democles, J.; Desai, S.; Delhaize, J.; Devriendt, J.; Dubois, Y.; Eckert, D.; Elyiv, A.; Ettori, S.; Evrard, A.; Faccioli, L.; Farahi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Finet, F.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fourmanoit, N.; Gandhi, P.; Gastaldello, F.; Gastaud, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Giles, P.; Guennou, L.; Guglielmo, V.; Horellou, C.; Husband, K.; Huynh, M.; Iovino, A.; Kilbinger, M.; Koulouridis, E.; Lavoie, S.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; Le Fevre, J. P.; Lidman, C.; Lieu, M.; Lin, C. A.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B. J.; Maurogordato, S.; McCarthy, I. G.; McGee, S.; Melin, J. B.; Melnyk, O.; Menanteau, F.; Novak, M.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Pomarede, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Ramos-Ceja, M. E.; Ranalli, P.; Rapetti, D.; Raychaudury, S.; Reiprich, T. H.; Rottgering, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Santos, J.; Sauvageot, J. L.; Schimd, C.; Sereno, M.; Smith, G. P.; Smolčić, V.; Snowden, S.; Spergel, D.; Stanford, S.; Surdej, J.; Valageas, P.; Valotti, A.; Valtchanov, I.; Vignali, C.; Willis, J.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The quest for the cosmological parameters that describe our universe continues to motivate the scientific community to undertake very large survey initiatives across the electromagnetic spectrum. Over the past two decades, the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories have supported numerous studies of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the X-ray background. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey; it comes at a time when the Planck mission results are being finalised. Aims: We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of ~5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The survey's main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programmes. Methods: We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi-λ and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. Results: The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-λ associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. Conclusions: The XXL multi-λ data set will have a unique lasting legacy

  9. The Detection of a Type IIn Supernova in Optical Follow-up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fuchs, T.; Glagla, M.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Gross, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfe, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vanheule, S.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel A.; Barlow, Tom; Horesh, Assaf; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, Ben; PTF Collaboration; Evans, Phil A.; Kennea, Jamie A.; Swift Collaboration; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Waters, C.; Flewelling, H.; Tonry, J. L.; Rest, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.°2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0.°54. It has a redshift of z = 0.0684, corresponding to a luminosity distance of about 300 Mpc and the Pan-STARRS1 survey shows that its explosion time was at least 158 days (in host galaxy rest frame) before the neutrino alert, so that a causal connection is unlikely. The a posteriori significance of the chance detection of both the neutrinos and the SN at any epoch is 2.2σ within IceCube's 2011/12 data acquisition season. Also, a complementary neutrino analysis reveals no long-term signal over the course of one year. Therefore, we consider the SN detection coincidental and the neutrinos uncorrelated to the SN. However, the SN is unusual and interesting by itself: it is luminous and energetic, bearing strong resemblance to the SN IIn 2010jl, and shows signs of interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense circumstellar medium. High-energy neutrino emission is expected in models of diffusive shock acceleration, but at a low, non-detectable level for this specific SN. In this paper, we describe the SN PTF12csy and present both the neutrino and electromagnetic data, as well as their analysis.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Don Frederic; Depoy, D.L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Craig, Hogan, J.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Apache Point Observ. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  11. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Gehrels, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  12. EARLY-TIME VLA OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND AFTERGLOW ANALYSIS OF THE FERMI/LAT DETECTED GRB 130907A

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A{sub *}), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  13. Pamidronate versus observation in asymptomatic myeloma: final results with long-term follow-up of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Gobbi, Paolo G; Broglia, Chiara; Sacchi, Stefano; Quarta, Giovanni; Baldini, Luca; Iannitto, Emilio; Falcone, Antonietta; Guariglia, Roberto; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Villani, Oreste; Martorelli, Maria Carmen; Mansueto, Giovanna; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Cascavilla, Nicola; Musto, Pellegrino

    2011-05-01

    A prospective, multicenter, randomized trial comparing pamidronate administration (60-90 mg once a month for 1 year) versus simple observation in 177 patients with asymptomatic myeloma was performed to explore whether the administration of this drug reduces the rate of and/or the time to progression to overt, symptomatic disease. No relevant side effects were recorded in pamidronate-treated patients. With a minimum follow-up of 5 years for live patients, there were 56/89 (62.9%) progressions in the pamidronate-treated group and 55/88 (62.5%) within the controls (p = NS). Median time to progression was 46 and 48 months, respectively (p = NS). Overall survival was also similar between the two groups. Skeletal-related events at the time of progression were observed in 40/55 (72.7%) controls, but only in 22/56 (39.2%) pamidronate-treated patients (p = 0.009). In conclusion, the administration of pamidronate in asymptomatic myeloma, while reducing bone involvement at progression, did not decrease the risk of transformation and the time to progression into overt myeloma.

  14. HST Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A.; Pian, E.

    1998-08-01

    The field of GRB970508 was imaged by HST with the STIS CCD in open filter mode (50CCD) on 1998 August 5.78-6.03 for a total exposure time of 11,568 seconds. An extended object, which we believe to be the host galaxy of GRB970508, was detected at the astrometric position of the optical transient of GRB970508. The galaxy has high signal-to-noise in our data and is clearly resolved, with a major axis of approximately 0."5 .

  15. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program. I. A Catalog of Companions to Kepler Stars from High-Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Ciardi, D. R.; Everett, M. E.; Saylors, M.; Teske, J. K.; Horch, E. P.; Howell, S. B.; van Belle, G. T.; Hirsch, L. A.; Gautier, T. N., III; Adams, E. R.; Barrado, D.; Cartier, K. M. S.; Dressing, C. D.; Dupree, A. K.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lillo-Box, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Wang, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present results from high-resolution, optical to near-IR imaging of host stars of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), identified in the original Kepler field. Part of the data were obtained under the Kepler imaging follow-up observation program over six years (2009–2015). Almost 90% of stars that are hosts to planet candidates or confirmed planets were observed. We combine measurements of companions to KOI host stars from different bands to create a comprehensive catalog of projected separations, position angles, and magnitude differences for all detected companion stars (some of which may not be bound). Our compilation includes 2297 companions around 1903 primary stars. From high-resolution imaging, we find that ∼10% (∼30%) of the observed stars have at least one companion detected within 1″ (4″). The true fraction of systems with close (≲4″) companions is larger than the observed one due to the limited sensitivities of the imaging data. We derive correction factors for planet radii caused by the dilution of the transit depth: assuming that planets orbit the primary stars or the brightest companion stars, the average correction factors are 1.06 and 3.09, respectively. The true effect of transit dilution lies in between these two cases and varies with each system. Applying these factors to planet radii decreases the number of KOI planets with radii smaller than 2 {R}\\oplus by ∼2%–23% and thus affects planet occurrence rates. This effect will also be important for the yield of small planets from future transit missions such as TESS.

  16. Trypanosoma-Cruzi Cross-Reactive Antibodies Longitudinal Follow-Up: A Prospective Observational Study in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Esber S.; Gueyffier, Lucie; Danjoy, Marie-Laure; Vanhems, Philippe; Pozzetto, Bruno; Sobh, Mohamad; Pottel, Hans; Michallet, Mauricette; Zrein, Maan A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies named TcCRA “Trypanosoma cruzi Cross Reactive Antibodies” were detected in 47% of blood donors from French population unexposed to the parasite. In order to evaluate the passive or active transmissibility of TcCRA and further characterize its role and etiology, we have conducted a study in a cohort of 47 patients who underwent allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantations (allo-HSCT). Donors and recipients were tested for TcCRA prior to transplantation. Recipients were further tested during follow-up after transplantation. Demographical, clinical and biological data were collected. Our primary end-point was to assess the risk of TcCRA acquisition after transplantation. During this initial analysis, we observed no seroconversion in patients receiving cells from TcCRA negative donors (n = 23) but detected seroconversion in 4 out of 24 patients who received hematopoietic stem cells from positive donors. Here, we are discussing possible scenarios to explain TcCRA-immune status in recipient after transplantation. PMID:26351849

  17. Organizational predictors of colonoscopy follow-up for positive fecal occult blood test results: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Partin, Melissa R.; Burgess, Diana J.; Burgess, James F.; Gravely, Amy; Haggstrom, David; Lillie, Sarah E; Nugent, Sean; Powell, Adam A; Shaukat, Aasma; Walter, Louise C.; Nelson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study assessed the contribution of organizational structures and processes identified from facility surveys to follow-up for positive Fecal Occult Blood Tests (FOBT+). Methods We identified 74,104 patients with FOBT+ results from 98 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities between 8/16/09-3/20/11 and followed them until 9/30/11 for completion of colonoscopy. We identified patient characteristics from VHA administrative records, and organizational factors from facility surveys completed by Primary Care and Gastroenterology Chiefs. We estimated predictors of colonoscopy completion within 60 days and 6 months using hierarchical logistic regression models. Results 30% of patients with FOBT+ results received colonoscopy within 60 days and 49% within 6 months. Having Gastroenterology or Laboratory staff notify Gastroenterology providers directly about FOBT+ cases was a significant predictor of 60-day (odds ratio (OR)=1.85, p=0.01) and 6-month follow-up (OR 1.25, p=0.008). Additional predictors of 60-day follow-up included adequacy of colonoscopy appointment availability (OR 1.43, p=0.01) and frequent individual feedback to Primary Care providers about FOBT+ referral timeliness (OR 1.79, p=0.04). Additional predictors of 6-month follow-up included using guideline-concordant surveillance intervals for low-risk adenomas (OR 1.57, p=0.01) and using group appointments and combined verbal-written methods for colonoscopy preparation instruction (OR 1.48, p=0.0001). Conclusion Directly notifying Gastroenterology providers about FOBT+ results, employing guideline-concordant adenoma surveillance intervals, and using colonoscopy preparations instruction methods that provide both verbal and written information may increase overall follow-up rates. Enhancing follow-up within 60-days may require increased colonoscopy capacity and feedback to Primary Care providers. Impact These findings may inform organizational-level interventions to improve FOBT+ follow-up

  18. LOW FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER CANDIDATES ESTIMATED FROM A COMBINATION OF SPITZER AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Latham, David W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  19. Low False Positive Rate of Kepler Candidates Estimated From A Combination Of Spitzer And Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Bryson, Stephen T.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  20. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  1. VI-band follow-up observations of ultra-long-period Cepheid candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I-Ling; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Kanbur, Shashi M.

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-long-period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding ≈80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ∼1 to ∼3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color–magnitude diagram and the Period–Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be μ{sub M31,ULPC}=24.30±0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the Period–Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Follow-up observations of SNIa ASASSN-14lp (Shappee+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, B. J.; Piro, A. L.; Holoien, T.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Contreras, C.; Itagaki, K.; Burns, C. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Alper, E.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Conseil, E.; Danilet, A. B.; Dong, S.; Falco, E.; Grupe, D.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Morrell, N.; Nicolas, J.; Phillips, M. M.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G.; Stritzinger, M.; Szczygiel, D. M.; Taddia, F.; Thompson, T. A.; Thorstensen, J.; Wagner, M. R.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-09-01

    The All-sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, or "Assassin"; Shappee et al. 2014ApJ...788...48S) scans the entire extragalactic sky in both the northern and southern hemispheres roughly once every 2-3 nights in the V band to depths of 16.5-17.3mag depending on lunation (Shappee et al. 2016, in preparation). We discovered a new source (ASASSN-14lp; V~14.9mag) on 2014 December 9.61 (JDtdisc=2457001.112) at RA=12:45:09.10, DE=-00:27:32.5 (J2000). There are no pre-explosion images of this site available in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Archive. Previous observations were obtained by ASAS-SN 1.25, 7.98, 10.98, 11.97, 15.96, and 18.96 days before discovery (see Table 1 and Figure 1 for details). The second set of prediscovery images were obtained by K. Itagaki from 2014 November 13 to 2015 January 09 at the Itagaki Astronomical Observatory, Japan. After the detection of ASASSN-14lp, we began a multiwavelength, ground- and space-based follow-up campaign from the X-ray to the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Swift/UVOT observations were obtained in V (5468Å), B (4392Å), U (3465Å), UVW1 (2600Å), UVM2 (2246Å), and UVW2 (1928Å). These observations span more than 30days. Optical ground-based images were obtained with the LCOGT 1m network of telescopes (gri), the 2m Liverpool telescope (LT) (gri), and the 40-inch Swope telescope (ugri) as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project II (CSPII; Hsiao et al. 2013ApJ...766...72H). We obtained an extensive sample of low- and medium-resolution optical spectra of ASASSN-14lp spanning more than 3 months between 2014 December 10 and 2015 March 16 (see table 2). (2 data files).

  3. Probing a Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitor at a Redshift of z = 2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226 including VLT spectroscopy, VLT polarimetry, and Chandra X-ray observations. In addition, we present BOOTES-1 wide-field observations at the time of the occurrence of the burst. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the event when the gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately 19 and continued until the afterglow had faded below the detection threshold (R greater than 26). No underlying host galaxy was found. The optical light curve shows a break around 0.8 days after the burst, which is achromatic within the observational errors, supporting the view that it was due to a jetted explosion. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, which favors a uniform-jet model rather than a structured one. VLT spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 plus or minus 0.001 and 1.986 plus or minus 0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. We emphasize that the kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds responsible for these line systems are very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004. This corroborates the picture in which at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  4. On the constraining observations of the dark GRB 001109 and the properties of a z = 0.398 radio selected starburst galaxy contained in its error box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Cerón, J. M.; Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Sokolov, V. V.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Dodonov, S. N.; Komarova, V. N.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Postnov, K. A.; Lisenfeld, U.; Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pedersen, H.; Rol, E.; Fliri, J.; Feldt, M.; Feulner, G.; Andersen, M. I.; Jensen, B. L.; Pérez Ramírez, M. D.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Israelian, G.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2004-09-01

    We present optical and NIR (near infrared) follow up observations of the GRB 001109 from 1 to 300 days after the burst. No transient emission was found at these wavelengths within this GRB's (Gamma Ray Burst) 50 arcsec radius BeppoSAX error box. Strong limits (3σ) are set with: R ⪆ 21, 10.2 h after the GRB; I ⪆ 23, 11.4 h after the GRB; H ⪆ 20.7, 9.9 h after the GRB; and KS⪆ 20, 9.6 h after the GRB. We discuss whether the radio source found in the GRB's error box (\\cite{taylor00}) might be related to the afterglow. We also present a multiwavelength study of a reddened starburst galaxy, found coincident with the potential radio and the X-ray afterglow. We show that our strong I band upper limit makes of the GRB 001109 the darkest one localised by the BeppoSAX's NFI (Narrow Field Instrument), and it is one of the most constraining upper limits on GRB afterglows to date. Further to it, the implications of these observations in the context of dark GRBs are considered. Based on observations made with telescopes at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (1.23 m + 3.50 m), at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (NOT + WHT), at the United States Naval Observatory (1.00 m) and at the Russian Academy of Sciences's Special Astrophysical Observatory (6.05 m). The NOT is operated on the island of San Miguel de la Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, in Spain's Observatorio del Roque de los Muchahos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. The Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán is operated in Calar Alto by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie of Heidelberg, jointly with Spain's Comisión Nacional de Astronomía.

  5. The Wasilewski sample of emission-line galaxies - Follow-up CCD imaging and spectroscopic and IRAS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Schmitz, Mark; Halpern, Jules P.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Impey, Chris

    1989-01-01

    The results of an extensive imaging and spectroscopic follow-up of the objective prism-selected emission line galaxy (ELG) sample of Wasilewski (1982) are presented. Fluxes at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns were also obtained from the coadded IRAS survey data. ELGs found by objective prism surveys are found to be generally small and underluminous galaxies which usually have higher than average optical surface brightness. The Seyfert detection rate in objective prism surveys is roughly 10 percent and the ratio of the space densities of Seyfert 2 to Seyfert 1 galaxies is significantly larger than unity. Most of the galaxies selected by objective prism surveys are star-forming, late-type spirals which often show disturbed morphology. About 25 percent of the galaxies detected by the surveys are faint, high-excitation metal-poor compact H II regions.

  6. Long-term follow-up after dilation in symptomatic esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis: an observational study in 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Bechtler, Matthias; Vollmer, Heiko; Vetter, Stephan; Fuchs, Erik-Sebastian; Weickert, Uwe; Jakobs, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Endoscopic bougienage seems to be the most effective therapy for dysphagia in esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD), but nothing is known about the long-term success of this treatment option. This report presents long-term results for 21 of 22 patients with EIPD who were treated with bougienage. A total of 103 sessions of bougienage up to a diameter of 18 mm were performed, without major complications and with 100 % clinical success. During follow-up, symptom recurrence with further bougienage occurred in 12 /21 patients (57 %), who had variable symptom-free intervals (range 1.5 - 96 months). Symptom recurrence was associated with concomitant reflux esophagitis. Although this series demonstrates that bougienage is an effective method for relieving dysphagia in EIPD, the long-term effectiveness is limited.

  7. Agomelatine versus Sertraline: An Observational, Open-labeled and 12 Weeks Follow-up Study on Efficacy and Tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Akpınar, Esma; Cerit, Cem; Talas, Anıl; Tural, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this open-labeled, 12 weeks follow-up study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of agomelatine with sertraline Methods The outpatients of adult psychiatry clinic who have a new onset of depression and diagnosed as ‘major depressive episode’ by clinician according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition and prescribed agomelatine (25 mg/day) or sertraline (50 mg/day) were included in the study. Results The decline of mean Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores of agomelatine group was significantly higher than the sertraline group at the end of 2nd week; however, the difference was not significant at the end of 3 months. Mean Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale (CGI-I) scores of agomelatine group was lower than sertraline group at first week. Mean CGI-Severity scale and CGI-I scores were favour to sertraline group at the end of the study. Remission rates were 46.7% for sertraline group and 33.3% for agomelatine group while response rates were 76.7% for both groups. Any patient from agomelatine group dropped-out due to adverse effects. The amount of side effects was also less with agomelatine. Conclusion Agomelatine has a rapid onset efficacy on depressive symptoms and this can be beneficial for some critical cases. Considering MADRS scores, agomelatine seems to have similar efficacy with sertraline but we also point the need for long term studies since CGI scores were favour to sertraline group at the end of the study. Agomelatine has a favourable tolerability profile both in terms of discontinuation and the amount of side effects compared to sertraline. PMID:27776387

  8. The FRAX ® as a predictor of mortality in Japanese incident hemodialysis patients: an observational, follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshihide; Joki, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Yuri; Iwasaki, Masaki; Kubo, Shun; Asakawa, Takasuke; Matsukane, Ai; Takahashi, Yasunori; Imamura, Yoshihiko; Hirahata, Koichi; Hase, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    The World Health Organization Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(®)) was recently developed to estimate the 10-year absolute risk of osteoporotic fracture among the general population. However, the evidence for its use in chronic kidney disease patients has been lacking, and the association between the FRAX(®) and mortality is unknown. Therefore, a hospital-based, prospective, cohort study was conducted to evaluate the predictive ability of the FRAX(®) for mortality in hemodialysis patients. A total of 252 patients who had been started on maintenance hemodialysis, 171 men and 81 women, with a mean age of 67 ± 14 years, was studied. The endpoint was defined as all-cause death. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95 % confidence intervals. During the mean follow-up period of 3.4 ± 2.7 years, 61 deaths occurred. The median (interquartile range) of the FRAX(®) for major osteoporotic fracture was 6.9 (4.6-12.0) % in men and 19.0 (7.6-33.0) % in women. Cumulative survival rates at 5 years after starting dialysis, with the FRAX(®) levels above and below the median, were 51.9 and 87.9 %, respectively, in men and 67.4 and 83.7 %, respectively, in women. Overall, in men, the multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that the log-transformed FRAX(®) remained an independent predictor of death after adjusting by confounding variables. However, in women, the significant association between the FRAX(®) value and the outcome was eliminated if age was put into these models. Among Japanese hemodialysis patients, the FRAX(®) seems to be useful for predicting death, especially in men.

  9. Follow-up Observations and Analysis of V530 Andromedae: A Totally Eclipsing Shallow Contact Solar Type Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Heather; Samec, Ronald G.; Caton, Daniel B.; Faulkner, Danny R.; Clark, Jeremy; Shebs, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We follow up on early, single coverage, UBVRcIc light curves (2013) and analyses. These early curves were taken in September 27 and 29 2011. Our present, BVRcIc, but full coverage light curves were taken on 6 nights: October 1,2,9, November 4,5, 2013 and January 4, 2014 by RGS, DBC, JDC, TS with the Dark Sky Observatory 0.81-m reflector of Appalachian State University and a (-40ºC) 2KX2K Apogee Alta CCD. Our present curves reveal V530 Andromedae as a totally eclipsing, shallow contact solar type binary rather than semidetached, near contact one. The newly determined times of minima include:HJD MinI = 2456566.84275 ±0.00007HJD MinII = 2456598.881995±0.0004, 24556600.6111±0.0002, 2456601.76665±0.00046.Using a new method of obtaining minima from earlier patrol light curves, in this case, NSVS, nine low weight timings of minimum light were added to the period study. Including these additional timings, we uncovered a period change. In our now, extended, period study over 9000 epochs, a 14.25 year interval, we find that the period is decreasing. This fits the scenario of magnetic breaking for solar type binaries. The temperatures of the primary and secondary components are estimated at 7000 and 6300 K, respectively, a large temperature difference for a contact binary. The fill-out, however, is a mere 4%. (Our earlier scant light curves modeled very nearly in contact.) The mass ratio, M2/M1, was found to be 0.385, almost identical with our first curves solution. The two star spots, probably magnetic in origin, were determined. A hot spot was modeled by the iterative process on the polar region of the smaller star. A cool spot is on the larger star facing the smaller star. The spot parameters have changed appreciably over the course of the two intervening years. We believe the binary has recently come into contact and thermal contact has not yet been achieved.

  10. Update on Swift follow-up observations of the GeV flaring blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Puccetti, S.; Perri, M.; Tavani, M.

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of the quick look analysis of 4 Swift target of opportunity observations performed on 2015, June 16-17, following the gamma-ray flare of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 detected by AGILE (ATel #7631).

  11. Swift Follow up observation of the transient source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    On February 25, 2016, Swift carried out a 2ks target of opportunity observation of the transient Fermi J1654-1055 (see ATel #8721). Only one source is clearly detected, within the LAT error circle, by the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) at RA, Dec= 16h 32m 49.9s, -10d 52' 30.1" (J2000) with a 90 % uncertainty radius of 6.3 arcsec.

  12. Ground-Based BVRI Time-Series Follow-Up Observations for the RR Lyrae stars in Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Young-Beom; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Nemec, James M.

    2015-09-01

    Time series observations for the 41 RR Lyrae stars in Kepler's fields were carried out in 2010 to 2013 using a number of meter class (or smaller) telescopes. These telescopes include the 1-m and 41-cm telescopes of Lulin Observatory (LOT and SLT respectively, Taiwan), the 81-cm telescope of Tenagra-II Observatory (TNG, Arizona, USA), the 1-m telescope at the Mt. Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory (LOAO, Arizona, USA), the 1.8-m and 15-cm telescopes at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO, Korea), and the 61-cm telescope at the Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO, Korea). All of these telescopes were equipped with commercial available CCD imagers, and the observations were done in standard BVRI filters. Photometric calibration of the RR Lyrae light curves was done with standard stars listed in Landolt standard stars [1]. Observations of selected Landolt standard stars (centered on SA 107-456 & SA 110-232) in Johnson-Kron-Cousins BVRI filters, spanning three distinct airmasses, were done with the 81-cm Tenagra II telescope on 25 June 2011. Raw imaging data were reduced with IRAF in the same manner as in the case of the RR Lyrae, and astrometric calibrated with astrometry.net [2]. We calibrated BVRI magnitudes for 40 RR Lyrae stars.

  13. GROND observations of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schady, P.; Kann, D. A.; Greiner, J.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the field of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103 (Swift trigger 700791; D'Ai et al., GCN #19547. ATel #9180) simultaneously in g'r'i'z'JHK with GROND (Greiner et al. 2008, PASP 120, 405) mounted at the 2.2 m MPG telescope at ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile).

  14. Astrometric follow-up observations of directly imaged sub-stellar companions to young stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.; Vogt, N.; Errmann, R.; Berndt, A.

    2014-11-01

    The formation of massive planetary or brown dwarf companions at large projected separations from their host star is not yet well understood. In order to put constraints on formation scenarios, we search for signatures in the orbit dynamics of the systems. We are specifically interested in the eccentricities and inclinations since those parameters might tell us about the dynamic history of the systems and where to look for additional low-mass sub-stellar companions. For this purpose, we utilized VLT/NACO to take several well-calibrated high-resolution images of six target systems and analyse them together with available literature data points of those systems as well as Hubble Space Telescope archival data. We used a statistical least-squares Monte Carlo approach to constrain the orbit elements of all systems that showed significant differential motion of the primary star and companion. We show for the first time that the GQ Lup system shows significant change in both separation and position angle. Our analysis yields best-fitting orbits for this system, which are eccentric (e between 0.21 and 0.69), but cannot rule out circular orbits at high inclinations. Given our astrometry, we discuss formation scenarios of the GQ Lup system. In addition, we detected an even fainter new companion candidate to GQ Lup, which is most likely a background object. We also updated the orbit constraints of the PZ Tel system, confirming that the companion is on a highly eccentric orbit with e > 0.62. Finally, we show with a high significance, that there is no orbital motion observed in the cases of the DH Tau, HD 203030 and 1RXS J160929.1-210524 systems, and give the most precise relative astrometric measurement of the UScoCTIO 108 system to date.

  15. Towards understanding magnetic field generation in relativistic shocks with GRB afterglow observations and the GRB radiation mechanism with photospheric simulations and the X-ray flare radiation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Rodolfo

    2015-12-01

    In this thesis, we present three projects on open questions in the Gammaray Burst (GRB) field. In the first project, we used X-ray and optical observations to determine the amount of amplification of the ISM magnetic field needed to explain the GRB afterglow observations. We determined that mild amplification is required, at a level stronger than shock-compression but weaker than predicted by the Weibel mechanism. In the second project, we present a Monte Carlo code we wrote from scratch to perform realistic simulations of the photospheric process, one of the mechanisms considered to explain the GRB gamma-ray emission. We determined that photospheric emission can explain the GRB gamma-ray spectrum above the peak-energy if the photons are taken to have a temperature much smaller than the electron temperature and if the interactions between photons and electrons take place at a large optical depth. In the third project, we used multi-wavelength observations to constrain the X-ray flare radiation mechanism. We determined that synchrotron from a Poynting jet and the Photospheric process are the best candidates to explain the X-ray flare observations.

  16. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE SHAPES: GRB PULSE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION CLARIFIED

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkila, Jon; Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Morris, David; Neff, James E.; Giblin, Timothy W.

    2015-12-20

    Isolated Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses, like their higher-energy BATSE counterparts, emit the bulk of their pulsed emission as a hard-to-soft component that can be fitted by the Norris et al. empirical pulse model. This signal is overlaid by a fainter, three-peaked signal that can be modeled by the residual fit of Hakkila and Preece: the two fits combine to reproduce GRB pulses with distinctive three-peaked shapes. The precursor peak appears on or before the pulse rise and is often the hardest component, the central peak is the brightest, and the decay peak converts exponentially decaying emission into a long, soft, power-law tail. Accounting for systematic instrumental differences, the general characteristics of the fitted pulses are remarkably similar. Isolated GRB pulses are dominated by hard-to-soft evolution; this is more pronounced for asymmetric pulses than for symmetric ones. Isolated GRB pulses can also exhibit intensity tracking behaviors that, when observed, are tied to the timing of the three peaks: pulses with the largest maximum hardnesses are hardest during the precursor, those with smaller maximum hardnesses are hardest during the central peak, and all pulses can re-harden during the central peak and/or during the decay peak. Since these behaviors are essentially seen in all isolated pulses, the distinction between “hard-to-soft and “intensity-tracking” pulses really no longer applies. Additionally, the triple-peaked nature of isolated GRB pulses seems to indicate that energy is injected on three separate occasions during the pulse duration: theoretical pulse models need to account for this.

  17. GRB 011121: Jet, wind and supernova -- all in one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Scholz, R. D.; Sterken, C.; Gorosabel, J.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A.; Grinkov, V.; Andersen, M. I.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fruchter, A.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Kaper, L.; Kouveliotou, C.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Salamanca, I.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van den Heuvel, E.

    2004-06-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of ˜9°. The jet origin of this break is supported by the achromatic spectral energy distribution. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law decline, interpreted as light from an underlying supernova. The deduced parameters for the decay slope as well as the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e. an outflow into a circum-burst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive GRB progenitor. Due to its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 is the so far best example for the GRB-supernova connection, and provides compelling evidence for a circum-burster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star.

  18. J-GEM follow-up observations to search for an optical counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Abe, Fumio; Tristram, Paul J.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Saito, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yoichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Uemura, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-08-01

    We present our optical follow-up observations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914 in the framework of the Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up (J-GEM), which is an observing group utilizing optical and radio telescopes in Japan, as well as in New Zealand, China, South Africa, Chile, and Hawaii. We carried out a wide-field imaging survey with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC) on the 1.05 m Kiso Schmidt telescope in Japan and a galaxy-targeted survey with Tripole5 on the B&C 61 cm telescope in New Zealand. Approximately 24 deg2 regions in total were surveyed in i-band with KWFC and 18 nearby galaxies were observed with Tripole5 in g-, r-, and i-bands 4-12 days after the gravitational wave detection. Median 5 σ depths are i ˜ 18.9 mag for the KWFC data and g ˜ 18.9 mag, r ˜ 18.7 mag, and i ˜ 18.3 mag for the Tripole5 data. The probability for a counterpart to be in the observed area is 1.2% in the initial skymap and 0.1% in the final skymap. We do not find any transient source associated to an external galaxy with spatial offset from its center, which is consistent with the local supernova rate.

  19. Rapid, Machine-learned Resource Allocation: Application to High-redshift Gamma-Ray Burst Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, A. N.; Long, James; Richards, Joseph W.; Broderick, Tamara; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-02-01

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation—based on the available telescope time—of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that ~56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and ~84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top ~40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  20. RAPID, MACHINE-LEARNED RESOURCE ALLOCATION: APPLICATION TO HIGH-REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A. N.; Richards, Joseph W.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Long, James; Broderick, Tamara

    2012-02-20

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation-based on the available telescope time-of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that {approx}56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and {approx}84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top {approx}40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  1. Observed changes in cardiovascular risk factors among high-risk middle-aged men who received lifestyle counselling: a 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Siren, Reijo; Eriksson, Johan G.; Vanhanen, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the long-term impact of health counselling among middle-aged men at high risk of CVD. Design An observational study with a 5-year follow-up. Setting and intervention All men aged 40 years in Helsinki have been invited to a visit to evaluate CVD risk from 2006 onwards. A modified version of the North Karelia project risk tool (CVD risk score) served to assess the risk. High-risk men received lifestyle counselling based on their individual risk profile in 2006 and were invited to a follow-up visit in 2011. Subjects Of the 389 originally high-risk men, 159 participated in the follow-up visits in 2011. Based on their follow-up in relation the further risk communication, we divided the participants into three groups: primary health care, occupational health care and no control visits. Main outcome measures Lifestyle and CVD risk score change. Results All groups showed improvements in lifestyles. The CVD risk score decreased the most in the group that continued the risk communication visits in their primary health care centre (6.1 to 4.8 [95% CI −1.6 to −0.6]) compared to those who continued risk communication visits in their occupational health care (6.0 to 5.4 [95% CI −1.3 to 0.3]), and to those with no risk communication visits (6.0 to 5.9 [95% CI −0.5 to 0.4]). Conclusions These findings indicate that individualized lifestyle counselling improves health behaviour and reduces total CVD risk among middle-aged men at high risk of CVD. Sustained improvement in risk factor status requires ongoing risk communication with health care providers. KEY POINTSStudies of short duration have shown that lifestyle changes reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among high-risk individuals.Sustaining these lifestyle changes and maintaining the lower disease risk attained can prove challenging.Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment and individualized health counselling for high-risk men, when implemented in primary health care, have the potential

  2. Optical and Near-infrared Observations of SN 2013dx Associated with GRB 130702A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, V. L.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Bersier, D.; Perley, D. A.; Margutti, R.; Bellm, E.; Bloom, J. S.; Cao, Y.; Capone, J. I.; Clubb, K.; Corsi, A.; De Cia, A.; de Diego, J. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fox, O. D.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gehrels, N.; Georgiev, L.; González, J. J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kelly, P. L.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Lee, W. H.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Singer, L.; Stern, D.; Troja, E.; Veilleux, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and optical spectra of SN 2013dx, associated with the nearby (redshift 0.145) gamma-ray burst GRB 130702A. The prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy released from GRB 130702A is measured to be Eγ ,iso=6.4-1.0+1.3× 1050 erg (1 keV to 10 MeV in the rest frame), placing it intermediate between low-luminosity GRBs like GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the broader cosmological population. We compare the observed g'r'i' z' light curves of SN 2013dx to a SN 1998bw template, finding that SN 2013dx evolves ˜20% faster (steeper rise time), with a comparable peak luminosity. Spectroscopically, SN 2013dx resembles other broad-lined SNe Ic, both associated with (SN 2006aj and SN 1998bw) and lacking (SN 1997ef, SN 2007I, and SN 2010ah) gamma-ray emission, with photospheric velocities around peak of ˜ 21,000 km s-1. We construct a quasi-bolometric (g'r'i'z'y) light curve for SN 2013dx, only the fifth GRB-associated SN with extensive NIR coverage and the third with a bolometric light curve extending beyond Δ t> 40 days. Together with the measured photospheric velocity, we derive basic explosion parameters using simple analytic models. We infer a 56Ni mass of MNi=0.37+/- 0.01 M⊙ , an ejecta mass of Mej=3.1+/- 0.1 M⊙ , and a kinetic energy of EK=(8.2+/- 0.43)× 1051 erg (statistical uncertainties only), consistent with previous GRB-associated supernovae. When considering the ensemble population of GRB-associated supernovae, we find no correlation between the mass of synthesized 56Ni and high-energy properties, despite clear predictions from numerical simulations that MNi should correlate with the degree of asymmetry. On the other hand, MNi clearly correlates with the kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta across a wide range of core-collapse events.

  3. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6+/-0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  4. Radio and X-ray observations of the Ultra-long GRB 150518A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Louis; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita; Supernova Forensics

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 150518A, discovered on 2015 May 18 by the MAXI and KONUS-Wind satellites, lasted for about 1000s, making it an important addition to the recently established class of very long duration GRBs. We report on the JVLA radio observations of the afterglow of GRB 150518A. Additionally, we report the analysis of Xray afterglow observations by Swift-XRT. Multi-band light curves of the radio afterglow display an unusual, conspicuous rise around 10 days after the burst, possibly due to enhanced mass-loss from the progenitor in the final stages of evolution before the GRB. The X-ray afterglow spectrum is significantly soft (photon index Γx > 3) and heavily absorbed (NHx,i > 8 × 10^{21}/cm^2). These properties suggest peculiar behavior that is different from the predictions of the standard fireball model of GRBs. In the light of these properties, we compare different models of progenitors for very long duration GRBs. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  5. GRB 050717: A Long, Short-Lag Burst Observed by Swift and Konus

    SciTech Connect

    Krimm, H. A.; Hurkett, C.; Osborne, J. P.; Pal'shin, V.; Golenetskii, S.; Norris, J. P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A. M.; Zhang, B.; Burrows, D. N.; Perri, M.

    2006-05-19

    The long burst GRB 050717 was observed simultaneously by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift and the Konus instrument on Wind. Significant hard to soft spectral evolution was seen. Early gamma-ray and X-ray emission was detected by both BAT and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Swift. The XRT continued to observe the burst for 7.1 days and detect it for 1.4 days. The X-ray light curve showed a classic decay pattern including evidence of the onset of the external shock emission at {approx} 45 s after the trigger; the afterglow was too faint for a jet break to be detected. No optical, infrared or ultraviolet counterpart was discovered despite deep searches within 14 hours of the burst. The spectral lag for GRB 050717 was determined to be 2.5 {+-} 2.6 ms, consistent with zero and unusually short for a long burst. This lag measurement suggests that this burst has a high intrinsic luminosity and hence is at high redshift (z > 2.7). GRB 050717 provides a good example of classic prompt and afterglow behavior for a gamma-ray burst.

  6. Rapid GRB Afterglow Response With SARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, K. V.; Homewood, A. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Riddle, C.; Fuller, S.; Manning, A.; McIntyre, T.; Henson, G.

    2006-05-01

    The Clemson GRB Follow-Up program utilizes the SARA 0.9-m telescope to observe optical afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts. SARA is not yet robotic; it operates under direct and Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) interrupt modes. To facilitate rapid response and timely reporting of data analysis results, we developed a software suite that operates in two phases: first, to notify observers of a burst and assist in data collection, and second, to quickly analyze the images.

  7. Pain, disability and health-related quality of life in osteoarthritis-joint matters: an observational, multi-specialty trans-national follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Montero, Antonio; Mulero, Juan-Francisco; Tornero, Carlos; Guitart, Jordi; Serrano, Mar

    2016-09-01

    The authors aimed to test potential relations between osteoarthritis (OA) features, disability and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) at different body locations. Outpatients consulting for pain associated to self-reported OA at varied healthcare settings were evaluated in a 3-month observational non-controlled follow-up study. Socio-demographic/anthropometric and medical data were collected at three time points. Lequesne's indices, quick-disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) and Oswestry questionnaires provided measures of physical function and disability. HR-QoL measures were obtained with EuroQol-5 Dimensions. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the differences of pain severity across body regions and the correlates of disability and HR-QoL. Six thousand patients were evaluated. Pain lasted 2 years or more in 3995 patients. The mean pain severity at baseline was moderate (6.4 points). On average, patients had pain in 1.9 joints/areas. The pain was more severe when OA involved the spine or all body regions. Pain severity explained much of the variance in disability and HR-QoL; this association was less relevant in patients with OA in the upper limbs. There were considerable improvements at follow up. Pain severity improved as did disability, which showed particularly strong associations with HR-QoL improvements. Pain severity is associated with functional limitations, disability and poor HR-QoL in patients with self-reported OA. Functional limitations might have particular relevance when OA affects the upper limbs. Improvements are feasible in many patients who consult because of their pain.

  8. Investigating the Impact of Optical Selection Effects on Observed Rest-frame Prompt GRB Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, D.; Heussaff, V.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Atteia, J.-L.; Klotz, A.; Dornic, D.

    2016-11-01

    Measuring gamma-ray burst (GRB) properties in their rest frame is crucial for understanding the physics at work in GRBs. This can only be done for GRBs with known redshifts. Since redshifts are usually measured from the optical spectrum of the afterglow, correlations between prompt and afterglow emissions may introduce biases into the distribution of the rest-frame properties of the prompt emission, especially considering that we measure the redshift of only one-third of Swift GRBs. In this paper, we study the optical flux of GRB afterglows and its connection to various intrinsic properties of GRBs. We also discuss the impact of the optical selection effect on the distribution of rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs. Our analysis is based on a sample of 90 GRBs with good optical follow-up and well-measured prompt emission. Seventy-six of them have a measure of redshift and 14 have no redshift. We compare the rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs with different afterglow optical fluxes in order to check for possible correlations between the promt properties and the optical flux of the afterglow. The optical flux is measured two hours after the trigger, which is a typical time for the measure of the redshift. We find that the optical flux of GRB afterglows in our sample is mainly driven by their optical luminosity and depends only slightly on their redshift. We show that GRBs with low and high afterglow optical fluxes have similar E {}{{pi}}, E {}{{iso}}, and L {}{{iso}}, indicating that the rest-frame distributions computed from GRBs with a redshift are not significantly distorted by optical selection effects. However, we found that the {T}90{rest} distribution is not immune to optical selection effects, which favor the selection of GRBs with longer durations. Finally, we note that GRBs well above the E {}{{pi}}-E {}{{iso}} relation have lower optical fluxes and we show that optical selection effects favor the detection of GRBs with bright optical afterglows located

  9. Galaxy Survey On the Fly: Prospects of Rapid Galaxy Cataloging to Aid the Electromagnetic Follow-Up of Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, I.; Crotts, A. P. S.; Márka, S.

