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Sample records for grb host galaxies

  1. Apparent brightness distribution of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Racz, Istvan; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos; Toth, Viktor; Horvath, Istvan

    2015-08-01

    We studied the relationship between the Swift GRB data and the optical brightness of the host galaxy measured by the Keck telescope. We calculated the unbiased distribution of the host's optical brightness by making use the survival analysis. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we studied also the dependence of this distribution on the GRB's data.

  2. Apparent brightness distribution of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Rácz, István I.; Balázs, Lajos G.; Horváth, István; Tóth, L. Viktor

    We studied the unbiased optical brightness distribution which was calculated from the survival analysis of host galaxies (HGs) data and its relationship with the Swift GRB data of the host galaxies observed by the Keck telescope. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we also studied the dependence of this distribution on the GRB's data. Finally, we compared the HGs distribution with standard galaxies distribution of the DEEP2 redshift survey and checked the result with the VIPERS catalogue too.

  3. Long-Wavelength Demographics of GRB Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    We present new VLA observations of 32 Swift and pre-Swift GRB host galaxies, supplemented by new ALMA and Herschel observations. Although our observations are quite deep, we securely detect only a few targets in the sample. Indeed, we rule out several claimed detections of ULIRG-like host galaxies in the previous literature, including every pre-Swift ULIRG-like host: these now appear to have been due to residual afterglow contamination or source confusion. Our results indicate that only a small minority of GRBs (~10%) occur in ULIRG-like galaxies and that intense star-formation does little to directly facilitate GRB production. This suggests in turn that dynamical interactions or ultra-massive stellar progenitors are not likely to be critical ingredients in GRB formation. Every GRB securely associated with a ULIRG is observed to significantly dust-obscured, consistent with the large dust optical depths and covering frations thought to be characteristic of these systems.

  4. HST Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A.; Pian, E.

    1998-08-01

    The field of GRB970508 was imaged by HST with the STIS CCD in open filter mode (50CCD) on 1998 August 5.78-6.03 for a total exposure time of 11,568 seconds. An extended object, which we believe to be the host galaxy of GRB970508, was detected at the astrometric position of the optical transient of GRB970508. The galaxy has high signal-to-noise in our data and is clearly resolved, with a major axis of approximately 0."5 .

  5. Gas-to-Dust Ratios in GRB Host Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schady, P.; Page, M. J.; De Pasquale, M.; Mason, K. O.; Morris, D. C.; Roming, P. W. A.; Berk, D. E. van den; Oates, S. R.; Immler, S.

    2008-05-22

    An understanding of GRB host galaxy properties is pivotal to determining the progenitor stars, and is critical in identifying the effect of the GRB local environment on our observations. The imprint left by dust and gas absorption on GRB X-ray and optical afterglows provides an effective probe to the immediate surroundings, and for this well-sampled, multi-wavelength afterglow observations are imperative. Swift's capabilities to obtain simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical data make it ideal to study the dust and gas content in the local environment of GRBs. In these proceedings we further the work from [1], and present the results of analysis on the combined Swift and ground-based spectra of 24 GRB afterglows, which is the largest sample of GRB afterglow spectral energy distributions thus far studied.

  6. Identifying the host galaxy of the short GRB 100628A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Klose, S.; Palazzi, E.; Greiner, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Kann, D. A.; Hunt, L. K.; Malesani, D.; Rossi, A.; Savaglio, S.; Schulze, S.; Xu, D.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; Ferrero, P.; Filgas, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Krühler, T.; Knust, F.; Masetti, N.; Olivares E., F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Schmidl, S.; Tanga, M.; Updike, A. C.; Varela, K.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the results of a comprehensive observing campaign to reveal the host galaxy of the short GRB 100628A. This burst was followed by a faint X-ray afterglow but no optical counterpart was discovered. However, inside the X-ray error circle a potential host galaxy at a redshift of z = 0.102 was soon reported in the literature. If this system is the host, then GRB 100628A was the cosmologically most nearby unambiguous short burst with a measured redshift so far. We used the multi-colour imager GROND at the ESO/La Silla MPG 2.2 m telescope, ESO/VLT spectroscopy, and deep Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio-continuum observations together with publicly available Gemini imaging data to study the putative host and the galaxies in the field of GRB 100628A. We confirm that inside the X-ray error circle the most probable host-galaxy candidate is the morphologically disturbed, interacting galaxy system at z = 0.102. The interacting galaxies are connected by a several kpc long tidal stream, which our VLT/FORS2 spectroscopy reveals strong emission lines of [O ii], [O iii], Hα and Hβ, characteristic for the class of extreme emission-line galaxies and indicative of ongoing star formation. The latter leaves open the possibility that the GRB progenitor was a member of a young stellar population. However, we indentify a second host-galaxy candidate slightly outside the X-ray error circle. It is a radio-bright, luminous elliptical galaxy at a redshift z = 0.311. With a K-band luminosity of 2 × 1011L⊙ this galaxy resembles the probable giant elliptical host of the first well-localized short burst, GRB 050509B. If this is the host, then the progenitor of GRB 100628A was a member of an old stellar population. Based on observations collected at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programme 087.D-0503 and 290.D-5194; PI: A. Nicuesa Guelbenzu; 090.A-0825; PI: D. Malesani), GROND (PI: J. Greiner), and ATCA (Program C

  7. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kupcu-Yoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, E.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  8. THE EXTREMELY RED HOST GALAXY OF GRB 080207

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Leslie; Cresci, Giovanni; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Klose, Sylvio; Savaglio, Sandra; Michalowski, Michal; Pian, Elena

    2011-08-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the host galaxy of the dark Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 080207. The host is faint, with extremely red optical-infrared colors (R - K = 6.3, 24 {mu}m/R-band flux {approx}1000) making it an extremely red object (ERO) and a dust-obscured galaxy (DOG). The spectral energy distribution (SED) shows the clear signature of the 1.6 {mu}m photometric 'bump', typical of evolved stellar populations. We use this bump to establish the photometric redshift z{sub phot} as 2.2{sup +0.2}{sub -0.3}, using a vast library of SED templates, including M 82. The star formation rate (SFR) inferred from the SED fitting is {approx}119 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, the stellar mass 3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and A{sub V} extinction from 1 to 2 mag. The ERO and DOG nature of the host galaxy of the dark GRB 080207 may be emblematic of a distinct class of dark GRB hosts, with high SFRs, evolved and metal-rich stellar populations, and significant dust extinction within the host galaxy.

  9. The Extremely Red Host Galaxy of GRB 080207

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Savaglio, Sandra; Cresci, Giovanni; Klose, Sylvio; Michałowski, Michał; Pian, Elena

    2011-08-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the host galaxy of the dark Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 080207. The host is faint, with extremely red optical-infrared colors (R - K = 6.3, 24 μm/R-band flux ~1000) making it an extremely red object (ERO) and a dust-obscured galaxy (DOG). The spectral energy distribution (SED) shows the clear signature of the 1.6 μm photometric "bump," typical of evolved stellar populations. We use this bump to establish the photometric redshift z phot as 2.2+0.2 - 0.3, using a vast library of SED templates, including M 82. The star formation rate (SFR) inferred from the SED fitting is ~119 M sun yr-1, the stellar mass 3 × 1011 M sun, and AV extinction from 1 to 2 mag. The ERO and DOG nature of the host galaxy of the dark GRB 080207 may be emblematic of a distinct class of dark GRB hosts, with high SFRs, evolved and metal-rich stellar populations, and significant dust extinction within the host galaxy.

  10. The SEDs and host galaxies of the dustiest GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krühler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Küpcü-Yoldaş, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, F.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe. Until recently, however, the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows, biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims: Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (AVGRB ≳ 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry, and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies, and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods: This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line and galaxy-integrated characteristics such as the host's stellar mass, luminosity, color-excess, and star-formation rate. Results: For the eight afterglows considered in this study, we report for the first time the redshift of GRB 081109 (z = 0.9787 ± 0.0005), and the visual extinction towards GRBs 081109 (AVGRB = 3.4-0.3+0.4 mag) and 100621A (AVGRB = 3.8±0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs, there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metal-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder (⟨ (R - K)AB ⟩ ~ 1.6 mag), more luminous (⟨ L ⟩ ~ 0.9 L∗), and massive (⟨ log M∗ [M⊙] ⟩ ~ 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. Hence, we probe a different galaxy population, suggesting that previous host samples miss most of the

  11. GRB 990712 optical decay: indication of bright host galaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, J.; Courbin, F.; Cuadra, J.; Minniti, D.

    We have obtained a 5-min R-band exposure of the optical afterglow of GRB 990712 (Frontera, GCN #385; Bakos et al., GCN #387) with the ESO 3.5-m NTT on 16.403 July 1999 UT. We detect an unresolved (seeing FWHM = 1.8") object at RA (2000) = 22 31 53.03, Dec (2000) = -73 24 28.3 (with a positional uncertainty of +- 0.6" relative to the USNO-A2.0 system), consistent with the position of the bright decaying source discovered by Bakos et al. (IAUC 7225). We have tied our photometry to the PLANET photometric zeropoint (K. Sahu, personal communication) and find that the object has continued to fade to R = 21.48 +- 0.02 (systematic) +- 0.05 (random). The combined SAAO data (Bakos et al., IAUC 7225) and NTT data indicate that the light curve is leveling off relative to a power law decline. Assuming that the light curve can be modeled as the combined effects of a power law decline of the OT and a constant contribution from the host galaxy we find an OT decay slope of -0.81 (i.e. a rather slow decay) and a bright host galaxy with R = 22.0. Such a bright host galaxy would be consistent with its fairly low redshift (z = 0.43) and would possibly even account for the prominent emission lines seen in the VLT spectrum (Galama et al., GCN #388). We caution however that the hypothesis of a bright host galaxy is based on just a few data points. To test this hypothesis continued monitoring of the system is therefore urged. The NTT image and the R-band light curve are posted at http://www.astro.ku.dk/~jens/grb990712/ .

  12. Probing the complex environments of GRB host galaxies and intervening systems: high resolution spectroscopy of GRB050922C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, S.; Vergani, S.; Fiore, F.; D'Elia, V.; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.; Stella, L.

    2009-05-01

    We use high resolution spectroscopic observations of the afterglow of GRB050922C, in order to investigate the environment of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and the interstellar matter of their host galaxies. We found that, as for most high resolution spectra of GRBs, the spectrum of the afterglow of GRB050922C is complex. The detection of lines of neutral elements like MgI and the detection of fine-structure levels of the ions FeII, SiII and CII allows us to separate components in the GRB ISM along the line of sight. GRB afterglow spectra can be used to disentangle the contribution of the different parts of the GRB host galaxy and to study their properties.

  13. Probing the complex environments of GRB host galaxies and intervening systems: high resolution spectroscopy of GRB050922C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, S.; Ward, P. A.; Fiore, F.; Vergani, S. D.; D'Elia, V.; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Chincarini, G.; Covino, S.; Della Valle, M.; Fugazza, D.; Norci, L.; Sbordone, L.; Stella, L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Goldoni, P.; Malesani, D.; Mirabel, I. F.; Pellizza, L. J.; Perna, R.

    2008-12-01

    Aims: The aim of this paper is to investigate the environment of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and the interstellar matter of their host galaxies. Methods: To this purpose we use high resolution spectroscopic observations of the afterglow of GRB050922C, obtained with UVES/VLT ~ 3.5 h after the GRB event. Results: We found that, as for most high resolution spectra of GRBs, the spectrum of the afterglow of GRB050922C is complex. At least seven components contribute to the main absorption system at z=2.1992. The detection of lines of neutral elements like MgI and the detection of fine-structure levels of the ions FeII, SiII and CII allows us to separate components in the GRB ISM along the line of sight. Moreover, in addition to the main system, we analyzed the five intervening systems between z = 2.077 and z = 1.5664 identified along the GRB line of sight. Conclusions: GRB afterglow spectra are very complex, but full of information. This can be used to disentangle the contribution of the different parts of the GRB host galaxy and to study their properties. Our metallicity estimates agree with the scenario of GRBs exploding in low metallicity galaxies Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) with the VLT/Kueyen telescope, Paranal, Chile, in the framework of program 075.A-0603.

  14. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Daniel; West, Andrew A.; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2009-08-03

    We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

  15. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  16. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES OF THE SUBLUMINOUS GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Emily M.; Chornock, Ryan; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Berger, Edo; Lunnan, Ragnhild

    2012-10-20

    GRB 120422A is a nearby (z = 0.283) long-duration gamma-ray burst (LGRB) detected by Swift with E {sub {gamma},iso} {approx} 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg. It is also associated with the spectroscopically confirmed broad-lined Type Ic SN 2012bz. These properties establish GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz as the sixth and newest member of the class of subluminous GRBs supernovae (SNe). Observations also show that GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz occurred at an unusually large offset ({approx}8 kpc) from the host galaxy nucleus, setting it apart from other nearby LGRBs and leading to speculation that the host environment may have undergone prior interaction activity. Here, we present spectroscopic observations using the 6.5 m Magellan telescope at Las Campanas. We extract spectra at three specific locations within the GRB/SN host galaxy, including the host nucleus, the explosion site, and the 'bridge' of diffuse emission connecting these two regions. We measure a metallicity of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.3 {+-} 0.1 and a star formation rate (SFR) per unit area of 0.08 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} at the host nucleus. At the GRB/SN explosion site we measure a comparable metallicity of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.2 {+-} 0.1 but find a much lower SFR per unit area of 0.01 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We also compare the host galaxy of this event to the hosts of other LGRBs, including samples of subluminous LGRBs and cosmological LGRBs, and find no systematic metallicity difference between the environments of these different subtypes.

  17. Detailed afterglow modelling and host galaxy properties of the dark GRB 111215A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Levan, A. J.; Pooley, G. G.; Wiersema, K.; Krühler, T.; Perley, D. A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Curran, P. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Strom, R. G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Hartoog, O. E.; Xu, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.

    2015-02-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the William Herschel Telescope and Nordic Optical Telescope in the nIR/optical, and with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have combined our data with the Swift X-Ray Telescope monitoring, and radio and millimetre observations from the literature to perform broad-band modelling, and determined the macro- and microphysical parameters of the GRB blast wave. By combining the broad-band modelling results with our nIR upper limits we have put constraints on the extinction in the host galaxy. This is consistent with the optical extinction we have derived from the excess X-ray absorption, and higher than in other dark bursts for which similar modelling work has been performed. We also present deep imaging of the host galaxy with the Keck I telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which resulted in a well-constrained photometric redshift, giving credence to the tentative spectroscopic redshift we obtained with the Keck II telescope, and estimates for the stellar mass and star formation rate of the host. Finally, our high-resolution HST images of the host galaxy show that the GRB afterglow position is offset from the brightest regions of the host galaxy, in contrast to studies of optically bright GRBs.

  18. GRB060111B: RTT150, Possible Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamitov, I.; Uluc, K.; Aslan, Z.; Kiziloglu, U.; Gogus, E.; Saygac, A. T.; Onal, O.; Burenin, R.; Pavlinsky, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Sakhibullin, N.

    2006-01-01

    We observed field around position of optical counterpart (Perri et al., GCN4487, Yost et al, GCN4488) of GRB060111B (Swift trigger 176918) with Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT150, Bakyrlytepe, TUBITAK National Observatory, Turkey), starting at Jan. 12, 02:11UT, i.e. A series of frames (13*300s exposures in R bands) were taken. We did not detect OT, but detect an extended source on about 5 arcsec NW from OT position with coordinates: RA= 19h05m43.0s (J2000.0) DEC=+70d22'29."8 (J2000.0) Using USNO-B1 stars we estimate the following magnitude for this source: R=20.52+/-0.03, and limiting magnitude of combined image as: R~22.6 The finding chart can be found at: http://www.tug.tubitak.gov.tr/~irekk/grb/grb060111b/grb060111B.JPG

  19. The GRB 030329 host: a blue low metallicity subluminous galaxy with intense star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Sollerman, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jakobsson, P.; Christensen, L.; Hjorth, J.; Jóhannesson, G.; Guziy, S.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Björnsson, G.; Sokolov, V. V.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Nilsson, K.

    2005-12-01

    We present broad band photometry and spectroscopic observations of the host galaxy of GRB 030329. Analysis of the spectral emission lines shows that the host is likely a low metallicity galaxy (Z˜0.004). The spectral energy distribution (SED) constructed with the photometric points has been fitted using synthetic and observational templates. The best SED fit is obtained with a starburst template with an age of 150 Myr and an extinction Av ˜ 0.6. We find that the GRB 030329 host galaxy is a subluminous galaxy (L ˜ 0.016 Lstar) with a stellar mass of ≳ 108 M⊙. Three independent diagnostics, based on the restframe UV continuum, the [O II], and the Balmer emission lines, provide a consistent unextinguished star formation rate of ˜ 0.6 M⊙ yr-1, implying a high unextinguished specific star formation rate ( 34 M⊙ yr-1 (L/Lstar)-1). We estimate that the unextinguished specific star formation rate of the GRB 030329 host is higher than 93.5% of the galaxies at a similar redshift. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Based on data taken at the 2.2-m and 3.5-m telescopes of the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán de Calar Alto, operated by the Max Planck institute of Heidelberg and Centro Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. The spectral observations were obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal (Chile), under the Director's Discretionary Time programme 271.D-5006(A).

  20. The dark nature of GRB 130528A and its host galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Bremer, M.; Winters, J. M.; Gorosabel, J.; Guziy, S.; Pandey, S. B.; Jelínek, M.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Sokolov, Ilya V.; Orekhova, N. V.; Moskvitin, A. S.; Tello, J. C.; Cunniffe, R.; Lara-Gil, O.; Oates, S. R.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Bai, J.; Fan, Y.; Wang, C.; Park, I. H.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We study the dark nature of GRB 130528A through multi-wavelength observations and conclude that the main reason for the optical darkness is local extinction inside of the host galaxy. Methods: Automatic observations were performed at the Burst Optical Observer and Transient Exploring System (BOOTES)-4/MET robotic telescope. We also triggered target of opportunity (ToO) observations at Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC + OSIRIS). The host galaxy photometric observations in optical to near-infrared (nIR) wavelengths were achieved through large ground-based aperture telescopes, such as 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT), 6 m Bolshoi Teleskop Alt-azimutalnyi (BTA) telescope, and 2 m Liverpool Telescope (LT). Based on these observations, spectral energy distributions (SED) for the host galaxy and afterglow were constructed. Results: Thanks to millimetre (mm) observations at PdBI, we confirm the presence of a mm source within the XRT error circle that faded over the course of our observations and identify the host galaxy. However, we do not find any credible optical source within early observations with BOOTES-4/MET and 1.5 m OSN telescopes. Spectroscopic observation of this galaxy by GTC showed a single faint emission line that likely corresponds to [OII] 3727 Å at a redshift of 1.250 ± 0.001, implying a star formation rate (M⊙/yr) > 6.18 M⊙/yr without correcting for dust extinction. The probable line-of-sight extinction towards GRB 130528A is revealed through analysis of the afterglow SED, resulting in a value of A^GRBV≥ 0.9 at the rest frame; this is comparable to extinction levels found among other dark GRBs. The SED of the host galaxy is explained well (χ2/d.o.f. = 0.564) by a luminous (MB = -21.16), low-extinction (AV = 0, rest frame), and aged (2.6 Gyr) stellar population. We can explain this apparent contradiction in global and

  1. THE AFTERGLOW AND ULIRG HOST GALAXY OF THE DARK SHORT GRB 120804A

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Margutti, R.; Laskar, T.; Fong, W.; Chornock, R.; Dupuy, T. J.; Levan, A.; Tunnicliffe, R. L.; Mangano, V.; Fox, D. B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Menten, K. M.; Hjorth, J.; Roth, K.

    2013-03-10

    We present the optical discovery and subarcsecond optical and X-ray localization of the afterglow of the short GRB 120804A, as well as optical, near-IR, and radio detections of its host galaxy. X-ray observations with Swift/XRT, Chandra, and XMM-Newton extending to {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 19 days reveal a single power-law decline. The optical afterglow is faint, and comparison to the X-ray flux indicates that GRB 120804A is ''dark'', with a rest-frame extinction of A {sup host}{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 mag (at z = 1.3). The intrinsic neutral hydrogen column density inferred from the X-ray spectrum, N{sub H,{sub int}}(z = 1.3) Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, is commensurate with the large extinction. The host galaxy exhibits red optical/near-IR colors. Equally important, JVLA observations at Almost-Equal-To 0.9-11 days reveal a constant flux density of F{sub {nu}}(5.8 GHz) = 35 {+-} 4 {mu}Jy and an optically thin spectrum, unprecedented for GRB afterglows, but suggestive instead of emission from the host galaxy. The optical/near-IR and radio fluxes are well fit with the scaled spectral energy distribution of the local ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220 at z Almost-Equal-To 1.3, with a resulting star formation rate of x Almost-Equal-To 300 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The inferred extinction and small projected offset (2.2 {+-} 1.2 kpc) are also consistent with the ULIRG scenario, as is the presence of a companion galaxy at the same redshift and with a separation of about 11 kpc. The limits on radio afterglow emission, in conjunction with the observed X-ray and optical emission, require a circumburst density of n {approx} 10{sup -3} cm{sup -3}, an isotropic-equivalent energy scale of E{sub {gamma},{sub iso}} Almost-Equal-To E{sub K,{sub iso}} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, and a jet opening angle of {theta}{sub j} {approx}> 11 Degree-Sign . The expected fraction of luminous infrared galaxies in the short GRB

  2. CO OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 000418 AT z = 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsukade, B.; Ohta, K.; Kohno, K.; Endo, A.; Nakanishi, K.

    2011-09-01

    We performed CO (J = 2-1) observations of the host galaxy of GRB 000418 at z = 1.1181 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Previous studies show that the host galaxy has properties similar to those of an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG). The star formation rate (SFR) of the host galaxy as derived from submillimeter and radio continuum emission is a few 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, which is an order of magnitude greater than the SFR derived from optical line emission. The large discrepancy between the SFRs derived from different observing wavelengths indicates the presence of a bulk of dust-obscured star formation and molecular gas that is enough to sustain the intense star formation. We failed to detect CO emission and derived 2{sigma} upper limits on the velocity-integrated CO (2-1) luminosity of L'{sub CO} < 6.9 x 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} and the molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.5x10{sup 9} M{sub sun} by adopting a velocity width of 300 km s{sup -1} and a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of {alpha}{sub CO} = 0.8 M{sub sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}, which are standard values for ULIRGs. The lower limit on the ratio of far-infrared luminosity to CO luminosity, a measure of the star formation efficiency, is higher compared to that of other gamma-ray burst hosts and other galaxy populations, which is consistent with active star formation taking place in this galaxy.

  3. GRB host galaxies with VLT/X-Shooter: properties at 0.8 < z < 1.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, S.; Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Savaglio, S.; Palazzi, E.; Covino, S.; Flores, H.; Goldoni, P.; Cupani, G.; Krühler, T.; Mannucci, F.; Onori, F.; Rossi, A.; D'Elia, V.; Pian, E.; D'Avanzo, P.; Gomboc, A.; Hammer, F.; Randich, S.; Fiore, F.; Stella, L.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2015-10-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the death of massive stars. Their host galaxies therefore represent a unique class of objects tracing star formation across the observable Universe. Indeed, recently accumulated evidence shows that GRB hosts do not differ substantially from general population of galaxies at high (z > 2) redshifts. However, it has been long recognized that the properties of z < 1.5 hosts, compared to general star-forming population, are unusual. To better understand the reasons for the supposed difference in LGRB hosts properties at z < 1.5, we obtained Very Large Telescope (VLT)/X-Shooter spectra of six hosts lying in the redshift range of 0.8 < z < 1.3. Some of these hosts have been observed before, yet we still lack well-constrained information on their characteristics such as metallicity, dust extinction and star formation rate (SFR). We search for emission lines in the VLT/X-Shooter spectra of the hosts and measure their fluxes. We perform a detailed analysis, estimating host average extinction, SFRs, metallicities and electron densities where possible. Measured quantities of our hosts are compared to a larger sample of previously observed GRB hosts at z < 2. SFRs and metallicities are measured for all the hosts analysed in this paper and metallicities are well determined for four hosts. The mass-metallicity relation, the fundamental metallicity relation and SFRs derived from our hosts occupy similar parameter space as other host galaxies investigated so far at the same redshift. We therefore conclude that GRB hosts in our sample support the found discrepancy between the properties of low-redshift GRB hosts and the general population of star-forming galaxies.

  4. IDENTIFYING THE LOCATION IN THE HOST GALAXY OF THE SHORT GRB 111117A WITH THE CHANDRA SUBARCSECOND POSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, T.; Troja, E.; Aoki, K.; Guiriec, S.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Im, M.; Jeon, Y.; Leloudas, G.; Malesani, D.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Andersen, M. I.; Melandri, A.; D'Avanzo, P.; Urata, Y.; Xu, D.; Gorosabel, J.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Briggs, M. S.; Foley, S.; and others

    2013-03-20

    We present our successful Chandra program designed to identify, with subarcsecond accuracy, the X-ray afterglow of the short GRB 111117A, which was discovered by Swift and Fermi. Thanks to our rapid target of opportunity request, Chandra clearly detected the X-ray afterglow, though no optical afterglow was found in deep optical observations. The host galaxy was clearly detected in the optical and near-infrared band, with the best photometric redshift of z=1.31{sub -0.23}{sup +0.46} (90% confidence), making it one of the highest known short gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts. Furthermore, we see an offset of 1.0 {+-} 0.2 arcsec, which corresponds to 8.4 {+-} 1.7 kpc, between the host and the afterglow position. We discuss the importance of using Chandra for obtaining subarcsecond X-ray localizations of short GRB afterglows to study GRB environments.

  5. UVES/VLT high resolution absorption spectroscopy of the GRB 080330 afterglow: a study of the GRB host galaxy and intervening absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Fiore, F.; Perna, R.; Krongold, Y.; Vergani, S. D.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Goldoni, P.; Guidorzi, C.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Norci, L.; Piranomonte, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ward, P.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: We study the gamma-ray burst (GRB) environment and intervening absorbers by analyzing the optical absorption features produced by gas surrounding the GRB or along its line of sight. Methods: We analyzed high resolution spectroscopic observations (R = 40 000, S/N = 3-6) of the optical afterglow of GRB 080330, taken with UVES at the VLT ~ 1.5 h after the GRB trigger. Results: The spectrum illustrates the complexity of the ISM of the GRB host galaxy at z = 1.51 which has at least four components in the main absorption system. We detect strong FeII, SiII, and NiII excited absorption lines associated with the bluemost component only. In addition to the host galaxy, at least two more absorbers lying along the line of sight to the afterglow have been detected in the redshift range 0.8 < z < 1.1, each exhibiting MgII absorption. For the bluemost component in the host galaxy, we derive information about its distance from the site of the GRB explosion. We do so by assuming that the excited absorption lines are produced by indirect UV pumping, and compare the data with a time dependent photo-excitation code. The distance of this component is found to be ˜ 280+40-50 pc, which is lower than found for other GRBs (1-6 kpc). We identify two additional MgII absorbers, one of them with a rest frame equivalent width larger than 1 Å. Conclusions: The distance between the GRB and the absorber measured in this paper confirms that the power of the GRB radiation can influence the conditions of the interstellar medium up to a distance of at least several hundred pc. For the intervening absorbers, we confirm the trend that on average one strong intervening system is found per afterglow, as has been noted in studies exhibiting an excess of strong MgII absorbers along GRB sightlines compared to quasars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, ESO, the VLT/Kueyen telescope, Paranal, Chile, in the framework of programs 080.A-0398.

  6. Infrared and Optical Observations of GRB 030115 and its Extremely Red Host Galaxy: Implications for Dark Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Rhoads, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Tanvir, Nial; Gorosabel, Javier; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; DellAntonio, Ian; Merrill, Javier

    2004-01-01

    We present near-infrared (a) and optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 030115. Discovered in an infrared search at Kitt Peak 5 hours after the burst trigger, this afterglow is the faintest ever observed in the R-band at such an early epoch, and exhibits very red colors, with R-K approximately equal to 6. The magnitude of the optical afterglow of GRB 030115 is fainter than many upper limits for other bursts, suggesting that without early nIR observations it would have been classified as a "dark" burst. Both the color and optical magnitude of the afterglow are likely due to dust extinction and indicate that at least some optical afterglows are observations were also taken of the host galaxy and the surrounding field. Photometric redshifts imply that the host, and a substantial number of faint galaxies in the field are at z approximately 2.5. The overdensity of galaxies is sufficiently great that GRB 030115 may have occurred in a rich high-redshift cluster. The host galaxy shows extremely red colors (R-K=5) and is the first GRB host to be classified as an Extreme Red Object (ERO). Some of the galaxies surrounding the host also show very red colors, while the majority of the cluster are much bluer, indicating ongoing unobscured star formation. As it is thought that much of high redshift star formation occurs in highly obscured environments it may well be that GRB 030115 represents a transition object, between the relatively unobscured afterglows seen to date and a population which are very heavily extinguished, even in the nIR.

  7. Infrared and Optical Observations of GRB 030115 and its ExtremelyRed Host Galaxy: Implications for Dark Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Rhoads, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Tanvir, Nial; Gorosabel, Javier; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Merrill, Michael; Bergeron, Eddie; Castro Ceron, JosMar a; Masetti, Nicola; Vreeswijk, Paul; Antonelli, Angelo; Bersier,David; Castro-Tirado, Alberto; Fynbo, Johan; Garnavich, Peter; Holland,Stephen; Hjorth, Jens; Nugent, Peter; Pian, Elena; Smette, Alain; Thomsen, Bjarne; Thorsett, Stephen E.; Wijers, Ralph

    2006-05-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) and optical observations ofthe afterglow of GRB 030115. Discovered in aninfrared search at Kitt Peak5 hr after the burst trigger, this afterglow is the faintest everobserved in the R band at such an early epoch and exhibits very redcolors, with R-K~;6. The optical magnitude of the afterglow of GRB 030115is fainter than many upper limits for other bursts, suggesting thatwithout early NIR observations it would have been classified as a "dark"burst. Both the color and optical magnitude of the afterglow are likelydue to dust extinction atmoderate redshift z>2 and indicate that atleast some optical afterglows are very faint due to dust along the lineof sight.Multicolor Hubble Space Telescope observations were also takenof the host galaxy and the surrounding field. Photometric redshifts implythat the host and a substantial number of faint galaxies in the field areat z 2:5. The overdensity of galaxies is sufficiently great that GRB030115 may have occurred in a rich high-redshift cluster. The host galaxyshows extremely red colors (R-K = 5) and is the first GRB host to beclassified as an extremely red object (ERO). Some of the galaxiessurrounding the host also show very red colors, while the majority of theclusterare much bluer, indicating ongoing unobscured star formation. Asit is thought that much of high-redshift starformation occurs in highlyobscured environments, it may well be that GRB 030115 represents atransition object, between the relatively unobscured afterglows seen todate and a population of objects that are very heavily extinguished, evenin the NIR.

  8. GRB 090417B AND ITS HOST GALAXY: A STEP TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING OF OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen T.; Cummings, Jay R.; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Sbarufatti, Boris; Shen, Rongfeng; Schady, Patricia; Still, Martin; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Jakobsson, Pall; Leitet, Elisabet; Linne, Staffan; Roming, Peter W. A.; Zhang Bing

    2010-07-01

    GRB 090417B was an unusually long burst with a T{sub 90} duration of at least 2130 s and a multi-peaked light curve at energies of 15-150 keV. It was optically dark and has been associated with a bright star-forming galaxy at a redshift of 0.345 that is broadly similar to the Milky Way. This is one of the few cases where a host galaxy has been clearly identified for a dark gamma-ray burst (GRB) and thus an ideal candidate for studying the origin of dark bursts. We find that the dark nature of GRB 090417B cannot be explained by high redshift, incomplete observations, or unusual physics in the production of the afterglow. Assuming the standard relativistic fireball model for the afterglow we find that the optical flux is at least 2.5 mag fainter than predicted by the X-ray flux. The Swift/XRT X-ray data are consistent with the afterglow being obscured by a dense, localized sheet of dust approximately 30-80 pc from the burst along the line of sight. Our results suggest that this dust sheet imparts an extinction of A{sub V} {approx_gt} 12 mag, which is sufficient to explain the missing optical flux. GRB 090417B is an example of a GRBs that is dark due to the localized dust structure in its host galaxy.

  9. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB 970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A. S.; Pian, E.; Gibbons, R.; Thorsett, S. E.; Ferguson, H.; Petro, L.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Caraveo, P.; Frontera, F.; Kouveliotou, C.; Macchetto, D.; Palazzi, E.; Pedersen, H.; Tavani, M.; van Paradijs, J.

    2000-12-01

    We report on observations of the field of GRB 970508 made in 1998 early August, 454 days after outburst, with the STIS CCD camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The images, taken in open filter (50CCD) mode, clearly reveal the presence of a galaxy that was overwhelmed in earlier (1997 June) HST images by emission from the optical transient (OT). The galaxy is regular in shape: after correcting for the HST/STIS PSF, it is well fitted by an exponential disk with a scale length of 0.046"+/-0.006" and an ellipticity of 0.70+/-0.07. All observations are marginally consistent with a continuous decline in OT emission as t-1.3 beginning 2 days after outburst; however, we find no direct evidence in the late-time HST image for emission from the OT, and the surface brightness profile of the galaxy is most regular if we assume that the OT emission is negligible, suggesting that the OT may have faded more rapidly at late times than is predicted by the power-law decay. Due to the wide bandwidth of the STIS clear mode, the estimated magnitude of the galaxy is dependent on the galaxy spectrum that is assumed. Using colors obtained from late-time ground-based observations to constrain the spectrum, we find V=25.4+/-0.15, a few tenths of a magnitude brighter than earlier ground-based estimates that were obtained by observing the total light of the galaxy and the OT and then subtracting the estimated OT brightness, assuming that it fades as a single power law. This again suggests that the OT may have faded faster at late time than the power law predicts. The position of the OT agrees with that of the isophotal center of the galaxy to 0.01", which, at the galaxy redshift z=0.83, corresponds to an offset from the center of the host of <~70 pc. This remarkable agreement raises the possibility that the gamma-ray burst may have been associated with either an active galactic nucleus or a nuclear starburst.

  10. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Ibar, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Van der Horst, A. J.; and others

    2012-08-20

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  11. The Afterglow and Early-type Host Galaxy of the Short GRB 150101B at z = 0.1343

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Shappee, B. J.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Smith, N.; Milne, P. A.; Laskar, T.; Fox, D. B.; Lunnan, R.; Blanchard, P. K.; Hjorth, J.; Wiersema, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Zaritsky, D.

    2016-12-01

    We present the discovery of the X-ray and optical afterglows of the short-duration GRB 150101B, pinpointing the event to an early-type host galaxy at z = 0.1343 ± 0.0030. This makes GRB 150101B the most nearby short gamma-ray burst (GRB) with an early-type host galaxy discovered to date. Fitting the spectral energy distribution of the host galaxy results in an inferred stellar mass of ≈ 7× {10}10 {M}⊙ , stellar population age of ≈2-2.5 Gyr, and star formation rate of ≲0.4 M ⊙ yr-1. The host of GRB 150101B is one of the largest and most luminous short GRB host galaxies, with a B-band luminosity of ≈ 4.3{L}* and half-light radius of ≈8 kpc. GRB 150101B is located at a projected distance of 7.35 ± 0.07 kpc from its host center and lies on a faint region of its host rest-frame optical light. Its location, combined with the lack of associated supernova, is consistent with an NS-NS/NS-BH merger progenitor. From modeling the evolution of the broadband afterglow, we calculate isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of ≈ 1.3× {10}49 erg and ≈ (6{--}14)× {10}51 erg, respectively, a circumburst density of ≈ (0.8{--}4)× {10}-5 cm-3, and a jet opening angle of ≳9°. Using observations extending to ≈30 days, we place upper limits of ≲ (2{--}4)× {10}41 erg s-1 on associated kilonova emission. We compare searches following previous short GRBs to existing kilonova models and demonstrate the difficulty of performing effective kilonova searches from cosmological short GRBs using current ground-based facilities. We show that at the Advanced LIGO/VIRGO horizon distance of 200 Mpc, searches reaching depths of ≈23-24 AB mag are necessary to probe a meaningful range of kilonova models.

  12. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Cenko, S. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Misra, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova, and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E iso > 1054 erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v ph ~ 15, 000 km s-1). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v ph ~ 30, 000 km s-1), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M ⊙ yr-1), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  14. GEMINI SPECTROSCOPY OF THE SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130603B AFTERGLOW AND HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Cardwell, A.; Turner, J.; Bloom, J. S.; Cobb, B. E.

    2013-11-10

    We present early optical photometry and spectroscopy of the afterglow and host galaxy of the bright short-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B discovered by the Swift satellite. Using our Target of Opportunity program on the Gemini South telescope, our prompt optical spectra reveal a strong trace from the afterglow superimposed on continuum and emission lines from the z = 0.3568 ± 0.0005 host galaxy. The combination of a relatively bright optical afterglow (r' = 21.52 at Δt = 8.4 hr), together with an observed offset of 0.''9 from the host nucleus (4.8 kpc projected distance at z = 0.3568), allow us to extract a relatively clean spectrum dominated by afterglow light. Furthermore, the spatially resolved spectrum allows us to constrain the properties of the explosion site directly, and compare these with the host galaxy nucleus, as well as other short-duration GRB host galaxies. We find that while the host is a relatively luminous (L∼0.8 L{sup *}{sub B}), star-forming (SFR = 1.84 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) galaxy with almost solar metallicity, the spectrum of the afterglow exhibits weak Ca II absorption features but negligible emission features. The explosion site therefore lacks evidence of recent star formation, consistent with the relatively long delay time distribution expected in a compact binary merger scenario. The star formation rate (SFR; both in an absolute sense and normalized to the luminosity) and metallicity of the host are both consistent with the known sample of short-duration GRB hosts and with recent results which suggest GRB 130603B emission to be the product of the decay of radioactive species produced during the merging process of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary ({sup k}ilonova{sup )}. Ultimately, the discovery of more events similar to GRB 130603B and their rapid follow-up from 8 m class telescopes will open new opportunities for our understanding of the final stages of compact-objects binary systems and provide crucial information

  15. The obscured hyper-energetic GRB 120624B hosted by a luminous compact galaxy at z = 2.20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Campana, S.; Thöne, C. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Melandri, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Veres, P.; Martín, S.; Petitpas, G.; Covino, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Levan, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions that we can witness in the Universe. Studying the most extreme cases of these phenomena allows us to constrain the limits for the progenitor models. Aims: In this Letter, we study the prompt emission, afterglow, and host galaxy of GRB 120624B, one of the brightest GRBs detected by Fermi, to derive the energetics of the event and characterise the host galaxy in which it was produced. Methods: Following the high-energy detection we conducted a multi-wavelength follow-up campaign, including near-infrared imaging from HAWKI/VLT, optical from OSIRIS/GTC, X-ray observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and at submillimetre/millimetre wavelengths from SMA. Optical/NIR spectroscopy was performed with X-shooter/VLT. Results: We detect the X-ray and NIR afterglow of the burst and determine a redshift of z = 2.1974 ± 0.0002 through identification of emission lines of [O ii], [O iii] and H-α from the host galaxy of the GRB. This implies an energy release of Eiso,γ = (3.0 ± 0.2) × 1054 erg, amongst the most luminous ever detected. The observations of the afterglow indicate high obscuration with AV > 1.5. The host galaxy is compact, with R1/2 < 1.6 kpc, but luminous, at L ~ 1.5 L∗ and has a star formation rate of 91 ± 6 M⊙/yr as derived from Hα. Conclusions: As for other highly obscured GRBs, GRB 120624B is hosted by a luminous galaxy, which we also prove to be compact, with very intense star formation. It is one of the most luminous host galaxies associated with a GRB, showing that the host galaxies of long GRBs are not always blue dwarf galaxies, as previously thought. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, with programmes 089.D-0256 and 090.D-0667, at the Gran Telescopio Canarias with programmes GTC49-12A and GTC58-12B, at the Submillimeter Array with programme 2012A-S001, at CAHA with programme F13-3.5-031, at Liverpool Telescope with programme CL13A03

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  17. Steep extinction towards GRB 140506A reconciled from host galaxy observations: Evidence that steep reddening laws are local

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, K. E.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.; Krühler, T.; Christensen, L.; Watson, D.; Ledoux, C.; Noterdaeme, P.; Perley, D. A.; Rhodin, H.; Selsing, J.; Schulze, S.; Tanvir, N. R.; Møller, P.; Goldoni, P.; Xu, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.

    2017-05-01

    We present the spectroscopic and photometric late-time follow-up of the host galaxy of the long-duration Swift γ-ray burst GRB 140506A at z = 0.889. The optical and near-infrared afterglow of this GRB had a peculiar spectral energy distribution (SED) with a strong flux-drop at 8000 Å (4000 Å rest-frame) suggesting an unusually steep extinction curve. By analysing the contribution and physical properties of the host galaxy, we here aim at providing additional information on the properties and origin of this steep, non-standard extinction. We find that the strong flux-drop in the GRB afterglow spectrum at <8000 Å and rise at <4000 Å (observers frame) is well explained by the combination of a steep extinction curve along the GRB line of sight and contamination by the host galaxy light at short wavelengths so that the scenario with an extreme 2175 Å extinction bump can be excluded. We localise the GRB to be at a projected distance of approximately 4 kpc from the centre of the host galaxy. Based on emission-line diagnostics of the four detected nebular lines, Hα, Hβ, [O ii] and [O iii], we find the host to be a modestly star forming (SFR = 1.34 ± 0.04 M⊙ yr-1) and relatively metal poor (Z=0.35+0.15-0.11 Z⊙) galaxy with a large dust content, characterised by a measured visual attenuation of AV = 1.74 ± 0.41 mag. We compare the host to other GRB hosts at similar redshifts and find that it is unexceptional in all its physical properties. We model the extinction curve of the host-corrected afterglow and show that the standard dust properties causing the reddening seen in the Local Group are inadequate in describing the steep drop. We thus conclude that the steep extinction curve seen in the afterglow towards the GRB is of exotic origin and issightline-dependent only, further confirming that this type of reddening is present only at very local scales and that it is solely a consequence of the circumburst environment. Based on observations carried out under

  18. THE SWIFT GRB HOST GALAXY LEGACY SURVEY. II. REST-FRAME NEAR-IR LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTION AND EVIDENCE FOR A NEAR-SOLAR METALLICITY THRESHOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krühler, T.; Laskar, T.; Berger, E.; Chary, R.; Postigo, A. de Ugarte; Michałowski, M. J.; Schulze, S.

    2016-01-20

    We present rest-frame near-IR (NIR) luminosities and stellar masses for a large and uniformly selected population of gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies using deep Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of 119 targets from the Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey spanning 0.03 < z < 6.3, and we determine the effects of galaxy evolution and chemical enrichment on the mass distribution of the GRB host population across cosmic history. We find a rapid increase in the characteristic NIR host luminosity between z ∼ 0.5 and z ∼ 1.5, but little variation between z ∼ 1.5 and z ∼ 5. Dust-obscured GRBs dominate the massive host population but are only rarely seen associated with low-mass hosts, indicating that massive star-forming galaxies are universally and (to some extent) homogeneously dusty at high redshift while low-mass star-forming galaxies retain little dust in their interstellar medium. Comparing our luminosity distributions with field surveys and measurements of the high-z mass–metallicity relation, our results have good consistency with a model in which the GRB rate per unit star formation is constant in galaxies with gas-phase metallicity below approximately the solar value but heavily suppressed in more metal-rich environments. This model also naturally explains the previously reported “excess” in the GRB rate beyond z ≳ 2; metals stifle GRB production in most galaxies at z < 1.5 but have only minor impact at higher redshifts. The metallicity threshold we infer is much higher than predicted by single-star models and favors a binary progenitor. Our observations also constrain the fraction of cosmic star formation in low-mass galaxies undetectable to Spitzer to be small at z < 4.

  19. The Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. II. Rest-frame Near-IR Luminosity Distribution and Evidence for a Near-solar Metallicity Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, D. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Hjorth, J.; Laskar, T.; Berger, E.; Chary, R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krühler, T.; Levan, A. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Schulze, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present rest-frame near-IR (NIR) luminosities and stellar masses for a large and uniformly selected population of gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies using deep Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of 119 targets from the Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey spanning 0.03 < z < 6.3, and we determine the effects of galaxy evolution and chemical enrichment on the mass distribution of the GRB host population across cosmic history. We find a rapid increase in the characteristic NIR host luminosity between z ˜ 0.5 and z ˜ 1.5, but little variation between z ˜ 1.5 and z ˜ 5. Dust-obscured GRBs dominate the massive host population but are only rarely seen associated with low-mass hosts, indicating that massive star-forming galaxies are universally and (to some extent) homogeneously dusty at high redshift while low-mass star-forming galaxies retain little dust in their interstellar medium. Comparing our luminosity distributions with field surveys and measurements of the high-z mass-metallicity relation, our results have good consistency with a model in which the GRB rate per unit star formation is constant in galaxies with gas-phase metallicity below approximately the solar value but heavily suppressed in more metal-rich environments. This model also naturally explains the previously reported “excess” in the GRB rate beyond z ≳ 2 metals stifle GRB production in most galaxies at z < 1.5 but have only minor impact at higher redshifts. The metallicity threshold we infer is much higher than predicted by single-star models and favors a binary progenitor. Our observations also constrain the fraction of cosmic star formation in low-mass galaxies undetectable to Spitzer to be small at z < 4.

  20. On the afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 021004: A comprehensivestudy with the Hubble Space Telescope1

    SciTech Connect

    Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.; Hjorth,J.; Pedersen, K.; Levan, A.; Burud, I.; Sahu, K.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Bergeron, E.; Kouveliotou1, C.; Tanvir, N.; Thorsett11, S.E.; Wijers,R.A.M.J.; Castro Ceron, J.M.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Garnavich, P.; Holland,S.T.; Jakobsson, P.; Moller, P.; Nugent, P.; Pian, E.; Rhoads, J.; Thomsen, B.; Watson, D.; Woosley, S.

    2004-12-01

    We report on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the late-time afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 021004 (z = 2.33).Although this gamma-ray burst (GRB) is one of the best observed so far in terms of sampling in the time domain, multi-wavelength coverage and polarimetric observations, there is large disagreement between different measurements and interpretations of this burst in the literature. We have observed the field of GRB 021004 with the HST at multiple epochs from 3 days until almost 10 months after the burst. With STI S prism and G430L spectroscopy we cover the spectral region from about 2000 Angstrom to 5700 Angstrom corresponding to 600 1700 Angstrom in the rest frame. From the limit on the flux recovery bluewards of the Lyman-limit we constrain the H I column density to be above 1 x 1018 cm-2 (5 sigma). Based on ACS and N ICMOS imaging we find that the afterglow evolved a chromatically within the errors (any variation must be less then 5 percent) during the period of HST observations. The color changes observed by other authors during the first four days must be related to a 'noisy' phenomenon superimposed on an afterglow component with a constant spectral shape. This also means that the cooling break has remained on the blue side of the optical part of the spectrum for at least two weeks after the explosion. The optical to X-ray slope OX is consistent with being the same at 1.4 and 52.4 days after the burst. This indicates that the cooling frequency is constant and hence, according to fireball models, that the circumburst medium has a constant density profile. The late-time slope of the light curve (alpha 2, F nu proportional to t-alpha2) is in the range 2 = 1.8-1.9, although inconsistent with a single power-law. This could be due to a late-time flattening caused by the transition to non-relativistic expansion or due to excess emission (a 'bump' in the light curve) about 7 days afterburst. The host galaxy is like most previously studied GRB hosts

  1. GRB 090417B and its Host Galaxy: A Step Towards an Understanding of Optically-Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Sbarufatti, Boris; Shen, Rongfeng; Schady, Patricia; Cummings, Jay R.; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Jakobsson, Pall; Leitet, Elisabet; Linne, Staffan; Roming, Peter W.A.; Still, Martin; Zhang, Bing

    2009-01-01

    GRB 090417B was an unusually long burst with a T(sub 90) duration of at least 2130 s and a multi-peaked light curve at energies of 15-150 keV. It was optically dark and has been convincingly associated with a bright star-forming galaxy at a redshift of 0.345 that is broadly similar to the Milky Way. This is one of the few cases where a host galaxy has been clearly identified for a dark gamma-ray burst and thus an ideal candidate for studying the origin of dark bursts. We find that the dark nature of GRB 090417B can not be explained by high redshift, incomplete observations, or unusual physics in the production of the afterglow. The Swift/XRT X-ray data are consistent with the afterglow being obscured by a dense, localized sheet of dust approximately 30-80 pc from the burst along the line of sight. Assuming the standard relativistic fireball model for the afterglow we find that the optical flux is at least 2.5 mag fainter than predicted by the X -ray flux. We are able to explain the lack of an optical afterglow, and the evolution of the X -ray spectrum, by assuming that there is a sheet of dust along the line of sight approximately 30-80 pc from the progenitor. Our results suggest that this dust sheet imparts an extinction of A(sub v)> or = 12 mag, which is sufficient to explain the missing optical flux. GRB 090417B is an example of a gamma-ray burst that is dark due to the localized dust structure in its host galaxy.

  2. Host Galaxy Spectra of Stripped SN from the Palomar Transient Factory: SN Progenitor Diagnostics and the SN-GRB Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modjaz, Maryam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair

    2012-02-01

    Stripped core-collapse supernovae (Stripped SNe) are powerful cosmic engines that energize and enrich the ISM and that sometimes accompany GRBs, but the exact mass and metallicity range of their massive progenitors is not known, nor the detailed physics of the explosion. We propose to continue conducting the first uniform and statistically significant study of host galaxies of 60 stripped SNe from the same innovative, homogeneous and galaxy-unbiased survey Palomar Transient Factory in order to determine the environmental conditions that influence the various kinds of massive stellar deaths. By obtaining spectra of the immediate host environments of our sample of stripped SN, we will (1) measure local abundances in order to differentiate between the two progenitor scenarios for stripped SN and (2) derive stellar population ages, masses and star formation histories via detailed stellar population synthesis models. Moreover, we will test if natal chemical abundance has effects on basic SN characteristics, such as peak luminosity. Any observed trends will have ramifications on SN and GRB explosion models and imply important demographic SN considerations. Our dataset will provide a crucial complimentary set to host galaxy studies of long-duration GRBs and pave the way for host studies of transients and SN found via upcoming surveys such as LSST.

  3. Identifying the Location in the Host Galaxy of Short GRB 1111l7A with the Chandra Sub- Arcsecond Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Troja, E.; Aoki, K.; Guiriec, S.; Im, M.; Leloudas, G.; Malesani, D.; Melandri, A.; deUgartePostigo, A.; Urata, Y.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present our successful program using Chandra for identifying the X-ray afterglow with sub-arcsecond accuracy for the short GRB 111117A d iscovered by Swift and Fermi. Thanks to our rapid target of opportuni ty request, Chandra clearly detected the X-ray afterglow, whereas no optical afterglow was found in deep optical observations. Instead, we clearly detect the host galaxy in optica; and also in near-infrared b ands. We found that the best photometric redshift fitofthe host is z = 1.31:(+0.46/-0.23) (90% confidence), making it one of the highest redshift short GRBs. Furthermore, we see an offset of 1.0+/-O.2 arcseco nds, which corresponds to 8.4+/-1.7 kpc aSBuming z= 1.31, between the host and the afterglow position. We discuss the importance of using Chandra for obtaining sub-arcsecond localization of the afterglow in X -rays for short GRBs to study GRB environments in great detail.

  4. Host Galaxy Spectra of Stripped SN from the Palomar Transient Factory: SN Progenitor Diagnostics and the SN-GRB Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modjaz, Maryam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair

    2011-02-01

    Stripped core-collapse supernovae (Stripped SN) are powerful cosmic engines that energize and enrich the ISM and that sometimes accompany GRBs, but the exact mass and metallicity range of their massive progenitors is not known, nor the detailed physics of the explosion. With the harvest of 50 stripped SN from the innovative survey Palomar Transient Factory, we propose to conduct the first uniform and statistically significant study with SN from the same homogeneous and galaxy-unbiased survey in order to determine the environmental conditions that influence the various kinds of massive stellar deaths. By obtaining spectra of the immediate host environments of our sample of stripped SN, we will (1) measure local abundances in order to differentiate between the two progenitor scenarios for stripped SN and (2) derive stellar population ages, masses and star formation histories via detailed stellar population synthesis models. Moreover, we will test if natal chemical abundance has effects on basic SN characteristics, such as peak luminosity. Any observed trends will have ramifications on SN and GRB explosion models and imply important demographic SN considerations. Our dataset will provide a crucial complimentary set to host galaxy studies of long-duration GRBs and pave the way for host studies of transients and SN found via upcoming surveys such as LSST.

  5. GRB 091127/SN 2009nz and the VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of its host galaxy: probing the faint end of the mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergani, S. D.; Flores, H.; Covino, S.; Fugazza, D.; Gorosabel, J.; Levan, A. J.; Puech, M.; Salvaterra, R.; Tello, J. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Fernández, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Ghirlanda, G.; Jelínek, M.; Lundgren, A.; Malesani, D.; Palazzi, E.; Piranomonte, S.; Rodrigues, M.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Terrón, V.; Thöne, C. C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Campana, S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Goldoni, P.; Hammer, F.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kaper, L.; Melandri, A.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Sollerman, J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2011-11-01

    We perform a detailed study of the gamma-ray burst GRB 091127/SN 2009nz host galaxy at z = 0.490 using the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph in slit and integral-field unit (IFU) mode. From the analysis of the optical and X-ray afterglow data obtained from ground-based telescopes and Swift-XRT, we confirm the presence of a bump associated with SN 2009nz and find evidence of a possible jet break in the afterglow lightcurve. The X-shooter afterglow spectra reveal several emission lines from the underlying host, from which we derive its integrated properties. These properties agree with those of previously studied GRB-SN hosts and, more generally, with those of the long GRB host population. We use the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based images of the host to determine its stellar mass (M⋆). Our results extend to lower M⋆ values the M-Z plot derived for the sample of long GRB hosts at 0.3 < z < 1.0 adding new information to probe the faint end of the M-Z relation and the shift of the LGRB host M-Z relation from that found from emission-line galaxy surveys. Thanks to the IFU spectroscopy, we can build the two-dimensional (2D) velocity, velocity dispersion, and star formation rate (SFR) maps. They show that the host galaxy has perturbed rotation kinematics with evidence of a SFR enhancement consistent with the afterglow position. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 084.A-0260 and 086.A-0874.

  6. ALMA observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23: deep limits on obscured star formation 630 million years after the big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Chary, R.-R.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Davies, J. E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Stanway, E. R.; Levan, A. J.; Levesque, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) and optical observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23 from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Spitzer Space Telescope, respectively. The host remains undetected to 3σ limits of F {sub ν}(222 GHz) ≲ 33 μJy and F {sub ν}(3.6 μm) ≲ 81 nJy. The FIR limit is about 20 times fainter than the luminosity of the local ULIRG Arp 220 and comparable to the local starburst M 82. Comparing this with model spectral energy distributions, we place a limit on the infrared (IR) luminosity of L {sub IR}(8-1000 μm) ≲ 3 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}, corresponding to a limit on the obscured star formation rate of SFR{sub IR}≲5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. For comparison, the limit on the unobscured star formation rate from Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) observations is SFR{sub UV} ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We also place a limit on the host galaxy stellar mass of M {sub *} ≲ 5 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} (for a stellar population age of 100 Myr and constant star formation rate). Finally, we compare our millimeter observations to those of field galaxies at z ≳ 4 (Lyman break galaxies, Lyα emitters, and submillimeter galaxies) and find that our limit on the FIR luminosity is the most constraining to date, although the field galaxies have much larger rest-frame UV/optical luminosities than the host of GRB 090423 by virtue of their selection techniques. We conclude that GRB host galaxies at z ≳ 4, especially those with measured interstellar medium metallicities from afterglow spectroscopy, are an attractive sample for future ALMA studies of high redshift obscured star formation.

  7. A NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST PROTOTYPE FOR z {approx} 7 LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES: SPITZER-IRS AND X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 031203

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.; French, J.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Christensen, L.; O'Halloran, B.; Michalowski, M.; Gordon, K. D.; Covino, S.

    2011-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG 031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z = 0.1055, allowing both low- and high-resolution spectroscopy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Medium-resolution UV to K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and submillimeter observations. These data allow us to construct a UV to radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3 to 35 {mu}m of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionization fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy-in particular the [S IV]/[S III] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios-suggestive of strong ongoing star formation and a very young stellar population. The absence of any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission supports these conclusions, as does the probable hot peak dust temperature, making HG 031203 similar to the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD), II Zw 40. The selection of HG 031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a useful analog of very young star-forming galaxies in the early universe, and hints that local BCDs may be used as more reliable analogs of star formation in the early universe than typical local starbursts. We look at the current debate on the ages of the dominant stellar populations in z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 galaxies in this context. The nebular line emission is so strong in HG 031203 that at z {approx} 7, it can reproduce the spectral energy distributions of z-band dropout galaxies with elevated IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m fluxes without the need to invoke a 4000 A break. Indeed, photometry of HG 031203 shows elevation of

  8. A nearby GRB host galaxy: VLT/X-shooter observations of HG 031203

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), which release enormous amounts of energy into the interstellar medium, occur in galaxies of generally low metallicity. For a better understanding of this phenomenon, detailed observations of the specific properties of the host galaxies (HG) and the environment near the LGRBs are mandatory. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic analysis of HG 031203, the host galaxy of a LRGB burst, to obtain its properties. Our results will be compared with those of previous studies and the properties of a sample of luminous compact emission-line galaxies (LCGs) selected from SDSS DR7. Methods: Based on VLT/X-shooter spectroscopic observations taken from commissioning mode in the wavelength range ~λλ3200-24 000 Å, we use standard direct methods to evaluate physical conditions and element abundances. The resolving power of the instrument also allowed us to trace the kinematics of the ionised gas. Furthermore, we use X-shooter data together with Spitzer observations in the mid-infrared range for testing hidden star formation. Results: We derive an interstellar oxygen abundance of 12 + log O/H = 8.20 ± 0.03 for HG 031203. The observed fluxes of hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value C(Hβ) = 1.67. We produce the CLOUDY photoionisation H ii region model that reproduces observed emission-line fluxes of different ions in the optical range. This model also predicts emission-line fluxes in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) ranges that agree well with the observed ones. This implies that the star-forming region observed in the optical range is the only source of ionisation and there is no additional source of ionisation seen in the NIR and MIR ranges that is hidden in the optical range. We find the composite kinematic structure from profiles of the strong emission lines by decomposing them into two Gaussian narrow and broad components. These components

  9. A Nearby Gamma-Ray Burst Host Prototype for z ~ 7 Lyman-break Galaxies: Spitzer-IRS and X-shooter Spectroscopy of the Host Galaxy of GRB 031203

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D.; French, J.; Christensen, L.; O'Halloran, B.; Michałowski, M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gordon, K. D.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Covino, S.; Reinfrank, R. F.

