Science.gov

Sample records for greater trochanteric pain

  1. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Eric J; Nho, Shane J; Kelly, Bryan T

    2010-06-01

    Originally defined as "tenderness to palpation over the greater trochanter with the patient in the side-lying position," greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) as a clinical entity, has expanded to include a number of disorders of the lateral, peritrochanteric space of the hip, including trochanteric bursitis, tears of the gluteus medius and minimus and external coxa saltans (snapping hip). Typically presenting with pain and reproducible tenderness in the region of the greater trochanter, buttock, or lateral thigh, GTPS is relatively common, reported to affect between 10% and 25% of the general population. Secondary to the relative paucity of information available on the diagnosis and management of components of GTPS, the presence of these pathologic entities may be underrecognized, leading to extensive workups and delays in appropriate treatment. This article aims to review the present understanding of the lesions that comprise GTPS, discussing the relevant anatomy, diagnostic workup and recommended treatment for trochanteric bursitis, gluteus medius and minimus tears, and external coxa saltans.

  2. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mallow, Michael; Nazarian, Levon N

    2014-05-01

    Lateral hip pain, or greater trochanteric pain syndrome, is a commonly seen condition; in this article, the relevant anatomy, epidemiology, and evaluation strategies of greater trochanteric pain syndrome are reviewed. Specific attention is focused on imaging of this syndrome and treatment techniques, including ultrasound-guided interventions.

  3. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: Epidemiology and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Neil A.; Felson, David T.; Torner, James C.; Zhu, Yanyan; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence of greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS); to determine whether GTPS is associated with iliotibial band (ITB) tenderness, knee osteoarthritis (OA), body mass index (BMI), or low back pain (LBP); and to assess whether GTPS is associated with reduced hip internal rotation, physical activity, and mobility. Design Cross-sectional, population-based study. Setting Multicenter observational study. Participants Community-dwelling adults (N=3026) ages 50 to 79 years. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Greater trochanteric tenderness to palpation in subjects with complaints of hip pain and no signs of hip OA or generalized myofascial tenderness. Results The prevalence of unilateral and bilateral GTPS was 15.0% and 8.5% in women and 6.6% and 1.9% men. Odds ratio (OR) for women was 3.37 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.67–4.25), but age and race were not significantly associated with GTPS. In a multivariate model, adjusting for age, sex, ITB tenderness, ipsilateral and contralateral knee OA, BMI, and LBP, ITB tenderness (OR=1.72; 95% CI, 1.34–2.19), knee OA ipsilaterally (OR=3.47; 95% CI, 2.72–4.42) and con-tralaterally (OR=1.74; 95% CI, 1.32–2.28), and LBP (OR=2.79; 95% CI, 2.22–3.50) were positively related to GTPS. In this complete model, BMI was not associated with GTPS (OR=1.10; 95% CI, 0.80–1.52 when comparing ≥ 30 with <25kg/m2). Hip internal rotation range of motion did not differ based on GTPS status. After multivariate adjustment, GTPS did not alter physical activity score, but bilateal GTPS was significantly associated with a higher 20-meter walk time and chair stand time. Conclusions The higher prevalence of GTPS in women and in adults with ITB pain or knee OA indicates that altered lower-limb biomechanics may be related to GTPS. Slower functional performance in those with GTPS suggests that the study of targeted rehabilitation may be useful. A longitudinal study will be necessary to identify

  4. Sonography of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and the rarity of primary bursitis.

    PubMed

    Long, Suzanne S; Surrey, David E; Nazarian, Levon N

    2013-11-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is a common condition with clinical features of pain and tenderness at the lateral aspect of the hip. Diagnosing the origin of greater trochanteric pain is important because the treatment varies depending on the cause. We hypothesized that sonographic evaluation of sources for greater trochanteric pain syndrome would show that bursitis was not the most commonly encountered abnormality. We performed a retrospective review of musculoskeletal sonographic examinations performed at our institution over a 6-year period for greater trochanteric pain syndrome; completed a tabulation of the sonographic findings; and assessed the prevalence of trochanteric bursitis, gluteal tendon abnormalities, iliotibial band abnormalities, or a combination of findings. Prevalence of abnormal findings, associations of bursitis, gluteal tendinosis, gluteal tendon tears, and iliotibial band abnormalities were calculated. The final study population consisted of 877 unique patients: 602 women, 275 men; average age, 54 years; and age range, 15-87 years). Of the 877 patients with greater trochanteric pain, 700 (79.8%) did not have bursitis on ultrasound. A minority of patients (177, 20.2%) had trochanteric bursitis. Of the 877 patients with greater trochanteric pain, 438 (49.9%) had gluteal tendinosis, four (0.5%) had gluteal tendon tears, and 250 (28.5%) had a thickened iliotibial band. The cause of greater trochanteric pain syndrome is usually some combination of pathology involving the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus tendons as well as the iliotibial band. Bursitis is present in only the minority of patients. These findings have implications for treatment of this common condition.

  5. The management of greater trochanteric pain syndrome: A systematic literature review☆

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common cause of lateral hip pain. Most cases respond to conservative treatments with a few refractory cases requiring surgical intervention. For many years, this condition was believed to be caused by trochanteric bursitis, with treatments targeting the bursitis. More recently gluteal tendinopathy/tears have been proposed as potential causes. Treatments are consequently developing to target these proposed pathologies. At present there is no defined treatment protocol for GTPS. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to evaluate the current evidence for the effectiveness of GTPS interventions, both conservative and surgical. PMID:26955229

  6. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a review of anatomy, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan S; Cohen, Steven P

    2009-05-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a term used to describe chronic pain overlying the lateral aspect of the hip. This regional pain syndrome, once described as trochanteric bursitis, often mimics pain generated from other sources, including, but not limited to myofascial pain, degenerative joint disease, and spinal pathology. The incidence of greater trochanteric pain is reported to be approximately 1.8 patients per 1000 per year with the prevalence being higher in women, and patients with coexisting low back pain, osteoarthritis, iliotibial band tenderness, and obesity. Symptoms of GTPS consist of persistent pain in the lateral hip radiating along the lateral aspect of the thigh to the knee and occasionally below the knee and/or buttock. Physical examination reveals point tenderness in the posterolateral area of the greater trochanter. Most cases of GTPS are self-limited with conservative measures, such as physical therapy, weight loss, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and behavior modification, providing resolution of symptoms. Other treatment modalities include bursa or lateral hip injections performed with corticosteroid and local anesthetic. More invasive surgical interventions have anecdotally been reported to provide pain relief when conservative treatment modalities fail.

  7. Factors Associated with the Outcome of Ultrasound-Guided Trochanteric Bursa Injection in Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Deok; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jihae; Park, Min-Ho; Ahn, Jae Ki; Park, Yongbum

    2016-05-01

    Trochanteric bursa injections of corticosteroids and local anesthetics have been shown to provide pain relief for the treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). However, symptom recurrence and incomplete symptom relief are common. The reason for the variation in response is unclear but may be related to disease-, treatment-, or patient-related factors. To determine whether there are factors related to patient, treatment, or disease that can predict either the magnitude or duration of response to ultrasound-guided trochanteric bursa injections for GTPS. Retrospective evaluation. A university hospital outpatient center. Potential study participants were patients who underwent ultrasound-guided trochanteric bursa injection at an outpatient rehabilitation department. Follow-up interviews were performed in a hospital visit at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. The Harris Hip Score and the Verbal Numeric Pain Scale were used to evaluate clinical effectiveness of pain reduction and functional improvement at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Clinical data and ultrasound findings were obtained to assess the possible predictive factors for a good and durable response to ultrasound-guided trochanteric bursa injection. Patients receiving ultrasound-guided trochanteric bursa injections had a statistically significant improvement in pain and hip function at 1, 3, and 6 months after the last injections. Of the 137 patients, 110 (80.3%), 95 (64.9%), and 77 (56.2%) patients achieved successful outcomes according to their 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up evaluations, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that patients with knee osteoarthritis and lumbar facet joint or sacroiliac joint pain experienced less therapeutic effect than those without the conditions at 6 months post-injection. Logistic regression analysis showed that the significant outcome predictors at the 6-month follow-up were facet joint or S-I joint pain (odds ratio = 0.304, P = .014) and knee

  8. Leg-length inequality is not associated with greater trochanteric pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Neil A; Harvey, William; Felson, David T; Yang, Mei; Torner, James C; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Nevitt, Michael C