    2015-03-01

    Galaxy catalogs are essential for efficient searches of the electromagnetic counterparts of extragalactic gravitational wave (GW) signals with highly uncertain localization. We show that one can efficiently catalog galaxies within a short period of time with 1-2 m class telescopes such as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) or MDM, in response to an observed GW signal from a compact binary coalescence. We find that a rapid galaxy survey is feasible on the relevant time scale of ≲ 1 week, with a maximum source distance of \\gt 200 Mpc and a sky area of 100 deg2. With PTF-like telescopes, even 1 day is sufficient for such a survey. This catalog can then be provided to other telescopes to aid electromagnetic follow-up observations to find kilonovae from binary coalescences, as well as other sources. We consider Hα observations, which track the star formation rate (SFR) and are therefore correlated with the rate of compact binary mergers. Hα surveys are also able to filter out galaxies that are farther away than the maximum GW source distance. Rapid galaxy surveys that follow GW triggers could achieve ˜90% completeness with respect to SFR, which is currently unavailable. This will significantly reduce the required effort and enhance the immediate availability of catalogs compared to possible future all-sky surveys.

  10. Transiting Primary Eclipse Photometric Follow-up Observations and Transit Timing Variations Studies of WASP-43 b and TrES-3 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Ji, J. H.; Dong, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Two photometric follow-up observations for transiting primary eclipse of WASP-43 b and four for TrES-3 b are performed using the Xuyi Near-Earth Object Survey Telescope. After differential photometry and light curve analysis, physical parameters of the two systems are obtained and are in good match with the literatures. Combining with transit data from many literatures, the residuals (O-C) of observations of both systems transits are fitted with the linear and quadratic terms. With the linear fitting, the periods and transit timing variations (TTVs) of the planets are obtained, and no obvious periodic TTV signal is found in either system after analysis. The maximum mass of perturbing planet located at 1:2 mean motion resonance (MMR) of WASP-43 b and TrES-3 b are estimated to be 1.826 and 1.504 Earth mass, respectively. By quadratic fitting, it is confirmed that WASP-43 b may have long-term TTV which means an orbital decay. The decay rate is shown to be dot{P} =(-0.005248 ± 0.001714) s\\cdotyr^{-1}, and is compared with the previous results. Based on this, the lower limit of the stellar tidal quality parameter of WASP-43 is calculated to be Q'_{*} ≥ 1.5×10^5, and the remaining lifetime of the planets of both systems is presented for different Q'_{*} values accordingly.

  11. Panchromatic Observations of the Textbook GRB 110205A: Constraining Physical Mechanisms of Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Zhang, B.; Pozanenko, A.; Nissinen, M.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E.; Volnova, A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Anto, P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Breeveld, A.; Carsenty, U.; Gehrels, N.; Sonbas, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T(sub 90) approx. 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Thanks to its long duration, nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray (1 eV - 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. In particular, by fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/ -ray spectra, it traces the -ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (approx. 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ( alpha approx. 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed.

  12. PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEXTBOOK GRB 110205A: CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF PROMPT EMISSION AND AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Pozanenko, A.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E. E-mail: rfshen@astro.utoronto.ca; and others

    2012-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long-duration (T{sub 90} {approx} 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb, and BOOTES telescopes when the gamma-ray burst (GRB) was still radiating in the {gamma}-ray band, with optical light curve showing correlation with {gamma}-ray data. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray, to {gamma}-ray (1 eV to 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission phase. In particular, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Shortly after prompt emission ({approx}1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ({alpha} {approx} 5.5) was observed, which we interpret as the reverse shock (RS) emission. It is the first time that the rising phase of an RS component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow light curves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high-quality prompt and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball model to extract valuable information, including the radiation mechanism (synchrotron), radius of prompt emission (R{sub GRB} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm), initial Lorentz factor of the outflow ({Gamma}{sub 0} {approx} 250), the composition of the ejecta (mildly magnetized), the collimation angle, and the total energy budget.

  13. Managing GRB afterglows optical/IR observations in the web 2.0 era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, D.; Nicastro, L.

    2013-07-01

    We present an overview of top internet technologies that can be used to build webtools and rich internet applications for astronomy. The aim is to simplify the data handling, reduction and access, in particular of optical/infrared images collected by traditional, automatic or robotic telescopes. These tools are particularly suitable for real-time management of GRB afterglow observations. Using these technologies we are developing a web-based images database management system. We present available features and discuss further improvements to the mentioned system.

  14. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  15. GRB 971214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Bloom, J.; Djorgovski, S.; Goodrich, R.; Frail, D.

    1998-01-01

    The optical transient (IAUC #6788) of GRB 971214 (IAUC #6787; IAUC #6792) was observed by J. Aycock using the LRIS instrument on Keck II. The observations were conducted between 1400--1600 UT of January 10, 1998 and images were obtained in the R band. The seeing was consistently 0.86 arcsec and 12 frames each of five minute duration were obtained. A source is clearly detected at the position of the OT.

  16. GRB 050717: A Long, Short-Lag Burst Observed by Swift and Konus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Hurkett, C.; Pal'shin, V.; Norris, J. P.; Zhang, B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Golenetskii, S.; Osborne, J. P.; Parsons, A. M.; Perri, M.; Willingale, R.

    2005-01-01

    The long burst GRB 050717 was observed simultaneously by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift and the Konus instrument on Wind. Significant hard to soft spectral evolution was seen. Early gamma-ray and X-ray emission was detected by both BAT and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Swift. The XRT continued to observe the burst for 7.1 days and detect it for 1.4 days. The X-ray light curve showed a classic decay pattern including evidence of the onset of the external shock emission at approx. 50 s after the trigger; the afterglow was too faint for a jet break to be detected. No optical, infrared or ultraviolet counterpart was discovered despite deep searches within 14 hours of the burst. The spectral lag for GRB 050717 was determined to be 2.5 +/- 2.6 ms, consistent, with zero and unusually short for a long burst. This lag measurement suggests that this burst has a high intrinsic luminosity and hence is at high redshift (z > 2.7). 050717 provides a good example of classic prompt and afterglow behavior for a gamma-ray burst.

  17. Swift observations of GRB 060614: an anomalous burst with a well behaved afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, V.; Holland, S. T.; Malesani, D.; Troja, E.; Chincarini, G.; Zhang, B.; La Parola, V.; Brown, P. J.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Capalbi, M.; Cusumano, G.; Della Valle, M.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Grupe, D.; Guidorzi, C.; Mineo, T.; Moretti, A.; Osborne, J. P.; Pandey, S. B.; Perri, M.; Romano, P.; Roming, P. W. A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2007-07-01

    GRB 060614 is a remarkable gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by Swift with puzzling properties, which challenge current progenitor models. In particular, the lack of any bright supernova (SN) down to very strict limits and the vanishing spectral lags during the whole burst are typical of short GRBs, strikingly at odds with the long (102 s) duration of this event. Here we present detailed spectral and temporal analysis of the Swift observations of GRB 060614. We show that the burst presents standard optical, ultraviolet and X-ray afterglows, detected beginning 4 ks after the trigger. An achromatic break is observed simultaneously in the optical and X-ray bands, at a time consistent with the break in the R-band light curve measured by the VLT. The achromatic behaviour and the consistent post-break decay slopes make GRB 060614 one of the best examples of a jet break for a Swift burst. The optical and ultraviolet afterglow light curves have also an earlier break at 29.7 ± 4.4 ks, marginally consistent with a corresponding break at 36.6 ± 2.4 ks observed in the X-rays. In the optical, there is strong spectral evolution around this break, suggesting the passage of a break frequency through the optical/ultraviolet band. The very blue spectrum at early times suggests this may be the injection frequency, as also supported by the trend in the light curves: rising at low frequencies, and decaying at higher energies. The early X-ray light curve (from 97 to 480 s) is well interpreted as the X-ray counterpart of the burst extended emission. Spectral analysis of the BAT and XRT data in the ~80 s overlap time interval show that the peak energy of the burst has decreased to as low as 8 keV at the beginning of the XRT observation. Spectral analysis of following XRT data shows that the peak energy of the burst continues to decrease through the XRT energy band and exits it at about 500 s after the trigger. The average peak energy Ep of the burst is likely below the BAT energy band (<24

  18. HAT-P-56b: An Inflated Massive Hot Jupiter Transiting a Bright F Star Followed Up with K2 Campaign 0 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bhatti, W.; Bieryla, A.; de Val-Borro, M.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Béky, B.; Falco, E.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M. L.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F-type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph on the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.5 m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of 2.18 {M}{{J}}, radius of 1.47 {R}{{J}}, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of 2.7908 day. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with {M}p\\gt 2 {M}{{J}}. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 {M}⊙ , and radius of 1.43 {R}⊙ . The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests that the star is a γ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the accuracy of the planetary parameters. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. Based in part on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. Based in part on observations obtained with the Kepler Space Craft in the K2 Campaign 0 Mission.

  19. Providing Information About Late Effects During Routine Follow-Up Consultations Between Pediatric Oncologists and Adolescent Survivors: A Video-Based, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Korsvold, Live; Finset, Arnstein; Loge, Jon; Ruud, Ellen; Lie, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Information about late effects is a prerequisite for survivors of childhood cancers to engage in self-management of their health. Yet, many lack such knowledge. This study investigated to what extent: (1) potential late effects were discussed with adolescent and young adult (AYA)-aged survivors (of pediatric cancer), and (2) information about late effects was provided by the pediatric oncologists (POs) during routine follow-up consultations. Methods: Consultations were recorded with 10 POs and 66 adolescents, aged 12–20 years, treated for leukemia (72.7%) or lymphoma (21.2%), or who had received hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for a benign disease (7.6%). Discussions of potential late effects were identified and coded, and then the amount of information about late effects provided was categorized into three levels: none, basic, and extended information. Results: Potential late effects were discussed in 85% of the consultations. Of these, 71% were PO initiated, and 60% concerned existing health problems. The POs provided none, basic, and extended information about late effects in 41%, 30%, and 29% of these discussions. Patients' age, time since treatment, and risk of late effects were not associated with amount of potential late effects discussed, but the type of potential late effect (physical vs. psychosocial and current vs. future risk) and PO were. Conclusion: Potential late effects were frequently discussed, thus providing ample opportunity to provide information about late effects to adolescent cancer survivors. The observed PO variability in providing such information indicates a need for standardization of information practices. PMID:26697269

  20. Longer term effects of very low energy diet on obstructive sleep apnoea in cohort derived from randomised controlled trial: prospective observational follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Hemmingsson, Erik; Harlid, Richard; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Granath, Fredrik; Rössner, Stephan; Neovius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether initial improvements in obstructive sleep apnoea after a very low energy diet were maintained after one year in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea. Design Single centre, prospective observational follow-up study. Setting Outpatient obesity clinic in a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Participants 63 men aged 30-65 with body mass index (BMI) 30-40 and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index ≥15 (events/hour), all treated with continuous positive airway pressure. Intervention A one year weight loss programme, consisting of an initial very low energy diet for nine weeks (seven weeks of 2.3 MJ/day and two weeks of gradual introduction of normal food) followed by a weight loss maintenance programme. Main outcome measure Apnoea-hypopnoea index, the main index for severity of obstructive sleep apnoea. Data from all patients were analysed (baseline carried forward for missing data). Results Of 63 eligible patients, 58 completed the very low energy diet period and started the weight maintenance programme and 44 completed the full programme; 49 had complete measurements at one year. At baseline the mean apnoea-hypopnoea index was 36 events/hour. After the very low energy diet period, apnoea-hypopnoea index was improved by −21 events/hour (95% confidence interval −17 to −25) and weight by −18 kg (−16 to −19; both P<0.001). After one year the apnoea-hypopnoea index had improved by −17 events/hour (−13 to −21) and body weight by −12 kg (−10 to −14) compared with baseline (both P<0.001). Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea at baseline had greater improvements in apnoea-hypopnoea index (−25 events/hour) compared with patients with moderate disease (−7 events/hour, P<0.001). At one year, 30/63 (48%, 95% confidence interval 35% to 60%) no longer required continuous positive airway pressure and 6/63 (10%, 2% to 17%) had total remission of

  1. SUZAKU X-RAY FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF SEVEN UNASSOCIATED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Maeda, K.; Makiya, R.; Totani, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.

    2012-03-01

    We report on our second-year campaign of X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 Degree-Sign ) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on board the Suzaku X-ray Observatory. In this second year of the project, seven new targets were selected from the First Fermi-LAT Catalog, and studied with 20-40 ks effective Suzaku exposures. We detected an X-ray point source coincident with the position of the recently discovered millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J2302+4442 within the 95% confidence error circle of 1FGL J2302.8+4443. The X-ray spectrum of the detected counterpart was well fit by a blackbody model with temperature of kT {approx_equal} 0.3 keV, consistent with an origin of the observed X-ray photons from the surface of a rotating magnetized neutron star. For four other targets that were also recently identified with a normal pulsar (1FGL J0106.7+4853) and MSPs (1FGL J1312.6+0048, J1902.0-5110, and J2043.2+1709), only upper limits in the 0.5-10 keV band were obtained at the flux levels of {approx_equal} 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A weak X-ray source was found in the field of 1FGL J1739.4+8717, but its association with the variable {gamma}-ray emitter could not be confirmed with the available Suzaku data alone. For the remaining Fermi-LAT object 1FGL J1743.8-7620 no X-ray source was detected within the LAT 95% error ellipse. We briefly discuss the general properties of the observed high Galactic-latitude Fermi-LAT objects by comparing their multiwavelength properties with those of known blazars and MSPs.

  2. The GRB luminosity function: predictions from the internal shock model and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovich, R.; Zerguini, T. H.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the context of the internal shock model. We assume that GRB central engines generate relativistic outflows characterized by the respective distributions of injected kinetic power and contrast in Lorentz factor κ = Γmax/Γmin. We find that if the distribution of contrast extends down to values close to unity (i.e. if both highly variable and smooth outflows can exist), then the luminosity function has two branches. At high luminosity it follows the distribution of while at low luminosity it is close to a power law of slope -0.5. We then examine if existing data can constrain the luminosity function. Using the logN-logP curve, the Ep distribution of bright Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) bursts and the X-ray flash (XRF)/GRB ratio obtained by High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), we show that single and broken power laws can provide equally good fits of these data. Present observations are therefore unable to favour one form or the other. However, when a broken power law is adopted they clearly indicate a low-luminosity slope ~= -0.6 +/- 0.2, compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  3. BATSE observations of the very intense gamma-ray burst GRB 930131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Preece, Robert; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Horack, John M.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Band, David

    1994-01-01

    Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) observed its most intense gamma-ray burst on 1993 January 31. The event reached count rates is approximately greater than 2 x 10(exp 6) counts/s with most of the flux emitted in an extremely short (is approximately less than 0.1 s) interval followed by a long tail, lasting about 50 s. Most of this initial pulse was recorded by our instrument with unique, very high temporal resolution (1 ms). We were thus able to show large changes in spectral hardness on 2 ms timescales throughout this initial complex. Photons as low as 25 keV and extending up to greater than 4 MeV in energy were recorded by BATSE during this first interval. The burst spectrum is best fitted by a broken power law with a break energy of 170 +/- 27 keV. The low-energy spectral index is -1.30 +/- 0.05, while a softer spectral index of -1.9 fits the spectrum between 170 keV and 2 MeV. Our data provide the only low-energy spectrum for this event; the combination of our spectrum with the one reported for GRB 930131 by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) group extends the total energy spectrum of a GRB for the first time over five decades, up to the GeV range.

  4. Broadband observations of the naked-eye gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B.

    PubMed

    Racusin, J L; Karpov, S V; Sokolowski, M; Granot, J; Wu, X F; Pal'shin, V; Covino, S; van der Horst, A J; Oates, S R; Schady, P; Smith, R J; Cummings, J; Starling, R L C; Piotrowski, L W; Zhang, B; Evans, P A; Holland, S T; Malek, K; Page, M T; Vetere, L; Margutti, R; Guidorzi, C; Kamble, A P; Curran, P A; Beardmore, A; Kouveliotou, C; Mankiewicz, L; Melandri, A; O'Brien, P T; Page, K L; Piran, T; Tanvir, N R; Wrochna, G; Aptekar, R L; Barthelmy, S; Bartolini, C; Beskin, G M; Bondar, S; Bremer, M; Campana, S; Castro-Tirado, A; Cucchiara, A; Cwiok, M; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Valle, M Della; de Ugarte Postigo, A; Dominik, W; Falcone, A; Fiore, F; Fox, D B; Frederiks, D D; Fruchter, A S; Fugazza, D; Garrett, M A; Gehrels, N; Golenetskii, S; Gomboc, A; Gorosabel, J; Greco, G; Guarnieri, A; Immler, S; Jelinek, M; Kasprowicz, G; La Parola, V; Levan, A J; Mangano, V; Mazets, E P; Molinari, E; Moretti, A; Nawrocki, K; Oleynik, P P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Pandey, S B; Paragi, Z; Perri, M; Piccioni, A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Roming, P W A; Steele, I A; Strom, R G; Testa, V; Tosti, G; Ulanov, M V; Wiersema, K; Wijers, R A M J; Winters, J M; Zarnecki, A F; Zerbi, F; Mészáros, P; Chincarini, G; Burrows, D N

    2008-09-11

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release copious amounts of energy across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and so provide a window into the process of black hole formation from the collapse of massive stars. Previous early optical observations of even the most exceptional GRBs (990123 and 030329) lacked both the temporal resolution to probe the optical flash in detail and the accuracy needed to trace the transition from the prompt emission within the outflow to external shocks caused by interaction with the progenitor environment. Here we report observations of the extraordinarily bright prompt optical and gamma-ray emission of GRB 080319B that provide diagnostics within seconds of its formation, followed by broadband observations of the afterglow decay that continued for weeks. We show that the prompt emission stems from a single physical region, implying an extremely relativistic outflow that propagates within the narrow inner core of a two-component jet.

  5. Use of Implant-Derived Minimally Invasive Sinus Floor Elevation: A Multicenter Clinical Observational Study With 12- to 65-Month Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Mijiritsky, Eitan; Barbu, Horia; Lorean, Adi; Shohat, Izhar; Danza, Matteo; Levin, Liran

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of implant-derived minimally invasive sinus floor elevation. A multicenter retrospective study was performed in 5 dental clinics. Patients requiring sinus augmentation for single implant placement were recorded and followed up. The dental implant used in this trial was a self-tapping endosseous dental implant that contains an internal channel to allow the introduction of liquids through the implant body into the maxillary sinus; those liquids include saline and a flowable bone grafting material. Overall, 37 implants were installed in 37 patients. The age range of the patients was 37-75 years (mean: 51.2 years). The average residual bone height prior to the procedure was 5.24 ± 1 mm. Of all cases, 25 implants replaced the maxillary first molar and 12 replaced the maxillary second premolar. All surgeries were uneventful with no apparent perforation of the sinus membrane. The mean follow-up time was 24.81 ± 13 months ranging from 12 to 65 months. All implants integrated and showed stable marginal bone level. No adverse events were recorded during the follow-up period. The presented method for transcrestal sinus floor elevation procedure can be accomplished using a specially designed dental implant. Further long-term studies are warranted to reaffirm the results of this study.

  6. Effect of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination on pregnancy outcomes: long term observational follow-up in the Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Befano, Brian L; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiller, John T; Kreimer, Aimée R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan; Wilcox, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on miscarriage. Design Observational long term follow-up of a randomized, double blinded trial combined with an independent unvaccinated population based cohort. Setting Single center study in Costa Rica. Participants 7466 women in the trial and 2836 women in the unvaccinated cohort enrolled at the end of the randomized trial and in parallel with the observational trial component. Intervention Women in the trial were assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (n=3727) or the control hepatitis A vaccine (n=3739). Crossover bivalent HPV vaccination occurred in the hepatitis A vaccine arm at the end of the trial. Women in the unvaccinated cohort received (n=2836) no vaccination. Main outcome measure Risk of miscarriage, defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as fetal loss within 20 weeks of gestation, in pregnancies exposed to bivalent HPV vaccination in less than 90 days and any time from vaccination compared with pregnancies exposed to hepatitis A vaccine and pregnancies in the unvaccinated cohort. Results Of 3394 pregnancies conceived at any time since bivalent HPV vaccination, 381 pregnancies were conceived less than 90 days from vaccination. Unexposed pregnancies comprised 2507 pregnancies conceived after hepatitis A vaccination and 720 conceived in the unvaccinated cohort. Miscarriages occurred in 451 (13.3%) of all exposed pregnancies, in 50 (13.1%) of the pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from bivalent HPV vaccination, and in 414 (12.8%) of the unexposed pregnancies, of which 316 (12.6%) were in the hepatitis A vaccine group and 98 (13.6%) in the unvaccinated cohort. The relative risk of miscarriage for pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from vaccination compared with all unexposed pregnancies was 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.34, one sided P=0.436) in unadjusted analyses. Results were similar after adjusting for age at

  7. Photometric Observations of Supernova 2013cq Associated with GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, R. L.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Fraija, N.; Butler, N. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Capone, J. I.; Cucchiara, A.; de Diego, J. A.; Fox, O. D.; Gehrels, N.; Georgiev, L. N.; González, J. J.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Littlejohns, O. M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Toy, V. L.; Troja, E.

    2017-03-01

    We observed the afterglow of GRB 130427A with the Reionization and Transients Infrared Camera (RATIR) instrument on the 1.5 m Harold L. Johnson telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir. Our homogenous griZY JH photometry extends from the night of the burst to three years later. We fit a model for the afterglow. There is a significant positive residual that matches the behavior of SN 1998bw in the griZ filters; we suggest that this is a photometric signature of the supernova SN 2013cq associated with the Gamma-ray burst. The peak absolute magnitude of the supernova is {M}r=-18.43+/- 0.11.

  8. MASTERS-D Study: A Prospective, Multicenter, Pragmatic, Observational, Data-Monitored Trial of Minimally Invasive Fusion to Treat Degenerative Lumbar Disorders, One-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Neil; Buzek, David; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Rosenberg, Wout; Pereira, Paulo; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Lam, Khai; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Durny, Peter; Lidar, Zvi; Scheufler, Kai; Senker, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess effectiveness and safety of minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) for degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) in daily surgical practice and follow up with patients for one year after surgery. A prospective, multicenter, pragmatic, monitored, international outcome study in patients with DLD causing back/leg pain was conducted (19 centers). Two hundred fifty-two patients received standard of care available in the centers. Patients were included if they were aged >18 years, required one- or two-level lumbar fusion for DLD, and met the criteria for approved device indications. Primary endpoints: time to first ambulation (TFA) and time to surgery recovery (TSR). Secondary endpoints: patient-reported outcomes (PROs)--back and leg pain (visual analog scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index (ODI)), health status (EQ-5D), fusion rates, reoperation rates, change in pain medication, rehabilitation, return to work, patient satisfaction, and adverse events (AEs). Experienced surgeons (≥30 surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF and patients were evaluated for one year (NCT01143324). At one year, 92% (233/252) of patients remained in the study. Primary outcomes: TFA, 1.3 ±0.5 days and TSR, 3.2 ±2.0 days. Secondary outcomes: Most patients (83.3%) received one level MILIF; one (two-level) MILIF mean surgery duration, 128 (182) min; fluoroscopy time, 115 (154) sec; blood loss, 164 (233) mL; at one year statistically significant (P<.0001) and clinically meaningful changes from baseline were reported in all PROs--reduced back pain (2.9 ±2.5 vs. 6.2 ±2.3 at intake), reduced leg pain (2.2 ±2.6 vs. 5.9 ±2.8), and ODI (22.4% ± 18.6 vs. 45.3% ± 15.3), as well as health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index: 0.71 ±0.28 vs. 0.34 ±0.32). More of the professional workers were working at one year than those prior to surgery (70.3% vs. 55.2%). Three AEs and one serious AE were considered

  9. GRB 011121: A Collimated Outflow into Wind-blown Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Scholz, R. D.; Sterken, C.; Gorosabel, J.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A.; Grinkov, V.; Andersen, M. I.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fruchter, A.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Kaper, L.; Kouveliotou, C.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van den Heuvel, E.

    2003-12-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121 collected predominantly at ESO telescopes in Chile. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of about 9°. The jet origin of this break is supported by the fact that the spectral energy distribution is achromatic during the first 4 days. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law, which we interpret as additional light from an underlying supernova. In particular, the spectral energy distribution of the optical transient approximately 2 weeks after the burst is clearly not of power-law type but can be presented by a blackbody with a temperature of ~6000 K. The deduced parameters for the decay slope and the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e., an outflow into a circumburst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor. Because of its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 has been the best example for the GRB-supernova connection until GRB 030329 and provides compelling evidence for a circumburster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla and Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme 165.H-0464).

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connaughton, V.; Cui, W.; Falcone, A. E-mail: sjzhu@umd.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ∼70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ∼71 ks (∼20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. The non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.

  11. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Cenko, S. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Misra, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova, and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E iso > 1054 erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v ph ~ 15, 000 km s-1). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v ph ~ 30, 000 km s-1), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M ⊙ yr-1), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  13. GRB 011121: A Collimated Outflow into Wind-Blown Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Fruchter, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121 collected predominantly at ESO telescopes in Chile. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of about 9 deg. The jet origin of this break is supported by the fact that the spectral energy distribution is achromatic during the first four days. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law, which we interpret as additional light from an underlying supernova. In particular, the spectral energy distribution of the optical transient approximately 2 weeks after the burst is clearly not of power-law type, but can be presented by a black body with a temperature of approx. 6000 K. The deduced parameters for the decay slope as well as the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e. an outflow into a circum-burst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive GRB progenitor. Due to its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 has been the best example for the GRB-supernova connection until GRB 030329, and provides compelling evidence for a circum-burster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star.

  14. FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION OF GRB 081006A FROM FERMI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; Pandey, Shashi B.; McKay, Timothy A.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing

    2012-01-20

    Since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument has firmly detected more than 20 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV. Using the matched filter technique, three more GRBs have also shown evidence of correlation with high-energy photon emission as demonstrated by Akerlof et al. In this paper, we present another GRB, GRB 081006A, unambiguously detected by the matched filter technique. This event is associated with more than 13 high-energy photons above 100 MeV. The likelihood analysis code provided by the Fermi Science Support Center generated an independent verification of this detection using a comparison of the test statistics value with similar calculations for random LAT data fields. We have performed detailed temporal and spectral analysis of photons from 8 keV up to 0.8 GeV from the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the LAT. The properties of GRB 081006A can be compared to those of the other two long-duration GRBs detected at similar significance, GRB 080825C and GRB 090217A. We find that GRB 081006A is more similar to GRB 080825C with comparable appearances of late high-energy photon emission. As demonstrated previously, there appears to be a surprising dearth of faint LAT GRBs, with only one additional GRB identified in a sample of 74. In this unique period when both Swift and Fermi are operational, there is some urgency to explore this aspect of GRBs as fully as possible.

  15. GRB980109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Martin

    1998-01-01

    GRB980109 field was observed by the OGLE collaboration with the 1.3-m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile on Jan. 10.06, 10.18, 11.05, 12.05 and 16.05, 1998. Ten 900 sec I-band exposures were collected. The field size was 14.2 by 14.2 arcmins covering almost entire error box. None fading or variable stellar-like object was detected up to detection limit of I ~ 21 mag and variability threshold of 0.4 mag.

  16. Observation on therapeutic efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid in Chinese patients with primary biliary cirrhosis: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiangyi; Shi, Yongquan; Zhou, Xinmin; Li, Zengshan; Huang, Xiaofeng; Han, Zheyi; Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Ruian; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Han, Ying; Fan, Daiming

    2013-06-01

    The efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on long-term outcome of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has been less documented in Chinese cohort. We aimed to assess the therapeutic effect of UDCA on Chinese patients with PBC. In the present study, 67 patients with PBC were treated with UDCA (13-15 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) and followed up for 2 years to evaluate the changes of symptoms, laboratory values and histological features. As the results indicated, fatigue and pruritus were obviously improved by UDCA, particularly in patients with mild or moderate symptoms. The alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transpetidase levels significantly declined at year 2 comparing to baseline values, with the most profound effects achieved in patients at stage 2. The levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase significantly decreased whereas serum bilirubin and immunoglobulin M levels exhibited no significant change. Histological feature was stable in patients at stages 1-2 but still progressed in patients at stages 3-4. The biochemical response of patients at stage 2 was much better than that of patients at stages 3-4. These data suggest that, when treated in earlier stage, patients in long-term administration of UDCA can gain favorable results not only on symptoms and biochemical responses but also on histology. It is also indicated that later histological stage, bad biochemical response and severe symptom may be indicators of poor prognosis for UDCA therapy.

  17. Multi-wavelength follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2015-10-01

    Transient sources are often associated with the most violent phenomena in the Universe, where the acceleration of hadrons may occur. Such sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN) or core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and are promising candidates for the production of high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The ANTARES telescope, located in the Mediterranean sea, aims at detecting these high energy neutrinos, which could reveal the presence of a cosmic ray accelerator. However, to enhance the sensitivity to transient sources, a method based on multi-wavelength follow-up of neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection. The telescopes start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect a possible electromagnetic counterpart to the neutrino event. The work presented in this thesis covers the development and implementation of an optical image analysis pipeline, as well as the analysis of optical and X-ray data to search for fast transient sources, such as GRB afterglows, and slowly varying transient sources, such as CCSNe.

  18. What Contributes to the Regularity of Patients with Hypertension or Diabetes Seeking Health Services? A Pilot Follow-Up, Observational Study in Two Sites in Hubei Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Da; Serrano, Ray; Ye, Ting; Tang, Shangfeng; Duan, Lei; Xu, Yuan; Yang, Jian; Liang, Yuan; Chen, Shanquan; Feng, Zhanchun; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Regular maintenance of non-communicable chronic diseases can constrain disease progression in diabetic and hypertensive patients. To identify the individual and social factors that are associated with positive health-seeking behaviors and regular maintenance of chronic diseases, we have conducted a follow up study in 2015 on diabetic and hypertensive patients in Hubei Province. We used binary logistic regression models to determine specific factors associated with diabetic and hypertensive patients that sought healthcare services for their conditions in accordance with current Chinese Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) guidelines. Our findings show that 42.16% of 510 people living with chronic conditions (PLCDs) sought health services in line with existing guidelines. Findings also show a higher probability (8.418 times) for PLCDs seeking healthcare services at higher-tiered hospitals (secondary and tertiary hospitals) than for PLCDs seeking care at primary hospitals (odds ratio (OR) = 8.418, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.82, 14.27, p < 0.001). These analyses underscore the importance of having patient advocates who can provide support, where necessary, and encourage positive health-seeking behavior. The study also shows a negative impact on regular maintenance for PLCDs in households with high financial constraints. In contrast, the study shows positive impacts for increased household income, age, and residency in rural locations. In sum, this study underscores the importance of primary hospitals as key points of care and critical players in care coordination for PLCDs. The study provides more evidence for Chinese policymakers seeking to contain costs and improve population health. The findings also underscore the need for community-based interventions, specifically interventions that link local primary hospitals, friends/family members, and PLCDs. PMID:28009850

  19. X-Ray Spectral Components Observed in the Afterglow of GRB 130925A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steven E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Horesh, Assaf; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Madsen, Kristin K.; Miller, Jon M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at greater than 4 less than 1 significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 x 10 (sup 5) and 10 (sup 6) seconds after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several kiloelectronvolts width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10 (sup 8) centimeters), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  1. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  2. Follow-up Observations of PTFO 8-8695: A 3 Myr Old T-Tauri Star Hosting a Jupiter-mass Planetary Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, David R.; van Eyken, Julian C.; Barnes, Jason W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Carey, Sean J.; Crockett, Christopher J.; Eastman, Jason; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Howell, Steve B.; Kane, Stephen R.; . Mclane, Jacob N.; Plavchan, Peter; Prato, L.; Stauffer, John; van Belle, Gerard T.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2015-08-01

    We present Spitzer 4.5 μm light curve observations, Keck NIRSPEC radial velocity observations, and LCOGT optical light curve observations of PTFO 8-8695, which may host a Jupiter-sized planet in a very short orbital period (0.45 days). Previous work by van Eyken et al. and Barnes et al. predicts that the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbital plane should precess with a period of 300-600 days. As a consequence, the observed transits should change shape and depth, disappear, and reappear with the precession. Our observations indicate the long-term presence of the transit events (\\gt 3 years), and that the transits indeed do change depth, disappear and reappear. The Spitzer observations and the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations (with contemporaneous LCOGT optical light curve data) are consistent with the predicted transit times and depths for the {M}\\star =0.34 {M}⊙ precession model and demonstrate the disappearance of the transits. An LCOGT optical light curve shows that the transits do reappear approximately 1 year later. The observed transits occur at the times predicted by a straight-forward propagation of the transit ephemeris. The precession model correctly predicts the depth and time of the Spitzer transit and the lack of a transit at the time of the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations. However, the precession model predicts the return of the transits approximately 1 month later than observed by LCOGT. Overall, the data are suggestive that the planetary interpretation of the observed transit events may indeed be correct, but the precession model and data are currently insufficient to confirm firmly the planetary status of PTFO 8-8695b.

  3. AstroSat CZT Imager Observations of GRB 151006A: Timing, Spectroscopy, and Polarization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Chand, Vikas; Hingar, M. K.; Iyyani, S.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Paul, D.; Bhalerao, V. B.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A. M.; Chattopadhyay, T.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Basak, R.; Pradeep, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Navalgund, K. H.; Pandiyan, R.; Sarma, K. S.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2016-12-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that the CZT Imager can localize this GRB correctly to about a few degrees, and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to those obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence, the CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localization for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: the CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarization information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows hints of a polarization signal at 100-300 keV (though at a low significance level). We point out that the CZT Imager should provide significant time resolved polarization measurements for GRBs that have fluence three times higher than that of GRB 151006A. We estimate that the number of such bright GRBs detectable by the CZT Imager is five to six per year. The CZT Imager can also act as a good hard X-ray monitoring device for possible electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events.

  4. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fynbok J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  5. Non-variability of intervening absorbers observed in the UVES spectra of the `naked-eye' GRB080319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Fiore, F.; Goldoni, P.; D'Odorico, V.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Norci, L.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the properties of the intervening absorbers lying along the line of sight of GRB080319B through the analysis of its optical absorption features. For this purpose, we analyse Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES)/Very Large Telescope multi-epoch, high-resolution spectroscopic observations (R = 40000, corresponding to 7.5 kms-1) of the optical afterglow of GRB080319B (z = 0.937), detected by Swift. Thanks to the rapid response mode (RRM), we observed the afterglow just 8min 30s after the gamma-ray burst (GRB) onset when the magnitude was R ~ 12. This allowed us to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), high-resolution spectrum of a GRB afterglow ever (S/N per resolution element of ~50). Two further RRM and target of opportunity observations were obtained starting 1.0 and 2.4 h after the event, respectively. Four MgII absorption systems lying along the line of sight to the afterglow have been detected in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8, most of them showing a complex structure featuring several components. Absorptions due to FeII, MgI and MnII are also present; they appear in four, two and one intervening absorbers, respectively. One out of four systems show an MgII λ2796 rest-frame-equivalent width larger than 1 Å. This is in agreement with the excess of strong MgII absorbers compared to quasars, with dn/dz = 0.9, approximately four times larger than the value observed along quasar lines of sight. In addition, the analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution spectra allowed us to exclude a significant variability in the column density of the single components of each absorber. In particular, 17 out of 21 MgII components belonging to the four absorbers do not vary at the 3σ confidence level, and the column densities of the remaining four are saturated and cannot be reliably measured. Combining this result with estimates of the size of the emitting region, we can reject the hypothesis that the difference

  6. Realtime GRB Followup with LOTIS/Super-LOTIS/LITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H. S.; Ables, E.; Porrata, R. A.; Ziock, K.; Williams, G. G.; Bradshaw, M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Nemiroff, R.; Pereira, W.; Perez, D.

    2001-05-01

    Even though many GRBs are now identified with late time afterglows, very few measurements are available on their prompt properties. Unlike delayed afterglows, early-time follow-up measurements will contain information about the GRB progenitors. These measurements are possible via automatic observations triggered by the GRB satellites. We have been operating automatic and rapidly slewing telescope systems, LOTIS (0.11 m aperture; 4 simultaneous astronomical filters) and Super-LOTIS (0.6 m aperture), to detect very prompt optical emission occurring within seconds of a GRB. This paper will present results from our attempts to follow-up observations of HETE2 triggers. We also present our plan to replace the current optical CCD camera on the Super-LOTIS to a near infrared camera to be able to probe dusty GRB environment. This research is supported under NASA contract numbers S-03975G and S-57797F and under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  7. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 3,500 targets and reported more than 16,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center (MPC).The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet is planned for 2017-2018.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA ARM list. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCOGT Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have recently extended the NEOexchange software to include automated data reduction to re-compute the astrometric solution, determine the photometric zeropoint and find moving objects and present these results to the user via

  8. Do maternal perceptions of child eating and feeding help to explain the disconnect between reported and observed feeding practices?: A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bergmeier, Heidi J; Skouteris, Helen; Hetherington, Marion M; Rodgers, Rachel F; Campbell, Karen J; Cox, Rachael

    2017-02-08

    Research demonstrates a mismatch between reported and observed maternal feeding practices. This mismatch may be explained by maternal cognitions, attitudes, and motivations relating to dyadic parent-child feeding interactions. These complex constructs may not be apparent during observations nor evidenced in self-report questionnaire. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a qualitative approach to gain a more nuanced and contextualized understanding of (a) maternal perceptions of children's food intake control; (b) how parent-child mealtime interactions influence maternal feeding practices; and (c) ways in which mothers may promote healthy child eating and weight outcomes. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 23 mothers (M = 38.4 ± 3.7 years of age) of preschool-aged children (M = 3.8 ± 0.6 years of age, 19 were normal weight, 14 were girls), who had previously completed child feeding questionnaire and participated in two home-based mealtime observations, 12 months apart. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and themes extracted to create the database. Four major themes emerged: (a) Maternal confidence in children's ability to regulate food intake is variable; (b) Implementing strategies for nurturing healthy relationships with food beyond the dining table; (c) Fostering positive mealtime interactions is valued above the content of what children eat; and (d) Situation-specific practices and inconsistencies. Findings indicate that maternal feeding practices are shaped by both parent and child influences, and child feeding is mostly guided by controlling the family food environment, rather than by directly pressuring or restricting their child's eating. Results also highlighted the need for research to consider both parent and child influences on child feeding.