    2011-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG 031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z = 0.1055, allowing both low- and high-resolution spectroscopy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Medium-resolution UV to K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and submillimeter observations. These data allow us to construct a UV to radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3 to 35 μm of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionization fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy—in particular the [S IV]/[S III] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios—suggestive of strong ongoing star formation and a very young stellar population. The absence of any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission supports these conclusions, as does the probable hot peak dust temperature, making HG 031203 similar to the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD), II Zw 40. The selection of HG 031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a useful analog of very young star-forming galaxies in the early universe, and hints that local BCDs may be used as more reliable analogs of star formation in the early universe than typical local starbursts. We look at the current debate on the ages of the dominant stellar populations in z ~ 7 and z ~ 8 galaxies in this context. The nebular line emission is so strong in HG 031203 that at z ~ 7, it can reproduce the spectral energy distributions of z-band dropout galaxies with elevated IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm fluxes without the need to invoke a 4000 Å break. Indeed, photometry of HG 031203 shows elevation of the broadband V

  10. A revised host galaxy association for GRB 020819B: a high-redshift dusty starburst, not a low-redshift gas-poor spiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Michałowski, Michał J.; Thöne, Christina C.; Petry, Dirk; Graham, John F.; Greiner, Jochen; Klose, Sylvio; Schulze, Steve; Kim, Sam

    2017-02-01

    The purported spiral host galaxy of GRB 020819B at z = 0.41 has been seminal in establishing our view of the diversity of long-duration gamma-ray burst environments: Optical spectroscopy of this host provided evidence that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can form even at high metallicities, whereas millimetric observations suggested that GRBs may preferentially form in regions with minimal molecular gas. We report new observations from the Very Large Telescope (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer and X-shooter), which demonstrate that the purported host is an unrelated foreground galaxy. The probable radio afterglow is coincident with a compact, highly star forming, dusty galaxy at z = 1.9621. The revised redshift naturally explains the apparent non-detection of CO(3-2) line emission at the afterglow site from the Atacama Large Millimetre Observatory. There is no evidence that molecular gas properties in GRB host galaxies are unusual, and limited evidence that GRBs can form readily at a super-Solar metallicity.

  11. Spitzer Observations of GRB Hosts: A Legacy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel; Tanvir, Nial; Hjorth, Jens; Berger, Edo; Laskar, Tanmoy; Michalowski, Michal; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Fynbo, Johan; Levan, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The host galaxies of long-duration GRBs are drawn from uniquely broad range of luminosities and redshifts. Thus they offer the possibility of studying the evolution of star-forming galaxies without the limitations of other luminosity-selected samples, which typically are increasingly biased towards the most massive systems at higher redshift. However, reaping the full benefits of this potential requires careful attention to the selection biases affecting host identification. To this end, we propose observations of a Legacy sample of 70 GRB host galaxies (an additional 70 have already been observed by Spitzer), in order to constrain the mass and luminosity function in GRB-selected galaxies at high redshift, including its dependence on redshift and on properties of the afterglow. Crucially, and unlike previous Spitzer surveys, this sample is carefully designed to be uniform and free of optical selection biases that have caused previous surveys to systematically under-represent the role of luminous, massive hosts. We also propose to extend to larger, more powerfully constraining samples the study of two science areas where Spitzer observations have recently shown spectacular success: the hosts of dust-obscured GRBs (which promise to further our understanding of the connection between GRBs and star-formation in the most luminous galaxies), and the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation at z>2 (for which GRB host observations provide particularly powerful constraints on high-z chemical evolution).

  12. Three intervening galaxy absorbers towards GRB 060418: faint and dusty?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Vreeswijk, Paul; Ledoux, Cédric; Willis, Jon P.; Jaunsen, Andreas; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Smette, Alain; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Møller, Palle; Hjorth, Jens; Kaufer, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    We present an analysis of three strong, intervening Mg II absorption systems (zabs = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107) towards the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060418. From high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra we measure metal column densities and find that the highest redshift absorber exhibits a large amount of dust depletion compared with damped Lyman absorbers (DLAs) seen in quasi-stellar object (QSO) spectra. The intervening zabs = 1.107 absorber is also unusual in exhibiting a clear 2175-Å bump, the first time this feature has been definitively detected in a GRB spectrum. The GRB afterglow spectrum is best fitted with a two-component extinction curve: a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) extinction law at z = 1.49 (the redshift of the host) with E(B - V) = 0.07 +/- 0.01 and a Galactic extinction curve at z ~ 1.1 with E(B - V) = 0.08 +/- 0.01. We also present a moderately deep New Technology Telescope (NTT) R-band image of the GRB 060418 field and spectroscopy of four galaxies within 1 arcmin. None of these objects has a redshift that matches any of the intervening absorbers, and we conclude that the galaxies responsible for the two intervening MgII absorbers at z ~ 0.6 have luminosities .

  13. 'DARK' GRB 080325 IN A DUSTY MASSIVE GALAXY AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.; Ohta, K.; Yabe, K.; Niino, Y.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, I.; Hattori, T.; Minowa, Y.; Noumaru, J.; Kawai, N.; Aoki, W.; Furusawa, H.; Iye, M.; Komiyama, Y.; Kosugi, G.; Mizumoto, Y.; Ogasawara, R.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kobayashi, N.; Nomoto, K.

    2010-08-10

    We present optical and near-infrared observations of Swift GRB 080325 classified as a 'dark gamma-ray burst (GRB)'. Near-infrared observations with Subaru/MOIRCS provided a clear detection of afterglow in the K{sub s} band, although no optical counterpart was reported. The flux ratio of rest-wavelength optical to X-ray bands of the afterglow indicates that the dust extinction along the line of sight to the afterglow is A{sub V} = 2.7-10 mag. This large extinction is probably the major reason for the optical faintness of GRB 080325. The J - K{sub s} color of the host galaxy, (J - K{sub s} = 1.3 in AB magnitude), is significantly redder than those for typical GRB hosts previously identified. In addition to J and K{sub s} bands, optical images in B, R{sub c} , i', and z' bands with Subaru/Suprime-Cam were obtained at about 1 year after the burst, and a photometric redshift of the host is estimated to be z {sub photo} = 1.9. The host luminosity is comparable to L* at z {approx} 2 in contrast to the sub-L* property of typical GRB hosts at lower redshifts. The best-fit stellar population synthesis model for the host shows that the red nature of the host is attributed to a large dust extinction (A{sub V} = 0.8 mag), and that the host galaxy is massive (M* = 7.0 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun}), which makes it one of the most massive GRB hosts yet identified. By assuming that the mass-metallicity relation for star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2 is applicable for the GRB host, this large stellar mass suggests the high-metallicity environment around GRB 080325, consistent with inferred large extinction.

  14. Closing in on a Short-Hard Burst Progenitor: Constraints From Early-Time Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of a Possible Host Galaxy of GRB 050509b

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Prochaska, J.X.; Pooley, D.; Blake, C.W.; Foley, R.J.; Jha, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Granot, J.; Filippenko, A.V.; Sigurdsson, S.; Barth, A.J.; Chen, H.-W.; Cooper, M.C.; Falco, E.E.; Gal, R.R.; Gerke, B.F.; Gladders, M.D.; Greene, J.E.; Hennanwi, J.; Ho, L.C.; Hurley, K.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /UC, Irvine /MIT, MKI /UC, Davis /UC, Berkeley /Carnegie Inst. Observ. /UC, Berkeley, Space Sci. Dept. /Michigan U. /LBL, Berkeley /Spitzer Space Telescope

    2005-06-07

    The localization of the short-duration, hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst GRB050509b by the Swift satellite was a watershed event. Never before had a member of this mysterious subclass of classic GRBs been rapidly and precisely positioned in a sky accessible to the bevy of ground-based follow-up facilities. Thanks to the nearly immediate relay of the GRB position by Swift, we began imaging the GRB field 8 minutes after the burst and have continued during the 8 days since. Though the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) discovered an X-ray afterglow of GRB050509b, the first ever of a short-hard burst, thus far no convincing optical/infrared candidate afterglow or supernova has been found for the object. We present a re-analysis of the XRT afterglow and find an absolute position of R.A. = 12h36m13.59s, Decl. = +28{sup o}59'04.9'' (J2000), with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 3.68'' in R.A., 3.52'' in Decl.; this is about 4'' to the west of the XRT position reported previously. Close to this position is a bright elliptical galaxy with redshift z = 0.2248 {+-} 0.0002, about 1' from the center of a rich cluster of galaxies. This cluster has detectable diffuse emission, with a temperature of kT = 5.25{sub -1.68}{sup +3.36} keV. We also find several ({approx}11) much fainter galaxies consistent with the XRT position from deep Keck imaging and have obtained Gemini spectra of several of these sources. Nevertheless we argue, based on positional coincidences, that the GRB and the bright elliptical are likely to be physically related. We thus have discovered reasonable evidence that at least some short-duration, hard-spectra GRBs are at cosmological distances. We also explore the connection of the properties of the burst and the afterglow, finding that GRB050509b was underluminous in both of these relative to long-duration GRBs. However, we also demonstrate that the ratio of the blast-wave energy to the {gamma}-ray energy is consistent with that of long-duration GRBs. We thus find plausible

  15. The host of the SN-less GRB 060505 in high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Bloom, J. S.; Gorosabel, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2014-07-01

    The spiral host galaxy of the Swift GRB 060505 at z = 0.089 was the site of a puzzling long duration burst without an accompanying supernova. Studies of the burst environment by Thöne et al. suggested that this Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) came from the collapse of a massive star and that the GRB site was a region with properties different from the rest of the galaxy. We reobserved the galaxy in high spatial resolution using the VIMOS integral-field unit at the VLT with a spaxel size of 0.67 arcsec. Furthermore, we use long-slit high-resolution data from HIRES/Keck at two different slit positions covering the GRB site, the centre of the galaxy and an H II region next to the GRB region. We compare the properties of different H II regions in the galaxy with the GRB site and study the global and local kinematic properties of this galaxy. The resolved data show that the GRB site has the lowest metallicity in the galaxy with ˜1/3 Z⊙, but its specific star formation rate (SSFR) of 7.4 M⊙ yr-1/L/L* and age (determined by the Hα EW) are similar to other H II regions in the host. The galaxy shows a gradient in metallicity and SSFR from the bulge to the outskirts as it is common for spiral galaxies. This gives further support to the theory that GRBs prefer regions of higher star formation and lower metallicity, which, in S-type galaxies, are more easily found in the spiral arms than in the centre. Kinematic measurements of the galaxy do not show evidence for large perturbations but a minor merger in the past cannot be excluded. This study confirms the collapsar origin of GRB 060505 but reveals that the properties of the H II region surrounding the GRB were not unique to that galaxy. Spatially resolved observations are key to know the implications and interpretations of unresolved GRB hosts observations at higher redshifts.

  16. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. III. REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, P.; Chapman, R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Starling, R. L. C.; Letawe, G.

    2012-06-10

    We present 10 new gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts and another five redshift limits based on host galaxy spectroscopy obtained as part of a large program conducted at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The redshifts span the range 0.345 {<=} z {approx}< 2.54. Three of our measurements revise incorrect values from the literature. The homogeneous host sample researched here consists of 69 hosts that originally had a redshift completeness of 55% (with 38 out of 69 hosts having redshifts considered secure). Our project, including VLT/X-shooter observations reported elsewhere, increases this fraction to 77% (53/69), making the survey the most comprehensive in terms of redshift completeness of any sample to the full Swift depth, analyzed to date. We present the cumulative redshift distribution and derive a conservative, yet small, associated uncertainty. We constrain the fraction of Swift GRBs at high redshift to a maximum of 14% (5%) for z > 6 (z > 7). The mean redshift of the host sample is assessed to be (z) {approx}> 2.2, with the 10 new redshifts reducing it significantly. Using this more complete sample, we confirm previous findings that the GRB rate at high redshift (z {approx}> 3) appears to be in excess of predictions based on assumptions that it should follow conventional determinations of the star formation history of the universe, combined with an estimate of its likely metallicity dependence. This suggests that either star formation at high redshifts has been significantly underestimated, for example, due to a dominant contribution from faint, undetected galaxies, or that GRB production is enhanced in the conditions of early star formation, beyond that usually ascribed to lower metallicity.

  17. METALLICITY IN THE GRB 100316D/SN 2010bh HOST COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Emily M.; Berger, Edo; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chornock, Ryan

    2011-09-20

    The recent long-duration GRB 100316D, associated with supernova SN 2010bh and detected by Swift, is one of the nearest gamma-ray burst (GRB)-supernovae (SNe) ever observed (z = 0.059). This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the explosion environment on {approx}kpc scale in relation to the host galaxy complex. Here we present spatially resolved spectrophotometry of the host galaxy, focusing on both the explosion site and the brightest star-forming regions. Using these data, we extract the spatial profiles of the relevant emission features (H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III]{lambda}5007, and [N II]{lambda}6584) and use these profiles to examine variations in metallicity and star formation rate (SFR) as a function of position in the host galaxy. We conclude that GRB 100316D/SN2010bh occurred in a low-metallicity host galaxy, and that the GRB-SN explosion site corresponds to the region with the lowest metallicity and highest SFR sampled by our observations.

  18. A Spatially - Resolved Study of the GRB 020903 Host Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, Mallory; Levesque, Emily M.

    2017-01-01

    The host complex of GRB 020903 is one of only a few long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB) environments where spatially-resolved observations are possible. It may also be the only known GRB host consisting of multiple interacting components, as well as an active galactic nucleus. We were granted 4.5 hours of observing time on the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (South) to obtain spatially resolved spectra of the GRB 020903 host complex. Using long-slit observations at two different position angles we were able to obtain optical spectra of the four main regions of the GRB host, with a spectral range of 3600 - 9000 Å. From this data we discern the redshift of each region to confirm that they comprise a single interacting system at an approximate redshift of z ~ 0.251. We also measure the metallicity, star formation rate, and young stellar population age of each region to create a spatially-resolved map of these parameters for the larger host complex. Based on the distribution of these characteristics we determine whether the localized GRB explosion site is representative of the host complex as a whole, or localized in a metal-poor or strongly star-forming region. Lastly, we consider the dynamics and past interactions of the host complex, studying the strongest emission lines for signs of potential inflows or outflows through each region.

  19. Dissecting High-Redshift Galaxies with GRBs: Three Hosts at z 6 Observed with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T. W.

    2016-10-01

    The first detection of three GRB hosts at z 6 is presented, along with their comparison to Lyman-break galaxies, potential star formation histories and a brief look at their impact on the high-redshift galaxy luminosity function.

  20. Constraining the nature of the most distant gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basa, S.; Cuby, J. G.; Savaglio, S.; Boissier, S.; Clément, B.; Flores, H.; Le Borgne, D.; Mazure, A.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow us to explore the distant Universe, and are potentially the most effective tracer of the most distant objects. Our current knowledge of the properties of GRB host galaxies at redshifts ≳ 5 is very scarce. We propose to improve this situation by obtaining more observations of high-redshift hosts to better understand their properties and help enable us to use GRBs as probes of the high-redshift universe. Methods: We performed very deep photometric observations of three high-redshift GRB host galaxies, GRB 080913 at z = 6.7, GRB 060927 at z = 5.5 and GRB 060522 at z = 5.1. Our FORS2 and HAWK-I observations at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) targeted the rest-frame ultraviolet continuum of these galaxies, allowing us to constrain their star formation rates (SFRs). In addition, we completed deep spectroscopic observations of the GRB 080913 host galaxy with X-Shooter at the VLT to search for Ly-α emission. For the sake of the discussion, we use published results on another high-redshift GRB host, GRB 050904 at z = 6.3. The sample of GRB host galaxies studied in this paper consists of four out of the five spectroscopically confirmed GRBs at z > 5. Results: Despite our presented observations being the deepest ever reported of high-redshift GRB host galaxies, we do not detect any of the hosts, neither in photometry nor in spectroscopy in the case of GRB 080913. These observations indicate that the GRB host galaxies seem to evolve with time and to have lower SFRs at z > 5 than they have at z ≲ 1. In addition, the host galaxy of GRB 080913 at z = 6.7 does not show Ly-α emission. Conclusions: While the measured properties of the galaxies in our sample agree with the properties of the general galaxy population at z > 5, our observations are not sufficiently sensitive to allow us to infer further conclusions on whether this specific population is representative of the general one. The characterization of high-redshift GRB

  1. Study of GRBs Hosts Galaxies Vicinity Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Vasquez, N.; Hoyle, F.

    2017-07-01

    The study of GRBs host galaxies and its vicinity could provide constrains on the progenitor and an opportunity to use these violent explosions to characterize the nature of the highredshift universe. Studies of GRB host galaxies reveal a population of starforming galaxies with great diversity, spanning a wide range of masses, star formation rate, and redshifts. In order to study the galactic ambient of GRBs we used the S. Savaglio catalog from 2015 where 245 GRBs are listed with RA-Dec position and z. We choose 22 GRBs Hosts galaxies from Savaglio catalog and SDSS DR12, with z range 0galaxies, in a local vicinity of 10 h-1 Mpc radius to determine some photometric and population characteristics. We calculate the volumetric density populatation of glalaxies around the GRB Hosts within a volume of an sphere whit radius of 10 h-1 Mpc and find a low density compared with a typical group of galaxies. In order to know the galaxies stellar formation state, in regions where GRBs are formed, we made an analysis of color index using SDSS data of μ [λ 3543], r[λ 6231] and calculate the indexes μ-r. We find a value μ-r=2.63, it means that the galactic ambient of GRBs Host regions are statistically redder than void and wall regions on a indirect way (Voids:μ-r=2.043; Walls:μ-r=2.162). Futhermore, we used a inverse concentration index analysis, ICI=R50/R90 and find that galaxies in GRBs Hosts vicinity are also of slightly early type than void and wall galaxies. With this work we provide characteristics on the regions for future works related with highredsift universe that using the GRBs.

  2. A quiescent galaxy at the position of the long GRB 050219A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Savaglio, S.; Palazzi, E.; Michałowski, M. J.; Klose, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Amati, L.; Elliott, J.; Greiner, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Japelj, J.; Kann, D. A.; Lo Faro, B.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Schulze, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Arnold, L. A.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Ferrero, P.; Filgas, R.; Goldoni, P.; Küpcü Yoldaş, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Pian, E.; Schady, P.; Stratta, G.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are produced by the collapse of very massive stars. Because of the short life time of their progenitors, LGRBs pinpoint star-forming galaxies. Recent studies demonstrate that LGRBs populate all types of star-forming galaxies from sub-luminous, blue compact dwarfs to luminous infrared galaxies. Aims: We present here a multi-band search for the host galaxy of the long dark GRB 050219A within the enhanced Swift/XRT error circle. We aim to characterise the properties of its host galaxy and compare them with those of other LGRB host galaxies. Methods: We used spectroscopic observations acquired with VLT/X-Shooter to determine the redshift and star-formation rate of the most probable host galaxy identified on the basis of a chance probability criterion. We compared the results with the optical and infrared spectral energy distribution obtained with Swift/UVOT, the seven-channel imager GROND at the 2.2-m telescope on La Silla and the Herschel Space Observatory, supplemented by archival observations obtained with FORS2 at the ESO/VLT, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the GALEX survey. Results: The most probable host galaxy of the genuine long-duration GRB 050219A is a 3 Gyr-old early-type galaxy at z = 0.211. It is characterised by a ratio of star-formation rate to stellar mass (specific star-formation rate) of ~ 6 × 10-12 yr-1 that is unprecedentedly low when compared to all known LGRB host galaxies. Its properties resemble those of post-starburst galaxies. Conclusions: GRB 050219A might be the first known long burst to explode in a quiescent early-type galaxy. This would be further evidence that GRBs can explode in all kinds of galaxies, with the only requirement being an episode of high-mass star formation. Based on observations collected with GROND at the 2.2 m telescope of the La Silla Observatory, Chile (PI: Greiner), at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (089.A-0843, PI

  3. GRB 051008: a long, spectrally hard dust-obscured GRB in a Lyman-break galaxy at z ≈ 2.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volnova, A. A.; Pozanenko, A. S.; Gorosabel, J.; Perley, D. A.; Frederiks, D. D.; Kann, D. A.; Rumyantsev, V. V.; Biryukov, V. V.; Burkhonov, O.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Ferrero, P.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Klose, S.; Loznikov, V. M.; Minaev, P. Yu.; Stecklum, B.; Svinkin, D. S.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Ulanov, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    We present observations of the dark gamma-ray burst GRB 051008 provided by Swift/BAT, Swift/XRT, Konus-WIND, INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS in the high-energy domain and the Shajn, Swift/UVOT, Tautenburg, NOT, Gemini and Keck I telescopes in the optical and near-infrared bands. The burst was detected only in gamma- and X-rays and neither a prompt optical nor a radio afterglow was detected down to deep limits. We identified the host galaxy of the burst, which is a typical Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) with R-magnitude of 24.06 ± 0.10 mag. A redshift of the galaxy of z = 2.77_{-0.20}^{+0.15} is measured photometrically due to the presence of a clear, strong Lyman-break feature. The host galaxy is a small starburst galaxy with moderate intrinsic extinction (AV = 0.3) and has a star formation rate of ˜60 M⊙ yr-1 typical for LBGs. It is one of the few cases where a GRB host has been found to be a classical LBG. Using the redshift we estimate the isotropic-equivalent radiated energy of the burst to be Eiso = (1.15 ± 0.20) × 1054 erg. We also provide evidence in favour of the hypothesis that the darkness of GRB 051008 is due to local absorption resulting from a dense circumburst medium.

  4. Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies in Emission and Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.; Niino, Yuu; Tanvir, Nial R.; Vergani, Susanna D.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.

    2016-12-01

    The galaxy population hosting long-duration GRBs provides a means to constrain the progenitor and an opportunity to use these violent explosions to characterize the nature of the high-redshift universe. Studies of GRB host galaxies in emission reveal a population of star-forming galaxies with great diversity, spanning a wide range of masses, metallicities, and redshifts. However, as a population GRB hosts are significantly less massive and poorer in metals than the hosts of other core-collapse transients, suggesting that GRB production is only efficient at metallicities significantly below Solar. GRBs may also prefer compact galaxies, and dense and/or central regions of galaxies, more than other types of core-collapse explosion. Meanwhile, studies of hosts in absorption against the luminous GRB optical afterglow provide a unique means of unveiling properties of the ISM in even the faintest and most distant galaxies; these observations are helping to constrain the chemical evolution of galaxies and the properties of interstellar dust out to very high redshifts. New ground- and space-based instrumentation, and the accumulation of larger and more carefully-selected samples, are continually enhancing our view of the GRB host population.

  5. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. V. VLT/X-SHOOTER EMISSION-LINE REDSHIFTS FOR SWIFT GRBs AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kruehler, Thomas; Malesani, Daniele; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Sparre, Martin; Watson, Darach J.; Jakobsson, Pall; Levan, Andrew J.; Tanvir, Nial R.

    2012-10-10

    We present simultaneous optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 19 Swift {gamma}-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies observed with the VLT/X-shooter with the aim of measuring their redshifts. Galaxies were selected from The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) survey (15 of the 19 galaxies) or because they hosted GRBs without a bright optical afterglow. Here we provide emission-line redshifts for 13 of the observed galaxies with brightnesses between F606W > 27 mag and R = 22.9 mag (median R-tilde =24.6 mag). The median redshift is z-tilde =2.1 for all hosts and z-tilde =2.3 for the TOUGH hosts. Our new data significantly improve the redshift completeness of the TOUGH survey, which now stands at 77% (53 out of 69 GRBs). They furthermore provide accurate redshifts for nine prototype dark GRBs (e.g., GRB 071021 at z = 2.452 and GRB 080207 at z = 2.086), which are exemplary of GRBs where redshifts are challenging to obtain via afterglow spectroscopy. This establishes X-shooter spectroscopy as an efficient tool for redshift determination of faint, star-forming, high-redshift galaxies such as GRB hosts. It is hence a further step toward removing the bias in GRB samples that is caused by optically dark events, and provides the basis for a better understanding of the conditions in which GRBs form. The distribution of column densities as measured from X-ray data (N{sub H,X}), for example, is closely related to the darkness of the afterglow and skewed toward low N{sub H,X} values in samples that are dominated by bursts with bright optical afterglows.

  6. Limits on radioactive powered emission associated with a short-hard GRB 070724A in a star-forming galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Daniel; Thöne, Christina C.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Bloom, Joshua S.; Granot, Jonathan; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Perley, Daniel A.; Modjaz, Maryam; Lee, William H.; Cobb, Bethany E.; Levan, Andrew J.; Tanvir, Nial; Covino, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    We present results of an extensive observing campaign of the short-duration, hard spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) 070724A, aimed at detecting the radioactively powered emission that might follow from a binary merger or collapse involving compact objects. Our multiband observations span the range in time over which this so-called Li-Paczyński mini-supernova (mini-SN) could be active, beginning within 3 h of the GRB trigger and represent some of the deepest and most comprehensive searches for such emission. We find no evidence for such activity and place limits on the abundances and the lifetimes of the possible radioactive nuclides that could form in the rapid decompression of nuclear density matter. Furthermore, our limits are significantly fainter than the peak magnitude of any previously detected broad-lined Type Ic SN associated with other GRBs, effectively ruling out a long GRB-like SN for this event. Given the unambiguous redshift of the host galaxy (z = 0.456), GRB 070724A represents one of a small, but growing, number of short-hard GRBs for which firm physical/rest-frame quantities currently exist. The host of GRB 070724A is a moderately star-forming galaxy with an older stellar population component and a relatively high metallicity of 12 + log(O/H)KD02 = 9.1. We find no significant evidence for large amounts of extinction along the line of sight that could mask the presence of an SN explosion and estimate a small probability for chance alignment with the putative host. We discuss how our derived constraints fit into the evolving picture of short-hard GRBs, their potential progenitors and the host environments in which they are thought to be produced.

  7. Molecular Gas in the Host Galaxies of Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, B.; Ohta, K.; Kohno, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Tamura, Y.; Endo, A.; Hashimoto, T.

    2016-10-01

    We conducted CO observations in 10 GRB hosts with ALMA and detected in 6 hosts (z = 1-2). We found the hosts have a star-formation efficiency similar to normal star-forming galaxies at z 1-2, suggesting that GRBs occur in normal environments at z 1-2.

  8. Detection of Three Gamma-ray Burst Host Galaxies at z ˜ 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T. W.; Tanvir, N. R.; Levan, A. J.; Trenti, M.; Stanway, E. R.; Shull, J. M.; Wiersema, K.; Perley, D. A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Bremer, M.; Stocke, J. T.; Hjorth, J.; Rhoads, J. E.; Curtis-Lake, E.; Schulze, S.; Levesque, E. M.; Robertson, B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Ellis, R. S.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow us to pinpoint and study star-forming galaxies in the early universe, thanks to their orders of magnitude brighter peak luminosities compared to other astrophysical sources, and their association with the deaths of massive stars. We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 detections of three Swift GRB host galaxies lying at redshifts z = 5.913 (GRB 130606A), z = 6.295 (GRB 050904), and z = 6.327 (GRB 140515A) in the F140W (wide-JH band, {λ }{{obs}}˜ 1.4 μ {{m}}) filter. The hosts have magnitudes (corrected for Galactic extinction) of {m}{λ {obs},{AB}}={26.34}-0.16+0.14,{27.56}-0.22+0.18, and {28.30}-0.33+0.25, respectively. In all three cases, the probability of chance coincidence of lower redshift galaxies is ≲ 2 % , indicating that the detected galaxies are most likely the GRB hosts. These are the first detections of high-redshift (z\\gt 5) GRB host galaxies in emission. The galaxies have luminosities in the range 0.1-0.6 {L}z=6* (with {M}1600* =-20.95+/- 0.12) and half-light radii in the range 0.6-0.9 {{kpc}}. Both their half-light radii and luminosities are consistent with existing samples of Lyman-break galaxies at z˜ 6. Spectroscopic analysis of the GRB afterglows indicate low metallicities ([{{M/H}}]≲ -1) and low dust extinction ({A}{{V}}≲ 0.1) along the line of sight. Using stellar population synthesis models, we explore the implications of each galaxy’s luminosity for its possible star-formation history and consider the potential for emission line metallicity determination with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.

  9. LONG GRBs ARE METALLICITY-BIASED TRACERS OF STAR FORMATION: EVIDENCE FROM HOST GALAXIES AND REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G. E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and the redshift distribution of long GRBs by considering that long GRBs occur in low-metallicity environments. We calculate the upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy which can produce long GRBs by utilizing the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relation of galaxies. After comparing with the observed GRB host galaxies masses, we find that the observed GRB host galaxy masses can fit the predicted masses well if GRBs occur in low-metallicity 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7. GRB host galaxies have low metallicity, low mass, and high star formation rate compared with galaxies of seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also study the cumulative redshift distribution of the latest Swift long GRBs by adding dark GRBs and 10 new GRBs redshifts from the TOUGH survey. The observed discrepancy between the GRB rate and the star formation history can be reconciled by considering that GRBs tend to occur in low-metallicity galaxies with 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7. We conclude that the metallicity cutoff that can produce long GRBs is about 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7 from the host mass distribution and redshift distribution.

  10. Clustering of galaxies around the GRB 021004 sight-line at z ~ 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Ilya V.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Baryshev, Yu. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this report we test for reliability any signatures of field galaxies clustering in the GRB 021004 line of sight. The first signature is the BTA and Hubble GRB 021004 field photometric redshift distribution with a peak at z ~ 0.5 estimated from multicolor photometry. The second signature is the MgII 2796,2803 absorption doublet at z ~ 0.5 in the GRB 021004 afterglow spectrum. The third signature is some inhomogeneity in Plank + GRB 021004 fields. And the fourth signature may be the galaxy clustering with an effective redshift of z = 0.5 from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is a part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III).

  11. The dark GRB 080207 in an extremely red host and the implications for gamma-ray bursts in highly obscured environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, K. M.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Perley, D. A.; Michalowski, M. J.; Page, K. L.; Bloom, J. S.; Cenko, S. B.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Watson, D.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2012-03-01

    We present comprehensive X-ray, optical, near- and mid-infrared and submm observations of GRB 080207 and its host galaxy. The afterglow was undetected in the optical and near-infrared (nIR) implying an X-ray-to-optical spectral slope less than 0.3, identifying GRB 080207 as a dark burst. Swift X-ray observations show extreme absorption in the host, which is confirmed by the unusually large optical extinction found by modelling the X-ray to nIR afterglow spectral energy distribution. Our Chandra observations obtained 8 d post-burst allow us to place the afterglow on the sky to subarcsec accuracy, enabling us to pinpoint an extremely red galaxy (ERO), with R-K > 5.4 (g-K˜ 7.5, VEGAmag) at the afterglow location. Follow-up host observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, Gemini, Keck and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope provide a photometric redshift solution of ? (1σ, 1.56 < z < 2.08 at 2σ) for the ERO host, and suggest that it is a massive and morphologically disturbed ultraluminous infrared galaxy system, with LFIR˜ 2.4 × 1012 L⊙. These results add to the growing evidence that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) originating in very red hosts always show some evidence of dust extinction in their afterglows (though the converse is not true - some extinguished afterglows are found in blue hosts). This indicates that a poorly constrained fraction of GRBs occurs in very dusty environments. By comparing the inferred stellar masses, and estimates of the gas phase metallicity in both GRB hosts and submm galaxies we suggest that many GRB hosts, even at z > 2, are at lower metallicity than the submm galaxy population, offering a likely explanation for the dearth of submm-detected GRB hosts. However, we also show that the dark GRB hosts are systematically more massive than those hosting optically bright events, perhaps implying that previous host samples are severely biased by the exclusion of dark events.

  12. The Spitzer/Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel; Berger, Edo; Butler, Nathaniel; Cenko, S. Bradley; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Cucchiara, Antonino; Ellis, Richard; Fong, Wen-fai; Fruchter, Andrew; Fynbo, Johan; Gehrels, Neil; Graham, John; Greiner, Jochen; Hjorth, Jens; Hunt, Leslie; Jakobsson, Pall; Kruehler, Thomas; Laskar, Tanmoy; Le Floc'h, Emerich; Levan, Andrew; Levesque, Emily; Littlejohns, Owen; Malesani, Daniele; Michalowski, Michal; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Salvaterra, Ruben; Schulze, Steve; Schady, Patricia; Tanvir, Nial; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Vergani, Susanna; Watson, Darach

    2016-08-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts act as beacons to the sites of star-formation in the distant universe. GRBs reveal galaxies too faint and star-forming regions too dusty to characterize in detail using any other method, and provide a powerful independent constraint on the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density at high-redshift. However, a full understanding of the GRB phenomenon and its relation to cosmic star-formation requires connecting the observations obtained from GRBs to the properties of the galaxies hosting them. The large majority of GRBs originate at moderate to high redshift (z>1) and Spitzer has proven crucial for understanding the host population, given its unique ability to observe the rest-frame NIR and its unrivaled sensitivity and efficiency. We propose to complete a comprehensive public legacy survey of the Swift GRB host population to build on our earlier successes and push beyond the statistical limits of previous, smaller efforts. Our survey will enable a diverse range of GRB and galaxy science including: (1) to quantitatively and robustly map the connection between GRBs and cosmic star-formation to constrain the GRB progenitor and calibrate GRB rate-based measurements of the high-z cosmic star-formation rate; (2) to constrain the luminosity function of star-forming galaxies at the faint end and at high redshift; (3) to understand how the ISM properties seen in absorption in high-redshift galaxies unveiled by GRBs - metallicity, dust column, dust properties - connect to global properties of the host galaxies such as mass and age. Building on a decade of experience at both observatories, our observations will create an enduring joint Swift-Spitzer legacy sample - providing the definitive resource with which to examine all aspects of the GRB/galaxy connection for years to come and setting the stage for intensive JWST follow-up of the most interesting sources from our sample.

  13. PROBING THE LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST PROGENITOR BY Lyalpha EMISSION OF HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Yuu; Totani, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.

    2009-12-20

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested to occur preferentially in low-metallicity environment. We discuss the possibility and theoretical aspects of using Lyalpha emission properties of long GRB host galaxies as a metallicity indicator of high-redshift GRB environments, where direct metallicity measurements are not easy. We propose to use the fraction of Lyalpha emitters (LAEs) in long GRB host galaxies as a function of UV luminosity, which can be compared with star formation rate weighted LAE fraction of Lyman break galaxies as the standard in the case of no metallicity dependence. There are two important effects of metallicity dependence of long GRB rate to change the LAE fraction of host galaxies. One is the enhancement of intrinsic Lyalpha equivalent width (EW) by stronger ionizing UV luminosity of low-metallicity stellar population, and the other is extinction by interstellar dust to change the observable EW. Based on a latest theoretical model of LAEs that reproduce observations, we argue that the latter is likely to work in the opposite direction to the former, i.e., to decrease LAE fraction if GRBs preferentially occur in low-metallicity environments, because of the clumpy interstellar medium effect. The high LAE fraction of GRB host galaxies indicated by observations is quantitatively explained by the LAE model if GRBs occur when Z approx< 0.1 Z{sub sun}, although this result is still indicative because of the limited statistics and theoretical uncertainties. This result demonstrates that the LAE statistics of GRB hosts may give us useful information in the future.

  14. The supernova associated with GRB 020405

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, S.; Dar, A.; De Rújula, A.

    2002-10-01

    We use the very simple and successful Cannonball (CB) model of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows (AGs) to analyze the observations of the mildly extinct optical AG of the relatively nearby GRB 020405. We show that GRB 020405 was associated with a 1998bw-like supernova (SN) at the GRB's redshift that appeared dimmer and redder than SN1998bw because of extinction in the host and our Galaxy. The case for the SN/GRB association - advocated in the CB model - is becoming indubitable. We discuss the extent to which the GRB/SN connection is model-dependent.

  15. Constraining Stellar Properties of Intervening Damped Lyα and Mg II Absorbing Galaxies toward GRB 050730

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Y.; Okoshi, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Takami, H.

    2012-09-01

    We performed multiband deep imaging of the field around GRB 050730 to identify the host galaxies of intervening absorbers, which consist of a damped Lyα absorption (DLA) system at z abs = 3.564, a sub-DLA system at z abs = 3.022, and strong Mg II absorption systems at z abs = 1.773 and 2.253. Our observations were performed after the gamma-ray burst afterglow had disappeared. Thus, our imaging survey has a higher sensitivity to the host galaxies of the intervening absorbers than the normal imaging surveys in the direction of QSOs, for which the QSO glare tends to hide the foreground galaxies. In this deep imaging survey, we could not detect any unambiguous candidates for the host galaxies of the intervening absorbers. Using the 3σ upper limit of the flux in the optical to mid-infrared observing bands, which corresponds to the UV to optical bands in the rest frame of the intervening absorbers, we constrained the star formation rates and stellar masses of the hosts. We estimated the star formation rates for the intervening absorbers to be <~ 2.5 M ⊙ yr-1 for z > 3 DLAs and <~ 1.0 M ⊙ yr-1 for z ~ 2 Mg II systems. Their stellar masses are estimated to be several times 109 M ⊙ or smaller for all intervening galaxies. These properties are comparable to dwarf galaxies, rather than the massive star-forming galaxies commonly seen in the z > 2 galaxy surveys based on emission-line selection or color selection.

  16. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.; Karska, A.; Messias, H.; van der Werf, P.; Hunt, L. K.; Baes, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rizzo, J. R.; Rossi, A.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Schady, P.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims: Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas in the closest galaxy hosting a GRB (980425). Methods: We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [O i] 63 μm spectroscopy, and an APEX/SHeFI CO(2-1) line detection and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. Results: The GRB 980425 host has elevated [C ii]/FIR and [O i]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rates (SFR) derived from line ([C ii], [O i], Hα) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [C ii] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy centre, whereas [O i] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [O i] flux indicates that there is high radiation field and high gas density at these positions, as derived from modelling of photo-dissociation regions. The [C ii]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Indeed, its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [C ii]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. Conclusions: The [O i] and H i concentrations and the high radiation field and density close to the GRB position are consistent with the hypothesis of a very recent (at most a few tens of Myr ago) inflow of atomic gas triggering star formation. In this scenario dust has not had time to build up (explaining high line-to-continuum ratios). Such a recent enhancement of star formation activity would indeed manifest itself in high SFRline/SFRcontinuum ratios because the line indicators are sensitive only to recent (≲10 Myr) activity, whereas the continuum indicators measure

  17. The metallicity and dust content of a redshift 5 gamma-ray burst host galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sparre, M.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Watson, D. J.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Hartoog, O. E.; Kaper, L.; Wiersema, K.; D'Elia, V.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Covino, S.; Flores, H.; Goldoni, P.; Jakobsson, P.; Klose, S.; Levan, A. J.; and others

    2014-04-20

    Observations of the afterglows of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the study of star-forming galaxies across most of cosmic history. Here we present observations of GRB 111008A, from which we can measure metallicity, chemical abundance patterns, dust-to-metals ratio (DTM), and extinction of the GRB host galaxy at z = 5.0. The host absorption system is a damped Lyα absorber with a very large neutral hydrogen column density of log N(H I)/cm{sup −2}=22.30±0.06 and a metallicity of [S/H] = –1.70 ± 0.10. It is the highest-redshift GRB with such a precise metallicity measurement. The presence of fine-structure lines confirms the z = 5.0 system as the GRB host galaxy and makes this the highest redshift where Fe II fine-structure lines have been detected. The afterglow is mildly reddened with A{sub V} = 0.11 ± 0.04 mag, and the host galaxy has a DTM that is consistent with being equal to or lower than typical values in the Local Group.

  18. Far-infrared observations of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Bourne, N.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; De Zotti, G.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S. J.; Scott, D.; Smith, D. J. B.; Smith, M. W. L.; Symeonidis, M.; Valiante, E.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomena in the Universe; believed to result from the collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars. Even though it has profound consequences for our understanding of their nature and selection biases, little is known about the dust properties of the galaxies hosting GRBs. We present analysis of the far-infrared properties of an unbiased sample of 20 BeppoSAX and Swift GRB host galaxies (at an average redshift of z = 3.1) located in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, the Herschel Fornax Cluster Survey, the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, totalling 880 deg2, or ˜3 per cent of the sky in total. Our sample selection is serendipitous, based only on whether the X-ray position of a GRB lies within a large-scale Herschel survey - therefore our sample can be considered completely unbiased. Using deep data at wavelengths of 100-500 μm, we tentatively detected 1 out of 20 GRB hosts located in these fields. We constrain their dust masses and star formation rates (SFRs), and discuss these in the context of recent measurements of submillimetre galaxies and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The average far-infrared flux of our sample gives an upper limit on SFR of <114 M⊙ yr-1. The detection rate of GRB hosts is consistent with that predicted assuming that GRBs trace the cosmic SFR density in an unbiased way, i.e. that the fraction of GRB hosts with SFR > 500 M⊙ yr-1 is consistent with the contribution of such luminous galaxies to the cosmic star formation density.

  19. The latest two GRB detected by Hete-2: GRB 051022 and GRB 051028

    SciTech Connect

    Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jelinek, M.; Pandey, S. B.; Ugarte Postigo, A. de; Gorosabel, J.; McBreen, S.; Bremer, M.; Guziy, S.; Bihain, G.; Caballero, J. A.; Ferrero, P.; Jong, J de; Misra, K.; Sahu, D. K.

    2006-05-19

    We present multiwavelength observations of the latest two GRB detected by Hete-2 in 2005. For GRB 051022, no optical/nIR afterglow has been detected, in spite of the strong gamma-ray emission and the reported X-ray afterglow discovered by Swift. A mm afterglow was discovered at PdB confirming the association of this event with a luminous (MV = - 21.5) galaxy within the X-ray error box. Spectroscopy of this galaxy shows strong a strong [O II] emission line at z = 0.807, besides weaker [O III] emission. The X-ray spectrum showed evidence of considerable absorption by neutral gas with NH,X-ray = 4.5 x 1022 cm2 (at rest frame). ISM absorption by dust in the host galaxy at z = 0.807 cannot certainly account for the non-detection of the optical afterglow, unless the dust-to-gas ratio is quite different than that seen in our Galaxy. It is possible then that GRB 051022 was produced in an obscured, stellar forming region in its parent host galaxy.For GRB 051028, the data can be interpreted by collimated emission (a jet model with p = 2.4) moving in an homogeneous ISM and with a cooling frequency vc still above the X-rays at 0.5 days after the burst onset. GRB 051028 can be classified as a 'gray' or 'potentially dark' GRB. The Swift/XRT data are consistent with the interpretation that the reason for the optical dimness is not extra absorption in the host galaxy, but rather the GRB taking place at high-redshift.

  20. Gamma-ray Bursts: Radio Afterglow and Host Galaxy Study with The FAST Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. B.; Huang, Y. F.; Kong, S. W.; Zhang, Z. B.; Li, D.; Luo, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    For four types of GRBs, namely high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, we calculated their radio afterglow light curves. Meanwhile, considering contributions from host galaxies in radio bands, we statistically investigated the effect of hosts on radio afterglows. It is found that a tight anti-correlation exists between the ratio of radio flux (RRF) of host galaxy to the total radio afterglow peak flux and the observed frequency. Using this method, the host flux densities of those bursts without host measurements can be estimated at low or medium frequencies. We predicted that almost all types of radio afterglows, except that of low-luminosity GRBs, can be observed by FAST up to z = 15 or even more. FAST is expected to significantly expand the samples of GRB radio afterglows and host galaxies.

  1. Radio-Excess IRAS Galaxies. II. Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Catherine L.; McGregor, Peter J.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2004-09-01

    This is the second of a series of papers studying a sample of radio-excess IRAS galaxies. These galaxies have radio emission in excess of that expected due to star formation, but largely fall between the traditional categories of radio-loud and radio-quiet active galaxies. R-band images of the hosts of far-infrared (FIR)-luminous radio-excess galaxies are presented and analyzed. The hosts of the FIR-luminous radio-excess galaxies are luminous galaxies, on average 0.8 mag brighter than M*R. Their optical luminosities and morphologies are similar to comparison samples of radio-loud compact steep-spectrum and gigahertz peaked-spectrum sources and extended radio galaxies. We find a similar fraction of galaxies in our sample (~70%) with companions or distorted morphologies as in radio-loud comparison samples. This is consistent with radio activity being associated with tidal interaction. The majority (65%) of the FIR-luminous radio-excess galaxies have radio source sizes that are smaller than the optical host by more than an order of magnitude. These compact radio sources may be young precursors to classical radio galaxies or a different population of radio sources, possibly confined by the host interstellar medium. The host galaxy types were determined by analysis of the surface brightness distributions. The elliptical hosts have effective surface brightnesses and radii consistent with known ellipticals but inconsistent with a population of brightest cluster galaxies. Thus, it is unlikely these objects are the precursors of FR I radio galaxies. The disk hosts have smaller sizes and low radio excesses. However, they have a range of radio source sizes, which is not expected if they are radio-``loud'' Seyfert galaxies.

  2. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perley, D. A.; Kruhler, T.; Schulze, S.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Hjorth, J.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chary, R.; Cucchiara, A.; Ellis, R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a multi-observatory high redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly deep, multicolor optical/near-IR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without preexisting redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust obscured, and at most 2% originate from z > 5.5. Using this sample, we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z approx. 2.5 and fall by at least an order of magnitude toward low (z = 0) redshift, while declining more gradually toward high (z approx. 7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.

  3. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos E.; Costa, Luiz N. da; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-11-08

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  4. Host galaxy identification for supernova surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos E.; Costa, Luiz N. da; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-11-10

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, and so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. Here, we find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  5. Host galaxy identification for supernova surveys

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; ...

    2016-11-10

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, and so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within theirmore » host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. Here, we find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.« less

  6. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Cunha, Carlos E.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-12-01

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, and so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate “hostless” SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  7. AGN Host Galaxy Properties And Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, Angela

    2016-10-01

    Supermassive black hole growth, nuclear activity, and galaxy evolution have been found to be closely related. In the context of AGN-galaxy coevolution, I will discuss about the relation found between the host galaxy properties and the central BH and I will present the latest determination of the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF), and the specific accretion rate distribution function (SARDF), derived from the XMM-COSMOS sample up to z˜2.5, with particular focus on AGN feedback as possible responsible mechanism for galaxy quenching.

  8. Gamma-ray burst afterglows as probes of their host galaxies and the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) represent the sole class of catastrophic phenomena seen over almost the entire history of the Universe. Their extreme luminosities in high energy gamma-ray radiation make them readily detectable, even with relatively small satellite-based detectors, out to the earliest cosmic epochs. Moreover, the brilliance of their fading afterglow light, routinely observed in X-ray, optical, near-infrared, and radio wavelengths, allows them to be exploited -- for hours, days, or weeks -- as cosmic lighthouses, probing the conditions of gas and dust along the line of sight, through their host galaxies and the cosmos at large. Since the November 2004 launch of Swift, this GRB-focused NASA mission has discovered more than 500 GRBs, in almost all cases reporting the burst coordinates to ground-based observers within seconds of the event. The availability of prompt burst positions from Swift, combined with promptly-reported flux measurements from instruments on Swift and an array of ground-based robotic telescopes, have enabled targeted spectroscopic campaigns that have gathered detailed observations of the young, bright afterglows of hundreds of these events. This thesis reports the results of my own efforts over the past 5 years, analyzing imaging and spectroscopic observations of Swift-detected GRBs as triggered according to my own requests, or as gathered from public data archives. In Chapter 2, I discuss our follow-up campaign for GRB090429B, one of our best "extreme redshift" (z > 8) candidates. This burst followed closely on the spectroscopicallyconfirmed z = 8.2 GRB090423, and our multiwavelength observations and SED modeling demonstrate the value and limitation of such studies, in cases where a spectroscopic redshift cannot be gathered in a timely fashion. I also address the importance of such extreme-redshift events from a cosmological perspective. In Chapter 3, I use high-resolution GRB afterglow spectra to study the properties of intervening

  9. A DETECTION OF MOLECULAR GAS EMISSION IN THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 080517

    SciTech Connect

    Stanway, E. R.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Van der Laan, T. P. R.

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the host galaxy of the low-redshift, low-luminosity Swift GRB 080517 at 105.8 GHz using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer. We detect an emission line with integrated flux SΔν = 0.39 ± 0.05 Jy km s{sup –1}—consistent both spatially and in velocity with identification as the J = 1-0 rotational transition of carbon monoxide (CO) at the host galaxy redshift. This represents only the third long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy with molecular gas detected in emission. The inferred molecular gas mass, M{sub H{sub 2}}∼6.3×10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}, implies a gas consumption timescale of ∼40 Myr if star formation continues at its current rate. Similar short timescales appear characteristic of the long GRB population with CO observations to date, suggesting that the GRB in these sources occurs toward the end of their star formation episode.

  10. Population Synthesis Modeling of QSO Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak; Sheinis, A.

    2007-12-01

    A strong connection between AGN activity and galaxy formation/evolution has emerged over the past few years. To obtain further insight into this important evolutionary phase we wish to analyze the properties of the host galaxies of AGN, using the tools of population synthesis. To this end, we investigate the utilization of simulated annealing and down-hill simplex method of optimization in the modeling of QSO host galaxy spectra. In this technique, subtraction of residual scattered quasar light in the observed spectra is performed while simultaneously modeling the constituent stellar populations of the host galaxy. The reliability of this method is tested by generating spectra with known parameters, adding noise, and measuring the correspondence between the known input and the output of the program. Preliminary results of the application of this program to data from off-nuclear host galaxy spectra via long-slit and integral field unit observations on the Keck and WIYN telescopes will be presented.

  11. GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST GALAXY SURVEYS AT REDSHIFT z {approx}> 4: PROBES OF STAR FORMATION RATE AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, Michele; Perna, Rosalba; Levesque, Emily M.; Shull, J. Michael; Stocke, John T.

    2012-04-20

    Measuring the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift is crucial for understanding cosmic reionization and galaxy formation. Two common complementary approaches are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) surveys for large samples and gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations for sensitivity to SFR in small galaxies. The z {approx}> 4 GRB-inferred SFR is higher than the LBG rate, but this difference is difficult to understand, as both methods rely on several modeling assumptions. Using a physically motivated galaxy luminosity function model, with star formation in dark matter halos with virial temperature T{sub vir} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K (M{sub DM} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), we show that GRB- and LBG-derived SFRs are consistent if GRBs extend to faint galaxies (M{sub AB} {approx}< -11). To test star formation below the detection limit L{sub lim} {approx} 0.05L*{sub z=3} of LBG surveys, we propose to measure the fraction f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) of GRB hosts with L > L{sub lim}. This fraction quantifies the missing star formation fraction in LBG surveys, constraining the mass-suppression scale for galaxy formation, with weak dependence on modeling assumptions. Because f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) corresponds to the ratio of SFRs derived from LBG and GRB surveys, if these estimators are unbiased, measuring f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) also constrains the redshift evolution of the GRB production rate per unit mass of star formation. Our analysis predicts significant success for GRB host detections at z {approx} 5 with f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) {approx} 0.4, but rarer detections at z > 6. By analyzing the upper limits on host galaxy luminosities of six z > 5 GRBs from literature data, we infer that galaxies with M{sub AB} > -15 were present at z > 5 at 95% confidence, demonstrating the key role played by very faint galaxies during reionization.

  12. Tomography of a Gamma-ray Burst Progenitor and its Host Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Moller, Palle; Garcia-Segura, Guillermo; Gorosabel, Javier; Perez, Enrique; deUgartePostigo, Antonio; Solano, Enrique; BarradoyNavascues, David; CastroCeron, Jose Marie; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained near-infrared and high-resolution optical spectroscopy of the bright afterglow of the very intense gamma-ray burst recorded on 2002, October 4 (GRB 021004). Besides of line emission in the near-IR allowing an independent measurement of the systemic redshift (z = 2.3304 plus or minus 0.0005), we find several absorption line groups spanning a range of about 3,000 kilometers per second in velocity relative to the redshift of the host galaxy. The absorption profiles are very complex with both velocity-broadened components extending over several 100 kilometers per second and narrow lines with velocity widths of only approximately 20 kilometers per second. By analogy with QSO absorption line studies, the relative velocities, widths, and degrees of ionization of the lines ("line-locking", "ionization-velocity correlation") show that the progenitor had both an extremely strong radiation field and several distinct mass loss phases (winds). These results are consistent with GRB progenitors being massive stars, such as Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) or Wolf-Rayet stars, providing a detailed picture of the spatial and velocity structure of the GRB progenitor star at the time of explosion. The host galaxy is a prolific star-forming galaxy with a SFR of approximately 10 solar mass yr(sup -l).

  13. Tomography of a Gamma-ray Burst Progenitor and its Host Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Moller, Palle; Garcia-Segura, Guillermo; Gorosabel, Javier; Perez, Enrique; deUgartePostigo, Antonio; Solano, Enrique; BarradoyNavascues, David; CastroCeron, Jose Marie; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained near-infrared and high-resolution optical spectroscopy of the bright afterglow of the very intense gamma-ray burst recorded on 2002, October 4 (GRB 021004). Besides of line emission in the near-IR allowing an independent measurement of the systemic redshift (z = 2.3304 plus or minus 0.0005), we find several absorption line groups spanning a range of about 3,000 kilometers per second in velocity relative to the redshift of the host galaxy. The absorption profiles are very complex with both velocity-broadened components extending over several 100 kilometers per second and narrow lines with velocity widths of only approximately 20 kilometers per second. By analogy with QSO absorption line studies, the relative velocities, widths, and degrees of ionization of the lines ("line-locking", "ionization-velocity correlation") show that the progenitor had both an extremely strong radiation field and several distinct mass loss phases (winds). These results are consistent with GRB progenitors being massive stars, such as Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) or Wolf-Rayet stars, providing a detailed picture of the spatial and velocity structure of the GRB progenitor star at the time of explosion. The host galaxy is a prolific star-forming galaxy with a SFR of approximately 10 solar mass yr(sup -l).

  14. The Luminosity Function of QSO Host Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.; Casertano, Stefano; Turnshek, David A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present some results from our HST archival image study of 71 QSO host galaxies. The objects are selected to have z less than or equal to 0.46 and total absolute magnitude M(sub v) less than or equal to -23 in our adopted cosmology (H(sub 0) = 50 kilometers per second Mpc(sup-1), q(sub 0) = 0.5, lambda = 0)). The aim of this initial study is to investigate the composition of the sample with respect to host morphology and radio loudness, as well as derive the QSO host galaxy luminosity function. We have analyzed available WFPC2 images in R or I band (U in one case), using a uniform set of procedures. The host galaxies span a narrow range of luminosities and are exceptionally bright, much more so than normal galaxies, usually L greater than L*(sub v). The QSOs are almost equally divided among three subclasses: radio-loud QSOs with elliptical hosts, radio-quiet QSOs with elliptical hosts, and radio-quiet QSOs with spiral hosts. Radio-loud QSOs with spiral hosts are extremely rare. Using a weighting procedure, we derive the combined luminosity function of QSO host galaxies. We find that the luminosity function of QSO hosts differs in shape from that of normal galaxies but that they coincide at the highest luminosities. The ratio of the number of quasar hosts to the number of normal galaxies at a luminosity L*(sub v) is R = (Lv/11.48L*(sub v))(sup 2.46), where L*(sub v) corresponds to M*(sub v)= -22.35, and a QSO is defined to be an object with total nuclear plus host light M(sub v) less than or equal to -23. This ratio can be interpreted as the probability that a galaxy with luminosity L(sub V) will host a QSO at redshift z approximately equal to 0.26.

  15. Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts: Propagation of Cosmic Rays in Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2015-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are proposed as candidate sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). We study the possibility that the PeV neutrinos recently observed by IceCube are produced by GRB cosmic rays interacting with the interstellar gas in the host galaxies. By studying the relation between the X-ray absorption column density NH and the surface star formation rate (SFR) of GRB host galaxies, we find that NH is a good indicator of the surface gas density of the host galaxies. Then we are able to calculate the neutrino production efficiency of CRs for GRBs with known NH. We collect a sample of GRBs that have both measurements of NH and accurate gamma-ray fluence and attempt to calculate the accumulated neutrino flux based on the current knowledge about GRBs and their host galaxies. When the CR intensity produced by GRBs is normalized with the observed UHECR flux above ∼ {{10}19} eV, the accumulated neutrino flux at PeV energies is estimated to be about (0.3+/- 0.2)× {{10}-8} GeV c{{m}-2} {{s}-1} s{{r}-1} (per flavor) under the assumption that the GRB energy production rate follows the cosmic SFR and the favorable assumption about the CR diffusion coefficient. This flux is insufficient to account for the IceCube observations, but the estimate suffers from some assumptions in the calculation and thus we cannot rule out this scenario at present.

  16. A deep search for the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts with no detected optical afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A.; Klose, S.; Ferrero, P.; Greiner, J.; Arnold, L. A.; Gonsalves, E.; Hartmann, D. H.; Updike, A. C.; Kann, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Palazzi, E.; Savaglio, S.; Schulze, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Amati, L.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Clemens, C.; Filgas, R.; Gorosabel, J.; Hunt, L. K.; Küpcü Yoldaş, A.; Masetti, N.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Olivares, F. E.; Pian, E.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Schmidl, S.; Yoldaş, A.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can provide information about star formation at high redshifts. Even in the absence of a bright optical/near-infrared/radio afterglow, the high detection rate of X-ray afterglows by Swift/XRT and its localization precision of 2-3 arcsec facilitates the identification and the study of GRB host galaxies. Aims: We focus on the search for the host galaxies of 17 bursts with arcsec-sized XRT error circles but no detected long-wavelength afterglow, in spite of their deep and rapid follow-up observations. Three of these events can also be classified as truly dark bursts, i.e., the observed upper limit on the optical flux of the afterglow was less than expected based on the measured X-ray flux. Our goals are to identify the GRB host galaxy candidates and characterize their phenomenological parameters. Methods: Our study is based on deep RC and Ks-band observations performed with FORS1, FORS2, VIMOS, ISAAC, and HAWK-I at the ESO/VLT, partly supported by observations with the seven-channel imager GROND at the 2.2-m telescope on La Silla, and supplemented by observations with NEWFIRM at the 4-m telescope on Kitt Peak. To be conservative, we searched for host galaxy candidates within an area of twice the radius of each associated 90% c.l. Swift/XRT error circle. Results: For 15 of the 17 bursts, we find at least one galaxy within the searching area, and in the remaining two cases only a deep upper limit to RC and Ks can be provided. In seven cases, we discover extremely red objects in the error circles, at least four of which might be dust-enshrouded galaxies. The most remarkable case is the host of GRB 080207, which has a color of (RC - Ks)AB ~ 4.7 mag, and is one of the reddest galaxies ever associated with a GRB. As a by-product of our study we identify the optical afterglow of GRB 070517. Conclusions: Only a minority of optically dim afterglows are due to Lyman dropout (≲ 1/3). Extinction by dust in the host galaxies might explain all

  17. In Search of Quasar Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Sturm, E.; Ciardullo, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Accretion-powered and star formation activity have been shown to coincide, motivating us to search for the star-forming regions in the host galaxies of quasars and to determine the star-formation rates. In this work we use calibrated narrow band emission line (H-beta and Pa-alpha) WFPC2 and NICMOS images as maps for total star formation rate. The main challenge in imaging quasar host galaxies is the separation of the quasar light from the galaxy light, especially in the case of z approximately 0.1 quasars in WFPC2 images where the PSF radius closely matches the expected host scale radius. To this this end we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light, which we have validated through extensive simulations using artificial quasar+galaxy images. The other significant challenge in mapping and measuring star forming regions is correcting for extinction, which we address using extinction maps created from the Pa-alpha/H-beta ratio. To determine the source of excitation, we utilize H-beta along with [OIII]5007 and [OII]3727 images in diagnostic line ratio (BPT) diagrams. We detect extended line emission in our targets on scales of order 1-2 kpc. A preliminary analysis suggests star formation rates of order 10 solar masses per year.