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common condition, the pathogenesis of which is incompletely understood. Although leg-length inequality has been suggested as a potential risk factor for GTPS, this widely held assumption has not been tested. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of greater trochanteric tenderness to palpation was performed in subjects with complaints of hip pain and no signs of hip osteoarthritis or generalized myofascial tenderness. Subjects were recruited from one clinical center of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, a multicenter population-based study of community-dwelling adults aged 50 to 79 years. Diagnosis of GTPS was based on a standardized physical examination performed by trained examiners, and technicians measured leg length on full-limb anteroposterior radiographs. Results A total of 1,482 subjects were eligible for analysis of GTPS and leg length. Subjects' mean ± standard deviation age was 62.4 ± 8.2 years, and 59.8% were female. A total of 372 lower limbs from 271 subjects met the definition for having GTPS. Leg-length inequality (difference ≥ 1 cm) was present in 37 subjects with GTPS and in 163 subjects without GTPS (P = 0.86). Using a variety of definitions of leg-length inequality, including categorical and continuous measures, there was no association of this parameter with the occurrence of GTPS (for example, for ≥ 1 cm leg-length inequality, odds ratio = 1.17 (95% confidence interval = 0.79 to 1.73)). In adjusted analyses, female sex was significantly associated with the presence of GTPS, with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.04 (95% confidence interval = 2.07 to 4.47). Conclusion The present study found no evidence to support an association between leg-length inequality and greater trochanteric pain syndrome. PMID:18510741

  9. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome: more than bursitis and iliotibial tract friction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Garry Wai Keung; Howard, Thomas Michael

    2012-01-01

    Disorders causing lateral hip pain are encountered frequently by physicians. Evaluating these problems can be challenging because of the myriad of potential causes, the complex anatomy of the peritrochanteric structures, and the inconsistently described etiologic factors. Misconceptions about the causes of lateral hip pain and tenderness are common, frequently leading to approaches that only provide temporary solutions rather than address the underlying pathology. Trochanteric bursitis is implicated frequently but is seldom the primary cause of pain in chronic cases. It is important to address hip rotator cuff tendinopathy and pelvic core instability. Treatment options include therapeutic exercise, physical modalities, corticosteroid injections, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, and regenerative injection therapies. For recalcitrant cases, surgery may be appropriate. By understanding the anatomy of the peritrochanteric structures, and the pathologic processes most likely responsible for symptomatology and dysfunction, the physician will be prepared to provide effective long-term solutions for this common problem.

  10. Dry Needling Versus Cortisone Injection in the Treatment of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: A Noninferiority Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kindyle L; Allen, Bryce C; Maldonado, Yolanda Munoz

    2017-04-01

    Study Design Prospective, randomized, partially blinded. Background Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is the current terminology for what was once called greater trochanteric or subgluteal bursitis. Cortisone (corticosteroid) injection into the lateral hip has traditionally been the accepted treatment for this condition; however, the effectiveness of injecting the bursa with steroids is increasingly being questioned. An equally effective treatment with fewer adverse side effects would be beneficial. Objective To investigate whether administration of dry needling (DN) is noninferior to cortisone injection in reducing lateral hip pain and improving function in patients with GTPS. Methods Forty-three participants (50 hips observed), all with GTPS, were randomly assigned to a group receiving cortisone injection or DN. Treatments were administered over 6 weeks, and clinical outcomes were collected at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the numeric pain-rating scale (0-10). The secondary outcome measure was the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (0-10). Medication intake for pain was collected as a tertiary outcome. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. A noninferiority test for a repeated-measures design for pain and averaged function scores at 6 weeks (with a noninferiority margin of 1.5 for both outcomes) indicated noninferiority of DN versus cortisone injection (both, P<.01). Medication usage (P = .74) was not different between groups at the same time point. No adverse side effects were reported. Conclusion Cortisone injections for GTPS did not provide greater pain relief or reduction in functional limitations than DN. Our data suggest that DN is a noninferior treatment alternative to cortisone injections in this patient population. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Registered December 2, 2015 at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02639039). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(4):232-239. Epub 3 Mar 2017. doi:10

  11. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: Percutaneous Tendon Fenestration Versus Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection for Treatment of Gluteal Tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jon A; Yablon, Corrie M; Henning, P Troy; Kazmers, Irene S; Urquhart, Andrew; Hallstrom, Brian; Bedi, Asheesh; Parameswaran, Aishwarya

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare ultrasound-guided percutaneous tendon fenestration to platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome. After Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, patients with symptoms of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and ultrasound findings of gluteal tendinosis or a partial tear (<50% depth) were blinded and treated with ultrasound-guided fenestration or autologous PRP injection of the abnormal tendon. Pain scores were recorded at baseline, week 1, and week 2 after treatment. Retrospective clinic record review assessed patient symptoms. The study group consisted of 30 patients (24 female), of whom 50% were treated with fenestration and 50% were treated with PRP. The gluteus medius was treated in 73% and 67% in the fenestration and PRP groups, respectively. Tendinosis was present in all patients. In the fenestration group, mean pain scores were 32.4 at baseline, 16.8 at time point 1, and 15.2 at time point 2. In the PRP group, mean pain scores were 31.4 at baseline, 25.5 at time point 1, and 19.4 at time point 2. Retrospective follow-up showed significant pain score improvement from baseline to time points 1 and 2 (P< .0001) but no difference between treatment groups (P= .1623). There was 71% and 79% improvement at 92 days (mean) in the fenestration and PRP groups, respectively, with no significant difference between the treatments (P >.99). Our study shows that both ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration and PRP injection are effective for treatment of gluteal tendinosis, showing symptom improvement in both treatment groups. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Low-dose external beam radiotherapy for greater trochanteric pain syndrome : Target volume definition and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hinsche, Tanja; Nitsche, Mirko; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2017-04-01

    Low-dose external beam radiotherapy (ED-EBRT) is frequently used in the therapy of refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). As studies reporting treatment results are scarce, we retrospectively analyzed our own patient collectives. In all, 60 patients (74 hips) received LD-EBRT (6 × 0.5 Gy in 29 hips, 6 × 1 Gy in 45). The endpoint was the patient's reported subjective response to treatment. The influence of different patient and treatment characteristics on treatment outcome was investigated. At the end of LD-EBRT, 69% reported partial remission, 4% complete remission, no change 28%. A total of 3 months later (n = 52 hips), the results were 37, 33, and 30% and 18 months after LD-EBRT (n = 47) 21, 51, and 28%. In univariate analysis "inclusion of the total femoral head into the PTV" and "night pain before LD-EBRT" were correlated with symptom remission at the end of LD-EBRT, while "initial increase in pain during LD-EBRT" was significantly associated with treatment failure. In multivariable modeling "initial increase in pain" was identified as a risk factor for treatment failure (p = 0.007; odds ratio [OR] 0.209; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.048-0.957), while "night pain" was an independent factor for remission (p = 0.038; OR 3.484; 95% CI 1.004-12.6). Three months after LD-EBRT "night pain" and "inclusion of the complete femoral neck circumference into the PTV" were predictive for remission. LD-EBRT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from GTPS. Three months after therapy two-thirds of the patients reported a partial or complete symptom remission. Especially patients who suffered from nocturnal pain seemed to benefit. Treatment appeared to be more effective when the entire circumference of the femoral neck was encompassed.

  13. Incidence of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in patients suspected for femoroacetabular impingement evaluated using magnetic resonance arthrography of the hip.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Grazia; Lanza, Ezio; Parra, Cleber Garcia; Merli, Ilaria; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Zerbi, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the incidence of greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS) in patients who underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the hip for a suspected femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome. Hip MRA performed at our institution (3/2012-1/2014) were reviewed. The absence/presence of FAI (cam, pincer, and mixed) was noted. GTPS diagnosis was based on gluteus medius/minimus tendinopathy/tears, trochanteric bursitis, fascia lata thickening, and trochanter bone oedema/erosion. Subgroup analysis for age (under/over 40 years) and FAI type (cam, pincer, and mixed) was also performed. N = 189 patients were included (n = 125 males; age 39 ± 12 years). FAI was diagnosed in n = 133 (70, 4%): cam type, n = 85 (63, 9%); pincer type, n = 22 (16, 6%); and mixed type, n = 26 (19, 5%). N = 72 patients (38.1%) had tendinopathy, n = 14 (7.4%) had trochanter erosion, n = 31 (16.4%) had bursitis, n = 4 had bone oedema (2.1%), and n = 3 (1.6%) had fascia lata thickening, resulting in GTPS diagnosis in n = 74 patients (39.2%). The association of normal hip morphology/GTPS was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than that of FAI/GTPS. Under 40 years, GTPS incidence was higher in patients with normal hip and pincer-type FAI (P = 0.028). Over 40 years, no difference between patients with/without FAI (P = 0.119) was seen. GTPS was more frequently observed in patients with normal hip morphology than in patients with FAI, particularly in patients under 40.