  9. Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis: Report of a Case with Observations on Clinical Manifestations, Radiology, and Pathology with a Late Follow-Up of Eight Years

    PubMed Central

    Aymore, Ierecê Lins; Amoedo, Armando Rocha; Hemais, Paulo Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study was to investigate clinical manifestations, roentgen images, histopathological studies, and evolution of the disease in patient displaying infantile cortical hyperostosis. Methods. Roentgenograms were made to evaluate a neonatal patient presenting multiple soft-tissue swellings. The initial radiographs insinuated that the disease had been present for some time in utero. Bone puncture biopsy of the tibia for histopathological observation and diagnosis conclusions was performed. Results. The disease was demonstrated radiographically by massive cortical diaphyseal thickening and also extensive periosteal new bone formation surrounding several bones. Results in blood count were as follows: discrete anemia, moderate leukocytosis, and elevated sedimentation rate. Histological pattern of tissue removed from tibia showed lamellar cortical bones and hyperplasia. Biopsy studies disclosed no evidence of neoplasia as well as of bacterial infection. Comments. Clinical manifestations in a neonatal patient displaying infantile cortical hyperostosis have gradually decreased. Radiograph findings have demonstrated complete recovery of bones manifested by the disease. The pathologic findings are in accordance with previous microscopic examination summarized by the literature. Total patient cure, without sequels, could be demonstrated. PMID:28050300

  10. [A follow-up study on pulmonary functions of workers exposed to various forms of dust. Observation on the workers of pneumoconiosis in Kitakyushu].

    PubMed

    Baba, Y; Iwao, S; Kodama, Y

    1983-09-01

    Serial spirograms of 121 dust workers whose chest X-rays were found to be "class 1" of the diagnostic criteria for pneumoconiosis were obtained during 1978-80. Yearly changes of pulmonary function variables (%VC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC%,V25/H, and V50/V25) by age, smoking habit, total years of exposure to dust, and work history were evaluated. The average age of the dust workers was 48.0 +/- 5.5 years, and the average years of exposure to dust was 21.6 +/- 6.8 years in 1978. Eighty-two dust workers smoked with the mean smoking history of 24.7 pack-years. No significant differences of spirograms were found between the smoking and non-smoking groups. Among the smokers, however, linear regression of FEV1/FVC% by age gradually decreased during 1978-80. All the pulmonary function variables showed no correlation with smoking history as well as total years of dust exposure. All the dust workers were classified into eight types of work by their histories; crushing and quarrying operators, brick mason, foundry and grinding operators, asbestos workers, underground miners, refractory material workers, pyrites roasters, and welders. The underground miners showed lower FEV1/FVC% and V25 than the average. However, the difference of such pulmonary function variables by eight types of work was not significant by analysis of variance. Since aging is the most dominant factor for pulmonary dysfunction, a longer observation on this group will be needed.

  11. Comparison of Proposed Modified and Original Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Scores in Predicting ICU Mortality: A Prospective, Observational, Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Daneshiyan, Maryam; Aarabi, Mohsen; Talebiyan Kiakolaye, Yaser; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Habibi, Mohammad Reza; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Sadeghi, Faegheh

    2016-01-01

    Background. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score has been recommended to triage critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study aimed to compare the performance of our proposed MSOFA and original SOFA scores in predicting ICU mortality. Methods. This prospective observational study was conducted on 250 patients admitted to the ICU. Both tools scores were calculated at the beginning, 24 hours of ICU admission, and 48 hours of ICU admission. Diagnostic odds ratio and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to compare the two scores. Results. MSOFA and SOFA predicted mortality similarly with an area under the ROC curve of 0.837, 0.992, and 0.977 for MSOFA 1, MSOFA 2, and MSOFA 3, respectively, and 0.857, 0.988, and 0.988 for SOFA 1, SOFA 2, and SOFA 3, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MSOFA 1 in cut-off point 8 were 82.9% and 68.4%, respectively, MSOFA 2 in cut-off point 9.5 were 94.7% and 97.1%, respectively, and MSOFA 3 in cut-off point of 9.3 were 97.4% and 93.1%, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between the MSOFA 1 and the SOFA 1 (r: 0.942), 24 hours (r: 0.972), and 48 hours (r: 0.960). Conclusion. The proposed MSOFA and the SOFA scores had high diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for predicting mortality. PMID:28116220

  12. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB 970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A. S.; Pian, E.; Gibbons, R.; Thorsett, S. E.; Ferguson, H.; Petro, L.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Caraveo, P.; Frontera, F.; Kouveliotou, C.; Macchetto, D.; Palazzi, E.; Pedersen, H.; Tavani, M.; van Paradijs, J.

    2000-12-01

    We report on observations of the field of GRB 970508 made in 1998 early August, 454 days after outburst, with the STIS CCD camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The images, taken in open filter (50CCD) mode, clearly reveal the presence of a galaxy that was overwhelmed in earlier (1997 June) HST images by emission from the optical transient (OT). The galaxy is regular in shape: after correcting for the HST/STIS PSF, it is well fitted by an exponential disk with a scale length of 0.046"+/-0.006" and an ellipticity of 0.70+/-0.07. All observations are marginally consistent with a continuous decline in OT emission as t-1.3 beginning 2 days after outburst; however, we find no direct evidence in the late-time HST image for emission from the OT, and the surface brightness profile of the galaxy is most regular if we assume that the OT emission is negligible, suggesting that the OT may have faded more rapidly at late times than is predicted by the power-law decay. Due to the wide bandwidth of the STIS clear mode, the estimated magnitude of the galaxy is dependent on the galaxy spectrum that is assumed. Using colors obtained from late-time ground-based observations to constrain the spectrum, we find V=25.4+/-0.15, a few tenths of a magnitude brighter than earlier ground-based estimates that were obtained by observing the total light of the galaxy and the OT and then subtracting the estimated OT brightness, assuming that it fades as a single power law. This again suggests that the OT may have faded faster at late time than the power law predicts. The position of the OT agrees with that of the isophotal center of the galaxy to 0.01", which, at the galaxy redshift z=0.83, corresponds to an offset from the center of the host of <~70 pc. This remarkable agreement raises the possibility that the gamma-ray burst may have been associated with either an active galactic nucleus or a nuclear starburst.

  13. DESAlert: Enabling real-time transient follow-up with Dark Energy Survey data

    SciTech Connect

    Poci, A.

    2015-04-12

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is currently undertaking an observational program imaging 1/4 of the southern hemisphere sky with unprecedented photometric accuracy. In the process of observing millions of faint stars and galaxies to constrain the parameters of the dark energy equation of state, the DES will obtain pre-discovery images of the regions surrounding an estimated 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) over five years. Once GRBs are detected by, e.g., the Swift satellite, the DES data will be extremely useful for follow-up observations by the transient astronomy community. We describe a recently-commissioned suite of software that listens continuously for automated notices of GRB activity, collates useful information from archival DES data, and promulgates relevant data products back to the community in near-real-time. Of particular importance are the opportunities that DES data provide for relative photometry of GRBs or their afterglows, as well as for identifying key characteristics (e.g., photometric redshifts) of potential GRB host galaxies. We provide the functional details of the DESAlert software as it presently operates, as well as the data products that it produces, and we show sample results from the application of DESAlert to several previously-detected GRBs.

  14. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB 980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, T. W.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Connaughton, V.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. D.; Fishman, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter, we present the first evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a gamma-ray burst, GRB 980923. The event consists of rapid variability lasting approximately 40 s followed by a smooth power-law emission tail lasting approximately 400 s. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for gamma-ray bursts. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB 990123.

  15. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Tim; vanParadijs, Jan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Connaughton, Valerie; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Fishman, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    In this letter, we present for the first time evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), GRB980923. The event ranks third highest in fluence (>25 keV) in the BATSE catalog and consists of a period of rapid variability lasting about 40 s followed by a smooth power law emission tail lasting about 400 s beyond the trigger time. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for GRBS. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the primary gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB990123.

  16. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim A.; Greenstreet, S.; Gomez, E.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network size of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and additionally for the discovery of new objects. We are using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1&2) and several hundred targets are now being followed per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO follow-up portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  17. Long-term outcomes of anthroposophic treatment for chronic disease: a four-year follow-up analysis of 1510 patients from a prospective observational study in routine outpatient settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthroposophic treatment includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We here report an update to a previously published study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases, including more patients and a longer follow up. The Anthroposophic Medicine Outcomes Study (AMOS) was a prospective observational cohort study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic indications in routine outpatient settings in Germany. Anthroposophic treatment was associated with improvements of symptoms and quality of life. Previous follow-up-analyses have been performed after 24 months or, in subgroups of patients enrolled in the period 1999-2001, after 48 months. We conducted a 48-month follow-up analysis of all patients enrolled in AMOS in the period 1999-2005. Methods 1,510 outpatients aged 1-75 years, starting anthroposophic treatment for chronic conditions in routine German outpatient settings, participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were Symptom Score (primary outcome, mean symptom severity on numerical rating scales), SF-36 Physical and Mental Component scores in adults, and disease-specific outcomes in the six most common diagnosis groups: asthma, anxiety disorders and migraine (numerical rating scales), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms (FBB-HKS Total score), and low back pain (Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire, Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Results Median disease duration at baseline was 3.5 years. From baseline to 48-month follow-up all ten outcomes improved significantly (p < 0.001 for all pre-post comparisons). Standardised Response Mean effect sizes were large (range 0.84-1.24 standard deviations) for seven comparisons, medium for two comparisons (SF-36 Mental Component: 0.60, Low Back Pain Rating Scale: 0.55), and small for one comparison (SF-36 Physical Component: 0.39). Symptom Score improved significantly with large effect

  18. Synchrotron Radiation from Ultra-High Energy Protons and the Fermi Observations of GRB 080916C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    when photopion processes are important, which will require IceCube neutrino detections [40] to establish. In GRB 080916C, where multi-GeV radiation...energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts. Phys Rev Lett 2003; 91: 071102. [26] Asano K, Guiriec S, Mészáros P. Hadronic models for the extra spectral...of gamma-ray burst high-energy lags. Astrophys J 2009; 707: 404-16. [37] Murase K, Ioka K, Nagataki S, Nakamura T. High-Energy neutrinos and cosmic

  19. Spectroscopic Follow Up of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L.; Endl, M.; Isaacson, H.; Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations, showing examples of the types of false positives found and ending with a presentation of the characteristics of a confirmed planet.

  20. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  1. Prospect Follow Up Pays Dividends in Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassom, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Describes a follow-up program for enrolling day care center prospects. Follow-up within the center utilizes contact management software and a prospect profile system to record information about potential customers. External follow-up includes a telephone call to confirm an appointment to the center or to provide additional information to the…

  2. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  3. GNAT Student Follow-Up Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Noll S.; Jaggi, N.; Milne, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Global Network of Astronomical Telescopes (GNAT) has discovered some 25,000 new variable star candidates along an equatorial strip of the sky with a non-moving (drift scan) telescope. With three closely spaced observations of any given star being made on the order of 100 nights spread over three years, GNAT could not determine the types of variability and periods of the short period, aliased light curve stars in their MG-1 Variable Star Catalog. Such determinations typically require, for each star, hundreds of closely spaced observations over a number of nights with a modest-aperture tracking telescope equipped for CCD photometry. Many college and amateur observatories are capable of making such observation. At Cuesta College we have initiated a GNAT follow-up pilot program to determine how students at small observatories could efficiently make such determinations in a single-semester research course. We used a 10” Meade LX-200 telescope equipped with a SBIG ST-8XE camera to observe nine GNAT candidates, looking for short-term variability. We found two of the nine to be very short-term variables. We obtained 1397 one-minute integrations on the GNAT star GM1-15036 (GSC 13:95) over seven nights. We determined its period to be about 0.16 days. Its sinusoidal waveform has a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.2 magnitudes. This star is most likely an RR Lyrae pulsating variable. The second short-term variable star is now being repeatedly observed and, in parallel, we are examining a second batch of nine candidates for short-term variability. At the end of the fall 2006 semester, we will summarize what have learned about one-semester GNAT student follow-up observations. We are pleased to acknowledge the assistance of Eric Craine from GNAT, Russell Genet from Cuesta College and Orion Observatory, and Thomas Smith from Dark Ridge Observatory.

  4. Graduate Follow-Up Studies: How Useful Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedley, Rande H.; Olson, George H.

    Follow-up surveys may fall prey to several sources of bias and error, among them lack of control over independent variables, lack of item validity and reliability, sampling biases, and observation bias. Two follow-up studies have been dissected to expose inherent limitations: the Texas Education Product Study (TEPS) and Project TALENT. The…

  5. X-ray flares in early GRB afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Falcone, A; Chincarini, G; Morris, D; Romano, P; Hill, J E; Godet, O; Moretti, A; Krimm, H; Osborne, J P; Racusin, J; Mangano, V; Page, K; Perri, M; Stroh, M

    2007-05-15

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has discovered that flares are quite common in early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being observed in roughly 50% of afterglows with prompt follow-up observations. The flares range in fluence from a few per cent to approximately 100% of the fluence of the prompt emission (the GRB). Repetitive flares are seen, with more than four successive flares detected by the XRT in some afterglows. The rise and fall times of the flares are typically considerably smaller than the time since the burst. These characteristics suggest that the flares are related to the prompt emission mechanism, but at lower photon energies. We conclude that the most likely cause of these flares is late-time activity of the GRB central engine.

  6. CALORIMETRY OF GRB 030329: SIMULTANEOUS MODEL FITTING TO THE BROADBAND RADIO AFTERGLOW AND THE OBSERVED IMAGE EXPANSION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.

    2013-09-01

    We perform calorimetry on the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 by fitting simultaneously the broadband radio afterglow and the observed afterglow image size to a semi-analytic MHD and afterglow emission model. Our semi-analytic method is valid in both the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes, and incorporates a model of the interstellar scintillation that substantially effects the broadband afterglow below 10 GHz. The model is fitted to archival measurements of the afterglow flux from 1 day to 8.3 yr after the burst. Values for the initial burst parameters are determined and the nature of the circumburst medium is explored. Additionally, direct measurements of the lateral expansion rate of the radio afterglow image size allow us to estimate the initial Lorentz factor of the jet.

  7. Multiwavelength observations of the energetic GRB 080810: detailed mapping of the broad-band spectral evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Willingale, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Holland, S. T.; McBreen, S.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rol, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.; Aceituno, F. J.; Akerlof, C.; Beardmore, A. P.; Briggs, M. S.; Burrows, D. N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Connaughton, V.; Evans, P. A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gehrels, N.; Guidorzi, C.; Howard, A. W.; Kennea, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pagani, C.; Preece, R.; Perley, D.; Steele, I. A.; Yuan, F.

    2009-11-01

    GRB 080810 was one of the first bursts to trigger both Swift and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It was subsequently monitored over the X-ray and UV/optical bands by Swift, in the optical by Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and a host of other telescopes, and was detected in the radio by the Very Large Array. The redshift of z = 3.355 +/- 0.005 was determined by Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) and confirmed by RTT150 and NOT. The prompt gamma/X-ray emission, detected over 0.3-103 keV, systematically softens over time, with Epeak moving from ~600 keV at the start to ~40 keV around 100s after the trigger; alternatively, this spectral evolution could be identified with the blackbody temperature of a quasi-thermal model shifting from ~60 to ~3keV over the same time interval. The first optical detection was made at 38s, but the smooth, featureless profile of the full optical coverage implies that this is originated from the afterglow component, not from the pulsed/flaring prompt emission. Broad-band optical and X-ray coverage of the afterglow at the start of the final X-ray decay (~8ks) reveals a spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands in the range of 1015-2 × 1016Hz. The decay profiles of the X-ray and optical bands show that this break initially migrates blueward to this frequency and then subsequently drifts redward to below the optical band by ~3 × 105s. GRB 080810 was very energetic, with an isotropic energy output for the prompt component of 3 × 1053 and 1.6 × 1052 erg for the afterglow; there is no evidence for a jet break in the afterglow up to 6d following the burst. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Martin Turner, who sadly passed away during its writing. Martin was an influential figure in X-ray Astronomy and an excellent PhD supervisor. He will be greatly missed. E-mail: kpa@star.le.ac.uk ‡ NASA postdoctoral program fellow.

  8. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  9. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Retief, Francois

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  10. The dangers of "follow-up" feeds.

    PubMed

    Greiner, T

    1991-09-01

    Artificial feeds constituted with contaminated water and unclean bottles are the leading cause of diarrhea in infants. Companies market artificial feeds globally as infant formula (a substitute for breast milk) and follow-up formula (a complement to breast milk). Breast milk is best for all 0-12 month old infants. Breast-fed infants do not need any formula even follow-up formula. Indeed 6-month old infants require solid healthful foods and breast milk. Like infant formulas, follow-up formula made with contaminated water or bottles can cause the infant to become ill with an infection, and offering follow-up formulas to infants impedes weaning and is costly. Follow-up formulas do not complement breast milk, but instead tend to replace it. The 1986 WHO World Health Assembly has even declared that, in some countries, provision of follow-up formula is not necessary. WHO fears mothers could use follow-up formula instead of infant formula because it has a higher protein and mineral content thus increasing the risk of dehydration during diarrhea. Follow-up formula can result in an unbalanced diet. Since the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes does not address formulas marketed as a complement to breast milk, formula companies market follow-up formulas in both developed and developing countries. Most mothers do not know the risks of using follow-up formulas, however. Governments have several alternatives to stop the marketing of these formulas. They can design and implement a code that defines breast-milk substitutes as any formula perceived and used as a breast milk option even if promoted as a breast-milk complement. They can also amend an existing code. WHO offers technical assistance to any member government who wishes to design, implement, and monitor such a code.

  11. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  12. RAPTOR: Closed-Loop monitoring of the night sky and the earliest optical detection of GRB 021211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Borozdin, K.; Casperson, D. J.; Fenimore, E.; Galassi, M.; McGowan, K.; Starr, D.; White, R. R.; Wozniak, P.; Wren, J.

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the RAPTOR (Rapid Telescopes for Optical Response) sky monitoring system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RAPTOR is a fully autonomous robotic system that is designed to identify and make follow-up observations of optical transients with durations as short as one minute. The RAPTOR design is based on Biomimicry of Human Vision. The sky monitor is composed of two identical arrays of telescopes, separated by 38 kilometers, which stereoscopically monitor a field of about 1300 square-degrees for transients. Both monitoring arrays are carried on rapidly slewing mounts and are composed of an ensemble of wide-field telescopes clustered around a more powerful narrow-field telescope called the ``fovea'' telescope. All telescopes are coupled to real-time analysis pipelines that identify candidate transients and relay the information to a central decision unit that filters the candidates to find real celestial transients and command a response. When a celestial transient is found, the system can point the fovea telescopes to any position on the sky within five seconds and begin follow-up observations. RAPTOR also responds to Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) alerts generated by GRB monitoring spacecraft. Here we present RAPTOR observations of GRB 021211 that constitute the earliest detection of optical emission from that event and are the second fastest achieved for any GRB. The detection of bright optical emission from GRB021211, a burst with modest gamma-ray fluence, indicates that prompt optical emission, detectable with small robotic telescopes, is more common than previously thought. Further, the very fast decline of the optical afterglow from GRB 021211 suggests that some so-called ``optically dark'' GRBs were not detected only because of the slow response of the follow-up telescopes.

  13. GRB 971214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Adelberger, K. L.; Bloom, J. S.; Kundic, T.; Lubin, L.

    1998-01-01

    On December 28, 1997, Kundic and Lubin obtained spectra of the optical transient of GRB 971214 (IAUC #6788) with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (LRIS) mounted on the Keck II telescope. The seeing conditions were excellent. If the transient continued the power-law decay as indicated by the data from Halpern et al. (IAUC #6788) then by this epoch the light at this position should be dominated by the host (cf. Kulkarni et al. GCN #27; ATEL #5).

  14. Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up Updated:Sep 14,2016 What to expect after heart valve surgery The normal recovery time after a heart valve surgery is usually ...

  15. Understanding Grb Physics With Multi-Wavelength Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    The study of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has entered a full multi-wavelength era. A rich trove of data from NASA GRB missions and ground-based follow up observations have been collected. Careful data mining with well-defined scientific objectives holds the key to address open questions in GRB physics, such as jet composition, radiation mechanism, progenitor and central engine physics. We propose to perform data analyses in the following three directions. 1. The time resolved GRB spectra have a dominant component that can be fit with a phenomenological ``Band'' function. The physical meaning of this function remains unclear. Recently we made a breakthrough in theoretical modeling, and showed that fast-cooling synchrotron radiation of electrons in a decreasing magnetic field can mimic the Band function in detector's bandpass, but differs from Band function slightly. We propose to apply this physically-motivated model to systematically fit the GRB prompt emission data collected by Fermi GBM and LAT, and test whether the dominant GRB emission mechanism is fast cooling synchrotron radiation. We will also fit time-dependent spectra with a time-dependent model to investigate whether a quasi- thermal "photosphere'' emission component is indeed needed to fit the observed spectra. This would shed light onto the unknown composition of GRB jets. By fitting the time resolved spectra, we will also constrain important physical parameters of GRB prompt emission, such as the emission site of GRBs, the strength of magnetic fields, as well as their evolution with radius. 2. Recent GRB multi-wavelength observations suggest that it is not straightforward to define the physical category of a GRB based on the traditional classification in the "duration''-"hardness'' domain. Some long-duration GRBs may not have a massive star origin, while some short-duration GRBs may instead have a massive star origin. We propose to systematically study the gamma-ray Swift/BAT, Fermi/GBM- LAT), X-ray (Swift

  16. GRB off-axis afterglows and the emission from the accompanying supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are likely produced in the shock that is driven as the GRB jet interacts with the external medium. Long-duration GRBs are also associated with powerful supernovae (SNe). We consider the optical and radio afterglows of long GRBs for both blasts viewed along the jet axis (`on-axis' afterglows) and misaligned observes (`off-axis' afterglows). Comparing the optical emission from the afterglow with that of the accompanying SN, using SN 1998bw as an archetype, we find that only a few per cent of afterglows viewed off-axis are brighter than the SN. For observable optical off-axis afterglows, the viewing angle is at most twice the half-opening angle of the GRB jet. Radio off-axis afterglows should be detected with upcoming radio surveys within a few hundred Mpc. We propose that these surveys will act as `radio triggers', and that dedicated radio facilities should follow-up these sources. Follow-ups can unveil the presence of the radio SN remnant, if present. In addition, they can probe the presence of a mildly relativistic component, either associated with the GRB jet or the SN ejecta, expected in these sources.

  17. The transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Casper, Anne S.; Sternberg, Alice L.; Holbrook, Janet T.; Jenkins, Gabrielle; Meinert, Curtis L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigators may elect to extend follow-up of participants enrolled in a randomized clinical trial after the trial comes to its planned end. The additional follow-up may be initiated to learn about longer term effects of treatments including adverse events, costs related to treatment, or for reasons unrelated to treatment such as to observe the natural course of the disease using the established cohort from the trial. Purpose We examine transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies when the goal of additional follow-up is to observe longer term treatment effects. Methods We conducted a literature search in selected journals from 2000–2012 to identify trials that extended follow-up for the purpose of studying longer term treatment effects and extracted information on the operational and logistical issues in the transition. We also draw experience from three trials coordinated by the Johns Hopkins Coordinating Centers that made transitions to extended followup: the Alzheimer’s Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT); Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) trial; and Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Results Transitions are not uncommon in multicenter clinical trials, even in trials that continued to the planned end of the trial. Transitioning usually necessitates new participant consents. If study infrastructure is not maintained during the transition, participants will be lost and re-establishing the staff and facilities will be costly. Merging data from the trial and follow-up study can be complicated by changes in data collection measures and schedules. Limitations Our discussion and recommendations are limited to issues that we have experienced in transitions from trials to follow-up studies. Discussion We discuss issues such as maintaining funding, IRB and consent requirements, contacting participants, and combining data from the trial and follow-up phases. We conclude with a list of recommendations to

  18. GRB 110715A: the peculiar multiwavelength evolution of the first afterglow detected by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Hancock, P. J.; Jóhannesson, G.; Murphy, Tara; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Kann, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Oates, S. R.; Japelj, J.; Thöne, C. C.; Lundgren, A.; Perley, D. A.; Malesani, D.; de Gregorio Monsalvo, I.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hu, Y.-D.; Jelínek, M.; Jeong, S.; Kamble, A.; Klose, S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Llorente, A.; Martín, S.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rossi, A.; Schady, P.; Sparre, M.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tello, J. C.; Updike, A.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2017-02-01

    We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 s after the burst and extending up to 74 d later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use the optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host-galaxy environment with low ionization, column density, and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broad-band afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best-fitting parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multiwavelength broad-band afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.

  19. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Data Processing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. The result of this project was a student information system (TEX-SIS) consisting of seven subsystems: (1) Student's Educational Intent, (2) Nonreturning Student Follow-up, (3)…

  20. Clinical evaluation of 860 anterior and posterior lithium disilicate restorations: retrospective study with a mean follow-up of 3 years and a maximum observational period of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Giacomo; Zarone, Fernando; Dellificorelli, Gianluca; Cannistraro, Giorgio; De Lorenzi, Marco; Mosca, Alberto; Sorrentino, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the clinical performance of lithium disilicate restorations supported by natural teeth or implants. Eight hundred sixty lithium disilicate adhesive restorations, including crowns on natural teeth and implant abutments, veneers, and onlays, were made in 312 patients. Parafunctional patients were included, but subjects with uncontrolled periodontitis and gingival inflammation were excluded. Veneers up to 0.5 mm thick were luted with flowable composite resin or light curing cements, while dual-curing composite systems were used with veneers up to 0.8 mm thick. Onlays up to 2 mm in thickness were luted with flowable composite resins or dual-curing composite cements. Crowns up to 1 mm in thickness were cemented with self-adhesive or dual-curing resin cements. The observational period ranged from 12 to 72 months, with a mean follow-up of 3 years. The mechanical and esthetic outcomes of the restorations were evaluated according to the modified California Dental Association (CDA) criteria. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Twenty-six mechanical complications were observed: 17 porcelain chippings, 5 fractures, and 4 losses of retention. Structural drawbacks occurred mainly in posterior segments, and monolithic restorations showed the lowest number of mechanical complications. The clinical ratings of the successful restorations, both monolithic and layered, were satisfactory according to the modified CDA criteria for color match, porcelain surface, and marginal integrity. The cumulative survival rates of lithium disilicate restorations ranged from 95.46% to 100%, while cumulative success rates ranged from 95.39% to 100%. All restorations recorded very high survival and success rates. The use of lithium disilicate restorations in fixed prosthodontics proved to be effective and reliable in the short- and medium-term.

  1. [Lyme borreliosis: follow up criteria after antibiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Christmann, D

    2007-01-01

    The post therapeutic follow-up of Lyme borreliosis is managed according to clinical and serological data. The evolution of antibody rates is such that it doesn't constitute the best element to rely on for follow-up. Indeed, after a sometimes transitory increase of this rate during or after antibiotherapy, the decrease is very slow, sometimes several months, and often incomplete. The follow-up should thus be made according to clinical symptoms and their resolution. Resolution of some but not all symptoms must lead to discussing two options. The first is that of administrating a complementary antibiotherapy with a different mode of action than the first antibiotic used. The second is that this may be due to recontamination, especially in highly endemic zones, given that antibodies present have no protecting effect. In this case, a new antibiotherapy must of course be initiated.

  2. WCTC Graduate Follow-Up Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waukesha County Technical Coll., Pewaukee, WI.

    This paper reports on a survey of 2001-02 graduates of Waukesha County Technical College (WCTC), Wisconsin. The report indicates 1,257 students were awarded Associate's Degrees, technical diplomas, and apprenticeship certificates by WCTC in 2001-02. Of those graduates, 702 (56%) responded to the Graduate Follow-up Survey. Also, 84% of all…

  3. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  4. Facilitating Follow-Up in ELT INSET

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Alan

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that ELT INSET does not always result in the desired level of "follow-up," i.e. impact on teachers' classroom practices. Nevertheless, little research appears to have been carried out concerning how the design of INSET systems affects such outcomes. This paper therefore attempts to throw light on some of the factors…

  5. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Ryde, Felix; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  6. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Norris, Jay; Ryde, Felix

    2007-05-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  7. [Nutritional follow-up after gastric bypass].

    PubMed

    Gasteyger, C; Giusti, V

    2006-03-29

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has become one of the main bariatric procedures. This surgical operation shows excellent results in weight evolution and quality of life and allows a decrease of mortality. However, it leads, relatively often, to nutritional deficiencies which need an effective post-operative follow-up. This follow-up includes not only medical and dietetic encounters but also regular blood analyses made every 3 months during the first post-operative year, every 6 months the second year, then each year. The most frequent deficiencies are those in vitamin B12, iron and folic acid. The secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by an increase of PTH associated to a low vitamin D and a normal calcium, is quite frequent.

  8. GRB 110709A, 111117A, AND 120107A: FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION FROM FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS AND DEMOGRAPHIC IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; McKay, Timothy A.; Pandey, Shashi B.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Launched on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided a rare opportunity to study high-energy photon emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although the majority of such events (27) have been identified by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, four were uncovered by using more sensitive statistical techniques. In this paper, we continue our earlier work by finding three more GRBs associated with high-energy photon emission, GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A. To systematize our matched filter approach, a pipeline has been developed to identify these objects in nearly real time. GRB 120107A is the first product of this analysis procedure. Despite the reduced threshold for identification, the number of GRB events has not increased significantly. This relative dearth of events with low photon number prompted a study of the apparent photon number distribution. We find an extremely good fit to a simple power law with an exponent of -1.8 {+-} 0.3 for the differential distribution. As might be expected, there is a substantial correlation between the number of lower energy photons detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the number observed by LAT. Thus, high-energy photon emission is associated with some but not all of the brighter GBM events. Deeper studies of the properties of the small population of high-energy emitting bursts may eventually yield a better understanding of these entire phenomena.

  9. [Follow-up of encopresis in children].

    PubMed

    Steinmüller, A; Steinhausen, H C

    1990-03-01

    The course of encopresis in 41 children who had been presented at a child and adolescent university clinic was examined by means of a follow-up interview which took place on an average of 3;6 years after the initial visit. The symptoms in this sample diminished considerably: 76% of the children were free of symptoms at the time of the follow-up interview, whereby most of these children had experienced a spontaneous remission. Eighty-one percent of the children were evaluated as having improved in regards to their whole development while in about one third of all the children new problems arose. Remission occurred within the first two years of the initial consultation in 81% of the sample. An examination of the prognostic factors yielded the following relationships: the total remission of symptoms was considerably greater if the frequency of encopresis had been low, if the subjects were male, and if there had not been any therapeutic intervention. However, treatment was usually reserved for relatively serious cases. Favorable outcome tended to be marked by the following factors: normal psychosocial conditions, higher intelligence, the absence of constipation, a concurrently presenting enuresis, and a low degree of behavioral disorders as evaluated by a parental questionnaire. A comparison of the behavioral disorders at the time of the initial consultation and at follow-up revealed a significant reduction of emotional disturbances and hyperactivity. This favorable development was not evident for conduct disorders.

  10. A nearby GRB host galaxy: VLT/X-shooter observations of HG 031203

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), which release enormous amounts of energy into the interstellar medium, occur in galaxies of generally low metallicity. For a better understanding of this phenomenon, detailed observations of the specific properties of the host galaxies (HG) and the environment near the LGRBs are mandatory. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic analysis of HG 031203, the host galaxy of a LRGB burst, to obtain its properties. Our results will be compared with those of previous studies and the properties of a sample of luminous compact emission-line galaxies (LCGs) selected from SDSS DR7. Methods: Based on VLT/X-shooter spectroscopic observations taken from commissioning mode in the wavelength range ~λλ3200-24 000 Å, we use standard direct methods to evaluate physical conditions and element abundances. The resolving power of the instrument also allowed us to trace the kinematics of the ionised gas. Furthermore, we use X-shooter data together with Spitzer observations in the mid-infrared range for testing hidden star formation. Results: We derive an interstellar oxygen abundance of 12 + log O/H = 8.20 ± 0.03 for HG 031203. The observed fluxes of hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value C(Hβ) = 1.67. We produce the CLOUDY photoionisation H ii region model that reproduces observed emission-line fluxes of different ions in the optical range. This model also predicts emission-line fluxes in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) ranges that agree well with the observed ones. This implies that the star-forming region observed in the optical range is the only source of ionisation and there is no additional source of ionisation seen in the NIR and MIR ranges that is hidden in the optical range. We find the composite kinematic structure from profiles of the strong emission lines by decomposing them into two Gaussian narrow and broad components. These components

  11. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  12. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  13. Constraints on binary neutron star merger product from short GRB observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Lü, Hou-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are strong gravitational-wave (GW) sources and the leading candidates to interpret short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Under the assumptions that SGRBs are produced by double neutron star mergers and that the x-ray plateau followed by a steep decay as observed in SGRB x-ray light curves marks the collapse of a supramassive neutron star to a black hole (BH), we use the statistical observational properties of Swift SGRBs and the mass distribution of Galactic double neutron star systems to place constraints on the neutron star equation of state (EoS) and the properties of the post-merger product. We show that current observations already impose the following interesting constraints. (1) A neutron star EoS with a maximum mass close to a parametrization of Mmax=2.37 M⊙(1 +1.58 ×10-10P-2.84) is favored. (2) The fractions for the several outcomes of NS-NS mergers are as follows: ˜40 % prompt BHs, ˜30 % supramassive NSs that collapse to BHs in a range of delay time scales, and ˜30 % stable NSs that never collapse. (3) The initial spin of the newly born supramassive NSs should be near the breakup limit (Pi˜1 ms ), which is consistent with the merger scenario. (4) The surface magnetic field of the merger products is typically ˜1015 G . (5) The ellipticity of the supramassive NSs is ɛ ˜(0.004 -0.007 ), so that strong GW radiation is released after the merger. (6) Even though the initial spin energy of the merger product is similar, the final energy output of the merger product that goes into the electromagnetic channel varies in a wide range from several 1049 to several 1052 erg , since a good fraction of the spin energy is either released in the form of GWs or falls into the black hole as the supramassive NS collapses.

  14. Neonatal follow-up programs and follow-up studies: Historical and current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sauve, Reg; Lee, Shoo K

    2006-01-01

    The present report reviews some highlights in the history of neonatal intensive care and neonatal follow-up programs, particularly developments and reports that were based on experiences in Canada. Early outcomes reported from ‘preemie baby units’ were distressing, but attention has consistently been paid to preterm infant outcomes, even from the early days of neonatal intensive care units. Most current follow-up programs have goals related to ‘audit’ functions, education and clinical roles, but existing literature related to these functions is limited. Several reports have provided guidance in terms of neonatal follow-up research issues, and these strengthen the place of follow-up studies in outcomes research. PMID:19030284

  15. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kupcu-Yoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, E.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  16. GRB Discoveries with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This brief presentation presents Swift Observatory recordings of gamma ray burst (GRB) activity. Long and short GRBs and afterglows are highlighted. Recordings of GRB emission, afterglow, optical/IR brightness, and flux density are presented. The time structure and current status of short GRB structures is also included.

  17. ALMA observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23: deep limits on obscured star formation 630 million years after the big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Chary, R.-R.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Davies, J. E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Stanway, E. R.; Levan, A. J.; Levesque, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) and optical observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23 from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Spitzer Space Telescope, respectively. The host remains undetected to 3σ limits of F {sub ν}(222 GHz) ≲ 33 μJy and F {sub ν}(3.6 μm) ≲ 81 nJy. The FIR limit is about 20 times fainter than the luminosity of the local ULIRG Arp 220 and comparable to the local starburst M 82. Comparing this with model spectral energy distributions, we place a limit on the infrared (IR) luminosity of L {sub IR}(8-1000 μm) ≲ 3 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}, corresponding to a limit on the obscured star formation rate of SFR{sub IR}≲5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. For comparison, the limit on the unobscured star formation rate from Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) observations is SFR{sub UV} ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We also place a limit on the host galaxy stellar mass of M {sub *} ≲ 5 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} (for a stellar population age of 100 Myr and constant star formation rate). Finally, we compare our millimeter observations to those of field galaxies at z ≳ 4 (Lyman break galaxies, Lyα emitters, and submillimeter galaxies) and find that our limit on the FIR luminosity is the most constraining to date, although the field galaxies have much larger rest-frame UV/optical luminosities than the host of GRB 090423 by virtue of their selection techniques. We conclude that GRB host galaxies at z ≳ 4, especially those with measured interstellar medium metallicities from afterglow spectroscopy, are an attractive sample for future ALMA studies of high redshift obscured star formation.

  18. Concluding Remarks: The Current Status and Future Prospects for GRB Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We are in a remarkable period of discovery in GRB astronomy. The current satellites including Swift, Fermi. AGILE and INTEGRAL are detecting and observing bursts of all varieties. Increasing capabilities for follow-up observations on the ground and in space are leading to rapid and deep coverage across the electromagnetic spectrum, The future will see continued operation of the current experiments and with future missions like SVOM plus possible rni_Ssions like JANUS and EXIST. An exciting expansion of capabilities is occurring in areas of gravitational waves and neutrinos that could open new windows on the GRB phenomenon. Increased IR capabilities on the ground and with missions like JWST will enable further exploration of high redshift bursts. The future is bright.

  19. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  20. An optical study of the GRB 970111 field beginning 19 hours after the gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Wolf, C.; Heidt, J.; Seitz, T.; Thommes, E.; Bartolini, C.; Guarnieri, A.; Masetti, N.; Piccioni, A.; Larsen, S.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Palazzi, E.; Lund, N.

    1998-11-01

    We present the results of the monitoring of the GRB 970111 field that started 19 hours after the event. This observation represents the fastest ground-based follow-up performed for GRB 970111 in all wavelengths. As soon as the detection of the possible GRB 970111 X-ray afterglow was reported by Feroci et al. (1998) we reanalyzed the optical data collected for the GRB 970111 field. Although we detect small magnitude variability in some objects, no convincing optical counterpart is found inside the WFC error box. Any change in brightness 19 hours after the GRB is less than 0.2 mag for objects with B < 21 and R < 20.8. The bluest object found in the field is coincident with 1SAX J1528.8+1937. Spectroscopic observations revealed that this object is a Seyfert-1 galaxy with redshift z=0.657, which we propose as the optical counterpart of the X-ray source. Further observations allowed to perform multicolour photometry for objects in the GRB 970111 error box. The colour-colour diagrams do not show any object with unusual colours. We applied a photometric classification method to the objects inside the GRB error box, that can distinguish stars from galaxies and estimate redshifts. We were able to estimate photometric redshifts in the range 0.2 < z < 1.4 for several galaxies in this field and we did not find any conspicuous unusual object. We note that GRB 970111 and GRB 980329 could belong to the same class of GRBs, which may be related to nearby sources (z ~ 1) in which high intrinsic absorption leads to faint optical afterglows. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg, jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy.Based on observations carried out at the Danish 1.54-m Telescope on the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, ChileBased on observations at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Loiano, Italy.

  1. Elevated Patient Body Mass Index Does Not Negatively Affect Self-Reported Outcomes of Thoracolumbar Surgery: Results of a Comparative Observational Study with Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Manson, Neil A; Green, Alana J; Abraham, Edward P

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Quantify the effect of obesity on elective thoracolumbar spine surgery patients. Methods Five hundred consecutive adult patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery to treat degenerative pathologies with minimum follow-up of at least 1 year were included. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scales for back and leg pain, the Short Form 36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary, the modified Oswestry Disability Index, and patient satisfaction scores collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative emergency department presentation, hospital readmission, and revision surgeries. Patients were grouped according to World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) guidelines to isolate the effect of obesity on primary and secondary outcome measures. Results Mean BMI was 30 kg/m(2), reflecting a significantly overweight population. Each BMI group reported statistically significant improvement on all self-reported outcome measures. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, there was no association between BMI group and primary outcome measures. Patients with BMI of 35 to 39.99 visited the emergency department with complaints of pain significantly more often than the other groups. Otherwise, we did not detect any differences in the secondary outcome measures between BMI groups. Conclusions Patients of all levels of obesity experienced significant improvement following elective thoracolumbar spine surgery. These outcomes were achieved without increased risk of postoperative complications such as infection and reoperation. A risk-benefit algorithm to assist with surgical decision making for obese patients would be valuable to surgeons and patients alike.