  18. Galaxy Evolution at High Redshift: Obscured Star Formation, GRB Rates, Cosmic Reionization, and Missing Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, A.; Mancuso, C.; Celotti, A.; Danese, L.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a holistic view of galaxy evolution at high redshifts z ≳ 4, which incorporates the constraints from various astrophysical/cosmological probes, including the estimate of the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density from UV/IR surveys and long gamma-ray burst (GRBs) rates, the cosmic reionization history following the latest Planck measurements, and the missing satellites issue. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting the SFR functions derived by Mancuso et al. on the basis of an educated extrapolation of the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and already tested against a number of independent observables. Our SFR functions integrated down to a UV magnitude limit MUV ≲ ‑13 (or SFR limit around 10‑2 M⊙ yr‑1) produce a cosmic SFR density in excellent agreement with recent determinations from IR surveys and, taking into account a metallicity ceiling Z ≲ Z⊙/2, with the estimates from long GRB rates. They also yield a cosmic reionization history consistent with that implied by the recent measurements of the Planck mission of the electron scattering optical depth τes ≈ 0.058 remarkably, this result is obtained under a conceivable assumption regarding the average value fesc ≈ 0.1 of the escape fraction for ionizing photons. We demonstrate via the abundance-matching technique that the above constraints concurrently imply galaxy formation becoming inefficient within dark matter halos of mass below a few 108 M⊙ pleasingly, such a limit is also required so as not to run into the missing satellites issue. Finally, we predict a downturn of the Galaxy luminosity function faintward of MUV ≲ ‑12, and stress that its detailed shape, to be plausibly probed in the near future by the JWST, will be extremely informative on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos, or even on the microscopic nature of the dark matter.

  19. Host Galaxies of z=4 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kim K.; Bechtold, J.

    2010-01-01

    We have undertaken a project to investigate the host galaxies and environments of a sample of quasars at z 4. In this paper, we describe deep near-infrared imaging of 34 targets using the Magellan I and Gemini North telescopes. We discuss in detail special challenges of distortion and nonlinearity that must be addressed when performing PSF subtraction with data from these telescopes and their IR cameras, especially in very good seeing. We derive black hole masses from emission-line spectroscopy, and we calculate accretion rates from our Ks-band photometry, which directly samples the rest-frame B for these objects. We introduce a new isophotal diameter technique for estimating host galaxy luminosities. We report the detection of four host galaxies on our deepest, sharpest images, and present upper limits for the others. We find that if host galaxies passively evolve such that they brighten by 2 magnitudes or more in the rest-frame B band between the present and z=4, then high-z hosts are less massive at a given black hole mass than are their low-z counterparts. We argue that the most massive hosts plateau at < 10L*. We estimate the importance of selection effects on this survey and the subsequent limitations of our conclusions. These results are in broad agreement with recent semi-analytical models for the formation of luminous quasars and their host spheroids by mergers of gas-rich galaxies, with significant dissipation, and self-regulation of black hole growth and star-formation by the burst of merger-induced quasar activity.

  20. DEMOGRAPHICS OF THE GALAXIES HOSTING SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Margutti, R.; Czekala, I.; Zauderer, B. A.; Laskar, T.; Servillat, M.; Levan, A. J.; Tunnicliffe, R. L.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fox, D. B.; Perley, D. A.; Cenko, S. B.; Persson, S. E.; Monson, A. J.; Kelson, D. D.; Birk, C.; Murphy, D.; Anglada, G.

    2013-05-20

    We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A, and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z = 0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z = 0.718 with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, a star formation rate of Almost-Equal-To 16 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 50 Myr. We also report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i {approx}> 26 mag, and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. From afterglow modeling, the bursts have inferred circumburst densities of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4}-1 cm{sup -3} and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg. These three events highlight the diversity of galactic environments that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment ({approx}1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to 2012 May) and classify bursts originating from four types of environments: late-type ( Almost-Equal-To 50%), early-type ( Almost-Equal-To 15%), inconclusive ( Almost-Equal-To 20%), and ''host-less'' (lacking a coincident host galaxy to limits of {approx}> 26 mag; Almost-Equal-To 15%). To find likely ranges for the true late- and early-type fractions, we assign each of the host-less bursts to either the late- or early-type category using probabilistic arguments and consider the scenario that all hosts in the inconclusive category are early-type galaxies to set an upper bound on the early-type fraction. We calculate most likely ranges for the late- and early-type fractions of Almost-Equal-To 60

  1. The Spiral Structure of AGN Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, J.; Barrows, R. S.; Hughes, J. A.; Schilling, A.; Davis, B.; Shields, D.; Madey, A.; Kennefick, D.; Lacy, C.; Seigar, M.

    2014-03-01

    Recent work has uncovered a correlation between the black hole mass, M, in the centers of local spiral galaxies and the pitch angles, P, of their spiral arms. We propose to test this M-P correlation at moderate to high redshifts, using a sample of active galaxies selected from the Great Observatories Origins Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey showing evidence for spiral structure in their host galaxies. The mass of the central black holes are estimated using the Hβ or Mg II lines in existing spectra using luminosity-radius scaling relations. Pitch angles are measured using an iterative 2D FFT algorithm. The aim is to establish this M-P relation beyond our local epoch, test for evolution in its form, and eventually to compute a BH mass function for late-type galaxies out to moderate redshifts.

  2. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  3. The galaxy hosts and large-scale environments of short-hard (gamma)-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, J X; Bloom, J S; Chen, H; Foley, R J; Perley, D A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Granot, J; Lee, W H; Pooley, D; Alatalo, K; Hurley, K; Cooper, M C; Dupree, A K; Gerke, B F; Hansen, B S; Kalirai, J S; Newman, J A; Rich, R M; Richer, H; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; van Breugel, W

    2006-04-07

    The nature of the progenitors of short duration, hard spectrum, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has remained a mystery. Even with the recent localizations of four short-hard GRBs, no transient emission has been found at long wavelengths that directly constrains the progenitor nature. Instead, as was the case in studying the different morphological subclasses of supernovae and the progenitors of long-duration GRBs, we suggest that the progenitors of short bursts can be meaningfully constrained by the environment in which the bursts occur. Here we present the discovery spectra of the galaxies that hosted three short-hard GRBs and the spectrum of a fourth host. The results indicate that these environments, both at the galaxy scale and galaxy-cluster scale, differ substantially from those of long-soft GRBs. The spatial offset of three bursts from old and massive galaxy hosts strongly favors an origin from the merger of compact stellar remnants, such as double neutron stars or a neutron-star black hole binary. The star-forming host of another GRB provides confirmation that, like supernovae of Type Ia, the progenitors of short-hard bursts are created in all galaxy types. This indicates a class of progenitors with a wide distribution of delay times between formation and explosion.

  4. HOST GALAXIES AS GAMMA-RAY BURST DISTANCE INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    D. BAND; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the distributions of the total burst energy, the peak luminosity and the X-ray afterglow energy using burst observations and distances to the associated host galaxies. To expand the sample, we include redshift estimates for host galaxies without spectroscopic redshifts. The methodology requires a model of the host galaxy population; we find that in the best model the burst rate is proportional to the host galaxy luminosity at the time of the burst.

  5. The low-extinction afterglow in the solar-metallicity host galaxy of γ-ray burst 110918A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J.; Krühler, T.; Greiner, J.; Savaglio, S.; Olivares, F.; Rau, E. A.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Wiersema, K.; Schady, P.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Nardini, M.; Berger, E.; Fox, D.; Gorosabel, J.; Klose, S.; Levan, A.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rossi, A.; Schmidl, S.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.

    2013-08-01

    Galaxies selected through long γ-ray bursts (GRBs) could be of fundamental importance when mapping the star formation history out to the highest redshifts. Before using them as efficient tools in the early Universe, however, the environmental factors that govern the formation of GRBs need to be understood. Metallicity is theoretically thought to be a fundamental driver in GRB explosions and energetics, but it is still, even after more than a decade of extensive studies, not fully understood. This is largely related to two phenomena: a dust-extinction bias, which prevented high-mass and thus likely high-metallicity GRB hosts from being detected in the first place, and a lack of efficient instrumentation, which limited spectroscopic studies, including metallicity measurements, to the low-redshift end of the GRB host population. The subject of this work is the very energetic GRB 110918A (Eγ,iso = 1.9 × 1054 erg), for which we measure a redshift of z = 0.984. GRB 110918A gave rise to a luminous afterglow with an intrinsic spectral slope of β = 0.70, which probed a sight-line with little extinction (AGRBV = 0.16 mag) and soft X-ray absorption (NH,X = (1.6 ± 0.5) × 1021 cm-2) typical of the established distributions of afterglow properties. However, photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the galaxy hosting GRB 110918A, including optical/near-infrared photometry with the Gamma-Ray burst Optical Near-infrared Detector and spectroscopy with the Very Large Telescope/X-shooter, reveal an all but average GRB host in comparison to the z ~ 1 galaxies selected through similar afterglows to date. It has a large spatial extent with a half-light radius of R1/2 ~ 10 kpc, the highest stellar mass for z < 1.9 (log (M∗/M⊙) = 10.68 ± 0.16), and an Hα-based star formation rate of SFRHα = 41+28-16M⊙ yr-1. We measure a gas-phase extinction of AgasV ~ 1.8 mag through the Balmer decrement and one of the largest host-integrated metallicities ever of around solar

  6. AGN Absorption Linked to Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stéphanie

    2014-07-01

    Multiwavelength identification of AGN is crucial not only to obtain a more complete census, but also to learn about the physical state of the nuclear activity (obscuration, efficiency, etc.). A panchromatic strategy plays an especially important role when the host galaxies are star-forming. Selecting far-Infrared galaxies at 0.3host galaxies, indicating a physical link between X-ray absorption and either the gas fraction or the gas geometry in the hosts. These findings have implications for our current understanding of both the AGN unification model and the nature of the black hole-galaxy connection.

  7. Circumnuclear Structures in Megamaser Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pjanka, Patryk; Greene, Jenny E.; Seth, Anil C.; Braatz, James A.; Henkel, Christian; Lo, Fred K. Y.; Läsker, Ronald

    2017-08-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope, we identify circumnuclear (100-500 pc scale) structures in nine new H2O megamaser host galaxies to understand the flow of matter from kpc-scale galactic structures down to the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at galactic centers. We double the sample analyzed in a similar way by Greene et al. and consider the properties of the combined sample of 18 sources. We find that disk-like structure is virtually ubiquitous when we can resolve <200 pc scales, in support of the notion that non-axisymmetries on these scales are a necessary condition for SMBH fueling. We perform an analysis of the orientation of our identified nuclear regions and compare it with the orientation of megamaser disks and the kpc-scale disks of the hosts. We find marginal evidence that the disk-like nuclear structures show increasing misalignment from the kpc-scale host galaxy disk as the scale of the structure decreases. In turn, we find that the orientation of both the ˜100 pc scale nuclear structures and their host galaxy large-scale disks is consistent with random with respect to the orientation of their respective megamaser disks.

  8. CONNECTING GRBs AND ULIRGs: A SENSITIVE, UNBIASED SURVEY FOR RADIO EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Michałowski, M. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Krühler, T.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2015-03-10

    Luminous infrared galaxies and submillimeter galaxies contribute significantly to stellar mass assembly and provide an important test of the connection between the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate and that of overall cosmic star formation. We present sensitive 3 GHz radio observations using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of 32 uniformly selected GRB host galaxies spanning a redshift range from 0 < z < 2.5, providing the first fully dust- and sample-unbiased measurement of the fraction of GRBs originating from the universe's most bolometrically luminous galaxies. Four galaxies are detected, with inferred radio star formation rates (SFRs) ranging between 50 and 300 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Three of the four detections correspond to events consistent with being optically obscured 'dark' bursts. Our overall detection fraction implies that between 9% and 23% of GRBs between 0.5 < z < 2.5 occur in galaxies with S {sub 3GHz} > 10 μJy, corresponding to SFR > 50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at z ∼ 1 or >250 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at z ∼ 2. Similar galaxies contribute approximately 10%-30% of all cosmic star formation, so our results are consistent with a GRB rate that is not strongly biased with respect to the total SFR of a galaxy. However, all four radio-detected hosts have stellar masses significantly lower than IR/submillimeter-selected field galaxies of similar luminosities. We suggest that the GRB rate may be suppressed in metal-rich environments but independently enhanced in intense starbursts, producing a strong efficiency dependence on mass but little net dependence on bulk galaxy SFR.

  9. Connecting GRBs and ULIRGs: A Sensitive, Unbiased Survey for Radio Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies at 0 < z < 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.; Hjorth, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Jakobsson, P.; Krühler, T.; Levan, A. J.; Malesani, D.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2015-03-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies and submillimeter galaxies contribute significantly to stellar mass assembly and provide an important test of the connection between the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate and that of overall cosmic star formation. We present sensitive 3 GHz radio observations using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of 32 uniformly selected GRB host galaxies spanning a redshift range from 0 < z < 2.5, providing the first fully dust- and sample-unbiased measurement of the fraction of GRBs originating from the universe's most bolometrically luminous galaxies. Four galaxies are detected, with inferred radio star formation rates (SFRs) ranging between 50 and 300 M ⊙ yr-1. Three of the four detections correspond to events consistent with being optically obscured "dark" bursts. Our overall detection fraction implies that between 9% and 23% of GRBs between 0.5 < z < 2.5 occur in galaxies with S 3GHz > 10 μJy, corresponding to SFR > 50 M ⊙ yr-1 at z ~ 1 or >250 M ⊙ yr-1 at z ~ 2. Similar galaxies contribute approximately 10%-30% of all cosmic star formation, so our results are consistent with a GRB rate that is not strongly biased with respect to the total SFR of a galaxy. However, all four radio-detected hosts have stellar masses significantly lower than IR/submillimeter-selected field galaxies of similar luminosities. We suggest that the GRB rate may be suppressed in metal-rich environments but independently enhanced in intense starbursts, producing a strong efficiency dependence on mass but little net dependence on bulk galaxy SFR.

  10. GRB 130606A AS A PROBE OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN A STAR-FORMING GALAXY IN THE FIRST Gyr AFTER THE BIG BANG

    SciTech Connect

    Chornock, Ryan; Berger, Edo; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Drout, Maria R.; Fong Wenfai; Laskar, Tanmoy; Fox, Derek B.; Roth, Katherine C.

    2013-09-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio Gemini and MMT spectroscopy of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130606A at redshift z = 5.913, discovered by Swift. This is the first high-redshift GRB afterglow to have spectra of comparable quality to those of z Almost-Equal-To 6 quasars. The data exhibit a smooth continuum at near-infrared wavelengths that is sharply cut off blueward of 8410 A due to absorption from Ly{alpha} at redshift z Almost-Equal-To 5.91, with some flux transmitted through the Ly{alpha} forest between 7000 and 7800 A. We use column densities inferred from metal absorption lines to constrain the metallicity of the host galaxy between a lower limit of [Si/H] {approx}> -1.7 and an upper limit of [S/H] {approx}< -0.5 set by the non-detection of S II absorption. We demonstrate consistency between the dramatic evolution in the transmission fraction of Ly{alpha} seen in this spectrum over the redshift range z = 4.9-5.85 with that previously measured from observations of high-redshift quasars. There is an extended redshift interval of {Delta}z = 0.12 in the Ly{alpha} forest at z = 5.77 with no detected transmission, leading to a 3{sigma} upper limit on the mean Ly{alpha} transmission fraction of {approx}<0.2% (or {tau}{sub GP}{sup eff} (Ly{alpha}) > 6.4). This is comparable to the lowest-redshift Gunn-Peterson troughs found in quasar spectra. Some Ly{beta} and Ly{gamma} transmission is detected in this redshift window, indicating that it is not completely opaque, and hence that the intergalactic medium (IGM) is nonetheless mostly ionized at these redshifts. We set a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.11 on the neutral fraction of the IGM at the redshift of the GRB from the lack of a Ly{alpha} red damping wing, assuming a model with a constant neutral density. GRB 130606A thus for the first time realizes the promise of GRBs as probes of the first galaxies and cosmic reionization.

  11. Host Galaxies of z = 4 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, K. K.; Bechtold, Jill

    2009-10-01

    We have undertaken a project to investigate the host galaxies and environments of a sample of quasars at z ~ 4. In this paper, we describe deep near-infrared imaging of 34 targets using the Magellan I and Gemini North telescopes. We discuss in detail special challenges of distortion and nonlinearity that must be addressed when performing point-spread function (PSF) subtraction with data from these telescopes and their IR cameras, especially in very good seeing. We derive black hole masses from emission-line spectroscopy, and we calculate accretion rates from our Ks -band photometry, which directly samples the rest frame B for these objects. We introduce a new isophotal diameter technique for estimating host galaxy luminosities. We report the detection of four host galaxies on our deepest, sharpest images, and present upper limits for the others. We find that if host galaxies passively evolve such that they brighten by 2 mag or more in the rest-frame B band between the present and z = 4, then high-z hosts are less massive at a given black hole mass than are their low-z counterparts. We argue that the most massive hosts plateau at lsim10 L*. We estimate the importance of selection effects on this survey and the subsequent limitations of our conclusions. These results are in broad agreement with recent semianalytical models for the formation of luminous quasars and their host spheroids by mergers of gas-rich galaxies, with significant dissipation, and self-regulation of black hole growth and star formation by the burst of merger-induced quasar activity. Based on data obtained with the 6.5 m Baade Telescope of the Magellan Telescope, located at the Las Campans Observatory, Chile. Based in part on data taken at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  12. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; Yip, Ching-Wa; Schneider, Donald P.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Burton, Ross E.; Jester, Sebastian; Hall, Patrick B.; Szalay, Alex S.; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.

  13. Understanding the Environmental Dependence of High-z Dust with GRB Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel; Watson, Darach; Zafar, Tayyaba; Bloom, Joshua; Cenko, S. Bradley; Morgan, Adam; Levan, Andrew; Tanvir, Nial; Greiner, Jochen; Kruehler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia

    2011-05-01

    Our understanding of interstellar dust properties in a cosmic context is currently being revolutionized. While traditional methods for measuring the most observationally fundamental important dust diagnostic (the extinction curve) have remained restricted to the Galaxy and Magellanic clouds for decades, a variety of new techniques has catapulted the detailed study of dust extinction from our local neighborhood out to the highest redshifts. Gamma-ray burst afterglows, perhaps the most capable of all such cosmological dust probes, have in the past five years provided many detailed extinction measurements of a large and growing sample of galaxies up to redshift z ~ 5. We propose to use the Spitzer Space Telescope to observe a statistically meaningful sample (17 objects) of these galaxies at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, to try to correlate the properties of the extinction law (such as the presence or absence of 2175-Angstrom absorption) with the properties of the host galaxy itself - in particular, the stellar mass, which is tightly coupled to dust production and is key to a host of other essential properties such as metallicity and specific star-formation rate.

  14. Exploring Damped Ly Alpha System Host Galaxies Using Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, Vicki L.; Cucchiara, Antonino; Veilleux, Sylvain; Fumagalli, Michele; Rafelski, Marc; Rahmati, Alireza; Cenko, S. Bradley; Capone, John I.; Pasham, Dheeraj R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a sample of 45 Damped Ly-Alpha system [DLA; H I-N is greater than or equal to 2 x 10(exp. 20) cm(exp. -2)] counterparts (33 detections, 12 upper limits) which host gamma-ray bursts (GRB-DLAs) in order to investigate star formation and metallicity within galaxies hosting DLAs. Our sample spans z is approx. 2 - 6 and is nearly three times larger than any previously detected DLA counterparts survey based on quasar line-of-sight searches (QSO-DLAs). We report star formation rates (SFRs) from rest-frame UV photometry and spectral energy distribution modeling. We find that DLA counterpart SFRs are not correlated with either redshift or H I column density. Thanks to the combination of Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observations, we also investigate DLA host star formation efficiency. Our GRB-DLA counterpart sample spans both higher efficiency and low efficiency star formation regions compared to the local Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, local star formation laws, and z is approximately 3 cosmological simulations. We also compare the depletion times of our DLA hosts sample to other objects in the local universe; our sample appears to deviate from the star formation efficiencies measured in local spiral and dwarf galaxies. Furthermore, we find similar efficiencies as local inner disks, SMC, and Lyman-break galaxy outskirts. Finally, our enrichment time measurements show a spread of systems with under- and over-abundance of metals, which may suggest that these systems had episodic star formation and a metal enrichment/depletion as a result of strong stellar feedback and/or metal inflow/outflow.

  15. Exploring Damped Lyα System Host Galaxies Using Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Vicki L.; Cucchiara, Antonino; Veilleux, Sylvain; Fumagalli, Michele; Rafelski, Marc; Rahmati, Alireza; Cenko, S. Bradley; Capone, John I.; Pasham, Dheeraj R.

    2016-12-01

    We present a sample of 45 Damped Lyα system (DLA; {N}{{H}{{I}}} ≥slant 2× {10}20 {{cm}}-2) counterparts (33 detections, 12 upper limits) which host gamma-ray bursts (GRB-DLAs) in order to investigate star formation and metallicity within galaxies hosting DLAs. Our sample spans z˜ 2{--}6 and is nearly three times larger than any previously detected DLA counterparts survey based on quasar line-of-sight searches (QSO-DLAs). We report star formation rates (SFRs) from rest-frame UV photometry and spectral energy distribution modeling. We find that DLA counterpart SFRs are not correlated with either redshift or H i column density. Thanks to the combination of Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observations, we also investigate DLA host star formation efficiency. Our GRB-DLA counterpart sample spans both higher efficiency and low efficiency star formation regions compared to the local Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, local star formation laws, and z˜ 3 cosmological simulations. We also compare the depletion times of our DLA hosts sample to other objects in the local universe; our sample appears to deviate from the star formation efficiencies measured in local spiral and dwarf galaxies. Furthermore, we find similar efficiencies as local inner disks, SMC, and Lyman-break galaxy outskirts. Finally, our enrichment time measurements show a spread of systems with under- and over-abundance of metals, which may suggest that these systems had episodic star formation and a metal enrichment/depletion as a result of strong stellar feedback and/or metal inflow/outflow.

  16. ALMA and RATIR observations of GRB 131030A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuiyun; Urata, Yuji; Takahashi, Satoko; Im, Myungshin; Yu, Po-Chieh; Choi, Changsu; Butler, Nathaniel; Watson, Alan M.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lee, William H.; Klein, Chris; Fox, Ori D.; Littlejohns, Owen; Cucchiara, Nino; Troja, Eleonora; González, Jesús; Richer, Michael G.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Bloom, Josh; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Gehrels, Neil; Moseley, Harvey; Georgiev, Leonid; de Diego, José A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    We report on the first open-use based Atacama Large Millimeter/submm Array (ALMA) 345 GHz observation for the late afterglow phase of GRB 131030A. The ALMA observation constrained a deep limit at 17.1 d for the afterglow and host galaxy. We also identified a faint submillimeter source (ALMA J2300-0522) near the GRB 131030A position. The deep limit at 345 GHz and multifrequency observations obtained using Swift and RATIR yielded forward-shock modeling with a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation and described X-ray excess in the afterglow. The excess was inconsistent with the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from the forward shock. The host galaxy of GRB 131030A and optical counterpart of ALMA J2300-0522 were also identified in the Subaru image. Based on the deep ALMA limit for the host galaxy, the 3σ upper limits of IR luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) are estimated as LIR < 1.11 × 1011 L⊙ and SFR <18.7 (M⊙ yr-1), respectively. Although the separation angle from the burst location (3{^''.}5) was rather large, ALMA J2300-0522 may be one component of the GRB 131030A host galaxy, according to previous host galaxy cases.

  17. ALMA and RATIR observations of GRB 131030A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuiyun; Urata, Yuji; Takahashi, Satoko; Im, Myungshin; Yu, Po-Chieh; Choi, Changsu; Butler, Nathaniel; Watson, Alan M.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lee, William H.; Klein, Chris; Fox, Ori D.; Littlejohns, Owen; Cucchiara, Nino; Troja, Eleonora; González, Jesús; Richer, Michael G.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Bloom, Josh; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Gehrels, Neil; Moseley, Harvey; Georgiev, Leonid; de Diego, José A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    We report on the first open-use based Atacama Large Millimeter/submm Array (ALMA) 345 GHz observation for the late afterglow phase of GRB 131030A. The ALMA observation constrained a deep limit at 17.1 d for the afterglow and host galaxy. We also identified a faint submillimeter source (ALMA J2300-0522) near the GRB 131030A position. The deep limit at 345 GHz and multifrequency observations obtained using Swift and RATIR yielded forward-shock modeling with a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation and described X-ray excess in the afterglow. The excess was inconsistent with the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from the forward shock. The host galaxy of GRB 131030A and optical counterpart of ALMA J2300-0522 were also identified in the Subaru image. Based on the deep ALMA limit for the host galaxy, the 3σ upper limits of IR luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) are estimated as LIR < 1.11 × 1011 L⊙ and SFR <18.7 (M⊙ yr-1), respectively. Although the separation angle from the burst location (3{^''.}5) was rather large, ALMA J2300-0522 may be one component of the GRB 131030A host galaxy, according to previous host galaxy cases.

  18. Late-time VLA reobservations rule out ULIRG-like host galaxies for most pre- Swift long-duration gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.; Hjorth, Jens; Tanvir, Nial R.; Perley, Richard A.

    2017-02-01

    We present new Jansky Very Large Array observations of five pre-Swift gamma-ray bursts for which an ultraluminous [star formation rate (SFR) >100 M⊙ yr-1] dusty host galaxy had previously been inferred from radio or submillimetre observations taken within a few years after the burst. In four of the five cases, we no longer detect any source at the host location to limits much fainter than the original observations, ruling out the existence of an ultraluminous galaxy hosting any of these gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We continue to detect a source at the position of GRB 980703, but it is much fainter than it was a decade ago and the inferred radio SFR (∼80 M⊙) is relatively modest. The radio flattening at 200-1000 d observed in the light curve of this GRB may have been caused by a decelerating counterjet oriented 180 deg away from the viewer, although an unjetted wind model can also explain the data. Our results eliminate all well-established ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) among the pre-Swift host population. They also rule out all cases for which an unobscured GRB was found in a galaxy dominated by heavily obscured star formation. When GRBs do occur in ULIRGs, the afterglow is almost always observed to be heavily obscured, consistent with the large dust opacities and high dust covering fractions characteristic of these systems.

  19. Deficiency of "Thin" Stellar Bars in Seyfert Host Galaxies.

    PubMed

    Shlosman; Peletier; Knapen

    2000-06-01

    Using all available major samples of Seyfert galaxies and their corresponding closely matched control samples of nonactive galaxies, we find that the bar ellipticities (or axial ratios) in Seyfert galaxies are systematically different from those in nonactive galaxies. Overall, there is a deficiency of bars with large ellipticities (i.e., "thin" or "strong" bars) in Seyfert galaxies compared to nonactive galaxies. Accompanied with a large dispersion due to small number statistics, this effect is strictly speaking at the 2 sigma level. To obtain this result, the active galaxy samples of near-infrared surface photometry were matched to those of normal galaxies in type, host galaxy ellipticity, absolute magnitude, and, to some extent, redshift. We discuss possible theoretical explanations of this phenomenon within the framework of galactic evolution, and, in particular, of radial gas redistribution in barred galaxies. Our conclusions provide further evidence that Seyfert hosts differ systematically from their nonactive counterparts on scales of a few kiloparsecs.

  20. Coevolution of Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiner, Kyle Devon

    The role of black holes in galaxy evolution has come under intense scrutiny since it was discovered that every galaxy in the local universe contains a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at its nucleus. The existence of scaling relations between the SMBH and its host galaxy show that their presence is not coincidental, but rather that SMBHs and their hosts have a shared evolution. The nature of this coevolution is still debated with some proposing it to be a natural result of hierarchical merging models, while others invoke SMBH feedback mechanisms that couple BH growth with that of the host galaxy. In this dissertation, I examine different regimes of SMBH activity and host galaxy properties. I investigate a sample of post-starburst galaxies to gain insight into the morphological and spectrophotometric evolution of galaxies through galaxy interactions and mergers. I plot detailed comparisons of the galaxy kinematics as measured from different stellar populations. I also investigate post-starburst galaxies that simultaneously host an AGN. I develop a technique to study the properties of both the host galaxy and the SMBH in these objects, directly investigating the scaling relation between the two. I describe analysis performed on red quasars in another study that directly probes the scaling relations in the non-local universe. Lastly, I conduct SED fitting of quasars to illuminate the differences between two major spectral types, and investigate host galaxy properties including star formation. All of these projects focus on the relationship between the SMBH and host galaxy. I show that a range of galaxy interactions can lead to black hole growth and are part of galaxy evolution over cosmic time.

  1. Star Forming Galaxies and AGN Hosts: The Seagull Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasińska, Grazyna; Cid Fernandes, Roberto; Mateus, Abîlio; Sodré, Laerte; Asari, Natalia V.

    2007-05-01

    We discuss the spectral signatures of normal star forming (NSF) galaxies and of AGN hosts of and present physically motivated techniques to distinguish these two classes of galaxies. We have determined the emission line intensities for a complete sample of galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital sky Survey, after subtracting the stellar continuum obtained from spectral synthesis. With the help of sequences of photoionization models, we explain why, in the famous [OIII]/Hbeta vs [NII]/Halpha diagram, NSF galaxies and AGN hosts form two separate sequences, which look like the open wings of a seagull. We also examine other techniques to distinguish star forming galaxies from AGN hosts. Finally, we propose a new diagnostic diagram which can be used with optical spectra of galaxies with redshifts up to z=1.3. This new diagram has also the advantage of allowing one to show all the galaxies of a sample in one plot, including passive galaxies.

  2. A population of massive, luminous galaxies hosting heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts: Implications for the use of GRBs as tracers of cosmic star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Morgan, A. N.; Hjorth, J.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Fruchter, A.; Kalirai, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2013-12-01

    We present observations and analysis of the host galaxies of 23 heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite during the years 2005-2009, representing all GRBs with an unambiguous host-frame extinction of A{sub V} > 1 mag from this period. Deep observations with Keck, Gemini, Very Large Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer successfully detect the host galaxies and establish spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for all 23 events, enabling us to provide measurements of the intrinsic host star formation rates, stellar masses, and mean extinctions. Compared to the hosts of unobscured GRBs at similar redshifts, we find that the hosts of dust-obscured GRBs are (on average) more massive by about an order of magnitude and also more rapidly star forming and dust obscured. While this demonstrates that GRBs populate all types of star-forming galaxies, including the most massive, luminous systems at z ≈ 2, at redshifts below 1.5 the overall GRB population continues to show a highly significant aversion to massive galaxies and a preference for low-mass systems relative to what would be expected given a purely star-formation-rate-selected galaxy sample. This supports the notion that the GRB rate is strongly dependent on metallicity, and may suggest that the most massive galaxies in the universe underwent a transition in their chemical properties ∼9 Gyr ago. We also conclude that, based on the absence of unobscured GRBs in massive galaxies and the absence of obscured GRBs in low-mass galaxies, the dust distributions of the lowest-mass and the highest-mass galaxies are relatively homogeneous, while intermediate-mass galaxies (∼10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) have diverse internal properties.

  3. The Discovery and Broadband Follow-Up of the Transient Afterglow of GRB 980703

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, J. S.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Halpern, J. P.; Marzke, R. O.; Patton, D. R.; Oke, J. B.; Horne, K. D.; Gomer, R.; hide

    1998-01-01

    We report on the discovery of the radio, infrared, and optical transient coincident with an X-ray transient proposed to be the afterglow of GRB 980703. At later times when the transient has faded below detection, we see an underlying galaxy with R = 22.6; this galaxy is the brightest host galaxy (by nearly 2 mag) of any cosmological gamma-ray burst (GRB) thus far. In keeping with an established trend, the GRB is not significantly offset from the host galaxy. Interpreting the multiwavelength data in the framework of the popular fireball model requires that the synchrotron cooling break was between the optical and X-ray bands on 1998 July 8.5 UT and that the intrinsic extinction of the transient is A(sub v) = 0.9. This is somewhat higher than the extinction for the galaxy as a whole, as estimated from spectroscopy.

  4. SN 2010ay is a Luminous and Broad-lined Type Ic Supernova within a Low-metallicity Host Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Valenti, S.; Chomiuk, L.; Berger, E.; Smartt, S.; Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We report on our serendipitous pre-discovery detection and detailed follow-up of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN2010ay at z approx 0.067 imaged by the Pan-STARRS1 3pi survey just approx 4 days after explosion. Combining our photometric observations with those available in the literature, we estimate the explosion date and the peak luminosity of the SN, M(sub R) approximately equals 20.2 mag, significantly brighter than known GRB-SNe and one of the most luminous SNe Ibc ever discovered. We measure the photospheric expansion velocity of the explosion from our spectroscopic follow-up observations, v(sub ph) approximately equals 19.2 X 10 (exp 3) km/s at approx 40 days after explosion. In comparison with other broad-lined SNe, the characteristic velocity of SN2010ay is 2 - 5 X higher and similar to the measurements for GRB-SNe at comparable epochs. Moreover the velocity declines two times slower than other SNe Ic-BL and GRB-SNe. Assuming that the optical emission is powered by radioactive decay, the peak magnitude implies the synthesis of an unusually large mass of Ni-56, M(sub Ni) = 0.9(+0.1/-0.1) solar mass. Our modeling of the light-curve points to a total ejecta mass, M(sub ej) approx 4.7 Solar Mass, and total kinetic energy, E(sub K,51) approximately equals 11. Thus the ratio of M(sub Ni) to M(sub ej) is at least twice as large for SN2010ay than in GRB-SNe and may indicate an additional energy reservoir. We also measure the metallicity (log(O/H) + 12 = 8.19) of the explosion site within the host galaxy using a high S/N optical spectrum. Our abundance measurement places this SN in the low-metallicity regime populated by GRB-SNe, and approx 0.2(0.5) dex lower than that typically measured for the host environments of normal (broad-lined) Ic supernovae. Despite striking similarities to the recent GRB-SN100316D/2010bh, we show that gamma-ray observations rule out an associated GRB with E(sub gamma) approx < 6 X 10(exp 48) erg (25-150 keV). Similarly, our deep

  5. AGN multi-wavelength identification and host galaxy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojegan; Coil, Alison L.; MOSDEF Team; PRIMUS Team

    2017-01-01

    I present results on AGN identification, selection biases, and host galaxy properties at z~2.3 and results on the relation between AGN accretion and star formation activity at z~0.8. In the MOSDEF survey, with a sample of X-ray, IR, and optically selected AGN at z~2.3, using rest-frame optical spectra obtained with the Keck/MOSFIRE instrument, I find clear selection biases in identifying AGN at these wavelengths. There is a strong bias against identifying AGN at any wavelength in low mass galaxies, and an additional bias against identifying IR AGN in the most massive galaxies. While AGN hosts span a wide range of SFR, IR AGN are mainly in less dusty galaxies with relatively higher SFR and optical AGN are in dusty galaxies with relatively lower SFR in our sample. X-ray AGN selection does not display a bias with host SFR. I also consider the relation between the growth of galaxies and their SMBHs using a large sample of X-ray AGN in the PRIMUS survey. I do not find a significant correlation between SFR and AGN instantaneous luminosity. However, I find a weak but significant correlation between the average luminosity of AGN and SFR, which likely reflects that AGN luminosities vary on shorter timescales than host galaxies SFR. My results indicate that AGN are also often hosted by quiescent galaxies, and within both the star-forming and quiescent galaxy populations the probability of hosting an AGN is a power-law distribution as a function of specific accretion rate. However, at a given stellar mass, I find that a star-forming galaxy is ~2-3 times more likely than a quiescent galaxy to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN is constant across the main sequence of star formation, while in quiescent galaxies increases with SFR.

  6. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  7. AGN-host galaxy connection: multiwavelength study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; García, A. M. Pérez; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Cepa

    2013-02-01

    The connection between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their hosts showed to be important for understanding the formation and evolution of active galaxies. Using X-ray and deep optical data, we study how morphology and colours are related to X-ray properties at redshifts z<=2.0 for a sample of > 300 X-ray detected AGN in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS; Furusawa et al. 2008) and Groth-Westphal Strip (GWS; Pović et al. 2009) fields. We performed our morphological classification using the galSVM code (Huertas-Company et al. 2008), which is a new method that is particularly suited when dealing with high-redshift sources. To separate objects between X-ray unobscured and obscured, we used X-ray hardness ratio HR(0.5-2 keV/2-4.5 keV). Colour-magnitude diagrams were studied in relationship to redshift, morphology, X-ray obscuration, and X-ray-to-optical flux ratio. Around 50% of X-ray detected AGN at z<=2.0 analysed in this work reside in spheroidal and bulge-dominated galaxies, while at least 18% have disk-dominated hosts. This suggests that different mechanisms may be responsible for triggering the nuclear activity. When analysing populations of X-ray detected AGN in both colour-magnitude (CMD) and colour-stellar mass diagrams (Figure 1), the highest number of sources is found to reside in the green valley at redshifts ~ 0.5-1.5. For the first time we studied CMD of these AGN in relation to morphology and X-ray obscuration, finding that they can reside in both early- and late-type hosts, where both morphological types cover similar ranges of X-ray obscuration (Figure 1). Our findings appear to confirm some previous suggestions that X-ray selected AGN residing in the green valley represent a transitional population (e.g. Nandra et al. 2007, Silverman et al. 2008, Treister et al. 2009), quenching star formation by means of different AGN feedback mechanisms and evolving to red-sequence galaxies. More details on analysis and results presented here can be found in

  8. From Enigma to Tool: Gamma-Ray Burst Reveals Secrets of Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    Five years ago, astronomers knew almost nothing about Gamma Ray Bursts. Now, a team of observers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope has used a gamma-ray burst as a powerful tool to unveil the nature of the galaxy in which it occurred, more than 7 billion light-years away. VLA Images of GRB980703 Host Galaxy "We believe that gamma-ray bursts may become one of the best available tools for studying the history of star formation in the universe," said Edo Berger, a graduate student at Caltech. Berger worked with Caltech astronomy professor Shri Kulkarni and Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, to study a gamma-ray burst first seen on July 3, 1998. The astronomers presented their results at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Pasadena, CA. "For the first time, we've seen the host galaxy of a gamma-ray burst with a radio telescope," Berger said. "Previously, gamma-ray-burst host galaxies have been seen with optical telescopes, but detecting this galaxy with a radio telescope has given us new clues about the nature of the galaxy itself -- clues we couldn't have gotten any other way," he added. For example, based on optical-telescope studies, astronomers estimated that new stars are forming in the host galaxy at the rate of about the mass equivalent of 20 suns per year. However, data from the radio observations show that the actual star-formation rate is 25 times greater -- the mass equivalent of 500 suns per year. "With the VLA, we are seeing the entire region of star formation in this galaxy, including the areas so dusty that visible light can't get out," said Frail. Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions since the Big Bang. First discovered in 1967 by a satellite launched to monitor compliance with the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty, gamma-ray bursts remained one of astronomy's premier mysteries for 30 years. For three decades

  9. Search for a supernova in a GRB at 55 Mp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, Andrew; Hjorth, Jens; Malesani, Daniele; Tanvir, Nial; Wiersema, Klaas; Fynbo, Johan

    2011-10-01

    We seek a rapid response target of opportunity observation of the recent GRB 111005A, which was detected by Swift last week. The burst is essentially invisible to most ground and space based optical/IR observations because it lies only 35 degrees from the Sun (as viewed from Earth). However, its gamma-ray error box contains the bright low redshift galaxy ESO 580-49, at only ~55 Mpc distance. Short integration (twilight) K-band observations do not show any sign of the burst in the optical/IR in the night after it occurred, perhaps because of extinction, or possibly because observations were too early to catch the associated supernova (SN). Howeve, radio observations today (10 Oct) do locate a transient source within the galaxy, presumably the GRB afterglow. This makes GRB 1110005A the closest Swift-GRB by some margin, and the second closest of all time. Such bursts provide a Rosetta Stone for our understanding of the GRB phenomena, since their proximity allows exquisite data to be obtained, and for late time observations to fully characterise the nature of the stellar population. Unlike other observatories, Spitzer can observe GRB 111005A until the end of the 14th October, providing an opportunity to search for an associated SN at optical and IR wavelengths, and even probe through the dust that may be present in the host galaxy. This is a unique opportunity, and a role that only Spitzer can perform.

  10. GRB 971214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Adelberger, K. L.; Bloom, J. S.; Kundic, T.; Lubin, L.

    1998-01-01

    On December 28, 1997, Kundic and Lubin obtained spectra of the optical transient of GRB 971214 (IAUC #6788) with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (LRIS) mounted on the Keck II telescope. The seeing conditions were excellent. If the transient continued the power-law decay as indicated by the data from Halpern et al. (IAUC #6788) then by this epoch the light at this position should be dominated by the host (cf. Kulkarni et al. GCN #27; ATEL #5).

  11. GRB 081007 and GRB 090424: The Surrounding Medium, Outflows, and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhi-Ping; Covino, Stefano; Della Valle, Massimo; Ferrero, Patrizia; Fugazza, Dino; Malesani, Daniele; Melandri, Andrea; Pian, Elena; Salvaterra, Ruben; Bersier, David; Campana, Sergio; Cano, Zach; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Gomboc, Andreja; Gorosabel, Javier; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Haislip, Joshua B.; Hjorth, Jens; Kobayashi, Shiho; LaCluyze, Aaron P.; Marconi, Gianni; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Mundell, Carole G.; Piranomonte, Silvia; Reichart, Daniel E.; Sánchez-Ramírez, Rubén; Smith, Robert J.; Steele, Ian A.; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tanvir, Nial R.; Valenti, Stefano; Vergani, Susanna D.; Vestrand, Thomas; Walker, Emma S.; Woźniak, Przemek

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be Γ ~ 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of Γ > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  12. GRB 081007 AND GRB 090424: THE SURROUNDING MEDIUM, OUTFLOWS, AND SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Zhiping; Covino, Stefano; Fugazza, Dino; Melandri, Andrea; Campana, Sergio; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Della Valle, Massimo; Ferrero, Patrizia; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Pian, Elena; Salvaterra, Ruben; Bersier, David; Cano, Zach; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Haislip, Joshua B.; and others

    2013-09-10

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be {Gamma} {approx} 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of {Gamma} > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  13. The ``Christmas burst'' GRB 101225A revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Kann, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Long GRBs are related to the death of massive stars and reveal themselves through synchrotron emission from highly relativistic jets. The `Christmas Burst' GRB 101225A was an exceptionally long GRB with a thermal afterglow, very different from the standard GRB. Initially, no spectroscopic redshift could be obtained and SED modeling yielded z=0.33. A plausible model was a He-NS star merger where the He-star had ejected part of its envelope in the common envelope phase during inspiral. The interaction between the jet and the previously ejected shell can explains the thermal emission. We obtained deep spectroscopy of the host galaxy which leads to a correction of the redshift to z=0.847. Despite the higher redshift, our model is still valid and theoretically better justified than the alternative suggestion of a blue supergiant progenitor proposed by Levan et al. (2014) for several ``ultra-long'' GRBs.

  14. Galaxy Zoo: evidence for rapid, recent quenching within a population of AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Simmons, B. D.; Schawinski, K.; Bamford, S. P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Kruk, S. J.; Masters, K. L.; Urry, C. M.; Willett, K. W.; Wong, O. I.

    2016-12-01

    We present a population study of the star formation history of 1244 Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies, compared to 6107 inactive galaxies. A Bayesian method is used to determine individual galaxy star formation histories, which are then collated to visualize the distribution for quenching and quenched galaxies within each population. We find evidence for some of the Type 2 AGN host galaxies having undergone a rapid drop in their star formation rate within the last 2 Gyr. AGN feedback is therefore important at least for this population of galaxies. This result is not seen for the quenching and quenched inactive galaxies whose star formation histories are dominated by the effects of downsizing at earlier epochs, a secondary effect for the AGN host galaxies. We show that histories of rapid quenching cannot account fully for the quenching of all the star formation in a galaxy's lifetime across the population of quenched AGN host galaxies, and that histories of slower quenching, attributed to secular (non-violent) evolution, are also key in their evolution. This is in agreement with recent results showing that both merger-driven and non-merger processes are contributing to the co-evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes. The availability of gas in the reservoirs of a galaxy, and its ability to be replenished, appear to be the key drivers behind this co-evolution.

  15. GRB 070125 and the environments of spectral-line poor afterglow absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cia, A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Wiersema, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Björnsson, G.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Rol, E.; Schulze, S.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2011-11-01

    GRB 070125 is among the most energetic bursts detected and the most extensively observed so far. Nevertheless, unresolved issues are still open in the literature on the physics of the afterglow and on the gamma-ray burst (GRB) environment. In particular, GRB 070125 was claimed to have exploded in a galactic halo environment, based on the uniqueness of the optical spectrum and the non-detection of an underlying host galaxy. In this work we collect all publicly available data and address these issues by modelling the near-infrared to X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and studying the high signal-to-noise ratio Very Large Telescope/FOcal Reducer/low dispersion Spectrograph afterglow spectrum in comparison with a larger sample of GRB absorbers. The SED reveals a synchrotron cooling break in the ultraviolet, low equivalent hydrogen column density and little reddening caused by a Large Magellanic Cloud type or Small Magellanic Cloud type extinction curve. From the weak Mg II absorption at z= 1.5477 in the spectrum, we derived log N(Mg II) = 12.96+0.13- 0.18 and upper limits on the ionic column density of several metals. These suggest that the GRB absorber is most likely a Lyman limit system with a 0.03 < Z < 1.3 Z⊙ metallicity. The comparison with other GRB absorbers places GRB 070125 at the low end of the absorption-line equivalent width distribution, confirming that weak spectral features and spectral-line poor absorbers are not so uncommon in afterglow spectra. Moreover, we show that the effect of photoionization on the gas surrounding the GRB, combined with a low N(H I) along a short segment of the line of sight within the host galaxy, can explain the lack of spectral features in GRB 070125. Finally, the non-detection of an underlying galaxy is consistent with a faint GRB host galaxy, well within the GRB host brightness distribution. Thus, the possibility that GRB 070125 is simply located in the outskirts of a gas-rich, massive star-forming region inside its

  16. Dust effects on LGRB host galaxies in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignone, L. A.; Pellizza, L. J.; Tissera, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    The very energetic long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) constitute an extremely important tool to study the cosmological evolution of the Universe up to very high redshift. In this work we study the properties of LGRB host galaxies using numerical simulations of galaxy formation. We combine the galaxy catalogue of a hydrodynamical cosmological simulation with a model for LGRBs, which includes constrains for the mass and metallicity of their progenitors. This allows us to analyse the chemical and physical properties of both LGRBs and their hosts. A current problem is to disentangle the bias introduced on the observed host properties by a possible metallicity dependence of the progenitors, from the selection effects produced by dust obscuration in the hosts. We explore this issue by modelling the effect of dust in host galaxies, using radiative transfer codes. In this work we present preliminary results of this research line.

  17. What We Learn from the Afterglow of GRB 021211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; De Rújula, A.

    2003-08-01

    The behavior of the afterglow (AG) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) directly provides, in the cannonball (CB) model, information about the environment of their progenitor stars. The well-observed early temporal decline of the AG of GRB 021211 is precisely the one predicted in the presence of a progenitor's ``wind,'' which resulted in a density profile ~1/r2 around the star. The subsequent fast fading-which makes this GRB ``quasi-dark''-is the one anticipated if, farther away, the interstellar density is roughly constant and relatively high. The CB model fit to the AG clearly shows the presence of an associated supernova akin to SN 1998bw and allows even for the determination of the broadband spectrum of the host galaxy. GRB 990123 and GRB 021004, whose AGs were also measured very early, are also discussed.

  18. Discovery of a bright quasar without a massive host galaxy.

    PubMed

    Magain, Pierre; Letawe, Géraldine; Courbin, Frédéric; Jablonka, Pascale; Jahnke, Knud; Meylan, Georges; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2005-09-15

    A quasar is thought to be powered by the infall of matter onto a supermassive black hole at the centre of a massive galaxy. Because the optical luminosity of quasars exceeds that of their host galaxy, disentangling the two components can be difficult. This led in the 1990s to the controversial claim of the discovery of 'naked' quasars. Since then, the connection between quasars and galaxies has been well established. Here we report the discovery of a quasar lying at the edge of a gas cloud, whose size is comparable to that of a small galaxy, but whose spectrum shows no evidence for stars. The gas in the cloud is excited by the quasar itself. If a host galaxy is present, it is at least six times fainter than would normally be expected for such a bright quasar. The quasar is interacting dynamically with a neighbouring galaxy, whose gas might be feeding the black hole.

  19. The coevolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies at z [ge] 1: Galaxy morphology, gravitational lensing, and quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chien Yi

    Supermassive black holes are ubiquitous in nearby galaxies. The strong correlations between black hole masses and their host galaxy bulges suggest they are intimately connected. To understand their coevolution we study quasars where both quantities can be probed out to high redshifts. To overcome the well known obstacles in studying quasar hosts at z > 1, we study 28 gravitationally lensed host galaxies, located at 1 <= z s <= 4.5, which are stretched out into arcs and Einstein rings. Applying two new algorithms, GALFIT and LENSFIT, to images obtained in the HST NICMOS F160W filter, we clearly resolve the host galaxies. Many have evidences of multiple components, interaction, offset galaxy components, or bulges and disks. The host galaxies at z > 1 are mostly brighter than [Special characters omitted.] galaxies today, but would become fainter than [Special characters omitted.] today after accounting for passive evolution. Furthermore, they have modest sizes ( R e < 6 kpc), and the profiles of the hosts are roughly equally split between bulge dominated and disk dominated. Due to these evidences, the quasar hosts may not be fully evolved early-type galaxies undergoing passive evolution if they evolve into [Special characters omitted.] galaxies today. Moreover, comparing the hosts of radio-loud quasars and radio-quiet quasars, there is not a significant difference in their luminosities. Finally, we study the bulge luminosities ( L bulge ) and black hole masses ( [Special characters omitted.] ) at z [approximate] 1 and z [approximate] 2, finding that the hosts at z > 2 already lie near the same L bulge vs. [Special characters omitted.] relationship as for z = 0 normal galaxies . Accounting for an early-type galaxy evolution, they would fade below the relationship at present day. Therefore, the hosts at z [approximate] 2 must undergo a stellar mass buildup by a factor of 3-5, if they evolve into early-type galaxies. This implies their [Special characters omitted

  20. On the constraining observations of the dark GRB 001109 and the properties of a z = 0.398 radio selected starburst galaxy contained in its error box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Cerón, J. M.; Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Sokolov, V. V.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Dodonov, S. N.; Komarova, V. N.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Postnov, K. A.; Lisenfeld, U.; Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pedersen, H.; Rol, E.; Fliri, J.; Feldt, M.; Feulner, G.; Andersen, M. I.; Jensen, B. L.; Pérez Ramírez, M. D.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Israelian, G.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2004-09-01

    We present optical and NIR (near infrared) follow up observations of the GRB 001109 from 1 to 300 days after the burst. No transient emission was found at these wavelengths within this GRB's (Gamma Ray Burst) 50 arcsec radius BeppoSAX error box. Strong limits (3σ) are set with: R ⪆ 21, 10.2 h after the GRB; I ⪆ 23, 11.4 h after the GRB; H ⪆ 20.7, 9.9 h after the GRB; and KS⪆ 20, 9.6 h after the GRB. We discuss whether the radio source found in the GRB's error box (\\cite{taylor00}) might be related to the afterglow. We also present a multiwavelength study of a reddened starburst galaxy, found coincident with the potential radio and the X-ray afterglow. We show that our strong I band upper limit makes of the GRB 001109 the darkest one localised by the BeppoSAX's NFI (Narrow Field Instrument), and it is one of the most constraining upper limits on GRB afterglows to date. Further to it, the implications of these observations in the context of dark GRBs are considered. Based on observations made with telescopes at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (1.23 m + 3.50 m), at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (NOT + WHT), at the United States Naval Observatory (1.00 m) and at the Russian Academy of Sciences's Special Astrophysical Observatory (6.05 m). The NOT is operated on the island of San Miguel de la Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, in Spain's Observatorio del Roque de los Muchahos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. The Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán is operated in Calar Alto by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie of Heidelberg, jointly with Spain's Comisión Nacional de Astronomía.

  1. Do Low Surface Brightness Galaxies Host Stellar Bars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Sánchez García, Osbaldo

    2017-09-01

    With the aim of assessing if low surface brightness galaxies host stellar bars and by studying the dependence of the occurrence of bars as a function of surface brightness, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to construct a large volume-limited sample of galaxies and then segregate these galaxies as having low or high surface brightness in terms of their central surface brightness. We find that the fraction of low surface brightness galaxies hosting strong bars is systematically lower than that found for high surface brightness galaxies. The dependence of the bar fraction on the central surface brightness is mostly driven by a correlation of the surface brightness with the spin and the gas richness of the galaxies, showing only a minor dependence on the surface brightness. We also find that the length of the bars is strongly dependent on the surface brightness, and although some of this dependence is attributed to the gas content, even at a fixed gas-to-stellar mass ratio, high surface brightness galaxies host longer bars than their low surface brightness counterparts, which we attribute to an anticorrelation of the surface brightness with the spin.

  2. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Cheung, C. C.

    2007-05-01

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Classical double-lobed radio galaxies are characterized by a single pair of "active" radio lobes. A small subset show an additional pair of lower surface brightness 'wings' of emission, thus forming an overall winged or X-shaped appearance. Two competing mechanisms have been proposed to explain the "winged" morphology. One model posits that these are the remnants left over from a relatively recent merger of a binary supermassive black hole system. Others have argued that they result naturally from strong backflow in a radio jet cocoon expanding into an asymmetric medium. We used available Sloan Digital Sky Survey r-band images of 11 X-shaped sources to measure the host galaxy ellipticities. By analyzing the host galaxy shapes, we trace the surrounding gas distribution. The radio morphologies are compared to the host galaxy parameters to analogize between differing model expectations. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Student Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  3. Galaxies of all Shapes Host Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This artist's concept illustrates the two types of spiral galaxies that populate our universe: those with plump middles, or central bulges (upper left), and those lacking the bulge (foreground).

    New observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope provide strong evidence that the slender, bulgeless galaxies can, like their chubbier counterparts, harbor supermassive black holes at their cores. Previously, astronomers thought that a galaxy without a bulge could not have a supermassive black hole. In this illustration, jets shooting away from the black holes are depicted as thin streams.

    The findings are reshaping theories of galaxy formation, suggesting that a galaxy's 'waistline' does not determine whether it will be home to a big black hole.

  4. Deficiency of ''Thin'' Stellar Bars in Seyfert Host Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac; Peletier, Reynier F.; Knapen, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Using all available major samples of Seyfert galaxies and their corresponding control samples of closely matched non-active galaxies, we find that the bar ellipticities (or axial ratios) in Seyfert galaxies are systematically different from those in non-active galaxies. Overall, there is a deficiency of bars with large ellipticities (i.e., 'fat' or 'weak' bars) in Seyferts, compared to non-active galaxies. Accompanied with a large dispersion due to small number statistics, this effect is strictly speaking at the 2 sigma level. To obtain this result, the active galaxy samples of near-infrared surface photometry were matched to those of normal galaxies in type, host galaxy ellipticity, absolute magnitude, and, to some extent, in redshift. We discuss possible theoretical explanations of this phenomenon within the framework of galactic evolution, and, in particular, of radial gas redistribution in barred galaxies. Our conclusions provide further evidence that Seyfert hosts differ systematically from their non-active counterparts on scales of a few kpc.

  5. SN 2010ay Is a Luminous and Broad-Lined Type Ic Supernova Within a Low-Metallicity Host Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Valenti, S.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Chomiuk, L.; Berger, E.; Smartt, S.; Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S. D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report on our serendipitous pre-discovery detection and follow-up observations of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) 2010ay at z = 0.067 imaged by the Pan-STARRS1 3pi survey just approximately 4 days after explosion. The supernova (SN) had a peak luminosity, MR approx. -20.2 mag, significantly more luminous than known GRB-SNe and one of the most luminous SNe Ib/c ever discovered. The absorption velocity of SN 2010ay is v Si (is) approx. 19×10(exp 3) km s-1 at approximately 40 days after explosion, 2-5 times higher than other broad-lined SNe and similar to the GRB-SN 2010bh at comparable epochs. Moreover, the velocity declines approximately 2 times slower than other SNe Ic-BL and GRB-SNe. Assuming that the optical emission is powered by radioactive decay, the peak magnitude implies the synthesis of an unusually large mass of 56Ni, MNi = 0.9 solar mass. Applying scaling relations to the light curve, we estimate a total ejecta mass, Mej (is) approx. 4.7 solar mass, and total kinetic energy, EK (is) approx. 11 × 10(exp 51) erg. The ratio of MNi to Mej is approximately 2 times as large for SN 2010ay as typical GRB-SNe and may suggest an additional energy reservoir. The metallicity (log(O/H)PP04 + 12 = 8.19) of the explosion site within the host galaxy places SN 2010ay in the low-metallicity regime populated by GRB-SNe, and (is) approximately 0.5(0.2) dex lower than that typically measured for the host environments of normal (broad-lined) SNe Ic. We constrain any gamma-ray emission with E(gamma) (is) approximately less than 6 × 10(exp 48) erg (25-150 keV), and our deep radio follow-up observations with the Expanded Very Large Array rule out relativistic ejecta with energy E (is) approximately greater than 10(exp 48) erg. We therefore rule out the association of a relativistic outflow like those that accompanied SN 1998bw and traditional long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but we place less-stringent constraints on a weak afterglow like that seen from XRF

  6. SN 2010ay is a Luminous and Broad-lined Type Ic Supernova within a Low-metallicity Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Valenti, S.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Chomiuk, L.; Berger, E.; Smartt, S.; Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Levesque, E. M.; Narayan, G.; Botticella, M. T.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Terada, Y.; Gehrels, N.; Golenetskii, S.; Mazets, E.; Cline, T.; von Kienlin, A.; Boynton, W.; Chambers, K. C.; Grav, T.; Heasley, J. N.; Hodapp, K. W.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Kirshner, R. P.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Luppino, G. A.; Lupton, R. H.; Magnier, E. A.; Monet, D. G.; Morgan, J. S.; Onaka, P. M.; Price, P. A.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waterson, M. F.