  14. Endoscopic Bursectomy and Iliotibial Tract Release as a Treatment for Refractory Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: A New Endoscopic Approach With Early Results

    PubMed Central

    Govaert, Louise H.M.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Zeegers, Adelgunde V.C.M.; Albers, Gerardus H.R.

    2012-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is associated with excessive tension between the iliotibial band (ITB) and the greater trochanter. Several endoscopic procedures have been reported, but in most cases the endoscopic approach only consists of a bursectomy. The ITB and fascia lata act as a lateral tension band to resist tensile strains on the concave aspect of the femur and are often implicated as the source of GTPS. We therefore believe that the ITB must be addressed. We describe an endoscopic technique to release the ITB and remove the bursa and conclude that endoscopic bursectomy with cross incision of the ITB is a safe approach to treat patients with refractory GTPS. PMID:23766989

  15. The effect of local injection of methylprednisolone acetate on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis among patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Habib, George; Elias, Shada; Abu-Elhaija, Muhanned; Sakas, Fahed; Khazin, Fadi; Artul, Suheil; Jabbour, Adel; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen

    2017-04-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common clinical entity for which the most effective treatment is local corticosteroid injection (LCI). There are no studies on the effect of LCI among patients with GTPS on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The present study recruited nonselected patients diagnosed with GTPS. After consenting, participants received low dose (1 μg) of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) stimulation test at 09:00. Immediately following the test, participants received a LCI of 80 mg of methylprednisolone acetate at the greater trochanteric region. The ACTH stimulation test was repeated 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks following the LCI. Cortisol samples were obtained at just prior to (basal) and 30 min (post-stimulation) following every ACTH stimulation test. Serum cortisol levels of <500 μmol/l obtained 30 min following the ACTH stimulation test were considered evidence of secondary adrenal insufficiency. The study enrolled 22 patients, 21 of whom completed participation. There were 19 female participants (~90%), and mean age of all the participants was 55.2 ± 8.6 years. Four participants showed evidence of secondary adrenal insufficiency, which was observed only at weeks 1 and 2 following the LCI. Mean serum cortisol level among these four participants 30 min following the ACTH stimulation test was 354 μmol/l, with a range of 268-430 μmol/l. LCI of 80 mg of methylprednisolone acetate in the greater trochanteric area among patients with GTPS was associated with transient secondary adrenal insufficiency in ~20% of the patients, mainly 1 week following the injection.

  16. Treatment of symptomatic greater trochanteric fracture after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Jeffrey I; Chuang, Michael J; Cerynik, Douglas L; Johanson, Norman A

    2009-08-01

    Isolated greater trochanter fractures after total hip arthroplasty are associated with major comorbidities such as debilitating weakness, pain, and dislocation. No definitive standard of care has been established for these fracture. However, it is well known that reestablishing osseous union in these patients is strongly associated with return of functional status. We report a case of an elderly patient with multiple hip revision surgeries now presenting with unilateral greater trochanter fracture. Treatment incorporated the use of a trochanteric claw plate, cerclage wiring, and adjuvant demineralized bone matrix allograft to achieve successful osseous union. This is the first reported use of adjuvant demineralized bone matrix for fixing these fractures.

  17. The relationship of femoral neck shaft angle and adiposity to greater trochanteric pain syndrome in women. A case control morphology and anthropometric study

    PubMed Central

    Fearon, AM; Stephens, S; Cook, JL; Smith, PN; Neeman, T; Cormick, W; Scarvell, JM

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if pelvic or hip width predisposed women to developing greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). Design Prospective case control study. Participants Four groups were included in the study: those gluteal tendon reconstructions (n=31, GTR), those with conservatively managed GTPS (n=29), those with hip osteoarthritis (n=20, OA) and 22 asymptomatic participants (ASC). Methods Anterior-posterior pelvic x-rays were evaluated for femoral neck shaft angle; acetabular index, and width at the lateral acetabulum, and the superior and lateral aspects of the greater trochanter. Body mass index, and waist, hip and greater trochanter girth were measured. Data were analysed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; posthoc Scheffe analysis), then multivariate analysis. Results The GTR group had a lower femoral neck shaft angle than the other groups (p=0.007). The OR (95% CI) of having a neck shaft angle of less than 134°, relative to the ASC group: GTR=3.33 (1.26 to 8.85); GTPS=1.4 (0.52 to 3.75); OA=0.85 (0.28 to 2.61). The OR of GTR relative to GTPS was 2.4 (1.01 to 5.6). No group difference was found for acetabular or greater trochanter width. Greater trochanter girth produced the only anthropometric group difference (mean (95% CI) in cm) GTR=103.8 (100.3 to 107.3), GTPS=105.9 (100.2 to 111.6), OA=100.3 (97.7 to 103.9), ASC=99.1 (94.7 to 103.5), (ANOVA: p=0.036). Multivariate analysis confirmed adiposity is associated with GTPS. Conclusion A lower neck shaft angle is a risk factor for, and adiposity is associated with, GTPS in women. PMID:22547561

  18. Does menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), exercise or a combination of both, improve pain and function in post-menopausal women with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS)? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ganderton, Charlotte; Semciw, Adam; Cook, Jill; Pizzari, Tania

    2016-06-16

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is pathology in the gluteus medius and minimus tendons and trochanteric bursa that causes debilitating tendon pain and dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Limited evidence in clinical studies suggests hormone changes after menopause may have a negative effect on tendon. This protocol describes a randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) and exercise therapy in reducing pain and dysfunction associated with GTPS in post-menopausal women. One hundred and sixteen post-menopausal women will be recruited and randomised to receive one of two exercise programs (sham or targeted intervention exercise) and transdermal creams (MHT cream containing oestradiol 50mcg and norethisterone acetate 140mcg or placebo cream). Interventions will be 12-weeks in duration and outcomes will be examined at baseline, 12-weeks and 52-weeks. The primary outcome measure will be the VISA-G questionnaire and secondary outcomes measures will include three hip pain and function questionnaires (Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, Lateral Hip Pain questionnaire), a global change in symptom questionnaire (using a 15-point Likert scale) and a quality of life measure (AQoL-8D questionnaire). Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. This study is the first randomised controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of menopausal hormone therapy therapy alone, and with the combination of exercise therapy, to treat pain and dysfunction associated with GTPS. This study has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the interventions in this study can be integrated into policy and clinical practice if found to be effective in the treatment of GTPS in post-menopausal women. If successful, there is potential for this treatment regimen to be explored in future studies of other persistent tendon conditions in the post-menopausal population. Australian New

  19. Improving greater trochanteric reattachment with a novel cable plate system.

    PubMed

    Baril, Yannick; Bourgeois, Yan; Brailovski, Vladimir; Duke, Kajsa; Laflamme, G Yves; Petit, Yvan

    2013-03-01

    Cable-grip systems are commonly used for greater trochanteric reattachment because they have provided the best fixation performance to date, even though they have a rather high complication rate. A novel reattachment system is proposed with the aim of improving fixation stability. It consists of a Y-shaped fixation plate combined with locking screws and superelastic cables to reduce cable loosening and limit greater trochanter movement. The novel system is compared with a commercially available reattachment system in terms of greater trochanter movement and cable tensions under different greater trochanteric abductor application angles. A factorial design of experiments was used including four independent variables: plate system, cable type, abductor application angle, and femur model. The test procedure included 50 cycles of simultaneous application of an abductor force on the greater trochanter and a hip force on the femoral head. The novel plate reduces the movements of a greater trochanter fragment within a single loading cycle up to 26%. Permanent degradation of the fixation (accumulated movement based on 50-cycle testing) is reduced up to 46%. The use of superelastic cables reduces tension loosening up to 24%. However this last improvement did not result in a significant reduction of the grater trochanter movement. The novel plate and cables present advantages over the commercially available greater trochanter reattachment system. The plate reduces movements generated by the hip abductor. The superelastic cables reduce cable loosening during cycling. Both of these positive effects could decrease the risks related to grater trochanter non-union. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Greater Trochanteric Reattachment Using the Third-Generation Cable Plate System in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sung; Pansey, Nachiket; Kansay, Rajeev K; Yoo, Je-Hyun; Lee, Hwang-Yong; Chang, Jun-Dong