  2. Multiwavelength Follow-up of a Rare Icecube Neutrino Multiplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    IceCube detected three neutrino-induced track events arriving within less than 100s from a similar direction. Expected chance occurrence rate of 1 every 14 years, so not exceptionally rare, but interesting. If astrophysical in nature, the source would have to be relatively nearby or be an exceptional bright neutrino emitter. Follow-up observations by Swift-BAT, Swift-XRT, Master, ASAS-SN, LCOG, Veritas, FACT, and HAWC. The IceCube collaboration wanted to produce a paper summarizing the non-detections and outlining the follow-up network they have assembled. We were asked by Anna Franckowiak to contribute Fermi analysis to their write-up of this event.

  3. Apparent brightness distribution of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Rácz, István I.; Balázs, Lajos G.; Horváth, István; Tóth, L. Viktor

    We studied the unbiased optical brightness distribution which was calculated from the survival analysis of host galaxies (HGs) data and its relationship with the Swift GRB data of the host galaxies observed by the Keck telescope. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we also studied the dependence of this distribution on the GRB's data. Finally, we compared the HGs distribution with standard galaxies distribution of the DEEP2 redshift survey and checked the result with the VIPERS catalogue too.

  4. Discovery and follow up of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowell, E.; Chernykh, N. S.; Marsden, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    After a summary of the increasing activity in steroid discovery during the past few years, the importance of carefully thought out observing strategy is discussed, in particular with regard to target selection, observing frequency, and the time distribution of observations. Problems of cataloging and orbit linkage are outlined, inasmuch as they affect individual observers and orbit computers, as well as the work of the Minor Planet Center. There is some discussion of appropriate two-way communication between observers and the Minor Planet Center.

  5. The SEDs and host galaxies of the dustiest GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krühler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Küpcü-Yoldaş, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, F.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe. Until recently, however, the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows, biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims: Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (AVGRB ≳ 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry, and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies, and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods: This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line and galaxy-integrated characteristics such as the host's stellar mass, luminosity, color-excess, and star-formation rate. Results: For the eight afterglows considered in this study, we report for the first time the redshift of GRB 081109 (z = 0.9787 ± 0.0005), and the visual extinction towards GRBs 081109 (AVGRB = 3.4-0.3+0.4 mag) and 100621A (AVGRB = 3.8±0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs, there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metal-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder (⟨ (R - K)AB ⟩ ~ 1.6 mag), more luminous (⟨ L ⟩ ~ 0.9 L∗), and massive (⟨ log M∗ [M⊙] ⟩ ~ 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. Hence, we probe a different galaxy population, suggesting that previous host samples miss most of the

  6. Astrometric Follow Up of Wide Planetary Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkan, Stephen; Janson, Markus; Carson, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The current population of known exoplanets is biased towards close in, short period planets due to the detection rate of transit and radial velocity techniques. However the advancement in direct imaging technologies and image reduction techniques has opened up sensitivity to massive planets at large separations, rapidly expanding the parameter space over which planetary existence and characteristics can be probed. The Spitzer space telescope is ideally suited for the direct imaging of such planets that have peak thermal emission at wavelengths around 4.5 microns. Previous Spitzer data collected under programs 34 and 48 has recently been the subject of a sophisticated principal components analysis reduction technique. This technique has removed stellar PSF to a much greater degree than preceding studies have achieved, the reduced archival Spitzer observations are sensitive to planetary mass companions at a much smaller separations than previously attainable. This reduction technique accompanied by stringent criteria, such as ≥5 sigma significance, realistic visual characteristics and taking into account the predicted spectral energy distribution of Jupiter mass planets, has identified a number of potential planetary companions. These targets must be observed in a 2nd epoch to test for common proper motion to offer a firm confirmation or refutation of the candidate's planetary nature. Here we propose to observe 12 of these targets for which data does not exist in a 2nd epoch to a sufficient degree of sensitivity to recover the potential planetary candidates for astrometric investigation.

  7. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Ibar, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Van der Horst, A. J.; and others

    2012-08-20

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  8. GRB 130427A: a nearby ordinary monster.

    PubMed

    Maselli, A; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Mundell, C G; Kawai, N; Campana, S; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; Cusumano, G; Evans, P A; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Guidorzi, C; Kobayashi, S; Kuin, P; La Parola, V; Mangano, V; Oates, S; Sakamoto, T; Serino, M; Virgili, F; Zhang, B-B; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A; Bernardini, M G; Bersier, D; Burrows, D; Calderone, G; Capalbi, M; Chiang, J; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; De Pasquale, M; Fugazza, D; Gehrels, N; Gomboc, A; Harrison, R; Hanayama, H; Japelj, J; Kennea, J; Kopac, D; Kouveliotou, C; Kuroda, D; Levan, A; Malesani, D; Marshall, F; Nousek, J; O'Brien, P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Page, K L; Page, M; Perri, M; Pritchard, T; Romano, P; Saito, Y; Sbarufatti, B; Salvaterra, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N; Vianello, G; Wiegand, B; Weigand, B; Wiersema, K; Yatsu, Y; Yoshii, T; Tagliaferri, G

    2014-01-03

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L ~ 3 × 10(53) ergs per second) and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the γ-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  9. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Mundell, C. G.; Kawai, N.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuin, P.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Sakamoto, T.; Serino, M.; Virgili, F.; Zhang, B.-B.; Barthelmy, S.; Beardmore, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bersier, D.; Burrows, D.; Calderone, G.; Capalbi, M.; Chiang, J.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; De Pasquale, M.; Fugazza, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gomboc, A.; Harrison, R.; Hanayama, H.; Japelj, J.; Kennea, J.; Kopac, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuroda, D.; Levan, A.; Malesani, D.; Marshall, F.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K. L.; Page, M.; Perri, M.; Pritchard, T.; Romano, P.; Saito, Y.; Sbarufatti, B.; Salvaterra, R.; Steele, I.; Tanvir, N.; Vianello, G.; Weigand, B.; Wiersema, K.; Yatsu, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L ˜ 3 × 1053 ergs per second) and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the γ-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  10. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maselli, A.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Mundell, C. G.; Kawai, N.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Ghirlander, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuin, P.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Marshall, F.; Wiegand, B.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L approx. 3 x 10(exp 53) ergs/s and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  11. The Grb2 adaptor.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Cussac, D; Maignan, S; Ducruix, A

    1995-08-01

    Grb2 is an 'adaptor' protein made of one SH2 and two SH3 domains. The SH3 domains bind to prolinerich motifs in the C-terminal part of the ras exchange factor Sos. Binding of the Grb2 SH2 domain to phosphotyrosine motifs on receptors, or other adaptor proteins such as Shc, recruits this Grb2/Sos complex at the plasma membrane where Sos stimulates nucleotide exchange on ras, then ras activates raf and leads to MAP kinase activation. The structure of Grb2, the precise motifs recognised by its SH2 and SH3 domains, the way Grb2 performs its function, a possible regulation of its association with Sos, and its ability to complex with other proteins in vivo, are discussed.

  12. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  13. The GRB coordinates network (GCN): A status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Marshall, F.; Takeshima, T.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Robinson, C. R.

    1998-05-01

    A review of the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) will be given. The GCN has recently replaced the BATSE Coordinates Distribution Network (BACODINE), maintaining all of BACODINE's original capabilities and services, but also providing new sources of GRB location information. These are: (1) source locations using the MSFC LOCBURST algorithm, (2) the Rossi-XTE detections (PCA and ASM), (3) the Interplanetary Network (IPN) locations, and (4) CGRO-COMPTEL locations. These new sources of locations are available for distribution in the minutes-to-hours-to-days time delay ranges, and they also have increasingly and significantly reduced error boxes, thus providing a broad range of time delays and error box sizes to fit within the observing capabilities of a broad range of follow-up instruments in the radio, optical, and TeV gamma-ray bands. Extreme-UV transients from ALEXIS are also now distributed. For all sources of location information, all the distribution methods are available (Internet Socket, E-mail, Alpha-numeric and Numeric Pagers, and Phone/modem) and several filters. Sites can choose which sources to receive and what filters to be applied. The GCN web site has been expanded to include a globally inclusive table of locations, light-curves, and fluence information which is automatically updated in real-time.

  14. Employer Follow-up Data Summary--1976-77. Tex-SIS FOLLOW-UP; Postsecondary Student Follow-up Management Information System. Monograph 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The Tex-SIS Follow-up system Employer Follow-up Survey involved four Texas community colleges, providing a statewide composite of employer data on the competency of occupational/technical graduates. The mailing list for prospective survey participants was derived from occupational/technical graduates' responses to a survey conducted in 1975-76. A…

  15. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discovered as of the date of the follow-up report; (3) The number of units in which corrective action has been completed as of the date of the follow-up report; (4) The number of first purchasers not notified... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15...

  16. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  17. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  18. Follow up observations of SDSS and CRTS candidate cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Szkody, Paula; Vasquez-Soltero, Stephanie; Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Landolt, Arlo U.; Bond, Howard E. E-mail: dsilva@noao.edu E-mail: landolt@rouge.phys.lsu.edu

    2014-10-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of 11 and 35 potential cataclysmic variables, respectively, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, and vsnet alerts. The photometry results include quasi-periodic oscillations during the decline of V1363 Cyg, nightly accretion changes in the likely Polar (AM Herculis binary) SDSS J1344+20, eclipses in SDSS J2141+05 with an orbital period of 76 ± 2 minutes, and possible eclipses in SDSS J2158+09 at an orbital period near 100 minutes. Time-resolved spectra reveal short orbital periods near 80 minutes for SDSS J0206+20, 85 minutes for SDSS J1502+33, and near 100 minutes for CSS J0015+26, RXS J0150+37, SDSS J1132+62, SDSS J2154+15, and SDSS J2158+09. The prominent He II line and velocity amplitude of SDSS J2154+15 are consistent with a Polar nature for this object, while the absence of this line and a low velocity amplitude argue against this classification for RXS J0150+37. Single spectra of 10 objects were obtained near outburst and the rest near quiescence, confirming the dwarf novae nature of these objects.

  19. A follow-up campaign for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Emily; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Bailes, Matthew; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Keane, Evan; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Caleb, Manisha

    2014-04-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are bright, millisecond-duration radio pulses hypothesized to originate at cosmological distances. To date, no counterpart sources have been associated with FRBs and their origins remain a puzzling mystery. Some have proposed FRBs come from Crab-like pulsar giant pulses or rare bursts from main sequence flare stars in our Galaxy. Both mechanisms would generate observable subsequent FRB-like events. In this proposal we directly test this hypothesis by conducting several follow-up observations on the eight FRBs from the High Time Resolution Universe Survey. This sample represents the majority of the dozen or so known FRB sources. With these observations we will set strict limits on any repetition of FRBs while using the 12 off-source beams of the multi-beam receiver as real-time FRB and transient detectors.

  20. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public.

  1. A 3-year follow-up of hypertension in Delhi.

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, N.; Chadha, S. L.; Shekhawat, S.; Tandon, R.

    1994-01-01

    A follow-up study of hypertension was carried out among adults in Delhi 3 years after an initial community-based epidemiological survey of the same population. The treatment and the severity status of 1115 out of 1749 individuals with hypertension detected in the initial survey were compared with those observed in the follow-up. The proportion of treated cases with controlled blood pressure rose from 10.8% to 60.8%. Among the cohort of 3611 subjects aged 25-64 years who were normotensive in the initial survey, 132 new cases of hypertension, were detected. The annual incidence of hypertension was the same in men and women (12.2 per 1000). Diabetes and regular alcohol consumption were significant risk factors for hypertension, being present in 13 and 7 cases, respectively. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded for 871 of the 1115 cases of hypertension. Abnormal ECGs were exhibited by 307 cases (35.2%), of which 24 (2.7%) had had myocardial infarction, 133 (15.3%) had ischaemic ST-T changes, 54 (6.2%) had left ventricular hypertrophy, and 96 (11.0%) had conduction defects and arrhythmias. PMID:7955019

  2. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; de SOUZA, Karen Regina Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment. PMID:23032213

  3. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and

  4. GRB 081007 AND GRB 090424: THE SURROUNDING MEDIUM, OUTFLOWS, AND SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Zhiping; Covino, Stefano; Fugazza, Dino; Melandri, Andrea; Campana, Sergio; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Della Valle, Massimo; Ferrero, Patrizia; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Pian, Elena; Salvaterra, Ruben; Bersier, David; Cano, Zach; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Haislip, Joshua B.; and others

    2013-09-10

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be {Gamma} {approx} 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of {Gamma} > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  5. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  6. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  7. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; Weiner, Benjamin; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60 C120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) Stellar Luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  8. A Compact Binary Merger Model for the Short, Hard GRB 050509b

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, William H.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-06-15

    The first X-ray afterglow for a short ({approx}30ms), hard {gamma}-ray burst was detected by Swift on 9 May 2005 (GRB 050509b). No optical or radio counterpart was identified in follow-up observations. The tentative association of the GRB with a nearby giant elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.2248 would imply the progenitor had traveled several tens of kpc from its point of origin, in agreement with expectations linking these events to the final merger of compact binaries driven by gravitational wave emission. We model the dynamical merger of such a system and the time-dependent evolution of the accretion tori thus created. The resulting energetics, variability, and expected durations are consistent with GRB 050509b originating from the tidal disruption of a neutron star by a stellar mass black hole, or of the merger of two neutron stars followed by prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. We discuss how the available {gamma}-ray and X-ray data provides a probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the surrounding medium.

  9. A GRB tool shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  10. Temporal Constraints on the Size of Gamma-ray Burst Progenitors and Implications for Gravitational Wave Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkhou, V. Zach; Butler, Nathaniel; Littlejohns, Owen

    2017-01-01

    Uncovering the intrinsic variability of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the most energetic explosions since the Big Bang, constrains the size of the GRB emission region, and ejecta velocity, in turn providing hints on the nature of GRBs and their progenitors.We develop a novel method which ties together wavelet and structure-function analyses to measure, for the first time, the actual minimum variability timescale, Δtmin, of GRB light curves. Implementing our technique to the largest sample of GRBs collected by Swift and Fermi instruments, reveals that only less than 10% of GRBs exhibit evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. Investigation on various energy bands of Fermi/GBM (spanning 8 keV-1 MeV) shows that the tightest constraints on progenitor radii derive from timescales obtained from the hardest energy channel of light curves (299 -1000 keV). Our derivations for the minimum Lorentz factor, Γmin, and the minimum emission radius, R = 2 c Γmin2 Δtmin / (1+z), find Γ ≥ 400 which imply typical emission radii R ≈ 1×1014 cm for long-duration GRBs and R ≈ 3×1013 cm for short-duration GRBs (sGRBs). This information is served in an online, publicly-accessible table which is automatically updated upon a new GRB trigger event.Given the possible linkage between sGRBs and Compact Binary Coalescence events, the practical approach to finally detect the Electromagnetic counterparts of LIGO triggers is to focus our follow-up resources on sGRBs. Our sGRB selection methodology, a direct measure of the emission region size, along with the implemented vetting algorithm of extracted transient candidates found by an image subtraction code could optimize efficiently LIGO follow-up with the Ground-based Telescopes.

  11. Continued Astrometric Follow-up Of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, Timothy; Johnson, Lindley (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    As the grant periods overlapped, some of this information below will also be present on the previous final report. During the period May 1 2004 to April 30 2005, approximately 100 NEOs fainter than V = 20 were observed on separate nights from the 1.2-m telescope at Mt. Hopkins. Additionally, a few comets were targeted, including astrometric support of the Deep Impact mission by observing comet P/Tempel 1. Kyle Smalley was again employed as an independent contractor, and he was trained in use of the telescope, performed several remote observing runs on his own, and has now begun critical software support of the observing program. Code to automatically operate the telescope, given a target list, is approximately 90% done. During the first observing run scheduled in late September or early October, this code will be tested at on the telescope. It is probable that the 1.2m telescope will be run automatically all night without any interruption from the observer for anything during this time. Additional work on selecting which NEO targets to observe is progressing, with a beta-release of a simple target selection web page. Additionally, two-night objects with the potential of being NEOs have been extracted on a routine basis during this last grant cycle. These will also be added to a web page to facilitate additional astrometric follow-up.

  12. GRB 030329: 3 years of radio afterglow monitoring.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, A J; Kamble, A; Wijers, R A M J; Resmi, L; Bhattacharya, D; Rol, E; Strom, R; Kouveliotou, C; Oosterloo, T; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2007-05-15

    Radio observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are essential for our understanding of the physics of relativistic blast waves, as they enable us to follow the evolution of GRB explosions much longer than the afterglows in any other wave band. We have performed a 3-year monitoring campaign of GRB 030329 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescopes and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Our observations, combined with observations at other wavelengths, have allowed us to determine the GRB blast wave physical parameters, such as the total burst energy and the ambient medium density, as well as to investigate the jet nature of the relativistic outflow. Further, by modelling the late-time radio light curve of GRB 030329, we predict that the Low-Frequency Array (30-240 MHz) will be able to observe afterglows of similar GRBs, and constrain the physics of the blast wave during its non-relativistic phase.

  13. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section 179.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an...

  14. First Grade Follow-Up of Kidi-Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stank, Peggy L.

    A 1971-72 study compared the effects of a Kindergarten Diagnostic Prereading Program with the effects of traditional kindergarten on children's predicted reading levels. A follow-up study of the first grade reading achievement of the children from both kindergarten programs was recently completed. The purpose of the follow-up study was to answer…

  15. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt analysis... notification of the results of the toxicological analysis, any provision of collective bargaining...

  16. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt analysis... notification of the results of the toxicological analysis, any provision of collective bargaining...

  17. The LCOGT Near Earth Object (NEO) Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric; Larson, Steve

    2014-11-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and robotically.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), NEOWISE and PanSTARRS (PS1). Over 600 NEO candidates have been targeted so far this year with 250+ objects reported to the MPC, including 70 confirmed NEOs. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects in order to improve the orbits and determine the rotation periods. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) targets. Recent results have included the first period determination for the Apollo 2002 NV16 and our first NEO spectrum from the FLOYDS spectrographs on the LCOGT 2m telescopes obtained for 2012 DA14 during the February 2013 closepass.

  18. DISCOVERY AND REDSHIFT OF AN OPTICAL AFTERGLOW IN 71 deg{sup 2}: iPTF13bxl AND GRB 130702A

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Leo P.; Brown, Duncan A.; Bradley Cenko, S.; Gehrels, Neil; McEnery, Julie; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Mulchaey, John; Perley, Daniel A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bellm, Eric; Barlow, Tom; Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Nugent, Peter E.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Masci, Frank J.; and others

    2013-10-20

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the γ-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 deg{sup 2} surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the Very Large Array confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200 inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z = 0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt γ-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ∼10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step toward overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.

  19. Detection of GRB 060927 at z = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Starling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bersier, D.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Göǧüş, E.; Gorosabel, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Güver, T.; Hjorth, J.; Horns, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Jakobsson, P.; Jensen, B. L.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Ledoux, C.; Levan, A. J.; Marsh, T.; McKay, T.; Melandri, A.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Mundell, C. G.; O'Brien, P. T.; Özel, M.; Phillips, A.; Quimby, R.; Rowell, G.; Rujopakarn, W.; Rykoff, E. S.; Schaefer, B. E.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.; Urata, Y.; Vestrand, W. T.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Watson, D.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wren, J.; Yost, S. A.; Yuan, F.; Zhai, M.; Zheng, W. K.

    2007-11-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture ground-based telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hr after the trigger shows a continuum break at λ~8070 Å, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at z~5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 Å, which we interpret as Si II λ1260 at z=5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Lyα profile with a column density with log(NH/cm-2)=22.50+/-0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: (1) GRB afterglows originating from z>~6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; (2) the presence of large H I column densities in some GRB host galaxies at z>5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; and (3) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at z>5, and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe. Partly based on observations carried out with the ESO telescopes under programs 077.D-0661, 077.A-0667, 078.D-0416, and the large program 177.A-f0591.

  20. Integrated GW-EM Follow-up Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LSC Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Advanced Gravitational-Wave (GW) detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo are expected to become operational for observation runs in 2015, with an expected ultimate improvement in sensitivity over previous configurations by a factor of 10 by 2019. There are many potential electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to GWs including short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and kilonovae. While SGRBs and LGRBs predominantly emit in the X-ray, and the recently-observed kilonova primarily in the infrared, all three sources are expected to have detectable traces in the optical band, albeit requiring very sensitive optical telescopes. In order to aid in the optimization of GW trigger follow-up procedures, we perform an end-to-end analysis feasibility study using synthesized Advanced detector data simulating a GW detection with a theoretical EM counterpart injected into archival optical images. We use images from Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and inject candidate events following observed lightcurves of SGRBs, LGRBs, and kilonovae. The use of Zernike PSF decomposition on candidate objects offers a fast way to identify point sources, speeding up the automated identification of transient sources in the images. We present our method of transient recovery and the latest results of our feasibility study of a joint GW-EM observation.

  1. Search for VHE emission from GRB with Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P.M.

    2005-02-21

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high-energy particles impacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for very high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRB) during the prompt emission phase because of its wide field of view and high duty cycle, monitoring the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. 33 satellite-triggered GRB have occurred within the field of view of Milagro between January 2000 and December 2003. We have searched for counterparts to these GRB and found no significant emission from any of these burst positions. In the case of GRB 010921, the redshift is low enough (0.45) that our upper limit on the fluence places an observational constraint on potential GRB models.

  2. Long GRB with Additional High Energy Maxima after the End of the Low Energy T90 Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irene, Arkhangelskaja; Alexander, Zenin; Dmitry, Kirin; Elena, Voevodina

    2013-01-01

    Now GRB high energy γ-emission was observed mostly by detectors onboard Fermi and Agile satellites. During most part of GRB high energy γ-emission registered some later than low energy trigger and lasts several hundreds of seconds, but its maxima are within low energy t90 intervals both for short and long bursts. But GRB090323, GRB090328 and GRB090626 temporal profiles have additional maxima after low energy t90 intervals finished. These bursts temporal profile analysis have shown that faint peaks in low energy bands close to the ends of low energy t90 intervals preceded such maxima. Moreover, these events low energy spectral index β behavior differs from usual GRB one according to preliminary analysis. We suppose that these GRB could be separated as different GRB type. In presented article this new GRB type properties are discussed.

  3. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  4. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:26097393

  5. A follow-up study on three caries activity tests.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sizhen; Deng, Qing; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Yakushiji, Masashi; Machida, Yukio; Liang, Qin

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the efficacy of three CAT's (Dentocult SM, Dentocult LB and Dentobuff Strip) in revealing caries condition and predicting caries progress, and provide a reference for application by comparing the three tests. Oral condition and results of the three CAT's of 82 children aged 3 to 4 were recorded and followed up. The examination was checked again two years later. The caries incidence, dft and CSI data from the two examinations were analyzed statistically. The results were that each Dentocult SM degree showed significant variances in incidence rate, as did the dft and CSI results in the second examination. The dft and CSI of both examinations exhibited a high degree of statistical significance. The same may be said of the Dentocult LB findings for the two years. No noticeable variances in caries incidence rate, dft and CSI from the Dentobuff Strip test were observed in both years' study, nor was there any statistical significance drawn from the findings, except for those of the second exam. No gender differences were observed in the distribution by degree with the three CATs The conclusion is that Dentocult SM is the best of the three tests for the diagnosis of the presence of caries and prognosis of its progress, Dentocult LB is second best whereas the Dentobuff Strip shows no detection capability. The findings serve as an application reference.

  6. Strategies to photometric follow-up transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.

    2014-03-01

    It is now well ascertained that those extrasolar planets that transit in front to their parent stars deserve extensive follow-up observations because they are the only ones for which we can directly measure all their physical parameters. This information currently provides the best route to constructing the mass-radius diagram of exoplanets, which channels the theoretical formation/evolution models in the right path. However, many of the discovered transiting planets do not have high-quality light curves, so their physical properties are poorly known. In this perspective, we are leading a large program to obtain ultra-high-precision photometry of transit events, which are analyzed to accurately measure the physical properties of know planetary systems. Besides measuring and refining the physical properties of the planets and their parent stars, we also try to obtain additional information from the light curves, by identifying particular features of the systems (e.g. stellar activity) and investigating the composition of the planetary atmospheres by transmission photometry. In this conference-proceedings contribution I present several observational strategies that we adopt to achieve these goals. %

  7. The ultraluminous GRB 110918A

    SciTech Connect

    Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, Ph. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V.; Kokomov, A. A.; Hurley, K.; Mangano, V.; Burrows, D. N.; Sbarufatti, B.; Siegel, M. H.; Oates, S.; Cline, T. L.; Krimm, H. A.; Pagani, C.; Mitrofanov, I. G. [Space Research Institute, Profsoyuznaya 84 and others

    2013-12-20

    GRB 110918A is the brightest long gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Konus-WIND during its almost 19 yr of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final Interplanetary Network localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderate peak energy of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z = 0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release E {sub iso} = (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 54} erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity L {sub iso} = (4.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}. A tail of the soft γ-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. The Swift/X-Ray Telescope and the Swift/Ultraviolet Optical Telescope observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and interstellar-medium-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among the multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.°7-3.°4 results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of z ∼ 7.5 for Konus-WIND and z ∼ 12 for the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early

  8. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  9. Outpatient follow-up for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Watch, Libby

    2014-09-01

    Outpatient follow-Up for critical limb ischemia offers the clinician the opportunity to monitor the patient for risk factor modification and wound healing. Routine surveillance following intervention will improve long-term patency.

  10. Radiological follow-up of pediatric pneumonia: principle and practice.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Dhia; Vartzelis, George; McQueen, Paula; Perkin, Michael R

    2007-03-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the trends in radiological follow up of childhood pneumonia among consultant pediatricians throughout the United Kingdom. A questionnaire was sent to 120 consultant pediatricians. Among the 88 respondents, 18% would carry out a repeat chest radiograph on follow-up of all their patients admitted with pneumonia, whereas 78% would perform the investigation selectively. Among the criteria for selection, persistence of symptoms and collapse or effusion were cited, although a considerable number would repeat a chest radiograph in children with lobar pneumonia. The mean timing of a repeat chest radiograph was 5.5 weeks after presentation (range 2-12 weeks). Only 23% of the respondents worked in units with written guidelines for the follow-up of children with pneumonia. Written guidelines, specifying the categories of children who would benefit from follow-up chest radiographs, should be present and implemented in all pediatric departments.

  11. Searching for Soft Relativistic Jets in Core-Collapse Supernovae with the IceCube Optical Follow-up Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. -H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Stamatikos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of < or approx.100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in high relativistic jets, core-collapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets, which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star leading to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. Aims. To increase the sensitivity to these neutrinos and identify their sources, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with the IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods. If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results. No statistically significant excess in the rate of neutrino multiplets has been observed and furthermore no coincidence with an optical counterpart was found. Conclusions. The search allows, for the first time, to set stringent limits on current models predicting a high-energy neutrino flux from soft relativistic hadronic jets in core-collapse SNe. We conclude that a sub-population of SNe with typical Lorentz boost factor and jet energy of 10 and 3 x 10(exp 51) erg, respectively, does not exceed 4:2% at 90% confidence.

  12. Searching for soft relativistic jets in core-collapse supernovae with the IceCube optical follow-up program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Akerlof, C. W.; Pandey, S. B.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W.; ROTSE Collaboration

    2012-03-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of ≲100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in high relativistic jets, core-collapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets, which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star leading to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. Aims: To increase the sensitivity to these neutrinos and identify their sources, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with the IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods: If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results: No statistically significant excess in the rate of neutrino multiplets has been observed and furthermore no coincidence with an optical counterpart was found. Conclusions: The search allows, for the first time, to set stringent limits on current models predicting a high-energy neutrino flux from soft relativistic hadronic jets in core-collapse SNe. We conclude that a sub-population of SNe with typical Lorentz boost factor and jet energy of 10 and 3 × 1051 erg, respectively, does not exceed 4.2% at 90% confidence.

  13. Women with abnormal screening mammography lost to follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Guan-Ru; Hung, Shou-Hung; Liu, Yi-Lien; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer has the highest incidence among all cancers for women in Taiwan. The current screening policy in Taiwan suggested a biennial mammography for all women 40 to 69 years of age. A recommendation for additional testing is recommended for women with a BI-RADS result of 0 or 4; a request made via postal mail. Approximately 20% of high-risk patients do not receive additional follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to explore the causes of these patients being lost to follow-up, despite an abnormal mammogram. Two questionnaires were designed separately according to the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model. Study participants, women who received a screening mammography at the National Taiwan University Hospital in 2011 with a BI-RAD of 0 or 4, were interviewed via telephone. The dependent variable was receipt of follow-up or not. The analyses were performed by using χ2 tests and logistic regression models. In total, 528 women were enrolled in the study: 51.2% in BI-RADS 0 group and 56.6% in BI-RADS 4, respectively. In the BI-RADS 0 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the most likely causes to be physician suggestion, health implications, and concerns regarding breast cancer. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited a lack of time and a perception of good personal health as primary reasons. In the BI-RADS 4 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the physician's recommendation and a recognition of the importance of follow-up examinations. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited having received follow-up at another hospital and a desire for a second opinion. In the BI-RADS 0 group, multivariate analysis showed that patients with higher scores in the “perceived benefits” domain were statistically more likely to receive a follow-up examination. There was no significant difference in perceived threats, perceived barriers, action cues, or self-efficacy between

  14. Pediatric Celiac Disease: Follow-Up in the Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Valitutti, Francesco; Trovato, Chiara Maria; Montuori, Monica; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The follow-up of celiac disease (CD) is challenging due to the scarcity of published data and the lack of standardized evidence-based protocols. The worldwide frequency and methods of CD follow-up appear to be heavily influenced by expert opinions of the individual physicians who assess children with CD. The aim of this review was to summarize the available studies on CD follow-up in children. We conducted a literature search with the use of PubMed, Medline, and Embase (from 1900 to 15 December 2016) for terms relevant to this review, including CD, follow-up, dietary adherence or dietary compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, complications, and quality of life. The aims of follow-up are as follows: to ensure strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, to ensure nutritional adequacy, to improve quality of life, and to prevent disease complications. For the correct evaluation of children with CD at follow-up, a clinical and biochemical evaluation is necessary on a regular basis. It is advisable to assess compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, or possible complications once a year at the referral center. Laboratory tests might be useful for a thorough evaluation of any patient with CD to rule out a micronutrient deficiency (full blood count, ferritin, folic acid, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12) and possible cardiovascular risk factors (glucose, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides). Biochemical evaluation is essential when there are clinical problems and should be customized on the basis of the specific clinical suspicion. Associated autoimmune thyroiditis should also be screened for yearly by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid autoantibody concentrations, regardless of symptoms, because hypothyroidism is often subtle and methods for early treatment are available and desirable. Although evidence-based recommendations for follow-up of pediatric patients with CD have not yet been established, we advise a yearly follow-up visit as the safest approach.

  15. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged.

  16. Searching for High-energy Neutrinos from Supernovae with IceCube and an Optical Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franckowiak, Anna

    2011-08-01

    In violent astrophysical processes high-energy neutrinos of TeV to PeV energies are expected to be produced along with the highest energy cosmic rays. The acceleration of nuclei to very high energies is assumed to takes place in astrophysical shocks and neutrinos are produced in the interaction of these cosmic rays with ambient baryons or photons. The neutrinos then escape the acceleration region and propagate through space without interaction, while the nuclei are deflected in magnetic fields and no longer carry information about their source position. Unlike gamma-rays, neutrinos are solely produced in hadronic processes and can therefore reveal the sources of charged cosmic rays. The IceCube neutrino detector, which is located at the geographical South Pole, has been build to detect these high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. The deep clear Antarctic ice is instrumented with light sensors on a grid, thus forming a Cherenkov particle detector, which is capable of detecting charged particles induced by neutrinos above 100 GeV. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of = 100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in the high relativistic jets driven by the central engine, corecollapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star and lead to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. This work aims for an increased sensitivity for these neutrinos and for a possible identification of their sources. Towards this goal, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with IceCube has been implemented. If a neutrino multiplet - i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s - is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE). The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the

  17. Pi of the Sky involvement in LSC-Virgo electromagnetic follow-up project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZadroŻny, Adam; Sokołowski, Marcin; Mankiewicz, Lech; Żarnecki, Aleksander Filip

    2016-09-01

    Pi of the Sky took part in LSC-Virgo's Electromagnetic (EM) Follow-up project during first science run of Advanced LIGO detectors between September 2015 and January 2016. More than 60 astronomical teams have signed Memorandum-of-Understanding with LSC-Virgo for EM Follow-up project. LSC-Virgo's EM Follow-up is aimed for searching electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave transient candidates. Observing an event both in EM and gravitational wave band might be a important step forward to multi-messenger astronomy. The aim of this paper is to show algorithms used by Pi of the Sky for analysing data taken during the science runs.

  18. Probing the complex environments of GRB host galaxies and intervening systems: high resolution spectroscopy of GRB050922C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, S.; Vergani, S.; Fiore, F.; D'Elia, V.; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.; Stella, L.

    2009-05-01

    We use high resolution spectroscopic observations of the afterglow of GRB050922C, in order to investigate the environment of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and the interstellar matter of their host galaxies. We found that, as for most high resolution spectra of GRBs, the spectrum of the afterglow of GRB050922C is complex. The detection of lines of neutral elements like MgI and the detection of fine-structure levels of the ions FeII, SiII and CII allows us to separate components in the GRB ISM along the line of sight. GRB afterglow spectra can be used to disentangle the contribution of the different parts of the GRB host galaxy and to study their properties.

  19. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H. T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-05-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the 0.3-10 keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of z ~ 0.5, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time (<700 s after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above ~380 GeV of 4.2 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 (95% confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been observed in the other bright X-ray GRB 130427A. A comparison between the H.E.S.S. upper limit and the contemporaneous energy output in X-rays constrains the ratio between the X-ray and VHE gamma-ray fluxes to be greater than 0.4. This value is an important quantity for modelling the afterglow and can constrain leptonic emission scenarios, where leptons are responsible for the X-ray emission and might produce VHE gamma rays.

  20. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  1. Follow-up skeletal survey use by child abuse pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Harper, Nancy S; Lewis, Terri; Eddleman, Sonja; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal survey is frequently used to identify occult fractures in young children with concern for physical abuse. Because skeletal survey is relatively insensitive for some abusive fractures, a follow-up skeletal survey (FUSS) may be undertaken at least 10-14 days after the initial skeletal survey to improve sensitivity for healing fractures. This was a prospectively planned secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study of 2,890 children who underwent subspecialty evaluation for suspected child physical abuse at 1 of 19 centers. Our objective was to determine variability between sites in rates of FUSS recommendation, completion and fracture identification among the 2,049 participants who had an initial SS. Among children with an initial skeletal survey, the rate of FUSS recommendation for sites ranged from 20% to 97%; the rate of FUSS completion ranged from 10% to 100%. Among sites completing at least 10 FUSS, rates of new fracture identification ranged from 8% to 28%. Among completed FUSS, new fractures were more likely to be identified in younger children, children with higher initial level of concern for abuse, and those with a fracture or cutaneous injury identified in the initial evaluation. The current variability in FUSS utilization is not explained by variability in occult fracture prevalence. Specific guidelines for FUSS utilization are needed.

  2. Surveys, Astrometric Follow-Up, and Population Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, R.; Granvik, M.; Micheli, M.; Ryan, E.; Spahr, T.; Yeomans, D. K.

    Asteroid surveys are the backbone of asteroid science, and with this in mind we begin with a broad review of the impact of asteroid surveys on our field. We then provide a brief history of asteroid discoveries so as to place contemporary and future surveys in perspective. Surveys in the United States (U.S.) have discovered the vast majority of the asteroids, and this dominance has been consolidated since the publication of Asteroids III. Our descriptions of the asteroid surveys that have been operational since that time are focused on those that have contributed the vast majority of asteroid observations and discoveries. We also provide some insight into upcoming next-generation surveys that are sure to alter our understanding of the small bodies in the inner solar system and provide evidence to untangle their complicated dynamical and physical histories. The Minor Planet Center, the nerve center of the asteroid discovery effort, has improved its operations significantly in the past decade so that it can manage the increasing discovery rate, and ensure that it is well-placed to handle the data rates expected in the next decade. We also consider the difficulties associated with astrometric follow-up of newly identified objects. It seems clear that both of these efforts must operate in new modes in order to keep pace with expected discovery rates of next-generation ground- and spacebased surveys.

  3. Asbestos and cancer: a cohort followed up to death.

    PubMed Central

    Enterline, P E; Hartley, J; Henderson, V

    1987-01-01

    The mortality experience of 1074 white men who retired from a United States asbestos company during the period 1941-67 and who were exposed to asbestos working as production and maintenance employees for the company is reported to the end of 1980 when 88% of this cohort was known to be dead. As noted in earlier reports the mortality for respiratory and gastrointestinal cancer was raised. A more detailed examination of causes of death shows that the excess in gastrointestinal cancer was largely due to a statistically significant excess in stomach cancer. A statistically significant excess was also noted for kidney cancer, cancer of the eye, and non-malignant respiratory disease. Eight deaths from malignant mesothelioma were observed, two of which were peritoneal. Asbestos exposures for these mesothelioma cases were low relative to other members of the cohort. Continuing follow up of this cohort shows a dose response relation for respiratory cancer that has become increasingly linear. Standardised mortality ratios peaked 10 to 15 years after retirement and were relatively constant at around 250 in each five year interval starting in 1950. This excess might have been detected as early as 1960 but certainly by 1965. The mortality experience of this cohort reflects the ultimate effects of asbestos since nearly all of the cohort has now died. PMID:3606968

  4. GRB 091127: The Cooling Break Race on Magnetic Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filgas, R.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Kruhler, T.; Updike, A. C.; Klose, S.; Nardini, M.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Olivares, F.; Rau, A.

    2011-01-01

    Using high-quality, broad-band afterglow data for GRB 091127, we investigate the validity of the synchrotron fireball model for gamma-ray bursts, and infer physical parameters of the ultra-relativistic outflow. Methods. We used multi-wavelength (NIR to X-ray) follow-up observations obtained with GROND simultaneously in the g' r' t' i' z' JH filters and the XRT onboard the Swift satellite in the 0.3 to 10 keY energy range. The resulting afterglow light curve is of excellent accuracy with relative photometric errors as low as 1 %, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) is well-sampled over 5 decades in energy. These data present one of the most comprehensive observing campaigns for a single GRB afterglow and allow us to test several proposed emission models and outflow characteristics in unprecedented detail. Results. Both the multi-color light curve and the broad-band SED of the afterglow of GRB 091127 show evidence of a cooling break moving from high to lower energies. The early light curve is well described by a broken power-law, where the initial decay in the optical/NlR wavelength range is considerably flatter than at X-rays. Detailed fitting of the time-resolved SED shows that the break is very smooth with a sharpness index of 2.2 +/- 0.2, and evolves towards lower frequencies as a power-law with index -1.23 +/- 0.06. These are the first accurate and contemporaneous measurements of both the sharpness of the spectral break and its time evolution. Conclusions. The measured evolution of the cooling break (V(sub c) varies as t(sup -1.2) is not consistent with the predictions of the standard model, wherein V(sub c) varies as t(sup -05) is expected. A possible explanation for the observed behavior is a time dependence of the microphysical parameters, in particular the fraction of the total energy in the magnetic field epsilon(sub Beta). This conclusion provides further evidence that the standard fireball model is too simplistic, and time-dependent micro

  5. Effect of Health Literacy on Research Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Leak, Cardella; Goggins, Kathryn; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Theobald, Cecelia; Donato, Katharine M; Bell, Susan P; Schnelle, John; Kripalani, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has not examined the effect of health literacy on research subjects' completion of scheduled research follow-up. This article evaluates patient factors associated with incomplete research follow-up at three time points after enrollment in a large, hospital-based prospective cohort study. Predictor variables included health literacy, age, race, gender, education, employment status, difficulty paying bills, hospital diagnosis, length of stay, self-reported global health status, depression, perceived health competence, medication adherence, and health care system distrust. In a sample of 2,042 patients, multivariable models demonstrated that lower health literacy and younger age were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of completing research follow-up interviews at 2-3 days, 30 days, and 90 days after hospital discharge. In addition, patients who had less education, were currently employed, and had moderate financial stress were less likely to complete 90-day follow-up. This study is the first to demonstrate that lower health literacy is a significant predictor of incomplete research follow-up.