    2012-09-01

    We report on our serendipitous pre-discovery detection and follow-up observations of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) 2010ay at z = 0.067 imaged by the Pan-STARRS1 3π survey just ~4 days after explosion. The supernova (SN) had a peak luminosity, MR ≈ -20.2 mag, significantly more luminous than known GRB-SNe and one of the most luminous SNe Ib/c ever discovered. The absorption velocity of SN 2010ay is v Si ≈ 19 × 103 km s-1 at ~40 days after explosion, 2-5 times higher than other broad-lined SNe and similar to the GRB-SN 2010bh at comparable epochs. Moreover, the velocity declines ~2 times slower than other SNe Ic-BL and GRB-SNe. Assuming that the optical emission is powered by radioactive decay, the peak magnitude implies the synthesis of an unusually large mass of 56Ni, M Ni = 0.9 M ⊙. Applying scaling relations to the light curve, we estimate a total ejecta mass, M ej ≈ 4.7 M ⊙, and total kinetic energy, EK ≈ 11 × 1051 erg. The ratio of M Ni to M ej is ~2 times as large for SN 2010ay as typical GRB-SNe and may suggest an additional energy reservoir. The metallicity (log (O/H)PP04 + 12 = 8.19) of the explosion site within the host galaxy places SN 2010ay in the low-metallicity regime populated by GRB-SNe, and ~0.5(0.2) dex lower than that typically measured for the host environments of normal (broad-lined) SNe Ic. We constrain any gamma-ray emission with E γ <~ 6 × 1048 erg (25-150 keV), and our deep radio follow-up observations with the Expanded Very Large Array rule out relativistic ejecta with energy E >~ 1048 erg. We therefore rule out the association of a relativistic outflow like those that accompanied SN 1998bw and traditional long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but we place less-stringent constraints on a weak afterglow like that seen from XRF 060218. If this SN did not harbor a GRB, these observations challenge the importance of progenitor metallicity for the production of relativistic ejecta and suggest that other parameters

  7. HOST GALAXIES OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, A.; Cheung, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, active galaxies that emit much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies has an “X”-or winged-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being a realignment of the black hole within the AGN and the second positing that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium, causing backflow and producing secondary wings. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, the distribution of the stellar mass is compared to the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN. Results show elliptical host galaxies with an orthogonal offset between the semi-major axis of the host galaxy and the secondary radio wings, which lends support to the hydrodynamical model. However, results also show circular host galaxies with radio wings, making the realignment scenario a more likely model to describe the formation of these X-shaped radio sources.

  8. Near-Infrared Properties of Quasar and Seyfert Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kim Katris

    1995-01-01

    We present near-infrared images of nearly 100 host galaxies of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our quasar sample is comprised of the 50 quasars from the Palomar Green Bright Quasar Survey with redshifts z\\<= 0.3. We have restricted the redshift range to ensure adequate spatial resolution, galaxy detectability, and minimal distance-dependent effects, while still giving a large sample of objects. For lower-luminosity AGN we have chosen to image the CfA Seyfert sample. This sample is composed of 48 Seyferts, roughly equally divided among types 1, 1.5-1.9, and 2. This sample was spectroscopically selected, and, therefore, is not biased towards Seyferts with significant star formation. Taken together, these samples allow a statistical look at the continuity of host-galaxy properties over a factor of 10,000 in nuclear luminosity. We find the near-infrared light to be a good tracer of luminous mass in these galaxies. The Seyferts are found in galaxies of type S0 to Sc. The radio quiet quasars live in similar kinds of galaxies spanning the same range of mass centered around L*. However, for the most luminous quasars, there is a correlation between the minimum host-galaxy mass and the luminosity of the active nucleus. Radio-loud quasars are generally found in hosts more massive than an L* galaxy. We also detect a population of low-mass host galaxies with very low-luminosity Seyfert nuclei. The low luminosity quasars and the Seyferts both tend to lie in host galaxies seen preferentially face-on, which suggests there is a substantial amount of obscuration coplanar with the galaxian disk. The obscuration must be geometrically thick (thickness-to-radius ~1) and must cover a significant fraction of the narrow line region (r>100 pc). We have examined our images for signs of perturbations that could drive fuel toward the galaxy nucleus, but there are none we can identify at a significant level. The critical element for fueling is evidently not reflected clearly in the large scale

  9. Near-infrared properties of quasar and Seyfert host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kim Katris

    1994-01-01

    We present near-infrared images of nearly 100 host galaxies of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our quasar sample is comprised of the 50 quasars from the Palomar Green Bright Quasar Survey with redshifts z less than or equal to 0.3. We have restricted the redshift range to ensure adequate spatial resolution, galaxy detectability, and minimal distance-dependent effects, while still giving a large sample of objects. For lower-luminosity AGN we have chosen to image the CfA Seyfert sample. This sample is composed of 48 Seyferts, roughly equally divided among types 1, 1.5-1.9, and 2. This sample was spectroscopically selected, and, therefore, is not biased towards Seyferts with significant star formation. Taken together, these samples allow a statistical look at the continuity of host galaxy properties over a factor of 10,000 in nuclear luminosity. We find the near-infrared light to be a good tracer of luminous mass in these galaxies. The Seyferts are found in galaxies of type SO to Sc. The radio quiet quasars live in similar kinds of galaxies spanning the same range of mass centered around L(*). However, for the most luminous quasars, there is a correlation between the minimum host galaxy mass and the luminosity of the active nucleus. Radio-loud quasars are generally found in hosts more massive than an L(*) galaxy. We also detect a population of low mass host galaxies with very low luminosity Seyfert nuclei. The low luminosity quasars and the Seyferts both tend to lie in host galaxies seen preferentially face-on, which suggests there is a substantial amount of obscuration coplanar with the galaxian disk. The obscuration must be geometrically thick (thickness-to-radius approximately 1) and must cover a significant fraction of the narrow line region (r greater than 100 pc). We have examined our images for signs of perturbations that could drive fuel toward the galaxy nucleus, but there are none we can identify at a significant level. The critical element for fueling is

  10. Comparing the host galaxies of different type supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y. C.; Shao, X.; Dennefeld, M.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhou, L.; Hammer, F.

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae, including Type Ia, II and Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the SDSS DR7. We further selected 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations > 15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. The diagrams related to D n (4000), HδA, stellar masses, SFRs and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and Absorp galaxies. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures < 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased towards higher 12+log(O/H) (~0.1dex) at a given stellar mass, suggesting the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  11. The environment of x ray selected BL Lacs: Host galaxies and galaxy clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtz, Ron; Stocke, John T.; Ellingson, Erica; Yee, Howard K. C.

    1993-01-01

    Using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we have imaged a complete, flux-limited sample of Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey BL Lacertae objects in order to study the properties of BL Lac host galaxies and to use quantitative methods to determine the richness of their galaxy cluster environments.

  12. The host galaxies of quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Timothy Scott

    The results of an archival study of 71 medium-redshift QSOs observed with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope are presented. The QSOs have magnitudes MV ≤ -23 mag (total nuclear + host light) and red shifts 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 0.46, with no additional criteria imposed. For each object, the nuclear light component is subtracted, using two-dimensional image fits, and the luminosity and size of the underlying host galaxy are determined by fitting both an r1/4 and an exponential light profile, which represent a bulge and disk component, respectively. The total number of objects considered is more than triple that of previous studies, and the general QSO population for redshifts z ≤ 0.46 is reasonably sampled. A luminosity function which is not grossly affected by selection criteria is derived for the QSO host galaxies. This luminosity function is compared with that of normal galaxies and a ratio of luminosity functions for QSO hosts and normal galaxies is derived. The logarithm of this ratio follows a nearly straight line when plotted against galaxy magnitude. Previous results which indicate that QSO hosts are more luminous than typical bright galaxies are confirmed. The relationship between host and nuclear luminosity is studied in the context of morphology and radio-loudness. The surface brightnesses of the host galaxies are compared to the known relationships between the effective surface magnitude and size of Brightest Cluster Galaxies. The surface brightness distribution is also examined in the context of radio-loudness and the merger history of the hosts. Black hole masses for a subset of the QSOs are taken from the literature and used to calculate the Eddington limit for those objects. The black hole mass, the nuclear luminosity, and the nuclear luminosity as a fraction of the Eddington limit are examined as functions of each other. Multi-parameter analyses are performed using Principal Components Analysis to search for

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies Have "Normal" Luminosities.

    PubMed

    Schaefer

    2000-04-10

    The galactic environment of gamma-ray bursts can provide good evidence about the nature of the progenitor system, with two old arguments implying that the burst host galaxies are significantly subluminous. New data and new analysis have now reversed this picture: (1) Even though the first two known host galaxies are indeed greatly subluminous, the next eight hosts have absolute magnitudes typical for a population of field galaxies. A detailed analysis of the 16 known hosts (10 with redshifts) shows them to be consistent with a Schechter luminosity function with R*=-21.8+/-1.0, as expected for normal galaxies. (2) Bright bursts from the Interplanetary Network are typically 18 times brighter than the faint bursts with redshifts; however, the bright bursts do not have galaxies inside their error boxes to limits deeper than expected based on the luminosities for the two samples being identical. A new solution to this dilemma is that a broad burst luminosity function along with a burst number density varying as the star formation rate will require the average luminosity of the bright sample (>6x1058 photons s-1 or>1.7x1052 ergs s-1) to be much greater than the average luminosity of the faint sample ( approximately 1058 photons s-1 or approximately 3x1051 ergs s-1). This places the bright bursts at distances for which host galaxies with a normal luminosity will not violate the observed limits. In conclusion, all current evidence points to gamma-ray burst host galaxies being normal in luminosity.

  14. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE AND HOST GALAXY STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2012-11-10

    We have used images and spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to examine the host galaxies of 519 nearby supernovae (SN). The colors at the sites of the explosions, as well as chemical abundances, and specific star formation rates (SFRs) of the host galaxies provide circumstantial evidence on the origin of each SN type. We examine separately SN II, SN IIn, SN IIb, SN Ib, SN Ic, and SN Ic with broad lines (SN Ic-BL). For host galaxies that have multiple spectroscopic fibers, we select the fiber with host radial offset most similar to that of the SN. Type Ic SN explode at small host offsets, and their hosts have exceptionally strongly star-forming, metal-rich, and dusty stellar populations near their centers. The SN Ic-BL and SN IIb explode in exceptionally blue locations, and, in our sample, we find that the host spectra for SN Ic-BL show lower average oxygen abundances than those for SN Ic. SN IIb host fiber spectra are also more metal-poor than those for SN Ib, although a significant difference exists for only one of two strong-line diagnostics. SN Ic-BL host galaxy emission lines show strong central specific SFRs. In contrast, we find no strong evidence for different environments for SN IIn compared to the sites of SN II. Because our SN sample is constructed from a variety of sources, there is always a risk that sampling methods can produce misleading results. We have separated the SN discovered by targeted surveys from those discovered by galaxy-impartial searches to examine these questions and show that our results do not depend sensitively on the discovery technique.

  15. The host galaxies of AGN with powerful relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguín-Iglesias, A.; León-Tavares, J.; Kotilainen, J. K.; Chavushyan, V.; Tornikoski, M.; Valtaoja, E.; Añorve, C.; Valdés, J.; Carrasco, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep Near-infrared (NIR) images of a sample of 19 intermediate-redshift (0.310^27 WHz^-1), previously classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars. We also compile host galaxy and nuclear magnitudes for blazars from literature. The combined sample (this work and compilation) contains 100 radio-loud AGN with host galaxy detections and a broad range of radio luminosities L1.4GHz = 10^23.7 - 10^28.3WHz^-1, allowing us to divide our sample into high-excitation (quasar-mode; HERGs) and low-excitation (radio-mode; LERGs) radio galaxies. The host galaxies of our sample are bright and seem to follow the Kormendy relation. Nuclear emission (dominated by non-thermal mechanisms) and host-galaxy magnitudes show a slightly negative weak trend for LERGs. On the other hand, the m_bulge -m_nuc relation is statistically significant for HERGs. Although it may be affected by selection effects, this correlation suggests a close coupling between the relativistic jets and their host galaxy. Our findings are consistent with the excitation state (LERG/HERG) scenario. In this view, LERGs emit the bulk of their energy in the form of radio jets, producing a strong feedback mechanism, and HERGs are affected by galaxy mergers and interactions, which provide a common supply of cold gas to feed both nuclear activity and star formation episodes.

  16. Discovery of rare double-lobe radio galaxies hosted in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sievers, Jonathan; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Hilton, Matt; Beelen, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Double-lobe radio galaxies in the local Universe have traditionally been found to be hosted in elliptical or lenticular galaxies. We report the discovery of four spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies (J0836+0532, J1159+5820, J1352+3126, and J1649+2635) that are discovered by cross-matching a large sample of 187 005 spiral galaxies from SDSS DR7 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7) to the full catalogues of FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm) and NVSS (NRAO VLA Sky Survey). J0836+0532 is reported for the first time. The host galaxies are forming stars at an average rate of 1.7-10 M⊙ yr-1 and possess supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses of a few times 108 M⊙. Their radio morphologies are similar to Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies with total projected linear sizes ranging from 86 to 420 kpc, but their total 1.4-GHz radio luminosities are only in the range 1024-1025 W Hz-1. We propose that the formation of spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies can be attributed to more than one factor, such as the occurrence of strong interactions, mergers, and the presence of unusually massive SMBHs, such that the spiral structures are not destroyed. Only one of our sources (J1649+2635) is found in a cluster environment, indicating that processes other than accretion through cooling flows e.g. galaxy-galaxy mergers or interactions could be plausible scenarios for triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei activity in spiral galaxies.

  17. Jet Feedback on the Hosts of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, L.; Ogle, P. M.; Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback due to active galactic nuclei is one of the key components of the current paradigm of galaxy evolution; however our understanding of the process remains incomplete. Radio galaxies with strong rotational H_2 emission provide an interesting window into the effect of radio jet feedback on their host galaxies, since the large masses of warm (>100 K) H_2 cannot solely be heated by star formation, instead requiring jet-driven ISM turbulence to power the molecular emission. I will discuss the insights multiwavelength (X-ray to submm) observations of 22 H_2 luminous radio galaxies yield on the process of jet feedback in these galaxies and the impact on star formation activity. Specifically, I find that the diffuse X-ray and warm H_2 emission are consistent with both being powered by dissipation of the jet's mechanical energy into the interstellar medium (ISM) and that the resulting turbulence injected into the ISM by this process results in the suppression of star formation activity by a factor of 3--6. The hosts of these galaxies show a wide range of star formation activity and optical and IR colors, indicating a diversity of evolutionary states in which this process may be active.

  18. Host galaxies are the obscurers of Gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes; Schulze, Steve; Bauer, Franz E.

    2017-08-01

    The luminous, high-energy emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) makes them efficient probes of the high-redshift universe. The origin of the obscuration of gamma-ray burst afterglow is still unclear. We study the afterglows metal column densities along the line-of-sight of all Swift-detected long GRBs with an improved hierarchical Bayesian analysis methodology. We characterise follow-up biases and side-step them using SHOALS, an unbiased sub-sample with highly complete follow-up. That survey also measures Spitzer host masses. Overall, the column densities shows little redshift evolution but a significant correlation with host stellar mass. A simple geometrical model explains the width and shape of the column density distribution and the trend with galaxy mass correlation. Our findings implicate the host's galaxy-scale metal gas as the dominant obscurer. From a galaxy evolution perspective, our study places new constraints on the metal gas mass inside galaxies at z=0.5-4. We compare these with modern cosmological simulations (Illustris and EAGLE) and discuss implications for the obscuration of other sources inside high redshift galaxies, such as active galactic nuclei.

  19. Constraints on Short Gamma-ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at approx. 2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5(sigma) limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type IC hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or IC SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts - supernovae

  20. Constraints on Short Gamma-ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at approx. 2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5(sigma) limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type IC hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or IC SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts - supernovae

  1. Constraints on Short Gamma-Ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.; Andersen, M.I.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Jensen, B.L.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Castro-Ceron, J.M.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A.; Pedersen, K.; Rhoads, J.E.; Tanvir, N.R.; Watson, D.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /IAA, Granada /KIPAC, Menlo Park /TLS, Tautenburg /NASA, Marshall /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Amsterdam U., Astron. Inst. /Aarhus U. /Potsdam, Astrophys. Inst. /European Southern Obs., Chile /Leicester U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Hertfordshire U.

    2005-06-15

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at {approx}2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type Ic hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or Ic SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB.

  2. Coevolution (Or Not) of Supermassive Black Holes and Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Ho, Luis C.

    2013-08-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) have been found in 85 galaxies by dynamical modeling of spatially resolved kinematics. The Hubble Space Telescope revolutionized BH research by advancing the subject from its proof-of-concept phase into quantitative studies of BH demographics. Most influential was the discovery of a tight correlation between BH mass [Formula: see text] and the velocity dispersion σ of the bulge component of the host galaxy. Together with similar correlations with bulge luminosity and mass, this led to the widespread belief that BHs and bulges coevolve by regulating each other's growth. Conclusions based on one set of correlations from [Formula: see text] in brightest cluster ellipticals to [Formula: see text] in the smallest galaxies dominated BH work for more than a decade. New results are now replacing this simple story with a richer and more plausible picture in which BHs correlate differently with different galaxy components. A reasonable aim is to use this progress to refine our understanding of BH-galaxy coevolution. BHs with masses of 105-106M⊙ are found in many bulgeless galaxies. Therefore, classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges are not necessary for BH formation. On the other hand, although they live in galaxy disks, BHs do not correlate with galaxy disks. Also, any [Formula: see text] correlations with the properties of disk-grown pseudobulges and dark matter halos are weak enough to imply no close coevolution. The above and other correlations of host-galaxy parameters with each other and with [Formula: see text] suggest that there are four regimes of BH feedback. (1) Local, secular, episodic, and stochastic feeding of small BHs in largely bulgeless galaxies involves too little energy to result in coevolution. (2) Global feeding in major, wet galaxy mergers rapidly grows giant BHs in short-duration, quasar-like events whose energy feedback does affect galaxy evolution. The resulting hosts are classical bulges and coreless

  3. Simple stellar population modelling of low S/N galaxy spectra and quasar host galaxy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, G.; Tremonti, C. A.; Hooper, E. J.; Wolf, M. J.; Sheinis, A. I.; Richards, J. W.

    2015-02-01

    To study the effect of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on their host galaxies it is important to study the hosts when the SMBH is near its peak activity. A method to investigate the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars is to obtain optical spectra at positions offset from the nucleus where the relative contribution of the quasar and host is comparable. However, at these extended radii the galaxy surface brightness is often low (20-22 mag arcsec-2) and the resulting spectrum might have such low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) that it hinders analysis with standard stellar population modelling techniques. To address this problem, we have developed a method that can recover galaxy star formation histories (SFHs) from rest-frame optical spectra with S/N ˜ 5 Å-1. This method uses the statistical technique diffusion k-means to tailor the stellar population modelling basis set. Our diffusion k-means minimal basis set, composed of four broad age bins, is successful in recovering a range of galaxy SFHs. Additionally, using an analytic prescription for seeing conditions, we are able to simultaneously model scattered quasar light and the SFH of quasar host galaxies (QHGs). We use synthetic data to compare results of our novel method with previous techniques. We also present the modelling results on a previously published QHG and show that galaxy properties recovered from a diffusion k-means basis set are less sensitive to noise added to this QHG spectrum. Our new method has a clear advantage in recovering information from QHGs and could also be applied to the analysis of other low S/N galaxy spectra such as those typically obtained for high redshift objects or integral field spectroscopic surveys.

  4. Disentangling AGN-Host Galaxy Interactions with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2014-11-01

    The circum-nuclear region in active galaxies is often complex with presence of high excitation gas, collimated radio outflow, and star forming regions, besides the active central supermassive black hole. In Chandra studies of a number of archetypal Seyfert galaxies to investigate AGN-host galaxy interaction, we were able to evaluate the mass outflow rate and shock heating by radio jet. For galaxies in the throes of a violent merging event such as NGC6240, we were able to resolve 70MK hot gas surrounding the double nuclei and discovered a large scale soft X-ray halo. The unique resolving power of Chandra also enables more discovery of such dual AGN systems and signs of past AGN outburst activities.

  5. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, Alessondra; /Wellesley Coll. /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies have an ''X''-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being through the merger of a binary supermassive black hole system and the second being that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, we probe the distribution of the stellar mass to compare the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN.

  6. Identifying the host galaxy of gravitational wave signals

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, Laura K.; Sutton, Patrick J.

    2010-11-15

    One of the goals of the current LIGO-GEO-Virgo science run is to identify transient gravitational wave (GW) signals in near real time to allow follow-up electromagnetic (EM) observations. An EM counterpart could increase the confidence of the GW detection and provide insight into the nature of the source. Current GW-EM campaigns target potential host galaxies based on overlap with the GW sky error box. We propose a new statistic to identify the most likely host galaxy, ranking galaxies based on their position, distance, and luminosity. We test our statistic with Monte Carlo simulations of GWs produced by coalescing binaries of neutron stars and black holes, one of the most promising sources for ground-based GW detectors. Considering signals accessible to current detectors, we find that when imaging a single galaxy, our statistic correctly identifies the true host {approx}20% to {approx}50% of the time, depending on the masses of the binary components. With five narrow-field images the probability of imaging the true host increases from {approx}50% to {approx}80%. When collectively imaging groups of galaxies using large field-of-view telescopes, the probability improves from {approx}30% to {approx}60% for a single image and from {approx}70% to {approx}90% for five images. For the advanced generation of detectors (circa 2015+), and considering binaries within 100 Mpc (the reach of the galaxy catalogue used), the probability is {approx}40% for one narrow-field image, {approx}75% for five narrow-field images, {approx}65% for one wide-field image, and {approx}95% for five wide-field images, irrespective of binary type.

  7. Type Ia supernova host galaxies as seen with IFU spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanishev, V.; Rodrigues, M.; Mourão, A.; Flores, H.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been widely used in cosmology as distance indicators. However, to fully exploit their potential in cosmology, a better control over systematic uncertainties is required. Some of the uncertainties are related to the unknown nature of the SN Ia progenitors. Aims: We aim to test the use of integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy for correlating the properties of nearby SNe Ia with the properties of their host galaxies at the location of the SNe. The results are to be compared with those obtained from an analysis of the total host spectrum. The goal is to explore this path of constraining the nature of the SN Ia progenitors and further improve the use of SNe Ia in cosmology. Methods: We used the wide-field IFU spectrograph PMAS/PPAK at the 3.5 m telescope of Calar Alto Observatory to observe six nearby spiral galaxies that hosted SNe Ia. Spatially resolved 2D maps of the properties of the ionized gas and the stellar populations were derived. Results: Five of the observed galaxies have an ongoing star formation rate of 1-5 M⊙ yr-1 and mean stellar population ages ~5 Gyr. The sixth galaxy shows no star formation and has an about 12 Gyr old stellar population. All galaxies have stellar masses larger than 2 × 1010 M⊙ and metallicities above solar. Four galaxies show negative radial metallicity gradients of the ionized gas up to -0.058 dex kpc-1 and one has nearly uniform metallicity with a possible shallow positive slope. The stellar components show shallower negative metallicity gradients up to -0.03 dex kpc-1. We find no clear correlation between the properties of the galaxy and those of the supernovae, which may be because of the small ranges spanned by the galaxy parameters. However, we note that the Hubble residuals are on average positive while negative Hubble residuals are expected for SNe Ia in massive hosts such as the galaxies in our sample. Conclusions: The IFU spectroscopy on 4-m telescopes is a viable technique for

  8. EXTREME HOST GALAXY GROWTH IN POWERFUL EARLY-EPOCH RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, Peter; Haas, Martin; Leipski, Christian; Wilkes, Belinda

    2012-10-01

    During the first half of the universe's life, a heyday of star formation must have occurred because many massive galaxies are in place after that epoch in cosmic history. Our observations with the revolutionary Herschel Space Observatory reveal vigorous optically obscured star formation in the ultra-massive hosts of many powerful high-redshift 3C quasars and radio galaxies. This symbiotic occurrence of star formation and black hole driven activity is in marked contrast to recent results dealing with Herschel observations of X-ray-selected active galaxies. Three archetypal radio galaxies at redshifts 1.132, 1.575, and 2.474 are presented here, with inferred star formation rates of hundreds of solar masses per year. A series of spectacular coeval active galactic nucleus/starburst events may have formed these ultra-massive galaxies and their massive central black holes during their relatively short lifetimes.

  9. Quasar Metallicities and Host Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leah, Simon E.; Hamann, F. W.

    2006-12-01

    From studies of galaxies in the local Universe we find the masses of the galactic spheroidal component corresponds with the mass of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). This relation is known as the M(gal) M(BH) relation, and suggests a close relationship between the formation of the galaxy and the black hole. We study the metallicities near quasars at high redshift to observe this formation process in action. Associated absorption lines (AALs) provide us with a unique tool for this study, because these lines have a high probability of forming close to the quasar. Most of the work so far, using the emission lines, suggests that quasar environments are typically metal rich, with gas-phase metallicities near solar or higher at all observed redshifts. However, other independant abundance checks, such as AALs, are essential in order to confirm these results. We use very high resolution echelle spectra from VLT-UVES for 8 high redshift (z of 2 to z of 4.6) quasars, selected to contain candidate intrinsic absorbers, and ecompassing a typical rest-frame spectral range from approximatly 900 Angstroms to 2500 Angstroms, designed to include at least Lyman alpha and C IV spectral features. We perform one of the first analyses of absorption line metallicities in high redshift quasars and present lower limits on column densities, as well as estimates for the absorber locations relative to the quasar. We place rough estimates on the abundances where possible. We find covering fractions which vary with velocity, and a significant fraction of absorption lines which exhibit variability, indicating their intrinsic nature. Saturated lines inhibit concrete abundance analysis, but present excellent opportunities for future research proposals.

  10. Quasar Metallicities and Host Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Leah; Hamann, F.

    2007-12-01

    From studies of galaxies in the local Universe we find the masses of the galactic spheroidal component corresponds with the mass of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). This relation is known as the M(gal) - M(BH) relation, and suggests a close relationship between the formation of the galaxy and the black hole. We study the metallicities near quasars at high redshift to observe this formation process in action. Associated absorption lines (AALs) provide us with a unique tool for this study, because these lines have a high probability of forming close to the quasar. Most of the work so far, using the emission lines, suggests that quasar environments are typically metal rich, with gas-phase metallicities near solar or higher at all observed redshifts. However, other independent abundance checks, such as AALs, are essential in order to confirm these results. We use very high resolution echelle spectra from VLT-UVES, Keck-HIRES and Magellan-MIKE for 18 high redshift (z of 2 to z of 4.6) quasars, selected to contain candidate intrinsic absorbers, and encompassing a typical rest-frame spectral range from approximately 900 Angstroms to 2500 Angstroms, designed to include at least Lyman alpha and C IV spectral features. We perform one of the first analyses of absorption line metallicities in high redshift quasars and present column densities, as well as estimates for the absorber locations relative to the quasar. We place solid limits on the C/H abundances, and find a wide range of values, from one hundredth solar to several times solar. We find covering fractions which vary with velocity, indicating the intrinsic nature of the absorbing gas. Saturated lines inhibit concrete abundance analysis in some systems, but are still useful for placing limits based on Gaussian fits to the lines.

  11. The Host Galaxies of Micro-Jansky Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchsinger, K. M.; Lacy, M.; Jones, K. M.; Mauduit, J. C.; Pforr, J.; Surace, J. A.; Vaccari, M.; Farrah, D.; Gonzales-Solares, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Maraston, C.; Marchetti, L.; Oliver, S.; Afonso, J.; Cappozi, D.; Sajina, A.

    2015-09-01

    We combine a deep 0.5 deg2, 1.4 GHz deep radio survey in the Lockman Hole with infrared and optical data in the same field, including the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) and UKIDSS near-infrared surveys, to make the largest study to date of the host galaxies of radio sources with typical radio flux densities ˜ 50 μJy. 87% (1274/1467) of radio sources have identifications in SERVS to {AB}≈ 23.1 at 3.6 or 4.5μm, and 9% are blended with bright objects (mostly stars), leaving only 4% (59 objects), which are too faint to confidently identify in the near-infrared. We are able to estimate photometric redshifts for 68% of the radio sources. We use mid-infrared diagnostics to show that the source population consists of a mixture of star-forming galaxies, rapidly accreting (cold mode) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and low accretion rate (hot mode) AGNs, with neither AGNs nor star-forming galaxies clearly dominating. We see the breakdown in the K-z relation in faint radio source samples, and show that it is due to radio source populations becoming dominated by sources with radio luminosities ˜ {10}23 {{WHz}}-1. At these luminosities, both the star-forming galaxies and the cold mode AGNs have hosts with stellar luminosities of about a factor of two lower than those of hot mode AGNs, which continue to reside in only the most massive hosts. We show that out to at least z˜ 2, galaxies with stellar masses \\gt {10}11.5 {M}⊙ have radio-loud fractions up to ˜30%. This is consistent with there being a sufficient number of radio sources for radio-mode feedback to play a role in galaxy evolution.

  12. On the environments of Type Ia supernovae within host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; James, P. A.; Förster, F.; González-Gaitán, S.; Habergham, S. M.; Hamuy, M.; Lyman, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    We present constraints on Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) progenitors through an analysis of the environments found at the explosion sites of 102 events within star-forming host galaxies. Hα and Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-ultraviolet (UV) images are used to trace on-going and recent star formation (SF), while broad-band B, R, J, K imaging is also analysed. Using pixel statistics we find that SNe Ia show the lowest degree of association with Hα emission of all supernova (SN) types. It is also found that they do not trace near-UV emission. As the latter traces SF on time-scales less than 100 Myr, this rules out any extreme `prompt' delay times as the dominant progenitor channel of SNe Ia. SNe Ia best trace the B-band light distribution of their host galaxies. This implies that the population within star-forming galaxies is dominated by relatively young progenitors. Splitting SNe by their (B - V) colours at maximum light, `redder' events show a higher degree of association with H II regions and are found more centrally within hosts. We discuss possible explanations of this result in terms of line-of-sight extinction and progenitor effects. No evidence for correlations between SN stretch and environment properties is observed.

  13. Molecular Gas in Three z ˜ 7 Quasar Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venemans, Bram P.; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Weiß, Axel; Findlay, Joseph R.; McMahon, Richard G.; Sutherland, Will J.; Meijerink, Rowin

    2017-08-01

    We present ALMA band 3 observations of the CO(6-5), CO(7-6), and [C i] 369 μm emission lines in three of the highest-redshift quasar host galaxies at 6.6< z< 6.9. These measurements constitute the highest-redshift CO detections to date. The target quasars have previously been detected in [C ii] 158 μm emission and the underlying FIR dust continuum. We detect (spatially unresolved, at a resolution of >2″, or ≳14 kpc) CO emission in all three quasar hosts. In two sources, we detect the continuum emission around 400 μm (rest-frame), and in one source we detect [C i] at low significance. We derive molecular gas reservoirs of (1-3) × 1010 {M}⊙ in the quasar hosts, i.e., approximately only 10 times the mass of their central supermassive black holes. The extrapolated [C ii]-to-CO(1-0) luminosity ratio is 2500-4200, consistent with measurements in galaxies at lower redshift. The detection of the [C i] line in one quasar host galaxy and the limit on the [C i] emission in the other two hosts enables a first characterization of the physical properties of the interstellar medium in z ˜ 7 quasar hosts. In the sources, the derived global CO/[C ii]/[C i] line ratios are consistent with expectations from photodissociation regions, but not X-ray-dominated regions. This suggest that quantities derived from the molecular gas and dust emission are related to ongoing star-formation activity in the quasar hosts, providing further evidence that the quasar hosts studied here harbor intense starbursts in addition to their active nucleus.

  14. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF HOST GALAXIES OF EXTRAGALACTIC NUCLEAR WATER MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Zaw, Ingyin; Blanton, Michael R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2011-12-01

    We study the optical properties of the host galaxies of nuclear 22 GHz ({lambda} = 1.35 cm) water masers. To do so, we cross-match the galaxy sample surveyed for water maser emission (123 detections and 3806 non-detections) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) low-redshift galaxy sample (z < 0.05). Out of 1636 galaxies with SDSS photometry, we identify 48 detections; out of the 1063 galaxies that also have SDSS spectroscopy, we identify 33 detections. We find that maser detection rate is higher at higher optical luminosity (M{sub B} ), larger velocity dispersion ({sigma}), and higher [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity, with [O III] {lambda}5007 being the dominant factor. These detection rates are essentially the result of the correlations of isotropic maser luminosity with all three of these variables. These correlations are natural if maser strength increases with central black hole mass and the level of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We also find that the detection rate is higher in galaxies with higher extinction. Based on these results, we propose that maser surveys seeking to efficiently find masers should rank AGN targets by extinction-corrected [O III] {lambda}5007 flux when available. This prioritization would improve maser detection efficiency, from an overall {approx}3% without pre-selection to {approx}16% for the strongest intrinsic [O III] {lambda}5007 emitters, by a factor of {approx}5.

  15. Optical Properties of Host Galaxies of Extragalactic Nuclear Water Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun; Zaw, Ingyin; Blanton, Michael R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2011-12-01

    We study the optical properties of the host galaxies of nuclear 22 GHz (λ = 1.35 cm) water masers. To do so, we cross-match the galaxy sample surveyed for water maser emission (123 detections and 3806 non-detections) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) low-redshift galaxy sample (z < 0.05). Out of 1636 galaxies with SDSS photometry, we identify 48 detections; out of the 1063 galaxies that also have SDSS spectroscopy, we identify 33 detections. We find that maser detection rate is higher at higher optical luminosity (MB ), larger velocity dispersion (σ), and higher [O III] λ5007 luminosity, with [O III] λ5007 being the dominant factor. These detection rates are essentially the result of the correlations of isotropic maser luminosity with all three of these variables. These correlations are natural if maser strength increases with central black hole mass and the level of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We also find that the detection rate is higher in galaxies with higher extinction. Based on these results, we propose that maser surveys seeking to efficiently find masers should rank AGN targets by extinction-corrected [O III] λ5007 flux when available. This prioritization would improve maser detection efficiency, from an overall ~3% without pre-selection to ~16% for the strongest intrinsic [O III] λ5007 emitters, by a factor of ~5.

  16. The Anticipated Supernova Associated with GRB 090618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2010-01-01

    We use the cannonball model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and public data from the first day of observations of GRB 090618 to predict its X-ray and optical light curves until very late times, and, in particular, the emergence of a photometric and spectroscopic signature of an SN akin to SN1998bw in its optical afterglow with an anticipated peak brightness of magnitude ~23.2 in the R band around 2009 July 10, if extinction in the host galaxy can be neglected.

  17. THE ANTICIPATED SUPERNOVA ASSOCIATED WITH GRB 090618

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.il

    2010-01-10

    We use the cannonball model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and public data from the first day of observations of GRB 090618 to predict its X-ray and optical light curves until very late times, and, in particular, the emergence of a photometric and spectroscopic signature of an SN akin to SN1998bw in its optical afterglow with an anticipated peak brightness of magnitude {approx}23.2 in the R band around 2009 July 10, if extinction in the host galaxy can be neglected.

  18. The Role of Host Galaxy for the Environmental Dependence of Active Nuclei in Local Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard I.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Erwin, P.; Burtscher, L.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Janssen, A.; Koss, M.; Lin, M.-Y.; Lutz, D.; Maciejewski, W.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Ricci, C.; Riffel, R.; Riffel, R. A.; Rosario, D.; Schartmann, M.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Shimizu, T.; Sternberg, A.; Sturm, E.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Tacconi, L.; Veilleux, S.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the environment of local hard X-ray selected active galaxies, with reference to two independent group catalogues. We find that the fraction of these AGN in S0 host galaxies decreases strongly as a function of galaxy group size (halo mass) - which contrasts with the increasing fraction of galaxies of S0 type in denser environments. However, there is no evidence for an environmental dependence of AGN in spiral galaxies. Because most AGN are found in spiral galaxies, this dilutes the signature of environmental dependence for the population as a whole. We argue that the differing results for AGN in disk-dominated and bulge-dominated galaxies is related to the source of the gas fuelling the AGN, and so may also impact the luminosity function, duty cycle, and obscuration. We find that there is a significant difference in the luminosity function for AGN in spiral and S0 galaxies, and tentative evidence for some difference in the fraction of obscured AGN.

  19. The role of host galaxy for the environmental dependence of active nuclei in local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard I.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Erwin, P.; Burtscher, L.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Janssen, A.; Koss, M.; Lin, M.-Y.; Lutz, D.; Maciejewski, W.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Ricci, C.; Riffel, R.; Riffel, R. A.; Rosario, D.; Schartmann, M.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Shimizu, T.; Sternberg, A.; Sturm, E.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Tacconi, L.; Veilleux, S.

    2017-04-01

    We discuss the environment of local hard X-ray selected active galaxies, with reference to two independent group catalogues. We find that the fraction of these AGN in S0 host galaxies decreases strongly as a function of galaxy group size (halo mass) - which contrasts with the increasing fraction of galaxies of S0 type in denser environments. However, there is no evidence for an environmental dependence of AGN in spiral galaxies. Because most AGN are found in spiral galaxies, this dilutes the signature of environmental dependence for the population as a whole. We argue that the differing results for AGN in disc-dominated and bulge-dominated galaxies are related to the source of the gas fuelling the AGN, and so may also impact the luminosity function, duty cycle and obscuration. We find that there is a significant difference in the luminosity function for AGN in spiral and S0 galaxies, and tentative evidence for some difference in the fraction of obscured AGN.

  20. GRB 110715A: the peculiar multiwavelength evolution of the first afterglow detected by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Hancock, P. J.; Jóhannesson, G.; Murphy, Tara; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Kann, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Oates, S. R.; Japelj, J.; Thöne, C. C.; Lundgren, A.; Perley, D. A.; Malesani, D.; de Gregorio Monsalvo, I.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hu, Y.-D.; Jelínek, M.; Jeong, S.; Kamble, A.; Klose, S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Llorente, A.; Martín, S.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rossi, A.; Schady, P.; Sparre, M.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tello, J. C.; Updike, A.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2017-02-01

    We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 s after the burst and extending up to 74 d later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use the optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host-galaxy environment with low ionization, column density, and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broad-band afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best-fitting parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multiwavelength broad-band afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.

  1. Erratum: A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Henrique R.; Kinney, Anne L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Antonucci, Robert

    1997-08-01

    In the paper ``A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies'' by Henrique R. Schmitt, Anne L. Kinney, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, & Robert Antonucci (ApJ, 477, 623 [1997]), there are errors in Table 1 and Figure 6, and there is a reference to a previous work that should be stated. With respect to the latter, the authors compare the position angle of small-scale radio structures in Seyfert galaxies with the position angle of their host galaxy major axis. In their analysis they find a zone of avoidance, where the small-scale radio axis avoids close alignment with the host galaxy minor axis. The authors wish to note that J. S. Ulvestad and A. S. Wilson (ApJ, 285, 439 [1984]) already observed a paucity of radio structures aligned with the host galaxy minor axis in Seyfert 2 galaxies, although on a smaller sample. Ulvestad & Wilson was referenced in their paper as Ulvestad & Wilson (1984b). In Table 1 there were errors in the references listed in the note to the table. A new version of Table 1 with correct references is given here, and the following reference entries should be added to the reference list of the original paper: Mulchaey, J. S., Wilson, A. S., & Tsvetanov, Z. I. 1996, ApJS, 102, 309; Oke, J. B., & Lauer, T. R. 1979, ApJ, 230, 360; Simkin, S. M. 1975, ApJ, 200, 567. Figure 6a was printed twice, once correctly and once incorrectly in place of Figure 6c. The correct version of Figure 6c appears below.

  2. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fynbok J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  3. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  4. Probing the Black Hole-Galaxy Connection with AGN Host Galaxy Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Brooke; Urry, C. M.; COSMOS Team

    2006-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that galaxies and supermassive black holes form and evolve together, exerting mutual feedback that governs the galaxy dynamics and the black hole mass. During their growth phase, supermassive black holes are readily visible as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The morphologies of AGN host galaxies offer a powerful, direct probe of the AGN-galaxy connection. We are carrying out morphological analysis of large AGN samples from deep multi-wavelength surveys, comparing the results to well-selected samples of inactive galaxies. To interpret the results properly requires understanding the observational bias introduced by the central point source, which can hide compact features and thus influence the extracted AGN host morphological parameters. Therefore, we performed extensive simulations, involving a variety of galaxy types over a range of redshifts. Here we present results of these simulations and describe preliminary work on deep HST ACS images from the COSMOS field. We gratefully acknowledge support from HST grants AR-10689.01-A and GO-09822.09-A, and Yale University.

  5. Probing the Black Hole-Galaxy Connection with AGN Host Galaxy Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Brooke; Urry, C. M.; COSMOS Team

    2007-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that galaxies and supermassive black holes form and evolve together, exerting mutual feedback that governs the galaxy dynamics and the black hole mass. During their growth phase, supermassive black holes are readily visible as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The morphologies of AGN host galaxies offer a powerful, direct probe of the AGN-galaxy connection. We are carrying out morphological analysis of large AGN samples from deep multi-wavelength surveys, comparing the results to well-selected samples of inactive galaxies. To interpret the results properly requires understanding the observational bias introduced by the central point source, which can hide compact features and thus influence the extracted AGN host morphological parameters. Therefore, we performed extensive simulations, involving a variety of galaxy types over a range of redshifts. Here we present results of these simulations and describe preliminary work on deep HST ACS images from the COSMOS field. We gratefully acknowledge support from HST grants AR-10689.01-A and GO-09822.09-A, and Yale University.

  6. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  7. What are the galaxies that host MIR-selected AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, David

    2016-08-01

    Infra-red selection techniques, sensitive to dust strongly heated by an AGN, offer a way to identify some of the most obscured accretion events in the Universe. I will describe the results of a comprehensive multi-wavelength study of AGN to z>2 selected using Spitzer/IRAC based methods in the COSMOS field. Armed with AGN-optimised redshifts and stellar masses, we explore the dust emission from the active nucleus and the host galaxy. We demonstrate that IR-selected AGN tend to be found in low mass host galaxies, when compared to other AGN identification methods. The star-formation rates of obscured and unobscured IR-selected AGN are very similar, implying that large-scale obscuration with co-eval star-bursts are not found in a major proportion of heavily obscured AGN.

  8. Morphology of QSO host galaxies --- a look at the SED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, A.; Coelho, B.; Anton, S.

    2015-08-01

    The Gaia Initial QSO Catalogue presents several characteristics of its 1,248,372 listed objects, among which the optical morphological type. From this a program studies the host galaxies of QSOs present in the SDSS up to its 8th release, based on retrieving a data bank of images in the five ugriz colors for the 105,783 objects spectroscopically found as QSOs. The first scope of this program is to study QSOs for which the isophotes of the host galaxy are not pronounced, so that the centroid determination is not affected for those fundamental grid-points of the Gaia Celestial Reference Frame. Since the target images come from relatively short exposures, we developed an approach to access disturbances of the target PSF relatively to the nearby stars. Here we focus on the first results for absolute magnitude of QSOs combining the SDSS colors and the SED library from Gaia.

  9. Locating star-forming regions in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. E.; Eracleous, M.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Gronwall, C.; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R.; Sturm, Eckhard

    2014-02-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II]λ3727, Hβ, [O III]λ5007 and Paα images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically around the nucleus, powered primarily by star formation. We determine star-formation rates of the order of a few tens of M⊙ yr-1. The host galaxies of our target quasars have stellar masses of the order of 1011 M⊙ and specific star-formation rates on a par with those of M82 and luminous infrared galaxies. As such they fall at the upper envelope or just above the star-formation mass sequence in the specific star formation versus stellar mass diagram. We see a clear trend of increasing star-formation rate with quasar luminosity, reinforcing the link between the growth of the stellar mass of the host and the black hole mass found by other authors.

  10. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR HOST SPHEROIDS. I. DISASSEMBLING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W.

    2016-01-15

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids; large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks; bars; rings; spiral arms; halos; extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors.

  11. Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Spheroids. I. Disassembling Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks bars rings spiral arms halos extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors.

  12. Starburst-driven Superwinds in Quasar Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Peter; Podigachoski, Pece; Wilkes, Belinda; Haas, Martin

    2017-07-01

    During the past five decades astronomers have been puzzled by the presence of strong absorption features including metal lines, observed in the optical and ultraviolet spectra of quasars, signaling inflowing and outflowing gas winds with relative velocities up to several thousands of km s-1. In particular, the location of these winds—close to the quasar, further out in its host galaxy, or in its direct environment—and the possible impact on their surroundings have been issues of intense discussion and uncertainty. Using our Herschel Space Observatory data, we report a tendency for this so-called associated metal absorption to occur along with prodigious star formation in the quasar host galaxy, indicating that the two phenomena are likely to be interrelated, that the gas winds likely occur on the kiloparsec scale and would then have a strong impact on the interstellar medium of the galaxy. This correlation moreover would imply that the unusually high cold dust luminosities in these quasars are connected with ongoing star formation. Given that we find no correlation with the AGN strength, the wind feedback that we establish in these radio-loud objects is most likely associated with their host star formation rather than with their black hole accretion.

  13. Quasars, their host galaxies and their central black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, J. S.; McLure, R. J.; Kukula, M. J.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.; Hughes, D. H.

    2003-04-01

    We present the final results from our deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging study of the host galaxies of radio-quiet quasars (RQQs), radio-loud quasars (RLQs) and radio galaxies (RGs). We describe and analyse new Wide Field & Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) R-band observations for 14 objects, which when combined with the first tranche of HST imaging reported in McLure et al., provide a complete and consistent set of deep, red, line-free images for statistically matched samples of 13 RQQs, 10 RLQs and 10 RGs in the redshift band 0.1 < z < 0.25. We also report the results of new deep VLA imaging that has yielded a 5-GHz detection of all but one of the 33 active galactic nuclei (AGN) in our sample. Careful modelling of our images, aided by a high dynamic-range point spread function, has allowed us to determine accurately the morphology, luminosity, scalelength and axial ratio of every host galaxy in our sample. Armed with this information we have undertaken a detailed comparison of the properties of the hosts of these three types of powerful AGN, both internally and with the galaxy population in general. We find that spheroidal hosts become more prevalent with increasing nuclear luminosity such that, for nuclear luminosities MV < -23.5, the hosts of both radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN are virtually all massive ellipticals. Moreover, we demonstrate that the basic properties of these hosts are indistinguishable from those of quiescent, evolved, low-redshift ellipticals of comparable mass. This result rules out the possibility that radio-loudness is determined by host-galaxy morphology, and also sets severe constraints on evolutionary schemes that attempt to link low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxies with RQQs. Instead, we show that our results are as expected given the relationship between black hole and spheroid mass established for nearby galaxies, and apply this relation to estimate the mass of the black hole in each object. The results agree remarkably well with

  14. Fast outflows and star formation quenching in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2016-06-01

    Negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is considered a key mechanism in shaping galaxy evolution. Fast, extended outflows are frequently detected in the AGN host galaxies at all redshifts and luminosities, both in ionised and molecular gas. However, these outflows are only potentially able to quench star formation, and we are still lacking decisive evidence of negative feedback in action. Here we present observations obtained with the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) H- and K-band integral-field of two quasars at z ~ 2.4 that are characterised by fast, extended outflows detected through the [Oiii]λ5007 line. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our observations allows us to identify faint narrow (FWHM< 500 km s-1) and spatially extended components in [Oiii]λ5007 and Hα emission associated with star formation in the host galaxy. This star formation powered emission is spatially anti-correlated with the fast outflows. The ionised outflows therefore appear to be able to suppress star formation in the region where the outflow is expanding. However, the detection of narrow spatially extended Hα emission indicates star formation rates of at least ~50-90 M⊙ yr-1, suggesting either that AGN feedback does not affect the whole galaxy or that many feedback episodes are required before star formation is completely quenched. On the other hand, the narrow Hα emission extending along the edges of the outflow cone may also lead also to a positive feedback interpretation. Our results highlight the possible double role of galaxy-wide outflows in host galaxy evolution. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, P.ID: 086.B-0579(A) and 091.A-0261(A).The reduced data cubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A28

  15. Quasar Host Galaxies and the MSMBH-σ* Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinis, A. I.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the emission line profiles detected in deep optical spectra of quasars to derive the mass of their super-massive black holes (SMBH) following the single-epoch virial method. Our sample consists in six radio-loud (RL) quasars and four radio-quiet (RQ) quasars. We carefully fit a broad and narrow Gaussian component for each emission line in both the Hβ (10 objects) and Hα regions (5 objects). A very good agreement of the derived SMBH masses, {M}{SMBH}, is found using the fitted broad Hβ and Hα emission lines. We compare our {M}{SMBH} results with those found by previous studies. We study the relationship between the {M}{SMBH} of the quasar and the stellar velocity dispersion, {σ }* , of the host galaxy. We use the measured {M}{SMBH} and {σ }* to investigate the {M}{SMBH}-{σ }* relation for both the RL and radio-quiet subsamples. Besides the scatter, we find a good agreement between radio-quiet quasars and AGN+quiescent galaxies and between RL quasars and AGN. Our analysis does not support the hypothesis of using σ([O iii] λ5007) as a surrogate for stellar velocity dispersions in high-mass, high-luminosity quasars. We also investigate the relationship between the 5 GHz radio-continuum luminosity, {L}5{GHz}, of the quasar host galaxy with both {M}{SMBH} and {σ }* . We do not find any correlation between {L}5{GHz} and {M}{SMBH}, although we observe a trend that galaxies with larger stellar velocity dispersions have larger {L}5{GHz}. Using the results of our fitting for the narrow emission lines of [O iii] λ5007 and [N ii] λ6583 we estimate the gas-phase oxygen abundance of six quasars, being sub-solar in all cases.

  16. Host galaxies of luminous type II AGN: Winds, shocks, and comparisons to The SAMI Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Rebecca; Croom, Scott; Pracy, Michael; SAMI Galaxy Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    We present IFS observations of luminous (log(L[O III]/L⊙) > 8.7) local (z < 0.11) type II AGN, and demonstrate that winds are ubiquitous within this sample and have a direct influence on the ISM of the host galaxies. We use both non-parametric (e.g. line width and asymmetry) and multi-Gaussian fitting to decompose the complex emission profiles close to the AGN. We find line widths containing 80% flux in the range 400 - 1600 km/s with a mean of 790 ± 90 km/s, such high velocities are strongly suggestive that these AGN are driving ionized outflows. Additionally, multi-Gaussian fitting reveals that 14/17 of our targets require 3 separate kinematic components in the ionized gas in their central regions. The broadest components of these fits have FWHM = 530 - 2520 km/s, with a mean value of 920 ± 50 km/s. By simultaneously fitting both the Hβ/[O III] and Hα/[N II] complexes we construct ionization diagnostic diagrams for each component. 13/17 of our galaxies show a significant (> 95 %) correlation between the [N II]/Hα ratio and the velocity dispersion of the gas. Such a correlation is the natural consequence of a contribution to the ionization from shock excitation and we argue that this demonstrates that the outflows from these AGN are directly impacting the surrounding ISM within the galaxies. In addition, we use stellar absorption features to measure kinematics for these AGN host galaxies and those of a control sample selected from the SAMI Galaxy Survey to search for evidence of these luminous AGN being preferentially hosted by disturbed or merging systems.

  17. Strategies for Prompt Searches for GRB Afterglows: The Discovery of GRB 001011 Optical/Near-Infrared Counterpart Using Colour-Colour Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Wolf, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Pedersen, H.; Christensen, L.; Jensen, B. L.; Moller, P.; Afonso, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical and near-infrared counterpart to GRB 001011. The GRB 001011 error box determined by Beppo-SAX was simultaneously imaged in the near-infrared by the 3.58-m. New Technology Telescope and in the optical by the 1.54-m Danish Telescope - 8 hr after the gamma-ray event. We implement the colour-colour discrimination technique proposed by Rhoads (2001) and extend it using near-IR data as well. We present the results provided by an automatic colour-colour discrimination pipe-line developed to discern the different populations of objects present in the GRB 001011 error box. Our software revealed three candidates based on single-epoch images. Second-epoch observations carried out approx. 3.2 days after the burst revealed that the most likely candidate had faded thus identifying it with the counterpart to the GRB. In deep R-band images obtained 7 months after the burst a faint (R=25.38 plus or minus 0.25) elongated object, presumably the host galaxy of GRB 001011, was detected at the position of the afterglow. The GRB 001011 afterglow is the first discovered with the assistance of colour-colour diagram techniques. We discuss the advantages of using this method and its application to boxes determined by future missions.

  18. The bulge-disc decomposition of AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, V. A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Mortlock, A.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Rosario, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results from a study of the morphologies of moderate luminosity X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies in comparison to a carefully mass-matched control sample at 0.5 < z < 3 in the CANDELS GOODS-S field. We apply a multiwavelength morphological decomposition analysis to these two samples and report on the differences between the morphologies as fitted from single Sérsic and multiple Sérsic models, and models which include an additional nuclear point-source component. Thus, we are able to compare the widely adopted single Sérsic fits from previous studies to the results from a full morphological decomposition, and address the issue of how biased the inferred properties of AGN hosts are by a potential nuclear contribution from the AGN itself. We find that the AGN hosts are indistinguishable from the general galaxy population except that beyond z ≃ 1.5 they have significantly higher bulge fractions. Even including nuclear sources in our modelling, the probability of this result arising by chance is ˜1 × 10-5, alleviating concerns that previous, purely single Sérsic, analyses of AGN hosts could have been spuriously biased towards higher bulge fractions. This data set also allows us to further probe the physical nature of these point-source components; we find no strong correlation between the point-source component and AGN activity. Our analysis of the bulge and disc fractions of these AGN hosts in comparison to a mass-matched control sample reveals a similar morphological evolutionary track for both the active and non-active populations, providing further evidence in favour of a model where AGN activity is triggered by secular processes.

  19. Black hole masses of tidal disruption event host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wevers, Thomas; van Velzen, Sjoert; Jonker, Peter G.; Stone, Nicholas C.; Hung, Tiara; Onori, Francesca; Gezari, Suvi; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2017-10-01

    The mass of the central black hole in a galaxy that hosted a tidal disruption event (TDE) is an important parameter in understanding its energetics and dynamics. We present the first homogeneously measured black hole masses of a complete sample of 12 optically/UV-selected TDE host galaxies (down to ghost ≤ 22 mag and z = 0.37) in the Northern sky. The mass estimates are based on velocity dispersion measurements, performed on late time optical spectroscopic observations. We find black hole masses in the range of 3 × 105 M⊙ ≤ MBH ≤ 2 × 107 M⊙. The TDE host galaxy sample is dominated by low-mass black holes (∼ 106 M⊙), as expected from theoretical predictions. The blackbody peak luminosity of TDEs with MBH ≤ 107.1 M⊙ is consistent with the Eddington limit of the supermassive black hole (SMBH), whereas the two TDEs with MBH ≥ 107.1 M⊙ have peak luminosities below their SMBH Eddington luminosity, in line with the theoretical expectation that the fallback rate for MBH ≥ 107.1 M⊙ is sub-Eddington. In addition, our observations suggest that TDEs around lower mass black holes evolve faster. These findings corroborate the standard TDE picture in 106 M⊙ black holes. Our results imply an increased tension between observational and theoretical TDE rates. By comparing the blackbody emission radius with theoretical predictions, we conclude that the optical/UV emission is produced in a region consistent with the stream self-intersection radius of shallow encounters, ruling out a compact accretion disc as the direct origin of the blackbody radiation at peak brightness.

  20. Simple Stellar Population Modeling of Quasar Host Galaxies with Diffusion K-Means Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Gregory; Moravec, E. A.; Tremonti, C. A.; Wolf, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the correlation of the masses of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxy stellar spheroid velocity dispersions (the M-sigma relation) was greeted as clear evidence for the co-evolution of host galaxies and their SMBHs. However, studies in the last five years have posited that this relation could arise from central-limit properties of hierarchical formation alone. To address the question of whether and how often the SMBHs evolve with their host galaxies, it is necessary to look at galaxies whose SMBHs are actively growing—quasars—and determine the host galaxy properties. The central nuclei of quasar host galaxies complicate this type of study because their high luminosity tends to wash out their host galaxies. But, by using 3-D spectroscopy with the integral field unit (IFU) Sparsepak on the WIYN telescope, we have shown that the quasar light can be mostly isolated to one fiber in order to obtain the spectra of the quasar and the host galaxy concurrently. We can then model simultaneously the scattered quasar light and the stellar populations in the host galaxy fiber using a new simple stellar population (SSP) modeling method called diffusion k-means (DFK). The objectives of the research presented in this poster are to model synthetic quasar host galaxies using a DFK basis and a more traditional basis, compare the accuracy of both modeling methods, and test the affects of various prescriptions for masking the quasar lines in the host galaxy fiber. We present results from our SSP modeling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) results for DFK and traditional modeling schemes using synthetic data. By determining and then using the more robust stellar population modeling method, we can more confidently study quasar host galaxies to answer remaining questions in galaxy evolution. This work was partially supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship (NSF Grant DGE-0718123) and through the NSF's REU program (NSF Award

  1. EARLY-TYPE HOST GALAXIES OF TYPE II AND Ib SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyewon; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Yoon, Sung-chul

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies find that some early-type galaxies host Type II or Ibc supernovae (SNe II, Ibc). This may imply recent star formation activities in these SNe host galaxies, but a massive star origin of the SNe Ib so far observed in early-type galaxies has been questioned because of their intrinsic faintness and unusually strong Ca lines shown in the nebular phase. To address the issue, we investigate the properties of early-type SNe host galaxies using the data with Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet photometry and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical data. Our sample includes eight SNe II and one peculiar SN Ib (SN 2000ds) host galaxies as well as 32 SN Ia host galaxies. The host galaxy of SN 2005cz, another peculiar SN Ib, is also analyzed using the GALEX data and the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database optical data. We find that the NUV-optical colors of SN II/Ib host galaxies are systematically bluer than those of SN Ia host galaxies, and some SN II/Ib host galaxies with NUV - r colors markedly bluer than the others exhibit strong radio emission. We perform a stellar population synthesis analysis and find a clear signature of recent star formation activities in most of the SN II/Ib host galaxies. Our results generally support the association of the SNe II/Ib hosted in early-type galaxies with core collapse of massive stars. We briefly discuss implications for the progenitors of the peculiar SNe Ib 2000ds and 2005cz.