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the radiologic and functional results of greater trochanteric reattachment using the third-generation cable plate system in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 47 trochanteric fixations (27 men and 18 women; mean age of 60.2 years) using the third-generation cable plate system in revision THA were retrospectively evaluated. The mean follow-up was 80.4 months (range 27-148 months). The osteotomized greater trochanter was reattached using the Cable-Ready system (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) and the Dall-Miles cable system (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ). The clinical results with Harris hip score, visual analog scale, and radiologic outcomes were evaluated. The mean Harris hip score was improved from 55.7 (range 17-72) preoperatively to 90.8 (range 68-100; P = .001) postoperatively, and the mean pain score was improved from 6.6 (range 3-10) to 2.5 (range 0-6; P = .001), respectively. Nonunion was observed in 6 hips (12.7%). Migration of the osteotomized greater trochanteric fragment (>1 cm) was seen in 8 hips (17.0%). Cable breakage occurred in 13 cases (27.6%). Although 5 cable plate systems were removed, there was no need for reattachment of the greater trochanter in this study. This study showed a relatively high incidence of radiologic failure after greater trochanteric reattachment using the cable plate system in revision THA, although reattachments were not required and clinical outcome was relatively satisfactory. Periodic and close observation for the early detection of failure is necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trochanteric bursitis--a frequent cause of 'hip' pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Raman, D; Haslock, I

    1982-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were examined for the presence of trochanteric bursitis. This condition was found in 15. Ten patients responded to a single local injection of corticosteroid and the remaining 5 to a second injection. Trochanteric bursitis is an underdiagnosed, easily remediable cause of pain in RA. Specific examination for in presence should be a routine in all patients with RA, especially those with hip pain. PMID:7149797

  2. Greater trochanter bursitis pain syndrome in females with chronic low back pain and sciatica.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Fares; Potoupnis, Michael; Kapetanos, George

    2004-10-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a clinical condition which simulates major hip diseases and low back pain, it may also mimic nerve root pressure syndrome. Patients with greater trochanteric bursitis pain syndrome (GTBPS) usually suffer from pain radiating to the posterolateral aspect of the thigh, paraesthesiae in the legs, and tenderness over the iliotibial tract.. The purpose of this study is to indicate the similarity between the clinical features of the GTBPS and those of chronic low back pain, and to highlight the importance of diagnosing GTBPS in patients complaining of low back conditions. Three hundred female patients were included in this prospective study. All patients complained about chronic low back pain or sciatica and had a failed long term conservative treatment. Local injection of the tender peritrochanteric area was only done in half of the patients (group 1). Patients were required to answer the Oswestry Disability Index Questionnaire during all periods of follow-up. Patients of group 1 had a better clinical outcome (p < 0.0005) than the patients in group 2 where no injection was done. We conclude that greater trochanter bursitis pain syndrome is a frequent syndrome which may be associated with low back symptoms. Patients with a long standing history of low back pain and sciatica should be routinely checked for GTBPS. GTBPS is easy to diagnose and can be treated. Peritrochanteric infiltration with glucocorticoids mixed with 2% lidocaine relieves patients from their symptoms for a long period of time. Recurrence should always be expected, but treatment may be repeated.

  3. Trochanteric bursitis: the last great misnomer.

    PubMed

    Board, Tim N; Hughes, Simon J; Freemont, Anthony J

    2014-12-05

    Trochanteric bursitis has been used as a general term to describe pain around the greater trochanteric region of the hip. We hypothesised that trochanteric bursitis may not however have an inflammatory component and that accordingly, bursal inflammation has no role in lateral hip pain. This study was designed to test this hypothesis. Patients undergoing primary total hip replacement were enrolled in this prospective, case-controlled, blinded study. Twenty-five patients who met the criteria for diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis (group A) were matched with a control group of 25 patients (group B). Trochanteric bursal samples were harvested from all patients intraoperatively and sent for histological analysis for the presence of inflammation. The intraoperative appearance of the abductor tendon insertion was also noted. None of the samples showed any evidence of acute or chronic inflammatory changes. Intraoperatively, five patients (20%) in group A were noted to have thinning of the gluteus medius tendon but no macroscopic tendon tears were detected in any bursal samples. This study suggests that there is no inflammatory component to so-called trochanteric bursitis, which accordingly casts doubt on both the terminology and the existence of this condition as a separate clinical entity. Clinicians should search for an alternative cause of symptoms in such cases.

  4. Trochanteric Micropuncture: Treatment for Gluteus Medius Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, John M.; Cregar, William M.; Gupta, Asheesh; Hammarstedt, Jon E.; Martin, Timothy J.; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Lateral hip pain along with tenderness of the greater trochanter has been associated with greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Radiographically, this has been associated with gluteus medius pathology on magnetic resonance imaging. This has led some surgeons to conclude that abductor pathology is a primary cause of lateral hip pain. Failure of conservative treatment in the setting of gluteus medius pathology may lead to surgical intervention. In some patients a focal tear of the gluteus medius cannot be visualized and likely represents more diffuse tendinopathy. In these patients we propose micropuncture of the greater trochanter. Similar procedures have shown effectiveness in the elbow and shoulder by eliciting a healing response. Our experience suggests that trochanteric micropuncture at the insertion of the gluteus medius tendon can be effectively performed endoscopically for gluteus medius tendinopathy. PMID:25973381

  5. Evaluation and management of greater trochanter pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Edward P; Middleton, Emily F; Brunette, Meredith

    2015-08-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is an enigmatic but common cause of lateral hip symptoms in middle-aged active women. The most common manifestation of this syndrome is a degenerative tendinopathy of the hip abductors similar to the intrinsic changes seen with rotator cuff pathology in the shoulder. There are no definitive tests to isolate the underlying pathology and palpation is a non-specific means by which to differentiate the source of the pain generator. The physical examination must comprehensively evaluate for a cluster of potential impairments and contributing factors that will need to be addressed to effectively manage the likely functional limitations and activity challenges the syndrome presents to the patient. Compressive forces through increased tension in the iliotibial band should be avoided. Intervention strategies should include education regarding postural avoidance, activity modifications, improvement of lumbopelvic control, and a patient approach to resolving hip joint restrictions and restoring the tensile capabilities of the deep rotators and abductors of the hip. A number of reliable and validated hip-specific self-report outcome tools are available to baseline a patient's status and monitor their progress. Further investigations to identify the epidemiological risk factors, establish effective treatment strategies, and predict prognosis are warranted.

  6. Trochanteric bursitis: refuting the myth of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernando; Adams, Thomas; Feinstein, Jeffery; Arroyo, Ramon A

    2008-04-01

    Greater trochanteric (GT) bursitis is a common cause of hip pain. Previously, the etiology of the trochanteric pain syndrome was thought to be caused by inflammation of the subgluteus maximus bursa (i.e., bursitis). Recently, MRI and ultrasound studies have brought into serious doubt the idea that bursitis is the etiology for trochanteric pain. To our knowledge, no histologic study of GT bursitis has been reported to date. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the histopathology of patients with and without the clinical syndrome of GT bursitis to assess for the presence of bursal inflammation. This is a prospective, case-controlled, blinded study of the histopathologic features of controls and patients with GT bursitis. We recruited patients who required total hip arthroplasty (THA) for rheumatoid or osteoarthritis. Inclusion criteria for the study consisted of the following: needing THA as standard of care; THA secondary to OA or RA; age greater than 18; and minimal risk for surgery by the American Heart Association Criteria. We excluded anyone who received a GT bursa injection 9 months before surgery. Eligible participants were then stratified as cases or controls using the 1985 clinical criteria for GT bursitis. The harvesting of the bursa required no modification of the surgical procedure. The specimens were then examined by 2 independent pathologists who were blinded as to the patients' clinical status. Six bursal specimens were evaluated by 2 blinded surgical pathologists revealing primarily fibroadipose tissue with no signs of acute or chronic inflammation. There were 3 bursas in the control group and 2 specimens with clinical GT bursitis. No significant differences were found between the specimens of the 2 groups. The results of this small prospective observational histologic study, along with recent MRI and ultrasound studies on the topic, strongly suggest that there is no etiologic role of bursal inflammation in the trochanteric pain syndrome.