  6. The 'Supercritical Pile' GRB Model: Afterglows and GRB, XRR, XRF Unification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present the general notions and observational consequences of the "Supercritical Pile" GRB model; the fundamental feature of this model is a detailed process for the conversion of the energy stored in relativistic protons in the GRB Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) into relativistic electrons and then into radiation. The conversion is effected through the $p \\, \\gamma \\rightarrow p \\, e circumflex + e circumflex -$ reaction, whose kinematic threshold is imprinted on the GRB spectra to provide a peak of their emitted luminosity at energy \\Ep $\\sim 1$ MeV in the lab frame. We extend this model to include, in addition to the (quasi--)thermal relativistic post-shock protons an accelerated component of power law form. This component guarantees the production of $e circumflex +e circumflex- - $pairs even after the RBW has slowed down to the point that its (quasi-) thermal protons cannot fulfill the threshold of the above reaction. We suggest that this last condition marks the transition from the prompt to the afterglow GRB phase. We also discuss conditions under which this transition is accompanied by a significant drop in the flux and could thus account for several puzzling, recent observations. Finally, we indicate that the same mechanism applied to the late stages of the GRB evolution leads to a decrease in \\Ep $\\propto \\Gamma circumflex 2(t)\\propto t circumflex {-3/4}$, a feature amenable to future observational tests.

  7. The GRB Simulator: A System for Testing GOES Rebroadcast (GRB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, K.; Race, R.; Miller, C.; Barnes, K.; Dittberner, G.

    2012-12-01

    GOES Rebroadcast (GRB) signals in the GOES-R era will replace the current legacy GOES Variable (GVAR) signal and will have substantially different characteristics, including a change in data rate from a single 2.1 Mbps stream to two digital streams of 15.5 Mbps each. The GRB Simulator is a portable system that outputs a high-fidelity stream of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) formatted GRB packet data equivalent to live GRB data. The data is used for on-site testing of user ingest and data handling systems known as field terminal sites. The GRB Simulator is a fully self-contained system which includes all hardware units needed for operation. The operator manages configurations to edit preferences, define individual test scenarios, and manage event logs and reports. Simulations are controlled by test scenarios, which are scripts that specify the test data and provide a series of actions for the GRB Simulator to perform when generating GRB output. Scenarios allow for the insertion of errors or modification of GRB packet headers for testing purposes. The GRB Simulator provides a built-in editor for managing scenarios. Data output by the simulator is derived from either proxy data files containing Level 1b (L1b) or GLM L2+ data, test pattern images, or non-image test pattern generation commands specified from within a scenario. The GRB Simulator outputs packets containing both instrument and GRB Information data. Instrument packets contain data simulated from any instrument: the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS), Extreme Ultraviolet Sensor (EUVS) and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (XRS) called EXIS, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), or the Magnetometer. The GRB Information packets contain information such as satellite schedules. The GRB Simulator will provide GRB data as either baseband (digital) or Intermediate Frequency (IF) output to the test system. GRB packet data will be sent

  8. Suicide Prevention and Follow-Up Services: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Alavi, Kaveh; Khaleghparast, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Previous suicide attempt is the most important predictor of death by suicide. Thus preventive interventions after attempting to suicide is essential to prevent reattempts. This paper attempts to determine whether phone preventive interventions or other vehicles (postal cards, email and case management) are effective in reattempt prevention and health promotion after discharge by providing an overview of studies on suicide reattempts. The research investigated in this review conducted from 1995 to 2014. A total of 26 cases related to the aim of this research were derived from 36 English articles with the aforementioned keywords Research shows that providing comprehensive aids, social support, and follow-up after discharge can significantly prevent suicide reattempts. Several studies showed that follow-up support (phone calls, crisis cards, mails, postal cards.) after discharge can significantly decrease the risk of suicide. More randomized controlled trials (RCT) are required to determine what factors of follow-up are more effective than other methods. PMID:26652085

  9. Breast cancer follow-up in the adjuvant setting.

    PubMed

    Khatcheressian, James; Swainey, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer may recur through 15 years and beyond after diagnosis; thus, breast cancer patients require long-term follow-up after adjuvant treatment to detect recurrent disease. History taking, physical examination, and regular mammography are still the foundation of appropriate breast cancer follow-up in the adjuvant setting. Clearly, breast MRI has a role in certain high-risk patients, but in moderate-risk patients, the decision to use MRI must be based on the complexity of the clinical scenario. Other routine imaging studies (CT, positron emission tomography, and bone scans) and laboratory testing--including tumor marker assessments--in asymptomatic patients have not demonstrated an improvement in survival, quality of life, toxicity, or cost-effectiveness. Survivorship issues are also an inherent part of breast cancer follow-up; physicians should make every effort to address supportive care issues unique to breast cancer survivors including hot flashes, bone health, neuropathy, and risk-reduction strategies.

  10. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  11. Kepler Data Validation and Follow-up Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    William, Borucki J.

    2009-01-01

    The approach that the Kepler Mission uses to remove false positive events and to validate the discoveries consists of two parts; data validation (DPI) and follow up observations program (FOP). DV consists of several methods of examining the data from the spacecraft observations. First, to rule out statistical fluctuations in the data, accept only signals that show 3 or more transits and that have a total signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds 7 sigma. Second. to identify small stellar companions to the target star, we check for secondary eclipses and determine if the transit characteristics are appropriate for a planetary companion. Third, check for background binaries that are in the target aperture. Here we measure the movement of the image centroid before, during, and after the transit. If the target is producing the signal, a dimming wi11 move the image centroid in a known direction and magnitude. If the signal comes from a nearby star, the amplitude and direction of the motion wi11 be different, This test is expected to rule out the hundreds of binary signals expected from background stars. The precision of the measurement depends on the stellar fluxes and positions but can be better than 0.01 pixel; i.e., 0.04". Those candidates that pass these tests are examined using ground-based telescopes and radial velocity spectrometers. First medium precision RV is used to rule out any remaining stellar companions. Then high spatial resolution imaging is used to check for nearby stars that are in the aperture- (The Kepler apertures depend on magnitude but are of order 36 sq are sec in area.) If no stars are present that quid generate the observed signal, then the candidate goes to a large telescope such as Keck, HET, or Wi1lilam Herschel for high precision observations to get the planet mass or an upper limit to it, if there are some stars in the aperture, then the photometric observations are employed to look for the transit by cane of the confounding stars. If none are

  12. Long-term follow-up of ophthalmic Graves' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Agapitos, P J; Hart, I R

    1987-01-01

    Sixteen patients with ophthalmic Graves' disease (clinically euthyroid with ophthalmopathy or exophthalmos) were followed up for 4.3 to 14.3 (mean 9.1) years to determine whether thyroid dysfunction developed and whether their ophthalmopathy progressed, regressed or remained stable. Five patients (31%) manifested hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, all before the end of the fifth year of follow-up. The ophthalmopathy was mild, and none of the patients required specific treatment. The thyroid function of patients with ophthalmic Graves' disease should be periodically monitored for at least 5 years. PMID:3815199

  13. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique.

  14. Preparing for LSST with the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward

    2016-10-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) provides an ideal platform for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the LCOGT telescope network in addition to a web-based system developed to perform prioritized target selection, scheduling, and data reduction to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs.In order to determine how to maximize our NEO follow-up efforts, we must first define our goals for the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network. This means answering the following questions. Should we follow-up all objects brighter than some magnitude limit? Should we only focus on the brightest objects or push to the limits of our capabilities by observing the faintest objects we think we can see and risk not finding the objects in our data? Do we (and how do we) prioritize objects somewhere in the middle of our observable magnitude range? If we want to push to faint objects, how do we minimize the amount of data in which the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to see the object? And how do we find a balance between performing follow-up and characterization observations?To help answer these questions, we have developed a LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network simulator that allows us to test our prioritization algorithms for target selection, confirm signal-to-noise predictions, and determine ideal block lengths and exposure times for observing NEO candidates. We will present our results from the simulator and progress on our NEO follow-up efforts.In the era of LSST, developing/utilizing infrastructure, such as the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network and our web-based platform for selecting, scheduling, and reducing NEO observations, capable of handling the large number of detections expected to be produced on a daily basis by LSST will be critical to follow-up efforts. We hope our

  15. Long-Wavelength Demographics of GRB Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    We present new VLA observations of 32 Swift and pre-Swift GRB host galaxies, supplemented by new ALMA and Herschel observations. Although our observations are quite deep, we securely detect only a few targets in the sample. Indeed, we rule out several claimed detections of ULIRG-like host galaxies in the previous literature, including every pre-Swift ULIRG-like host: these now appear to have been due to residual afterglow contamination or source confusion. Our results indicate that only a small minority of GRBs (~10%) occur in ULIRG-like galaxies and that intense star-formation does little to directly facilitate GRB production. This suggests in turn that dynamical interactions or ultra-massive stellar progenitors are not likely to be critical ingredients in GRB formation. Every GRB securely associated with a ULIRG is observed to significantly dust-obscured, consistent with the large dust optical depths and covering frations thought to be characteristic of these systems.

  16. AN IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF FOUR STRONG Mg II ABSORBERS REVEALED BY GRB 060418

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.

    2009-08-20

    We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic study of four strong Mg II absorbers of W(2796) {approx}> 1 A revealed by the afterglow of GRB 060418 at z{sub GRB} = 1.491. These absorbers, at z = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107, and z {sub GRB}, exhibit large ion abundances that suggest neutral gas columns characteristic of damped Ly{alpha} systems. The imaging data include optical images obtained using Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope and using Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope, and near-infrared H-band images obtained using Persson's Auxiliary Nasmyth Infrared Camera on the Magellan Baade Telescope and K'-band images obtained using NIRC2 with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. These images reveal six distinct objects at {delta} {theta} {approx}< 3.''5 of the afterglow's position, two of which exhibit well-resolved mature disk morphology, one shows red colors, and three are blue compact sources. Follow-up spectroscopic observations using LRIS confirm that one of the disk galaxies coincides with the Mg II absorber at z = 0.656. The observed broadband spectral energy distributions of the second disk galaxy and the red source indicate that they are associated with the absorbers at z = 0.603 and z = 1.107, respectively. These results show that strong Mg II absorbers identified in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra are associated with typical galaxies of luminosity {approx}0.1 - 1 L{sub *} at impact parameter of {rho} {approx}< 10 h {sup -1} kpc. The close angular separation would preclude easy detections toward a bright quasar. Finally, we associate the remaining three blue compact sources with the GRB host galaxy, noting that they are likely star-forming knots located at projected distances of {rho} = 2 - 12 h {sup -1} kpc from the afterglow. At the afterglow's position, we derive a 2{sigma} upper limit to the underlying star-formation rate intensity of 0.0074 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc

  17. Gamma-ray burst observations above 100 GeV with STACEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Alexander Charles

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful known explosions in the universe. Forty years after their discovery, they are still some of the most enigmatic phenomena in the universe. Sensitive measurements of the high-energy spectra of GRBs can place important constraints on the burst environments, particle acceleration mechanisms and radiation mechanisms. Until the past few years, there were no observations of the early minutes of GRB afterglows in the energy range between 30 GeV and 1 TeV. With the launch of the Swift GRB Explorer in late 2004, GRB alerts and localizations within seconds of the bursts became available. The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) was a ground-based, gamma-ray telescope sensitive to gamma rays with energies above 50 GeV. At the time of Swift's launch, STACEE was in a rare position to provide rapid, low-energy-threshold follow-up observations of GRBs. In addition, STACEE performed follow-up observations of several GRBs that were localized by other satellites. Between the end of major modifications to the experiment in 2002 and the decommissioning of the experiment in 2007, STACEE obtained follow-up observations of 23 GRBs. In this thesis, STACEE's GRB observations are described and limits are placed on the high-energy, gamma-ray fluxes that reached Earth from these bursts.

  18. Probing the complex environments of GRB host galaxies and intervening systems: high resolution spectroscopy of GRB050922C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, S.; Ward, P. A.; Fiore, F.; Vergani, S. D.; D'Elia, V.; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Chincarini, G.; Covino, S.; Della Valle, M.; Fugazza, D.; Norci, L.; Sbordone, L.; Stella, L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Goldoni, P.; Malesani, D.; Mirabel, I. F.; Pellizza, L. J.; Perna, R.

    2008-12-01

    Aims: The aim of this paper is to investigate the environment of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and the interstellar matter of their host galaxies. Methods: To this purpose we use high resolution spectroscopic observations of the afterglow of GRB050922C, obtained with UVES/VLT ~ 3.5 h after the GRB event. Results: We found that, as for most high resolution spectra of GRBs, the spectrum of the afterglow of GRB050922C is complex. At least seven components contribute to the main absorption system at z=2.1992. The detection of lines of neutral elements like MgI and the detection of fine-structure levels of the ions FeII, SiII and CII allows us to separate components in the GRB ISM along the line of sight. Moreover, in addition to the main system, we analyzed the five intervening systems between z = 2.077 and z = 1.5664 identified along the GRB line of sight. Conclusions: GRB afterglow spectra are very complex, but full of information. This can be used to disentangle the contribution of the different parts of the GRB host galaxy and to study their properties. Our metallicity estimates agree with the scenario of GRBs exploding in low metallicity galaxies Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) with the VLT/Kueyen telescope, Paranal, Chile, in the framework of program 075.A-0603.

  19. Follow-Up of the Fall 1990 FTIC Cohort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    Drawing from data provided by the Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP), this series of reports provides follow-up information on FTIC students entering Tallahassee Community College (TCC) in fall 1990. The four reports compare students based on race, entry level test pass rates, full-/part-time status, and grade…

  20. Sexually Abstinent Adolescents: An 18-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Berger, Thomas J.; Hewett, John; Oleson, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    This study was a longitudinal follow-up of 697 early adolescents from 20 schools in Missouri, investigating students who, in 1997, indicated on a survey of sexual attitudes and behaviors that they had not had sexual intercourse. They completed the Reasons for Abstinence Scale (RAS) by identifying those items that were reasons why they had not had…

  1. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  2. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  3. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  4. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  5. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  6. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  7. Extended Follow-Up | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports the continued follow-up of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) to strengthen the PLCO as a valuable resource for molecular epidemiologic research as well as provide long-term data on the trial’s primary endpoints. |

  8. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  9. Follow-Up Study of 1994 Dental Hygiene Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of its dental hygiene program, William Rainey Harper College (WRHC), in Illinois, conducted a follow-up study of program graduates from 1994. Surveys were mailed to all 30 1994 dental hygiene associate degree graduates, receiving responses from 77% (n=23). Study findings included the following: (1) all…

  10. Graduate Follow-Up Report, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    Each year, a follow-up study is conducted to gather data on the activities and perceptions of students approximately 6 months after their graduation from Wisconsin's Technical Colleges (WTC). Specifically, the survey seeks to identify the current activities of the WTC graduates, determine the extent to which current activities are related to the…

  11. Three Year Follow-Up of 1974 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    To evaluate the long-term benefits of attendance at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC), a three-year follow-up study was conducted of the 620 1974 graduates (324 transfer and 296 occupational students). Each graduate was sent a questionnaire collecting information on involvement with MVCC after graduation, present educational status,…

  12. Follow-Up Activities for the HISD Kindergarten Screening Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Pat; Cater, Margot

    The Kindergarten Screening Instrument consists of five sub-scales and attempts to screen for possible difficulty in the areas of distant vision, hearing, eye-hand coordination, language learning, and gross motor performance. In response to many requests for follow-up activities after screening, this manual was prepared by Volunteers in Public…

  13. 1988-89 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    In 1989, a graduate follow-up survey was conducted to gather data regarding student perceptions and activities following graduation from the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical and Adult Education System (VTAE). Primary objectives of the survey were to identify current activities of VTAE graduates, determine whether the activities were related to the…

  14. 1987-88 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Glen A.

    The Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) System annually conducts a student follow-up survey to gather data on the activities and perceptions of graduates of Designed to provide information for career awareness and program planning efforts, the survey investigates the current activities of VTAE graduates and the relationship…

  15. Trident Technical College 1998 Graduate Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1998 graduate follow-up survey report of 915 TTC graduates. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job were obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job…

  16. Trident Technical College 1999 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1999 graduate follow-up survey report. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job satisfaction, job…

  17. Job Training Partnership Act 8% Follow-up Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Charlene M.; And Others

    From September through November 1986, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) conducted a follow-up survey of Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) 8% program participants in the 1985-86 school year. The DPI is responsible for administering half of the JTPA 8% Education Coordination and Grants for economically disadvantaged youth, ages…

  18. Cleft lip and palate surgery: 30 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Cesar A.

    2012-01-01

    Ten cleft lip and palate patients with complete unilateral (five patients) and bilateral (five patients) clefts were treated by a multidisciplinary team integrated by psychologists, surgeons, orthodontists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and speech pathologists, to obtain ideal soft tissue and hard tissue continuity, facial symmetry, functional and esthetic dentitions, excellent nasal architecture, subtle, and hidden lip scars. No hypernasality and adequate social adaptation were found in the 30 years follow-up (20-30 years follow-up with an average of 25.5 years). The patients were treated in a pro-active fashion avoiding complications and related problems, executing the ideal surgical, dental, and speech therapy plan, based on a close follow-up over the entire period. Those patients treated at the right time required less surgeries and less salvaging maneuvers and presented complete dentitions with less dental prosthesis or dental implants and stable occlusions, than those who missed the ideal dental and surgical treatment opportunities. The focus of this article is the need of a close long-term follow-up to ensure an ideal patient's quality of life. PMID:23483117

  19. Matching Methods for Selection of Participants for Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Lalongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines ways to make the best use of limited resources when selecting individuals to follow up in a longitudinal study estimating causal effects. In the setting under consideration, covariate information is available for all individuals but outcomes have not yet been collected and may be expensive to gather, and thus only a subset of…

  20. Search for a supernova in a GRB at 55 Mp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, Andrew; Hjorth, Jens; Malesani, Daniele; Tanvir, Nial; Wiersema, Klaas; Fynbo, Johan

    2011-10-01

    We seek a rapid response target of opportunity observation of the recent GRB 111005A, which was detected by Swift last week. The burst is essentially invisible to most ground and space based optical/IR observations because it lies only 35 degrees from the Sun (as viewed from Earth). However, its gamma-ray error box contains the bright low redshift galaxy ESO 580-49, at only ~55 Mpc distance. Short integration (twilight) K-band observations do not show any sign of the burst in the optical/IR in the night after it occurred, perhaps because of extinction, or possibly because observations were too early to catch the associated supernova (SN). Howeve, radio observations today (10 Oct) do locate a transient source within the galaxy, presumably the GRB afterglow. This makes GRB 1110005A the closest Swift-GRB by some margin, and the second closest of all time. Such bursts provide a Rosetta Stone for our understanding of the GRB phenomena, since their proximity allows exquisite data to be obtained, and for late time observations to fully characterise the nature of the stellar population. Unlike other observatories, Spitzer can observe GRB 111005A until the end of the 14th October, providing an opportunity to search for an associated SN at optical and IR wavelengths, and even probe through the dust that may be present in the host galaxy. This is a unique opportunity, and a role that only Spitzer can perform.

  1. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Luke; Shaheen, Aisha; Crandall, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that rates of ambulatory follow-up after traumatic injury are not optimal, but the association with insurance status has not been studied. Aims: To describe trauma patient characteristics associated with completed follow-up after hospitalization and to compare relative rates of healthcare utilization across payor types. Setting and Design: Single institution retrospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: We compared patient demographics and healthcare utilization behavior after discharge among trauma patients between April 1, 2005 and April 1, 2010. Our primary outcome of interest was outpatient provider contact within 2 months of discharge. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between characteristics including insurance status and subsequent ambulatory and acute care. Results: We reviewed the records of 2906 sequential trauma patients. Patients with Medicaid and those without insurance were significantly less likely to complete scheduled outpatient follow-up within 2 months, compared to those with private insurance (Medicaid, OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88; uninsured, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.23-0.36). Uninsured and Medicaid patients were twice as likely as privately insured patients to visit the Emergency Department (ED) for any reason after discharge (uninsured patients (Medicaid, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.50-4.53; uninsured, OR 2.10, 94% CI 1.31-3.36). Conclusion: We found marked differences between patients in scheduled outpatient follow-up and ED utilization after injury associated with insurance status; however, Medicaid seemed to obviate some of this disparity. Medicaid expansion may improve outpatient follow-up and affect patient outcome disparities after injury. PMID:25400385

  2. How Can The SN-GRB Time Delay Be Measured?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    The connection between SNe and GRBs, launched by SN 1998bw / GRB 980425 and clinched by SN 2003dh / GRB 030329-with the two GRBs differing by a factor of approximately 50000 in luminosity-so far suggests a rough upper limit of approximately 1-2 days for the delay between SN and GRB. Only four SNe have had nonnegligible coverage in close coincidence with the initial explosion, near the W shock breakout: two Qpe II, and two Type IC, SN 1999ex and SN 1998bw. For the latter, only a hint of the minimum between the UV maximum and the radioactivity bump served to help constrain the interval between SN and GRB. Swift GRB alerts may provide the opportunity to study many SNe through the UV breakout phase: GRB 980425 look dikes -apparently nearby, low- luminosity, soft-spectrum, long-lag GRBs-accounted for half of BATSE bursts near threshold, and may dominate the Swift yield near threshold, since it has sensitivity to lower energies than did BATSE. The SN to GRB delay timescale should be better constrained by prompt UV/optical observations alerted by these bursts. Definitive delay measurements may be obtained if long-lag bursters are truly nearby: The SNe/GRBs could emit gravitational radiation detectable by LIGO-II if robust non-axisymmetric bar instabilities develop during core collapse, and/or neutrino emission may be detectable as suggested by Meszaros et al.

  3. The AAVSO International GRB Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron

    2003-04-01

    The AAVSO International GRB Network provides services to both amateurs and professionals to help detect GRB afterglows. The network leverages the unique abilities of amateur astronomers to offer global coverage to eliminate geographic and climatic restrictions to GRB alert reaction times. Additionally, public outreach is a critical component of the network and automated online chart making procedures have made it a useful tool for professionals. The financial support of NASA and the Curry Foundation is gratefully appreciated.

  4. GRB 110709B in the induced gravitational collapse paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penacchioni, A. V.; Ruffini, R.; Bianco, C. L.; Izzo, L.; Muccino, M.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 110709B is the first source for which Swift-BAT was triggered twice, with a time separation of ~10 min. The first emission (called here episode 1) lasted from 40 s before the first trigger time until 60 s after it. The second emission (hereafter episode 2) lasted from 35 s before the second trigger time until 100 s after it. These features reproduce those of GRB 090618, which has recently been interpreted within the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm. In line with this paradigm, we assume the progenitor to be a close binary system composed of the core of an evolved star and a neutron star (NS). The evolved star explodes as a supernova (SN) and ejects material that is partially accreted by the NS. We identify this process with episode 1. The accretion process accumulates more than the critical mass of the NS, which gravitationally collapses into a black hole (BH). This process leads to the GRB emission, episode 2. The two trigger episodes have for the first time provided the possibility to cover the X-ray emission observed by XRT both prior to and during the prompt phase of GRB 110709B. Aims: We analyze the spectra and time variability of episodes 1 and 2 and compute the relevant parameters of the binary progenitor, as well as the astrophysical parameters both in the SN and the GRB phase in the IGC paradigm. Methods: We performed a time-resolved spectral analysis of episode 1 by fitting the spectrum with a blackbody (BB) plus a power-law (PL) spectral model. From the BB fluxes and temperatures of episode 1 and the luminosity distance dL, we evaluated the evolution with time of the radius of the BB emitter, associated here to the evolution of the SN ejecta. We analyzed episode 2 within the fireshell model, identifying the proper GRB (P-GRB) and simulating the light curve and spectrum. We established the redshift to be z = 0.75, following the phenomenological methods described in the literature, and our analysis of the late X

  5. The Achromatic Light Curve of the Optical Afterglow of GRB 030226 at a Redshift of z Approximately 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Masetti, N.; Guenther, E.; Stecklum, B.; Lindsay, K.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract. We report on optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up observations of the afterglow of GRB 030226, mainly performed with the telescopes at ESO La Silla and Paranal, with additional data obtained at other places. Our first observations started 0.2 days after the burst when the afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately equal to 19 . One week later the magnitude of the afterglow had fallen to R=25, and at two weeks after the burst it could no longer be detected (R > 26). Our VLT blueband spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 +/- 0.001 and at z = 1.986 +/- 0.001, placing the redshift of the burster close to 2. Within our measurement errors no evidence for variations in the line strengths has been found between 0.2 and 1.2 days after the burst. An overabundance of alpha-group elements might indicate that the burst occurred in a chemically young interstellar region shaped by the nucleosynthesis from type II supernovae. The spectral slope of the afterglow shows no signs for cosmic dust along the line of sight in the GRB host galaxy, which itself remained undetected (R > 26.2). At the given redshift no supernova component affected the light from the GRB afterglow, so that the optical transient was essentially only powered by the radiation from the GRB fireball, allowing for a detailed investigation of the color evolution of the afterglow light. In our data set no obvious evidence for color changes has been found before, during, or after the smooth break in the light curve approximately 1 day after the burst. In comparison with investigations by others, our data favor the interpretation that the afterglow began to develop into a homogeneous interstellar medium before the break in the light curve became apparent.

  6. A Bulk Comptonization Model for the Prompt GRB Emission and its Relation to the Fermi GRB Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    We present a model in which the GRB prompt emission at E E(sub peak) is due to bulk Comptonization by the relativistic blast wave motion of either its own synchrotron photons of ambient photons of the stellar configuration that gave birth to the GRB. The bulk Comptonization process then induces the production of relativistic electrons of Lorentz factor equal to that of the blast wave through interactions with its ambient protons. The inverse compton emission of these electrons produces a power law component that extends to multi GeV energies in good agreement with the LAT GRB observations.

  7. SYNCHROTRON ORIGIN OF THE TYPICAL GRB BAND FUNCTION—A CASE STUDY OF GRB 130606B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Briggs, Michael S.; Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing; Connaughton, Valerie

    2016-01-10

    We perform a time-resolved spectral analysis of GRB 130606B within the framework of a fast-cooling synchrotron radiation model with magnetic field strength in the emission region decaying with time, as proposed by Uhm and Zhang. The data from all time intervals can be successfully fit by the model. The same data can be equally well fit by the empirical Band function with typical parameter values. Our results, which involve only minimal physical assumptions, offer one natural solution to the origin of the observed GRB spectra and imply that, at least some, if not all, Band-like GRB spectra with typical Band parameter values can indeed be explained by synchrotron radiation.

  8. Longitudinal follow-up of occupational status in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the long-term outcome of tinnitus patients was studied in terms of changes in occupational status from admission to follow-up for an average duration of 5 years. A consecutive series of 189 tinnitus patients seen between the years 1988 and 1995 were sent a postal questionnaire booklet; 146 provided usable responses (a 77% response rate). Results showed a significant change in occupational status, which was explained partly by retirement because of old age. Few were unemployed at follow-up, and relatively few were on sick leave. These data suggest that tinnitus patients may be less of a demand for the sickness benefit system in Sweden, but it may reflect also that tinnitus is not accepted as a cause for sick absenteeism.

  9. The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

    PubMed Central

    Foshee, V A; Bauman, K E; Greene, W F; Koch, G G; Linder, G F; MacDougall, J E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program. METHODS: Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended. RESULTS: The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance. PMID:11029999

  10. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed.

  11. [Follow-up after radiation therapy for cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Cao, K I; Mazeron, R; Barillot, I

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy plays a central role in treatment strategies of cervical cancer. Follow-up after external pelvic radiation therapy and brachytherapy is based upon French and international specific recommendations. It aims to assess early tumour response, and to detect local or metastatic recurrences which can be suitable for salvage treatment. Follow-up after radiation therapy for cervical cancer should also assess gastro-intestinal, urinary and sexual toxicities which may have an impact on quality of life. This is a major concern in the evaluation of the results of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and MRI-guided brachytherapy, which should lead to a better local control and to a better bowel tolerance.

  12. From themes to hypotheses: following up with quantitative methods.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David L

    2015-06-01

    One important category of mixed-methods research designs consists of quantitative studies that follow up on qualitative research. In this case, the themes that serve as the results from the qualitative methods generate hypotheses for testing through the quantitative methods. That process requires operationalization to translate the concepts from the qualitative themes into quantitative variables. This article illustrates these procedures with examples that range from simple operationalization to the evaluation of complex models. It concludes with an argument for not only following up qualitative work with quantitative studies but also the reverse, and doing so by going beyond integrating methods within single projects to include broader mutual attention from qualitative and quantitative researchers who work in the same field.

  13. GRB 070724B: the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by SuperAGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Rapisarda, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Basset, M.; Foggetta, L.; Vallazza, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.

    2008-05-22

    GRB070724B is the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by the SuperAGILE instrument aboard the AGILE space mission. The SuperAGILE localization has been confirmed after the after-glow observation by the XRT aboard the Swift satellite. No significant gamma ray emission above 50 MeV has been detected for this GRB. In this paper we describe the SuperAGILE capabilities in detecting Gamma Ray Burst and the AGILE observation of GRB 070724B.

  14. Curiosity and Exploratory Behavior in Disadvantaged Children: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuchin, Patricia P.

    In a follow-up study of curiosity and exploratory behavior, subjects were 18 disadvantaged inner-city black children who had been observed at age four in their first year of a Head Start program, and who were now finishing first grade. Data were obtained from teachers, observations in the classrooms, and an individual session with each child. Each…

  15. Measurements of Wide Tycho Double Stars in Orion - Follow Up Canis Minor and Columba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Ross; Knapp, Wilfried

    2016-10-01

    As follow up to our report "Visual Observation and Measurements of some Tycho Double Stars" we decided to have a look at some more wider TDS objects in other constellations but to replace the hapless visual observation task by counterchecking with existing Sky Survey images

  16. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  17. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  18. Paediatrician office follow-up of common minor fractures

    PubMed Central

    Koelink, Eric; Boutis, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that minor paediatric fractures can be followed by primary care paediatricians (PCPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine PCP opinions, knowledge and perceived barriers to managing minor paediatric fractures in the office. METHODS: An online survey was sent between June and September 2013 to all paediatricians who subscribed to the American Academy of Pediatrics PROS-Net Listerv and to those who were registered with the Scott’s Canadian Medical Directory as paediatricians who treated children in a primary care capacity. The primary outcome was the proportion of PCPs who agreed with PCP follow-up of minor paediatric fractures. Secondary outcomes included PCP’s perceived barriers to office follow-up. RESULTS: A total of 1752 surveys were sent; 1235 were eligible and 459 (37.2%) responded to the survey. Overall, 296 (69.5% [95% CI 65.2% to 74.0%]) PCPs agreed that minor paediatric fractures could be followed in a PCP office. The most frequently reported barriers were lack of materials to replace immobilization (58.1%), PCP knowledge deficits (44.8%) and a perceived parental preference for an orthopedic surgeon (38.6%). Finally, 58.8% of respondents believed that further education was necessary if PCPs assumed responsibility for follow-up of midshaft clavicle fractures, while 66.5% and 77.1% (P<0.0001) believed this was necessary for distal radius buckle and fibular fractures, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: More than two-thirds of responding PCPs in Canada and the United States agreed that minor common paediatric fractures can be followed-up by paediatricians. However, PCPs reported some barriers to this management strategy, including a desire for more education on this topic. PMID:25382996

  19. Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Follow-up Report.

    SciTech Connect

    United Industries Corporation.

    1986-06-01

    United Industries Corporation (UIC) conducted an energy analysis at five food processing plants (SIC 20) in the winter of 1984-1985. Tour of plants (Alpac, Carnation, Terminal flour mill, Tree Top) were revisited eighteen months later to determine what energy conservation measures (ECM's) had been or would be implemented. Additionally, the follow-up investigation evaluated the actual energy savings that accrued for the implemented ECM's and recorded the plants' views on the usefulness of the energy analysis.

  20. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aneurysm: a retrospective analysis of CT follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hechelhammer, Lukas; Wildermuth, Simon; Lachat, Mario L; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    Retrospective radiologic and clinical midterm follow-up is reported for 10 patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). At a mean follow-up of 33 months, regression of the thickness of the perianeurysmal fibrosis (PAF) and decrease of aneurysmal sac diameter was observed in nine patients. Four EVAR-associated complications were observed: periinterventional dissection of femoral artery (n = 1), blue toe syndrome (n = 1), and stent-graft disconnection (n = 2). EVAR is the less invasive method of aneurysm exclusion in patients with IAAA with a comparable evolution of the PAF as reported after open repair.

  1. Neonatal follow-up program: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal follow-up program (NFP) is becoming the corner stone of standard, high quality care provided to newborns at risk of future neuorodevelopmental delay. Most of the recognized neonatal intensive care units in the developed countries are adopting NFP as part of their mandatory care for the best long term outcome of high risk infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Unfortunately, in the developing and in underdeveloped countries, such early detection and intervention programs are rarely existing, mainly because of the lack of awareness of and exposure to such programs in spite of the increasing numbers of surviving sick newborns due to advancement in neonatal care in these countries. This is a review article to explore the Neonatal follow-up programs looking at historical development, benefts and aims, and standard requirements for successful program development that can be adopted in our countries. In conclusion, proper Neonatal follow-up programs are needed to improve neonatal outcome. Therefore all professionals working in the feld of neonatal care in developing countries should cooperate to create such programs for early detection and hence early intervention for any adverse long term outcome in high-risk newborn infants PMID:27493326

  2. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  3. Pacemaker follow-up and adequacy of Medicare guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vallario, L E; Leman, R B; Gillette, P C; Kratz, J M

    1988-07-01

    The time of occurrence of cardiac pacemaker problems after implantation was identified to assess the adequacy of published federal guidelines for clinic and transtelephonic follow-up. One hundred eighty-nine pacemaker patients' charts were examined retrospectively to identify pacemaker problems: inadequate sensing, non-capture, battery failure, myoinhibition, muscle stimulation, and inadequate threshold safety margin. Twenty-nine patients (15%) were identified as having pacemaker problems. A total of 41 problems were identified, of which 28 (68%) were corrected by reprogramming. Sixty-one percent of the problems were found during a clinic visit. Problems occurred more frequently during the first year in dual-chamber devices (62%) vs single-chamber devices (35%). During years 1 to 4, when few problems are expected, 30% of all problems of single-chamber devices occurred and 39% of all problems of dual-chamber devices occurred. This is a period of time that Medicare guidelines allow for one clinic visit per year for single- and two visits per year for dual-chamber devices. These data suggest: (1) Many pacemaker problems will be missed with transtelephonic follow-up alone. (2) The majority of problems involving dual-chamber devices occurred in the first year. (3) For both dual- and single-chamber devices, an unexpected significant percentage of problems occurred in 1 to 4 years. (4) Medicare guidelines may be inadequate for follow-up during this time period.

  4. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. Quality of evidence A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Main message Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Conclusion Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. PMID:27737976

  5. [Guidelines for the follow up of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Tarazona, S; Rueda Esteban, S; Alfonso Diego, J; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Callejón Callejón, A; Cortell Aznar, I; de la Serna Blázquez, O; Domingo Miró, X; García García, M L; García Hernández, G; Luna Paredes, C; Mesa Medina, O; Moreno Galdó, A; Moreno Requena, L; Pérez Pérez, G; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M; Torrent Vernetta, A; Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Vilella Sabaté, M

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth, and remains a major problem in pediatric pulmonology units. The decision of discharging from the Neonatal Unit should be based on a thorough assessment of the condition of the patient and compliance with certain requirements, including respiratory and nutritional stability, and caregiver education on disease management. For proper control of the disease, a schedule of visits and complementary tests should be established prior to discharge, and guidelines for prevention of exacerbations and appropriate treatment should be applied. In this paper, the Working Group in Perinatal Respiratory Diseases of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology proposes a protocol to serve as a reference for the follow up of patients with BPD among different centers and health care settings. Key factors to consider when planning discharge from the Neonatal Unit and during follow up are reviewed. Recommendations on treatment and prevention of complications are then discussed. The final section of this guide aims to provide a specific schedule for follow-up and diagnostic interventions to be performed in patients with BPD.

  6. A follow-up study of attempted railway suicides.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Arthur, A J; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the subsequent mortality of 94 persons who attempted suicide by jumping in front of London Underground trains between 1977 and 1979. The follow-up period was 10 yr. Despite the apparent seriousness of the method, completion of suicide was not found to be higher than in previous studies of attempted suicide by other methods. By the end of the follow-up period 18 persons had died, nine of natural causes. Coroners' inquests were held for the unnatural deaths. Seven verdicts of suicide and two of accidental death were recorded. Of the nine unnatural deaths four were from multiple injuries, three from drowning, one from asphyxia and one from acute narcotic poisoning. All four multiple injury deaths were women, three of these were from repeated incidents involving London Underground trains. The time interval between the index attempt and eventual death for the suicide/accident group ranged from 1 day to 43 months. For ethical reasons it was not possible to follow-up attempted suicides who were presumed to have remained alive.

  7. Pi of the Sky preparations for LSC-Virgo's electromagnetic follow-up project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZadroŻny, Adam; Sokołowski, Marcin; Majcher, Ariel; Opiela, Rafał; Obara, Łukasz

    2015-09-01

    The presentation focuses on plans of the Pi of the Sky collaboration to participate in the future LSC-Virgo's Electromagnetic (EM) Follow-up campaigns. Pi of the Sky telescope participated in the first "EM Follow-up project", called Looc-Up1-3 2009-2010 organized by LSC-Virgo collaboration. Pi of the Sky brought to the project an instrument with the biggest field of view and with a very high time resolution. Recently Pi of the Sky has signed an Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with LSC-Virgo for EM Follow-up observations in the Advanced Detector Era (ADE). Plans of the Pi of the Sky telescope for joint observations with advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors will be also outlined.

  8. Detection of GRB 060927 at zeta = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sterling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bersier, D.; CastroCeron, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Gogus, E.; Gorosabel, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Guver, T.; Hjorth, J.; Horns, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Jakobsson, P.; Jensen, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture groundbased telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hours after the trigger shows a continuum break at lambda approx. equals 8070 A, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at zeta = 5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 A which we interpret as Si II lambda 1260 at zeta = 5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Ly(alpha) profile with a column density with log(N(sub HI)/sq cm) = 22.50 +/- 0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: i) GRB afterglows originating from zeta greater than or approx. equal to 6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; ii) The presence of large H I column densities in some GRBs host galaxies at zeta > 5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; iii) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at zeta > 5 and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe.