  2. Strong bimodality in the host halo mass of central galaxies from galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Wang, Wenting; Zu, Ying; White, Simon; Henriques, Bruno; More, Surhud

    2016-04-01

    We use galaxy-galaxy lensing to study the dark matter haloes surrounding a sample of locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We measure mean halo mass as a function of the stellar mass and colour of the central galaxy. Mock catalogues constructed from semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations demonstrate that most LBGs are the central objects of their haloes, greatly reducing interpretation uncertainties due to satellite contributions to the lensing signal. Over the full stellar mass range, 10.3 < log [M*/M⊙] < 11.6, we find that passive central galaxies have haloes that are at least twice as massive as those of star-forming objects of the same stellar mass. The significance of this effect exceeds 3σ for log [M*/M⊙] > 10.7. Tests using the mock catalogues and on the data themselves clarify the effects of LBG selection and show that it cannot artificially induce a systematic dependence of halo mass on LBG colour. The bimodality in halo mass at fixed stellar mass is reproduced by the astrophysical model underlying our mock catalogue, but the sign of the effect is inconsistent with recent, nearly parameter-free age-matching models. The sign and magnitude of the effect can, however, be reproduced by halo occupation distribution models with a simple (few-parameter) prescription for type dependence.

  3. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s-1. The redshift range of this sample is within z < 4, with a mean value of 1.5 ± 0.78. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr-1 and the mean gas mass is ˜1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH-M * scaling relation.

  4. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Keane, E F; Johnston, S; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called 'missing baryons'. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts.

  5. A Comparison of Seyfert 1 and 2 Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Robertis, M.; Virani, S.

    2000-12-01

    Wide-field, R-band CCD data of 15 Seyfert 1 and 15 Seyfert 2 galaxies taken from the CfA survey were analysed in order to compare the properties of their host galaxies. As well, B-band images for a subset of 12 Seyfert 1s and 7 Seyfert 2s were acquired and analysed in the same way. A robust technique for decomposing the three components---nucleus, bulge and disk---was developed in order determine the structural parameters for each galaxy. In effect, the nuclear contribution was removed empirically by using a spatially nearby, high signal-to-noise ratio point source as a template. Profile fits to the bulge+disk ignored data within three seeing disks of the nucleus. Of the many parameters that were compared between Seyfert 1s and 2s, only two distributions differed at greater than the 95% confidence level for the K-S test: the magnitude of the nuclear component, and the radial color gradient outside the nucleus. The former is expected. The latter could be consistent with some proposed evolutionary models. There is some suggestion that other parameters may differ, but at a lower confidence level.

  6. Quasar Host Galaxies/Neptune Rotation/Galaxy Building Blocks/Hubble Deep Field/Saturn Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Computerized animations simulate a quasar erupting in the core of a normal spiral galaxy, the collision of two interacting galaxies, and the evolution of the universe. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images show six quasars' host galaxies (including spirals, ellipticals, and colliding galaxies) and six clumps of galaxies approximately 11 billion light years away. A false color time lapse movie of Neptune displays the planet's 16-hour rotation, and the evolution of a storm on Saturn is seen though a video of the planet's rotation. A zoom sequence starts with a ground-based image of the constellation Ursa major and ends with the Hubble Deep Field through progressively narrower and deeper views.

  7. Quasar Host Galaxies/Neptune Rotation/Galaxy Building Blocks/Hubble Deep Field/Saturn Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Computerized animations simulate a quasar erupting in the core of a normal spiral galaxy, the collision of two interacting galaxies, and the evolution of the universe. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images show six quasars' host galaxies (including spirals, ellipticals, and colliding galaxies) and six clumps of galaxies approximately 11 billion light years away. A false color time lapse movie of Neptune displays the planet's 16-hour rotation, and the evolution of a storm on Saturn is seen though a video of the planet's rotation. A zoom sequence starts with a ground-based image of the constellation Ursa major and ends with the Hubble Deep Field through progressively narrower and deeper views.

  8. Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Gangler, E.; Guy, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Paech, K.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wu, C.

    2013-06-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Nearby Supernova Factory. Combining Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV data with optical and near-infrared photometry, we employ stellar population synthesis techniques to measure SN Ia host galaxy stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and reddening due to dust. We reinforce the key role of GALEX UV data in deriving accurate estimates of galaxy SFRs and dust extinction. Optical spectra of SN Ia host galaxies are fitted simultaneously for their stellar continua and emission lines fluxes, from which we derive high-precision redshifts, gas-phase metallicities, and Hα-based SFRs. With these data we show that SN Ia host galaxies present tight agreement with the fiducial galaxy mass-metallicity relation from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for stellar masses log(M */M ⊙) > 8.5 where the relation is well defined. The star formation activity of SN Ia host galaxies is consistent with a sample of comparable SDSS field galaxies, though this comparison is limited by systematic uncertainties in SFR measurements. Our analysis indicates that SN Ia host galaxies are, on average, typical representatives of normal field galaxies.

  9. HOST GALAXIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon; Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne; CNRS and others

    2013-06-20

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Nearby Supernova Factory. Combining Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV data with optical and near-infrared photometry, we employ stellar population synthesis techniques to measure SN Ia host galaxy stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and reddening due to dust. We reinforce the key role of GALEX UV data in deriving accurate estimates of galaxy SFRs and dust extinction. Optical spectra of SN Ia host galaxies are fitted simultaneously for their stellar continua and emission lines fluxes, from which we derive high-precision redshifts, gas-phase metallicities, and H{alpha}-based SFRs. With these data we show that SN Ia host galaxies present tight agreement with the fiducial galaxy mass-metallicity relation from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for stellar masses log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) > 8.5 where the relation is well defined. The star formation activity of SN Ia host galaxies is consistent with a sample of comparable SDSS field galaxies, though this comparison is limited by systematic uncertainties in SFR measurements. Our analysis indicates that SN Ia host galaxies are, on average, typical representatives of normal field galaxies.

  10. Evolution of the dust-to-metals ratio in high-redshift galaxies probed by GRB-DLAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, P.; Schady, P.; Bolmer, J.; Krühler, T.; Yates, R. M.; Greiner, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Several issues regarding the nature of dust at high redshift remain unresolved: its composition, its production and growth mechanisms, and its effect on background sources. Aims: We provide a more accurate relation between dust depletion levels and dust-to-metals ratio (DTM), and to use the DTM to investigate the origin and evolution of dust in the high-redshift Universe via gamma-ray burst damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (GRB-DLAs). Methods: We use absorption-line measured metal column densities for a total of 19 GRB-DLAs, including five new GRB afterglow spectra from VLT/X-Shooter. We use the latest linear models to calculate the dust depletion strength factor in each DLA. Using these values we calculate total dust and metal column densities to determine a DTM. We explore the evolution of DTM with metallicity, and compare it to previous trends in DTM measured with different methods. Results: We find significant dust depletion in 16 of our 19 GRB-DLAs, yet 18 of the 19 have a DTM significantly lower than the Milky Way. We find that DTM is positively correlated with metallicity, which supports a dominant ISM grain-growth mode of dust formation. We find a substantial discrepancy between the dust content measured from depletion and that derived from the total V-band extinction, AV, measured by fitting the afterglow SED. We advise against using a measurement from one method to estimate that from the other until the discrepancy can be resolved. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, Program IDs: 088.A-0051(B), 089.A-0067(B), 091.C-0934, 094.A-0134(A).

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Properties of SN host galaxies (Kelly+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. L.; Filippenko, A. V.; Modjaz, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2017-03-01

    We study the host galaxies of both nearby (z<0.2) core-collapse SNe discovered by "galaxy-untargeted" transient searches (e.g., the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF); Rau et al., 2009PASP..121.1334R; Law et al., 2009PASP..121.1395L), which do not target specific potential hosts or z<1.2 LGRBs detected by gamma-ray satellites. We use the SDSS spectroscopic sample to build a control sample of low-redshift star-forming galaxies and SDSS photometry and spectroscopy to measure properties of both the sample of low-redshift star-forming galaxies and the host galaxies of the nearby SNe. For the host galaxies of z<1.2 LGRBs, we estimate host properties using published photometry and HST imaging. (2 data files).

  12. An observational study of quasar host galaxies, radio galaxies, and lyman alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak George Bayard

    In this thesis I provide observational constraints on quasar host galaxies, radio galaxies, and Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs). I develop and implement a method to provide stellar age constraints for the host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) quasars. The observational strategy is to spectroscopically observe quasar host galaxies offset from the bright central point source to maximize the signal-to-noise of the stellar light. The central quasar is also spectroscopically observed, so that any nuclear light scattered into our off-axis spectrum can be efficiently modeled and subtracted. The reliability of my technique is tested via a Monte-Carlo routine in which the correspondence between synthetic spectra with known parameters and the model output is determined. Application of this model to a preliminary sample of 10 objects is presented and compared to previous studies. I present 1.4 GHz catalogs for the cluster fields A370 and A2390 observed with the Very Large Array. These are two of the deepest radio images of cluster fields ever taken. I construct differential number counts for each field and find results consistent with previous studies. I emphasize the need to account for cosmic variance. These high resolution, ultra-deep radio catalogs will be vital to future multiwavelength studies. Finally, I apply a newly developed search method to all of the deep GALEX grism fields, which correspond to some of the most intensively studied regions in the sky. My work provides the first large sample of z=0.67-1.16 LAEs (N=60) that can be used to investigate the physical properties of these galaxies. I catalog the candidate z=1 LAE samples in each field and give optical redshifts from both archival and newly obtained observations. With X-ray, UV, and optical data, I determine the false detection rate (cases where the emission line is either not confirmed or is not Lya) and the AGN contamination rate of my sample. With the remaining LAEs, I compute the LAE galaxy luminosity function

  13. Supernovae and their host galaxies - V. The vertical distribution of supernovae in disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Barkhudaryan, L. V.; Karapetyan, A. G.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Adibekyan, V.; Aramyan, L. S.; Petrosian, A. R.; Turatto, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of the height distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) from the plane of their host galaxies. We use a well-defined sample of 102 nearby SNe appearing inside high-inclined (i ≥ 85°), morphologically non-disturbed S0-Sd host galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we show that in all the subsamples of spirals, the vertical distribution of core-collapse (CC) SNe is about twice closer to the plane of the host disc than the distribution of SNe Ia. In Sb-Sc hosts, the exponential scale height of CC SNe is consistent with those of the younger stellar population in the Milky Way (MW) thin disc, while the scale height of SNe Ia is consistent with those of the old population in the MW thick disc. We show that the ratio of scale lengths to scale heights of the distribution of CC SNe is consistent with those of the resolved young stars with ages from ∼10 up to ∼100 Myr in nearby edge-on galaxies and the unresolved stellar population of extragalactic thin discs. The corresponding ratio for SNe Ia is consistent with the same ratios of the two populations of resolved stars with ages from a few 100 Myr up to a few Gyr and from a few Gyr up to ∼10 Gyr, as well as with the unresolved population of the thick disc. These results can be explained considering the age-scale height relation of the distribution of stellar population and the mean age difference between Type Ia and CC SNe progenitors.

  14. The Hubble Space Telescope Survey of BL Lacertae Objects. IV. Infrared Imaging of Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Urry, C. Megan; Padovani, Paolo; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Dowd, Matthew

    2000-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Camera 2 was used for H-band imaging of 12 BL Lacertae objects taken from the larger sample observed with the WFPC2 in the R band by Urry and coworkers and Scarpa and coworkers. Ten of the 12 BL Lacs are clearly resolved, and the detected host galaxies are large, bright ellipticals with average absolute magnitude =-26.2+/-0.45 mag and effective radius =10+/-5 kpc. The rest-frame integrated color of the host galaxies is on average =2.3+/-0.3, consistent with the value for both radio galaxies and normal, nonactive elliptical galaxies and indicating that the dominant stellar population is old. The host galaxies tend to be bluer in their outer regions than in their cores, with average color gradient Δ(R-H)/Δlogr=-0.2 mag, again consistent with results for normal nonactive elliptical galaxies. The infrared Kormendy relation, derived for the first time for BL Lac host galaxies, is μe=3.8logre+14.8, fully in agreement with the relation for normal ellipticals. The close similarity between BL Lac host galaxies and normal ellipticals suggests that the active nucleus has surprisingly little effect on the host galaxy. This supports a picture in which all elliptical galaxies harbor black holes that can be actively accreting for some fraction of their lifetime.

  15. GRB 021211 as a Faint Analogue of GRB 990123: Exploring the Similarities and Differences in the Optical Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Bersier, David; Bloom, J. S.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Caldwell, Nelson; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert; Luhman, Kevin; McLeod, Brian; Stanek, K. Z.

    2004-01-01

    We present BVR(sub c)JHK(sub s) photometry of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021211 taken at the Magellan, MMT, and WIYN observatories between 0.7 and 50 days after the burst. We find an intrinsic spectral slope at optical and near-infrared wavelengths of 0.69 +/- 0.14 at 0.87 days. The optical decay during the first day is almost identical to that of GRB 990123 except that GRB 021211's optical afterglow was intrinsically approximately 38 times fainter and the transition from the reverse shock to the forward shock may have occurred earlier than it did for GRB 990123. We find no evidence for a jet break or the cooling break passing through optical frequencies during the first day after the burst. There is weak evidence for a break in the J-band decay between 0.89 and 1.87 days which may be due to a jet. The optical and infrared data are consistent with a relativistic fireball where the shocked electrons are in the slow cooling regime and the electron index is 2.3 +/- 0.1. The burst appears to have occurred in a homogeneous ambient medium. Our analysis suggests that the jet of GRB 021211 may have a small opening angle (1.4 deg-4.4 deg) and that the total gamma-ray energy is much less than the canonical value of 1.33 x 10(exp 51) erg. If, this is the case then most of the energy of the burst may be in another form such as a frozen magnetic field, in supernova ejecta, or in a second jet component. The host galaxy of GRB 021211 is subluminous and has a star formation rate of at least 1 solar mass/yr.

  16. Host galaxy spectra and consequences for supernova typing from the SDSS SN survey

    SciTech Connect

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Sako, Masao; Gupta, Ravi R.; Bassett, Bruce; Kunz, Martin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of SN host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future analysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased toward lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  17. Host Galaxy Spectra and Consequences for SN Typing from the SDSS SN Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brewington, Howard; Campbell, Heather; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Gupta, Ravi R.; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kunz, Martin; Lampeitl, Hubert; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pan, Kaike; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey E.; Smith, Mathew; Snedden, Stephanie A.

    2014-03-06

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of supernova (SN) host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future nalysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2 light curve fitter, we find a 21% increase in the number of fits that converge when using the spectroscopic redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased towards lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  18. Identification and properties of host galaxies of RCR radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelenkova, O. P.; Soboleva, N. S.; Majorova, E. K.; Temirova, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    FIRST and NVSS radio maps are used to cross identify the radio sources of the RCR catalog, which is based on observational data obtained in several runs of the "Cold" survey, with the SDSS and DPOSS digital optical sky surveys and the 2MASS, LAS UKIDSS, and WISE infrared surveys. Digital images in various filters and the coadded gri-band SDSS images, red and infrared DPOSS images, JHK-band UKIDSS images, and JHK-band 2MASS images are analyzed for the sources with no optical candidates found in the above catalogs. Our choice of optical candidates was based on the data on the structure of the radio source, its photometry, and spectroscopy (where available). We found reliable identifications for 86% of the radio sources; possible counterparts for 8% of the sources, and failed to find any optical counterparts for 6% of the sources because their host objects proved to be fainter than the limiting magnitude of the corresponding surveys. A little over half of all the identifications proved to be galaxies; about one quarter were quasars, and the types of the remaining objects were difficult to determine because of their faintness. A relation between the luminosity and the radioloudness index was derived and used to estimate the 1.4 and 3.94 GHz luminosities for the sources with unknown redshifts. We found 3% and 60% of all the RCR radio sources to be FRI-type objects ( L ≲ 1024 W/Hz at 1.4 GHz) and powerful FRII-type galaxies ( L ≳ 1026.5 W/Hz), respectively, whereas the rest are sources including objects of the FRI, FRII, and mixed FRI-FRII types. Unlike quasars, galaxies show a trend of decreasing luminosity with decreasing flux density. Note that identification would be quite problematic without the software and resources of the virtual observatory.

  19. Host Galaxies of Young Dust-Reddened Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, T.; Lacy, M.; Becker, R.; Glikman, E.

    2009-10-01

    We present results on a multiwavelength campaign to identify the nature of dust-reddened Type 1 quasars. These quasars were selected by matching FIRST, 2MASS and very red optical counterparts with r'-K > 5. We find a very high fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (LoBALs) among AGN selected with this method, perhaps a sign of quasar feedback. From X-ray observations and Balmer decrement measurements, the obscuring dust is most likely located in a cold absorber such as the host galaxy, rather than from a torus near the AGN. Hubble ACS imaging of a sub-sample of these sources showed a very high fraction of interacting and merging systems. The quasars appear to be very young in which dust from the merging galaxies is still settling in. Spitzer IRS and MIPS data show star formation signatures and deep Silicate absorption features in these objects, but overall the quasar is the dominant source in the Mid-infrared.

  20. The MOSDEF Survey: AGN Multi-wavelength Identification, Selection Biases, and Host Galaxy Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojegan; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Reddy, Naveen; Shapley, Alice; Freeman, William R.; Kriek, Mariska; Leung, Gene C. K.; Mobasher, Bahram; Price, Sedona H.; Sanders, Ryan L.; Shivaei, Irene; Siana, Brian

    2017-01-01

    We present results from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey on the identification, selection biases, and host galaxy properties of 55 X-ray, IR, and optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 1.4< z< 3.8. We obtain rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies and AGNs and use the BPT diagram to identify optical AGNs. We examine the uniqueness and overlap of the AGNs identified at different wavelengths. There is a strong bias against identifying AGNs at any wavelength in low-mass galaxies, and an additional bias against identifying IR AGNs in the most massive galaxies. AGN hosts span a wide range of star formation rates (SFRs), similar to inactive galaxies once stellar mass selection effects are accounted for. However, we find (at ∼2–3σ significance) that IR AGNs are in less dusty galaxies with relatively higher SFR and optical AGNs in dusty galaxies with relatively lower SFR. X-ray AGN selection does not display a bias with host galaxy SFR. These results are consistent with those from larger studies at lower redshifts. Within star-forming galaxies, once selection biases are accounted for, we find AGNs in galaxies with similar physical properties as inactive galaxies, with no evidence for AGN activity in particular types of galaxies. This is consistent with AGNs being fueled stochastically in any star-forming host galaxy. We do not detect a significant correlation between SFR and AGN luminosity for individual AGN hosts, which may indicate the timescale difference between the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes.

  1. The Host Galaxies of Nearby, Optically Luminous, AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petric, Andreea

    2016-01-01

    Coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes (BH) has been the central theme of much of recent extragalactic astronomical research. Observations of the dynamics of stars and gas in the nuclear regions of nearby galaxies suggest that the majority of spheroidal galaxies in the local Universe contain massive BHs and that the masses of those central BH correlate with the velocity dispersions of the stars in the spheroid and the bulge luminosity. Cold ISM is the basic fuel for star-formation and BH growth so its study is essential to understanding how galaxies evolve.I will present high sensitivity observations taken with the Herschel Space Observatory to measure the cold dust content in a sample of 85 nearby (z <= 0.5) QSOs chosen from the optically luminous broad-line PG QSOs sample (QSO1s) and in a complementary sample of 85 narrow-line QSOs (QSO2s) chosen to match the redshift and optical luminosity distribution of the broad-line targets. The FIR data are combined with NIR and MIR measurements from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer to determine their IR spectral energy distributions which we use to assess and compare the aggregate dust properties of QSO1s and QSO2s. I will also present NIR spectroscopy obtained with Gemini's Near-Infrared Spectrograph of a sub-sample of QSO2s and QSO1s which I use to compare the ratio of cold to warm H2 gas that emits in the NIR in the hosts of QSO1s and QSO2s.Finally I will present a comparison of star-formation in QSO1s and QSO2s. For both QSO1s and QSO2s 3stimates of star-formation rates that are based on the total IR continuum emission correlate with those based on the 11.3 micron PAH feature. However, for the QSO1s, star-formation rates estimated from the FIR continuum are higher than those estimated from the 11.3 micron PAH emission. This result can be attributed to a variety of factors including the possible destruction of the PAHs and that, in some sources, a fraction of the

  2. AGN host galaxies at redshift z ≈ 0.7: peculiar or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, A.; Wisotzki, L.; Bell, E. F.; Jahnke, K.; Wolf, C.; Bacon, D.; Barden, M.; Gray, M. E.; Hoeppe, G.; Jogee, S.; McIntosh, D. H.; Peng, C. Y.; Robaina, A. R.; Balogh, M.; Barazza, F. D.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Heymans, C.; Häußler, B.; van Kampen, E.; Lane, K.; Meisenheimer, K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Taylor, A. N.; Zheng, X.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We perform a quantitative morphological comparison between the hosts of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z ≈ 0.7). The imaging data are taken from the large HST/ACS mosaics of the GEMS and STAGES surveys. Our main aim is to test whether nuclear activity at this cosmic epoch is triggered by major mergers. Methods: Using images of quiescent galaxies and stars, we created synthetic AGN images to investigate the impact of an optical nucleus on the morphological analysis of AGN hosts. Galaxy morphologies are parameterized using the asymmetry index A, the concentration index C, the Gini coefficient G, and the M20 index. A sample of ~200 synthetic AGN was matched to 21 real AGN in terms of redshift, host brightness, and host-to-nucleus ratio to ensure a reliable comparison between active and quiescent galaxies. Results: The optical nuclei strongly affect the morphological parameters of the underlying host galaxy. Taking these effects into account, we find that the morphologies of the AGN hosts are clearly distinct from galaxies undergoing violent gravitational interactions. Indeed, the host galaxy distributions in morphological descriptor space are more similar to undisturbed galaxies than to major mergers. Conclusions: Intermediate-luminosity (LX ≲ 1044 erg/s) AGN hosts at z ≈ 0.7 show morphologies similar to the general population of massive galaxies with significant bulges at the same redshifts. If major mergers are the driver of nuclear activity at this epoch, the signatures of gravitational interactions fade rapidly before the optical AGN phase starts, making them undetectable on single-orbit HST images, at least with usual morphological descriptors. This could be investigated in future synthetic observations created from numerical simulations of galaxy-galaxy interactions.

  3. The host galaxies and black hole-to-galaxy mass ratios of luminous quasars at z≃ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targett, Thomas A.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.

    2012-03-01

    Deep K-band imaging of the most luminous z≃ 4 quasars currently offers the earliest possible view of the mass-dominant stellar populations of the host galaxies which house the first supermassive black holes in the Universe. This is because, until the advent of the James Webb Space Telescope, it is not possible to obtain the necessary deep, sub-arcsec resolution imaging at rest-frame wavelengths λrest > 4000 Å at any higher redshift. We here present and analyse the deepest, high-quality KS-band images ever obtained of luminous quasars at z≃ 4, in an attempt to determine the basic properties of their host galaxies less than 1 Gyr after the first recorded appearance of black holes with Mbh > 109 M⊙. To maximize the robustness of our results, we have carefully selected two Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at z≃ 4. With absolute magnitudes Mi < -28, these quasars are representative of the most luminous quasars known at this epoch, but they also, crucially, lie within 40 arcsec of comparably bright foreground stars (required for accurate point spread function definition), and have redshifts which ensure line-free KS-band imaging. The data were obtained in excellent seeing conditions (<0.4 arcsec) at the European Southern Observatory on the Very Large Telescope with integration times of ≃5.5 h per source. Via carefully controlled separation of host galaxy and nuclear light, we estimate the luminosities and stellar masses of the host galaxies, and set constraints on their half-light radii. The apparent KS-band magnitudes of the quasar host galaxies are consistent with those of luminous radio galaxies at comparable redshifts, suggesting that these quasar hosts are also among the most massive galaxies in existence at this epoch. However, the quasar hosts are a factor ˜5 smaller (= 1.8 kpc) than the host galaxies of luminous low-redshift quasars. We estimate the stellar masses of the z≃ 4 host galaxies to lie in the range 2-10 × 1011 M⊙, and use the C

  4. EARLY-TYPE HOST GALAXIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. I. EVIDENCE FOR DOWNSIZING

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yijung; Kim, Young-Lo; Lim, Dongwook; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook

    2016-03-15

    Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) cosmology provides the most direct evidence for the presence of dark energy. This result is based on the assumption that the lookback time evolution of SN Ia luminosity, after light curve corrections, would be negligible. Recent studies show, however, that the Hubble residual (HR) of SN Ia is correlated with the mass and morphology of host galaxies, implying the possible dependence of SN Ia luminosity on host galaxy properties. In order to investigate this more directly, we have initiated a spectroscopic survey for early-type host galaxies, for which population age and metallicity can be more reliably determined from the absorption lines. In this first paper of the series, we present here the results from high signal-to-noise ratio (≳100 per pixel) spectra for 27 nearby host galaxies in the southern hemisphere. For the first time in host galaxy studies, we find a significant (∼3.9σ) correlation between host galaxy mass (velocity dispersion) and population age, which is consistent with the “downsizing” trend among non-host early-type galaxies. This result is rather insensitive to the choice of population synthesis models. Since we find no correlation with metallicity, our result suggests that stellar population age is mainly responsible for the relation between host mass and HR. If confirmed, this would imply that the luminosity evolution plays a major role in the systematic uncertainties of SN Ia cosmology.

  5. A PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT OF z {approx} 9.4 FOR GRB 090429B

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Fox, D. B.; Wu, X. F.; Toma, K.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Rowlinson, A.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Berger, E.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Olivares, F. E.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue; Amati, L.; Sakamoto, T.; Roth, K.; Stephens, A.; Fritz, Alexander; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.

    2011-07-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) serve as powerful probes of the early universe, with their luminous afterglows revealing the locations and physical properties of star-forming galaxies at the highest redshifts, and potentially locating first-generation (Population III) stars. Since GRB afterglows have intrinsically very simple spectra, they allow robust redshifts from low signal-to-noise spectroscopy, or photometry. Here we present a photometric redshift of z {approx} 9.4 for the Swift detected GRB 090429B based on deep observations with Gemini-North, the Very Large Telescope, and the GRB Optical and Near-infrared Detector. Assuming a Small Magellanic Cloud dust law (which has been found in a majority of GRB sight lines), the 90% likelihood range for the redshift is 9.06 < z < 9.52, although there is a low-probability tail toward somewhat lower redshifts. Adopting Milky Way or Large Magellanic Cloud dust laws leads to very similar conclusions, while a Maiolino law does allow somewhat lower redshift solutions, though in all cases the most likely redshift is found to be z > 7. The non-detection of the host galaxy to deep limits (Y(AB) {approx} 28, which would correspond roughly to 0.001L* at z = 1) in our late-time optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope strongly supports the extreme-redshift origin of GRB 090429B, since we would expect to have detected any low-z galaxy, even if it were highly dusty. Finally, the energetics of GRB 090429B are comparable to those of other GRBs and suggest that its progenitor is not greatly different from those of lower redshift bursts.

  6. A Bar Fuels a Supermassive Black Hole?: Host Galaxies of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kouji; Aoki, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kiuchi, Gaku

    2007-03-01

    We present optical images of nearby 50 narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) that cover all the NLS1s at z<0.0666 and δ>=-25deg known in 2001. Among the 50 NLS1s, 40 images are newly obtained by our observations and 10 images are taken from archive data. Motivated by the hypothesis that NLS1s are in an early phase of a supermassive black hole (BH) evolution, we present a study of NLS1 host galaxy morphology to examine trigger mechanism(s) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by seeing the early phase of AGN. With these images, we made morphological classification by visual inspection and by quantitative method, and found a high bar frequency of the NLS1s in the optical band; the bar frequency is 85%+/-7% among disk galaxies (64%-71% in total sample) which is more frequent than that (40%-70%) of broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (BLS1s) and normal disk galaxies, although the significance is marginal. Our results confirm the claim by Crenshaw and coworkers with a similar analysis for 19 NLS1s. The frequency is comparable to that of H II/starburst galaxies. We also examined the bar frequency against width of the broad Hβ emission line, Eddington ratio, and BH mass, but no clear trend is seen. Possible implications, such as an evolutionary sequence from NLS1s to BLS1s, are discussed briefly. Based on data collected at University of Hawaii 88 inch telescope, Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1 m telescope, which is operated by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), operated by AURA, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation; and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the

  7. The Host Galaxies of High-Luminosity Obscured Quasars at 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas; Strauss, M. A.; Greene, J. E.; Zakamska, N. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexandroff, R.; Liu, G.; Smith, P. S.; The SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Working Group

    2014-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei play a key role in the evolution of galaxies. However, very little is known about the host galaxies of the most luminous quasars at redshift 2.5, the epoch when massive black hole growth peaked. The brightness of the quasar itself, which can easily outshine a galaxy by a large factor, makes it very difficult to study emission from extended gas or stars in the host galaxy. However, we have imaged the extended emission from the host galaxies of a unique sample of six optically extinguished (Type II) luminous quasars with 2.5, with the Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 20, GO 13014) using ACS/F814W to access the rest-frame near-ultraviolet, and WFC3/F160W for the rest-frame optical longward of 4000A. These objects are selected from the spectroscopic database of the SDSS/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to have strong, narrow emission lines and weak continua. With these images, we have quantified the luminosity, morphology, and dynamical state of the host galaxies, and searched for extended scattered light from the obscured central engine. These observations are the first comprehensive study of both host galaxy light and scattered light in high-luminosity quasars at the epoch of maximum black hole growth, and give insights into the relationship between host galaxies and black holes during this important, and yet largely unexplored period.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SN host galaxies basic information (Shao+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Dennefeld, M.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Hammer, F.; Deng, L. C.; Flores, H.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.

    2017-03-01

    We select the SNe and their host galaxies by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog (ASC, Barbon et al., cat II/227) with the SDSS DR7 main galaxy sample (MGS, Strauss et al., 2002AJ....124.1810S), only retaining spectral observations of the SNe host galaxies with good quality. In this work, we take into account SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc (the latter two as CC-SNe) together to compare the properties of their hosts. In particular, we will use a stricter selection criterion to select the objects, for which the 3 arcsec fiber spectra of SDSS can represent the global properties of the galaxies better. We believe it is important to show the global properties of SN host galaxies since it is often difficult to acquire the local properties at the sites of an SN explosion. (1 data file).

  9. A Peculiar GRB 110731A: Lorentz Factor, Jet Composition, Central Engine, and Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, HouJun; Wang, XiangGao; Lu, RuiJing; Lan, Lin; Gao, He; Liang, EnWei; Graham, Melissa L.; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Zhang, Bing

    2017-07-01

    The jet compositions, central engines, and progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain open questions in GRB physics. Applying broadband observations, including GRB prompt emission and afterglow properties derived from Fermi and Swift data, as well as from Keck host-galaxy observations, we address these questions for the peculiar, bright GRB 110731A. By using the pair-opacity method, we derive Γ0 > 190 during the prompt emission phase. Alternatively, we derive Γ0 ≈ 580 and Γ0 ≈ 154 by invoking the early-afterglow phase within the homogeneous density and wind cases, respectively. On the other hand, nondetection of a thermal component in the spectra suggests that the prompt emission is likely powered by dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated jet leading to synchrotron radiation in an optically thin region. The nondetection of a jet break in the X-ray and optical bands allows us to place a lower limit on the jet opening angle θ j > 5.°5. Within a millisecond magnetar central engine scenario, we derive the period P 0 and polar magnetic field strength B p, which have extreme (but still allowed) values. The moderately short observed duration (7.3 s) and relatively large redshift (z = 2.83) place the burst as a “rest-frame short” GRB, so the progenitor of the burst is subject to debate. Its relatively large {f}{eff,z} parameter (ratio of the 1 s peak flux of a pseudo-GRB and the background flux) and a large physical offset from a potential host galaxy suggest that the progenitor of GRB 110731A may be a compact-star merger.

  10. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nearby Supernova Factory; Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Feindt, U.; Fleury, M.; Gangler, E.; Greskovic, P.; Guy, J.; Kowalski, M.; Lombardo, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.

    2014-01-17

    Kim et al. (2013) [K13] introduced a new methodology for determining peak- brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spec- trophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ? 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at ? 1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement the Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.045 ? 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch param- eters: Steps at> 2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light- curve width and color around peak (similar to the∆m15 and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20 to 30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  11. Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals and host-galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Fleury, M.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Feindt, U.; Greskovic, P.; Kowalski, M.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Université de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon; Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne; CNRS and others

    2014-03-20

    Kim et al. introduced a new methodology for determining peak-brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ± 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at <<1σ, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement of the Hubble residual step with the host mass is 0.045 ± 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch parameters: steps at >2σ significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light-curve width and color around peak (similar to the Δm {sub 15} and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20-30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  12. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H. E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), Hδ{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (∼0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  13. GRB070125: The First Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Burst in a Halo Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Cenko S.; Fox, Derek B.; Penprase, Brian E.; Kulkarni, Shri R.; Price, Paul A.; Berger, Edo; Kulkarni, Shri R.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We present the discovery and high signal-to-noise spectroscopic observations of the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB070125. Unlike all previously observed long-duration afterglows in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2.0, we find no strong (rest-frame equivalent width W > 1.0 A) absorption features in the wavelength range 4000 - 10000 A. The sole significant feature is a weak doublet we identify as Mg 11 2796 (W = 0.18 +/- 0.02 A), 2803 (W = 0.08 +0I.-01 ) at z = 1.5477 +/- 0.0001. The low observed Mg II and inferred H I column densities are typically observed in galactic halos, far away from the bulk of massive star formation. Deep ground-based imaging reveals no host directly underneath the afterglow to a limit of R > 25.4 mag. Either of the two nearest blue galaxies could host GRB070125; the large offset (d >= 27 kpc) would naturally explain the low column density. To remain consistent with the large local (i.e. parsec scale) circum-burst density inferred from broadband afterglow observations, we speculate GRB070125 may have occurred far away from the disk of its host in a compact star-forming cluster. Such distant stellar clusters, typically formed by dynamical galaxy interactions, have been observed in the nearby universe, and should be more prevalent at z>l where galaxy mergers occur more frequently.

  14. GRB070125: The First Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Burst in a Halo Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Cenko S.; Fox, Derek B.; Penprase, Brian E.; Kulkarni, Shri R.; Price, Paul A.; Berger, Edo; Kulkarni, Shri R.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; Rau, Arne; Chandra, Poonam; Frail, Dale A.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Cameron, P. Brian; Roth, Kathy C.

    2007-01-01

    We present the discovery and high signal-to-noise spectroscopic observations of the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB070125. Unlike all previously observed long-duration afterglows in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2.0, we find no strong (rest-frame equivalent width W > 1.0 A) absorption features in the wavelength range 4000 - 10000 A. The sole significant feature is a weak doublet we identify as Mg 11 2796 (W = 0.18 +/- 0.02 A), 2803 (W = 0.08 +0I.-01 ) at z = 1.5477 +/- 0.0001. The low observed Mg II and inferred H I column densities are typically observed in galactic halos, far away from the bulk of massive star formation. Deep ground-based imaging reveals no host directly underneath the afterglow to a limit of R > 25.4 mag. Either of the two nearest blue galaxies could host GRB070125; the large offset (d >= 27 kpc) would naturally explain the low column density. To remain consistent with the large local (i.e. parsec scale) circum-burst density inferred from broadband afterglow observations, we speculate GRB070125 may have occurred far away from the disk of its host in a compact star-forming cluster. Such distant stellar clusters, typically formed by dynamical galaxy interactions, have been observed in the nearby universe, and should be more prevalent at z>l where galaxy mergers occur more frequently.

  15. The Luminosity Function of the Host Galaxies of QSOs and BL Lac Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carangelo, Nicoletta; Falomo, Renato; Treves, Aldo

    A clear insight of the galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei is of fundamental importance for understanding the processes of galaxies and nuclei formation and their cosmic evolution. A good characterization of the host galaxies properties requires images of excellent quality in order to disentangle the light of the galaxy from that of the bright nucleus. To this aim HST has provided a major improvement of data on QSOs (Disney et al. 1995; Bahcall et al. 1996,1997; Boyce et al. 1998; McLure et al. 1999; Hamilton et al. 2000; Kukula et al. 2001) and BL Lacs (Scarpa et al. 2000, Urry et al. 2000).

  16. Black hole accretion and host galaxies of obscured quasars in XMM-COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainieri, V.; Bongiorno, A.; Merloni, A.; Aller, M.; Carollo, M.; Iwasawa, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Mignoli, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Bolzonella, M.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Lusso, E.; Salvato, M.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lilly, S.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Balestra, I.; Bardelli, S.; Caputi, K.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovač, K.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Nair, P.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez Montero, E.; Pozzetti, L.; Ricciardelli, E.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Aussel, H.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Elvis, M.; Fiore, F.; Hasinger, G.; Impey, C.; Le Floc'h, E.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Trump, J.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We explore the connection between black hole growth at the center of obscured quasars selected from the XMM-COSMOS survey and the physical properties of their host galaxies. We study a bolometric regime ( ⟨ Lbol ⟩ = 8 × 1045 erg s-1) where several theoretical models invoke major galaxy mergers as the main fueling channel for black hole accretion. Methods: To derive robust estimates of the host galaxy properties, we use an SED fitting technique to distinguish the AGN and host galaxy emission. We evaluate the effect on galaxy properties estimates of being unable to remove the nuclear emission from the SED. The superb multi-wavelength coverage of the COSMOS field allows us to obtain reliable estimates of the total stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) of the hosts. We supplement this information with a morphological analysis of the ACS/HST images, optical spectroscopy, and an X-ray spectral analysis. Results: We confirm that obscured quasars mainly reside in massive galaxies (M ⋆ > 1010M⊙) and that the fraction of galaxies hosting such powerful quasars monotonically increases with the stellar mass. We stress the limitation of the use of rest-frame color - magnitude diagrams as a diagnostic tool for studying galaxy evolution and inferring the influence that AGN activity can have on such a process. We instead use the correlation between SFR and stellar mass found for star-forming galaxies to discuss the physical properties of the hosts. We find that at z ~ 1, ≈62% of Type-2 QSOs hosts are actively forming stars and that their rates are comparable to those measured for normal star-forming galaxies. The fraction of star-forming hosts increases with redshift: ≈ 71% at z ~ 2, and 100% at z ~ 3. We also find that the evolution from z ~ 1 to z ~ 3 of the specific SFR of the Type-2 QSO hosts is in excellent agreement with that measured for star-forming galaxies. From the morphological analysis, we conclude that most of the objects are bulge

  17. GRB 980326 and GRB 980329

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Michael S.; Richardson, Georgia A.; Kippen, Richard M.; Woods, Peter

    1998-01-01

    M. S. Briggs, G. Richardson, R. M. Kippen, and p. M. woods, University of Alabama in Huntsville, report on behalf of the BATSE team: GRB 980326 (IAUC 6851) was observed with BATSE on Mar. 26.88811 UT as trigger 6660. The event lasted about 5 s and exhibited three narrow pulses. Its peak flux (integrated over 0.5 s) and fluence (50-300 keV) are 8 x l0(exp -7) erg /sq cm sE-1 and 1 x 10(exp -6) erg/sq cm, respectively. GRB 980329 (IAUC 6853) was observed with BATSE on Mar. 29.15600 as trigger 6665; the event was very intense and lasted about 55 s, exhibiting a 10-s-long, highly structured peak. Its peak flux (integrated over 0.5 s) and fluence (50-300 keV) are 8 x 10(exp -6) erg/ sq cm sE-1 and 5 x l0(exp -5) erg/ sq cm, respectively. The BATSE locations are consistent with the locations of the reported optical transient for GRB 980326 (IAUC 6852) and the SAX/NFI x-ray counterpart for GRB 980329 (IAUC 6854). Location maps can be found at http://www.batse.msfc.nasa.gov/-kippen/batsebr.

  18. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Nichol, Robert C.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  19. First Detection of a Foreground Damped Ly-Alpha Absorber Along a GRB Line of Sight?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Fruchter, A. S.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kaper, L.; Palazzi, E.; Masetti, N.; Frontera, F.; hide

    2001-01-01

    We present a VLT spectrum of the optical afterglow of GRB 991216, taken 1.5 days after the burst, and HST (Hubble Space Telescope) imaging of the host galaxy, obtained four months later. The spectrum contains three metal absorption-line systems with redshifts z = 1.024, z = 0.803, and z = 0.771, where the highest redshift most likely reflects the distance to the host galaxy. For the z = 1.024 and z = 0.803 systems we tentatively detect MgI which suggests a dense environment at these redshifts. This and the strength of the z = 0.803 Fe lines indicate that this system very likely is a damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA), which would be the first foreground DLA to be detected along a GRB afterglow sight line. The HST images are consistent with these findings: they show two blobs of light, one underneath the projected OT position, the presumed host galaxy, and the other 0.6" away, which is probably responsible for the absorption lines at z = 0.803. The lowest redshift system can be explained by either one of the two galaxies that are located roughly 2" away from the transient. Including these newly found systems, the total number of DLAS and Lyman limit systems along GRB afterglow sight lines is consistent with the number expected from QSO (quasi-stellar object) absorption line studies. We expect early spectroscopy of GRB afterglows to significantly increase the number of detected foreground absorption systems, and we discuss some advantages over QSO lines of sight.

  20. First Detection of a Foreground Damped Ly-Alpha Absorber Along a GRB Line of Sight?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Fruchter, A. S.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kaper, L.; Palazzi, E.; Masetti, N.; Frontera, F.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a VLT spectrum of the optical afterglow of GRB 991216, taken 1.5 days after the burst, and HST (Hubble Space Telescope) imaging of the host galaxy, obtained four months later. The spectrum contains three metal absorption-line systems with redshifts z = 1.024, z = 0.803, and z = 0.771, where the highest redshift most likely reflects the distance to the host galaxy. For the z = 1.024 and z = 0.803 systems we tentatively detect MgI which suggests a dense environment at these redshifts. This and the strength of the z = 0.803 Fe lines indicate that this system very likely is a damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA), which would be the first foreground DLA to be detected along a GRB afterglow sight line. The HST images are consistent with these findings: they show two blobs of light, one underneath the projected OT position, the presumed host galaxy, and the other 0.6" away, which is probably responsible for the absorption lines at z = 0.803. The lowest redshift system can be explained by either one of the two galaxies that are located roughly 2" away from the transient. Including these newly found systems, the total number of DLAS and Lyman limit systems along GRB afterglow sight lines is consistent with the number expected from QSO (quasi-stellar object) absorption line studies. We expect early spectroscopy of GRB afterglows to significantly increase the number of detected foreground absorption systems, and we discuss some advantages over QSO lines of sight.

  1. Astrobiological Effects of Gamma-ray Bursts in the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowanlock, Michael G.

    2016-11-01

    A planet having protective ozone within the collimated beam of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) may suffer ozone depletion, potentially causing a mass extinction event to existing life on a planet’s surface and oceans. We model the dangers of long GRBs to planets in the Milky Way and utilize a static statistical model of the Galaxy, which matches major observable properties, such as the inside-out star formation history (SFH), metallicity evolution, and three-dimensional stellar number density distribution. The GRB formation rate is a function of both the SFH and metallicity. However, the extent to which chemical evolution reduces the GRB rate over time in the Milky Way is still an open question. Therefore, we compare the damaging effects of GRBs to biospheres in the Milky Way using two models. One model generates GRBs as a function of the inside-out SFH. The other model follows the SFH, but generates GRB progenitors as a function of metallicity, thereby favoring metal-poor host regions of the Galaxy over time. If the GRB rate only follows the SFH, the majority of the GRBs occur in the inner Galaxy. However, if GRB progenitors are constrained to low-metallicity environments, then GRBs only form in the metal-poor outskirts at recent epochs. Interestingly, over the past 1 Gyr, the surface density of stars (and their corresponding planets), which survive a GRB is still greatest in the inner galaxy in both models. The present-day danger of long GRBs to life at the solar radius (R ⊙ = 8 kpc) is low. We find that at least ∼65% of stars survive a GRB over the past 1 Gyr. Furthermore, when the GRB rate was expected to have been enhanced at higher redshifts, such as z ≳ 0.5, our results suggest that a large fraction of planets would have survived these lethal GRB events.

  2. A Bayesian approach to multi-messenger astronomy: identification of gravitational-wave host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, XiLong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2014-11-01

    We present a general framework for incorporating astrophysical information into Bayesian parameter estimation techniques used by gravitational wave data analysis to facilitate multi-messenger astronomy. Since the progenitors of transient gravitational wave events, such as compact binary coalescences, are likely to be associated with a host galaxy, improvements to the source sky location estimates through the use of host galaxy information are explored. To demonstrate how host galaxy properties can be included, we simulate a population of compact binary coalescences and show that for ∼8.5% of simulations within 200 Mpc, the top 10 most likely galaxies account for a ∼50% of the total probability of hosting a gravitational wave source. The true gravitational wave source host galaxy is in the top 10 galaxy candidates ∼10% of the time. Furthermore, we show that by including host galaxy information, a better estimate of the inclination angle of a compact binary gravitational wave source can be obtained. We also demonstrate the flexibility of our method by incorporating the use of either the B or K band into our analysis.

  3. GRB 971214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Bloom, J.; Djorgovski, S.; Goodrich, R.; Frail, D.

    1998-01-01

    The optical transient (IAUC #6788) of GRB 971214 (IAUC #6787; IAUC #6792) was observed by J. Aycock using the LRIS instrument on Keck II. The observations were conducted between 1400--1600 UT of January 10, 1998 and images were obtained in the R band. The seeing was consistently 0.86 arcsec and 12 frames each of five minute duration were obtained. A source is clearly detected at the position of the OT.

  4. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES OF THE SWIFT BAT ULTRA HARD X-RAY SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-10-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) active galactic nucleus (AGN) with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z < 0.05), moderate luminosity AGNs from the Swift BAT sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u - r and g - r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGNs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGNs are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGNs in massive galaxies (log M{sub *} >10.5) have a 5-10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGNs or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-infrared emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGNs are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGNs have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] {lambda}5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGNs in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as a whole. In agreement with the unified model of AGNs, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGNs suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  5. A spectral energy distribution analysis of AGN host galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon; Civano, Francesca M.; Hasinger, Guenther; Elvis, Martin; Marchesi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We present the host galaxy properties of a large sample of ~ 4000 X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey to investigate the connection between BH accretion and host galaxy. The COSMOS Legacy survey reaching X-ray fluxes of 2x10-16 (cgs) in the 0.5-2 keV band, bridges the gap between large area shallow surveys and pencil beamed one. Making use of the existing multi-wavelength photometric data available for 96.6% of the sources, COSMOS Legacy survey provides a uniquely large sample to derive host galaxy properties for both obscured and unobscured sources. We perform a multi-component modeling from far-infrared (500 μm) when available to UV (1500 Å) using a 3-component fitting (nuclear hot dust, galaxy and starburst components) for obscured AGN and a 4-component fitting (nuclear hot dust, AGN big blue bump, galaxy, and starburst components) for unobscured AGN. Galaxy templates are from the stellar population synthesis models of Bruzual & Charlot (2003), nuclear hot dust templates are taken from Silva et al. (2004), and AGN big blue bump templates are from Richards et al. (2006). We use the column density information measured in the X-ray to constrain the AGN in the infrared band when available. Through detailed analysis of the broad-band spectral energy distribution, we derive the stellar masses and the star formation rates of the host galaxy as well as the nuclear and galaxy contribution at each frequency. We study the dependence of host galaxy properties on redshifts, luminosities, and black hole masses to infer the growth history of galaxies and black holes and we compare with a sample of inactive galaxies.

  6. Host Galaxy Properties of the Swift BAT Ultra Hard X-Ray Selected AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u -- r and g -- r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGN are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGN in massive galaxies (log Stellar Mass >10.5) have a 5 to 10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGN or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-IR emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGN are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGN have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] Lambda 5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGN in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as whole. In agreement with the Unified Model of AGN, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGN suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  7. The Afterglow, Energetics, and Host Galaxy of the Short-Hard Gamma-Ray Burst 051221a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, A. M.; Berger, E.; Kasliwal, M.; Frail, D. A.; Price, P. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, D. B.; Cenko, S. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nakar, E.; Roth, K. C.

    2006-10-01

    We present detailed optical, X-ray, and radio observations of the bright afterglow of the short gamma-ray burst 051221a obtained with Gemini, Swift XRT, and the Very Large Array, as well as optical spectra from which we measure the redshift of the burst, z=0.5464. At this redshift the isotropic-equivalent prompt energy release was about 1.5×1051 ergs, and using a standard afterglow synchrotron model, we find that the blast wave kinetic energy is similar, EK,iso~8.4×1051 ergs. An observed jet break at t~5 days indicates that the opening angle is θj~7deg and the total beaming-corrected energy is therefore ~2.5×1049 ergs, comparable to the values inferred for previous short GRBs. We further show that the burst experienced an episode of energy injection by a factor of 3.4 between t=1.4 and 3.4 hr, which was accompanied by reverse shock emission in the radio band. This result provides continued evidence that the central engines of short GRBs may be active significantly longer than the duration of the burst and/or produce a wide range of Lorentz factors. Finally, we show that the host galaxy is actively forming stars at a rate of about 1.6 Msolar yr-1, yet exhibits evidence for an appreciable population of old stars (~1 Gyr) and near-solar metallicity. These properties are intermediate between those of long GRB hosts and previous short burst hosts. The lack of bright supernova emission and the low circumburst density (n~10-3 cm-3), however, continue to support the idea that short bursts are not related to massive stellar death. Given that the total energy release is larger than the predicted yield for a neutrino annihilation mechanism, this suggests that magnetohydrodynamic processes may be required to power the burst.

  8. Massive relic galaxies from the Early Universe challenge the co-evolution of SMBHs and their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferre-Mateu, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have reported the existence of outliers in the MBH-host galaxy local scaling relations. These outliers show extremely large SMBHs (über-massive) compared with what is expected from their velocity dispersions or stellar masses. However, a clear explanation for these deviations has not yet been found. In this talk, I will show a proposed scenario to explain the nature of such deviations, in which the hosts of these über-massive SMBHs are galaxies that have followed a different evolutionary path than the two-phase growth channel assumed for massive galaxies. Once the SMBH and the core of the galaxy are formed at z~2, the galaxy skips the second phase, remaining structurally untouched and without further mass and size increase. We show that if the outliers had followed the normal evolutionary path by growing in size via merger activity over cosmic time, the expected (mild) growth in mass would place them closer to the observed local relations. Our results suggest that by the end of the z~2 phase the SMBH is almost fully in place, being larger than expected from the galaxy stellar mass, therefore the SMBH growth epoch for the most massive galaxies stopped ~10Gyr ago (Ferré-Mateu et al. 2015, submitted to ApJ).

  9. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES AND HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon; Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne; CNRS and others

    2013-06-20

    We examine the relationship between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) Hubble residuals and the properties of their host galaxies using a sample of 115 SNe Ia from the Nearby Supernova Factory. We use host galaxy stellar masses and specific star formation rates fitted from photometry for all hosts, as well as gas-phase metallicities for a subset of 69 star-forming (non-active galactic nucleus) hosts, to show that the SN Ia Hubble residuals correlate with each of these host properties. With these data we find new evidence for a correlation between SN Ia intrinsic color and host metallicity. When we combine our data with those of other published SN Ia surveys, we find the difference between mean SN Ia brightnesses in low- and high-mass hosts is 0.077 {+-} 0.014 mag. When viewed in narrow (0.2 dex) bins of host stellar mass, the data reveal apparent plateaus of Hubble residuals at high and low host masses with a rapid transition over a short mass range (9.8 {<=} log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) {<=} 10.4). Although metallicity has been a favored interpretation for the origin of the Hubble residual trend with host mass, we illustrate how dust in star-forming galaxies and mean SN Ia progenitor age both evolve along the galaxy mass sequence, thereby presenting equally viable explanations for some or all of the observed SN Ia host bias.

  10. Host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts in the Millennium Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, N. E.; Tissera, P. B.; Pellizza, L. J.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the nature of the host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) using a galaxy catalogue constructed from the Millennium Simulation. We developed an LGRB synthetic model based on the hypothesis that these events originate at the end of the life of massive stars following the collapsar model, with the possibility of including a constraint on the metallicity of the progenitor star. A complete observability pipeline was designed to calculate a probability estimation for a galaxy to be observationally identified as a host for LGRBs detected by present observational facilities. This new tool allows us to build an observable host galaxy catalogue which is required to reproduce the current stellar mass distribution of observed hosts. This observability pipeline predicts that the minimum mass for the progenitor stars should be ~ 75 Msolar in order to be able to reproduce BATSE observations. Systems in our observable catalogue are able to reproduce the observed properties of host galaxies, namely stellar masses, colours, luminosity, star formation activity and metallicities as a function of redshift. At z > 2, our model predicts that the observable host galaxies would be very similar to the global galaxy population. We found that ~ 88 per cent of the observable host galaxies with mean gas metallicity lower than 0.6 Zsolar have stellar masses in the range 108.5-1010.3 Msolar, in excellent agreement with observations. Interestingly in our model, observable host galaxies remain mainly within this mass range regardless of redshift, since lower stellar mass systems would have a low probability of being observed while more massive ones would be too metal-rich. Observable host galaxies are predicted to preferentially inhabit dark matter haloes in the range 1011-1011.5 Msolar, with a weak dependence on redshift. They are also found to preferentially map different density environments at different stages of evolution of the Universe. At high redshifts

  11. The Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae Discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Sullivan, M.; McGuire, K.; Hook, I. M.; Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Arcavi, I.; Botyanszki, J.; Cenko, Stephen Bradley; DeRose, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the host galaxies of 82 low-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We determine star-formation rates, gas-phase stellar metallicities, and stellar masses and ages of these objects. As expected, strong correlations between the SN Ia light-curve width (stretch) and the host age mass metallicity are found: fainter, faster-declining events tend to be hosted by older massive metal-rich galaxies. There is some evidence that redder SNe Ia explode in higher metallicity galaxies, but we found no relation between the SN colour and host galaxy extinction based on the Balmer decrement, suggesting that the colour variation of these SNe does not primarily arise from this source. SNe Ia in higher-mass metallicity galaxies also appear brighter after stretch colour corrections than their counterparts in lower mass hosts, and the stronger correlation is with gas-phase metallicity suggesting this may be the more important variable. We also compared the host stellar mass distribution to that in galaxy targeted SN surveys and the high-redshift untargeted Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). SNLS has many more low mass galaxies, while the targeted searches have fewer. This can be explained by an evolution in the galaxy stellar mass function, coupled with a SN delay-time distribution proportional to t1. Finally, we found no significant difference in the mass--metallicity relation of our SN Ia hosts compared to field galaxies, suggesting any metallicity effect on the SN Ia rate is small.

  12. The X-shooter sample of GRB afterglow spectra: Properties of the absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Since its commissioning at ESO's Very Large Telescope in 2009, the X-shooter spectrograph has become the reference instrument in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectroscopy. During this time our collaboration has collected more than 70 spectra of GRB afterglows, with redshifts ranging from 0.06 to 6.3. Thanks to their extreme luminosity and simple intrinsic shape, GRB spectra are optimal tools for the study of galactic environments at basically any redshift. Being produced by the death of short-lived massive stars, they are also tracers of star formation.I will present the sample of absorption spectral features identified in X-shooter's GRB spectra describing observation and analysis techniques. The different features are compared with the characteristics of the explosion (duration, spectral shape, energetics, etc.) and with the properties of the host galaxy (mass, age, etc.) to improve our understanding of the nature of the explosions and how they interact with their environments. Using the large redshift range of the spectra collection we perform studies of the evolution of GRB environments across the history of the Universe and their relation with the evolution of star formation.

  13. Ionised outflows in z ~ 2.4 quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked by galaxy evolutionary models to quench star formation and to explain the origin of the relations observed locally between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. We here aim to detect extended ionised outflows in luminous quasars, where we expect the highest activity both in star formation and in black-hole accretion. Currently, there are only a few studies based on spatially resolved observations of outflows at high redshift, z > 2. Methods: We analysed a sample of six luminous (L > 1047 erg/s) quasars at z ~ 2.4, observed in H-band using the near-IR integral field spectrometer SINFONI at the VLT. We performed a kinematic analysis of the [Oiii] emission line at λ = 5007 Å. Results: We detect fast, spatially extended outflows in five out of six targets. [Oiii]λ5007 has a complex gas kinematic, with blue-shifted velocities of a few hundreds of km s-1 and line widths up to 1500 km s-1. Using the spectroastrometric method, we infer a size of the ionised outflows of up to ~2 kpc. The properties of the ionised outflows, mass outflow rate, momentum rate, and kinetic power, are correlated with the AGN luminosity. The increase in outflow rate with increasing AGN luminosity is consistent with the idea that a luminous AGN pushes away the surrounding gas through fast outflows that are driven by radiation pressure, which depends on the emitted luminosity. Conclusions: We derive mass outflow rates of about 6-700 M⊙ yr-1 for our sample, which are lower than those observed in molecular outflows. The physical properties of ionised outflows show dependences on AGN luminosity that are similar to those of molecular outflows, but indicate that the mass of ionised gas is lower than that of molecular outflows. Alternatively, this discrepancy between ionised and molecular outflows could be explained with different acceleration mechanisms. Based on Observations collected at the European Organisation for

  14. H0LiCOW. VI. Testing the fidelity of lensed quasar host galaxy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuheng; Liao, Kai; Treu, Tommaso; Suyu, Sherry H.; Chen, Geoff C.-F.; Auger, Matthew W.; Marshall, Philip J.; Agnello, Adriano; Courbin, Frederic; Nierenberg, Anna M.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Sluse, Dominique; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Wong, Kenneth C.