  7. Lateral hip pain: does imaging predict response to localized injection?

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter; Kannangara, Siri; Bruce, Warwick J M; Michael, Dean; Van der Wall, H

    2007-04-01

    Lateral hip pain is a common complaint in patients with a history of lower back pain from spinal disease. These patients often are diagnosed and treated for trochanteric bursitis because of localized pain and tenderness in the lateral hip. We presumed numerous scintigraphic features could provide diagnostic criteria for diagnosing gluteus medius tendinitis and trochanteric bursitis. A study was designed to assess the scintigraphic criteria for diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis and to evaluate the relationship of trochanteric bursitis to gluteus medius tendinitis and lumbar degenerative disease in predicting relapse after injection. We evaluated 97 patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome to find a correlation between trochanteric bursitis, gluteus medius tendinitis, and spinal degenerative disease using scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. We also evaluated predictors for responding to trochanteric injection of local anesthetic/glucocorticoid injection. We found a correlation between lumbar degenerative disease, gluteus medius tendinopathy, and trochanteric bursitis. Of these, 30 of 48 patients (63%) responded to injection of local anesthetic and glucocorticoids. The major predictor of relapse of pain after injection in 18 patients was the presence of moderate to severe lumbar degenerative disease seen on scintigraphic imaging. We propose a mechanistic model of the greater trochanteric pain syndrome to explain the interrelationship and response to therapy. Scintigraphy can provide sensitive and specific diagnoses of gluteus medius tendinitis and trochanteric bursitis.

  8. Effect of greater trochanteric epiphysiodesis after femoral varus osteotomy for lateral pillar classification B and B/C border Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease: A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Keun-Sang; Wang, Sung Il; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Moon, Young Jae; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2017-08-01

    This is a retrospective observational study. Greater trochanteric epiphysiodesis (GTE) has been recommended to prevent Trendelenburg gait and limitation of the hip joint motion due to trochanteric overgrowth after femoral varus osteotomy (FVO) in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD). However, capital femoral physeal arrest frequently occurs in patients with severe disease (lateral pillar C), so GTE might not be as effective in these patients. The aim of this study was to compare trochanteric growth inhibition due to GTE after FVO between 2 age groups (<8 or >8 years) in patients with lateral pillar B and B/C border LCPD and evaluate the effectiveness of GTE compared with the normal, unaffected hip.This study included 19 children with lateral pillar B and B/C border LCPD in 1 leg who underwent FVO followed by GTE. Of the 19 children, 9 underwent GTE before the age of 8 years and 10 underwent GTE after 8 years of age. On radiographs taken at the immediate postoperative period and at skeletal maturity, the articulo-trochanteric distance (ATD), center-trochanteric distance (CTD), and neck-shaft angle (NSA) were compared between the 2 age groups. The amount of correction was compared between groups. The contralateral, unaffected hip was used as a control for trochanteric growth. The patients were clinically evaluated with Iowa hip score at the final follow-up.There was no significant difference between the 2 age groups in terms of time to GTE, length of follow-up, or lateral pillar classification. In the affected hip, the amount of correction of the ATD, CTD, and NSA was significantly greater in patients < 8 years than in patients > 8 years. However, in the unaffected hip, the change in the ATD, CTD, and NSA did not differ significantly between the 2 groups.We suggest that FVO followed by GTE for lateral pillar B and B/C border LCPD in patients under the age of 8 years can affect growth of the greater trochanter. However, effective growth inhibition due to GTE was not

  9. Treatment of trochanteric bursitis: our experience.

    PubMed

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Jovasevic, Ljubisa; Konicanin, Admira; Bajin, Zoran; Ilic, Katarina Parezanovic; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Dolicanin, Zana

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] Trochanteric bursitis is a disease for which there are no effective standardized therapy protocols. Very often pain persists in spite of applying all therapeutic treatments. The purpose of this study was to determine whether treatment of trochanteric bursitis with a local injection of bicomponent corticosteroid and 2% lidocaine would improve patients' conditions and relieve pain symptoms in the trochanteric area. [Subjects and Methods] A retrospective observational study was conducted of 2,217 patients in a 6 year follow-up period at the Special Hospital "Agens", Mataruska Banja, Serbia. [Results] Of 2,217 examined patients, 58 (2.6%) patients were found to suffer from trochanteritis associated with low back pain, and 157 (7%) were found to suffer from trochanteric pains without low back pains. Local corticosteroid therapy followed by physical therapy was effective in 77 (49%) of these patients, and only corticosteroid injection in 61 (39%) patients. A single injection was given to 47 (29.9%) of the patients. Two injections were given to 9 (5.7%) patients, and from 3 to 5 injections were given repeatedly every 4-6 weeks to 7 (4.5%) patients. [Conclusion] For most patients, local injections of corticosteroids with lidocaine alone or followed by physical therapy gave satisfactory results.

  10. Treatment of trochanteric bursitis: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Jovasevic, Ljubisa; Konicanin, Admira; Bajin, Zoran; Ilic, Katarina Parezanovic; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Dolicanin, Zana

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Trochanteric bursitis is a disease for which there are no effective standardized therapy protocols. Very often pain persists in spite of applying all therapeutic treatments. The purpose of this study was to determine whether treatment of trochanteric bursitis with a local injection of bicomponent corticosteroid and 2% lidocaine would improve patients’ conditions and relieve pain symptoms in the trochanteric area. [Subjects and Methods] A retrospective observational study was conducted of 2,217 patients in a 6 year follow-up period at the Special Hospital “Agens”, Mataruska Banja, Serbia. [Results] Of 2,217 examined patients, 58 (2.6%) patients were found to suffer from trochanteritis associated with low back pain, and 157 (7%) were found to suffer from trochanteric pains without low back pains. Local corticosteroid therapy followed by physical therapy was effective in 77 (49%) of these patients, and only corticosteroid injection in 61 (39%) patients. A single injection was given to 47 (29.9%) of the patients. Two injections were given to 9 (5.7%) patients, and from 3 to 5 injections were given repeatedly every 4–6 weeks to 7 (4.5%) patients. [Conclusion] For most patients, local injections of corticosteroids with lidocaine alone or followed by physical therapy gave satisfactory results. PMID:27512268

  11. Endoscopic Trochanteric Bursectomy and Iliotibial Band Release for Persistent Trochanteric Bursitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Justin J; Chahla, Jorge; Vap, Alexander R; Menge, Travis J; Soares, Eduardo; Frank, Jonathan M; Dean, Chase S; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-10-01

    Lateral hip pain associated with trochanteric bursitis is a common orthopedic condition, and can be debilitating in chronic or recalcitrant situations. Conservative management is the most common initial treatment and often results in resolution of symptoms and improved patient outcomes. These modalities include rest, activity modification, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, or corticosteroid injections. However, there is a subset of patients in which symptoms persist despite exhaustive conservative modalities. For these patients, trochanteric bursectomy is a surgical option to address persistent pathology. Previous literature indicates that both open and arthroscopic surgical techniques can be used to address the inflamed bursa and results in good patient outcomes. However, recent advances in hip arthroscopy have allowed for improvements in minimally invasive techniques to address intracapsular and extracapsular pathology of the hip, including recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe our technique for a minimally invasive arthroscopic trochanteric bursectomy.

  12. Pseudo-radiculopathy in subacute trochanteric bursitis of the subgluteus maximus bursa.

    PubMed

    Swezey, R L

    1976-08-01

    Seventy patients, averaging 82 years of age, were referred for low back pain and/or a suspected herniated disk. Objective neurological deficits consistent with L5 or S1 root involvement were identified in 5 of the 70 patients. Trochanteric bursitis (TB), often mimicking radiculitis, was diagnosed in 31 patients. Trochanteric bursitis was associated with lumbosacral strain and lumbar osteoarthrosis in 21 of 31 patients and with an S1 disk in 1 of those 31 patients. Degenerative joint disease of the ipsilateral hip was present in 4 of 20 of these patients with TB. Six patients with low back pain had both hip and knee arthritis (including two patients with rheumatoid arthritis). Three patients had degenerative hip disease without low back complaints. The remaining patient had TB associated with left hemiparesis. All patients had limitation of lumbosacral motion. Patients with arthritic hips had apparent shortening of the affected leg of one-half inch or greater. Trochanteric bursitis is a common complication of lumbosacral strain, frequently mimicking radiculopathy. Gait alteration associated with back pain or static traction on gluteal musculature during rest therapy may be predisposing factors. The association of TB with hip disease and/or leg length discrepancies was again confirmed.