  9. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Jan-Albert

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  10. A Spatially - Resolved Study of the GRB 020903 Host Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, Mallory; Levesque, Emily M.

    2017-01-01

    The host complex of GRB 020903 is one of only a few long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB) environments where spatially-resolved observations are possible. It may also be the only known GRB host consisting of multiple interacting components, as well as an active galactic nucleus. We were granted 4.5 hours of observing time on the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (South) to obtain spatially resolved spectra of the GRB 020903 host complex. Using long-slit observations at two different position angles we were able to obtain optical spectra of the four main regions of the GRB host, with a spectral range of 3600 - 9000 Å. From this data we discern the redshift of each region to confirm that they comprise a single interacting system at an approximate redshift of z ~ 0.251. We also measure the metallicity, star formation rate, and young stellar population age of each region to create a spatially-resolved map of these parameters for the larger host complex. Based on the distribution of these characteristics we determine whether the localized GRB explosion site is representative of the host complex as a whole, or localized in a metal-poor or strongly star-forming region. Lastly, we consider the dynamics and past interactions of the host complex, studying the strongest emission lines for signs of potential inflows or outflows through each region.

  11. [Barrett's oesophagus: endoscopic diagnosis and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Ponsot, P

    2006-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus (BO), or replacement of the squamous mucosa by a specialized intestinal metaplasia due to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), predisposes to adenocarcinoma. It is estimated that 6 to 12% of patients undergoing GI endoscopy have short BO (< 3 cm), and 1% have a long BO. Macroscopic diagnosis of BO is sometimes difficult and, in case of doubt, endoscopy should be redone after a period of efficient anti-secretory treatment. Diagnosis of BO is histological and should be confirmed by biopsies. The incidence of adenocarcinoma is globally estimated at 0.5% patient by year of follow-up, and exists for both short and long BO. Due to this low incidence, screening for BO is only justified in patients at high risk for adenocarcinoma (male gender, age > 50 ans, old GORD in a young patient). Low-grade dysplasia (LGD) then high-grade dysplasia (HGD) precedes adenocarcinoma. Histological diagnosis of LGD is difficult: the main cause of confusion is inflammation so diagnosis of LGD must be confirmed after a 3-month high-dose anti-secretory treatment. Diagnosis of HGD is easier but multiple biopsies are needed to determine the focal or multifocal disposition of HGD. The benefit of follow-up of BO is debated. Aged patients should be followed only if dysplasia is present. When dysplasia is absent, an endoscopic control with biopsies is desirable within 3 to 5 years. In case of dysplasia, the latter must be confirmed by another examination of biopsies, particularly in case of suspicion of HGD and after antisecretory treatment. In case of LGD, endoscopy with biopsies should be redone 6 months later to screen for HGD, then every year if LGD is confirmed. In case of HGD, the 5-year risk of cancer is 60% so surgical or endoscopic treatment is usually proposed. If HGD follow-up is decided, it should be performed on a 3- to 6-month basis.

  12. Follow-up study of small-for-dates babies.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, R; Campbell, S; Harvey, D; Norman, A P

    1976-06-12

    A group of small-for-dates full-term babies whose intra-uterine growth was followed by serial ultrasonic cephalometry were examined at a mean age of 4 years. Those children whose skull growth had begun to slow in utero before 34 weeks' menstrual age were more likely to have a height and weight less than the 10th centile. When the onset of growth failure had occurred before 26 weeks there was a lower developmental quotient at follow-up using the Griffiths extended scales. Prolonged slow growth in utero therefore seems to be followed by slow growth and development after birth.

  13. Root Resorption a 6-Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Caroline; Closs, Luciane; Barletta, Fernando; Reston, Eduardo; Tovo, Maximiano F; Lambert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical course of a pediatric patient developing cervical external root resorption (CERR). An 11-year old male patient had sustained dental trauma and was diagnosed with crown fracture affecting the incisal and middle thirds of the maxillary right permanent central incisor and the maxillary right permanent lateral incisor with pulp exposure and CERR after 24 months. Diagnosis and treatment of CERR are a challenge for dental practitioners. In this case, preservation of natural dentition is shown as a successful treatment in a 6-year follow-up. PMID:25870717

  14. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and

  15. [Ataxia telangiectasia. Diagnosis and follow-up in 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Monterrubio Ledezma, César Eduardo; Corona Rivera, Alfredo; Corona Rivera, Jorge Román; Rodríguez Casillas, Lourdes Jocelyn; Hernández Rocha, Juan; Barros Nuñez, Patricio; Bobadilla Morales, Lucina

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a chromosomal instability syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance, it is caused by more than 500 mutations of the ATM gene, which is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. The diagnosis becomes difficult due to the evolution of the disease, their poor knowledge, and limited access to diagnostic tests. Chromosomal damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR) assay is still a sensitive method for early diagnosis, and it is essential for better management and genetic counseling. This paper shows diagnosis and follow-up in four cases with AT.

  16. Juvenile Hyaline Fibromatosis: A 10-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Baltacioglu, Esra; Guzeldemir, Esra; Sukuroglu, Erkan; Yildiz, Kadriye; Yuva, Pinar; Aydin, Güven; Karacal, Naci

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare hereditary disease with an autosomal recessive transmission. JHF is characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, osteolytic bone lesions, flexural joint contractures, and gingival hyperplasia and usually diagnosed in infancy or early childhood. JHF is thought to be a disorder of collagen metabolism and characterized by homogenous amorphous eosinophilic material and fibrous tissue. We report the case of a 14-year-old male child with multiple papulonodular skin lesions, progressive flexion contractures of joints, and severe gingival hyperplasia, with a 10-year follow-up. Although the lesions were totally removed thrice during the last 10 years, they recurred rigorously.

  17. Two Early Gamma-ray Bursts Optical Afterglow Detections with TAOS Telescopes--GRB 071010B and GRB 071112C

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K. Y.; Wang, S. Y.; Urata, Y.

    2009-05-25

    We present on two early detections of GRB afterglows with the Taiwanese-American Occltation Sruvey (TAOS) telescopes. The robotic TAOS system has been devised so that the routine Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) survey is interrupted when a GRB alert is triggered. Our first detection, GRB 071010B was detected by TAOS 62 s after the burst and showed a weak early brightening during the observations. No significant correction with the prompt gamma-ray emission indicated that our optical emission detected is afterglow emission. The second detection of TAOS, GRB 071112C was detected 96 s after the burst, also showed a possible initial raising then followed a steep decay in the R-band light curve.

  18. What Happens in Classrooms after Earth Science Fieldwork? Supporting Student Learning Processes during Follow-Up Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmen, Kari Beate; Frøyland, Merethe

    2015-01-01

    Follow-up activities after fieldwork are recommended, yet little research has been conducted in this area. This study investigates six cases of follow-up work carried out by three teachers and their students in three upper secondary schools in Norway. The data comprises video observations of teachers and students, instructional artifacts,…

  19. Radio Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Triggers during Advanced LIGO O1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, N. T.; Corsi, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Frail, D. A.; Perley, D. A.; Mishra, N.; Singer, L. P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Surace, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present radio follow-up observations carried out with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array during the first observing run (O1) of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). A total of three gravitational-wave triggers were followed-up during the ≈ 4 months of O1, from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these triggers, GW150914 and GW151226, are binary black hole (BH) merger events of high significance. A third trigger, G194575, was subsequently declared as an event of no interest (i.e., a false alarm). Our observations targeted selected optical transients identified by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in the Advanced LIGO error regions of the three triggers, and a limited region of the gravitational-wave localization area of G194575 not accessible to optical telescopes due to Sun constraints, where a possible high-energy transient was identified. No plausible radio counterparts to GW150914 and GW151226 were found, in agreement with expectations for binary BH mergers. We show that combining optical and radio observations is key to identifying contaminating radio sources that may be found in the follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers, such as emission associated with star formation and active galactic nuclei. We discuss our results in the context of the theoretical predictions for radio counterparts to gravitational-wave transients, and describe our future plans for the radio follow-up of Advanced LIGO (and Virgo) triggers.

  20. [Colonoscopy in the long-term follow-up of surgical anastomoses of the large intestine].

    PubMed

    Rossini, F P; Ferrari, A; Roatta, L; Presti, F; Boido, C

    1976-10-15

    On the bases of personal experience the importance of endoscopic examination of the colon in the follow-up of patients who have been subjected to resection of the large intestine is emphasized. Fibercoloscopy permits direct observation of "high" surgical anastomoses, which are inaccessible for examination with rigid rectosigmoidoscope, and thus opens the way to precise diagnosis and a correct therapeutic approach.

  1. Liverpool Telescope follow-up of candidate electromagnetic counterparts during the first run of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Piascik, A. S.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Lamb, G. P.; Levan, A. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Mundell, C. G.; Pian, E.; Pollacco, D.; Steeghs, D.; Tanvir, N. R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-11-01

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in 2015 September with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overview of the Liverpool Telescope contribution to the follow-up campaign over this period. Given the hundreds of square degree uncertainty in the sky position of any gravitational wave event, efficient searching for candidate counterparts required survey telescopes with large (˜degrees) fields of view. The role of the Liverpool Telescope was to provide follow-up classification spectroscopy of any candidates. We followed candidates associated with all three alerts, observing 1, 9 and 17 candidates respectively. We classify the majority of the transients we observed as supernovae. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole-black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely.

  2. Endometrial cancer. Prevention, detection, management, and follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Elit, L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review risk factors for uterine cancer; to discuss strategies for detecting uterine cancer; to outline prognostic factors and treatment; and to review the role of follow up for patients who have completed primary therapy. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from January 1996 to June 1998 using the terms endometrial neoplasms, estrogen replacement therapy, hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen, and screening. Only English language articles were reviewed. Study types included reviews. Bibliographies of articles found were searched for further relevant titles. Causation literature is available from well conducted cohort trials. Treatment recommendations are based in part on prognostic information and a few randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Risk factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic, are associated with uterine cancer. Family physicians have a role in preventing disease by ensuring that all women with uteri in situ using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have progesterone therapy as part of the HRT regimen. Detection is crucial; abnormal uterine bleeding or undiagnosed postmenopausal bleeding warrants investigation with endometrial biopsy. The goal of surgery is to remove the uterus and ovaries and identify factors that make the disease at high risk of recurrence. Although adjuvant radiation therapy does not prolong survival, it does alter the pattern of disease recurrence. The goal of follow up after primary therapy is to identify recurrent disease while it is still curable. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians play an important role in preventing uterine cancer, initiating early diagnosis of disease, and in the future, might be more actively involved in caring for patients following primary therapy. PMID:10790821

  3. [Long-term follow-up of osteochondritis dissecans].

    PubMed

    Gudas, Rimtautas; Kunigiskis, Giedrius; Kalesinskas, Romas Jonas

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with osteochondritis dissecans lesions were evaluated after 7-25 years after excision of a partially detached (grade III) fragment or loose (grade IV) fragment from the medial femoral condyles. Average follow-up time was 17.2 (range 7-25 years). Two homogenic groups based on special inclusion criteria were formed; 31 patient was in the first and 21--in the second group. The only difference between the groups was the age; the age average in the first group was--25.6 years (range 15-35 years), and -45.2 years (range 35-55 years) in the second group. Patients were evaluated through ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society), modified HSS and KOOS (Knee injury and osteoarthritis Outcome score) scales, and with X-rays. Evaluation with the ICRS, modified HSS and KOOS rating scales for osteochondritis dissecans revealed in 9 cases (17%) good results, 32 cases (62%)--fair, and 11 cases (21%)--failure results. Final ICRS and modified HSS evaluation showed statistically significantly better results in the younger patient group at the 21 years (p < 0.04). At an average 17.2 year follow-up X-rays and KOOS evaluation form showed initial and second-degree (according to Ahlbäck) osteoarthritis signs in the knees. The long-term results of the natural history of osteochondritis dissecans are extremely poor. Consequently, we recommend autologous osteochondral grafting for the replacement of the osteochondritis dissecans defects in the knee joint.

  4. Gastric and Duodenal Stents: Follow-Up and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto Pabon, Isabel Teresa; Paul Diaz, Laura; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Lopez Herrero, Julio

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in treating inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses during follow-up and to evaluate the complications encountered.Methods: A total of 31 patients suffering from gastroduodenal obstruction (29 malignant, 2 benign) were treated with a self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent). In 24 cases insertion was by the peroral route, in seven cases via gastrostomy.Results: All the strictures were successfully negotiated under fluoroscopic guidance without having to resort to endoscopy. A total of 27 patients (87%) were able to resume a regular diet, a soft diet, or a liquid diet orally. Complications included one case of stent malpositioning, one case of leakage of ascitic fluid through the gastrostomy orifice, one case of perforation and fistula to the biliary tree, and two cases of hematemesis. In two patients (6%) additional stents were implanted to improve patency. In all patients follow-up was maintained until death. Recurrence of symptoms immediately before death occurred in seven cases (23%). Mean survival time of patients was 13.3 weeks (SE {+-} 4.6).Conclusions: The deployment of gastroduodenal stents resulted in good palliation of inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses. Certain technical aspects, e.g., adaptation of stents to bowel morphology, is critical to proper stent function and avoidance of complications.

  5. Ablative radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism: long term follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall-Taylor, P; Keir, M J; Ross, W M

    1984-01-01

    A total of 225 patients were treated for hyperthyroidism with 555 MBq (15 mCi) radioiodine to ablate the thyroid and induce early hypothyroidism. The efficacy of this treatment in eradicating hyperthyroidism and problems of follow up were assessed one to six years later from case records and questionnaires. Information was received from 197 out of 219 live patients (90%) and from 160 doctors concerning 207 patients (92%). Only three patients were not traced and six had died since treatment. The modal time to hypothyroidism was three months, and 64% of patients were hypothyroid at one year; 5.6% had failed to become euthyroid within one year. Ninety five per cent of patients had been seen by the doctor and 82% had had a thyroid test done within the past two years. Most doctors preferred patients to be returned to their care once thyroxine treatment was stabilised. An ablative dose of 131I is recommended as an effective means of treatment which has clear advantages over conventional methods. Good communications and effective follow up should ensure success. PMID:6432100

  6. Wartenberg's migrant sensory neuritis: a prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; van der Meulen, Marjon F G; van der Pol, W-Ludo; Vrancken, Alexander F J E; Franssen, Hessel; Notermans, Nicolette C

    2010-08-01

    Migrant sensory neuropathy (Wartenberg's migrant sensory neuritis) is characterized by sudden numbness in the distribution of one or multiple cutaneous nerves. To study disease course and outcome, we prospectively followed 12 patients who presented to our tertiary referral neuromuscular outpatient clinic between January 2003 and January 2004. Medical history, neurological, laboratory and electrophysiological examinations were obtained from all patients. All patients were reviewed a second time in 2007, and five had a follow-up electrophysiological examination. At the first visit, 50% described an episode of stretching preceding the sensory complaints. All but three described pain in the affected area before or concomitant with sensory loss. At clinical examination a median of six skin areas were affected, and in 75% this could be confirmed by nerve conduction studies in at least one nerve. Forty-two percent had involvement of the trigeminal nerve. After a mean disease duration of 7.5 years, three patients reported a complete disappearance of sensory complaints and five that the pain had disappeared, but numbness remained. Three patients still had both painful and numb sensory deficits. One patient developed a distal symmetric sensory polyneuropathy. In conclusion, Wartenberg's sensory neuritis is a distinct, exclusively sensory, neuropathy, marked by pain preceding numbness in affected nerves. An episode of stretching preceding pain is not necessary for the diagnosis. Wartenberg's sensory neuritis often retains its spotty, exclusively sensory characteristics after long term follow-up.

  7. Tuberculosis of the knee -- a long term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chow, S P; Yau, A

    1980-01-01

    Thirty cases of tuberculosis of the knee followed up for an average of 15 years were reviewed. The majority of patients developed the disease during childhood. All had received standard anti-tuberculous drug treatment. Fifteen were treated conservatively alone, while the other 15 had a debridement type of surgery in addition to drugs. At review, one-third had occasional mild pain, but this was only present in the conservatively treated group. Stiffness, however, was more predominant in the operated and in the late onset groups. Some mild deformity was seen in 17 out of 30 patients and was related not so much to disturbance of epiphyseal growth, but rather, to bone collapse. Interesting X-ray appearances at follow-up were found. The factors which could lead to a good outcome included young age of onset, treatment within six months of onset, and early mobilisation. If the disease is well advanced, surgical treatment will lead to a painless joint, but with greater restriction of joint movement.

  8. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  9. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  10. A predictive scoring instrument for tuberculosis lost to follow-up outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is troublesome, due to long therapy duration, quick therapeutic response which allows the patient to disregard about the rest of their treatment and the lack of motivation on behalf of the patient for improved. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the probability of lost to follow-up outcome in TB patients as a way to identify patients suitable for directly observed treatments (DOT) and other interventions to improve adherence. Methods Two prospective cohorts, were used to develop and validate a logistic regression model. A scoring system was constructed, based on the coefficients of factors associated with a lost to follow-up outcome. The probability of lost to follow-up outcome associated with each score was calculated. Predictions in both cohorts were tested using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results The best model to predict lost to follow-up outcome included the following characteristics: immigration (1 point value), living alone (1 point) or in an institution (2 points), previous anti-TB treatment (2 points), poor patient understanding (2 points), intravenous drugs use (IDU) (4 points) or unknown IDU status (1 point). Scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 points were associated with a lost to follow-up probability of 2,2% 5,4% 9,9%, 16,4%, 15%, and 28%, respectively. The ROC curve for the validation group demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0,67 [95% CI; 0,65-0,70]). Conclusion This model has a good capacity to predict a lost to follow-up outcome. Its use could help TB Programs to determine which patients are good candidates for DOT and other strategies to improve TB treatment adherence. PMID:22938040

  11. Follow-up of adolescent oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Delmore, T; Kalagian, W F; Loewen, I R

    1991-01-01

    Clients in birth control centers (St. Catharines, Niagara Falls, and Welland) in Ontario, Canada were profiled in 1989; factors affecting compliance with the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) were investigated. Compliance was assessed for those 16 years and after 3 months of OC use. A control group and 2 study groups were randomly formed. 1 group was told about a follow up telephone call if the 3-month checkup appointment was not kept and the other not told. Compliance was determined by keeping the follow-up appointment and taking the pill as directed. Self-administered questionnaires were obtained at the 1st appointment and the 2nd study group was interviewed at the 3-month appointment time. Of the 334 intake interviews, 28.4% were adolescents 16 years old. Information on birth control came most frequently from friends (78.7%; then high school classmates, 61.4% grade school classmates, 61.4%; and family, 38.0%). 94.3% had a boyfriend, primarily a steady one. 82.4% were sexually active before the Center visit. 21.3% had had sex when 15 years old. 9.2% of those sexually active had never used birth control. 85.2% of those using contraception had used a condom at least once, and 33.9% used withdrawal. In the preceding month, birth control was used 60% of the time. 46% of mothers and 25% of fathers were considered supportive of birth control. 228 16 years participated in the compliance study. The 2 study groups and the control group were not significantly different in their compliance. The only statistically significant predictor of compliance (from the intake interview) was the previous use of the condom. Those more likely to be compliant were the 10.9% sexually active who had never used a condom. Continuing with the family doctor, not sexually active, advice to stop, side effects concerns, and remembering to take the pill were the most common reasons for noncompliance. The implication for health and sex education is that emphasis needs to the placed on the risks taken

  12. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper.

  13. Endobronchial valves for advanced emphysema: an endobronchial follow-up.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Pablo S; Seijo, Luis M; Zulueta, Javier J

    2014-01-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery is a therapeutic option for selected patients with advanced emphysema. However, it is an invasive procedure benefitting only a selected group of patients with heterogeneous upper lobe predominant disease and limited exercise capacity. The most widely studied alternatives are endobronchial valves. Hundreds of patients worldwide have undergone endobronchial valve placement. Although short-term outcomes have been described, little is known about the long-term side effects following this treatment, and endoscopic follow-up is virtually nonexistent. The images, biopsies, and microbiologic evidence accrued from this patient are witnesses to the natural evolution of endobronchial valves in the airways and should offer a word of caution with regard to valve placement in patients with life expectancies exceeding those typical of severe chronic obstructive lung disease.

  14. [Follow-up of tetralogy of Fallot after repair].

    PubMed

    Van Aerschot, Isabelle; Iserin, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) exists for more than 40 years. This repair results in a pulmonary regurgitation, which is usually well tolerated for two decades or so, but eventually this is injurious for the right ventricle (RV). The RV enlargement and severe RV dysfunction increase risk for ventricular tachycardia (VT) and sudden death in the long-term. The pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) is shifting earlier to preserve RV function before patients develop symptoms. Several parameters have to be considered to facilate correct timing for PVR (surgically of by catheterization) : echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, electrocardiogram and cardiopulmonary exercise. All patients should have regular follow-up in a specialized grown-up congenital heart disease (GUCH) center to detect as soon as possible pathological signs of RV enlargement. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation for primary prevention and programmed ventricular stimulation in repaired TOF remain controversal.

  15. Late follow-up of the Braunwald-Cutter valve.

    PubMed

    Jonas, R A; Garratt-Boyes, B G; Kerr, A R; Whitlock, R M

    1982-06-01

    A retrospective review has been made of 234 patients who received 239 Braunwald-Cutter valves (109 aortic, 130 mitral). For the aortic valve, the thromboembolic rate was very high (10.3 per 100 patient-years). This was associated with severe strut cloth wear in 94.5% of valves and with long strands of fibrin attached to the worn cloth in 58% of valves studied at reoperation or postmortem examination. The aortic poppet showed a mean decrease in volume of 4%, and poppet escape was recognized in 4 patients. The actuarial incidence of poppet escape was less than that predicted in earlier reports. There was a 4% incidence of stenosis of the valve. The hospital mortality associated with removal of the aortic Braunwald-Cutter valve and replacement with another device was 4%. Performance of the mitral Braunwald-Cutter valve appears satisfactory to date (mean follow-up, 42 months). Its electric removal is not recommended.

  16. Endoscopic palliation for inoperable malignant dysphagia: long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Maunoury, V; Brunetaud, J M; Cochelard, D; Boniface, B; Cortot, A; Paris, J C

    1992-01-01

    This prospective non-randomised trial of 128 selected patients with unresectable oesophageal or gastrooesophageal junction cancers aims to evaluate the initial relief of malignant obstruction by means of bipolar electrocoagulation for both circumferential and submucosal strictures of Nd:YAG laser for the other patients. A limited dilatation was performed initially if a small calibre endoscope was unable to pass through the stricture. Prompt and significant relief of dysphagia without complications was achieved in 83% of patients. Improved patients were retreated monthly during the follow up period. Radiotherapy was recommended when possible. Symptomatic relief of obstruction lasted 4.2 months on average and 76% of patients remained palliated until death. Monthly retreatment using the most appropriate endoscopic procedure for the tumour configuration and radiotherapy after endoscopic relief of obstruction seems to give the best palliation for patients with unresectable cancers of the oesophagus or gastrooesophageal junction. PMID:1283144

  17. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  18. Home/community monitoring using telephonic follow-up.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elisabeth Moy; French, Louis; Janos, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Service members who have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a war theatre [Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)] may have associated injuries far different and/or more complex (i.e., polytrauma) than injuries obtained outside the theatre of operation. This article expands on what has been learned from monitoring patients injured during peacetime to the newly injured war veterans being monitored in the home setting via routine telephonic follow-up. As Tanielian et al. state TBI, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression may occur during and following deployment/s which then pose a significant health risk to these veterans. This is particularly important as veterans of these two conflicts may incur these "invisible wounds of war". Thus, safe and effective monitoring of these veterans by nurses/case managers in the home/community setting becomes important in the recovery process.

  19. [Patient education: the way for long-term follow up].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J

    2008-06-04

    Therapeutic education is now perfectly integrated in caring and medicine. Its field of application is primarily in chronic diseases for the acquisition of competences in the management of treatments, in co-operation with health professionals. In ambulatory medicine, patients and health professionals are currently running up against the difficulties of the long-term follow-up with its part of uncertainty, lassitude and economic pressure. EBM and the various models of health psychology light us only partially the way. A new type of reflexive step is emerging. This way of thinking should place in its center the concept of therapeutic relation: between science and being. We summarize here our reflexive process in the course of an interdisciplinary team gathering social sciences, art and medicine.

  20. Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    de Maindreville, Anne Doé; Fénelon, Gilles; Mahieux, Florence

    2005-02-01

    To study prevalence of hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a 1-year period, and identify factors predictive of the onset of hallucinations in patients who were hallucination-free at baseline, 141 unselected outpatients with PD were evaluated prospectively for a set of demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables and the presence of hallucinations during the previous 3 months. Patient groups were compared with nonparametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Follow-up data were available for 127 patients. The hallucination prevalence rates (%) at the first and second evaluation were, respectively, 41.7 and 49.6 for hallucinations of all types (NS), 29.1 and 40.2 for minor hallucinations (i.e., presence or passage hallucinations, and illusions) (P = 0.02), 22.8 and 21.2 for formed visual hallucinations (NS), and 8.7 and 8.7 for auditory hallucinations (NS). Hallucinations rarely started or ceased during the study. The most labile forms were minor hallucinations, which developed in 20% of patients and ceased in 9%. During follow-up, 15% of patients started to hallucinate. Three factors, all present at the first evaluation, independently predicted the onset of hallucinations in patients previously free of hallucinations at baseline (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): severe sleep disturbances (14.3; 2.5-80.9), ocular disorders (9.1; 1.6-52.0), and a high axial motor score (5.7; 1.2-27.4). Hallucinations have a chronic course in most parkinsonian patients. Factors predicting the onset of hallucinations point to a role of extranigral brainstem involvement and a nonspecific, facilitating role of ocular disorders.

  1. Schizophrenia spectrum personality disorders in psychometrically identified schizotypes at two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bolinskey, P Kevin; Smith, Elizabeth A; Schuder, Kelly M; Cooper-Bolinskey, Dianna; Myers, Kevin R; Hudak, Daniel V; James, Alison V; Hunter, Helen K; Novi, Jonathan H; Guidi, Janice P; Gonzalez, Yelena; McTiernan, Erin F; Arnold, Kaitlin M; Iati, Carina A; Gottesman, Irving I

    2017-03-08

    Earlier (Bolinskey et al., 2015), we reported that psychometrically identified schizotypes displayed greater symptom levels and higher incidences of schizophrenia spectrum (schizotypal, schizoid, paranoid, and avoidant) personality disorders (PDs). In this study, 49 schizotypes and 39 matched controls participated in follow-up assessments after two years. Participants were previously identified as schizotypes or controls based on scores on the Chapman Psychosis Proneness Scales (CPPS), and were interviewed at baseline and follow-up with the Personality Disorder Interview for DSM-IV (PDI-IV). At follow-up, schizotypes displayed significantly higher symptom levels compared to controls, with medium to large effects, and appeared to meet criteria for diagnosis of each PD more often than controls, although significant differences were only observed for paranoid PD. Overall, schizotypes were more likely to have met criteria for a diagnosis at either baseline or follow-up. Finally, we observed a widening disparity over time between schizotypes and controls in avoidant and schizoid PDs. These results suggest that schizophrenia spectrum PDs, as well as subthreshold symptoms of these disorders, can represent a greater liability for schizophrenia in individuals identified as at-risk on the basis of psychometric means only. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that such differences persist, and in some cases increase, over time.

  2. Stopping rules for surveys with multiple waves of nonrespondent follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Sowmya; Glickman, Mark E; Glynn, Robert J

    2008-05-30

    In surveys with multiple waves of follow-up, nonrespondents to the first wave are sometimes followed intensively but this does not guarantee an increase in the response rate or an appreciable change in the estimate of interest. Most prior research has focused on stopping rules for Phase I clinical trials. To our knowledge there are no standard methods to stop follow-up in observational studies. Previous research suggests optimal stopping strategies where decisions are based on achieving a given precision for minimum cost or reducing cost for a given precision. In this paper, we propose three stopping rules that are based on assessing whether successive waves of sampling provide evidence that the parameter of interest is changing. Two of the rules rely on examining patterns of observed responses while the third rule uses missing data methods to multiply impute missing responses. We also present results from a simulation study to evaluate our proposed methods. Our simulations suggest that rules that adjust for nonresponse are preferred for decisions to discontinue follow-up since they reduce bias in the estimate of interest. The rules are not complicated and may be applied in a straightforward manner. Discontinuing follow-up would save time and possibly resources, and adjusting for the nonresponse in the analysis would reduce the impact of nonresponse bias.

  3. Criminal behavior in antisocial substance abusers between five and fifteen years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Mats; Hesse, Morten; Billsten, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is one of the most common co-occurring disorders in substance abusers, characterized among other things by a high propensity for criminal actions. A cohort of 125 substance abusers were followed in a longitudinal design. Patients were diagnosed with ASPD at an index treatment episode, interviewed at five-year follow-up, and followed-up through the Swedish criminal justice register by 2005 for the years 1995-2003. ASPD and non-ASPD subjects were compared using Mann Whitney U test for ordinal variables (number of offenses and months in prison) and chi-square tests for categorical variables. A total of 107 were alive by 1995, when the period of observation began. ASPD diagnosed at baseline was related to criminal offenses and incarceration during the follow-up from 5 to 15 years. For most categories, ASPD diagnosis was associated with higher frequency of offense. An ASPD diagnosis based on SCID-II interview made at five-year follow-up was related to the number of offenses but unrelated to incarceration. In a sample of drug abusers, ASPD was associated with high levels of criminal behavior, even years after the diagnosis was given. A diagnosis based on clinical observation during treatment was at least as predictive of criminal behavior as a diagnosis based on a SCID-II interview.

  4. Follow-up and characterization of the TESS exoplanets with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, N.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Boisse, I.; Hébrard, G.; Forveille, T.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouchy, F.; Moutou, C.; Doyon, R.; Artigau, E.; Albert, L.; Malo, L.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Santerne, A.; Author2, J.-P.; Author3, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA TESS mission will deliver hundreds of transiting exoplanet candidates orbiting bright stars. The spectrometers SOPHIE at OHP and SPIRou at CFHT will be ideal to obtain radial velocities of these candidates, confirm their nature, and derive the planets' masses. These measurements will be crucial to deliver the best targets for atmospheric characterization with JWST. Here, we calculate the required observing time with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST for each of the TESS targets in order to prepare follow-up observations. To infer their potential for JWST, we restrict the calculations to the case of transmission spectroscopy with NIRISS. The radial velocity follow-up of the giant planets (R_p > 4 R_E) could be achieved with SOPHIE, with a median observing time of 3.47 hours per target, and a total observing time of 305 hours that includes the 80% most favorable cases. Several small planets (R_p < 4 R_E) could also be confirmed, but most of them would require an unrealistic time investment. On the other hand, SPIRou is ideally suited to the follow-up of the small planets, with a median observing time of 2.65 hours per target, and a median observing time of 4.70 hours for the terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (R_p < 2 R_E, S < 2 S_E). With JWST, the 10% most favorable small planets have a median observing time of 16.2 hours, and the 10% most favorable habitable zone terrestrial planets have a median observing time of 59.7 hours. Overall, this study will help define a follow-up strategy and prepare observation programs with SOPHIE and SPIRou before the first planet candidates are delivered by TESS.

  5. Updates to Advanced LIGO and Virgo's Low-Latency Electromagnetic Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min-A.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Data from Advanced LIGO (and soon, Virgo) is promptly analyzed to enable electromagnetic follow-up observations by dozens of observing teams. In this talk I present three key changes made to this program for the second observing run, O2. These key changes cover (1) down-selecting from multiple gravitational wave triggers to the event candidate we follow-up on, provided these triggers all describe the same astrophysical event, (2) upgrading to 3-dimensional sky localization probability maps (skymaps) for compact binary coalescence events, and (3) providing additional information about event candidates that will be communicated via GCN notices/VOEvents to our observing partners. I will conclude by describing online low-latency pipelines. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation through grant PHY-1404121.

  6. Increased adipose tissue expression of Grb14 in several models of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Cariou, Bertrand; Capitaine, Nadège; Le Marcis, Véronique; Vega, Nathalie; Béréziat, Véronique; Kergoat, Micheline; Laville, Martine; Girard, Jean; Vidal, Hubert; Burnol, Anne-Françoise

    2004-06-01

    Grb14 is an effector of insulin signaling, which directly inhibits insulin receptor catalytic activity in vitro. Here, we investigated whether the expression of Grb14 and its binding partner ZIP (PKC zeta interacting protein) is regulated during insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rodents and humans. Grb14 expression was increased in adipose tissue of both ob/ob mice and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, whereas there was no difference in liver. An increase was also observed in subcutaneous adipose tissue of type 2 diabetic subjects when compared with controls. ZIP expression was increased in adipose tissue of ob/ob mice and type 2 diabetic patients, but it did not vary in GK rats. Hormonal regulation of Grb14 and ZIP expression was then investigated in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. In this model, insulin stimulated Grb14 expression, while TNF-alpha increased ZIP expression. Moreover, the insulin-sensitizing drugs thiazolidinediones (TZDs) decreased Grb14 expression in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. Finally, we investigated the dynamic regulation of Grb14 expression in ob/ob mice in several conditions improving their insulin sensitivity. Prolonged fasting and treatment with metformin significantly decreased Grb14 expression in peri-epidydimal adipose tissue, while there was only a trend to a diminution after TZD treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the regulation of Grb14 expression in adipose tissue may play a physiological role in insulin sensitivity.

  7. THE AFTERGLOW AND ENVIRONMENT OF THE SHORT GRB 111117A

    SciTech Connect

    Margutti, R.; Berger, E.; Fong, W.; Zauderer, B. A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N.; Cenko, S. B.; Greiner, J.; Cucchiara, A.

    2012-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the afterglow of the short GRB 111117A, and follow-up observations of its host galaxy. From rapid optical and radio observations, we place limits of r {approx}> 25.5 mag at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 0.55 days and F{sub {nu}}(5.8 GHz) {approx}< 18 {mu}Jy at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 0.50 days, respectively. However, using a Chandra observation at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 3.0 days we locate the absolute position of the X-ray afterglow to an accuracy of 0.''22 (1{sigma}), a factor of about six times better than the Swift/XRT position. This allows us to robustly identify the host galaxy and to locate the burst at a projected offset of 1.''25 {+-} 0.''20 from the host centroid. Using optical and near-IR observations of the host galaxy we determine a photometric redshift of z = 1.3{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2}, one of the highest for any short gamma-ray burst (GRB), leading to a projected physical offset for the burst of 10.5 {+-} 1.7 kpc, typical of previous short GRBs. At this redshift, the isotropic {gamma}-ray energy is E{sub {gamma},iso} Almost-Equal-To 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (rest-frame 23-2300 keV) with a peak energy of E{sub pk} Almost-Equal-To 850-2300 keV (rest-frame). In conjunction with the isotropic X-ray energy, GRB 111117A appears to follow our recently reported E{sub x,iso}-E{sub {gamma},iso}-E{sub pk} universal scaling. Using the X-ray data along with the optical and radio non-detections, we find that for a blastwave kinetic energy of E{sub K,iso} Almost-Equal-To E{sub {gamma},iso} erg, the circumburst density is n{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} - 1 cm{sup -3} (for a range of {epsilon}{sub B} = 0.001-0.1). Similarly, from the non-detection of a break in the X-ray light curve at {delta}t {approx}< 3 days, we infer a minimum opening angle for the outflow of {theta}{sub j} {approx}> 3-10 Degree-Sign (depending on the circumburst density). We conclude that Chandra observations of short

  8. Fast response electromagnetic follow-ups from low latency GW triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. J.; Chu, Q.; Rowlinson, A.; Gao, H.; Zhang, B.; Tingay, S. J.; Boër, M.; Wen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming that BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of extreme low-latency search pipelines, we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs and use these to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. Using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors, we determine what EM observations could be achieved from low-frequency radio up to high energy γ-ray. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multi-messenger science is possible through low latency pipelines.

  9. Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study

    SciTech Connect

    Forni, A.

    1996-12-01

    To study the evolution of cytogenetic damage from past exposure to high concentrations of benzene and its health significance, chromosome aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes were reinvestigated after approximately 20 years in four subjects with past severe hemopathy and in seven controls studied in the late 1960s. Increased chromosome-type aberrations were still present up to 30 years after benzene toxicity, but blood counts were normal. The vital status at the end of 1993 was ascertained for 32 subjects with a history of benzene toxicity and for 31 controls studied for CA from 1965 to 1970, who differed significantly for CA rates. Of the 32 benzene-exposed subjects, 1 was lost to follow-up, 20 were still alive, and 11 had died at ages 36 to 83, between 1 and 20 years after the last CA study. Five deaths were from neoplasia (acute erythroleukemia, brain tumor, cancer of lung, paranasal cavity, esophagus). The deceased subjects had significantly higher rates of chromosome-type aberrations than those alive, and those who died of neoplasia had the highest rates of these aberrations in the last study before death or diagnosis of cancer. Out of the 31 controls, 12 had died from 4 to 23 years after the CA study. Three deaths were from neoplasia (two lung cancer, one brain tumor). Even if this is a small sample, the results suggest a higher risk of cancer for the benzene-exposed cohort, who had persistently high CA rates in lymphocytes. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Cohort Profile: The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS).

    PubMed

    Tate, Robert B; Cuddy, T Edward; Mathewson, Francis A L

    2015-10-01

    The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) is Canada's longest running study of cardiovascular disease and ageing. The MFUS cohort consists of 3983 men recruited from the Royal Canadian Air Force at the end of World War II. At entry to the study, 1 July 1948, their mean age was 31 years, with 90% between ages 20 and 39 years. All study members were free of clinical evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The protocol of MFUS was to obtain routine medical examinations from these men at regular intervals over time. The research goal of the study was to examine the role that any abnormalities detected on routine electrocardiograms from apparently healthy men might play in the prediction of subsequent diagnoses of cardiovascular disease. Over the course of 65 years, about 35% of the cohort has documented evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The research focus was expanded in 1996 to explore the roles of physical, mental and social functioning in support of healthy and successful ageing. On 1 July 2013, 429 original cohort members were alive with a mean age of 92 years. Collaborative research with others outside the in-house team is welcomed.

  11. [Cardiological follow-up in patients with Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Chimenti, Cristina; Frustaci, Andrea; Sarais, Cristiano; Cecchi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare tesaurismosis due to a deficit of the lysosomal enzyme activity of alpha-galactosidase, needed for the normal catabolism of globotriaosylceramides (GL3). Fabry cardiac involvement has several clinical manifestations: concentric left ventricular hypertrophy without left ventricular dilation and severe loss of left ventricular systolic function, mitral and aortic valvulopathy, disorders of the atrioventricular conduction or repolarization, and compromised diastolic function. Differentiating Fabry disease from similar conditions is often quite straightforward, e.g., cardiac amyloidosis is often associated with low electrocardiographic voltages, and systemic symptoms are usually associated with hemochromatosis and sarcoidosis. However, sometimes second-level (genetic analysis, alpha-galactosidase levels) or invasive investigations are required, which can include endomyocardial biopsy. Diagnostic imaging techniques have been described, but they lack specificity. Echocardiographic imaging with tissue Doppler analysis and/or strain rate analysis can allow diagnosis of Fabry disease even before left ventricular hypertrophy becomes apparent. This review illustrates the techniques for staging cardiac involvement and damage in Fabry disease and for the long-term follow-up of Fabry patients with or without cardiac involvement. Careful cardiac monitoring is especially important in elderly female carriers, who often develop renal disorders and/or left ventricular hypertrophy as the only manifestations of their late Fabry disease. In some clinical series, Fabry disease was diagnosed in 12% of women with adult-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Cardiological problems and outcomes of enzyme replacement therapy, associated with or without other cardiological treatments, are also discussed.