    2017-03-01

    The empirical correlation between the mass of a supermassive black hole (M_BH) and its host galaxy properties is widely considered to be an evidence of their co-evolution. A powerful way to test the co-evolution scenario and learn about the feedback processes linking galaxies and nuclear activity is to measure these correlations as a function of redshift. Unfortunately, currently M_BH can only be estimated in active galaxies at cosmological distances. At these distances, bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can outshine the host galaxy, making it extremely difficult to measure the host's luminosity. Strongly lensed AGNs provide in principle a great opportunity to improve the sensitivity and accuracy of the host galaxy luminosity measurements as the host galaxy is magnified and more easily separated from the point source, provided the lens model is sufficiently accurate. In order to measure the M_BH-L correlation with strong lensing, it is necessary to ensure that the lens modelling is accurate, and that the host galaxy luminosity can be recovered to at least a precision and accuracy better than that of the typical M_BH measurement. We carry out extensive and realistic simulations of deep Hubble Space Telescope observations of lensed AGNs obtained by our collaboration. We show that the host galaxy luminosity can be recovered with better accuracy and precision than the typical uncertainty in M_BH(∼0.5 dex) for hosts as faint as 2-4 mag dimmer than the AGN itself. Our simulations will be used to estimate bias and uncertainties in the actual measurements to be presented in a future paper.

  15. SWIFT Detects a remarkable Gamma-ray Burst, GRB 060514, that introduces a New Classification Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Norris, J. P.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Granot, J.; Kaneko, Y.; Kouveliotou, C.; Markwardt, C. B.; Meszaros, P.; hide

    2007-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GFU3s) are known to come in two duration classes, separated at approx.2 s. Long bursts originate from star forming regions in galaxies, have accompanying supernovae (SNe) when near enough to observe and are likely caused by massive-star collapsars. Recent observations show that short bursts originate in regions within their host galaxies with lower star formation rates, consistent with binary neutron star (NS) or NS - black hole (BH) mergers. Moreover, although their hosts are predominantly nearby galaxies, no SNe have been so far associated with short GRBs. We report here on the bright, nearby GRB 060614 that does not fit in either class. Its approx.102 s duration groups it with long GRBs, while its temporal lag and peak luminosity fall entirely within the short GRB subclass. Moreover, very deep optical observations exclude an accompanying supernova, similar to short GRBs. This combination of a long duration event without accompanying SN poses a challenge to both a collapsar and merging NS interpretation and opens the door on a new GRB classification scheme that straddles both long and short bursts.

  16. A new gamma-ray burst classification scheme from GRB 060614.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, N; Norris, J P; Barthelmy, S D; Granot, J; Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Markwardt, C B; Mészáros, P; Nakar, E; Nousek, J A; O'Brien, P T; Page, M; Palmer, D M; Parsons, A M; Roming, P W A; Sakamoto, T; Sarazin, C L; Schady, P; Stamatikos, M; Woosley, S E

    2006-12-21

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are known to come in two duration classes, separated at approximately 2 s. Long-duration bursts originate from star-forming regions in galaxies, have accompanying supernovae when these are near enough to observe and are probably caused by massive-star collapsars. Recent observations show that short-duration bursts originate in regions within their host galaxies that have lower star-formation rates, consistent with binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole mergers. Moreover, although their hosts are predominantly nearby galaxies, no supernovae have been so far associated with short-duration GRBs. Here we report that the bright, nearby GRB 060614 does not fit into either class. Its approximately 102-s duration groups it with long-duration GRBs, while its temporal lag and peak luminosity fall entirely within the short-duration GRB subclass. Moreover, very deep optical observations exclude an accompanying supernova, similar to short-duration GRBs. This combination of a long-duration event without an accompanying supernova poses a challenge to both the collapsar and the merging-neutron-star interpretations and opens the door to a new GRB classification scheme that straddles both long- and short-duration bursts.

  17. Swift Detects a Remarkable Gamma-Ray Burst, GRB 060614, That Introduces a New Classification Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrels, Neil; Norris, J.P.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Burrows, D.N.; Granot, J.; Kaneko, Y.; Kouveliotou, C.; Markwardt, C.B.; Meszaros, P.; Nakar, E.; Nousek, J.A.; O'Brien, P.T.; Page, M.; Palmer, D.M.; Parsons, A.M.; Roming, P.W.A.; Sakamoto, T.; Sarazin, C.L.; Schady, P.; Stamatikos, M.; /NASA, Goddard /Brera Observ. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /USRA, Huntsville /NASA, Marshall /Maryland U. /Penn State U. /Caltech /Leicester U. /Mullard Space Sci. Lab. /Los Alamos /Oak Ridge /Virginia U., Astron. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz

    2006-11-28

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are known to come in two duration classes, separated at {approx}2 s. Long bursts originate from star forming regions in galaxies, have accompanying supernovae (SNe) when near enough to observe and are likely caused by massive-star collapsars. Recent observations show that short bursts originate in regions within their host galaxies with lower star formation rates, consistent with binary neutron star (NS) or NS - black hole (BH) mergers. Moreover, although their hosts are predominantly nearby galaxies, no SNe have been so far associated with short GRBs. We report here on the bright, nearby GRB 060614 that does not fit in either class. Its {approx}102 s duration groups it with long GRBs, while its temporal lag and peak luminosity fall entirely within the short GRB subclass. Moreover, very deep optical observations exclude an accompanying supernova, similar to short GRBs. This combination of a long duration event without accompanying SN poses a challenge to both a collapsar and merging NS interpretation and opens the door on a new GRB classification scheme that straddles both long and short bursts.

  18. The Properties Of The Stellar Nuclei With The Host Galaxy Morphology In The ACSVCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-chul

    2012-01-01

    We have revisited the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS), a Hubble Space Telescope program to obtain ACS/WFC g and z bands imaging for a sample of 100 early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. In this study, we examine 51 nucleated early-type galaxies in the ACSVCS in order to look into the relationship between the photometric and structural properties of stellar nuclei and their host galaxies. We morphologically dissect galaxies into five classes. We note that (1) the stellar nuclei of dwarf early-type galaxies (dS0, dE, and dE,N) are generally fainter and bluer with g > 18.95 and (g-z) < 1.40 compared to some brighter and redder counterparts of the ellipticals (E) and lenticular galaxies (S0), (2) the g-band half-light radii of stellar nuclei of all dwarf early-type galaxies (dS0, dE, and dE,N) are smaller than 20 pc and their average is about 4 pc, and (3) the colors of red stellar nuclei with (g-z) > 1.40 in bright ellipticals and lenticular galaxies are bluer than their host galaxies colors. We also show that most of the unusually RED stellar nuclei with (g-z) > 1.54 in the ACSVCS are the central parts of bright ellipticals and lenticular galaxies.

  19. Low-redshift quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82. Host galaxy colours and close environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, D.; Falomo, R.; Kotilainen, J. K.; Karhunen, K.; Uslenghi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a photometrical and morphological multicolour study of the properties of low-redshift (z < 0.3) quasar hosts based on a large and homogeneous data set of quasars derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7). We used quasars that were imaged in the SDSS Stripe82 that is up to 2 mag deeper than standard Sloan images. This sample is part of a larger data set of ˜400 quasars at z < 0.5 for which both the host galaxies and their galaxy environments were studied. For 52 quasars, we undertake a study of the colour of the host galaxies and of their close environments in the u, g, r, i and z bands. We are able to resolve almost all the quasars in the sample in the filters g, r, i and z and also in u for about 50 per cent of the targets. We found that the mean colours of the QSO host galaxy (g - i = 0.82 ± 0.26; r - i = 0.26 ± 0.16 and u - g = 1.32 ± 0.25) are very similar to the values of a sample of inactive galaxies matched in terms of redshift and galaxy luminosity with the quasar sample. There is a suggestion that the most massive QSO hosts have bluer colours. Both quasar hosts and the comparison sample of inactive galaxies have candidates of close (<50 kpc) companion galaxies for ˜30 per cent of the sources with no significant difference between active and inactive galaxies. We do not find significant correlation between the central black hole (BH) mass and the quasar host luminosity that appears to be extra luminous at a given BH mass with respect to the local relation (MBH - Mhost) for inactive galaxies. This confirms previous suggestion that a substantial disc component, not correlated with the BH mass, is present in the galaxies hosting low-z quasars. These results support a scenario where the activation of the nucleus has negligible effects on the global structural and photometrical properties of the hosting galaxies.

  20. DUST-CORRECTED COLORS REVEAL BIMODALITY IN THE HOST-GALAXY COLORS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Megan Urry, C.; Brammer, Gabriel; Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel; Gawiser, Eric

    2010-09-20

    Using new, highly accurate photometric redshifts from the MUSYC medium-band survey in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDF-S), we fit synthetic stellar population models to compare active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies to inactive galaxies at 0.8 {<=} z {<=} 1.2. We find that AGN host galaxies are predominantly massive galaxies on the red sequence and in the green valley of the color-mass diagram. Because both passive and dusty galaxies can appear red in optical colors, we use rest-frame near-infrared colors to separate passively evolving stellar populations from galaxies that are reddened by dust. As with the overall galaxy population, {approx}25% of the 'red' AGN host galaxies and {approx}75% of the 'green' AGN host galaxies have colors consistent with young stellar populations reddened by dust. The dust-corrected rest-frame optical colors are the blue colors of star-forming galaxies, which imply that these AGN hosts are not passively aging to the red sequence. At z {approx} 1, AGN activity is roughly evenly split between two modes of black hole growth: the first in passively evolving host galaxies, which may be heating up the galaxy's gas and preventing future episodes of star formation, and the second in dust-reddened young galaxies, which may be ionizing the galaxy's interstellar medium and shutting down star formation.

  1. Globular cluster systems and their host galaxies: comparison of spatial distributions and colors

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Jonathan R.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2014-11-20

    We present a study of the spatial and color distributions of four early-type galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems observed as part of our ongoing wide-field imaging survey. We use BVR KPNO 4 m+MOSAIC imaging data to characterize the galaxies' GC populations, perform surface photometry of the galaxies, and compare the projected two-dimensional shape of the host galaxy light to that of the GC population. The GC systems of the ellipticals NGC 4406 and NGC 5813 both show an elliptical distribution consistent with that of the host galaxy light. Our analysis suggests a similar result for the giant elliptical NGC 4472, but a smaller GC candidate sample precludes a definite conclusion. For the S0 galaxy NGC 4594, the GCs have a circular projected distribution, in contrast to the host galaxy light, which is flattened in the inner regions. For NGC 4406 and NGC 5813, we also examine the projected shapes of the metal-poor and metal-rich GC subpopulations and find that both subpopulations have elliptical shapes that are consistent with those of the host galaxy light. Lastly, we use integrated colors and color profiles to compare the stellar populations of the galaxies to their GC systems. For each galaxy, we explore the possibility of color gradients in the individual metal-rich and metal-poor GC subpopulations. We find statistically significant color gradients in both GC subpopulations of NGC 4594 over the inner ∼5 effective radii (∼20 kpc). We compare our results to scenarios for the formation and evolution of giant galaxies and their GC systems.

  2. Spatially resolved analysis of superluminous supernovae PTF 11hrq and PTF 12dam host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikota, Aleksandar; De Cia, Annalisa; Schulze, Steve; Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Perley, Daniel A.; Cikota, Stefan; Kim, Sam; Patat, Ferdinando; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Quimby, Robert; Yaron, Ofer; Yan, Lin; Mazzali, Paolo A.

    2017-08-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are the most luminous supernovae in the Universe. They are found in extreme star-forming galaxies and are probably connected with the death of massive stars. One hallmark of very massive progenitors would be a tendency to explode in very dense, UV-bright and blue regions. In this paper, we investigate the resolved host galaxy properties of two nearby hydrogen-poor SLSNe, PTF 11hrq and PTF 12dam. For both galaxies Hubble Space Telescope multifilter images were obtained. Additionally, we perform integral field spectroscopy of the host galaxy of PTF 11hrq using the Very Large Telescope Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (VLT/MUSE), and investigate the line strength, metallicity and kinematics. Neither PTF 11hrq nor PTF 12dam occurred in the bluest part of their host galaxies, although both galaxies have overall blue UV-to-optical colours. The MUSE data reveal a bright starbursting region in the host of PTF 11hrq, although far from the SN location. The SN exploded close to a region with disturbed kinematics, bluer colour, stronger [O iii] and lower metallicity. The host galaxy is likely interacting with a companion. PTF 12dam occurred in one of the brightest pixels, in a starbursting galaxy with a complex morphology and a tidal tail, where interaction is also very likely. We speculate that SLSN explosions may originate from stars generated during star formation episodes triggered by interaction. High-resolution imaging and integral field spectroscopy are fundamental for a better understanding of SLSNe explosion sites and how star formation varies across their host galaxies.

  3. DISCOVERY AND EARLY MULTI-WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF THE ENERGETIC TYPE IC SUPERNOVA PTF12GZK: A MASSIVE-STAR EXPLOSION IN A DWARF HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Modjaz, Maryam; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel; Howell, D. Andrew; Graham, Melissa L.; Sand, David J.; Horst, J. Chuck; Leonard, Douglas C.; Im, Myunshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Sullivan, Mark; and others

    2012-12-01

    We present the discovery and extensive early-time observations of the Type Ic supernova (SN) PTF12gzk. Our light curves show a rise of 0.8 mag within 2.5 hr. Power-law fits (f(t){proportional_to}(t - t{sub 0}) {sup n}) to these data constrain the explosion date to within one day. We cannot rule out a quadratic fireball model, but higher values of n are possible as well for larger areas in the fit parameter space. Our bolometric light curve and a dense spectral sequence are used to estimate the physical parameters of the exploding star and of the explosion. We show that the photometric evolution of PTF12gzk is slower than that of most SNe Ic. The high ejecta expansion velocities we measure ({approx}30, 000 km s{sup -1} derived from line minima four days after explosion) are similar to the observed velocities of broad-lined SNe Ic associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) rather than to normal SN Ic velocities. Yet, this SN does not show the persistent broad lines that are typical of broad-lined SNe Ic. The host-galaxy characteristics are also consistent with GRB-SN hosts, and not with normal SN Ic hosts. By comparison with the spectroscopically similar SN 2004aw, we suggest that the observed properties of PTF12gzk indicate an initial progenitor mass of 25-35 M{sub Sun} and a large ((5-10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg) kinetic energy, the later being close to the regime of GRB-SN properties.

  4. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the current standard-bearers for dark energy but face several hurdles for their continued success in future large surveys. For example, spectroscopic classification of the myriad SNe soon to be discovered will not be possible, and systematics from uncertainties in dust corrections and the evolution of SN demographics and/or empirical calibrations used to standardize SNe Ia must be studied. Through the identification of low-dust host galaxies and through increased understanding of both the SN - progenitor connections and empirical calibrations, host galaxy information may offer opportunities to improve the cosmological utility of SNe Ia. The first half of this thesis analyzes the sample of SNe Ia discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. Correlations between properties of SNe and their host galaxies are examined at high redshift. Using galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters, a model is developed to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, 6 early-type cluster member hosts and 11 SN Ia early-type field hosts are identified. For the first time at z > 0.9, the correlation between host galaxy type and the rise and fall time of SN Ia light curves is confirmed. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions of early-type galaxies also enables stellar mass measurements for these hosts. In combination with literature host mass measurements, these measurements are used to show, at z > 0.9, a hint of the correlation between host mass and Hubble residuals reported at lower redshift. By simultaneously fitting cluster galaxy formation histories and dust content to the scatter of the cluster red sequences, it is shown that dust reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely less

  5. STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES AND THE HOST GALAXY IN THREE H II GALAXIES: Mrk 36, UM 408, AND UM 461

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, P.; Telles, E.; Nigoche-Netro, A.

    2011-11-15

    We present a stellar population study of three H II galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high-resolution near-infrared J, H, and K{sub p} broadband and Br{gamma} narrowband images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine the relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low-luminosity H II galaxies is {approx}10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses {approx}>10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently and likely simultaneously over short timescales in their host galaxies, triggered by some internal mechanism. Finally, the fraction of the total cluster mass with respect to the low surface brightness (or host galaxy) mass, considering our complete range in ages, is less than 1%.

  6. The Coevolution of Nuclear Star Clusters, Massive Black Holes, and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Fabio; Barausse, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Studying how nuclear star clusters (NSCs) form and how they are related to the growth of the central massive black holes (MBHs) and their host galaxies is fundamental for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies and the processes that have shaped their central structures. We present the results of a semi-analytical galaxy formation model that follows the evolution of dark matter halos along merger trees, as well as that of the baryonic components. This model allows us to study the evolution of NSCs in a cosmological context, by taking into account the growth of NSCs due to both dynamical-friction-driven migration of stellar clusters and star formation triggered by infalling gas, while also accounting for dynamical heating from (binary) MBHs. We find that in situ star formation contributes a significant fraction (up to ∼80%) of the total mass of NSCs in our model. Both NSC growth through in situ star formation and that through star cluster migration are found to generate NSC—host galaxy scaling correlations that are shallower than the same correlations for MBHs. We explore the role of galaxy mergers on the evolution of NSCs and show that observational data on NSC—host galaxy scaling relations provide evidence of partial erosion of NSCs by MBH binaries in luminous galaxies. We show that this observational feature is reproduced by our models, and we make predictions about the NSC and MBH occupation fraction in galaxies. We conclude by discussing several implications for theories of NSC formation.

  7. Are long gamma-ray bursts biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II. Star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Salvaterra, R.; D'Avanzo, P.; Mannucci, F.; Fernandez-Soto, A.; Boissier, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Atek, H.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Cristiani, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Flores, H.; Gallego, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Hammer, F.; Perley, D. A.; Pescalli, A.; Petitjean, P.; Puech, M.; Rafelski, M.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and might therefore be a potentially powerful tool for tracing cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z< 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the effect of the environment on GRB formation. Methods: We studied host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z< 1 bright LGRBs. We used the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplemented the data set with previously measured stellar masses M⋆. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M⋆ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies. Results: We find that LGRB hosts at z< 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to 12 +log ≤ft( frac{OHright)} 8.4-8.5, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are consistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of an increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z< 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless, the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevents us from investigating more quantitatively whether the starburst incidence is such as expected

  8. Metallicity of Stars and Parameters of Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, N.

    2017-06-01

    On the basis of archival ACS/WFC images of the Hubble space telescope we carried out a stellar photometry of 46 irregular galaxies. On the received Hertzsprung -Russel diagrams (CM-diagrams), branches of red supergiants and giants were allocated. We determined the distances to galaxies and metallicity of red giants by the TRGB-method. For red supergiants the color index (V-I) of stars at the level of MI = -7 was accepted as an equivalent of metallicity. We constructed the distributions of the number density of stars of different age along the radius of galaxies and determined the spatial sizes of subsystems of these stars. Dependences between metallicities of stars of different age, and also between metallicity and global parameters of galaxies — sizes of stellar subsystems and brightness of galaxies — were found.

  9. GRB980109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Martin

    1998-01-01

    GRB980109 field was observed by the OGLE collaboration with the 1.3-m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile on Jan. 10.06, 10.18, 11.05, 12.05 and 16.05, 1998. Ten 900 sec I-band exposures were collected. The field size was 14.2 by 14.2 arcmins covering almost entire error box. None fading or variable stellar-like object was detected up to detection limit of I ~ 21 mag and variability threshold of 0.4 mag.

  10. What Distinguishes the Host Galaxies of Radio-loud and Radio-quiet AGNs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Sikora, M.; Goettems, E. I.; Wójtowicz, A.

    2017-09-01

    We compare the optical properties of the host galaxies of radio-quiet (RQ) and radio-loud (RL) Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to infer whether the jet production efficiency depends on the host properties or is determined just by intrinsic properties of the accretion flows. We carefully select galaxies from SDSS, FIRST, and NVSS catalogs. We confirm previous findings that the fraction of RL AGNs depends on the black-hole (BH) masses, and on the Eddington ratio. The comparison of the nature of the hosts of RL and RQ AGNs, therefore, requires pair-matching techniques. Matching in BH mass and Eddington ratio allows us to study the differences between galaxies hosting RL and RQ AGNs that have the same basic accretion parameters. We show that these two samples differ predominantly in the host-galaxy concentration index, morphological type (in the RL sample the frequency of elliptical galaxies becoming larger with increasing radio loudness), and nebular extinction (galaxies with highest radio loudness showing only low nebular extinction). Contrary to some previous studies, we find no significant difference between our radio-loud and radio-quiet samples regarding merger/interaction features.

  11. AGN host galaxy mass function in COSMOS. Is AGN feedback responsible for the mass-quenching of galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Schulze, A.; Merloni, A.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; La Franca, F.; Peng, Y.; Piconcelli, E.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the role of supermassive black holes in the global context of galaxy evolution by measuring the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF) and the specific accretion rate, that is, λSAR, the distribution function (SARDF), up to z ~ 2.5 with ~1000 X-ray selected AGN from XMM-COSMOS. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we jointly fit the stellar mass function and specific accretion rate distribution function, with the X-ray luminosity function as an additional constraint. Our best-fit model characterizes the SARDF as a double power-law with mass-dependent but redshift-independent break, whose low λSAR slope flattens with increasing redshift while the normalization increases. This implies that for a given stellar mass, higher λSAR objects have a peak in their space density at earlier epoch than the lower λSAR objects, following and mimicking the well-known AGN cosmic downsizing as observed in the AGN luminosity function. The mass function of active galaxies is described by a Schechter function with an almost constant M∗⋆ and a low-mass slope α that flattens with redshift. Compared to the stellar mass function, we find that the HGMF has a similar shape and that up to log (M⋆/M⊙) ~ 11.5, the ratio of AGN host galaxies to star-forming galaxies is basically constant (~10%). Finally, the comparison of the AGN HGMF for different luminosity and specific accretion rate subclasses with a previously published phenomenological model prediction for the "transient" population, which are galaxies in the process of being mass-quenched, reveals that low-luminosity AGN do not appear to be able to contribute significantly to the quenching and that at least at high masses, that is, M⋆ > 1010.7 M⊙, feedback from luminous AGN (log Lbol ≳ 46 [erg/s]) may be responsible for the quenching of star formation in the host galaxy.

  12. Bulgeless Galaxies Hosting 107 M⊙ AGN in Galaxy Zoo: The Growth of Black Holes via Secular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Brooke; Lintott, C. J.; Schawinski, K.; Moran, E. C.; Han, A.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Urry, C. M.; Willett, K.; Bamford, S. P.; Nichol, R.

    2013-01-01

    The growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) appears to proceed via multiple pathways including mergers and secular processes, but these are difficult to disentangle for most galaxies given their complex evolutionary histories. In order to understand the effects of secular galaxy evolution on black hole growth, we require a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in galaxies with a calm formation history free of significant mergers, a population that heretofore has been difficult to locate. Here we present a sample of 13 AGN in massive galaxies lacking the classical bulges believed inevitably to result from mergers; they also either lack or have extremely small pseudobulges, meaning they have had very calm accretion histories. This is the largest sample to date of massive, bulgeless AGN host galaxies selected without any direct restriction on the SMBH mass. The broad-line objects in the sample have black hole masses of 106-7 M⊙ Eddington arguments imply similar masses for the rest of the sample, meaning these black holes have grown substantially in the absence of mergers or other bulge-building processes such as violent disk instabilities. The black hole masses are systematically higher than expected from established bulge-black hole relations. However, these systems may be consistent with the correlation between black hole mass and total stellar mass. We discuss these results in the context of other studies and consider the implication that the details of stellar galaxy evolution and dynamics may not be fundamental to the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes.

  13. Supernovae and their host galaxies - II. The relative frequencies of supernovae types in spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Nazaryan, T. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Petrosian, A. R.; Aramyan, L. S.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; de Lapparent, V.; Bertin, E.; Gomes, J. M.; Turatto, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present an analysis of the relative frequencies of different supernova (SN) types in spirals with various morphologies and in barred or unbarred galaxies. We use a well-defined and homogeneous sample of spiral host galaxies of 692 SNe from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in different stages of galaxy-galaxy interaction and activity classes of nucleus. We propose that the underlying mechanisms shaping the number ratios of SNe types can be interpreted within the framework of interaction-induced star formation, in addition to the known relations between morphologies and stellar populations. We find a strong trend in behaviour of the NIa/NCC ratio depending on host morphology, such that early spirals include more Type Ia SNe. The NIbc/NII ratio is higher in a broad bin of early-type hosts. The NIa/NCC ratio is nearly constant when changing from normal, perturbed to interacting galaxies, then declines in merging galaxies, whereas it jumps to the highest value in post-merging/remnant galaxies. In contrast, the NIbc/NII ratio jumps to the highest value in merging galaxies and slightly declines in post-merging/remnant subsample. The interpretation is that the star formation rates and morphologies of galaxies, which are strongly affected in the final stages of interaction, have an impact on the number ratios of SNe types. The NIa/NCC (NIbc/NII) ratio increases (decreases) from star-forming to active galactic nuclei (AGN) classes of galaxies. These variations are consistent with the scenario of an interaction-triggered starburst evolving into AGN during the later stages of interaction, accompanied with the change of star formation and transformation of the galaxy morphology into an earlier type.

  14. Massive star-forming host galaxies of quasars on Sloan digital sky survey stripe 82

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Strauss, Michael A.; Price, Ted N. III; DiDonato, Matthew S.

    2014-01-10

    The stellar properties of about 800 galaxies hosting optically luminous, unobscured quasars at z < 0.6 are analyzed. Deep co-added Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images of the quasars on Stripe 82 are decomposed into nucleus and host galaxy using point spread function and Sérsic models. The systematic errors in the measured galaxy absolute magnitudes and colors are estimated to be less than 0.5 mag and 0.1 mag, respectively, with simulated quasar images. The effect of quasar light scattered by the interstellar medium is also carefully addressed. The measured quasar-to-galaxy ratio in total flux decreases toward longer wavelengths, from ∼8 in the u band to ∼1 in the i and z bands. We find that the SDSS quasars are hosted exclusively by massive galaxies (stellar mass M {sub star} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}), which is consistent with previous results for less luminous narrow-line (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The quasar hosts are very blue and almost absent on the red sequence, showing stark contrast to the color-magnitude distribution of normal galaxies. The fact that more powerful AGNs reside in galaxies with higher star-formation efficiency may indicate that negative AGN feedback, if it exists, is not concurrent with the most luminous phase of AGNs. We also find positive correlation between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs; M {sub BH}) and host stellar mass, but the M {sub BH}-M {sub star} relation is offset toward large M {sub BH} or small M {sub star} compared to the local relation. While this could indicate that SMBHs grow earlier than do their host galaxies, such an argument is not conclusive, as the effect may be dominated by observational biases.

  15. Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated with Host Galaxy Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Hicken, Malcolm; Burke, David L.; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-05-03

    From Sloan Digital Sky Survey u{prime} g{prime} r{prime} i{prime} z{prime} imaging, we estimate the stellar masses of the host galaxies of 70 low redshift SN Ia (0.015 < z < 0.08) from the hosts absolute luminosities and mass-to-light ratios. These nearby SN were discovered largely by searches targeting luminous galaxies, and we find that their host galaxies are substantially more massive than the hosts of SN discovered by the flux-limited Supernova Legacy Survey. Testing four separate light curve fitters, we detect {approx}2.5{sigma} correlations of Hubble residuals with both host galaxy size and stellar mass, such that SN Ia occurring in physically larger, more massive hosts are {approx}10% brighter after light curve correction. The Hubble residual is the deviation of the inferred distance modulus to the SN, calculated from its apparent luminosity and light curve properties, away from the expected value at the SN redshift. Marginalizing over linear trends in Hubble residuals with light curve parameters shows that the correlations cannot be attributed to a light curve-dependent calibration error. Combining 180 higher-redshift ESSENCE, SNLS, and HigherZ SN with 30 nearby SN whose host masses are less than 10{sup 10.8} M{circle_dot} n a cosmology fit yields 1 + w = 0.22{sub -0.108}{sup +0.152}, while a combination where the 30 nearby SN instead have host masses greater than 10{sup 10.8} M{circle_dot} yields 1 + w = ?0.03{sub -0.143}{sup +0.217}. Progenitor metallicity, stellar population age, and dust extinction correlate with galaxy mass and may be responsible for these systematic effects. Host galaxy measurements will yield improved distances to SN Ia.

  16. HST Service Observations of GRB 990123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Steven

    1997-07-01

    This program provides DD ToO observations of the remarkable new gamma-ray burst, GRB 990123. It is the brightest GRB detected by SAX. In rapid succession, the optical and radio afterglow to this GRB were discovered {Odewahn, Kulkarni, Djorgovski, et al.}, and a redshift of z >= 1.61 {Kelson et al.} to the GRB measured. At this redshift, the implied isotropic energy release is greater than 2 imes 10(54) erg in gamma-rays alone, an order of magnitude higher than for the already extreme GRB 971214 and more than the rest mass energy of a neutron star. In addition, the burst is interesting for the discovery of the first prompt optical emission of a GRB by the ROTSE-I team. As noted by the Caltech group, the pre-burst POSS-II images show a bright foreground galaxy close {< 2 arcsec} to the position of the optical transient. Absorption lines from two intervening systems {z=0.21 and z=0.29} have been detected in a spectrum obtained by the Nordic Optical Telescope group, which could indicate a foreground gravitational lens. If lensing is weak, the energetics of this GRB would make it the brightest object in the Universe detected to date. If the GRB is lensed and the magnification is high, measurements of time delay in the multiple images of the afterglow could be used to measure H_0 with a an accuracy of better than 10%. High resolution observations by HST are essential to resolve the environment of the GRB. The urgency of the observation is motivated by the fact that the afterglow is fading. To maximize the scientific benefit to the community of this unique event, we are observing the GRB with HST as a service and will make the data immediately available with no proprietary period.

  17. A Hubble Space Telescope survey of the host galaxies of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, C. R.; Levan, A. J.; Perley, D. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Lyman, J. D.; Stanway, E. R.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 UV and near-IR (nIR) imaging of 21 Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) host galaxies, providing a sensitive probe of star formation and stellar mass within the hosts. Comparing the photometric and morphological properties of these host galaxies with those of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), we find SLSN hosts are fainter and more compact at both UV and nIR wavelengths, in some cases we barely recover hosts with absolute magnitude around MV ≈ -14. With the addition of ground based optical observations and archival results, we produce spectral energy distribution fits to these hosts, and show that SLSN hosts possess lower stellar mass and star formation rates. This is most pronounced for the hydrogen deficient Type-I SLSN hosts, although Type-II H-rich SLSN host galaxies remain distinct from the bulk of CCSNe, spanning a remarkably broad range of absolute magnitudes, with ˜30 per cent of SLSNe-II arising from galaxies fainter than MnIR ˜ -14. The detection of our faintest SLSN hosts increases the confidence that SLSNe-I hosts are distinct from those of LGRBs in star formation rate and stellar mass, and suggests that apparent similarities in metallicity may be due to the limited fraction of hosts for which emission line metallicity measurements are feasible. The broad range of luminosities of SLSN-II hosts is difficult to describe by metallicity cuts, and does not match the expectations of any reasonable UV-weighted luminosity function, suggesting additional environmental constraints are likely necessary to yield hydrogen rich SLSNe.

  18. Galaxies of all Shapes Host Black Holes Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-10

    Observations from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope provide strong evidence that the slender, bulgeless galaxies can, like their chubbier counterparts, harbor supermassive black holes at their cores in this artist concept.

  19. Do Typical Galaxies in Adolescence Already Host Growing Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    This archival grism proposal achieves a 100-fold gain in high-quality {5+sigma} information for discovering which properties of adolescent {0.7galaxies of typical mass and SFR are linked to AGN activity. We propose to analyze 147 WFC3 G141 and 111 ACS 800L pointings of 2-orbit grism data in the CANDELS fields, for a sample of 3000 galaxies reaching SFR 5 Msun/yr and stellar masses of log{M*/Msun} 9 at z 1.5. We will leverage spatially-resolved line ratios to uniquely distinguish a nuclear AGN from extended low-metallicity or shocked gas. Compared to our 30-galaxy published sample that hints at AGNs in low-mass z 2 galaxies {Trump et al. 2011}, this 3000 galaxy sample enables a 100-fold gain in divisions by galaxy morphology, SFR, and stellar mass to discover which galaxy properties correlate most with rapid SMBH growth. We will stack the deep {0.8-4 Ms} Chandra data available in these fields as an independent check of the grism AGN/SF diagnostics. The unique ancillary data in these fields also include ACS+WFC3 imaging for morphologies, deep multiwavelength data for well-sampled SEDs and stellar masses, and previous optical {and future near-IR} spectroscopy to supplement the G141 coverage. Based on discussions with the GOODS-N and 3D-HST teams, our proposed AGN science does not overlap with their proposed or funded science goals. As a value-added product for the community we will release, via the public Rainbow-CANDELS database server, an atlas of spatial maps of emission lines and line ratios {and associated errors} for the entire sample of 3000 galaxies.

  20. Morphological Differences Between Seyfert Hosts and Normal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    Using new sub-arcsecond resolution imaging we compare large-scale stellar bar fraction in CfA sample of Seyferts and a closely matched control sample of normal galaxies. We find a difference between the samples on the 2.5σ level. We further compare the axial ratios of bars in all available samples quoted in the literature and find a deficiency of small axial ratio bars in Seyferts compared to normal galaxies.

  1. Scaling Relations Between Warm Galactic Outflows and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti, Christy A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei; Wofford, Aida; Lundgren, Britt

    2015-10-01

    We report on a sample of 48 nearby, star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure the kinematics of warm gas in galactic outflows using a combination of four Si ii absorption lines. We use multi-wavelength ancillary data to estimate stellar masses (M*), star formation rates (SFR), circular velocities (vcirc), and morphologies. The galaxies cover four orders of magnitude in M* and SFR, and sample a wide range of morphologies from starbursting mergers to normal star-forming galaxies. We derive 3.0-3.5σ relations between outflow velocity and SFR, M*, and vcirc. The outflow velocities scale as SFR0.08-0.22, {M}*0.12-0.20 and {v}{circ}0.44-0.87, with the range depending on whether we use a maximum or a central velocity to quantify the outflow velocity. After accounting for their increased SFR, mergers drive 32% faster outflows than non-merging galaxies, with all of the highest velocity outflows arising from mergers. Low-mass galaxies (log(M*/ M⊙) < 10.5) lose some low-ionization gas through galactic outflows, while more massive galaxies retain all of their low-ionization gas, unless they undergo a merger.

  2. The Relation between Luminous AGNs and Star Formation in Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Rieke, G. H.; Egami, E.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Smith, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    We study the relation of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to star formation in their host galaxies. Our sample includes 205 Type-1 and 85 Type-2 AGNs, 162 detected with Herschel, from fields surrounding 30 galaxy clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey. The sample is identified by optical line widths and ratios after selection to be brighter than 1 mJy at 24 μm. We show that Type-2 AGN [O iii]λ5007 line fluxes at high z can be contaminated by their host galaxies with typical spectrograph entrance apertures (but our sample is not compromised in this way). We use spectral energy distribution (SED) templates to decompose the galaxy SEDs and estimate star formation rates (SFRs), AGN luminosities, and host galaxy stellar masses (described in an accompanying paper). The AGNs arise from massive black holes (˜ 3× {10}8{M}⊙ ) accreting at ˜10% of the Eddington rate and residing in galaxies with stellar mass \\gt 3× {10}10{M}⊙ ; those detected with Herschel have IR luminosity from star formation in the range of {L}{SF,{IR}}˜ {10}10-{10}12{L}⊙ . We find that (1) the specific SFRs in the host galaxies are generally consistent with those of normal star-forming (main sequence) galaxies; (2) there is a strong correlation between the luminosities from star formation and the AGN; and (3) the correlation may not result from a causal connection, but could arise because the black hole mass (and hence AGN Eddington luminosity) and star formation are both correlated with the galaxy mass.

  3. Imaging and Demography of the Host Galaxies of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Hogan, Craig J.; Barris, Brian; Candia, Pablo; Challis, Peter; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Coil, Alison L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Holland, Stephen T.; Jha, Saurabh; Krisciunas, Kevin; Leibundgut, Bruno; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Maza, Jose; Phillips, Mark M.; Riess, Adam G.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Schommer, Robert A.; Smith, R. Chris; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Stubbs, Christopher; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Tonry, John L.

    2003-12-01

    We present the results of a study of the host galaxies of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We provide a catalog of 18 hosts of SNe Ia observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by the High-z Supernova Search Team, including images, scale lengths, measurements of integrated (Hubble-equivalent) BVRIZ photometry in bands where the galaxies are brighter than m~25 mag, and galactocentric distances of the supernovae. We compare the residuals of SN Ia distance measurements from cosmological fits with measurable properties of the supernova host galaxies that might be expected to correlate with variable properties of the progenitor population, such as host-galaxy color and position of the supernova. We find mostly null results; the current data are generally consistent with no correlations of the distance residuals with host-galaxy properties in the redshift range 0.42hosts shows a formally significant (3 σ) correlation between apparent V-R host color and distance residuals, the correlation is not consistent with the null results from other host colors probed by our largest samples. There is also evidence for the same correlations between SN Ia properties and host type at low redshift and high redshift. These similarities support the current practice of extrapolating properties of the nearby population to high redshifts, pending more robust detections of any correlations between distance residuals from cosmological fits and host properties. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  4. Radio Loudness of AGNs: Host Galaxy Morphology and the Spin Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Sikora, M.; Lasota, J.-P.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate how the total radio luminosity of AGN-powered radio sources depends on their accretion luminosity and the central black hole mass. We find that AGNs form two distinct and well separated sequences on the radio-loudness -- Eddington-ratio plane. We argue that these sequences mark the real upper bounds of radio-loudness of two distinct populations of AGNs: those hosted respectively by elliptical and disk galaxies. Both sequences show the same dependence of the radio-loudness on the Eddington ratio (an increase with decreasing Eddington ratio), which suggests that another parameter in addition to the accretion rate must play a role in determining the jet production efficiency in active galactic nuclei, and that this parameter is related to properties of the host galaxy. The revealed host-related radio dichotomy breaks down at high accretion rates where the dominant fraction of luminous quasars hosted by elliptical galaxies is radio quiet. We argue that the huge difference between the radio-loudness reachable by AGNs in disc and elliptical galaxies can be explained by the scenario according to which the spin of a black hole determines the outflows power, and central black holes can reach large spins only in early type galaxies (following major mergers), and not (in a statistical sense) in spiral galaxies.

  5. FRB 121102 Is Coincident with a Star-forming Region in Its Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Adams, E. A. K.; Maddox, N.; Bogdanov, S.; Bower, G. C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Butler, B. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Law, C. J.; Marcote, B.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Spitler, L. G.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    2017-07-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared imaging of the host galaxy of FRB 121102 with the Gemini North telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The FRB 121102 host galaxy is resolved, revealing a bright star-forming region located in the outskirts of the irregular, low-metallicity dwarf galaxy. The star-forming region has a half-light radius of 0.68 kpc (0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 20), encompassing the projected location of the compact (< 0.7 pc), persistent radio source that is associated with FRB 121102. The half-light diameter of the dwarf galaxy is 5-7 kpc, and broadband spectral energy distribution fitting indicates that it has a total stellar mass of {M}\\star ˜ {10}8 {M}⊙ . The properties of the host galaxy of FRB 121102 are comparable to those of extreme emission line galaxies, also known as hosts to some hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae and long-duration γ-ray bursts. The projected location of FRB 121102 within the star-forming region supports the proposed connection of FRBs with newly born neutron stars or magnetars.

  6. A statistical study of H i gas in nearby narrow-line AGN-hosting galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yi-Nan; Wu, Hong E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    As a quenching mechanism, active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback could suppress on going star formation in host galaxies. On the basis of a sample of galaxies selected from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) H i survey, the dependence of the H i mass (M{sub H} {sub i}), stellar mass (M{sub *}), and H i-to-stellar mass ratio (M{sub H} {sub i}/M{sub *}) on various tracers of AGN activity are presented and analyzed in this paper. Almost all the AGN hostings in this sample are gas-rich galaxies, and there is not any evidence to indicate that the AGN activity could increase or decrease either M{sub H} {sub i} or M{sub H} {sub i}/M{sub *}. The position of the cold neutral gas cannot be fixed accurately based only on available H i data, due to the large beam size of ALFALFA survey. In addition, even though AGN hostings are more easily detected by an H i survey compared with absorption line galaxies, these two types of galaxies show similar star formation history. If an AGN hosting would ultimately evolve into an old red galaxy with low cold gas, then when and how the gas has been exhausted must be solved by future hypotheses and observations.

  7. Do Nuclear Star Clusters and Supermassive Black Holes Follow the Same Host-Galaxy Correlations?

    DOE PAGES

    Erwin, Peter; Gadotti, Dimitri Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Smore » tudies have suggested that there is a strong correlation between the masses of nuclear star clusters (NSCs) and their host galaxies, a correlation which is said to be an extension of the well-known correlations between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. But careful analysis of disk galaxies—including 2D bulge/disk/bar decompositions—shows that whileMBHs correlate with the stellar mass of the bulge component of galaxies, the masses of NSCs correlate much better with the total galaxy stellar mass. In addition, the mass ratio M NSC / M ⋆ ,  tot for NSCs in spirals (at least those with Hubble typesc and later) is typically an order of magnitude smaller than the mass ratio M BH / M ⋆ ,  bul ofMBHs. The absence of a universal “central massive object” correlation argues against common formation and growth mechanisms for bothMBHs and NSCs. We also discuss evidence for a break in the NSC-host galaxy correlation, galaxies with Hubble types earlier thanbc appear to host systematically more massive NSCs than do typesc and later.« less

  8. The MUSE QSO Blind Survey: A Census of Absorber Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie A.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the distribution of gas in galaxies and its interaction with the IGM is crucial to complete the picture of galaxy evolution. At all redshifts, absorption features seen in QSO spectra serve as a unique probe of the gaseous content of foreground galaxies and the IGM, extending out to 200 kpc. Studies show that star formation history is intimately related to the co-evolution of galaxies and the IGM. In order to study the environments traced by absorption systems and the role of inflows and outflows, it is critical to measure the emission properties of host galaxies and their halos. We overcome the challenge of detecting absorption host galaxies with the MUSE integral field spectrograph on VLT. MUSE's large field of view and sensitivity to emission lines has allowed a never-before seen match between the number density of absorbers along QSO sightlines and the number density of emission line galaxies within 200 kpc of the QSO. These galaxies represent a sample for which previously elusive connections can be made between mass, metallicity, SFR, and absorption.

  9. Energy input from quasars regulates the growth and activity of black holes and their host galaxies.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Tiziana; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2005-02-10

    In the early Universe, while galaxies were still forming, black holes as massive as a billion solar masses powered quasars. Supermassive black holes are found at the centres of most galaxies today, where their masses are related to the velocity dispersions of stars in their host galaxies and hence to the mass of the central bulge of the galaxy. This suggests a link between the growth of the black holes and their host galaxies, which has indeed been assumed for a number of years. But the origin of the observed relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion, and its connection with the evolution of galaxies, have remained unclear. Here we report simulations that simultaneously follow star formation and the growth of black holes during galaxy-galaxy collisions. We find that, in addition to generating a burst of star formation, a merger leads to strong inflows that feed gas to the supermassive black hole and thereby power the quasar. The energy released by the quasar expels enough gas to quench both star formation and further black hole growth. This determines the lifetime of the quasar phase (approaching 100 million years) and explains the relationship between the black hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion.

  10. Supernovae and their host galaxies - IV. The distribution of supernovae relative to spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramyan, L. S.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; de Lapparent, V.; Bertin, E.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Nazaryan, T. A.; Adibekyan, V.; Turatto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using a sample of 215 supernovae (SNe), we analyse their positions relative to the spiral arms of their host galaxies, distinguishing grand-design (GD) spirals from non-GD (NGD) galaxies. We find that: (1) in GD galaxies, an offset exists between the positions of Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNe relative to the peaks of arms, while in NGD galaxies the positions show no such shifts; (2) in GD galaxies, the positions of CC SNe relative to the peaks of arms are correlated with the radial distance from the galaxy nucleus. Inside (outside) the corotation radius, CC SNe are found closer to the inner (outer) edge. No such correlation is observed for SNe in NGD galaxies nor for SNe Ia in either galaxy class; (3) in GD galaxies, SNe Ibc occur closer to the leading edges of the arms than do SNe II, while in NGD galaxies they are more concentrated towards the peaks of arms. In both samples of hosts, the distributions of SNe Ia relative to the arms have broader wings. These observations suggest that shocks in spiral arms of GD galaxies trigger star formation in the leading edges of arms affecting the distributions of CC SNe (known to have short-lived progenitors). The closer locations of SNe Ibc versus SNe II relative to the leading edges of the arms supports the belief that SNe Ibc have more massive progenitors. SNe Ia having less massive and older progenitors, have more time to drift away from the leading edge of the spiral arms.

  11. Supermassive black holes and central star clusters: Connection with the host galaxy kinematics and color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasov, A. V.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between the masses of the central, supermassive black holes ( M bh) and of the nuclear star clusters ( M nc) of disk galaxies with various parameters galaxies are considered: the rotational velocity at R = 2 kpc V (2), the maximum rotational velocity V max, the indicative dynamical mass M 25, the integrated mass of the stellar population M *, and the integrated color index B-V. The rotational velocities andmasses of the central objects were taken from the literature. Themass M nc correlatesmore closely with the kinematic parameters and the disk mass than M bh, including with the velocity V max, which is closely related to the virial mass of the dark halo. On average, lenticular galaxies are characterized by higher masses M bh compared to other types of galaxies with similar characteristics. The dependence of the blackhole mass on the color index is bimodal: galaxies of the red group (red-sequence) with B-V >0.6-0.7 which are mostly early-type galaxies with weak star formation, differ appreciably from blue galaxies, which have higher values of M nc and M bh. At the dependences we consider between the masses of the central objects and the parameters of the host galaxies (except for the dependence of M bh on the central velocity dispersion), the red-group galaxies have systematically higher M bh values, even when the host-galaxy parameters are similar. In contrast, in the case of nuclear star clusters, the blue and red galaxies form unified sequences. The results agree with scenarios in which most red-group galaxies form as a result of the partial or complete loss of interstellar gas in a stage of high nuclear activity in galaxies whose central black-hole masses exceed 106-107 M ⊙ (depending on the mass of the galaxy itself). The bulk of disk galaxies with M bh > 107 M ⊙ are lenticular galaxies (types S0, E/S0) whose disks are practically devoid of gas.

  12. Supermassive black holes: Coevolution (or not) of black holes and host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-07-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) have been found in 75 galaxies by observing spatially resolved dynamics. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) revolutionized BH work by advancing the subject from its `proof of concept' phase into quantitative studies of BH demographics. Most influential was the discovery of a tight correlation between BH masses M • and the velocity dispersions σ of stars in the host galaxy bulge components at radii where the stars mostly feel each other and not the BH. Together with correlations between M • and bulge luminosity, with the `missing light' that defines galaxy cores, and with numbers of globular clusters, this has led to the conclusion that BHs and bulges coevolve by regulating each other's growth. This simple picture with one set of correlations for all galaxies dominated BH work in the past decade. New results are now replacing the above, simple story with a richer and more plausible picture in which BHs correlate differently with different kinds of galaxy components. BHs with masses of 105-106 M ⊙ live in some bulgeless galaxies. So classical (merger-built) bulges are not necessary equipment for BH formation. On the other hand, while they live in galaxy disks, BHs do not correlate with galaxy disks or with disk-grown pseudobulges. They also have no special correlation with dark matter halos beyond the fact that halo gravity controls galaxy formation. This leads to the suggestion that there are two modes of BH feeding, (1) local, secular and episodic feeding of small BHs in largely bulgeless galaxies that involves too little energy feedback to drive BH-host-galaxy coevolution and (2) global feeding in major galaxy mergers that rapidly grows giant BHs in short-duration events whose energy feedback does affect galaxy formation. After these quasar-like phases, maintenance-mode BH feedback into hot, X-ray-emitting gas continues to have a primarily negative effect in preventing late-time star formation when cold gas or gas-rich galaxies

  13. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Imaging of the Host Galaxies of High-RedshiftRadio-loud Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Matthew D.; van Breugel, Wil J. M.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Miley, George K.

    1999-09-01

    We present rest-frame UV and Lyα images of spatially resolved structures (``hosts'') around five high-redshift radio-loud quasars obtained with the WFPC2 camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The quasars were imaged with the PC1 through the F555W (``V''-band) filter, which at the redshifts of the quasars (2.1host galaxies that appeared to have properties similar to those of high-redshift radio galaxies. Our HST observations allow a more detailed investigation of quasar host morphologies and a comparison with similar HST studies of radio galaxies by others. Using several methods to measure and quantify the host properties we find that all five quasars are extended and that this ``fuzz'' contains ~5%-40% of the total continuum flux and 15%-65% of the Lyα flux within a radius of about 1.5". The rest-frame UV luminosities of the hosts are log λPλ~11.9-12.5 Lsolar (assuming no internal dust extinction), comparable to the luminous radio galaxies at similar redshifts and a factor 10 higher than both radio-quiet field galaxies at z~2-3 and the most UV-luminous low-redshift starburst galaxies. The Lyα luminosities of the hosts are log LLyα~44.3-44.9 ergs s-1, which are also similar to the those of luminous high-redshift radio galaxies and considerably larger than the Lyα luminosities of high-redshift field galaxies. To generate the Lyα luminosities of the hosts would require roughly a few percent of the total observed ionizing luminosity of the quasar. The UV continuum morphologies of the hosts appear complex and knotty at the relatively high surface brightness levels of our exposures (about 24 V mag arcsec-2). In two quasars we find evidence for foreground galaxies that confuse the

  14. Imaging the host galaxies of high-redshift radio-quiet QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenthal, James D.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew, D.; Elias, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    We present new deep K-band and optical images of four radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 1 and six radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 2.5, as well as optical images only of six more at z approximately = 2.5. We have examined the images carefully for evidence of extended 'fuzz' from any putative QSO host galaxy. None of the z approximately = 2.5 QSOs shows any extended emission, and only two of the z approximately = 1 QSOs show marginal evidence for extended emission. Our 3 sigma detection limits in the K images, m(sub K) approximately = 21 for an isolated source, would correspond approximately to an unevolved L(sup star) elliptical galaxy at z = 2.5 or 2-3 mag fainter than an L(sup star) elliptical at z = 1, although our limits on host galaxy light are weaker than this due to the difficulty of separating galaxy light from QSO light. We simulate simple models of disk and elliptical host galaxies, and find that the marginal emission around the two z approximately = 1 QSOs can be explained by disks or bulges that are approximately 1-2 mag brighter than an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy in one case and approximately 1.5-2.5 mag brighter than L(sub star) in the other. For two other z approximately = 1 QSOs, we have only upper limits (L approximately = L(sup star)). The hosts of the high-redshift sample must be no brighter than about 3 mag above an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy, and are at least 1 magnitude fainter than the hosts of radio-loud QSOs at the same redshift. If the easily detected K-band light surrounding a previous sample of otherwise similar but radio-loud QSOs is starlight, then it must evolve on timescales of greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 8) yr (e.g., Chambers & Charlot 1990); therefore our non-detection of host galaxy fuzz around radio-quiet QSOs supports the view that high-redshift radio-quiet and radio-loud QSOs inhabit different host objects, rather than being single types of objects that turn their radio emission on and off over

  15. Molecular gas in the host galaxy of a quasar at redshift z = 6.42.

    PubMed

    Walter, Fabian; Bertoldi, Frank; Carilli, Chris; Cox, Pierre; Lo, K Y; Neri, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Omont, Alain; Strauss, Michael A; Menten, Karl M

    2003-07-24

    Observations of molecular hydrogen in quasar host galaxies at high redshifts provide fundamental constraints on galaxy evolution, because it is out of this molecular gas that stars form. Molecular hydrogen is traced by emission from the carbon monoxide molecule, CO; cold H2 itself is generally not observable. Carbon monoxide has been detected in about ten quasar host galaxies with redshifts z > 2; the record-holder is at z = 4.69 (refs 1-3). Here we report CO emission from the quasar SDSS J114816.64 + 525150.3 (refs 5, 6) at z = 6.42. At that redshift, the Universe was only 1/16 of its present age, and the era of cosmic reionization was just ending. The presence of about 2 x 1010 M\\circ of H2 in an object at this time demonstrates that molecular gas enriched with heavy elements can be generated rapidly in the youngest galaxies.

  16. INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN CLASSICAL QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Canalizo, Gabriela; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Although mergers and starbursts are often invoked in the discussion of quasi-stellar object (QSO) activity in the context of galaxy evolution, several studies have questioned their importance or even their presence in QSO host galaxies. Accordingly, we are conducting a study of z {approx} 0.2 QSO host galaxies previously classified as passively evolving elliptical galaxies. We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a sample of 15 hosts and model their stellar absorption spectra using stellar synthesis models. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our spectra allows us to break various degeneracies that arise from different combinations of models, varying metallicities, and contamination from QSO light. We find that none of the host spectra can be modeled by purely old stellar populations and that the majority of the hosts (14/15) have a substantial contribution from intermediate-age populations with ages ranging from 0.7 to 2.4 Gyr. An average host spectrum is strikingly well fit by a combination of an old population and a 2.1 (+0.5, -0.7) Gyr population. The morphologies of the host galaxies suggest that these aging starbursts were induced during the early stages of the mergers that resulted in the elliptical-shaped galaxies that we observe. The current active galactic nucleus activity likely corresponds to the late episodes of accretion predicted by numerical simulations, which occur near the end of the mergers, whereas earlier episodes may be more difficult to observe due to obscuration. Our off-axis observations prevent us from detecting any current star formation or young stellar populations that may be present in the central few kiloparsecs.

  17. Rapidly growing black holes and host galaxies in the distant Universe from the Herschel Radio Galaxy Evolution Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouart, G.; De Breuck, C.; Vernet, J.; Seymour, N.; Lehnert, M.; Barthel, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Ibar, E.; Galametz, A.; Haas, M.; Hatch, N.; Mullaney, J. R.; Nesvadba, N.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stern, D.; Wylezalek, D.

    2014-06-01

    We present results from a comprehensive survey of 70 radio galaxies at redshifts 1 galaxies in our sample are continuously covered across 3.6-870 μm. The total 8-1000 μm restframe infrared luminosities of these radio galaxies are such that almost all of them are either ultra-(LtotIR 1012 L⊙) or hyper-luminous (LtotIR 1013 L⊙) infrared galaxies. We fit the infrared SEDs with a set of empirical templates which represent dust heated by a variety of starbursts (SB) and by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We find that the SEDs of radio galaxies require the dust to be heated by both AGN and SB, but the luminosities of these two components are not strongly correlated. Assuming empirical relations and simple physical assumptions, we calculate the star formation rate (SFR), the black hole mass accretion rate (ṀBH), and the black hole mass (MBH) for each radio galaxy. We find that the host galaxies and their black holes are growing extremely rapidly, having SFR ≈ 100-5000 M⊙ yr-1 and ṀBH ≈ 1-100 M⊙ yr-1. The mean specific SFRs (sSFR) of radio galaxies at z> 2.5 are higher than the sSFR of typical star forming galaxies over the same redshift range, but are similar or perhaps lower than the galaxy population for radio galaxies at z< 2.5. By comparing the sSFR and the specific ṀBH (sṀBH), we conclude that black holes in radio loud AGN are already, or soon will be, overly massive compared to their host galaxies in terms of expectations from the local MBH-MGal relation. In order to catch up with the black hole, the galaxies require about an order of magnitude more time to grow in mass at the observed SFRs compared to the time the black hole is actively accreting

  18. Cepheid Variables in the Maser-host Galaxy NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Samantha L.; Macri, Lucas M.

    2015-06-01

    We present results of a ground-based survey for Cepheid variables in NGC 4258. This galaxy plays a key role in the Extragalactic Distance Scale due to its very precise and accurate distance determination via very long baseline interferometry observations of water masers. We imaged two fields within this galaxy using the Gemini North telescope and the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, obtaining 16 epochs of data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri bands over 4 yr. We carried out point-spread function photometry and detected 94 Cepheids with periods between 7 and 127 days, as well as an additional 215 variables which may be Cepheids or Population II pulsators. We used the Cepheid sample to test the absolute calibration of theoretical gri Period-Luminosity relations and found good agreement with the maser distance to this galaxy. The expected data products from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should enable Cepheid searches out to at least 10 Mpc.

  19. CEPHEID VARIABLES IN THE MASER-HOST GALAXY NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Samantha L.; Macri, Lucas M.

    2015-06-15

    We present results of a ground-based survey for Cepheid variables in NGC 4258. This galaxy plays a key role in the Extragalactic Distance Scale due to its very precise and accurate distance determination via very long baseline interferometry observations of water masers. We imaged two fields within this galaxy using the Gemini North telescope and the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, obtaining 16 epochs of data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri bands over 4 yr. We carried out point-spread function photometry and detected 94 Cepheids with periods between 7 and 127 days, as well as an additional 215 variables which may be Cepheids or Population II pulsators. We used the Cepheid sample to test the absolute calibration of theoretical gri Period–Luminosity relations and found good agreement with the maser distance to this galaxy. The expected data products from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should enable Cepheid searches out to at least 10 Mpc.

  20. The Galaxy Hosts And Large-Scale Environments of Short-Hard Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, Jason X.; Bloom, J.S.; Chen, H.-W.; Foley, R.J.; Perley, D.A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Granot, J.; Lee, W.H.; Pooley, D.; Alatalo, K.; Hurley, K.; Cooper, M.C.; Dupree, A.K.; Gerke, B.F.; Hansen, B.M.S.; Kalirai, J.S.; Newman, J.A.; Rich, R.M.; Richer, H.; Stanford, S.A.; Stern, D.; /Lick Observ. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /KIPAC, Menlo Park /UNAM, Inst. Astron. /UC, Berkeley, Space Sci. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /UC, Berkeley /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /British Columbia U. /UC, Davis /LLNL, Livermore /Caltech, JPL

    2005-10-07

    The rapid succession of discovery of short-duration hard-spectrum GRBs has led to unprecedented insights into the energetics of the explosion and nature of the progenitors. Yet short of the detection of a smoking gun, like a burst of coincident gravitational radiation or a Li-Paczynski mini-supernova, it is unlikely that a definitive claim can be made for the progenitors. As was the case with long-duration soft-spectrum GRBs, however, the expectation is that a systematic study of the hosts and the locations of short GRBs could begin to yield fundamental clues about their nature. We present the first aggregate study of the host galaxies of short-duration hard-spectrum GRBs. In particular, we present the Gemini-North and Keck discovery spectra of the galaxies that hosted three short GRBs and a moderate-resolution (R {approx} 6000) spectrum of a fourth host. We find that these short-hard GRBs originate in a variety of low-redshift (z < 1) environments that differ substantially from those of long-soft GRBs, both on individual galaxy scales and on galaxy-cluster scales. Specifically, three of the bursts are found to be associated with old and massive galaxies with no current (< 0.1M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}) or recent star formation. Two of these galaxies are located within a cluster environment. These observations support an origin from the merger of compact stellar remnants, such as double neutron stars of a neutron star-black hole binary. The fourth event, in contrast, occurred within a dwarf galaxy with a star formation rate exceeding 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}. Therefore, it appears that like supernovae of Type Ia, the progenitors of short-hard bursts are created in all galaxy types, suggesting a corresponding class with a wide distribution of delay times between formation and explosion.