  13. Arthroscopic bursectomy with concomitant iliotibial band release for the treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Farr, Derek; Selesnick, Harlan; Janecki, Chet; Cordas, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Trochanteric bursitis with lateral hip pain is a commonly encountered orthopaedic condition. Although most patients respond to corticosteroid injections, rest, physical therapy (PT), stretching, and anti-inflammatory medications, those with recalcitrant symptoms may require operative intervention. Studies have explored the use of the arthroscope in the treatment of these patients. However, these reports have not addressed the underlying pathology in this chronic condition. We believe that the iliotibial band must be addressed and is the main cause of pain, inflammation, and trochanteric impingement leading to the development of bursitis. We report a new technique for arthroscopic trochanteric bursectomy with iliotibial band release. Our technique involves 2 incisions--one 4 cm proximal to the greater trochanter along the anterior border of the iliotibial band, and the other 4 cm distal and along the posterior border. The 30 degrees arthroscope is introduced through the inferior portal, and a cannula is introduced through the superior portal. A 5.5-mm arthroscopic shaver is inserted through the superior cannula to clear off the surface of the iliotibial band, so that it may be adequately visualized. A hooked electrocautery probe is then used to longitudinally incise the iliotibial band until it no longer rubs, causing impingement over the greater trochanter.

  14. Guided growth of the trochanteric apophysis combined with soft tissue release for Legg-Calve-Perthes disease.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Peter M; Anderson, Lucas A; Gililland, Jeremy M; Novais, Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    During the initial fragmentation stage of Perthes disease, the principle focus is to achieve containment of the femoral head within the acetabulum. Whether by bracing, abduction casts, femoral and/or pelvic osteotomy, the goals are to maximize the range of hip motion and to avoid incongruity, hoping to avert subsequent femoro-acetabular impingement or hinge abduction. A more subtle and insidious manifestation of the disease relates to growth disturbance involving the femoral neck. We have chosen to tether the greater trochanteric physis, combined with a medial soft tissue release, as part of our non-osteotomy management strategy for select children with progressive symptomatology and related radiographic changes. In addition to providing containment, we feel that this strategy addresses potential long-range issues pertaining to limb length and abductor mechanics, while avoiding iatrogenic varus deformity caused by osteotomy. This is a retrospective review of 12 patients (nine boys, three girls), average age 7.3 years old (range 5.3-9.7), who underwent non-osteotomy surgery for Perthes disease. An eight-plate was applied to the greater trochanteric apophysis at the time of arthrogram, open adductor and iliopsoas tenotomy, and Petrie cast application. We compared clinical and radiographic findings at the outset to those at an average follow-up of 49 months (range 14-78 months). Six plates were subsequently removed; the others remain in situ. Eleven of twelve patients experienced improvement in pain, and alleviation of limp and Trendelenburg sign at latest follow-up. The majority had improved or maintained range of motion and prevention of trochanteric impingement demonstrated by near normalization of abduction. Neck-shaft angles, Shenton's line, extrusion index, center edge angles and trochanteric height did not change significantly. One patient underwent subsequent trochanteric distalization and no other patients have undergone subsequent femoral or

  15. Greater fear of visceral pain contributes to differences between visceral and somatic pain in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Laura Ricarda; Icenhour, Adriane; Forkmann, Katarina; Pasler, Annika; Theysohn, Nina; Forsting, Michael; Bingel, Ulrike; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2017-08-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study addressed similarities and differences in behavioral and neural responses to experimental visceral compared with somatic pain stimuli and explored the contribution of fear of pain to differences between pain modalities. In N = 22 healthy women, we assessed blood oxygen level-dependent responses to rectal distensions and cutaneous heat stimuli matched for perceived pain intensity. Fear of pain and pain unpleasantness were assessed before and after scanning. Visceral pain was more fear evoking and more unpleasant, and trial-by-trial intensity ratings failed to habituate across trials (all interactions modality × time: P < 0.01). Differences in fear of pain and pain intensity independently contributed to greater visceral pain unpleasantness (combined regression model: R = 0.59). We observed joint neural activations in somatosensory cortex and frontoparietal attention network (conjunction analysis: all pFWE <0.05), but distensions induced greater activation in somatosensory cortex, dorsal and ventral anterior insula, dorsal anterior and midcingulate cortices, and brainstem, whereas cutaneous heat pain led to enhanced activation in posterior insula and hippocampus (all pFWE <0.05). Fear of visceral pain correlated with prefrontal activation, but did not consistently contribute to neural differences between modalities. These findings in healthy women support marked differences between phasic pain induced by rectal distensions vs cutaneous heat, likely reflecting the higher salience of visceral pain. More studies with clinically relevant pain models are needed to discern the role of fear in normal interindividual differences in the response to different types of pain and as a putative risk factor in the transition from acute to chronic pain.

  16. [Osteomyelitis after septic trochanteric bursitis - clinical case].

    PubMed

    Miguel, C; Gonçalves, I; Matos, Maria L; Coelho, Paulo Clemente

    2010-01-01

    We report the clinical case of a 76 years-old woman with a subacute trochanteric inflammatory pain with low-grade fever and laboratory markers of acute inflammation, associated with the ultrasonographic evidence of bursitis and radiologic evidence of femoral erosions, that resolved after intravenous antibiotherapy. Although rare, the infectious etiology should be considered in patients with clinical manifestations of bursitis and signs of systemic involvement.

  17. Efficacy of Treatment of Trochanteric Bursitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lustenberger, David P; Ng, Vincent Y; Best, Thomas M; Ellis, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Trochanteric bursitis (TB) is a self-limiting disorder in the majority of patients and typically responds to conservative measures. However, multiple courses of nonoperative treatment or surgical intervention may be necessary in refractory cases. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment of TB. Data Sources A literature search in the PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases was performed for all English language studies up to April 2010. Terms combined in a Boolean search were greater trochanteric pain syndrome, trochanteric bursitis, trochanteric, bursitis, surgery, therapy, drug therapy, physical therapy, rehabilitation, injection, Z-plasty, Z-lengthening, aspiration, bursectomy, bursoscopy, osteotomy, and tendon repair. Study Selection All studies directly involving the treatment of TB were reviewed by 2 authors and selected for further analysis. Expert opinion and review articles were excluded, as well as case series with fewer than 5 patients. Twenty-four articles were identified. According to the system described by Wright et al, 2 studies, each with multiple arms, qualified as level I evidence, 1 as level II, 1 as level III, and the rest as level IV. More than 950 cases were included. Data Extraction The authors extracted data regarding the type of intervention, level of evidence, mean age of patients, patient gender, number of hips in the study, symptom duration before the study, mean number of injections before the study, prior hip surgeries, patient satisfaction, length of follow-up, baseline scores, and follow-up scores for the visual analog scale (VAS) and Harris Hip Scores (HHS). Data Synthesis Symptom resolution and the ability to return to activity ranged from 49% to 100% with corticosteroid injection as the primary treatment modality with and without multimodal conservative therapy. Two comparative studies (levels II and III) found low-energy shock-wave therapy (SWT) to be

  18. Efficacy of treatment of trochanteric bursitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, David P; Ng, Vincent Y; Best, Thomas M; Ellis, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis (TB) is a self-limiting disorder in the majority of patients and typically responds to conservative measures. However, multiple courses of nonoperative treatment or surgical intervention may be necessary in refractory cases. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment of TB. A literature search in the PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases was performed for all English language studies up to April 2010. Terms combined in a Boolean search were greater trochanteric pain syndrome, trochanteric bursitis, trochanteric, bursitis, surgery, therapy, drug therapy, physical therapy, rehabilitation, injection, Z-plasty, Z-lengthening, aspiration, bursectomy, bursoscopy, osteotomy, and tendon repair. All studies directly involving the treatment of TB were reviewed by 2 authors and selected for further analysis. Expert opinion and review articles were excluded, as well as case series with fewer than 5 patients. Twenty-four articles were identified. According to the system described by Wright et al, 2 studies, each with multiple arms, qualified as level I evidence, 1 as level II, 1 as level III, and the rest as level IV. More than 950 cases were included. The authors extracted data regarding the type of intervention, level of evidence, mean age of patients, patient gender, number of hips in the study, symptom duration before the study, mean number of injections before the study, prior hip surgeries, patient satisfaction, length of follow-up, baseline scores, and follow-up scores for the visual analog scale (VAS) and Harris Hip Scores (HHS). Symptom resolution and the ability to return to activity ranged from 49% to 100% with corticosteroid injection as the primary treatment modality with and without multimodal conservative therapy. Two comparative studies (levels II and III) found low-energy shock-wave therapy (SWT) to be superior to other nonoperative modalities. Multiple surgical options for