  12. [Follow-up and counselling after pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Derniaux, E; Lucereau-Barbier, M; Graesslin, O

    2012-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can be responsible for infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Treatment of acute PID is very important as it can reduce the risk of sequelae. However, follow-up, partner treatment and counselling are also useful to reduce the reinfection rate. Few weeks after PID, clinical evaluation as well as transvaginal and transabdominal sonography must be performed. The interest of systematic bacteriological tests is not proved. Hysterosalpingography and second-look laparoscopy should be considered only for women with infertility and severe infection. Use of condom is advisable in this population in order to prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STD) including HIV and to decrease rate of recurrence, associated to contraceptive pill, which is also a good option. In selected cases, intrauterine devices can be used in patients with history of PID if the infection is resolved and no significant risk factors for STD exist. Infertility and chronic pelvic pain are the most common sequelae in the population of young women with severe and recurrent infection. The risk of ectopic pregnancy is higher for these women and must be kept in mind. Counselling and risk-reduction interventions decreased significatively the rate of recurrence and sequelae in PID.

  13. French consensus. Idiopathic hypersomnia: Investigations and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Leu-Semenescu, S; Quera-Salva, M-A; Dauvilliers, Y

    Idiopathic hypersomnia is a rare, central hypersomnia, recently identified and to date of unknown physiopathology. It is characterised by a more or less permanent, excessive daytime sleepiness, associated with long and unrefreshing naps. Night-time sleep is of good quality, excessive in quantity, associated with sleep inertia in the subtype previously described as "with long sleep time". Diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia is complex due to the absence of a quantifiable biomarker, the heterogeneous symptoms, which overlap with the clinical picture of type 2 narcolepsy, and its variable evolution over time. Detailed evaluation enables other frequent causes of somnolence, such as depression or sleep deprivation, to be eliminated. Polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) are essential to rule out other sleep pathologies and to objectify excessive daytime sleepiness. Sometimes the MSLT do not show excessive sleepiness, hence a continued sleep recording of at least 24hours is necessary to show prolonged sleep (>11h/24h). In this article, we propose recommendations for the work-up to be carried out during diagnosis and follow-up for patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

  14. COPD and microalbuminuria: a 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Romundstad, Solfrid; Naustdal, Thor; Romundstad, Pål Richard; Sorger, Hanne; Langhammer, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), low lung function independent of diagnosis and markers of inflammation are all associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Microalbuminuria, reflecting endothelial dysfunction, could be a relevant inflammatory marker of potential systemic effects of COPD. We hypothesised that there was a positive association between microalbuminuria and mortality in individuals with COPD. We conducted a 12-year follow-up study of 3129 participants in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. At baseline, albuminuria was analysed in three urine samples and spirometry was performed. Among the participants, 136 had COPD and microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio between 2.5 and 30.0 mg·mmol(-1). The main outcome measures were hazard ratio of all-cause mortality according to microalbuminuria. Compared to those with COPD without microalbuminuria, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in those with COPD and microalbuminuria was 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.04. This result was similar after excluding cardiovascular disease at baseline. Classifying COPD severity by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, there was a positive association trend with increasing severity stages. Microalbuminuria is associated with all-cause mortality in individuals with COPD and could be a relevant tool in identification of patients with poor prognosis.

  15. GEMINI SPECTROSCOPY OF THE SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130603B AFTERGLOW AND HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Cardwell, A.; Turner, J.; Bloom, J. S.; Cobb, B. E.

    2013-11-10

    We present early optical photometry and spectroscopy of the afterglow and host galaxy of the bright short-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B discovered by the Swift satellite. Using our Target of Opportunity program on the Gemini South telescope, our prompt optical spectra reveal a strong trace from the afterglow superimposed on continuum and emission lines from the z = 0.3568 ± 0.0005 host galaxy. The combination of a relatively bright optical afterglow (r' = 21.52 at Δt = 8.4 hr), together with an observed offset of 0.''9 from the host nucleus (4.8 kpc projected distance at z = 0.3568), allow us to extract a relatively clean spectrum dominated by afterglow light. Furthermore, the spatially resolved spectrum allows us to constrain the properties of the explosion site directly, and compare these with the host galaxy nucleus, as well as other short-duration GRB host galaxies. We find that while the host is a relatively luminous (L∼0.8 L{sup *}{sub B}), star-forming (SFR = 1.84 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) galaxy with almost solar metallicity, the spectrum of the afterglow exhibits weak Ca II absorption features but negligible emission features. The explosion site therefore lacks evidence of recent star formation, consistent with the relatively long delay time distribution expected in a compact binary merger scenario. The star formation rate (SFR; both in an absolute sense and normalized to the luminosity) and metallicity of the host are both consistent with the known sample of short-duration GRB hosts and with recent results which suggest GRB 130603B emission to be the product of the decay of radioactive species produced during the merging process of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary ({sup k}ilonova{sup )}. Ultimately, the discovery of more events similar to GRB 130603B and their rapid follow-up from 8 m class telescopes will open new opportunities for our understanding of the final stages of compact-objects binary systems and provide crucial information

  16. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  17. Effectiveness of antismoking telephone helpline: follow up survey.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, S.; Tannahill, A.; Watson, J.; Fraser, E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of an antismoking campaign conducted by the Health Education Board for Scotland. DESIGN: Descriptive survey of adult callers to a telephone helpline (Smokeline) for stopping smoking; panel study of a random sample of adult callers; assessment of changes in prevalence of smoking in Scotland before and after introduction of the helpline. SETTING: Telephone helpline. SUBJECTS: Callers to Smokeline over the initial one year period. Detailed information was collected on a 10% sample (n = 8547). A cohort of adult smokers who called Smokeline (total n = 848) was followed up by telephone interview three weeks, six months, and one year after the initial call. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Numbers of adult smokers calling helpline; changes in smoking behaviour, especially stopping smoking among cohort members; and changes in prevalence of smoking in the general population. RESULTS: An estimated 82782 regular adult smokers made genuine contact with Smokeline over the year, representing about 5.9% of all adult smokers in Scotland. At one year 143 of the cohort of 848 callers (23.6%; 95% confidence interval 20.2% to 27.0%) reported that they had stopped smoking and 534 (88.0%; 85.4% to 90.6%) reported having made some change. About 19500 (16700 to 22350) adult smokers, equivalent to 1.4% (1.2% to 1.6%) of the mean adult smoking population, stopped smoking with direct help from Smokeling. During the second year of the campaign (1994) smoking prevalence among 25-65 year olds in Scotland was 6% (2.0% to 10.0%) lower than it had been before the start of the campaign. CONCLUSION: The Health Education Board for Scotland's antismoking campaign reached a high number of adult smokers, was associated with a highly acceptable quit rate among adults given direct help through Smokeline, and contributed considerably to an accelerated decline in smoking prevalence in Scotland. PMID:9161308

  18. Latex allergy: a follow up study of 1040 healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Filon, F Larese; Radman, G

    2006-01-01

    Background Natural rubber latex allergy can cause skin and respiratory symptoms The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of latex related symptoms and sensitisation among a large group of healthcare workers in Trieste hospitals, followed for three years before and after the introduction of powder‐free gloves with low latex release. Methods In the years 1997–99 the authors evaluated 1040 healthcare workers exposed to latex allergen for latex related symptoms and sensitisation by means of a questionnaire, a medical examination, skin prick tests, and IgE specific antibody assay. The second evaluation was carried out in the years 2000–02, subsequent to the changeover to a powder‐free environment. Results Glove related symptoms were seen in 21.8% of the nurses (227), mostly consisting of mild dermatitis: 38 (3.6%) complaining of contact urticaria and 24 (2.3%) of asthma and/or rhinitis. These symptoms were significantly related to skin prick tests positive to latex (OR = 9.70; 95% CI 5.5 to 17) and to personal atopy (OR = 2.29; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.2). Follow up was completed in 960 subjects (92.3%): 19 new subjects (2.4%) complained of itching erythema when using gloves, but none was prick positive to latex. Symptoms significantly improved and in most cases disappeared (p<0.0001). Conclusions Simple measures such as the avoidance of unnecessary glove use, the use of non‐powdered latex gloves by all workers, and use of non‐latex gloves by sensitised subjects can stop the progression of latex symptoms and can avoid new cases of sensitisation. PMID:16421390

  19. Six month-follow up of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Keleidari, Behrouz; Mahmoudie, Mohsen; Anaraki, Amin Ghanei; Shahraki, Masoud Sayadi; Jamalouee, Samira Dvashi; Gharzi, Mahsa; Mohtashampour, Farnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rising prevalence of obesity in today populations has led obese individuals to seek medical interventions. Aside from special diets, routine exercise and in some cases, medical treatment, most of the obese patients, favoring those with morbid or super obesity can benefit from bariatric surgery to lose weight. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is relatively new method to limit the compliance of stomach. The consequent quick satiety during each meal results in gradual weight loss in patients. We investigated the efficacy and safety of this method among a group of our patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Isfahan, Iran, from January 2012 to January 2013. Thirty-five cases of obesity that had undergone LSG were enrolled and their baseline data of weight, body mass index (BMI), blood sugar, lipid profile, liver function indexes and blood pressure were collected. The patients were followed up for 6 months. The 6-month results were analyzed. Results: There was significant reduction in BMI, weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, liver enzymes and lipid profile components (P < 0.05), except for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (P = 0.3). The average of excess weight loss percentage after 6 months was 69.2 ± 20.9%. No mortality occurred. Two of the patients had micro anastomotic leaks that were treated with nonoperative management. A case of gross leakage was treated with tube jejunostomy. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the efficacy and safety of LSG as a single surgical intervention for body weight reduction in morbidly and super obese patients. PMID:27110546

  20. The 8 O'clock Arc: current and future follow-up plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, D. L.; Lin, H.; Diehl, H.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Annis, J.; Frieman, J. A.; Brinchmann, J.; Shapley, A.; Strauss, M.; Tremonti, C.; Martin, C.; Baker, A.; Lutz, D.; Smith, J.; Kubik, D.; Kubo, J.; Scarpine, V.; McGinnis, D.; Estrada, J.; Schneider, D.; Kochanek, C.; Gladders, M.; Hall, P.

    2007-05-01

    The newly discovered brightest lensed Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) currently known (the 8 O'clock Arc, Allam et al. 2007), will allow several follow-up observations, as well as the creation of new tools for searching for similar bright gravitationally lensed objects in the SDSS data set. Here we discuss the photometric properties of the 8 O'clock Arc, and briefly describe a search program for similar candidate and our future plans.

  1. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER) and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an "interesting" neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  2. Synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from reverse shock on GRB 120326A

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kuiyun; Takahashi, Satoko; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Jang, Minsung; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tashiro, Makoto; Pak, Soojong

    2014-07-10

    We present multi-wavelength observations of a typical long duration GRB 120326A at z = 1.798, including rapid observations using a Submillimeter Array (SMA) and a comprehensive monitoring in the X-ray and optical. The SMA observation provided the fastest detection to date among seven submillimeter afterglows at 230 GHz. The prompt spectral analysis, using Swift and Suzaku, yielded a spectral peak energy of E{sub peak}{sup src}=107.8{sub −15.3}{sup +15.3} keV and an equivalent isotropic energy of E{sub iso} as 3.18{sub −0.32}{sup +0.40}×10{sup 52} erg. The temporal evolution and spectral properties in the optical were consistent with the standard forward shock synchrotron with jet collimation (6.°69 ± 0.°16). The forward shock modeling, using a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation, was also determined by the reasonable burst explosion and the synchrotron radiation parameters for the optical afterglow. The X-ray light curve showed no apparent jet break and the temporal decay index relation between the X-ray and optical (αo – α{sub X} = –1.45 ± 0.10) indicated different radiation processes in each of them. Introducing synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from reverse shock is a possible solution, and the detection and slow decay of the afterglow in submillimeter supports that this is a plausible idea. The observed temporal evolution and spectral properties, as well as forward shock modeling parameters, enabled us to determine reasonable functions to describe the afterglow properties. Because half of the events share similar properties in the X-ray and optical as the current event, GRB 120326A will be a benchmark with further rapid follow-ups, using submillimeter instruments such as an SMA and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.

  3. Mortality patterns among workers exposed to acrylamide: 1994 follow up

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, G. M.; Lucas, L. J.; Youk, A. O.; Schall, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the mortality experience of a cohort of 8508 workers with potential exposure to acrylamide at three plants in the United States from 1984-94. METHODS: Analyses of standardised mortality ratios (SMR) with national and local rates and relative risk (RR) regression modelling were performed to assess site specific cancer risks by demographic and work history factors, and exposure indicators for acrylamide and muriatic acid. RESULTS: For the 1925-94 study period, excess and deficit overall mortality risks were found for cancer sites of interest: brain and other central nervous system (CNS) (SMR 0.65, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.36 to 1.09), thyroid gland (SMR 2.11, 95% CI 0.44 to 6.17), testis and other male genital organs (SMR 0.28, 95% CI 0.01 to 1.59), and cancer of the respiratory system (SMR 1.10, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.22); however, none was significant or associated with exposure to acrylamide. A previously reported excess mortality risk of cancer of the respiratory system at one plant remained increased among workers with potential exposure to muriatic acid (RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.86 to 2.59), but was only slightly increased among workers exposed or unexposed to acrylamide. In an exploratory exposure-response analysis of rectal, oesophageal, pancreatic, and kidney cancer, we found increased SMRs for some categories of exposure to acrylamide, but little evidence of an exposure-response relation. A significant 2.26-fold risk (95% CI 1.03 to 4.29) was found for pancreatic cancer among workers with cumulative exposure to acrylamide > 0.30 mg/m3.years; however, no consistent exposure-response relations were detected with the exposure measures considered when RR regression models were adjusted for time since first exposure to acrylamide. CONCLUSION: The contribution of 1115 additional deaths and nearly 60,000 person-years over the 11 year follow up period corroborate the original cohort study findings of little evidence for a causal relation between

  4. Psychological type: a 32-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bradway, K; Detloff, W

    1996-10-01

    This study is a follow-up to three previous studies of psychological type published in this Journal in 1964, 1976 and 1978 by Bradway, Bradway and Detloff, and Bradway and Joseph Wheelwright. Participants in all of our studies were limited to Jungian analysts and candidates. Participants of the first two studies and of the current study were from California; participants of the 1978 study included the participants from the previous study plus persons attending the 1974 International Congress in London. In 1993 we sent letters to the 232 current analysts and candidates in the San Francisco and Los Angeles C.G. Jung Institutes, as well as to the nine participants in our 1974 study who were no longer members of the Institutes but could be located, asking them to fill out a questionnaire that included self-typing, and to self-administer the Gray-Wheelwrights Jungian Type Survey (GW). The response rate was high: 196 or 81% of the 241 persons to whom we sent letters returned filled-in questionnaires and GWs; all 67 or 100% of the participants in the 1974 study who could be located returned the filled-in material. Eight of those 67 had also been in the 1961 study. The current study provides data on the changes in psychological type over time, in some instances over a period of 32 years. It added for the first time a consideration of analysts' rating of themselves as primarily clinically or symbolically orientated, and a survey of analyst opinions as to the determinants of psychological type. Summarizing the results: A smaller percentage of analysts typed themselves as intuitive thinking than in 1961; the percentages of congruence between self-typing and the Gray-Wheelwrights scores in the three dimensions (introvert/extravert, sensation/intuition, and thinking/feeling) in 1961, 1974 and 1993 are between 76% and 96%; changes in typology from 1961 to 1993 occur more frequently in the younger age group than in the older age group; 65% of the participants considered the

  5. Mortality of aircraft maintenance workers exposed to trichloroethylene and other hydrocarbons and chemicals: extended follow up

    PubMed Central

    Radican, Larry; Blair, Aaron; Stewart, Patricia; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objective To extend follow-up of 14,455 workers from 1990 to 2000, and evaluate mortality risk from exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chemicals. Methods Multivariable Cox models were used to estimate relative risk for exposed vs. unexposed workers based on previously developed exposure surrogates. Results Among TCE exposed workers, there was no statistically significant increased risk of all-cause mortality (RR=1.04) or death from all cancers (RR=1.03). Exposure-response gradients for TCE were relatively flat and did not materially change since 1990. Statistically significant excesses were found for several chemical exposure subgroups and causes, and were generally consistent with the previous follow up. Conclusions Patterns of mortality have not changed substantially since 1990. While positive associations with several cancers were observed, and are consistent with the published literature, interpretation is limited due to the small numbers of events for specific exposures. PMID:19001957

  6. Annealing a Follow-up Program: Improvement of the Dark Energy Figure of Merit for Optical Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CCAPP, Columbus /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-06-02

    The precision of cosmological parameters derived from galaxy cluster surveys is limited by uncertainty in relating observable signals to cluster mass. We demonstrate that a small mass-calibration follow-up program can significantly reduce this uncertainty and improve parameter constraints, particularly when the follow-up targets are judiciously chosen. To this end, we apply a simulated annealing algorithm to maximize the dark energy information at fixed observational cost, and find that optimal follow-up strategies can reduce the observational cost required to achieve a specified precision by up to an order of magnitude. Considering clusters selected from optical imaging in the Dark Energy Survey, we find that approximately 200 low-redshift X-ray clusters or massive Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters can improve the dark energy figure of merit by 50%, provided that the follow-up mass measurements involve no systematic error. In practice, the actual improvement depends on (1) the uncertainty in the systematic error in follow-up mass measurements, which needs to be controlled at the 5% level to avoid severe degradation of the results; and (2) the scatter in the optical richness-mass distribution, which needs to be made as tight as possible to improve the efficacy of follow-up observations.

  7. Free gingival grafting procedure after excisional biopsy, 12-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Keskiner, Ilker; Alkan, B. Arzu; Tasdemir, Zekeriya

    2016-01-01

    The total removal of a lesion via excisional biopsy causes gingival recession, resulting in dentin hypersensitivity and esthetical problems. In this case report, a gingival recession defect resulting from an excisional biopsy was treated with a free gingival grafting procedure performed during the same appointment, and its 12-year follow-up was presented. A 44-year-old female patient was presented to our clinic with a firm, pedunculated, red gingival enlargement located on the labial surface of lower incisors. The exposed root surface, after the excisional biopsy, was covered with a free gingival graft. The lesion was pathologically diagnosed as pyogenic granuloma, and in the early postoperative phase, no recurrence was observed, but partial root coverage was determined. At 6-month follow-up, root coverage resulting from “creeping attachment” was observed, and this situation was maintained throughout the 12-year follow-up period. Repetitious postoperative discomfort and emotional stress for the patient may be avoided with a timesaving single appointment performing excisional biopsy and free gingival graft. Free gingival grafting procedure was used for this purpose not only to cover exposed root surfaces but also to eliminate dentin hypersensitivity and make oral hygiene procedures more effective. PMID:27403067

  8. Swift follow-up of the recent gamma-ray transient AGL J1035-6055

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.

    2017-01-01

    Swift-XRT has performed follow-up observations of the error region of the AGILE transient AGL J1035-6055 (Lucarelli et al., ATel #9947) in a series of observations tiled on the sky. The total exposure time was 6.035 ks, distributed over 7 tiles; the maximum exposure at a single sky location was 0.94 ks. The 7-tiled SWIFT observations have fully covered the AGL J1035-6055 error circle (0.4 deg, 95% C.L. stat.

  9. Polarization Evolution of the Afterglow of GRB 030329

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, Jochen; Klose, Sylvio; Reinsch, Klaus; Schmid, Hans Martin; Sari, Re'em; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Rau, Arne; Palazzi, Eliana; Straubmeier, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The association of a supernova with GRB 030329l strongly supports the collapsar model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where a relativistic jet forms after the progenitor star collapses. Such jets cannot be spatially resolved because of their cosmological distances. Their existence is conjectured based on breaks in GRB afterglow light curves and the theoretical desire to reduce the GRB energy requirements. Temporal evolution of polarization may provide independent evidence for the jet structure of the relativistic outflow. Small-level polarization (approx. 1-3%) has been reported for a few bursts, but the temporal evolution of polarization properties could not be established. Here, we report polarimetric observations of the afterglow of GRB 030329 with high signal-to-noise and high sampling frequency. We establish the polarization light curve, detect sustained polarization at the percent level, and find significant variability. The data imply that the afterglow magnetic field has small coherence length and is mostly random, probably generated by turbulence, in contrast with the high polarization detected in the prompt gamma-rays from GRB 02120618. Our results suggest a different structure and origin of the magnetic field in the prompt vs. afterglow emission regions.

  10. Development of de novo major involvement during follow-up in Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; d'Ascanio, Anna; Figus, Michele; Favati, Benedetta; Baldini, Chiara; Tani, Chiara; Neri, R; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of de novo major involvement during follow-up in a cohort of patients with Behçet's syndrome (BS); the secondary aim was to analyse the epidemiological profile and the long-term outcome of those patients who developed new major involvement. Among our cohort of 120 BS patients, we evaluated all subjects who had no major organ involvement during the early years of their disease; specifically, at disease onset, the 52% of the cohort presented a prevalent mucocutaneous involvement. The primary outcomes were represented by the following: Hatemi et al. (Rheum Dis Clin North Am 39(2):245-61, 2013) the incidence of de novo major involvement during the follow-up and Hatemi et al. (Clin Exp Rheumatol 32(4 Suppl 84):S112-22, 2014) the use of immunosuppressive drugs during the follow-up. We have defined the development of de novo major involvement during the follow-up as the occurrence of severe ocular, vascular or CNS involvement after a latency period from the diagnosis of at least 3 years. Among 62 patients characterized by a mild onset of disease, we observed that after at least 3 years from the diagnosis, 21 BS patients (34%) still developed serious morbidities. Specifically, three patients developed ocular involvement, nine patients developed neurological involvement and nine patients presented vascular involvement. Comparing main epidemiological and clinical findings of the two groups, we observed that patients who developed de novo major involvement were more frequently males and younger; furthermore, 95% of these patients were characterized by a young onset of disease (p < 0.001). Being free of major organ complication in the first years of BS is not necessary a sign of a favourable outcome. Globally, the development of de novo major involvement during the coursfce of BS suggests that a tight control is strongly recommended during the course of the disease.

  11. VERY HIGH ENERGY OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH STACEE

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, A.; Ong, R. A.; Ball, J.; Carson, J. E.; Zweerink, J.; Williams, D. A.; Aune, T.; Covault, C. E.; Driscoll, D. D.; Fortin, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Kildea, J.; Lindner, T.; Mueller, C.; Ragan, K.

    2010-10-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions known in the universe. Sensitive measurements of the high-energy spectra of GRBs can place important constraints on the burst environments and radiation processes. Until recently, there were no observations during the first few minutes of GRB afterglows in the energy range between 30 GeV and {approx}1 TeV. With the launch of the Swift GRB Explorer in late 2004, GRB alerts and localizations within seconds of the bursts became available. The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) was a ground-based, gamma-ray telescope with an energy threshold of {approx}150 GeV for sources at zenith. At the time of Swift's launch, STACEE was in a rare position to provide >150 GeV follow-up observations of GRBs as fast as three minutes after the burst alert. In addition, STACEE performed follow-up observations of several GRBs that were localized by the HETE-2 and INTEGRAL satellites. Between 2002 June and 2007 July, STACEE made follow-up observations of 23 GRBs. Upper limits are placed on the high-energy gamma-ray fluxes from 21 of these bursts.

  12. The Enigma of the Strong MgII Absorbers along the GRB Sightlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino; Charlton, J.; Jones, T.; Fox, D. B.; Narayan, A.; Narayan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The startling result of Prochter & Prochaska (2006) that the incidence of strong MgII absorbers (equivalent width EW(2796Å) > 1 Å) along gamma-ray burst (GRB) sightlines is four times larger (dN/dzGR=0.90) than for quasar sightlines (dN/dzQSO=0.24) has yet to be understood. In particular, explanations relating to dust bias in quasar samples, partial covering of quasars, and lensing amplification of the GRB beam all fail to satisfy basic observational constraints. We are currently engaged in an effort to explore this mystery using archival VLT/UVES (R=45,000) quasar and afterglow spectra. Identifying strong MgII absorbers in a uniform and statistically complete manner, we have compiled a sample of 28 absorbers toward 81 quasars and 9 absorbers toward 6 GRB afterglows. We explore the kinematics of the absorbers, the abundances of other metal species, and the strength of dust depletion in the GRB and QSO samples. We fail to identify any respects in which 75% of the GRB line-of-sight absorbers can be distinguished from the other members of the GRB and QSO absorber populations. We consider whether this finding rules out the possibility of an intrinsic high-velocity (v 0.2 c) GRB or GRB host-related origin for the excess absorbers, and conclude that it does not.

  13. Constraints on Short Gamma-ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at approx. 2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5(sigma) limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type IC hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or IC SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts - supernovae

  14. Constraints on Short Gamma-Ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.; Andersen, M.I.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Jensen, B.L.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Castro-Ceron, J.M.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A.; Pedersen, K.; Rhoads, J.E.; Tanvir, N.R.; Watson, D.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /IAA, Granada /KIPAC, Menlo Park /TLS, Tautenburg /NASA, Marshall /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Amsterdam U., Astron. Inst. /Aarhus U. /Potsdam, Astrophys. Inst. /European Southern Obs., Chile /Leicester U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Hertfordshire U.

    2005-06-15

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at {approx}2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type Ic hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or Ic SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB.

  15. Ergonomic Training Reduces Musculoskeletal Disorders among Office Workers: Results from the 6-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Norashikin; Kenny, Dianna Theadora; Md Zein, Raemy; Hassan, Siti Nurani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are commonly reported among computer users. This study explored whether these disorders can be reduced by the provision of ergonomics education. Methods: A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in which 3 units were randomised for intervention and received training, and 3 units were given a leaflet. The effect of intervention on workstation habits, musculoskeletal disorders, days and episodes of sick leave, and psychological well-being were assessed. Results: A significant improvement in workstation habits was found, and the differences remained significant at the follow-up time point for keyboard, mouse, chair, and desk use. The largest reduction in the percentage of musculoskeletal disorders was in the neck region (−42.2%, 95% CI −60.0 to −24.4). After adjusting for baseline values, significant differences were found at the follow-up time point in the neck, right shoulder, right and left upper limbs, lower back, and right and left lower limbs. No significant differences were found for the days and episodes of sick leave or the psychological well-being among workers after the intervention. Conclusion: Consistent reductions were observed for all musculoskeletal disorders at the follow-up time point, although the difference was not statistically significant for the upper back. The improvements in the musculoskeletal disorders did not translate into fewer days lost from work or improved psychological well-being. PMID:22135582

  16. The Bologna-Oxford total ankle replacement: a mid-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A; Martinelli, N; Sartorelli, E; Malerba, F

    2012-06-01

    The Bologna-Oxford (BOX) total ankle replacement (TAR) was developed with the aim of achieving satisfactory pain-free movement of the ankle. To date, only one single multicentre study has reported its clinical results. The aim of this study was to conduct an independent review of its mid-term results. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 60 prospectively followed patients in whom 62 BOX TARs had been implanted between 2004 and 2008. We used the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score to assess the clinical results. Standardised radiographs taken at the time of final follow-up were analysed by two observers. The overall survival was 91.9% at a mean follow-up of 42.5 months (24 to 71). The mean AOFAS score had improved from 35.1 points (sd 16.6; 4 to 73) pre-operatively to 78.0 (sd 10.7; 57 to 100) at final follow-up (p < 0.01). Tibial radiolucencies < 2 mm in width were seen around 16 TARs. Talar radiolucencies < 2 mm were seen around four TARs. A total of 47 patients (78.3%) were very satisfied or satisfied with the outcome. Five patients required revision for functional limitation or continuing pain.

  17. Retained intracranial splinters : a follow up study in survivors of low intensity military conflicts.

    PubMed

    Bhatoe, H S

    2001-03-01

    With improvements in the ballistic physics, patient evacuation, imaging, neurosurgical management and intensive care facilities, there has been overall improvement in the survival of patients with missile injuries of the brain. Patients with retained intracranial fragments have been followed up and the sequelae of such fragments were analysed. We present our observations in 43 such patients who had survived low velocity missile injuries of the brain during military conflicts and had retained intracranial fragments. Over a follow up period of 2 to 7 years, suppurative sequelae (brain abscess, recurrent meningitis) were seen in 6 patients, two of these progressing to formation of brain abscess. Three patients developed hydrocephalus and one seizures. Patients with orbitocranial or faciocranial wound of entry had a higher incidence of suppurative complications (3 out of 4), while those with skull vault entry had a lower incidence of such sequelae (7 out of 30). Nine patients were lost to follow up. Other determinants of suppurative complications were postoperative CSF leak and intraventricular lodgement of the fragment.

  18. Involution patterns of retinopathy of prematurity after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab: implications for follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, M; Tehrani, N; Mireskandari, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe involution patterns following monotherapy with intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVB) for type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in zone I or zone II posterior. Methods A retrospective chart review of infants treated with IVB from January 2010–April 2014. Infants with minimum of 82 weeks postmenstrual age at last follow-up were included. Primary outcome was timing of involution of type 1 ROP for the first 12 weeks post treatment. Secondary outcomes were development of any recurrence and structural outcome at last follow-up. Retinal examination records, fundus, and flourescein angiography images were reviewed. Results Twenty-eight eyes were included. Average follow-up post treatment was 33.9±9.7 months (range 21.4–61.9). Cumulative frequency of regression of plus disease was seen in 73.3, 86.7, and 100% of eyes by days 3, 5, and 8, respectively. Regression of both stage 3 and plus disease was observed in 29, 82, 88, and 100% by weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Within the first 3 months, 17/28 eyes developed recurrence to stage 1 or 2 after regression. None developed recurrence of plus disease. By the end of 3 months 18% of eyes vascularized into zone III. At a mean of 24±17.3 months, 39% of eyes were not vascularized into zone III as seen on flourescein angiography with scleral indentation. Conclusion Our experience suggests regression of plus disease and stage 3 are expected within the first 4 weeks after bevacizumab treatment. Recurrence may occur despite initial regression and requires careful follow-up. PMID:26869159

  19. Profile and follow-up of patients with tuberculosis in a priority city in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jisleny da Cruz; Silva, Marcio Roberto; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cases of tuberculosis and the impact of direct follow-up on the assessment of treatment outcomes. METHODS This open prospective cohort study evaluated 504 cases of tuberculosis reported in the Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN – Notifiable Diseases Information System) in Juiz de Fora, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. The incidence of treatment outcomes was compared between a group of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and directly followed up by monthly consultations during return visits (287) and a patient group for which the information was indirectly collected (217) through the city’s surveillance system. The Chi-square test was used to compare the percentages, with a significance level of 0.05. The relative risk (RR) was used to evaluate the differences in the incidence rate of each type of treatment outcome between the two groups. RESULTS Of the outcomes directly and indirectly evaluated, 18.5% and 3.2% corresponded to treatment default and 3.8% and 0.5% corresponded to treatment failure, respectively. The incidence of treatment default and failure was higher in the group with direct follow-up (p < 0.05) (RR = 5.72, 95%CI 2.65;12.34, and RR = 8.31, 95%CI 1.08;63.92, respectively). CONCLUSIONS A higher incidence of treatment default and failure was observed in the directly followed up group, and most of these cases were neglected by the disease reporting system. Therefore, effective measures are needed to improve the control of tuberculosis and data quality. PMID:25741659

  20. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  1. the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertou, Xavier

    2009-04-30

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique (SPT) in ground based water Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on the project progresses and the first operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 6 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  2. Project MINERVA's Follow-up on Wide-Field, Small Telescope Photometry to Identify Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, Audrey; Henderson, Morgan; Johnson, Samson; Sergi, Anthony; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; McCrady, Nate

    2017-01-01

    MINERVA is an array of four 0.7-m telescopes equipped for high precision photometry and spectroscopy dedicated to exoplanet observations. During the first 18 months of science operations, MINERVA engaged in a program of photometric follow-up of potential transiting exoplanet targets identified by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). Robotically-obtained observations are passed through our data reduction pipeline and we extract light curves via differential photometry. We seek transit signals via a Markov chain Monte Carlo fit using BATMAN. We discuss results for over 100 target stars analyzed to date.

  3. Potential follow-up increases private contributions to public goods

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Todd; Ternovski, John; Yoeli, Erez

    2016-01-01

    People contribute more to public goods when their contributions are made more observable to others. We report an intervention that subtly increases the observability of public goods contributions when people are solicited privately and impersonally (e.g., mail, email, social media). This intervention is tested in a large-scale field experiment (n = 770,946) in which people are encouraged to vote through get-out-the-vote letters. We vary whether the letters include the message, “We may call you after the election to ask about your voting experience.” Increasing the perceived observability of whether people vote by including that message increased the impact of the get-out-the-vote letters by more than the entire effect of a typical get-out-the-vote letter. This technique for increasing perceived observability can be replicated whenever public goods solicitations are made in private. PMID:27114553

  4. Potential follow-up increases private contributions to public goods.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Todd; Ternovski, John; Yoeli, Erez

    2016-05-10

    People contribute more to public goods when their contributions are made more observable to others. We report an intervention that subtly increases the observability of public goods contributions when people are solicited privately and impersonally (e.g., mail, email, social media). This intervention is tested in a large-scale field experiment (n = 770,946) in which people are encouraged to vote through get-out-the-vote letters. We vary whether the letters include the message, "We may call you after the election to ask about your voting experience." Increasing the perceived observability of whether people vote by including that message increased the impact of the get-out-the-vote letters by more than the entire effect of a typical get-out-the-vote letter. This technique for increasing perceived observability can be replicated whenever public goods solicitations are made in private.

  5. Transcranial sonography in the evaluation of pineal lesions: two-year follow up study.

    PubMed

    Budisić, Mislav; Bosnjak, Jelena; Lovrencić-Huzjan, Arijana; Strineka, Maja; Bene, Raphael; Azman, Drazen; Bedek, Darko; Trkanjec, Zlatko; Demarin, Vida

    2008-12-01

    We have recently reported that transcranial sonography (TCS) is a method competitive to magnetic resonance neuroimaging (MRI) in the evaluation of pineal gland lesions. The aim of the present is study was to assess the usefulness of TCS in a larger patient sample during a two-year follow up. Twenty patients with incidental pineal gland cyst (PGC) detected by MRI scan of the brain and 40 healthy controls without any previous documented data on a disease related to pineal gland were evaluated by TCS and compared with MRI scans. There were no statistically significant differences in PGC size measured by TCS by two observers (p = 0.475), PGC size measured by TCS and MRI (first observer, p = 0.453; and second observer, p = 0.425), size of the pineal gland measured by TCS and MRI in control group (first observer, p = 0.497; and second observer, p = 0.370), and pineal gland size measured by TCS by two observers in control group (p = 0.473). Study results suggested TCS to be a suitable method in the evaluation of pineal gland lesions. Although its resolution cannot match the MRI resolution, its repeatability and accuracy might add to its practical value. We suggest that the repeat MRI scan of such lesions might be replaced by clinical and TCS follow up.

  6. The obscured hyper-energetic GRB 120624B hosted by a luminous compact galaxy at z = 2.20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Campana, S.; Thöne, C. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Melandri, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Veres, P.; Martín, S.; Petitpas, G.; Covino, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Levan, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions that we can witness in the Universe. Studying the most extreme cases of these phenomena allows us to constrain the limits for the progenitor models. Aims: In this Letter, we study the prompt emission, afterglow, and host galaxy of GRB 120624B, one of the brightest GRBs detected by Fermi, to derive the energetics of the event and characterise the host galaxy in which it was produced. Methods: Following the high-energy detection we conducted a multi-wavelength follow-up campaign, including near-infrared imaging from HAWKI/VLT, optical from OSIRIS/GTC, X-ray observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and at submillimetre/millimetre wavelengths from SMA. Optical/NIR spectroscopy was performed with X-shooter/VLT. Results: We detect the X-ray and NIR afterglow of the burst and determine a redshift of z = 2.1974 ± 0.0002 through identification of emission lines of [O ii], [O iii] and H-α from the host galaxy of the GRB. This implies an energy release of Eiso,γ = (3.0 ± 0.2) × 1054 erg, amongst the most luminous ever detected. The observations of the afterglow indicate high obscuration with AV > 1.5. The host galaxy is compact, with R1/2 < 1.6 kpc, but luminous, at L ~ 1.5 L∗ and has a star formation rate of 91 ± 6 M⊙/yr as derived from Hα. Conclusions: As for other highly obscured GRBs, GRB 120624B is hosted by a luminous galaxy, which we also prove to be compact, with very intense star formation. It is one of the most luminous host galaxies associated with a GRB, showing that the host galaxies of long GRBs are not always blue dwarf galaxies, as previously thought. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, with programmes 089.D-0256 and 090.D-0667, at the Gran Telescopio Canarias with programmes GTC49-12A and GTC58-12B, at the Submillimeter Array with programme 2012A-S001, at CAHA with programme F13-3.5-031, at Liverpool Telescope with programme CL13A03

  7. Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize themore » follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Furthermore, detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.« less

  8. Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Furthermore, detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.

  9. Localization and Broadband Follow-up of the Gravitational-wave Transient GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavagliá, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Castro, J. M. G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R. J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R. J.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M. T.; Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) Collaboration; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelínek, M.; Tello, J. C.; Oates, S. R.; Hu, Y.-D.; Kubánek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellón, A.; García-Cerezo, A.; Muñoz, V. F.; Pérez del Pulgar, C.; Castillo-Carrión, S.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-García, M. D.; Páta, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J. A.; Konig, S.; Rendón, F.; Mateo Sanguino, T. de J.; Fernández-Muñoz, R.; Yock, P. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W. H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I. H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W. H.; Claret, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Pandey, S. B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; BOOTES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.-F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C. L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Kind, M. C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. C.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Dark Energy Survey; Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaboration; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Zhang, B.-B.; Hui, C. M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M. M.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H.-F.; Blackburn, L.; Fermi GBM Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm (GRAWITA); Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J. P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; INTEGRAL Collaboration; Kasliwal, M. M.; Singer, L. P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A. A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) Collaboration; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D. M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; InterPlanetary Network; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K. S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; J-GEM Collaboration; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; La Silla–QUEST Survey; Bersier, D. F.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C. G.; Piascik, A. S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I. A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Liverpool Telescope Collaboration; Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Collaboration; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; MASTER Collaboration; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; MAXI Collaboration; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Williams, A.; Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) Collaboration; Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Wright, D. E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS Collaboration; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Chen, T.-W.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; PESSTO Collaboration; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Pi of Sky Collaboration; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; SkyMapper Collaboration; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F. E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Swift Collaboration; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; TAROT, Zadko, Algerian National Observatory, C2PU Collaboration; Beroiz, M.; Peñuela, T.; Macri, L. M.; Oelkers, R. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J. L.; DePoy, D. L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N. A.; Benacquista, M.; TOROS Collaboration; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C. G.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Thoene, C. C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.; VISTA Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline, and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.