  1. The Black Hole-Bulge Mass Relation in Megamaser Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läsker, Ronald; Greene, Jenny E.; Seth, Anil; van de Ven, Glenn; Braatz, James A.; Henkel, Christian; Lo, K. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images for nine megamaser disk galaxies with the primary goal of studying photometric BH-galaxy scaling relations. The megamaser disks provide the highest-precision extragalactic BH mass measurements, while our high-resolution HST imaging affords us the opportunity to decompose the complex nuclei of their late-type hosts in detail. Based on the morphologies and shapes of the galaxy nuclei, we argue that most of these galaxies’ central regions contain secularly evolving components (pseudo-bulges), and in many cases we photometrically identify co-existing “classical” bulge components as well. Using these decompositions, we draw the following conclusions. (1) The megamaser BH masses span two orders of magnitude (106-{10}8 {M}⊙ ) while the stellar mass of their spiral host galaxies are all ˜ {10}11 {M}⊙ within a factor of three. (2) The BH masses at a given bulge mass or total stellar mass in the megamaser host spiral galaxies tend to be lower than expected when compared to an extrapolation of the BH-bulge relation based on early-type galaxies. (3) The observed large intrinsic scatter of BH masses in the megamaser host galaxies raises the question of whether scaling relations exist in spiral galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 12185.

  2. Strong radio emission from SN 2007bg one year after the explosion - detection of spreading, off-axis GRB jet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, J. L.; Watson, L. C.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2009-05-01

    In their study of supernova hosts using SDSS data (Prieto, Stanek & Beacom 2008, ApJ, 673, 999), the broad-lined SN Ic 2007bg at z=0.034 (Quimby et al. 2007, #CBET 927; Harutyunyan et al. 2007, CBET #948; Soderberg & Immler 2007, ATEL #1142), was identified as a good candidate for an off-axis GRB. The likely host of SN 2007bg is an extremely low- luminosity galaxy with M_B ~ -12, one of the least-luminous supernova hosts of any kind ever observed.

  3. The nuclear properties and extended morphologies of powerful radio galaxies: the roles of host galaxy and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Best, P. N.

    2017-04-01

    Powerful radio Galaxies exist as either compact or extended sources, with the extended sources traditionally classified by their radio morphologies as Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I and II sources. FRI/FRII and compact radio galaxies have also been classified by their optical spectra into two different types: high excitation (HERG; quasar-mode) and low excitation (LERG; jet-mode). We present a catalogue of visual morphologies for a complete sample of >1000 1.4-GHz-selected extended radio sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We study the environment and host galaxy properties of FRI/FRII and compact sources, classified into HERG/LERG types, in order to separate and distinguish the factors that drive the radio morphological variations from those responsible for the spectral properties. Comparing FRI LERGs with FRII LERGs at fixed stellar mass and radio luminosity, we show that FRIs typically reside in richer environments and are hosted by smaller galaxies with higher mass surface density; this is consistent with extrinsic effects of jet disruption driving the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) dichotomy. Using matched samples of HERGs and LERGs, we show that HERG host galaxies are more frequently star forming, with more evidence for disc-like structure than LERGs, in accordance with currently favoured models of fundamentally different fuelling mechanisms. Comparing FRI/FRII LERGs with compact LERGs, we find the primary difference is that compact objects typically harbour less massive black holes. This suggests that lower mass black holes may be less efficient at launching stable radio jets, or do so for shorter times. Finally, we investigate rarer sub-classes: wide-angle-tailed, head-tail, FR-hybrid and double-double sources.

  4. The nuclear properties and extended morphologies of powerful radio galaxies: the roles of host galaxy and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Best, P. N.

    2017-01-01

    Powerful radio galaxies exist as either compact or extended sources, with the extended sources traditionally classified by their radio morphologies as Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I and II sources. FRI/II and compact radio galaxies have also been classified by their optical spectra into two different types: high excitation (HERG; quasar-mode) and low excitation (LERG; jet-mode). We present a catalogue of visual morphologies for a complete sample of >1000 1.4-GHz-selected extended radio sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We study the environment and host galaxy properties of FRI/II and compact sources, classified into HERG/LERG types, in order to separate and distinguish the factors that drive the radio morphological variations from those responsible for the spectral properties. Comparing FRI LERGs with FRII LERGs at fixed stellar mass and radio luminosity, we show that FRIs typically reside in richer environments and are hosted by smaller galaxies with higher mass surface density; this is consistent with extrinsic effects of jet disruption driving the FR dichotomy. Using matched samples of HERGs and LERGs, we show that HERG host galaxies are more frequently star-forming, with more evidence for disk-like structure than LERGs, in accordance with currently-favoured models of fundamentally different fuelling mechanisms. Comparing FRI/II LERGs with compact LERGs, we find the primary difference is that compact objects typically harbour less massive black holes. This suggests that lower-mass black holes may be less efficient at launching stable radio jets, or do so for shorter times. Finally, we investigate rarer sub-classes: wide-angle tail, head-tail, FR-hybrid and double-double sources.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SN Ia host-galaxy/cosmological parameters (Campbell+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, H.; Fraser, M.; Gilmore, G.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated correlations between SNe Ia light curves and their host galaxies and look at the effect on the cosmological constraints. For this we have used the sample of 581 photometrically classified SNe Ia from Campbell et al. (2013, Cat. J/ApJ/763/88). This sample was assembled from three years of photometry from the SDSS-II SN Survey, together with BOSS spectroscopy of the host galaxies of transients. We use the stellar population parameters derived from the BOSS DR10 results (Ahn et al., 2012ApJS..203...21A, Cat V/139) (1 data file).

  6. Tracing the evolution of active galactic nuclei host galaxies over the last 9 Gyr of cosmic time

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, A. D.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.; Paggi, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Huang, J.-S.; Kraft, R.; Willner, S. P.; Hickox, R. C.; Coil, A. L.; Cooper, M. C.; Newman, J. A.; Weiner, B. J.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a combined galaxy population analysis for the host galaxies of active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified at 0 < z < 1.4 within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Boötes, and DEEP2 surveys. We identified AGN in a uniform and unbiased manner at X-ray, infrared, and radio wavelengths. Supermassive black holes undergoing radiatively efficient accretion (detected as X-ray and/or infrared AGN) appear to be hosted in a separate and distinct galaxy population than AGN undergoing powerful mechanically dominated accretion (radio AGN). Consistent with some previous studies, radiatively efficient AGN appear to be preferentially hosted in modest star-forming galaxies, with little dependence on AGN or galaxy luminosity. AGN exhibiting radio-emitting jets due to mechanically dominated accretion are almost exclusively observed in massive, passive galaxies. Crucially, we now provide strong evidence that the observed host-galaxy trends are independent of redshift. In particular, these different accretion-mode AGN have remained as separate galaxy populations throughout the last 9 Gyr. Furthermore, it appears that galaxies hosting AGN have evolved along the same path as galaxies that are not hosting AGN with little evidence for distinctly separate evolution.

  7. THE COEVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS, MASSIVE BLACK HOLES, AND THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Barausse, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2015-10-10

    Studying how nuclear star clusters (NSCs) form and how they are related to the growth of the central massive black holes (MBHs) and their host galaxies is fundamental for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies and the processes that have shaped their central structures. We present the results of a semi-analytical galaxy formation model that follows the evolution of dark matter halos along merger trees, as well as that of the baryonic components. This model allows us to study the evolution of NSCs in a cosmological context, by taking into account the growth of NSCs due to both dynamical-friction-driven migration of stellar clusters and star formation triggered by infalling gas, while also accounting for dynamical heating from (binary) MBHs. We find that in situ star formation contributes a significant fraction (up to ∼80%) of the total mass of NSCs in our model. Both NSC growth through in situ star formation and that through star cluster migration are found to generate NSC—host galaxy scaling correlations that are shallower than the same correlations for MBHs. We explore the role of galaxy mergers on the evolution of NSCs and show that observational data on NSC—host galaxy scaling relations provide evidence of partial erosion of NSCs by MBH binaries in luminous galaxies. We show that this observational feature is reproduced by our models, and we make predictions about the NSC and MBH occupation fraction in galaxies. We conclude by discussing several implications for theories of NSC formation.

  8. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB 080310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Ledoux, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Smette, A.; De Cia, A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Fox, A. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Jakobsson, P.

    2013-01-01

    We model the time-variable absorption of Fe II, Fe III, Si II, C II and Cr II detected in Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z = 2.42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array, which is presented in this paper, and Swift's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied for a handful of other GRBs, fails to describe the observed column density evolution in the case of GRB 080310. Inclusion of ionization is required to explain the column density decrease of all observed Fe II levels (including the ground state 6D9/2) and increase of the Fe III 7S3 level. The large population of ions in this latter level (up to 10% of all Fe III) can only be explained through ionization of Fe II, as a large fraction of the ionized Fe II ions (we calculate 31% using the Flexible Atomic and Cowan codes) initially populate the 7S3 level of Fe III rather than the ground state. This channel for producing a significant Fe III 7S3 level population may be relevant for other objects in which absorption lines from this level, the UV34 triplet, are observed, such as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and η Carinae. This provides conclusive evidence for time-variable ionization in the circumburst medium, which to date has not been convincingly detected. However, the best-fit distance of the neutral absorbing cloud to the GRB is 200-400 pc, i.e. similar to GRB-absorber distance estimates for GRBs without any evidence for ionization. We find that the presence of time-varying ionization in GRB 080310 is likely due to a combination of the super-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H] = +0.2) and the low H I column density (log N(H i) = 18.7) in the host of GRB 080310. Finally

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF STAR-FORMING HOST GALAXIES AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HUBBLE RESIDUALS IN A NEARLY UNBIASED SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Morris, Matt; Nichol, Robert C.; Campbell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Brown, Peter J.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kessler, Richard; Garnavich, Peter; Jha, Saurabh W.; Marriner, John; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova (SN) host-galaxy properties and their residuals in the Hubble diagram. We use SNe discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M{sub r} < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of {approx}40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve-corrected SNe Ia are {approx}0.1 mag brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (>3{sigma}) correlation between the Hubble Residuals of SNe Ia and the specific SFR of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of SN/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep SN surveys.

  10. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; et al.

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  11. The black hole-host galaxy relation for very low mass quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, J.; Kotilainen, J. K.; Falomo, R.; Decarli, R.; Karhunen, K.; Uslenghi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the relation between the masses of the black hole (MBH) and the host galaxy (Mhost) in quasars has been probed down to the parameter space of MBH ˜ 108 M⊙ and Mhost ˜ 1011 M⊙ at z < 0.5. In this study, we have investigated the MBH-Mhost log-linear relation for a sample of 37 quasars with low black hole masses (107 M⊙ < MBH < 108.3 M⊙) at 0.5 < z < 1.0. The black hole masses were derived using virial mass estimates from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optical spectra. For 25 quasars, we detected the presence of the host galaxy from deep near-infrared H-band imaging, whereas upper limits for the host galaxy luminosity (mass) were estimated for the 12 unresolved quasars. We combined our previous studies with the results from this work to create a sample of 89 quasars at z < 1.0 having a large range of black hole masses (107 M⊙ < MBH < 1010 M⊙) and host galaxy masses (1010 M⊙ < Mhost < 1013 M⊙). Most of the quasars at the low-mass end lie below the extrapolation of the local relation. This apparent break in the linearity of the entire sample is due to increasing fraction of disc-dominated host galaxies in the low-mass quasars. After correcting for the disc component, and considering only the bulge component, the bilinear regression for the entire quasar sample holds over 3.5 dex in both the black hole mass and the bulge mass, and is in very good agreement with the local relation. We advocate secular evolution of discs of galaxies being responsible for the relatively strong disc domination.

  12. GRB Discoveries with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This brief presentation presents Swift Observatory recordings of gamma ray burst (GRB) activity. Long and short GRBs and afterglows are highlighted. Recordings of GRB emission, afterglow, optical/IR brightness, and flux density are presented. The time structure and current status of short GRB structures is also included.

  13. Sub-millimeter emission from type Ia supernova host galaxies at z=0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, D. L.; Farrah, D.; Fox, M.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Afonso, J.

    2004-05-01

    We present deep sub-millimetre (sub-mm) observations of sixteen galaxies at z=0.5, selected through being hosts of a type Ia supernova. Two galaxies are detected directly, and the sample, excluding the brightest detected galaxy, is detected statistically with a mean 850 μm flux of 0.92 ± 0.33 mJy. We infer that the mean value of AV in normal galaxies is 0-80% higher than locally, in agreement with galaxy chemical evolution models. The dust in the brightest sub-mm object in our sample is best interpreted as normal `cirrus' dust similar to that seen locally. This result, when combined with local surveys of type Ia supernovae, suggests that dust in supernova host galaxies at z=0.5 could produce a dimming that is comparable to the dimming attributed to accelerated expansion. This emphasizes the need to carefully monitor dust extinction when using type Ia supernovae to measure the cosmological parameters. As supernova surveys push to higher redshifts and to greater precision in extracted cosmological parameters, understanding the role of dust in these objects will become even more important.

  14. Heavily obscured quasar host galaxies at z ∼ 2 are discs, not major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Urry, C. Megan; Treister, Ezequiel; Glikman, Eilat

    2012-09-01

    We explore the nature of heavily obscured quasar host galaxies at z˜ 2 using deep Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3/infrared imaging of 28 dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) to investigate the role of major mergers in driving black hole growth. The high levels of obscuration of the quasars selected for this study act as a natural coronagraph, blocking the quasar light and allowing a clear view of the underlying host galaxy. The sample of heavily obscured quasars represents a significant fraction of the cosmic mass accretion on supermassive black holes as the quasars have inferred bolometric luminosities around the break of the quasar luminosity function. We find that only a small fraction (4 per cent, at most 11-25 per cent) of the quasar host galaxies are major mergers. Fits to their surface brightness profiles indicate that 90 per cent of the host galaxies are either disc dominated, or have a significant disc. This disc-like host morphology, and the corresponding weakness of bulges, is evidence against major mergers and suggests that secular processes are the predominant driver of massive black hole growth. Finally, we suggest that the coincidence of mergers and active galactic nucleus activity is luminosity dependent, with only the most luminous quasars being triggered mostly by major mergers. a MUSYC catalogue ID, see Cardamone et al. (2010). Objects with X-ray detections are marked with *. b See images shown in Fig. 1. c The ratio of the host luminosity to the point source luminosity, reported only when GALFIT requires an unresolved object to yield a physical fit. This may be due to an AGN point source (in the case of the X-ray-detected DOGs) or an unresolved bulge or central concentration, i.e. a central bulge. d See Fig. 2.

  15. Inner polar ionized-gas disks and properties of their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil'chenko, Olga K.

    2015-02-01

    I have analyzed line-of-sight velocity fields of the stellar and ionized-gas components for the volume-limited sample of nearby lenticular galaxies by using the raw data of the ATLAS-3D survey undertaken with the integral-field spectrograph SAURON. Among 200 nearby lenticular galaxies, I distinguish 20 cases of nearly orthogonal rotation of the inner ionized gas with respect to the central stellar components; so I estimate a frequency of the inner polar disks in nearby S0 galaxies as 10%. Properties of the central stellar populations - mean ages, metallicities, magnesium-to-iron ratios - are derived through the Lick indices. The typical stellar population properties of the polar-disk host galaxies are exactly the same as the stellar population properties of the complete sample.

  16. Accreting SMBH in the COSMOS field: the connection to their host galaxies .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merloni, A.; Bongiorno, A.

    Using the rich multi-band photometry in the COSMOS field we explore the host galaxy properties of a large, complete, sample of X-ray and spectroscopically selected AGN. Based on a two-components fit to their Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) we derive rest-frame magnitudes, colours, stellar masses and star formation rates up to z˜ 3. The probability for a galaxy to host a black hole growing at any given specific accretion rate (the ratio of X-ray luminosity to the host stellar mass) is independent of the galaxy mass and follows a power-law distribution in L_X/M. By looking at the normalisation of such a probability distribution, we show how the incidence of AGN increases with redshift as rapidly as (1+z)4.2, in close resemblance with the overall evolution of the specific star formation rate. Although AGN activity and star formation appear to have a common triggering mechanism, we do not find any 'smoking gun' signalling powerful AGN influence on the global properties of their host galaxies.

  17. ASASSN-17di: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in an Uncatalogued Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Post, R. S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Cruz, I.; Fernandez, J. M.; Koff, R. A.; Stone, G.

    2017-03-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in an uncatalogued host galaxy.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Long & short GRBs with host galaxies data (Li+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zhang, B.; Lu, H.-J.

    2017-01-01

    Our main sample includes 375 GRBs with spectroscopic redshift measurements in the literature before 2014 June 30. Also included are 32 GRBs with host galaxy information, even though no spectroscopic redshifts have been reported for these bursts. Altogether we have 407 GRBs. (5 data files).

  19. A COMPACT GROUP OF GALAXIES AT Z = 2.48 HOSTING AN AGN-DRIVEN OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2015-12-10

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ⊙} and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass–metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow.

  20. Kinematics and host-galaxy properties suggest a nuclear origin for calcium-rich supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Ryan J.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-rich supernovae (Ca-rich SNe) are peculiar low-luminosity SNe Ib with relatively strong Ca spectral lines at ˜2 months after peak brightness. This class also has an extended projected offset distribution, with several members of the class offset from their host galaxies by 30-150 kpc. There is no indication of any stellar population at the SN positions. Using a sample of 13 Ca-rich SNe, we present kinematic evidence that the progenitors of Ca-rich SNe originate near the centres of their host galaxies and are kicked to the locations of the SN explosions. Specifically, SNe with small projected offsets have large line-of-sight velocity shifts as determined by nebular lines, while those with large projected offsets have no significant velocity shifts. Therefore, the velocity shifts must not be primarily the result of the SN explosion. Additionally, nearly every Ca-rich SN is hosted by a galaxy with indications of a recent merger and/or is in a dense environment. We propose a progenitor model which fits all current data: the progenitor system for a Ca-rich SN is a double white dwarf (WD) system where at least one WD has a significant He abundance. This system, through an interaction with a super-massive black hole (SMBH) is ejected from its host galaxy and the binary is hardened, significantly reducing the merger time. After 10-100 Myr (on average), the system explodes with a large physical offset. The rate for such events is significantly enhanced for galaxies which have undergone recent mergers, potentially making Ca-rich SNe new probes of both the galaxy merger rate and (binary) SMBH population.

  1. Which haloes host Herschel-ATLAS galaxies in the local Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi; Cole, Shaun; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Norberg, Peder; Auld, R.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S. P.; Bourne, N.; Buttiglione, E. S.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopkins, A.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Parkinson, H.; Pascale, E.; Peacock, J. A.; Pohlen, M.; Prescott, M.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Sharp, R.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van Kampen, E.

    2011-04-01

    We measure the projected cross-correlation between low-redshift (z < 0.5) far-infrared selected galaxies in the science demonstration phase (SDP) field of the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey and optically selected galaxies from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey. In order to obtain robust correlation functions, we restrict the analysis to a subset of 969 out of 6900 H-ATLAS galaxies, which have reliable optical counterparts with r < 19.4 mag and well-determined spectroscopic redshifts. The overlap region between the two surveys is 12.6 deg2; the matched sample has a median redshift of z≈ 0.2. The cross-correlation of GAMA and H-ATLAS galaxies within this region can be fitted by a power law, with correlation length r0≈ 4.63 ± 0.51 Mpc. Comparing with the corresponding autocorrelation function of GAMA galaxies within the SDP field yields a relative bias (averaged over 2-8 Mpc) of H-ATLAS and GAMA galaxies of bH/bG≈ 0.6. Combined with clustering measurements from previous optical studies, this indicates that most of the low-redshift H-ATLAS sources are hosted by haloes with masses comparable to that of the Milky Way. The correlation function appears to depend on the 250-μm luminosity, L250, with bright (median luminosity νL250˜ 1.6 × 1010 L⊙) objects being somewhat more strongly clustered than faint (νL250˜ 4.0 × 109 L⊙) objects. This implies that galaxies with higher dust-obscured star formation rates are hosted by more massive haloes.

  2. The Host Galaxy and Redshift of the Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, S. P.; Bassa, C. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Bower, G. C.; Law, C. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Adams, E. A. K.; Bogdanov, S.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Butler, B. J.; Demorest, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Maddox, N.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Seymour, A.; Spitler, L. G.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Wharton, R. S.

    2017-01-01

    The precise localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB 121102) has provided the first unambiguous association (chance coincidence probability p ≲ 3 × 10‑4) of an FRB with an optical and persistent radio counterpart. We report on optical imaging and spectroscopy of the counterpart and find that it is an extended (0.″6–0.″8) object displaying prominent Balmer and [O iii] emission lines. Based on the spectrum and emission line ratios, we classify the counterpart as a low-metallicity, star-forming, mr‧ = 25.1 AB mag dwarf galaxy at a redshift of z = 0.19273(8), corresponding to a luminosity distance of 972 Mpc. From the angular size, the redshift, and luminosity, we estimate the host galaxy to have a diameter ≲4 kpc and a stellar mass of M* ∼ (4–7) × 107 M⊙, assuming a mass-to-light ratio between 2 to 3 M⊙ L⊙‑1. Based on the Hα flux, we estimate the star formation rate of the host to be 0.4 M⊙ yr‑1 and a substantial host dispersion measure (DM) depth ≲324 pc cm‑3. The net DM contribution of the host galaxy to FRB 121102 is likely to be lower than this value depending on geometrical factors. We show that the persistent radio source at FRB 121102’s location reported by Marcote et al. is offset from the galaxy’s center of light by ∼200 mas and the host galaxy does not show optical signatures for AGN activity. If FRB 121102 is typical of the wider FRB population and if future interferometric localizations preferentially find them in dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and prominent emission lines, they would share such a preference with long gamma-ray bursts and superluminous supernovae.

  3. Detection of GRB 060927 at z = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Starling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bersier, D.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Göǧüş, E.; Gorosabel, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Güver, T.; Hjorth, J.; Horns, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Jakobsson, P.; Jensen, B. L.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Ledoux, C.; Levan, A. J.; Marsh, T.; McKay, T.; Melandri, A.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Mundell, C. G.; O'Brien, P. T.; Özel, M.; Phillips, A.; Quimby, R.; Rowell, G.; Rujopakarn, W.; Rykoff, E. S.; Schaefer, B. E.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.; Urata, Y.; Vestrand, W. T.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Watson, D.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wren, J.; Yost, S. A.; Yuan, F.; Zhai, M.; Zheng, W. K.

    2007-11-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture ground-based telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hr after the trigger shows a continuum break at λ~8070 Å, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at z~5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 Å, which we interpret as Si II λ1260 at z=5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Lyα profile with a column density with log(NH/cm-2)=22.50+/-0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: (1) GRB afterglows originating from z>~6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; (2) the presence of large H I column densities in some GRB host galaxies at z>5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; and (3) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at z>5, and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe. Partly based on observations carried out with the ESO telescopes under programs 077.D-0661, 077.A-0667, 078.D-0416, and the large program 177.A-f0591.

  4. Investigating the AGN-Galaxy Interaction Relationship by Examining the Color and Morphology Measurements of Real and Simulated AGN Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Christina M.

    2009-01-01

    UV-optical colors provide a clear distinction between quiescent galaxies and those undergoing star formation. Galaxy morphology measurements, such as the Gini coefficient, M20, concentration, asymmetry, and the Sersic index, allow identification of interacting galaxies and separation of non-interacting galaxies into bulge or disk-dominated systems. Thus, one can use the colors and morphologies of AGN host galaxies to probe the predicted relationship between galaxy interactions and significant black hole growth (an AGN stage). However, due to the UV excess observed in many AGNs (particularly quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies) and the potentially significant optical contribution from AGNs that are not heavily obscured, one must exercise caution when interpreting the results from color and morphology measurements of AGN host galaxies. With this in mind, we created a set of simulated AGNs to test the reliability of color and morphology measurements of AGN host galaxies. The results were compared to observations of AGN host galaxies at z 1 from the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). Our observed results reveal a population of X-ray luminous AGN hosts that appear to have green UV-optical colors, indicative of recent star-formation, and a largely disk-dominated profile, suggesting a bulge that is not yet fully developed. Comparison with results from our simulated AGNs suggest that at least some of the observational results are not likely to be due to color or morphological contamination from the presence of an AGN. Therefore, the observed AGN hosts seem to represent a real population that may be going through a transition phase, during which significant star-formation has recently ceased, but for which the black hole remains quite luminous.

  5. The Host Galaxy and the Extended Emission-Line Region of the Radio Galaxy 3C 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai; Stockton, Alan

    2008-04-01

    We present extensive ground-based spectroscopy and HST imaging of 3C 79, an FR II radio galaxy associated with a luminous extended emission-line region (EELR). Surface brightness modeling of an emission-line-free HST R-band image reveals that the host galaxy is a massive elliptical with a compact companion 0.8'' away and 4 mag fainter. The host galaxy spectrum is best described by an intermediate-age (1.3 Gyr) stellar population (4% by mass), superimposed on a 10 Gyr old population and a power law (αλ = - 1.8); the stellar populations are consistent with supersolar metallicities, with the best fit given by the 2.5 Z⊙ models. We derive a dynamical mass of 4 × 1011 M⊙ within the effective radius from the velocity dispersion. The EELR spectra clearly indicate that the EELR is photoionized by the hidden central engine. Photoionization modeling shows evidence that the gas metallicity in both the EELR and the nuclear narrow-line region is mildly subsolar (0.3-0.7 Z⊙), significantly lower than the supersolar metallicities deduced from typical active galactic nuclei in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The more luminous filaments in the EELR exhibit a velocity field consistent with a common disk rotation. Fainter clouds, however, show high approaching velocities that are uncoupled from this apparent disk rotation. The striking similarities between this EELR and the EELRs around steep-spectrum radio-loud quasars provide further evidence for the orientation-dependent unification schemes. The metal-poor gas is almost certainly not native to the massive host galaxy. We suggest that the close companion galaxy could be the tidally stripped bulge of a late-type galaxy that is merging with the host galaxy. The interstellar medium of such a galaxy is probably the source for the low-metallicity gas in 3C 79. Based in part on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative

  6. The Dependence of Cluster Galaxy Properties on the Central Entropy of their Host Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Ko, Jongwan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Edge, Alastair C.; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Jong Chul; Jeong, Hyunjin

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the connection between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host galaxy clusters. Using galaxy clusters at 0.1< z< 0.3 from the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS) with X-ray information from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), we confirm that BCGs in low central entropy clusters are well aligned with the X-ray center. Additionally, the magnitude difference between BCG and the second brightest galaxy also correlates with the central entropy of the intracluster medium. From the red-sequence (RS) galaxies, we cannot find significant dependence of RS color scatter and stellar population on the central entropy of the intracluster medium of their host cluster. However, BCGs in low-entropy clusters are systematically less massive than those in high-entropy clusters, although this is dependent on the method used to derive the stellar mass of BCGs. In contrast, the stellar velocity dispersion of BCGs shows no dependence on BCG activity and cluster central entropy. This implies that the potential of the BCG is established earlier and the activity leading to optical emission lines is dictated by the properties of the intracluster medium in the cluster core.

  7. Supernova Candidate in MACSJ1149 Galaxy Cluster Field With No Detected Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Diego, Jose Maria; Nonino, Mario; Zitrin, Adi; Jauzac, Mathilde; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2017-01-01

    We report discovery of a supernova (SN) candidate in the MACSJ1149 (z=0.54) galaxy-cluster field. In Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data taken on January 23, 2017 UT, we found a bright source (dubbed 'Amos') in WFC3 UVIS F606W ( 23.3 mag AB) and WFC3 IR F110W ( 23.7 mag) exposures.

  8. The host galaxies of fast-ejecta core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Modjaz, Maryam; Kocevski, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities (∼0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z < 0.2) core-collapse SNe, including 17 SNe Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z < 1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SNe Ic-BL and z < 1.2 LGRBs have high stellar mass and star formation rate densities. Core-collapse SNe having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SNe Ic-BL, unlike those of SNe Ib/Ic and SNe II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitor systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for an SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SNe Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar mass and star formation rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.

  9. The Host Galaxies of Fast-Ejecta Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Modjaz, Maryam; Kocevski, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SN Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities ((is) approximately 0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z (is) less than 0.2) core-collapse SN, including 17 SN Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z (is) less than 1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with SDSS galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SN Ic- BL and z (is) is less than 1.2 LGRBs have high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities. Core-collapse SN having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SN Ic-BL, unlike those of SN Ib/Ic and SN II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments, and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitors systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for a SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SN Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.

  10. The Host Galaxy Properties of Variability Selected AGN in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinis, S.; Gezari, S.; Kumar, S.; Burgett, W. S.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-07-01

    We study the properties of 975 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected by variability in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium deep Survey. Using complementary multi-wavelength data from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared, we use spectral energy distribution fitting to determine the AGN and host properties at z < 1 and compare to a well-matched control sample. We confirm the trend previously observed: that the variability amplitude decreases with AGN luminosity, but we also observe that the slope of this relation steepens with wavelength, resulting in a “redder when brighter” trend at low luminosities. Our results show that AGNs are hosted by more massive hosts than control sample galaxies, while the rest frame dust-corrected NUV - r color distribution of AGN hosts is similar to control galaxies. We find a positive correlation between the AGN luminosity and star formation rate (SFR), independent of redshift. AGN hosts populate the entire range of SFRs within and outside of the Main Sequence of star-forming galaxies. Comparing the distribution of AGN hosts and control galaxies, we show that AGN hosts are less likely to be hosted by quiescent galaxies and more likely to be hosted by Main Sequence or starburst galaxies.

  11. Can Supermassive Black Holes Influence the Evolution of their Host Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Veilleux, Sylvain; Reeves, James; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-04-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this "quasar-mode" feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS F11119+3257 hosting a luminous quasar at the center. Energetics arguments indicate a connection with a massive, large-scale molecular outflow observed in infrared with Herschel. This seems to be in agreement with theoretical models in which AGN winds drive hot bubbles in the host galaxy medium, thereby providing a link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. This work was the “cover story” of the March 26th 2015 issue of Nature. Revolutionary improvements in this field are expected from ASTRO-H and Athena.

  12. WHICH GALAXIES HOST BARS AND DISKS? A STUDY OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Abreu, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L. E-mail: jalfonso@iac.es

    2010-03-10

    We present a study of the bar fraction in the Coma Cluster galaxies based on a sample of {approx}190 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS). The unprecedented resolution of the HST-ACS images allows us to explore the presence of bars, detected by visual classification, throughout a luminosity range of 9 mag (-23 {approx}< M{sub r} {approx}< -14), permitting us to study the poor known region of dwarf galaxies. We find that bars are hosted by galaxies in a tight range of both luminosities (-22 {approx}< M{sub r} {approx}< -17) and masses (10{sup 9}{approx}galaxies. In addition, we find that the bar fraction does not vary significantly when going from the center to the cluster outskirts, implying that cluster environment plays a second-order role in bar formation/evolution. The shape of the bar fraction distribution with respect to both luminosity and mass is well matched by the luminosity distribution of disk galaxies in Coma, indicating that bars are good tracers of cold stellar disks. We discuss the implications of our results for the formation and evolution scenarios of bars and disks.

  13. X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Wuyts, S.; Nandra, K.; Mozena, M.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Koekemoer, A.; Ferguson, H.; Grogin, N.; McGrath, E.; Hathi, N. P.; Dekel, A.; Donley, J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Laird, E.; Rangel, C.; Newman, J.; and others

    2013-01-20

    We use multi-band spatially resolved photometry from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South to explore the nuclear and extended colors, color gradients, and stellar populations of the host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z = 3. Based on a study of their central light, we develop X-ray based criteria to exclude objects with strong AGN contamination. We use stellar masses from the FIREWORKS database to understand and account for stellar mass selection effects and carefully study, for the first time, the resolved host galaxy properties of AGNs at z {approx} 2 in their rest-frame optical light without substantial nuclear contamination. AGN hosts span a sizable range of stellar masses, colors, and color gradients at these redshifts. Their colors, color gradients, and stellar population properties are very similar to inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. At z {approx} 1, we find a slightly narrower range in host colors compared to inactive galaxies, as well as hints of more recent star formation. These differences are weaker or non-existent among AGN hosts at z {approx} 2. We discuss the importance of AGN-driven feedback in the quenching of galaxies at z {approx}> 1 and speculate on possible evolution in the relationship between black hole accretion and the host galaxy toward high redshifts.

  14. The host galaxies of active galactic nuclei with powerful relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguín-Iglesias, A.; León-Tavares, J.; Kotilainen, J. K.; Chavushyan, V.; Tornikoski, M.; Valtaoja, E.; Añorve, C.; Valdés, J.; Carrasco, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep near-infrared (NIR) images of a sample of 19 intermediate-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.0) radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) with powerful relativistic jets (L1.4 GHz > 1027 W Hz-1), previously classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars. We also compile host galaxy and nuclear magnitudes for blazars from literature. The combined sample (this work and compilation) contains 100 radio-loud AGN with host galaxy detections and a broad range of radio luminosities L1.4 GHz ˜ 1023.7-1028.3 W Hz-1, allowing us to divide our sample into high-luminosity blazars (HLBs) and low-luminosity blazars (LLBs). The host galaxies of our sample are bright and seem to follow the μe-Reff relation for ellipticals and bulges. The two populations of blazars show different behaviours in the MK,nuclear -MK,bulge plane, where a statistically significant correlation is observed for HLBs. Although it may be affected by selection effects, this correlation suggests a close coupling between the accretion mode of the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy, which could be interpreted in terms of AGN feedback. Our findings are consistent with semi-analytical models where low-luminosity AGN emit the bulk of their energy in the form of radio jets, producing a strong feedback mechanism, and high-luminosity AGN are affected by galaxy mergers and interactions, which provide a common supply of cold gas to feed both nuclear activity and star formation episodes.

  15. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. I. SURVEY DESIGN AND CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Kruehler, Thomas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Watson, Darach; Jakobsson, Pall; Schulze, Steve; Jaunsen, Andreas O.; Gorosabel, Javier; Levan, Andrew J.; Michalowski, Michal J.; Moller, Palle; Tanvir, Nial R.

    2012-09-10

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful tracers of star-forming galaxies. We have defined a homogeneous subsample of 69 Swift GRB-selected galaxies spanning a very wide redshift range. Special attention has been devoted to making the sample optically unbiased through simple and well-defined selection criteria based on the high-energy properties of the bursts and their positions on the sky. Thanks to our extensive follow-up observations, this sample has now achieved a comparatively high degree of redshift completeness, and thus provides a legacy sample, useful for statistical studies of GRBs and their host galaxies. In this paper, we present the survey design and summarize the results of our observing program conducted at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) aimed at obtaining the most basic properties of galaxies in this sample, including a catalog of R and K{sub s} magnitudes and redshifts. We detect the host galaxies for 80% of the GRBs in the sample, although only 42% have K{sub s} -band detections, which confirms that GRB-selected host galaxies are generally blue. The sample is not uniformly blue, however, with two extremely red objects detected. Moreover, galaxies hosting GRBs with no optical/NIR afterglows, whose identification therefore relies on X-ray localizations, are significantly brighter and redder than those with an optical/NIR afterglow. This supports a scenario where GRBs occurring in more massive and dusty galaxies frequently suffer high optical obscuration. Our spectroscopic campaign has resulted in 77% now having redshift measurements, with a median redshift of 2.14 {+-} 0.18. TOUGH alone includes 17 detected z > 2 Swift GRB host galaxies suitable for individual and statistical studies-a substantial increase over previous samples. Seven hosts have detections of the Ly{alpha} emission line and we can exclude an early indication that Ly{alpha} emission is ubiquitous among GRB hosts, but confirm that Ly{alpha} is stronger in GRB

  16. Supernovae and their host galaxies - III. The impact of bars and bulges on the radial distribution of supernovae in disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Karapetyan, A. G.; Barkhudaryan, L. V.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Petrosian, A. R.; Adibekyan, V.; Aramyan, L. S.; Turatto, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of bars and bulges on the radial distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) in the stellar discs of host galaxies with various morphologies. We use a well-defined sample of 500 nearby (≤100 Mpc) SNe and their low-inclined (i ≤ 60°) and morphologically non-disturbed S0-Sm host galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that in Sa-Sm galaxies, all core-collapse (CC) and vast majority of SNe Ia belong to the disc, rather than the bulge component. The radial distribution of SNe Ia in S0-S0/a galaxies is inconsistent with their distribution in Sa-Sm hosts, which is probably due to the contribution of the outer bulge SNe Ia in S0-S0/a galaxies. In Sa-Sbc galaxies, the radial distribution of CC SNe in barred hosts is inconsistent with that in unbarred ones, while the distributions of SNe Ia are not significantly different. At the same time, the radial distributions of both types of SNe in Sc-Sm galaxies are not affected by bars. We propose that the additional mechanism shaping the distributions of Type Ia and CC SNe can be explained within the framework of substantial suppression of massive star formation in the radial range swept by strong bars, particularly in early-type spirals. The radial distribution of CC SNe in unbarred Sa-Sbc galaxies is more centrally peaked and inconsistent with that in unbarred Sc-Sm hosts, while the distribution of SNe Ia in unbarred galaxies is not affected by host morphology. These results can be explained by the distinct distributions of massive stars in the discs of early- and late-type spirals.

  17. Star Formation and AGN activity of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon

    2017-01-01

    One of the ongoing issues for understanding the galaxy formation and evolution is how active galactic nuclei (AGNs) affect the growth of their host galaxies. We investigate the correlations between AGN activity and star formation properties of a large sample of ~3700 X-ray selected AGNs over a wide range of luminosities (42 < log Lx < 45) up to z~5 in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey. We perform a multi-component modeling from the far-infrared, when available, to the near-UV using AGN emission from the big-blue-bump (for Type 1 AGNs), a nuclear dust torus model, a galaxy model and a starburst component for the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Through detailed analysis of SEDs, we derive AGN host galaxy properties, such as stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and AGN luminosities. We find that AGN host galaxies have, on average, similar SFRs compared to the normal star-forming main sequence galaxies, suggesting no significant enhancement or quenching of star formation. The average SFR of AGN host galaxies shows a flat distribution in bins of AGN luminosity, consistent with recent ideas that the shorter variability timescale of AGN compared to star formation can lead to a flat relationship between the SFR and black hole accretion rates. Our results suggest that both star formation and nuclear activity in the majority of AGN host galaxies might be driven more by internal secular processes at z<3, implying that they have substantially grown at much earlier epoch.

  18. HST WFC3/IR OBSERVATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES GROW IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Treister, Ezequiel; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Simmons, Brooke; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2011-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical morphologies of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies at 1.5 < z < 3, using near-infrared imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, the first such study of AGN host galaxies at these redshifts. The AGNs are X-ray-selected from the Chandra Deep Field South and have typical luminosities of 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}host galaxies of these AGNs have low Sersic indices indicative of disk-dominated light profiles, suggesting that secular processes govern a significant fraction of the cosmic growth of black holes. That is, many black holes in the present-day universe grew much of their mass in disk-dominated galaxies and not in early-type galaxies or major mergers. The properties of the AGN host galaxies are furthermore indistinguishable from their parent galaxy population and we find no strong evolution in either effective radii or morphological mix between z {approx} 2 and z {approx} 0.05.

  19. The Distribution of Supernovae Relative to Spiral Arms of Host Disc Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramyan, L. S.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; de Lapparent, V.; Bertin, E.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Nazaryan, T. A.; Adibekyan, V.; Turatto, M.

    2017-07-01

    Using a sample of 215 supernovae (SNe), we analyse their positions relative to the spiral arms of their host galaxies, distinguishing grand-design (GD) spirals from non-GD (NGD) galaxies. Our results suggest that shocks in spiral arms of GD galaxies trigger star formation in the leading edges of arms affecting the distributions of core-collapse (CC) SNe (known to have short-lived progenitors). The closer locations of SNe Ibc vs. SNe II relative to the leading edges of the arms supports the belief that SNe Ibc have more massive progenitors. SNe Ia having less massive and older progenitors, show symmetric distribution with respect to the peaks of spiral arms.

  20. Supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. II. The correlation with near-infrared luminosity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Läsker, Ronald; Van de Ven, Glenn; Ferrarese, Laura; Shankar, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We present an investigation of the scaling relations between supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, M {sub •}, and their host galaxies' K-band bulge (L {sub bul}) and total (L {sub tot}) luminosities. The wide-field WIRCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope was used to obtain the deepest and highest resolution near-infrared images available for a sample of 35 galaxies with securely measured M {sub •}, selected irrespective of Hubble type. For each galaxy, we derive bulge and total magnitudes using a two-dimensional image decomposition code that allows us to account, if necessary, for large- and small-scale disks, cores, bars, nuclei, rings, envelopes, and spiral arms. We find that the present-day M {sub •}-L {sub bul} and M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relations have consistent intrinsic scatter, suggesting that M {sub •} correlates equally well with bulge and total luminosity of the host. Our analysis provides only mild evidence of a decreased scatter if the fit is restricted to elliptical galaxies. The log-slopes of the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} and M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relations are 0.75 ± 0.10 and 0.92 ± 0.14, respectively. However, while the slope of the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} relation depends on the detail of the image decomposition, the characterization of M {sub •}-L {sub tot} does not. Given the difficulties and ambiguities of decomposing galaxy images into separate components, our results indicate that L {sub tot} is more suitable as a tracer of SMBH mass than L {sub bul}, and that the M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relation should be used when studying the co-evolution of SMBHs and galaxies.

  1. A Herschel Study of 24 μμm-Selected AGNs and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Rieke, G. H.; Egami, E.; Pereira, M. J.; Haines, C. P.; Smith, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    We present a sample of 290 24 μm-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) mostly at z ˜ 0.3-2.5, within 5.2 {{deg}}2 distributed as 25\\prime × 25\\prime fields around each of 30 galaxy clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey. The sample is nearly complete to 1 mJy at 24 μm, and has a rich multiwavelength set of ancillary data; 162 are detected by Herschel. We use spectral templates for AGNs, stellar populations, and infrared (IR) emission by star-forming galaxies to decompose the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these AGNs and their host galaxies, and estimate their star formation rates, AGN luminosities, and host galaxy stellar masses. The set of templates is relatively simple: a standard Type-1 quasar template; another for the photospheric output of the stellar population; and a far-infrared star-forming template. For the Type-2 AGN SEDs, we substitute templates including internal obscuration, and some Type-1 objects require a warm component (T≳ 50 K). The individually Herschel-detected Type-1 AGNs and a subset of 17 Type-2 AGNs typically have luminosities \\gt {10}45 {ergs} {{{s}}}-1, and supermassive black holes of ˜ 3× {10}8 {M}⊙ emitting at ˜10% of the Eddington rate. We find them in about twice the numbers of AGNs identified in SDSS data in the same fields, i.e., they represent typical high-luminosity AGNs, not an IR-selected minority. These AGNs and their host galaxies are studied further in an accompanying paper.

  2. Active galactic nuclei vs. host galaxy properties in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Marchesi, S.; Perna, M.; Pozzi, F.; Salvato, M.; Symeonidis, M.; Vignali, C.; Vito, F.; Volonteri, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The coeval active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy evolution, and the observed local relations between super massive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxy properties suggest some sort of connection or feedback between SMBH growth (i.e., AGN activity) and galaxy build-up (i.e., star formation history). Aims: We looked for correlations between average properties of X-ray detected AGN and their far-IR (FIR) detected, star forming host galaxies in order to find quantitative evidence for this connection, which has been highly debated in recent years. Methods: We exploited the rich multiwavelength data set (from X-ray to FIR) available in the COSMOS field for a large sample (692 sources) of AGN and their hosts in the redshift range 0.1 host galaxy properties, such as stellar mass (M∗) and star formation rate (SFR). Results: We find that the AGN 2-10 keV luminosity (LX) and the host 8-1000 μm star formation luminosity (LIRSF) are significantly correlated, even after removing the dependency of both quantities with redshift. However, the average host LIRSF has a flat distribution in bins of AGN LX, while the average AGN LX increases in bins of host LIRSF with logarithmic slope of 0.7 in the redshift range 0.4 host properties is found. On the other hand, we find that the average column density (NH) shows a clear positive correlation with the host M∗ at all redshifts, but not with the SFR (or LIRSF). This translates into a negative correlation with specific SFR at all redshifts. The same is true if the obscured fraction is computed. Conclusions: Our results are in agreement with the

  3. AN IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF FOUR STRONG Mg II ABSORBERS REVEALED BY GRB 060418

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.

    2009-08-20

    We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic study of four strong Mg II absorbers of W(2796) {approx}> 1 A revealed by the afterglow of GRB 060418 at z{sub GRB} = 1.491. These absorbers, at z = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107, and z {sub GRB}, exhibit large ion abundances that suggest neutral gas columns characteristic of damped Ly{alpha} systems. The imaging data include optical images obtained using Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope and using Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope, and near-infrared H-band images obtained using Persson's Auxiliary Nasmyth Infrared Camera on the Magellan Baade Telescope and K'-band images obtained using NIRC2 with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. These images reveal six distinct objects at {delta} {theta} {approx}< 3.''5 of the afterglow's position, two of which exhibit well-resolved mature disk morphology, one shows red colors, and three are blue compact sources. Follow-up spectroscopic observations using LRIS confirm that one of the disk galaxies coincides with the Mg II absorber at z = 0.656. The observed broadband spectral energy distributions of the second disk galaxy and the red source indicate that they are associated with the absorbers at z = 0.603 and z = 1.107, respectively. These results show that strong Mg II absorbers identified in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra are associated with typical galaxies of luminosity {approx}0.1 - 1 L{sub *} at impact parameter of {rho} {approx}< 10 h {sup -1} kpc. The close angular separation would preclude easy detections toward a bright quasar. Finally, we associate the remaining three blue compact sources with the GRB host galaxy, noting that they are likely star-forming knots located at projected distances of {rho} = 2 - 12 h {sup -1} kpc from the afterglow. At the afterglow's position, we derive a 2{sigma} upper limit to the underlying star-formation rate intensity of 0.0074 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc

  4. The impact of compact radio sources on their host galaxies: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C.

    2016-02-01

    I review the observational evidence that CSS/GPS radio sources have a significant impact on the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly on the kpc-scales of the galaxy bulges. Starting with an overview of the observational evidence for jet-cloud interactions and warm ionised outflows in CSS/GPS sources, I then consider the challenges involved in quantifying the feedback effect of the warm outflows in terms of their mass outflow rates and kinetic powers. For the best-observed cases it is shown that the warm outflows may have a major negative feedback effect in the very central regions, but probably lack the power to heat and eject the full cool ISM contents of the host galaxies. In contrast, the recently-discovered neutral and molecular outflows are more massive and powerful and therefore carry more destructive potential. However, the feedback effect of such outflows is not necessarily negative: there is now clear observational evidence that the molecular outflows are formed as the hot, compressed gas cools behind fast shocks driven into the ISM by the relativistic jets. The natural endpoint of this process is the formation of stars. Therefore, jet-induced star formation may be a significant process in CSS/GPS radio galaxies. Finally, I discuss whether CSS/GPS sources are ``imposters'' in flux-limited radio samples, due the flux boosting of the radio sources by strong jet-cloud interactions in the early stages of radio source evolution.

  5. Diversity of gamma-ray burst energetics vs. supernova homogeneity: SN 2013cq associated with GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melandri, A.; Pian, E.; D'Elia, V.; D'Avanzo, P.; Della Valle, M.; Mazzali, P. A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Cano, Z.; Levan, A. J.; Møoller, P.; Amati, L.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bersier, D.; Bufano, F.; Campana, S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Covino, S.; Ghirlanda, G.; Hurley, K.; Malesani, D.; Masetti, N.; Palazzi, E.; Piranomonte, S.; Rossi, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanaka, M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vergani, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been found to be associated with broad-lined type-Ic supernovae (SNe), but only a handful of cases have been studied in detail. Prompted by the discovery of the exceptionally bright, nearby GRB 130427A (redshift z = 0.3399), we aim at characterising the properties of its associated SN 2013cq. This is the first opportunity to test the progenitors of high-luminosity GRBs directly. Methods: We monitored the field of the Swift long-duration GRB 130427A using the 3.6 m TNG and the 8.2 m VLT during the time interval between 3.6 and 51.6 days after the burst. Photometric and spectroscopic observations revealed the presence of the type Ic SN 2013cq. Results: Spectroscopic analysis suggests that SN 2013cq resembles two previous GRB-SNe, SN 1998bw and SN 2010bh, associated with GRB 980425 and X-ray flash (XRF) 100316D, respectively. The bolometric light curve of SN 2013cq, which is significantly affected by the host galaxy contribution, is systematically more luminous than that of SN 2010bh (~2 mag at peak), but is consistent with SN 1998bw. The comparison with the light curve model of another GRB-connected SN 2003dh indicates that SN 2013cq is consistent with the model when brightened by 20%. This suggests a synthesised radioactive 56Ni mass of ~0.4M⊙. GRB 130427A/SN 2013cq is the first case of low-z GRB-SN connection where the GRB energetics are extreme (Eγ,iso ~ 1054 erg). We show that the maximum luminosities attained by SNe associated with GRBs span a very narrow range, but those associated with XRFs are significantly less luminous. On the other hand the isotropic energies of the accompanying GRBs span 6 orders of magnitude (1048 erg GRB total radiated energy is in fact a small fraction of the SN energy budget. Based on observations made with the VLT, operated on the mountain of Cerro Paranal in Chile under programme 091.D-0291

  6. Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-08-23

    The physical relation between the properties of Type Ia supernovae and their host galaxies is investigated. Such supernovae are used to constrain the properties of dark energy, making it crucial to understand their physical properties and to check for systematic effects relating to the stellar populations of the progenitor stars from which these supernovae arose. This grant found strong evidence for two distinct populations of supernovae, and correlations between the progenitor stellar populations and the nature of the supernova light curves.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Host galaxies of Superluminous Supernovae (Angus+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, C. R.; Levan, A. J.; Perley, D. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Lyman, J. D.; Stanway, E. R.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    Here we use nIR and rest-frame UV observations of a sample of 21 SLSN host galaxies, within a redshift range of 0.019 SCP 06F6). This HST sample (programme GO-13025; PI: Levan) comprised 21 targets, based on the sample of Neill et al. (2011ApJ...727...15N), supplemented with luminous SNe from the literature (up to 2012 Jan). (6 data files).

  8. Understanding the Relations between QSOs and Their Host Galaxies from Combined HST Imaging and VLT Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letawe, Y.; Magain, P.; Letawe, G.; Courbin, F.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2008-06-01

    The host galaxies of six nearby QSOs are studied on the basis of high-resolution HST optical images and spatially resolved VLT slit spectra. The gas ionization and velocity are mapped as a function of the distance to the central QSO. In the majority of the cases, the QSO significantly contributes to the gas ionization in its whole host galaxy, and sometimes even outside. Reflection or scattering of the QSO Hα line from remote regions of the galaxy is detected in several instances. The line shifts show that, in all cases, the matter responsible for the light reflection moves away from the QSO, likely accelerated by its radiation pressure. The two faintest QSOs reside in spirals, with some signs of a past gravitational perturbation. One of the intermediate-luminosity QSOs resides in a massive elliptical containing gas ionized (and probably pushed away) by the QSO radiation. The other medium-power object is found in a spiral galaxy displaying complex velocity structure, with the central QSO moving with respect to the bulge, probably as a result of a galactic collision. The two most powerful objects are involved in violent gravitational interactions, and one of them has no detected host. These results suggest that (1) large-scale phenomena, such as galactic collisions, are closely related to the triggering and the feeding of the QSO and (2) once ignited, the QSO has significant influence on its large-scale neighborhood (often the whole host and sometimes further away). Based on observations made with the Nasa/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 13 proposal 10238), and with ANTU/UT1 at ESO-Paranal observatory in Chile [programs 65.P-0361(A) and 66.B-0139(A)].

  9. When Do Internal Shocks End and External Shocks Begin? Early-Time Broadband Modeling of GRB 051111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, N. R.; Li, W.; Perley, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Urata, Y.; Prochaska, J. X.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Kocevski, D.; Chen, H.-W.; Qiu, Y.; Kuo, P. H.; Huang, F. Y.; Ip, W. H.; Tamagawa, T.; Onda, K.; Tashiro, M.; Makishima, K.; Nishihara, S.; Sarugaku, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Even with the renaissance in gamma-ray burst (GRB) research fostered by the Swift satellite, few bursts have both contemporaneous observations at long wavelengths and exquisite observations at later times across the electromagnetic spectrum. We present here contemporaneous imaging with the KAIT robotic optical telescope, dense optical sampling with Lulin, supplemented with infrared data from PAIRITEL and radio to gamma-ray data from the literature. For the first time, we can test the constancy of microphysical parameters in the internal-external shock paradigm and carefully trace the flow of energy from the GRB to the surrounding medium. KAIT data taken <~1 minute after the start of GRB 051111 and coinciding with the fading gamma-ray tail of the prompt emission indicate a smooth reinjection of energy into the shock. No color change is apparent in observations beginning ~1.5 minutes after the GRB and lasting for the first hour after the burst. There are achromatic flux modulations about the best-fit model at late (t~104 s) times, possibly due to variations in the external density. We find that the host galaxy extinction is well fit by a curve similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. Low visual extinction, AV~0.2 mag, combined with high column densities determined from the X-ray and optical spectroscopy (NH>1021 cm-2), indicate a low dust-to-metals ratio and a possible overabundance of the light metals. An apparent small ratio of total to selective extinction (RV~2) argues against dust destruction by the GRB. Time constancy of both the IR/optical/UV spectral energy distribution and the soft X-ray absorption suggests that the absorbing material is not local to the GRB.

  10. Origin of the Correlations Between Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Sydney; Li, Y.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established from observations that suppermassive black holes in nearby elliptical galaxies correlate tightly with the stellar velocity dispersion (the M - σ relation) and mass (the MBH - Mhost relation) of their host spheroids. However, the origin of these correlations remains ambiguous. Here, we compile a sample of observed galaxies with different properties (e.g., mass, type, kinematics, growth history, etc.) and examine the dependence of the above correlations on these parameters. We find that galaxies that satisfy the M - σ correlation appear to have reached virial equilibrium, as indicated by the ratio between kinetic energy and gravitational potential, 2K/U ~ 1. Furthermore, the ratio of black hole accretion rate to star formation rate remains nearly constant, AR /SFR ~ 10-3, over a wide range of galaxy mass from redshift z=0 - 2. These results confirm our previous theoretical model that the observed correlations have different origins: the M - σ relation may be the result of virial equilibrium, while MBH - Mhost relation may be the result of self-regulated star formation and black hole growth in galaxies.

  11. The Nature of the Remarkable Transient GRB 110328A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, Andrew

    2010-09-01

    One orbit was approved for GO/DD 12447. The PI was given permission to use time under his related approved GRB program, 12370, for subsequent observations of this GRB. To allow the second visit to go forward quickly, it was kept on the schedule as GO/DD 12447, but the orbit was charged to GO 12370. As a result, THE SECOND VISIT OF 12447 HAS THE PROPRIETARY PERIOD ASSOCIATED WITH 12370. We apologize for the confusion caused by this change. However, it was done to allow rapid observations of an unusual astrophysical object.We propose HST observations of the extraordinary transient, GRB 110328A. This object triggered the Swift automatic burst detection twice over the course of about ninety minutes, and has continued to be a bright X-ray source for the two days since. While this behavior might typically suggest a Galactic source, the high Galactic latitude of the object, and its coincidence with a star-forming galaxy at z=0.35 instead suggests a new type of extragalactic transient. WFC3 imaging in the optical and NIR will allow us to search for a varying point source to far greater depth than could be done from the ground, given the presence of an apparent host, and the use of the F160W filter may allow us to pierce enshrouding dust, if extinction is the reason for the present lack of a detection in the optical. While we do not yet know the astrophysical source of this transient, it appears unique among the hundreds of transients so far detected by Swift. This alone should provide strong grounds for HST observations of this unusual and potentially important object.

  12. DISSECTING THE QUASAR MAIN SEQUENCE: INSIGHT FROM HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jiayi; Shen, Yue

    2015-05-01

    The diverse properties of broad-line quasars appear to follow a well-defined main sequence along which the optical Fe ii strength increases. It has been suggested that this sequence is mainly driven by the Eddington ratio (L/L{sub Edd}) of the black hole (BH) accretion. Shen and Ho demonstrated with quasar clustering analysis that the average BH mass decreases with increasing Fe ii strength when quasar luminosity is fixed, consistent with this suggestion. Here we perform an independent test by measuring the stellar velocity dispersion σ{sub *} (hence, the BH mass via the M–σ{sub *} relation) from decomposed host spectra in low-redshift Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars. We found that at fixed quasar luminosity, σ{sub *} systematically decreases with increasing Fe ii strength, confirming that the Eddington ratio increases with Fe ii strength. We also found that at fixed luminosity and Fe ii strength, there is little dependence of σ{sub *} on the broad Hβ FWHM. These new results reinforce the framework that the Eddington ratio and orientation govern most of the diversity seen in broad-line quasar properties.

  13. CO (2-1) LINE EMISSION IN REDSHIFT 6 QUASAR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ran; Wagg, Jeff; Carilli, Chris L.; Walter, Fabian; Riechers, Dominick A.; Willott, Chris; Bertoldi, Frank; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Beelen, Alexandre; Cox, Pierre; Strauss, Michael A.; Forveille, Thierry; Menten, Karl M.; Fan, Xiaohui

    2011-09-20

    We report new observations of CO (2-1) line emission toward five z {approx} 6 quasars using the Ka-band receiver system on the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). Strong detections were obtained in two of them, SDSS J092721.82+200123.7 and CFHQS J142952.17+544717.6, and a marginal detection was obtained in another source, SDSS J084035.09+562419.9. Upper limits of the CO (2-1) line emission have been obtained for the other two objects. The CO (2-1) line detection in J0927+2001 together with previous measurements of the CO (6-5) and (5-4) lines reveal important constraints on the CO excitation in the central {approx}10 kpc region of the quasar host galaxy. The CO (2-1) line emission from J1429+5447 is resolved into two distinct peaks separated by 1.''2 ({approx}6.9 kpc), indicating a possible gas-rich, major merging system, and the optical quasar position is consistent with the west peak. This result is in good agreement with the picture in which intense host galaxy star formation is coeval with rapid supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion in the most distant universe. The two EVLA detections are ideal targets for further high-resolution imaging (e.g., with ALMA or EVLA observations) to study the gas distribution, dynamics, and SMBH-bulge-mass relation in these earliest quasar host galaxy systems.