  19. Trochanteric Fixation With a Third-Generation Cable-Plate System: An Independent Experience.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Andrew D; Abdelbary, Hesham; Beaulé, Paul E

    2017-09-01

    Greater trochanteric fracture/nonunion can be a devastating complication with significant functional impact after total hip arthroplasty, and their fixation remains a challenge because of the significant forces being transmitted as well as the poor bone quality often associated with these fractures. The objective of this study is to investigate the rates of reoperation and trochanteric nonunion using a third-generation cable-plate system at one center. Thirty-five patients, mean age 72.9 years (range 46-98 years) with 24 women and 11 men, underwent fixation of their fractured greater trochanter using a third-generation cable-plate system. The indications were: periprosthetic fracture (n = 17), complex primary arthroplasty (n = 5), and complex revision arthroplasty (n = 13). Primary outcomes included rates of reoperation and radiographic union. At a mean follow-up of 2.5 years, trochanteric union rate was 62.9% with nonunion rate of 31.4%, and fibrous union in 5.7%. In regard to quality of initial apposition, only 40% achieved a perfect bone on bone reduction. Ten patients (28.6%) had evidence of wire breakage. Five patients (14.3%) required reoperation and removal of the internal fixation because of lateral hip pain. Fixation of the trochanteric fractures remains a challenge with a relatively high reoperation rate. Poor bone quality and capacity to maintain a stable reduction continue to make this complication after total hip arthroplasty a difficult problem to solve. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. [Trochanteric bursitis due to tuberculosis in an immunocompetent young woman].

    PubMed

    Soro Marín, Sandra; Sánchez Trenado, María Asunción; Mínguez Sánchez, María Dolores; Paulino Huertas, Marcos; García Morales, Paula Virginia; Salas Manzanedo, Verónica

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can affect muscle, tendons, fascia, bursa and synovial tissue. Tuberculous trochanteric bursitis is a rare entity that usually affects immunocompromised patients. Manifestations usually occur insidiously, which delays diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of an immunocompetent young woman who came to our department for chronic left hip pain. The study confirms the diagnosis of tuberculous trochanteric bursitis. This case demonstrates the importance of considering a possible infectious origin of bursitis in immunocompetent patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  2. Severe Pain Predicts Greater Likelihood of Subsequent Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgen, Mark A.; Zivin, Kara; Austin, Karen L.; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Czyz, Ewa K.; Valenstein, Marcia; Kilbourne, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the 1999 Large Health Survey of Veterans, Veterans Affairs' medical records, and the National Death Index (N = 260,254), the association between self-reported pain severity and suicide among veterans as examined, after accounting for demographic variables and psychiatric diagnoses. A Cox proportional hazards regression demonstrated…

  3. Severe Pain Predicts Greater Likelihood of Subsequent Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgen, Mark A.; Zivin, Kara; Austin, Karen L.; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Czyz, Ewa K.; Valenstein, Marcia; Kilbourne, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the 1999 Large Health Survey of Veterans, Veterans Affairs' medical records, and the National Death Index (N = 260,254), the association between self-reported pain severity and suicide among veterans as examined, after accounting for demographic variables and psychiatric diagnoses. A Cox proportional hazards regression demonstrated…

  4. Trochanteric osteotomies in revision total hip arthroplasty: contemporary techniques and results.

    PubMed

    Jando, Victor T; Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P

    2005-01-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents several challenges to the orthopaedic surgeon and typically requires the use of a more extensile surgical approach. Osteotomy of the greater trochanter can be considered as the ultimate extensile exposure in revision THA. The methods of trochanteric osteotomy can be categorized into three types: the standard trochanteric osteotomy, the trochanteric slide, and the extended trochanteric osteotomy. Although the standard osteotomy and trochanteric slide osteotomy provide excellent acetabular exposure, in the revision setting they are frequently associated with an unacceptably high rate of nonunion and proximal migration of the trochanteric fragment. The extended trochanteric osteotomy (ETO) has increased in popularity as the number and complexity of revision THAs continue to increase. Two commonly used techniques are the ETO via a posterolateral approach or via a modified direct lateral approach. Both techniques provide wide exposure of the acetabulum, facilitate femoral component exposure and removal, aid in canal preparation and femoral reconstruction, and allow for correction of proximal femoral deformity. The osteotomy fragment is easily secured and may be advanced distally to achieve proper tensioning of the abductors. Recent literature demonstrates that the ETO has a relatively low rate of nonunion and is associated with fewer intraoperative femoral fractures or cortical perforations, as well as decreased surgical time.

  5. Trochanteric fossa or piriform fossa of the femur: time for standardised terminology?

    PubMed

    Ansari Moein, C M S; Gerrits, P D; ten Duis, H J

    2013-06-01

    Piriform fossa, trochanteric fossa and greater trochanteric tip have each been described as entry points for antegrade femoral nailing. However, the terminology used for these entry points is confusing. The accuracy of the entry point nomenclature in published text and illustrations was recorded in this review study. The trochanteric fossa, a deep depression at the base of the femoral neck is indicated as 'piriform fossa' in the vast majority of the publications. Other publications indicate the insertion site of the tendon of the piriformis muscle on the greater trochanteric tip as 'piriform fossa'. As a result of recurrent terminology error and consistent reproductions of it, the recommended entry point in literature is confusing and seems to need standardisation. The piriform fossa does not appear to exist in the femoral region. The trochanteric fossa is the standard entry point which most surgeons recommend for facilitating a standard straight intramedullary nail, as is in line with the medullary canal. The greater trochanteric tip is the lateral entry point for intramedullary nails with a proximal lateral bend.

  6. 'Bald trochanter' spontaneous rupture of the conjoined tendons of the gluteus medius and minimus presenting as a trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    LaBan, Myron M; Weir, Susan K; Taylor, Ronald S

    2004-10-01

    A 66-yr-old white woman presented with progressive complaints of right lateral hip and thigh pain associated with a disabling limp without an antecedent history of trauma. Physical examination revealed localized pain over the right greater trochanter to palpation. A full pain-free range of motion of the right hip was associated with weakness in the hip abductors. The patient ambulated with a compensated right Trendelenburg gait. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a trochanteric bursitis and an effusion of the hip and a full-thickness tear of the gluteus medius muscle, with both a disruption and retraction of the tendon of an atretic gluteus minimus muscle. Conjoined tendon pathology of both the gluteus medius and minimus as, revealed by magnetic resonance examination, is probably more frequent than heretofore commonly recognized. In patients presenting with "intractable" complaints of a trochanteric bursitis and an ambulatory limp due to weakness in the hip abductors, imaging studies calling attention to a possible tendon rupture may be diagnostic.

  7. Trochanteric bursitis after total hip arthroplasty: incidence and evaluation of response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Kevin W; Jones, Lynne C; Brownson, Kirstyn E; Khanuja, Harpal S; Hungerford, Marc W

    2010-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of corticosteroid injection as treatment for postarthroplasty trochanteric bursitis and the risk factors for failure of nonoperative treatment. There were 32 (4.6%) cases of postsurgical trochanteric bursitis in 689 primary total hip arthroplasties. Of the 25 hips with follow-up, 11 (45%) required multiple injections. Symptoms resolved in 20 (80%) but persisted in 5. We found no statistically significant differences between patients who did and did not develop trochanteric bursitis, or between those who did and did not respond to treatment. There was a trend toward younger age and greater limb-length discrepancy in nonresponders. In conclusion, (1) corticosteroid injection(s) for postoperative trochanteric bursitis is effective; and (2) nonoperative management may be more likely to fail in young patients and those with leg-length discrepancy. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of prophylactic trochanteric epiphyseodesis in older children with Perthes' disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hitesh; Siddesh, Nandi D; Joseph, Benjamin; Nair, Sreekumaran N