  10. Orthogonal predictions: follow-up questions for suggestive data.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alexander M

    2010-05-01

    When a biological hypothesis of causal effect can be inferred, the hypothesis can sometimes be tested in the selfsame database that gave rise to the study data from which the hypothesis grew. Valid testing happens when the inferred biological hypothesis has scientific implications that predict new relations between observations already recorded. Testing for the existence of the new relations is a valid assessment of the biological hypothesis, so long as the newly predicted relations are not a logical correlate of the observations that stimulated the hypothesis in the first place. These predictions that lead to valid tests might be called 'orthogonal' predictions in the data, and stand in marked contrast to 'scrawny' hypotheses with no biological content, which predict simply that the same data relations will be seen in a new database. The Universal Data Warehouse will shortly render moot searches for new databases in which to test.

  11. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Tazeen H.; Jehan, Imtiaz; Liang, Feng; Barbier, Sylvaine; Islam, Muhammad; Bux, Rasool; Khan, Aamir Hameed; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Poulter, Neil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ebrahim, Shah

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP) is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA) Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE) and trained general practitioner (GP) intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care) in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up. Methods A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment) were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense) in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes. Findings After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1–0.1] mm Hg) compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04). Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl. Conclusions The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still

  12. Follow-up of K2 planet candiates with the LCOGT network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Bayliss, Daniel; Colón, Knicole; Cochran, William; Zhou, George; Brown, Timothy; Shporer, Avi; Espinoza, Nestor; Fulton, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    K2 has proven to be an outstanding successor to the Kepler mission. It has already revealed dozens of new planet candidates, and unlike those found by the primary mission, many of these systems’ host stars are sufficiently bright to allow extensive follow-up observations. This is especially important since each of the K2 observing campaigns are only ~80 days long, leaving the community with the discovery of exciting new systems but often not enough time coverage to enable a thorough characterization of these systems.We are leading a large effort to observe K2 transiting planet candidates with the LCOGT telescope network. LCOGT’s longitudinal coverage, multiple identical telescopes per site and automated queue observing make it an ideal facility for fast, high-precision and multi-color follow-up. Our program focuses on specific aspects of K2 follow-up for which the network is especially powerful: period determination for candidates with fewer than three K2 transits; transit timing variation monitoring to measure planetary masses, orbital parameters and to search for additional planets in multiple systems; and multi-color photometry to vet planet candidates and carry-out preliminary atmospheric spectroscopy.We will present new results for a selection of systems observed so far through this program. These include K2-19, a multi-planet system extremely close to 3:2 resonance and experiencing transit timing variations with amplitudes as large as one hour; EPIC201702477, a long-period planet with only two K2 transits; WASP-47, a system hosting a hot Jupiter and two K2-discovered small planets; and EPIC201637175b, a disintegrating rocky planet.Our program demonstrates that LCOGT is uniquely positioned to be the primary ground-based photometric follow-up resource for K2 exoplanet discoveries, but also for the numerous bright systems that will result from the TESS mission. LCOGT photometry complements ongoing radial velocity and atmospheric spectroscopy efforts to

  13. Educational Goals and Student Flow: Model for Institutional Student Flow and Follow-up. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Duane

    This report details the development and implementation of a follow-up system, by Western Texas Community College (WTCC) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, relating student flow patterns to educational goals. Phase I of this project involved establishment of a data base which included elements designed to reveal an adequate picture of…

  14. Availability of mobile phones for discharge follow-up of pediatric Emergency Department patients in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    House, Darlene R; Cheptinga, Philip; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Mobile phones have been successfully used for Emergency Department (ED) patient follow-up in developed countries. Mobile phones are widely available in developing countries and may offer a similar potential for follow-up and continued care of ED patients in low and middle-income countries. The goal of this study was to determine the percentage of families with mobile phones presenting to a pediatric ED in western Kenya and rate of response to a follow-up phone call after discharge. Methods. A prospective, cross-sectional observational study of children presenting to the emergency department of a government referral hospital in Eldoret, Kenya was performed. Documentation of mobile phone access, including phone number, was recorded. If families had access, consent was obtained and families were contacted 7 days after discharge for follow-up. Results. Of 788 families, 704 (89.3%) had mobile phone access. Of those families discharged from the ED, successful follow-up was made in 83.6% of cases. Conclusions. Mobile phones are an available technology for follow-up of patients discharged from a pediatric emergency department in resource-limited western Kenya.

  15. Energetic Fermi/LAT GRB 100414A: Energetic and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tsai, Patrick P.; Tashiro, Makoto S.

    2012-03-01

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E src peak of 1458.7+132.6 - 106.6 keV and E iso of 34.5+2.0 - 1.8 × 1052 erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of α = -2.6 ± 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 ± 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5fdg8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E src peak-E iso and E src peak-E γ correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  16. GRB970228: A Supernova Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T. J.; Tanvir, N.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Groot, P. J.; Rol, E.; VanParadiijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fruchter, A. S.; Guarnieri, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present B-, V-, R(sub c)-, I(sub c)-, J-, H-, and K-band observations of the optical transient (OT) associated with GRB970228 based on a reevaluation of published data. and present yet unpublished data. In order to minimize small calibration differences we collected and analyzed most of the photometry and determined the magnitude of the OT relative to a set of secondary field stars. We confirm that the early decay of the light curves (before March 6. 1997) was faster than that at later times (between March 6 and April 7. 1997). The early-time observations of GRB 970228 are consistent with relativistic blast wave models but the late-time observations are hard to understand in this framework. The observations are well explained by an initial power law decay with alpha = -1.46 +/- 0.33 modified at later times by a type-I(sub c) supernova light curve. together with the evidence for GRB980326 and GRB 980425 this is further evidence that at least some GRBs are associated with an unusual class of core-collapse supernovae.

  17. Measurements of BU109 in Cetus - Follow Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Nanson, John; Thuemen, Chris

    2016-02-01

    As was detailed in a paper published in Vol. 11 No.3, July 1, 2015 in the Journal of Double Star Observations, the data within WDS 2014.96 for BU 109 in Cetus was suspect. Since our discussions with the WDS in late 2014 and prior to the publication of this paper, updates were made for BU 109 based on the existing available data. In the July 2015 paper, we discussed that further research by way of new imagery allowing more detailed photometry and astrometry would be initiated. This current paper is the results of the new photometry and astrometry.

  18. Unusual Central Engine Activity in the Double Burst GRB 110709B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Burrows, David N.; Zhang, Bing; Meszaros, Peter; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, S.; Cummings, Jay R.; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Falcone, Abraham D.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered Swift/BAT twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 9 July 2011. This is the first time we observed a GRB with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events are from the same physical origin, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggest they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  19. UNUSUAL CENTRAL ENGINE ACTIVITY IN THE DOUBLE BURST GRB 110709B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Binbin; Burrows, David N.; Meszaros, Peter; Falcone, Abraham D.; Zhang Bing; Wang Xiangyu; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, Sergey; Cummings, Jay R.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil; Norris, Jay P.

    2012-04-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 2011 July 9. This is the first time we observed a gamma-ray burst (GRB) with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events originated from the same physical progenitor, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggests they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  20. Workers exposed to ethylene oxide: a follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Harris, E C

    1989-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2876 men and women with potential exposure to ethylene oxide. Subjects were identified from employment records at four companies that have produced or used ethylene oxide since the 1950s and at eight hospitals which have had ethylene oxide sterilising units since the 1960s. The cohort represents a substantial proportion of the British workforce with a history of occupational exposure to ethylene oxide. Industrial hygiene data were not available before 1977, but since then time weighted average exposures have been less than 5 ppm in almost all jobs and less than 1 ppm in many. Past exposures were probably somewhat higher. In contrast to some previous studies, no clear excess of leukaemia (three deaths observed, 2.09 expected) and no increase in stomach cancer (five deaths observed, 5.95 expected) were found. This discrepancy with earlier reports may be due in part to differences in levels of exposure. Total cancer mortality was similar to that expected from national and local death rates. Some specific cancers showed small excesses but their relevance to ethylene oxide exposure is doubtful. Again, contrary to some earlier reports, no excess of cardiovascular disease was found. This study does not exclude the possibility that ethylene oxide is a human carcinogen but suggests that any risk of cancer from currently permitted occupational exposures is small. PMID:2611160

  1. Long-term follow-up of cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carey, J S

    1976-05-01

    One hundred patients in whom cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses were implanted have now been followed for 3 to 7 years. The hospital mortality rate was 5 per cent, and survival at five years was 70 per cent. Complications related to valve design occurred in 8 per cent (4 per cent fatal). The majority of late deaths and poor results were related to progressive cardiac disease rather than valve-related complications. The results indicate that cloth-covered prostheses have significantly lowered the incidence of thromboembolism and eliminated poppet dysfunction. The problem of strut cloth wear was clinically observed only twice in 500 patient-years of follow-up.

  2. Discovery and Spectroscopic Follow-up of Milky Way Satellites in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting

    2016-01-01

    A complete census of Milky Way satellite galaxies provides crucial tests of both galaxy formation models and the Lambda-Cold Dark Matter theoretical paradigm. Wide-field imaging survey data from the first two year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) have recently been used to discover many new Milky Way satellites, nearly doubling the number of known satellites. In this talk, I will describe the new dwarf galaxy candidates found in DES. I will also discuss the latest results from spectroscopic follow-up observations on some of the candidates using the Magellan, VLT, and AAT telescopes.

  3. Precocious puberty in Sanfilippo IIIA disease: diagnosis and follow-up of two new cases.

    PubMed

    Concolino, D; Muzzi, G; Pisaturo, L; Piccirillo, A; Di Natale, P; Strisciuglio, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    To date the association between mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIA and precocious puberty has been found in only three polish patients. We observed two children affected by MPS IIIA with central precocious puberty (CPP) both treated with GnRH agonists. The occurrence of CPP in both patients with MPS IIIA suggests that it is necessary to look for an association between the two conditions. The follow-up of our two patients leads us to believe also that GnRH agonist treatment can have a beneficial effect on final height and probably on the improvement of behavioural problems.

  4. Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Vestrand, W Thomas; Davis, H; Wren, J; Wozniak, P; Norman, B; White, R; Bloch, J; Fenimore, E; Hodge, Barry; Jah, Moriba; Rast, Richard

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the development of prototypes for a global grid of advanced 'thinking' sky sentinels and robotic follow-up telescopes that observe the full night sky to provide real-time monitoring of the night sky by autonomously recognizing anomalous behavior, selecting targets for detailed investigation, and making real-time anomaly detection to enable rapid recognition and a swift response to transients as they emerge. This T3 global EO grid avoids the limitations imposed by geography and weather to provide persistent monitoring of the night sky.

  5. Gamma-ray follow-up studies on η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, K.; Reimer, O.; Reimer, A.; Werner, M.; Egberts, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2012-12-01

    The increased exposure in conjunction with the improved instrumental response functions of the Fermi-LAT now allows a more detailed investigation of location, spectral shape and flux time history of the observed γ-ray emission at the position of η Carinae. We detect a weak but regular flux decrease over time. This can be understood and interpreted in a colliding-wind binary scenario for orbital modulation of the γ-ray emission. We find that the spectral shape of the γ-ray signal agrees with a single emitting particle population in combination with significant absorption by γ-γ pair production. Concluding, we are able to report on the first unambiguous detection of GeV γ-ray emission from a colliding-wind massive star binary. Studying the correlation of the flux decrease with the orbital separation of the binary components allows us to predict the behaviour up to the next periastron passage in 2014.

  6. Cognitive evolution in hypertensive patients: a six-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Augusto; del Sueldo, Mildren A; Zilberman, Judith M; Cerezo, Gustavo H

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several studies have examined the links between hypertension, vascular damage, and cognitive impairment. The functions most commonly involved seem to be those associated with memory and executive function. Aims: 1) to report the cognitive evolution in a cohort of hypertensive patients, 2) to identify the affected domains, and 3) to correlate the results obtained with blood pressure measurements. Materials and Methods: Observational 6-year follow-up cohort study including both males and females aged ≥65 and ≤80 years, and hypertensive patients under treatment. Patients with a history of any of the following conditions were excluded: stroke, transient ischemic attack, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, cardiac surgery, dementia, or depression. Four neurocognitive evaluations were performed (at baseline and every 2 years). The tests used evaluated memory and executive function domain. Blood pressure was measured on every cognitive evaluation. Results: Sixty patients were followed for 76.4 ± 2.8 months. The average age at baseline was 72.5 ± 4.2 and 77.9 ± 4.6 at 6 years (65% were women). Two patients were lost to follow up (3.3%) and 8 patients died (13.3%).The density incidence for dementia was 0.6% patients per year (pt/y) (n = 3) and for depression was 1.6% pt/y (n = 12). No changes were observed in either memory impairment or the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) results (p = ns) during follow-up. A progressive impairment of the executive function was shown regardless of the blood pressure measurements. Conclusion: 1) the incidence of dementia doubled to general population, 2) the initial memory impairment did not change during the evaluation period, 3) cognitive impairment worsened in the areas related to executive function (prefrontal cortex) regardless of the adequacy of anti-hypertensive treatment and blood pressure values. PMID:21603597

  7. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies.

  8. Teacher Education Follow-up Surveys: Variables Related to Response Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.

    This study of teacher education graduate follow-up surveys examined the relationship between response rate and number of graduates, questionnaire length, and follow-up contacts. Also, the study investigated survey practices differentiating between surveys which had high and low return rates in such areas as number of follow-up contacts,…

  9. Supplement: "Localization and Broadband Follow-up of the Gravitational-wave Transient GW150914" (2016, ApJL, 826, L13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavagliá, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Castro, J. M. G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R. J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R. J.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M. T.; Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP Collaboration; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelínek, M.; Tello, J. C.; Oates, S. R.; Hu, Y.-D.; Kubánek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellón, A.; García-Cerezo, A.; Muñoz, V. F.; Pérez del Pulgar, C.; Castillo-Carrión, S.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-García, M. D.; Páta, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J. A.; Konig, S.; Rendón, F.; Mateo Sanguino, T. de J.; Fernández-Muñoz, R.; Yock, P. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W. H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I. H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W. H.; Claret, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Pandey, S. B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; BOOTES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.-F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C. L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Kind, M. C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. C.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration; Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaboration; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Zhang, B.-B.; Hui, C. M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M. M.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H.-F.; Blackburn, L.; Fermi GBM Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm (GRAWITA; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J. P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; INTEGRAL Collaboration; Kasliwal, M. M.; Singer, L. P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A. A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF Collaboration); Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D. M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; InterPlanetary Network; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K. S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; J-GEM Collaboration; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; La Silla-QUEST Survey; Bersier, D. F.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C. G.; Piascik, A. S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I. A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Liverpool Telescope Collaboration; Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Collaboration; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; MASTER Collaboration; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; MAXI Collaboration; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Williams, A.; Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) Collaboration; Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Wright, D. E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS Collaboration; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Chen, T.-W.; Valle, M. D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; PESSTO Collaboration; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Pi of Sky Collaboration; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; SkyMapper Collaboration; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F. E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Swift Collaboration; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; TAROT, Zadko, Algerian National Observatory, C2PU Collaboration; Beroiz, M.; Peñuela, T.; Macri, L. M.; Oelkers, R. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J. L.; DePoy, D. L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N. A.; Benacquista, M.; TOROS Collaboration; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C. G.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; Postigo, A. de U.; Thoene, C. C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.; VISTA Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for Abbott et al. (2016a). We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  10. Pipeline for uncoilable or failed aneurysms: 3-year follow-up results.

    PubMed

    Becske, Tibor; Potts, Matthew B; Shapiro, Maksim; Kallmes, David F; Brinjikji, Waleed; Saatci, Isil; McDougall, Cameron G; Szikora, István; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Moran, Christopher J; Woo, Henry H; Lopes, Demetrius K; Berez, Aaron L; Cher, Daniel J; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Fiorella, David J; Berentei, Zsolt; Marosföi, Miklós; Cekirge, Saruhan H; Nelson, Peter K

    2016-10-14

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effectiveness of endovascular treatment of large and giant wide-neck aneurysms using traditional endovascular techniques has been disappointing, with high recanalization and re-treatment rates. Flow diversion with the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) has been recently used as a stand-alone therapy for complex aneurysms, showing significant improvement in effectiveness while demonstrating a similar safety profile to stent-supported coil treatment. However, relatively little is known about its long-term safety and effectiveness. Here the authors report on the 3-year safety and effectiveness of flow diversion with the PED in a prospective cohort of patients with large and giant internal carotid artery aneurysms enrolled in the Pipeline for Uncoilable or Failed Aneurysms (PUFS) trial. METHODS The PUFS trial is a prospective study of 107 patients with 109 aneurysms treated with the PED. Primary effectiveness and safety end points were demonstrated based on independently monitored 180-day clinical and angiographic data. Patients were enrolled in a long-term follow-up protocol including 1-, 3-, and 5-year clinical and imaging follow-up. In this paper, the authors report the midstudy (3-year) effectiveness and safety data. RESULTS At 3 years posttreatment, 74 subjects with 76 aneurysms underwent catheter angiography as required per protocol. Overall, complete angiographic aneurysm occlusion was observed in 71 of these 76 aneurysms (93.4% cure rate). Five aneurysms were re-treated, using either coils or additional PEDs, for failure to occlude, and 3 of these 5 were cured by the 3-year follow-up. Angiographic cure with one or two treatments of Pipeline embolization alone was therefore achieved in 92.1%. No recanalization of a previously completely occluded aneurysm was noted on the 3-year angiograms. There were 3 (2.6%) delayed device- or aneurysm-related serious adverse events, none of which led to permanent neurological sequelae. No major or minor

  11. THE PROPERTIES OF THE 2175 A EXTINCTION FEATURE DISCOVERED IN GRB AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach; Eliasdottir, Ardis; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Kruehler, Thomas; Leloudas, Giorgos; Schady, Patricia; Greiner, Jochen; Jakobsson, Pall; Thoene, Christina C.; Perley, Daniel A.; Morgan, Adam N.; Bloom, Joshua E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    The unequivocal, spectroscopic detection of the 2175 A bump in extinction curves outside the Local Group is rare. To date, the properties of the bump have been examined in only two gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows (GRB 070802 and GRB 080607). In this work, we analyze in detail the detections of the 2175 Angstrom-Sign extinction bump in the optical spectra of two further GRB afterglows: GRB 080605 and 080805. We gather all available optical/near-infrared photometric, spectroscopic, and X-ray data to construct multi-epoch spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for both GRB afterglows. We fit the SEDs with the Fitzpatrick and Massa model with a single or broken power law. We also fit a sample of 38 GRB afterglows, known to prefer a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-type extinction curve, with the same model. We find that the SEDs of GRB 080605 and GRB 080805 at two epochs are fit well with a single power law with a derived extinction of A{sub V} = 0.52{sup +0.13}{sub -0.16} and 0.50{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10}, and 2.1{sup +0.7}{sub -0.6} and 1.5 {+-} 0.2, respectively. While the slope of the extinction curve of GRB 080805 is not well constrained, the extinction curve of GRB 080605 has an unusual very steep far-UV rise together with the 2175 A bump. Such an extinction curve has previously been found in only a small handful of sightlines in the Milky Way. One possible explanation of such an extinction curve may be dust arising from two different regions with two separate grain populations, however we cannot distinguish the origin of the curve. We finally compare the four 2175 A bump sightlines to the larger GRB afterglow sample and to Local Group sightlines. We find that while the width and central positions of the bumps are consistent with what is observed in the Local Group, the relative strength of the detected bump (A{sub bump}) for GRB afterglows is weaker for a given A{sub V} than for almost any Local Group sightline. Such dilution of the bump strength may offer tentative

  12. Two Variable Radio Sources Near the Position of GRB 940301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T. J.; DeBruyn, A. G.; vanParadijs, J.; Hanlon, L.; Groot, P. J.; VanDerKlis, M.; Strom, R.; Spoelstra, T.; Bennett, K.; Fishman, G. J.; Hurley, K.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the results of a search for a radio counterpart to the strong gamma-ray burst GRB 940301. Observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the Compton Telescope error box region of GRB 940301 began on March 4, 1994, at 21 cm and April 2, 1994, at 92 cm. No flux density variations were detected at 92 cm above S= 10 mJy (5 (sigma)) within a period of 1 to 4 months after the burst. However, when we compared the field with Westerbork Northern Sky Survey data, taken two years prior to GRB 940301, we found two radio sources with significantly increased flux densities. These sources, only 17 min. apart, are located at the 2.3 and 2.6(sigma) Compton Telescope confidence contours. Their separation from the Inter Planetary Network annulus virtually excludes association with GRB 940301. Further observations in January 1996 reveal that the sources continued to change in flux density. The relatively large flux density variations at 92 cm, compared to those at higher frequencies, and the inverted spectra in the frequency range from 325-38O MHz make the sources somewhat unusual. Because the sources were already detected at 5 GHz in 1986 most, if not all, of the radio emission is probably associated with activity in Active Galactic Nuclei in distant galaxies.

  13. [Dynamic renal echography versus urography in the follow-up of patients who have undergone ureterosigmoidostomy].

    PubMed

    Montanari, E; Tzoumas, S; Deiana, G; Cogni, M; Guarneri, A; Zanetti, G; Austoni, E

    1994-09-01

    The main post uretero-sigmoidostomy complications are stricture of the anastomosis, chronic infection and urolithiasis. In our institution the patients with ureterosigmodostomy undergo a follow-up protocol in which blood chemistry, ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography and C.T. are periodically performed. The aim of the present paper is to compare the accuracy of kidney sonography after diuretic stimulation with intravenous pyelography in the diagnosis of ureteral stenosis. Out of 91 patient with ureterosigmoidostomy 18 patients (34 kidneys) underwent intravenous pyelography, a basal U.S. and then a dynamic one at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 minutes after administration of furosemide 20 mg i.v. At basal U.S. 27 kidneys were normal and 7 showed a dilations. After diuretic stimulation we observed 16 normal kidneys, 16 dilated units and 2 intermittent hydronephrosis. Out of 16 dilated kidneys 6 became normal in 60 minutes. Out of 10 dilated units 3 were normal in 90 minutes (hipotonic), 2 were normal before 120 minutes (low grade obstruction) and 5 were dilated after 120 minutes (high grade obstruction). With intravenous pyelography we observed 27 normal kidneys and seven dilated units. Dynamic sonography have shown high sensibility (100%), specificity (88.8%) and accuracy (91%) in diagnosis of ureteral obstruction in to I.V.P. in the follow-up of this kind of divesion.

  14. Transit clairvoyance: enhancing TESS follow-up using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David M.; Lam, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission is expected to find thousands of transiting planets around bright stars, yet for three-quarters of the fields observed the temporal coverage will limit discoveries to planets with orbital periods below 13.7 d. From the Kepler catalogue, the mean probability of these short-period transiting planets having additional longer period transiters (which would be missed by TESS) is 18 per cent, a value 10 times higher than the average star. In this work, we show how this probability is not uniform but functionally dependent upon the properties of the observed short-period transiters, ranging from less than 1 per cent up to over 50 per cent. Using artificial neural networks (ANNs) trained on the Kepler catalogue and making careful feature selection to account for the differing sensitivity of TESS, we are able to predict the most likely short-period transiters to be accompanied by additional transiters. Through cross-validation, we predict that a targeted, optimized TESS transit and/or radial velocity follow-up programme using our trained ANN would have a discovery yield improved by a factor of 2. Our work enables a near-optimal follow-up strategy for surveys following TESS targets for additional planets, improving the science yield derived from TESS and particularly beneficial in the search for habitable-zone transiting worlds.

  15. X-Linked Retinoschisis in Juveniles: Follow-Up by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qin-rui; Huang, Lv-zhen; Xia, Hui-ka; Li, Tian-qi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the structural progression of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) in patients by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Design. Retrospective, observational study. Methods. Patients who were diagnosed with XLRS by genetic testing underwent comprehensive ophthalmological examinations from December 2014 to October 2016. Each eye was measured by SD-OCT using the same clinical protocol. A correlation between best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and SD-OCT measurements was observed. Results. Six patients demonstrated retinoschisis (12 eyes) and typical foveal cyst-like cavities (10 eyes) on SD-OCT images with a mean logMAR VA of 0.48. The median age was 7.5 years at the initial visit. Their foveal retinal thickness (516.9 μm) and choroid thickness (351.4 μm) decreased at a rate of 38.1 and 7.5 μm, respectively, at the 10.5-month follow-up visit; however, there were no significant differences (P = 0.622 and P = 0.406, resp.). There was no significant correlation between VA, the foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. Conclusions. SD-OCT images for XLRS patients during the juvenile period revealed no significant changes in the fundus structure, including the foveal retinal thickness and choroid thickness within one-year follow-up. There was a lack of correlation between VA, foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. PMID:28286756

  16. Sky Localization and Electromagnetic Follow-up with Third-Generation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Shreya; Singer, Leo; Miller, Cole

    2017-01-01

    We present a preliminary investigation of the potential of third-generation gravitational-wave (GW) detectors for multi-messenger astronomy, from the standpoint of electromagnetic follow-up and identification of host galaxies. Using approximate sky localization inferred from GW observations, we intend to plan their electromagnetic follow-up in order to pinpoint the host galaxies. This involves simulating GW data, matching it with electromagnetic observations, and converting it into a sky-map used to chart locations of host galaxies of known sources. We aim to understand whether there are identifiable trends for host galaxies of transients in order to address whether a strategy that focuses on individual host galaxies is more optimal than one that locates them based on a statistical trend. Our project also concerns the configuration and calibration of a next generation detector network. Questions we focus on include: at what redshift will sky localization accuracy be limited by detector calibration? Using different combinations of detectors, what sky localization can be achieved? Our research motivates why third generation GW detector networks are crucial in enhancing signals detected and in providing insight into the sources and their physical environments. University of Maryland-College Park.

  17. Radiofrequency ablation of benign thyroid nodules: safety and imaging follow-up in 236 patients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Baek, Jung Hwan; Rhim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yoon Suk; Kwak, Min Sook; Jeong, Hyun Jo; Lee, Ducky

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the safety and volume reduction of ultrasonography (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for benign thyroid nodules, and the factors affecting the results obtained. A total of 302 benign thyroid nodules in 236 euthyroid patients underwent RFA between June 2002 and January 2005. RFA was carried out using an internally cooled electrode under local anesthesia. The volume-reduction ratio (VRR) was assessed by US and safety was determined by observing the complications during the follow-up period (1-41 months). The correlation between the VRR and several factors (patient age, volume and composition of the index nodule) was evaluated. The volume of index nodules was 0.11-95.61 ml (mean, 6.13 +/- 9.59 ml). After ablation, the volume of index nodules decreased to 0.00-26.07 ml (mean, 1.12 +/- 2.92 ml) and the VRR was 12.52-100% (mean, 84.11 +/- 14.93%) at the last follow-up. A VRR greater than 50% was observed in 91.06% of nodules, and 27.81% of index nodules disappeared. The complications encountered were pain, hematoma and transient voice changes. In conclusion, RFA is a safe modality effective at reducing volume in benign thyroid nodules.

  18. Panoramic imaging is not suitable for quantitative evaluation, classification, and follow up in unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; Karssemakers, L H E; Grootendorst, D C; Tuinzing, D B; Becking, A G

    2015-05-01

    Patients with suspected unilateral condylar hyperplasia are often screened radiologically with a panoramic radiograph, but this is not sufficient for routine diagnosis and follow up. We have therefore made a quantitative analysis and evaluation of panoramic radiographs in a large group of patients with the condition. During the period 1994-2011, 132 patients with 113 panoramic radiographs were analysed using a validated method. There was good reproducibility between observers, but the condylar neck and head were the regions reported with least reliability. Although in most patients asymmetry of the condylar head, neck, and ramus was confirmed, the kappa coefficient as an indicator of agreement between two observers was poor (-0.040 to 0.504). Hardly any difference between sides was measured at the gonion angle, and the body appeared to be higher on the affected side in 80% of patients. Panoramic radiographs might be suitable for screening, but are not suitable for the quantitative evaluation, classification, and follow up of patients with unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

  19. Follow-up care for survivors of lymphoma who have received curative-intent treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, J.; Varela, N.P.; Cheung, M.; Hicks, L.; Kraftcheck, D.; Mandel, J.; Fraser, G.; Jimenez-Juan, L.; Boudreau, A.; Sajkowski, S.; McQuillan, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This evidence summary set out to assess the available evidence about the follow-up of asymptomatic survivors of lymphoma who have received curative-intent treatment. Methods The medline and embase databases and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched for evidence published between 2000 and August 2015 relating to lymphoma survivorship follow-up. The evidence summary was developed by a Working Group at the request of the Cancer Care Ontario Survivorship and Cancer Imaging programs because of the absence of evidence-based practice documents in Ontario for the follow-up and surveillance of asymptomatic patients with lymphoma in complete remission. Results Eleven retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria. The proportion of relapses initially detected by clinical manifestations ranged from 13% to 78%; for relapses initially detected by imaging, the proportion ranged from 8% to 46%. Median time for relapse detection ranged from 8.6 to 19 months for patients initially suspected because of imaging and from 8.6 to 33 months for those initially suspected because of clinical manifestations. Only one study reported significantly earlier relapse detection for patients initially suspected because of clinical manifestations (mean: 4.5 months vs. 6.0 months, p = 0.042). No benefit in terms of overall survival was observed for patients depending on whether their relapse was initially detected because of clinical manifestations or surveillance imaging. Summary Findings in the present study support the importance of improving awareness on the part of survivors and clinicians about the symptoms that might be associated with recurrence. The evidence does not support routine imaging for improving outcomes in this patient population. PMID:27803611

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in very elderly patients: immediate results and medium term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Isaac; Muñoz-García, Antonio J; López-Otero, Diego; Avanzas, Pablo; Jimenez-Navarro, Manuel F; Cid-Alvarez, Belén; del Valle, Raquel; Alonso-Briales, Juan H; Ocaranza-Sanchez, Raimundo; Hernández, José M; Trillo-Nouche, Ramiro; Morís, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate immediate transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) results and medium-term follow-up in very elderly patients with severe and symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Methods This multicenter, observational and prospective study was carried out in three hospitals. We included consecutive very elderly (> 85 years) patients with severe AS treated by TAVI. The primary endpoint was to evaluate death rates from any cause at two years. Results The study included 160 consecutive patients with a mean age of 87 ± 2.1 years (range from 85 to 94 years) and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 18.8% ± 11.2% with 57 (35.6%) patients scoring ≥ 20%. Procedural success rate was 97.5%, with 25 (15.6%) patients experiencing acute complications with major bleeding (the most frequent). Global mortality rate during hospitalization was 8.8% (n = 14) and 30-day mortality rate was 10% (n = 16). Median follow up period was 252.24 ± 232.17 days. During the follow-up period, 28 (17.5%) patients died (17 of them due to cardiac causes). The estimated two year overall and cardiac survival rates using the Kaplan-Meier method were 71% and 86.4%, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression showed that the variable EuroSCORE ≥ 20 was the unique variable associated with overall mortality. Conclusions TAVI is safe and effective in a selected population of very elderly patients. Our findings support the adoption of this new procedure in this complex group of patients. PMID:26345138

  1. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Manca, Antonio; Marcia, Stefano; Chiara, Gabriele; Marini, Stefano; Baroud, Gamal; Regge, Daniele; Montemurro, Filippo

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  2. Diagnostic criteria and follow-up in neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy: a case series*

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Vivianne Calheiros Chaves; Silva, Mara Cristina Coelho; Maia, José Holanda; Daltro, Pedro; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Brody, Alan S.; Marchiori, Edson

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI) is a form of childhood interstitial lung disease characterized by tachypnea, retractions, crackles, and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to report and discuss the clinical, imaging, and histopathological findings in a series of NEHI cases at a tertiary pediatric hospital, with an emphasis on diagnostic criteria and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Between 2003 and 2011, 12 full-term infants were diagnosed with NEHI, based on clinical and tomographic findings. Those infants were followed for 1-91 months. Four infants were biopsied, and the histopathological specimens were stained with bombesin antibody. RESULTS: In this case series, symptoms appeared at birth in 6 infants and by 3 months of age in the remaining 6. In all of the cases, NEHI was associated with acute respiratory infection. The most common initial chest HRCT findings were ground-glass opacities that were in the middle lobe/lingula in 12 patients and in other medullary areas in 10. Air trapping was the second most common finding, being observed in 7 patients. Follow-up HRCT scans (performed in 10 patients) revealed normal results in 1 patient and improvement in 9. The biopsy findings were nonspecific, and the staining was positive for bombesin in all samples. Confirmation of NEHI was primarily based on clinical and tomographic findings. Symptoms improved during the follow-up period (mean, 41 months). A clinical cure was achieved in 4 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients, the diagnosis of NEHI was made on the basis of the clinical and tomographic findings, independent of the lung biopsy results. Most of the patients showed clinical improvement and persistent tomographic changes during the follow-up period, regardless of the initial severity of the disease or type of treatment. PMID:24310630

  3. Learning, Memory, and Executive Function in New MDMA Users: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Daniel; Tkotz, Simon; Koester, Philip; Becker, Benjamin; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is associated with changes in neurocognitive performance. Recent studies in laboratory animals have provided additional support for the neurodegeneration hypothesis. However, results from animal research need to be applied to humans with caution. Moreover, several of the studies that examine MDMA users suffer from methodological shortcomings. Therefore, a prospective cohort study was designed in order to overcome these previous methodological shortcomings and to assess the relationship between the continuing use of MDMA and cognitive performance in incipient MDMA users. It was hypothesized that, depending on the amount of MDMA taken, the continued use of MDMA over a 2-year period would lead to further decreases in cognitive performance, especially in visual paired association learning tasks. Ninety-six subjects were assessed, at the second follow-up assessment: 31 of these were non-users, 55 moderate-users, and 10 heavy-users. Separate repeated measures analyses of variance were conducted for each cognitive domain, including attention and information processing speed, episodic memory, and executive functioning. Furthermore, possible confounders including age, general intelligence, cannabis use, alcohol use, use of other concomitant substances, recent medical treatment, participation in sports, level of nutrition, sleep patterns, and subjective well-being were assessed. The Repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) revealed that a marginally significant change in immediate and delayed recall test performances of visual paired associates learning had taken place within the follow-up period of 2 years. No further deterioration in continuing MDMA-users was observed in the second follow-up period. No significant differences with the other neuropsychological tests were noted. It seems that MDMA use can impair visual paired associates learning in new users. However, the groups differed in their use of concomitant use of

  4. Office-based cryoablation of breast fibroadenomas with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Cary S; Littrup, Peter J; Freeman-Gibb, Laurie A; Smith, J Stanley; Francescatti, Darius; Simmons, Rache; Stocks, Lewis H; Bailey, Lisa; Harness, Jay K; Bachman, Barbara A; Henry, C Alan

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 10% of women will experience a breast fibroadenoma in their lifetime. Cryoablation is a new treatment that combines the better attributes of the current standards: surveillance and surgery. It is a minimally invasive office-based procedure that is administered without the use of general anesthesia, involving minimal patient discomfort and little to no scarring. This work aimed to establish the long-term (2-3 years) efficacy, safety, and satisfaction of the procedure, as well as the impact of cryoablation on mammogram and ultrasound images. Thirty-seven treated fibroadenomas were available for assessment with an average follow-up period of 2.6 years. Of the original 84% that were palpable prior to treatment, only 16% remained palpable to the patient as of this writing. Of those fibroadenomas that were initially < or = 2.0 cm in size, only 6% remained palpable. A median volume reduction of 99% was observed with ultrasound. Ninety-seven percent of patients and 100% of physicians were satisfied with the long-term treatment results. Mammograms and ultrasounds showed cryoablation produced no artifact that would adversely affect interpretation. Cryoablation for breast fibroadenomas has previously been reported as safe and effective both acutely and at the 1-year follow-up mark, and thus has been implemented as a treatment option. At long-term follow-up, cryoablation as a primary therapy for breast fibroadenomas demonstrates progressive resolution of the treated area, durable safety, and excellent patient and physician satisfaction. The treatment is performed in an office setting rather than an operating room, resulting in a cost-effective and patient-friendly procedure. Cryoablation should be considered a preferred option for those patients desiring definitive therapy for their fibroadenomas without surgical intervention.

  5. Disclusion time measurement studies: stability of disclusion time--a 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, R

    1994-08-01

    Six of seven women were recalled after 1 year to remeasure their right- and left-side working disclusion times. Before the occlusal adjustment technique known as immediate complete anterior guidance development (ICAGD), these patients presented lengthy mean disclusion times (> 1.0 second) and multiple chronic myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS) symptoms. After ICAGD, these patients presented with short mean disclusion times (< 0.7 second) and no chronic MPDS symptoms were observed. At 1-year follow-up, there was no statistical difference between present measurements of disclusion time and those of 1 year earlier. In addition, all six posttreatment patients demonstrated no observed chronic MPDS symptoms. However, the symptom of nocturnal bruxism appeared to recur with some chronic regularity. These results suggest that, for this population, disclusion time was stable over the 1-year period of observation, and the short disclusion time appears to allow normal daily muscle function with significantly lessened appearance of chronic myofacial pain dysfunction symptoms.

  6. Methods for successful follow-up of elusive urban populations: an ethnographic approach with homeless men.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, S.; Berkman, A.; Gheith, A.; Jahiel, R.; Stanley, D.; Geller, P. A.; Valencia, E.; Susser, E.

    1997-01-01

    Public health is paying increasing attention to elusive urban populations such as the homeless, street drug users, and illegal immigrants. Yet, valid data on the health of these populations remain scarce; longitudinal research, in particular, has been hampered by poor follow-up rates. This paper reports on the follow-up methods used in two randomized clinical trials among one such population, namely, homeless men with mental illness. Each of the two trials achieved virtually complete follow-up over 18 months. The authors describe the ethnographic approach to follow-up used in these trials and elaborate its application to four components of the follow-up: training interviewers, tracking participants, administering the research office, and conducting assessments. The ethnographic follow-up method is adaptable to other studies and other settings, and may provide a replicable model for achieving high follow-up rates in urban epidemiologic studies. PMID:9211004

  7. Apparent brightness distribution of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Racz, Istvan; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos; Toth, Viktor; Horvath, Istvan

    2015-08-01

    We studied the relationship between the Swift GRB data and the optical brightness of the host galaxy measured by the Keck telescope. We calculated the unbiased distribution of the host's optical brightness by making use the survival analysis. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we studied also the dependence of this distribution on the GRB's data.

  8. Delta Reverse Polarity Shoulder Replacement: Single Surgeon Experience with a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Eltayeb, Magid; Javaid, Mohammad Muddassir Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background The delta reverse shoulder replacement system was developed for the treatment of rotator cuff arthropathy so that the deltoid can substitute for the deficient rotator cuff. To evaluate the results of delta reverse shoulder replacement for functional improvement and complications in a consecutive series by a single surgeon over a period of six years with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Methods The data were collected retrospectively from electronic theatre records. Over a period of 6 years (2006-2012), 46 cases that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were identified. There were 34 females and 12 males. The average age of patients was 76.2 years (range, 58 to 87 years). A single surgeon performed all procedures using the anterosuperior approach. The mean follow-up time was 49 months (range, 24 to 91 months). All cases had preoperative and postoperative Constant scores. We collected the data on indications, hospital stay, and change in the Constant score, complications, and reoperation rates. Results The main indication for surgery was rotator cuff arthropathy (52.2%), followed by massive rotator cuff tear (28.3%), osteoarthritis (8.7%), fractures (6.5%), and rheumatoid arthritis (4.3%). Also, 65.2% of the cases were referred by general practitioners, 26% of the cases were referred by other consultants, and 8.8% of the cases were already under the care of a shoulder surgeon. The average preoperative Constant score was 23.5 (range, 8 to 59). The average Constant score at the final follow-up was 56 (range, 22 to 83). On average, there was an improvement of 33 points in the Constant score. The improvement in t