  14. The effect of host cluster gravitational tidal forces on the internal dynamics of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    New empirical observation by Bidin, Carraro, Mendez & Smith finds ``a lack of dark matter in the Solar neighborhood" (2012 ApJ 751, 30). This, and the discovery of a vast polar structure of Milky Way satellites by Pawlowski, Pflamm-Altenburg & Kroupa (2012 MNRAS 423, 1109), conflict with the prevailing interpretation of the measured Galactic rotation curve. Simulating the dynamical effects of host cluster tidal forces on galaxy disks reveals radial migration in a spiral structure and an orbital velocity that accelerates with increasing galactocentric radial coordinate. A virtual ``toy model,'' which is based on an Earth-orbiting system of particles and is physically realizable in principle, is available at GravitySim.net. Given the perturbing gravitational effect of the host cluster on a spiral galaxy disk and that a similar effect does not exist for the Solar System, the two systems represent distinct classes of gravitational dynamical systems. The observed `flat' and accelerating rotation curves of spiral galaxies can be attributed to gravitational interaction with the host cluster; no `dark matter halo' is required to explain the observable.

  15. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN SDSS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA RATES AND HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yan; Pritchet, Chris

    2013-03-15

    Studying the correlation of Type Ia supernova rates (SNRs) with host galaxy properties is an important step in understanding the exact nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We use SNe Ia from the SDSS-II sample, spectroscopically determined masses and star formation rates, and a new maximum likelihood method, to fit the Scannapieco and Bildsten rate model SNR = A Multiplication-Sign M + B Multiplication-Sign SFR, where M is galaxy mass and SFR is star formation rate. We find A = 3.5{sup +0.9}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} (SNe/yr)(M{sub Sun }){sup -1} and B = 1.3{sup +0.4}{sub -0.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (SNe/yr)(M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}){sup -1}, assuming overall efficiency of 0.5. This is in reasonable agreement with other determinations. However we find strong evidence that this model is a poor fit to other projections of the data: it fails to correctly predict the distribution of supernovae with host mass or SFR. An additional model parameter is required; most likely this parameter is related to host galaxy mass. Some implications of this result are discussed.

  16. THE DWARF STARBURST HOST GALAXY OF A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA AT z = 1.55 FROM CANDELS

    SciTech Connect

    Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hjorth, Jens; Maund, Justyn R.; Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Dahlen, Tomas; Mobasher, Bahram

    2012-12-01

    We present VLT/X-shooter observations of a high-redshift, Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) host galaxy, discovered with HST/WFC3 as part of the CANDELS Supernova project. The galaxy exhibits strong emission lines of Ly{alpha}, [O II], H{beta}, [O III], and H{alpha} at z = 1.54992{sup +0.00008} {sub -0.00004}. From the emission-line fluxes and spectral energy distribution fitting of broadband photometry we rule out activity from an active galactic nucleus and characterize the host galaxy as a young, low-mass, metal-poor, starburst galaxy with low intrinsic extinction and high Ly{alpha} escape fraction. The host galaxy stands out in terms of the star formation, stellar mass, and metallicity compared to its lower redshift counterparts, mainly because of its high specific star formation rate. If valid for a larger sample of high-redshift SN Ia host galaxies, such changes in the host galaxy properties with redshift are of interest because of the potential impact on the use of SN Ia as standard candles in cosmology.

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Post-Starburst Signatures in Quasar Host Galaxies at z > 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Strauss, Michael A.; Shen, Yue; Brandt, William N.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sun, Mouyuan; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2015-10-01

    Quasar host galaxies are key for understanding the relation between galaxies and the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at their centers. We present a study of 191 broad-line quasars and their host galaxies at z\\lt 1, using high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. Clear detection of stellar absorption lines allows a reliable decomposition of the observed spectra into nuclear and host components, using spectral models of quasar and stellar radiations as well as emission lines from the interstellar medium. We estimate age, mass {M}*, and velocity dispersion {σ }* of the host stars, the star formation rate (SFR), quasar luminosity, and SMBH mass {M}\\bullet , for each object. The quasars are preferentially hosted by massive galaxies with {M}*˜ {10}11 {M}⊙ characterized by stellar ages around 1 billion yr, which coincides with the transition phase of normal galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence. The host galaxies have relatively low SFRs and fall below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. These facts suggest that the hosts have experienced an episode of major star formation sometime in the past 1 billion yr, which was subsequently quenched or suppressed. The derived {M}\\bullet -{σ }* and {M}\\bullet -{M}* relations agree with our past measurements and are consistent with no evolution from the local universe. The present analysis demonstrates that reliable measurements of stellar properties of quasar host galaxies are possible with high-S/N fiber spectra, which will be acquired in large numbers with future powerful instruments such as the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph.

  18. An evolutionary missing link? A modest-mass early-type galaxy hosting an oversized nuclear black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sansom, Anne E.

    2015-11-01

    SAGE1C J053634.78-722658.5 is a galaxy at redshift z = 0.14, discovered behind the Large Magellanic Cloud in the Spitzer Space Telescope`Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution' Spectroscopy survey. It has very strong silicate emission at 10 μm but negligible far-IR and UV emission. This makes it a candidate for a bare active galactic nuclei (AGN) source in the IR, perhaps seen pole-on, without significant IR emission from the host galaxy. In this paper we present optical spectra taken with the Southern African Large Telescope to investigate the nature of the underlying host galaxy and its AGN. We find broad H α emission characteristic of an AGN, plus absorption lines associated with a mature stellar population (>9 Gyr), and refine its redshift determination to z = 0.1428 ± 0.0001. There is no evidence for any emission lines associated with star formation. This remarkable object exemplifies the need for separating the emission from any AGN from that of the host galaxy when employing IR diagnostic diagrams. We estimate the black hole mass, MBH = 3.5 ± 0.8 × 108 M⊙, host galaxy mass, M_stars=2.5^{2.5}_{1.2}× 10^{10} M⊙, and accretion luminosity, Lbol(AGN) = 5.3 ± 0.4 × 1045 erg s-1 (≈12 per cent of the Eddington luminosity), and find the AGN to be more prominent than expected for a host galaxy of this modest size. The old age is in tension with the downsizing paradigm in which this galaxy would recently have transformed from a star-forming disc galaxy into an early-type, passively evolving galaxy.

  19. The Connection between the Host Halo and the Satellite Galaxies of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yu; Benson, Andrew; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Tonnesen, Stephanie; Peter, Annika H. G.; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-10-01

    Many properties of the Milky Way’s (MW) dark matter halo, including its mass-assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population, remain poorly constrained. We explore the connection between these properties of the MW and its satellite galaxy population, especially the implication of the presence of the Magellanic Clouds for the properties of the MW halo. Using a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of MW-mass halos with a fixed final {M}{vir}˜ {10}12.1 {M}⊙ , we find that the presence of Magellanic Cloud-like satellites strongly correlates with the assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population of the host halo, such that MW-mass systems with Magellanic Clouds have lower concentration, more rapid recent accretion, and more massive subhalos than typical halos of the same mass. Using a flexible semi-analytic galaxy formation model that is tuned to reproduce the stellar mass function of the classical dwarf galaxies of the MW with Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo, we show that adopting host halos with different mass-assembly histories and concentrations can lead to different best-fit models for galaxy-formation physics, especially for the strength of feedback. These biases arise because the presence of the Magellanic Clouds boosts the overall population of high-mass subhalos, thus requiring a different stellar-mass-to-halo-mass ratio to match the data. These biases also lead to significant differences in the mass-metallicity relation, the kinematics of low-mass satellites, the number counts of small satellites associated with the Magellanic Clouds, and the stellar mass of MW itself. Observations of these galaxy properties can thus provide useful constraints on the properties of the MW halo.

  20. The connection between the host halo and the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Yu; Benson, Andrew; Mao, Yao -Yuan; ...

    2016-10-11

    Many properties of the Milky Way's (MW) dark matter halo, including its mass-assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population, remain poorly constrained. We explore the connection between these properties of the MW and its satellite galaxy population, especially the implication of the presence of the Magellanic Clouds for the properties of the MW halo. Using a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of MW-mass halos with a fixed finalmore » $${M}_{\\mathrm{vir}}\\sim {10}^{12.1}\\,{M}_{\\odot }$$, we find that the presence of Magellanic Cloud-like satellites strongly correlates with the assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population of the host halo, such that MW-mass systems with Magellanic Clouds have lower concentration, more rapid recent accretion, and more massive subhalos than typical halos of the same mass. Using a flexible semi-analytic galaxy formation model that is tuned to reproduce the stellar mass function of the classical dwarf galaxies of the MW with Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo, we show that adopting host halos with different mass-assembly histories and concentrations can lead to different best-fit models for galaxy-formation physics, especially for the strength of feedback. These biases arise because the presence of the Magellanic Clouds boosts the overall population of high-mass subhalos, thus requiring a different stellar-mass-to-halo-mass ratio to match the data. These biases also lead to significant differences in the mass–metallicity relation, the kinematics of low-mass satellites, the number counts of small satellites associated with the Magellanic Clouds, and the stellar mass of MW itself. Finally, observations of these galaxy properties can thus provide useful constraints on the properties of the MW halo.« less

  1. The connection between the host halo and the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yu; Benson, Andrew; Mao, Yao -Yuan; Tonnesen, Stephanie; Peter, Annika H. G.; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-10-11

    Many properties of the Milky Way's (MW) dark matter halo, including its mass-assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population, remain poorly constrained. We explore the connection between these properties of the MW and its satellite galaxy population, especially the implication of the presence of the Magellanic Clouds for the properties of the MW halo. Using a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of MW-mass halos with a fixed final ${M}_{\\mathrm{vir}}\\sim {10}^{12.1}\\,{M}_{\\odot }$, we find that the presence of Magellanic Cloud-like satellites strongly correlates with the assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population of the host halo, such that MW-mass systems with Magellanic Clouds have lower concentration, more rapid recent accretion, and more massive subhalos than typical halos of the same mass. Using a flexible semi-analytic galaxy formation model that is tuned to reproduce the stellar mass function of the classical dwarf galaxies of the MW with Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo, we show that adopting host halos with different mass-assembly histories and concentrations can lead to different best-fit models for galaxy-formation physics, especially for the strength of feedback. These biases arise because the presence of the Magellanic Clouds boosts the overall population of high-mass subhalos, thus requiring a different stellar-mass-to-halo-mass ratio to match the data. These biases also lead to significant differences in the mass–metallicity relation, the kinematics of low-mass satellites, the number counts of small satellites associated with the Magellanic Clouds, and the stellar mass of MW itself. Finally, observations of these galaxy properties can thus provide useful constraints on the properties of the MW halo.

  2. Tidally Induced Bars in Dwarf Galaxies on Different Orbits around a Milky Way-like Host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Grzegorz; Łokas, Ewa L.; Athanassoula, E.

    2017-06-01

    Bars in galaxies may develop through a global instability or as a result of an interaction with another system. We study bar formation in disky dwarf galaxies orbiting a Milky Way-like galaxy. We employ N-body simulations to study the impact of the initial orbital parameters: the size of the dwarf galaxy orbit, and the inclination of its disk with respect to the orbital plane. In all cases, a bar develops in the center of the dwarf during the first pericenter on its orbit around the host. Between subsequent pericenter passages, the bars are stable, but at the pericenters, they are usually weakened and shortened. The initial properties and details of the further evolution of the bars depend heavily on the orbital configuration. We find that for the exactly prograde orientation, the strongest bar is formed for the intermediate-sized orbit. On the tighter orbit, the disk is too disturbed and stripped to form a strong bar. On the wider orbit, the tidal interaction is too weak. The dependence on the disk inclination is such that weaker bars form in more inclined disks. The bars experience either a very weak buckling or none at all. We do not observe any secular evolution, possibly because the dwarfs are perturbed at each pericenter passage. The rotation speed of the bars can be classified as slow (R CR/l bar ˜ 2-3). We attribute this to the loss of a significant fraction of the disk rotation during the encounter with the host galaxy.

  3. The connection between the host halo and the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yu; Benson, Andrew; Mao, Yao -Yuan; Tonnesen, Stephanie; Peter, Annika H. G.; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-10-11

    Many properties of the Milky Way's (MW) dark matter halo, including its mass-assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population, remain poorly constrained. We explore the connection between these properties of the MW and its satellite galaxy population, especially the implication of the presence of the Magellanic Clouds for the properties of the MW halo. Using a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of MW-mass halos with a fixed final ${M}_{\\mathrm{vir}}\\sim {10}^{12.1}\\,{M}_{\\odot }$, we find that the presence of Magellanic Cloud-like satellites strongly correlates with the assembly history, concentration, and subhalo population of the host halo, such that MW-mass systems with Magellanic Clouds have lower concentration, more rapid recent accretion, and more massive subhalos than typical halos of the same mass. Using a flexible semi-analytic galaxy formation model that is tuned to reproduce the stellar mass function of the classical dwarf galaxies of the MW with Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo, we show that adopting host halos with different mass-assembly histories and concentrations can lead to different best-fit models for galaxy-formation physics, especially for the strength of feedback. These biases arise because the presence of the Magellanic Clouds boosts the overall population of high-mass subhalos, thus requiring a different stellar-mass-to-halo-mass ratio to match the data. These biases also lead to significant differences in the mass–metallicity relation, the kinematics of low-mass satellites, the number counts of small satellites associated with the Magellanic Clouds, and the stellar mass of MW itself. Finally, observations of these galaxy properties can thus provide useful constraints on the properties of the MW halo.

  4. The Post-starburst Evolution of Tidal Disruption Event Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, K. Decker; Arcavi, Iair; Zabludoff, Ann

    2017-02-01

    We constrain the recent star formation histories of the host galaxies of eight optical/UV-detected tidal disruption events (TDEs). Six hosts had quick starbursts of <200 Myr duration that ended 10–1000 Myr ago, indicating that TDEs arise at different times in their hosts’ post-starburst evolution. If the disrupted star formed in the burst or before, the post-burst age constrains its mass, generally excluding O, most B, and highly massive A stars. If the starburst arose from a galaxy merger, the time since the starburst began limits the coalescence timescale and thus the merger mass ratio to more equal than 12:1 in most hosts. This uncommon ratio, if also that of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) binary, disfavors the scenario in which the TDE rate is boosted by the binary but is insensitive to its mass ratio. The stellar mass fraction created in the burst is 0.5%–10% for most hosts, not enough to explain the observed 30–200× boost in TDE rates, suggesting that the host’s core stellar concentration is more important. TDE hosts have stellar masses 109.4–1010.3 M⊙, consistent with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey volume-corrected, quiescent Balmer-strong comparison sample and implying SMBH masses of 105.5–107.5 M⊙. Subtracting the host absorption line spectrum, we uncover emission lines; at least five hosts have ionization sources inconsistent with star formation that instead may be related to circumnuclear gas, merger shocks, or post-AGB stars.

  5. The Grb2 adaptor.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Cussac, D; Maignan, S; Ducruix, A

    1995-08-01

    Grb2 is an 'adaptor' protein made of one SH2 and two SH3 domains. The SH3 domains bind to prolinerich motifs in the C-terminal part of the ras exchange factor Sos. Binding of the Grb2 SH2 domain to phosphotyrosine motifs on receptors, or other adaptor proteins such as Shc, recruits this Grb2/Sos complex at the plasma membrane where Sos stimulates nucleotide exchange on ras, then ras activates raf and leads to MAP kinase activation. The structure of Grb2, the precise motifs recognised by its SH2 and SH3 domains, the way Grb2 performs its function, a possible regulation of its association with Sos, and its ability to complex with other proteins in vivo, are discussed.

  6. Adaptive optics imaging of QSO host galaxies with Hokupa'a on the Gemini North telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, O.; Sanders, D. B.; Stockton, A.; Baudoz, P.; Potter, D.

    2001-05-01

    We report the initial results of a new near-infrared imaging survey of quasar hosts using the University of Hawaii Hokupa'a Adaptive Optics system on the 8.2m Gemini-North telescope. J,H,K' images of a complete subsample ( 25) of nearby (z <0.3), "bona-fide" optically selected (MB < -23; Ho = 50, qo=0; Schmidt & Green 1983) QSOs are being taken in order to obtain accurate host galaxy magnitudes and colors and to determine two-dimensional structure. In the initial phase of our observations we found that PSF subtraction residuals were severely limiting our ability to characterize the host galaxy. However we were able to obtain a significant increase in stability of the PSF by turning off the Cassegrain rotator during observations (see Roth et al. contribution at this meeting). Our sample of Palomar-Green Bright QSOs includes both radio quiet and radio loud objects plus objects spanning the full range of observed "infrared excess" continuum emission. One of the most surprising results has been the detection of modest scale (3-5" 5 kpc diameter) "bars" and/or circumnuclear "disks" that were not evident in previous one-dimensional profile analyses. These structures may be related to the reservoir of fuel needed to power the QSO and may provide important clues concerning the origin and evolution of QSO hosts.

  7. Erratum: ``CO Line Width Differences in Early Universe Molecular Emission-Line Galaxies: Submillimeter Galaxies versus QSO Hosts'' (AJ, 131, 2763 [2006])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Wang, Ran

    2006-11-01

    It has been pointed out to us that in three dimensions the mean angle of randomly oriented disks with respect to the sky plane is <θ>=30deg, and not the 45° assumed in the original paper. This lower angle for the (assumed) random distribution of submillimeter galaxies, coupled with the factor of 2.3 lower mean CO line width for high-z, far-IR-luminous QSO host galaxies relative to the submillimeter galaxies, implies a mean angle with respect to the sky plane for the QSO host galaxies of <θ>QSO=13deg, as opposed to the 18° quoted in the original paper. We thank Pat Hall for bringing this to our attention.

  8. SN 2013dx associated with GRB 130702A: a detailed photometric and spectroscopic monitoring and a study of the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, Valerio

    We aim at characterizing SN 2013dx, associated with GRB 130702A, and their environment, through ground-based observational campaigns in the optical-IR band. We infer a synthesized 56Ni mass of ~0.2 M⊙, a photospheric velocity of the ejected material declining from ~ 2.7 × 104 km s-1 at 8 rest frame days from the explosion, to ~ 3.5× 103 km s-1 at 40 days, a kinetic energy of ~ 35 × 1051 erg, an ejected mass of ~ 7 M⊙ and a progenitor mass of ~ 25-30 M⊙. We also find that the host belongs to a group of galaxies, an unprecedented finding for a GRB-associated SN and, to our knowledge, for long GRBs in general.

  9. Using diffusion k-means for simple stellar population modeling of low S/N quasar host galaxy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Gregory; Tremonti, Christina A.; Hooper, Eric; Wolf, Marsha J.; Sheinis, Andrew; Richards, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Quasar host galaxies (QHGs) represent a unique stage in galaxy evolution that can provide a glimpse into the relationship between an active supermassive black hole (SMBH) and its host galaxy. However, observing the hosts of high luminosity, unobscured quasars in the optical is complicated by the large ratio of quasar to host galaxy light. One strategy in optical spectroscopy is to use offset longslit observations of the host galaxy. This method allows the centers of QHGs to be analyzed apart from other regions of their host galaxies. But light from the accreting black hole's point spread function still enters the host galaxy observations, and where the contrast between the host and intervening quasar light is favorable, the host galaxy is faint, producing low signal-to-noise (S/N) data. This stymies traditional stellar population methods that might rely on high S/N features in galaxy spectra to recover key galaxy properties like its star formation history (SFH). In response to this challenge, we have developed a method of stellar population modeling using diffusion k-means (DFK) that can recover SFHs from rest frame optical data with S/N ~ 5 Å^-1. Specifically, we use DFK to cultivate a reduced stellar population basis set. This DFK basis set of four broad age bins is able to recover a range of SFHs. With an analytic description of the seeing, we can use this DFK basis set to simultaneously model the SFHs and the intervening quasar light of QHGs as well. We compare the results of this method with previous techniques using synthetic data and find that our new method has a clear advantage in recovering SFHs from QHGs. On average, the DFK basis set is just as accurate and decisively more precise. This new technique could be used to analyze other low S/N galaxy spectra like those from higher redshift or integral field spectroscopy surveys.This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. DGE -0718123 and the Advanced

  10. Detection of GRB 060927 at zeta = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sterling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture groundbased telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hours after the trigger shows a continuum break at lambda approx. equals 8070 A, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at zeta = 5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 A which we interpret as Si II lambda 1260 at zeta = 5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Ly(alpha) profile with a column density with log(N(sub HI)/sq cm) = 22.50 +/- 0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: i) GRB afterglows originating from zeta greater than or approx. equal to 6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; ii) The presence of large H I column densities in some GRBs host galaxies at zeta > 5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; iii) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at zeta > 5 and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe.

  11. On the Dependence of Type Ia SNe Luminosities on the Metallicity of Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Raya, Manuel E.; Mollá, Mercedes; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Galbany, Lluís; Vílchez, José Manuel; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Domínguez, Inmaculada

    2016-02-01

    The metallicity of the progenitor system producing a type Ia supernova (SN Ia) could play a role in its maximum luminosity, as suggested by theoretical predictions. We present an observational study to investigate if such a relationship exists. Using the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) we have obtained intermediate-resolution spectroscopy data of a sample of 28 local galaxies hosting SNe Ia, for which distances have been derived using methods independent of those based on SN Ia parameters. From the emission lines observed in their optical spectra, we derived the gas-phase oxygen abundance in the region where each SN Ia exploded. Our data show a trend, with an 80% of chance not being due to random fluctuation, between SNe Ia absolute magnitudes and the oxygen abundances of the host galaxies, in the sense that luminosities tend to be higher for galaxies with lower metallicities. This result seems likely to be in agreement with both the theoretically expected behavior and with other observational results. This dependence MB-Z might induce systematic errors when it is not considered when deriving SNe Ia luminosities and then using them to derive cosmological distances.

  12. ON THE DEPENDENCE OF TYPE Ia SNe LUMINOSITIES ON THE METALLICITY OF THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Raya, Manuel E.; Mollá, Mercedes; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Galbany, Lluís; Vílchez, José Manuel; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Domínguez, Inmaculada

    2016-02-10

    The metallicity of the progenitor system producing a type Ia supernova (SN Ia) could play a role in its maximum luminosity, as suggested by theoretical predictions. We present an observational study to investigate if such a relationship exists. Using the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) we have obtained intermediate-resolution spectroscopy data of a sample of 28 local galaxies hosting SNe Ia, for which distances have been derived using methods independent of those based on SN Ia parameters. From the emission lines observed in their optical spectra, we derived the gas-phase oxygen abundance in the region where each SN Ia exploded. Our data show a trend, with an 80% of chance not being due to random fluctuation, between SNe Ia absolute magnitudes and the oxygen abundances of the host galaxies, in the sense that luminosities tend to be higher for galaxies with lower metallicities. This result seems likely to be in agreement with both the theoretically expected behavior and with other observational results. This dependence M{sub B}–Z might induce systematic errors when it is not considered when deriving SNe Ia luminosities and then using them to derive cosmological distances.

  13. A CCD Color Comparison of Seyfert 1 and 2 Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virani, S. N.; De Robertis, M. M.

    2001-05-01

    Wide-field, R-band CCD data of 15 Seyfert 1 and 15 Seyfert 2 galaxies taken from the CfA survey were analysed in order to compare the properties of their host galaxies. Also, B-band images for a subset of 12 Seyfert 1s and 7 Seyfert 2s were acquired and analysed in the same way. The nuclear contribution of the Seyfert host galaxies was modeled and removed empirically by using a robust technique for decomposing the nucleus, bulge and disk components (see Virani et al. 2000, De Robertis and Virani, 2001). Profile fits to the remaining bulge+disk light were then performed. Of the many B-R color comparisons that were performed (i.e., component colors, color gradient, etc.) between Seyfert 1s and 2s, only two distributions differed at greater than the 95% confidence level for the K-S test: the magnitude of the nuclear component, and the radial color gradient outside the nucleus. The former is expected. The latter could be consistent with some proposed evolutionary models. There is some suggestion that other parameters may differ, but at a lower confidence level. Color contour maps and results from all tests performed (K-S test and Wilcoxon-Rank Sum Test) are presented.

  14. The Role of Radiation Pressure in the Narrow Line Regions of Seyfert Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Dopita, Michael A.; Kewley, Lisa; Groves, Brent; Sutherland, Ralph; Hampton, Elise J.; Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Bhatt, Harish; Scharwächter, Julia; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the relative significance of radiation pressure and gas pressure in the extended narrow line regions (ENLRs) of four Seyfert galaxies from the integral field Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7). We demonstrate that there exist two distinct types of starburst-active galactic nucleus (AGN) mixing curves on standard emission line diagnostic diagrams, which reflect the balance between gas pressure and radiation pressure in the ENLR. In two of the galaxies the ENLR is radiation pressure dominated throughout and the ionization parameter remains constant (log U ˜ 0). In the other two galaxies radiation pressure is initially important, but gas pressure becomes dominant as the ionization parameter in the ENLR decreases from log U ˜ 0 to -3.2 ≲ log U ≲ -3.4. Where radiation pressure is dominant, the AGN regulates the density of the interstellar medium on kiloparsec scales and may therefore have a direct impact on star formation activity and/or the incidence of outflows in the host galaxy to scales far beyond the zone of influence of the black hole. We find that both radiation pressure dominated and gas pressure dominated ENLRs are dynamically active with evidence for outflows, indicating that radiation pressure may be an important source of AGN feedback even when it is not dominant over the entire ENLR.

  15. THE AFTERGLOW AND ENVIRONMENT OF THE SHORT GRB 111117A

    SciTech Connect

    Margutti, R.; Berger, E.; Fong, W.; Zauderer, B. A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N.; Cenko, S. B.; Greiner, J.; Cucchiara, A.

    2012-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the afterglow of the short GRB 111117A, and follow-up observations of its host galaxy. From rapid optical and radio observations, we place limits of r {approx}> 25.5 mag at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 0.55 days and F{sub {nu}}(5.8 GHz) {approx}< 18 {mu}Jy at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 0.50 days, respectively. However, using a Chandra observation at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 3.0 days we locate the absolute position of the X-ray afterglow to an accuracy of 0.''22 (1{sigma}), a factor of about six times better than the Swift/XRT position. This allows us to robustly identify the host galaxy and to locate the burst at a projected offset of 1.''25 {+-} 0.''20 from the host centroid. Using optical and near-IR observations of the host galaxy we determine a photometric redshift of z = 1.3{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2}, one of the highest for any short gamma-ray burst (GRB), leading to a projected physical offset for the burst of 10.5 {+-} 1.7 kpc, typical of previous short GRBs. At this redshift, the isotropic {gamma}-ray energy is E{sub {gamma},iso} Almost-Equal-To 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (rest-frame 23-2300 keV) with a peak energy of E{sub pk} Almost-Equal-To 850-2300 keV (rest-frame). In conjunction with the isotropic X-ray energy, GRB 111117A appears to follow our recently reported E{sub x,iso}-E{sub {gamma},iso}-E{sub pk} universal scaling. Using the X-ray data along with the optical and radio non-detections, we find that for a blastwave kinetic energy of E{sub K,iso} Almost-Equal-To E{sub {gamma},iso} erg, the circumburst density is n{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} - 1 cm{sup -3} (for a range of {epsilon}{sub B} = 0.001-0.1). Similarly, from the non-detection of a break in the X-ray light curve at {delta}t {approx}< 3 days, we infer a minimum opening angle for the outflow of {theta}{sub j} {approx}> 3-10 Degree-Sign (depending on the circumburst density). We conclude that Chandra observations of short

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BH masses & host galaxy dispersion vel. (van den Bosch, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, R. C. E.

    2017-02-01

    According to the virial theorem, all gravitational systems in equilibrium sit on a plane in the three-dimensional parameter space defined by their mass, size, and second moment of the velocity tensor. While these quantities cannot be directly observed, there are suitable proxies: the luminosity Lk, half-light radius Re, and dispersion σe. These proxies indeed lie on a very tight fundamental plane (FP). How do the black holes (BHs) in the centers of galaxies relate to the FP? Their masses are known to exhibit no strong correlation with total galaxy mass, but they do correlate weakly with bulge mass (when present), and extremely well with the velocity dispersion through the M{bullet}∝σe5.4 relation. These facts together imply that a tight plane must also exist defined by BH mass, total galaxy mass, and size. Here, I show that this is indeed the case using a heterogeneous set of 230 BHs. The sample includes BHs from zero to 10 billion solar masses and host galaxies ranging from low surface brightness dwarfs, through bulgeless disks, to brightest cluster galaxies. The resulting BH-size-luminosity relation M{bullet}∝(Lk/Re)3.8 has the same amount of scatter as the M*-σ relation and is aligned with the galaxy FP, such that it is just a reprojection of σe. The inferred BH-size-mass relation is M{bullet}∝(M*/Re)2.9. These relationships are universal and extend to galaxies without bulges. This implies that the BH is primarily correlated with its global velocity dispersion and not with the properties of the bulge. I show that the classical bulge-mass relation is a projection of the M*-σ relation. When the velocity dispersion cannot be measured (at high z or low dispersions), the BH-size-mass relation should be used as a proxy for BH mass in favor of just galaxy or bulge mass. (4 data files).

  17. Uncovering hidden black holes: Obscured AGN and their relationship to the host galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.

    that accurately trace AGN flux, we have shown that these processes are significantly correlated. This link suggests that supermassive black holes and their host galaxies grow simultaneously in the local universe.

  18. GALAXY ZOO: THE FUNDAMENTALLY DIFFERENT CO-EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR EARLY- AND LATE-TYPE HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Virani, Shanil; Coppi, Paolo; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Bamford, Steven P.; Treister, Ezequiel; Lintott, Chris J.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Sarzi, Marc; Keel, William C.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Ross, Nicholas P.; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Szalay, Alex S.; Slosar, Anze

    2010-03-01

    We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and visual classifications of morphology from the Galaxy Zoo project to study black hole growth in the nearby universe (z < 0.05) and to break down the active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxy population by color, stellar mass, and morphology. We find that the black hole growth at luminosities L[O{sub III}]>10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} in early- and late-type galaxies is fundamentally different. AGN host galaxies as a population have a broad range of stellar masses (10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub sun}), reside in the green valley of the color-mass diagram and their central black holes have median masses around 10{sup 6.5} M{sub sun}. However, by comparing early- and late-type AGN host galaxies to their non-active counterparts, we find several key differences: in early-type galaxies, it is preferentially the galaxies with the least massive black holes that are growing, while in late-type galaxies, it is preferentially the most massive black holes that are growing. The duty cycle of AGNs in early-type galaxies is strongly peaked in the green valley below the low-mass end (10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) of the red sequence at stellar masses where there is a steady supply of blue cloud progenitors. The duty cycle of AGNs in late-type galaxies on the other hand peaks in massive (10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) green and red late-types which generally do not have a corresponding blue cloud population of similar mass. At high-Eddington ratios (L/L{sub Edd}>0.1), the only population with a substantial fraction of AGNs are the low-mass green valley early-type galaxies. Finally, the Milky Way likely resides in the 'sweet spot' on the color-mass diagram where the AGN duty cycle of late-type galaxies is highest. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the role of AGNs in the evolution of galaxies.

  19. [C ii] 158-μm emission from the host galaxies of damped Lyman-alpha systems.

    PubMed

    Neeleman, Marcel; Kanekar, Nissim; Prochaska, J Xavier; Rafelski, Marc; Carilli, Chris L; Wolfe, Arthur M

    2017-03-24

    Gas surrounding high-redshift galaxies has been studied through observations of absorption line systems toward background quasars for decades. However, it has proven difficult to identify and characterize the galaxies associated with these absorbers due to the intrinsic faintness of the galaxies compared with the quasars at optical wavelengths. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, we report on detections of [C ii] 158-μm line and dust-continuum emission from two galaxies associated with two such absorbers at a redshift of z ~ 4. Our results indicate that the hosts of these high-metallicity absorbers have physical properties similar to massive star-forming galaxies and are embedded in enriched neutral hydrogen gas reservoirs that extend well beyond the star-forming interstellar medium of these galaxies. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. [C II] 158-μm emission from the host galaxies of damped Lyman-alpha systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeleman, Marcel; Kanekar, Nissim; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rafelski, Marc; Carilli, Chris L.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2017-03-01

    Gas surrounding high-redshift galaxies has been studied through observations of absorption line systems toward background quasars for decades. However, it has proven difficult to identify and characterize the galaxies associated with these absorbers due to the intrinsic faintness of the galaxies compared with the quasars at optical wavelengths. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, we report on detections of [C II] 158-μm line and dust-continuum emission from two galaxies associated with two such absorbers at a redshift of z ~ 4. Our results indicate that the hosts of these high-metallicity absorbers have physical properties similar to massive star-forming galaxies and are embedded in enriched neutral hydrogen gas reservoirs that extend well beyond the star-forming interstellar medium of these galaxies.

  1. Stellar Photometric Structures of the Host Galaxies of Nearby Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.; Barth, Aaron J.; Im, Myungshin

    2017-10-01

    We present detailed image analysis of rest-frame optical images of 235 low-redshift (z ≲ 0.35) Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. The high-resolution images enable us to perform rigorous two-dimensional image modeling to decouple the luminous central point source from the host galaxy, which, when warranted, is further decomposed into its principal structural components (bulge, bar, and disk). In many cases, care must be taken to account for structural complexities such as spiral arms, tidal features, and overlapping or interacting companion galaxies. We employ Fourier modes to characterize the degree of asymmetry of the light distribution of the stars as a quantitative measure of morphological distortion due to interactions or mergers. We examine the dependence of the physical parameters of the host galaxies on the properties of the AGNs, namely, radio-loudness and the width of the broad emission lines. In accordance with previous studies, narrow-line (Hβ FWHM ≤ 2000 km s‑1) Type 1 AGNs, in contrast to their broad-line (Hβ FWHM > 2000 km s‑1) counterparts, are preferentially hosted in later-type, lower-luminosity galaxies, which have a higher incidence of pseudo-bulges, are more frequently barred, and are less morphologically disturbed. This suggests that narrow-line Type 1 AGNs experienced a more quiescent evolutionary history driven primarily by internal secular evolution instead of external dynamical perturbations. The fraction of AGN hosts showing merger signatures is larger for more luminous sources. Radio-loud AGNs generally preferentially live in earlier-type (bulge-dominated), more massive hosts, although a minority of them appear to contain a significant disk component. We do not find convincing evidence for enhanced merger signatures in the radio-loud population. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute

  2. A QSO host galaxy and its Lyα emission at z = 6.43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomotsugu; Utsumi, Yousuke; Furusawa, Hisanori; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka

    2009-12-01

    Host galaxies of highest redshift quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) are of interest; they provide us with a valuable opportunity to investigate physics relevant to the starburst-active galactic nuclei (AGN) connection at the earliest epoch of the Universe, with the most luminous black holes. Here, we report an optical detection of an extended structure around a QSO at z = 6.43 in deep z'- and zr-band images of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. Our target is CFHQS J2329-0301 (z = 6.43), the highest redshift QSO currently known. We have carefully subtracted a point spread function (PSF) constructed using nearby stars from the images. After the PSF (QSO) subtraction, a structure in the z' band extends more than 4arcsec on the sky (Re = 11 kpc), and, thus, is well resolved (16σ detection). The PSF-subtracted zr-band structure is in a similar shape to that in the z' band, but less significant with a 3σ detection. In the z' band, a radial profile of the QSO+host shows a clear excess over that of the averaged PSF in 0.8-3 arcsec radius. Since the z' band includes a Lyα emission at z = 6.43, we suggest the z' flux is a mixture of the host (continuum light) and its Lyα emission, whereas the zr-band flux is from the host. Through a SED modelling, we estimate 40 per cent of the PSF-subtracted z'-band light is from the host (continuum) and 60 per cent is from Lyα emission. The absolute magnitude of the host is M1450 = -23.9 (cf. M1450 = -26.4 for the QSO). A lower limit of the SFR(Lyα) is 1.6Msolar yr-1 with stellar mass ranging from 6.2 × 108 to 1.1 × 1010Msolar when 100 Myr of age is assumed. The detection shows that a luminous QSO is already harboured by a large, star-forming galaxy in the early Universe only after ~840 Myr after the big bang. The host may be a forming giant galaxy, co-evolving with a super-massive black hole. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. E-mail: tomo@ifa.hawaii.edu ‡ JSPS SPD

  3. Archival Support for HST Service Observations of GRB 990123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas

    1999-07-01

    This program provides Archival Research Funding to the DD ToO observations of the remarkable new gamma-ray burst, GRB 990123. It is the brightest GRB detected by SAX. In rapid succession, the optical and radio afterglow to this GRB were discovered {Odewahn, Kulkarni, Djorgovski, et al.}, and a redshift of z >= 1.61 {Kelson et al.} to the GRB measured. At this redshift, the implied isotropic energy release is greater than 2 imes 10(54) erg in gamma-rays alone, an order of magnitude higher than for the already extreme GRB 971214 and more than the rest mass energy of a neutron star. In addition, the burst is interesting for the discovery of the first prompt optical emission of a GRB by the ROTSE-I team. As noted by the Caltech group, the pre-burst POSS-II images show a bright foreground galaxy close {< 2 arcsec} to the position of the optical transient. Absorption lines from two intervening systems {z=0.21 and z=0.29} have been detected in a spectrum obtained by the Nordic Optical Telescope group, which could indicate a foreground gravitational lens. If lensing is weak, the energetics of this GRB would make it the brightest object in the Universe detected to date. If the GRB is lensed and the magnification is high, measurements of time delay in the multiple images of the afterglow could be used to measure H_0 with an accuracy of better than 10%. High resolution observations by HST are essential to resolve the environment of the GRB. The urgency of the observation is motivated by the fact that the afterglow is fading. To maximize the scientific benefit to the community of this unique event, we are observing the GRB with HST as a service and will make the data immediately available with no proprietary period.

  4. A tale of two feedbacks: Star formation in the host galaxies of radio AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Ji Hoon; Trichas, Markos; Goto, Tomo; Malkan, Matt; Ruiz, Angel; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kim, Seong Jin; Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Murata, K.; Wada, Takehiko; Wada, Kensuke; Shim, Hyunjin; Hanami, Hitoshi; Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J.; and others

    2014-04-01

    Several lines of argument support the existence of a link between activity at the nuclei of galaxies, in the form of an accreting supermassive black hole, and star formation activity in these galaxies. Radio jets have long been argued to be an ideal mechanism that allows active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to interact with their host galaxies and affect star formation. We use a sample of radio sources in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field to study the nature of this putative link, by means of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We employ the excellent spectral coverage of the AKARI infrared space telescope and the rich ancillary data available in the NEP to build SEDs extending from UV to far-IR wavelengths. We find a significant AGN component in our sample of relatively faint radio sources (host galaxy, independent of the radio luminosity. In contrast, for narrow redshift and AGN luminosity ranges, we find that increasing radio luminosity leads to a decrease in the specific star formation rate. The most radio-loud AGNs are found to lie on the main sequence of star formation for their respective redshifts. For the first time, we potentially see such a two-sided feedback process in the same sample. We discuss the possible suppression of star formation, but not total quenching, in systems with strong radio jets, that supports the maintenance nature of feedback from radio AGN jets.

  5. Study of a homogeneous QSO sample: relations between the QSO and its host galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letawe, Y.; Letawe, G.; Magain, P.

    2010-04-01

    We analyse a sample of 69 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) which have been randomly selected in a complete sample of 104 QSOs (R <= 18,0.142 < z < 0.198,δ < 10°). 60 have been observed with the NTT/SUSI2 at La Silla, through two filters in the optical band (WB 655 and V 812), and the remaining nine are taken from archive data bases. The filter V 812 contains the redshifted Hβ and forbidden [OIII] emission lines, while WB 655 covers a spectral region devoid of emission lines, thus measuring the QSO and stellar continua. The contributions of the QSO and the host are separated thanks to the MCS deconvolution algorithm, allowing a morphological classification of the host, and the computation of several parameters such as the host and nucleus absolute V magnitude, distance between the luminosity centre of the host and the QSO and colour of the host and nucleus. We define a new asymmetry coefficient, independent of any galaxy models and well suited for QSO host studies. The main results from this study are (i) 25 per cent of the total number of QSO hosts are spirals, 51 per cent are ellipticals and 60 per cent show signs of interaction, (ii) highly asymmetric systems tend to have a higher gas ionization level and (iii) elliptical hosts contain a substantial amount of ionized gas and some show off-nuclear activity. These results agree with hierarchical models merger driven evolution. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programme IDs 77.B-0229 and 78.B-0081. E-mail: gletawe@ulg.ac.be

  6. Towards a comprehensive picture of powerful quasars, their host galaxies and quasar winds at z ˜ 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Obied, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Luminous type-2 quasars in which the glow from the central black hole is obscured by dust are ideal targets for studying their host galaxies and the quasars' effect on galaxy evolution. Such feedback appears ubiquitous in luminous obscured quasars where high-velocity-ionized nebulae have been found. We present rest-frame yellow-band (˜5000 Å) observations using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for a sample of 20 luminous quasar host galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we combine host galaxy observations with geometric measurements of quasar illumination using blue-band HST observations and [O III] integral field unit observations probing the quasar winds. The HST images reveal bright merger signatures in about half the galaxies; a significantly higher fraction than in comparison inactive ellipticals. We show that the host galaxies are primarily bulge-dominated, with masses close to M*, but belong to <30 per cent of elliptical galaxies that are highly star forming at z ˜ 0.5. Ionized gas signatures are uncorrelated with faint stellar discs (if present), confirming that the ionized gas is not concentrated in a disc. Scattering cones and [O III] ionized gas velocity field are aligned with the forward scattering cones being co-spatial with the blue-shifted side of the velocity field, suggesting the high-velocity gas is indeed photo-ionized by the quasar. Based on the host galaxies' high star formation rates and bright merger signatures, we suggest that this low-redshift outbreak of luminous quasar activity is triggered by recent minor mergers. Combining these novel observations, we present new quasar unification tests, which are in agreement with expectations of the orientation-based unification model for quasars.

  7. SN 2013dx associated with GRB 130702A: a detailed photometric and spectroscopic monitoring and a study of the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2015-08-01

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and broad-line, type Ic supernovae (SNe) are strongly connected. We aim at characterizing SN 2013dx, associated with GRB 130702A, through sensitive and extensive ground-based observational campaigns in the optical-IR band.We monitored the field of the Swift GRB 130702A (redshift z = 0.145) using the 8.2-m VLT, the 3.6-m TNG and the 0.6-m REM telescopes during the time interval between 4 and 40 days after the burst. Photometric and spectroscopic observations revealed the presence of the associated Type Ic SN 2013dx. Our multi-band photometry allowed the construction of a bolometric light curve.The bolometric light curve of SN 2013dx resembles that of 2003dh (associated with GRB 030329), but is ~ 10% faster and ~25% dimmer. From this we infer a synthesized 56Ni mass of ~0.3 solar masses. The multi-epoch optical spectroscopy shows that the SN 2013dx behavior is best matched by SN 1998bw, among the other well-known low-z SNe associated with GRBs and XRFs, and by SN 2010ah, an energetic Type Ic SN not associated with any GRB. The photospheric velocity of the ejected material declines from ~ 2.7 X10^4 km/s at 8 rest frame days from the explosion, to ~3.5X103 km/s at 40 days. These values are extremely close to those of SN1998bw and 2010ah. We deduce for SN 2013dx a kinetic energy of (32 +/- 9)X10^51 erg, and an ejected mass of 7 +/- 1 solar masses. This suggests that the progenitor of SN2013dx had a mass of ~25 solar masses, i.e., 15-20% less massive than that of SN 1998bw.Finally, we perfom a study of the SN 2013dx environment, through spectroscopy of the closeby galaxies. 9 out of the 14 inspected galaxies lie within 0.03 in redshift from z=0.145, indicating that the host of GRB 130702A/SN 2013dx belongs to a group of galaxies, an unprecedented finding for a GRB-associated SN and, to our knowledge, for long GRBs in general.

  8. A Compact Group of Galaxies at z = 2.48 Hosting an AGN-driven Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 1011M⊙ and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass-metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The work is also based, in part, on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  9. DISCERNING THE PHYSICAL ORIGINS OF COSMOLOGICAL GAMMA-RAY BURSTS BASED ON MULTIPLE OBSERVATIONAL CRITERIA: THE CASES OF z = 6.7 GRB 080913, z = 8.2 GRB 090423, AND SOME SHORT/HARD GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bing; Zhang Binbin; Virgili, Francisco J.; Proga, Daniel; Liang, E.-W.; Lv, H.-J.; Kann, D. Alexander; Wu Xuefeng; Toma, Kenji; Meszaros, Peter; Burrows, David N.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Gehrels, Neil

    2009-10-01

    The two high-redshift gamma-ray bursts, GRB 080913 at z = 6.7 and GRB 090423 at z = 8.2, recently detected by Swift appear as intrinsically short, hard GRBs. They could have been recognized by BATSE as short/hard GRBs should they have occurred at z <= 1. In order to address their physical origin, we perform a more thorough investigation on two physically distinct types (Type I/II) of cosmological GRBs and their observational characteristics. We reiterate the definitions of Type I/II GRBs and then review the following observational criteria and their physical motivations: supernova (SN) association, specific star-forming rate (SFR) of the host galaxy, location offset, duration, hardness, spectral lag, statistical correlations, energetics and collimation, afterglow properties, redshift distribution, luminosity function, and gravitational wave signature. Contrary to the traditional approach of assigning the physical category based on the gamma-ray properties (duration, hardness, and spectral lag), we take an alternative approach to define the Type I and Type II Gold Samples using several criteria that are more directly related to the GRB progenitors (SN association, host galaxy type, and specific SFR). We then study the properties of the two Gold Samples and compare them with the traditional long/soft and short/hard samples. We find that the Type II Gold Sample reasonably tracks the long/soft population, although it includes several intrinsically short (shorter than 1 s in the rest frame) GRBs. The Type I Gold Sample only has five GRBs, four of which are not strictly short but have extended emission. Other short/hard GRBs detected in the Swift era represent the BATSE short/hard sample well, but it is unclear whether all of them belong to Type I. We suggest that some (probably even most) high-luminosity short/hard GRBs instead belong to Type II. Based on multiple observational criteria, we suggest that GRB 080913 and GRB 090423 are more likely Type II events. In

  10. Spectroscopic identification of a redshift 1.55 supernova host galaxy from the Subaru Deep Field Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Maoz, Dan; Poznanski, Dovi

    2014-03-01

    Context. The Subaru Deep Field (SDF) Supernova Survey discovered ten Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 1.5 < z < 2.0, determined solely from photometric redshifts of the host galaxies. However, photometric redshifts might be biased, and the SN sample could be contaminated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Aims: We aim to obtain the first robust redshift measurement and classification of a z > 1.5 SDF SN Ia host galaxy candidate. Methods: We use the X-shooter (U-to-K-band) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope to allow the detection of different emission lines in a wide spectral range. Results: We measure a spectroscopic redshift of 1.54563 ± 0.00027 of hSDF0705.25, consistent with its photometric redshift of 1.552 ± 0.018. From the strong emission-line spectrum we rule out AGN activity, thereby confirming the optical transient as a SN. The host galaxy follows the fundamental metallicity relation showing that the properties of this high-redshift SN Ia host galaxy is similar to other field galaxies. Conclusions: Spectroscopic confirmation of additional SDF SN hosts would be required to confirm the cosmic SN rate evolution measured in the SDF. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 089.A-0739.

  11. A GRB tool shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  12. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OPTICAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS HOSTING RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Joshua D.; Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2013-04-20

    Using radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey, and optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have identified a large number of galaxy clusters. The radio sources within these clusters are driven by active galactic nuclei, and our cluster samples include clusters with bent, and straight, double-lobed radio sources. We also included a single-radio-component comparison sample. We examine these galaxy clusters for evidence of optical substructure, testing the possibility that bent double-lobed radio sources are formed as a result of large-scale cluster mergers. We use a suite of substructure analysis tools to determine the location and extent of substructure visible in the optical distribution of cluster galaxies, and compare the rates of substructure in clusters with different types of radio sources. We found no preference for significant substructure in clusters hosting bent double-lobed radio sources compared to those with other types of radio sources.

  13. Can supermassive black holes influence the evolution of their host galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J.; Braito, V.; Veilleux, S.; Reynolds, C.; Lobban, A.

    2016-06-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this "quasar mode" feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in an ultraluminous infrared galaxy and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow observed in the IR with Herschel, suggesting a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, suggest that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes, to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and dynamics of these winds. XMM-Newton provided a fundamental contribution to these studies and it will still provide the highest effective area in the critical Fe K band of the spectrum until the launch of Athena. Very important improvements are expected from the high energy resolution of the Hitomi X-ray Observatory.

  14. Probing the Interplay between AGN Outflows and their Host Galaxies: - Optical Integral Field Unit and Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Prajval; Dopita, Michael; Kewley, Lisa; Davies, Rebecca; Scharwaechter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Maithil, Jaya; Sundar, M. N.; Pavana, M.; Radhakrishnan, Vikram; Hampton, Elise; James, Bethan; Ho, I-Ting; Gupta, Maitrayee; Bhatt, Harish; Srivastava, Shweta; Banfield, Julie; Jin, Chichuan

    2015-08-01

    It is well-known that accreting supermassive black holes impact star-formation processes in their host galaxies in a significant way, perhaps contributing to the well-known but poorly understood scaling relationships of supermassive black holes. In this context we have undertaken a spectroscopic imaging survey and follow-up radio observations of a large sample of nearby active galaxies in order to investigate connections between their nuclear properties and the extended emission-line regions, star-formation regions and radio structures. We will present some results from the optical (WiFeS IFU on the Siding Spring 2.3m) and radio imaging from this investigation. The results place important constraints on models of the interplay between AGN outflows and their host galaxies, especially during the earlier phases of cosmic galaxy evolution, when stellar mass assembly and black hole growth both peak.

  15. Investigating the host galaxies of luminous AGN in the local universe with integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Rebecca; Croom, Scott; Husemann, Bernd; Close AGN Reference Survey; SAMI Galaxy Survey

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates how galaxies and their super massive black holes coevolve. We use integral field spectroscopy to search for evidence of AGN feedback and triggering. We demonstrate that outflows are ubiquitous among luminous local type 2 AGN using observations from the AAT's SPIRAL instrument. Using multiple component Gaussian emission line decomposition we are able to disentangle the kinematic and ionisation properties of these winds. This allows us to argue that the outflows from these AGN are directly impacting the surrounding ISM within the galaxies. We search for evidence of AGN triggering using data from The Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS). CARS aims to provide a detailed multi-wavelength view of 40 nearby (0.01 < z < 0.06) unobscured AGN to study the link between AGN and their host galaxies. The primary CARS observations come from the MUSE integral field unit on the VLT, and complementary multi-wavelength observations have been approved from SOFIA, Chandra, VLA, HST, and others. We compare the stellar kinematics of active galaxies from CARS to similar inactive galaxies. We then use kinemetry to estimate the degree of dynamical disturbance, to determine whether active nuclei are preferentially hosted in dynamically disturbed or merging systems. Finally, we highlight the discovery of an AGN that has changed spectral type not once, but twice. So called ‘changing look’ AGN are an uncommon phenomenon, but twice changed AGN are much rarer. This AGN first transitioned from a narrow line AGN (type 2) to a broad line AGN (type 1) in the 1980s. It was recently observed as part of CARS. Examination of the MUSE data for this particular source showed that it no longer had the spectral features typical of a type 1 AGN. The continuum emission from the accretion disk was no longer visible and the broad lines were dramatically diminished. In this talk we describe the possible reasons for this change, supported by analysis of multi-epoch optical photometry and

  16. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  17. Extracting Host Galaxy Dispersion Measure and Constraining Cosmological Parameters using Fast Radio Burst Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    The excessive dispersion measures (DMs) and high Galactic latitudes of fast radio bursts (FRBs) hint toward a cosmological origin of these mysterious transients. Methods of using measured DM and redshift z to study cosmology have been proposed, but one needs to assume a certain amount of DM contribution from the host galaxy ({{DM}}{HG}) in order to apply those methods. We introduce a slope parameter β (z)\\equiv d{ln}< {{DM}}{{E}}> /d{ln}z (where {{DM}}{{E}} is the observed DM subtracting the Galactic contribution), which can be directly measured when a sample of FRBs have z measured. We show that < {{DM}}{HG}> can be roughly inferred from β and the mean values, \\overline{< {{DM}}{{E}}> } and \\bar{z}, of the sample. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the mean value of local host galaxy DM, < {{DM}}{HG,{loc}}> , along with other cosmological parameters (mass density {{{Ω }}}m in the ΛCDM model, and the IGM portion of the baryon energy density {{{Ω }}}b{f}{IGM}), can be independently measured through Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting to the data.

  18. The impact of dust in host galaxies on quasar luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakata, Hikari; Okamoto, Takashi; Enoki, Motohiro; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Makiya, Ryu

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated effects of dust attenuation on quasar luminosity functions at z ˜ 2 using a semi-analytic galaxy formation model combined with a large cosmological N-body simulation. We estimate the dust attenuation of quasars self-consistently with that of galaxies by considering the dust in their host bulges. We find that the luminosity of the bright quasars is strongly dimmed by the dust attenuation, ˜2 mag in the B-band. Assuming the empirical bolometric corrections for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by Marconi et al., we find that this dust attenuation is too strong to explain the B-band and X-ray quasar luminosity functions simultaneously. We consider two possible mechanisms that weaken the dust attenuation. As such a mechanism, we introduce a time delay for AGN activity, that is, gas fuelling to a central black hole starts sometime after the beginning of the starburst induced by a major merger. The other is the anisotropy in the dust distribution. We find that in order to make the dust attenuation of the quasars negligible, either the gas accretion into the black holes has to be delayed at least three times the dynamical time-scale of their host bulges or the dust covering factor is as small as ˜0.1.

  19. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLES AND SPHEROIDS. V. THE RELATION BETWEEN BLACK HOLE MASS AND HOST GALAXY LUMINOSITY FOR A SAMPLE OF 79 ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bennert, Vardha N.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Malkan, Matthew A. E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: vbennert@calpoly.edu E-mail: malkan@astro.ucla.edu

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the black hole (BH) mass-bulge luminosity relation using a sample of 52 active galaxies at z ∼ 0.36 and z ∼ 0.57 in the BH mass range of 10{sup 7.4}-10{sup 9.1} M {sub ☉}. By consistently applying multicomponent spectral and structural decomposition to high-quality Keck spectra and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images, BH masses (M {sub BH}) are estimated using the Hβ broad emission line combined with the 5100 Å nuclear luminosity, and bulge luminosities (L {sub bul}) are derived from surface photometry. Comparing the resulting M {sub BH} – L {sub bul} relation to local active galaxies and taking into account selection effects, we find evolution of the form M {sub BH}/L {sub bul}∝(1 + z){sup γ} with γ = 1.8 ± 0.7, consistent with BH growth preceding that of the host galaxies. Including an additional sample of 27 active galaxies with 0.5 < z < 1.9 taken from the literature and measured in a consistent way, we obtain γ = 0.9 ± 0.7 for the M {sub BH} – L {sub bul} relation and γ = 0.4 ± 0.5 for the M {sub BH}-total host galaxy luminosity (L {sub host}) relation. The results strengthen the findings from our previous studies and provide additional evidence for host galaxy bulge growth being dominated by disk-to-bulge transformation via minor mergers and/or disk instabilities.

  20. Supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. I. Bulge luminosities from dedicated near-infrared data

    SciTech Connect

    Läsker, Ronald; Van de Ven, Glenn; Ferrarese, Laura

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to secure, refine, and supplement the relation between central supermassive black hole masses, M {sub •}, and the bulge luminosities of their host galaxies, L {sub bul}, we obtained deep, high spatial resolution K-band images of 35 nearby galaxies with securely measured M {sub •}, using the wide-field WIRCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope. A dedicated data reduction and sky subtraction strategy was adopted to estimate the brightness and structure of the sky, a critical step when tracing the light distribution of extended objects in the near-infrared. From the final image product, bulge and total magnitudes were extracted via two-dimensional profile fitting. As a first order approximation, all galaxies were modeled using a simple Sérsic-bulge+exponential-disk decomposition. However, we found that such models did not adequately describe the structure that we observed in a large fraction of our sample galaxies which often include cores, bars, nuclei, inner disks, spiral arms, rings, and envelopes. In such cases, we adopted profile modifications and/or more complex models with additional components. The derived bulge magnitudes are very sensitive to the details and number of components used in the models, although total magnitudes remain almost unaffected. Usually, but not always, the luminosities and sizes of the bulges are overestimated when a simple bulge+disk decomposition is adopted in lieu of a more complex model. Furthermore, we found that some spheroids are not well fit when the ellipticity of the Sérsic model is held fixed. This paper presents the details of the image processing and analysis, while we discuss how model-induced biases and systematics in bulge magnitudes impact the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} relation in a companion paper.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope observations of the host galaxies and environments of calcium-rich supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, J. D.; Levan, A. J.; James, P. A.; Angus, C. R.; Church, R. P.; Davies, M. B.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2016-05-01

    Calcium-rich supernovae (SNe) represent a significant challenge for our understanding of the fates of stellar systems. They are less luminous than other SN types and they evolve more rapidly to reveal nebular spectra dominated by strong calcium lines with weak or absent signatures of other intermediate- and iron-group elements, which are seen in other SNe. Strikingly, their explosion sites also mark them out as distinct from other SN types. Their galactocentric offset distribution is strongly skewed to very large offsets (˜1/3 are offset >20 kpc), meaning they do not trace the stellar light of their hosts. Many of the suggestions to explain this extreme offset distribution have invoked the necessity for unusual formation sites such as globular clusters or dwarf satellite galaxies, which are therefore difficult to detect. Building on previous work attempting to detect host systems of nearby Ca-rich SNe, we here present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of five members of the class - three exhibiting large offsets and two coincident with the disc of their hosts. We find no underlying sources at the explosion sites of any of our sample. Combining with previous work, the lack of a host system now appears to be a ubiquitous feature amongst Ca-rich SNe. In this case the offset distribution is most readily explained as a signature of high-velocity progenitor systems that have travelled significant distances before exploding.

  2. GRB060218 as a Tidal Disruption of a White Dwarf by an Intermediate-mass Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Pe'er, Asaf; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Haas, Roland; Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo

    2013-06-01

    The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate \\dot{M}(t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 104 M ⊙ in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption \\dot{M}(t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

  3. GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Pe'er, Asaf; Haas, Roland; Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo

    2013-06-01

    The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X