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of prophylactic epiphyseodesis of the greater trochanter in Perthes' disease, 62 children with unilateral Perthes' disease who underwent trochanteric epiphyseodesis combined with varus osteotomy of the femur during the active stage of the disease (mean age at surgery: 8.4 y) and 20 controls were followed up until skeletal maturity. On radiographs taken at skeletal maturity, the articulo-trochanteric distance, the center-trochanteric distance, the length of the abductor lever arm, the neck-shaft angle, the radius of the femoral head, and the Reimer's migration index of normal and affected hips were measured. The shape of the femoral head was assessed according to the criteria of Mose. The range of hip motion, the strength of hip abduction, and limb lengths were measured and the Trendelenburg sign was elicited. The mean values of articulo-trochanteric distance and center-trochanteric distance were greater and the frequency of a positive Trendelenburg sign was less in children who had undergone trochanteric epiphyseodesis than in children who had no surgery (P<0.01). Trochanteric epiphyseodesis achieved optimal trochanteric growth arrest in 60% of operated children; the procedure was not effective in 30%, and in 10% of children there was overcorrection. Logistic regression analysis showed that the size of the femoral head at healing and the age at surgery were variables that significantly influenced the effectiveness of trochanteric growth arrest. At skeletal maturity, the mean shortening of the affected limb in operated children was 0.44 cm (SD 0.68 cm), whereas that of non-operated children was 0.86 cm (SD 0.78 cm) (P<0.05). The range of motion of the hip was excellent and there were no significant differences in the range of motion among children with optimal correction, under-correction, and overcorrection. A probability curve plotted on the basis of a logistic regression model suggests that effective trochanteric arrest may be achieved in a

  9. Antegrade versus retrograde nailing techniques and trochanteric versus piriformis intramedullary nailing entry points for femoral shaft fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nasir; Hussain, Farrah Naz; Sermer, Corey; Kamdar, Hera; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Sternheim, Amir; Kuzyk, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background There are several different techniques commonly used to perform intramedullary (IM) nailing of the femur to fix femoral fractures. We sought to identify significant differences in outcomes of studies comparing 1) trochanteric and piriformis entry and 2) antegrade and retrograde entry in IM nailing of the femur. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane and Embase databases and the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons websites for comparative studies published from inception to November 2015. Criteria used to select articles for detailed review included use of antegrade and retrograde entry point or use of trochanteric and piriformis entry point for IM nailing of the femur in adult patients. Functional and technical outcomes were extracted from accepted studies. Results We identified 483 potential studies, of which 52 were eligible. Of these, we included 13 publications and 2 abstracts (2 level I, 7 level II and 6 level III studies). Trochanteric entry significantly reduced operative duration by 14 min compared with piriformis entry (p = 0.030). Retrograde nailing had a greater risk of postoperative knee pain than antegrade nailing (p = 0.05). On the other hand, antegrade nailing had significantly more postoperative hip pain (p = 0.003) and heterotopic ossification (p < 0.001) than retrograde nailing. No significant differences in functional outcomes were observed. Conclusion Although some significant differences were found, the varying quality of studies made recommendation difficult. Our meta-analysis did not confirm superiority of either antegrade over retrograde or trochanteric over piriformis entry for IM nailing of the femur. Level of evidence Level III therapeutic. PMID:28234586

  10. Trans trochanteric approach with coronal osteotomy of the great trochanter

    PubMed Central

    Steffann, Francois; Prudhon, Jean-Louis; Puch, Jean-Marc; Ferreira, André; Descamps, Loys; Verdier, Régis; Caton, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Several surgical approaches could be used in hip arthroplasty or trauma surgery: anterior, anterolateral, lateral, posterior (with or without trochanterotomy), using or not an orthopedic reduction table. Subtrochanteric and extra-capsular trochanteric fractures (ECTF) are usually treated by internal fixation with mandatory restrictions on weight bearing. Specific complications have been widely described. Mechanical failures are particularly high in unstable fractures. Hip fractures are a major public health issue with a mortality rate of 12%–23% at 1 year. An alternative option is to treat ECTF by total hip arthroplasty (THA) to prevent decubitus complications, to help rapid recovery, and to permit immediate weight bearing as well as quick rehabilitation. However, specific risks of THA have to be considered such as dislocation or cardiovascular failure. The classical approach (anterior or posterior) requires the opening of the joint and capsule, weakening hip stability and the repair of the great trochanter is sometimes hazardous. For 15 years, we have been treating unstable ECTF by THA with cementless stem, dual mobility cup (DMC), greater trochanter (GT) reattachment, and a new surgical approach preserving capsule, going through the fracture and avoiding joint dislocation. Bombaci first described a similar approach in 2008; our trans fractural digastric approach (medial gluteus and lateral vastus) is different. A coronal GT osteotomy is performed when there is no coronal fracture line. It allows easy access to the femoral neck and acetabulum. The THA is implanted without femoral internal rotation to avoid extra bone fragment displacement. With pre-operative planning, cup implantation is easy and stem positioning is adjusted referring to the top of the GT after trial reduction and preoperative planning. The longitudinal osteotomy and trochanteric fracture are repaired with wires and the digastric incision is closed. This variant of Bombaci approach could be

  11. Lateral Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Grumet, Robert C.; Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Historically, the term greater trochanteric pain syndrome has been used to describe a spectrum of conditions that cause lateral-sided hip pain, including greater trochanteric bursitis, snapping iliotibial band, and/or strains or tendinopathy of the abductor mechanism. Diagnosis of these conditions may be difficult because clinical presentations are variable and sometimes inconclusive. Especially difficult is differentiating intrinsic pain from pain referred to the greater trochanteric region. The purposes of this article are to review the relevant anatomy and pathophysiology of the lateral hip. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature conducted through a MEDLINE search of all relevant papers between 1980 and January 2010. Results: Recent advances in imaging and an improved understanding of pathomechanics have helped to guide the evaluation, diagnosis, and appropriate treatment for patients presenting with lateral hip pain. Conclusion: Various diagnostic tools and treatment modalities can be used to effectively manage the athletic patient presenting with lateral hip pain. PMID:23015937

  12. PRP IN THE TREATMENT OF TROCHANTERIC SYNDROME: A PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Arthur de Góes; Ricioli, Walter; Silva, Alice Roxo Nobre Sousa e; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the efficacy of platelet rich plasma (PRP) against corticosteroid on the treatment of trochanteric pain syndrome. Methods: From July 2011 to November 2012, eighteen patients (20 hips) with trochanter pain syndrome were randomized in two groups and treated with platelet rich plasma or triamcinolone infiltration guided by ultrasound. Pain and function were evaluated prior to the intervention and after 10, 30 and 60 days, through the Facial Expressions Scale for Pain and the Western Ontario McMaster and Harris Hip Score questionnaires. Inter-group analysis was performed by Student t-test and intragroup analysis by ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni post hoc test. Statistical significance was set at p <0.05. Results: There was no difference between the groups. The triamcinolone group showed pain reduction (p=0.004) and improved function (p=0.036) through the Harris Hip Score questionnaire at 10, 30 and 60 days after treatment, when compared with the pre- intervention period. The platelet rich plasma group showed no statistical improvement in any of the variables. Conclusion: Up to 60 days, PRP infiltration has no influence on pain relief and function improvement in trochanteric syndrome treatment. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:28243176

  13. Trochanteric osteotomy and fixation during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, Michael J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Berger, Richard A; Silverton, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    Once used routinely, trochanteric osteotomy in total hip arthroplasty now is usually limited to difficult primary and revision cases. There are three types: the standard trochanteric osteotomy and its variations, the trochanteric slide, and the extended trochanteric osteotomy. Each has unique indications, fixation techniques, and complications. Primary total hip arthroplasty procedures requiring the enhanced exposure provided by trochanteric osteotomy may be needed in patients with hip ankylosis or fusion, protrusio acetabuli, proximal femoral deformities, developmental dysplasia, or abductor muscle laxity. Trochanteric osteotomies in revision arthroplasties, primarily the extended trochanteric osteotomy, facilitate the removal of well-fixed femoral components, provide direct access to the diaphysis for distal fixation, and enhance acetabular exposure.

  14. Lower inhibitory control interacts with greater pain catastrophizing to predict greater pain intensity in women with migraine and overweight/obesity.

    PubMed

    Galioto, Rachel; O'Leary, Kevin C; Thomas, J Graham; Demos, Kathryn; Lipton, Richard B; Gunstad, John; Pavlović, Jelena M; Roth, Julie; Rathier, Lucille; Bond, Dale S

    2017-12-01

    Pain catastrophizing (PC) is associated with more severe and disabling migraine attacks. However, factors that moderate this relationship are unknown. Failure of inhibitory control (IC), or the ability to suppress automatic or inappropriate responses, may be one such factor given previous research showing a relationship between higher PC and lower IC in non-migraine samples, and research showing reduced IC in migraine. Therefore, we examined whether lower IC interacts with increased PC to predict greater migraine severity as measured by pain intensity, attack frequency, and duration. Women (n = 105) aged 18-50 years old (M = 38.0 ± 1.2) with overweight/obesity and migraine who were seeking behavioral treatment for weight loss and migraine reduction completed a 28-day smartphone-based headache diary assessing migraine headache severity. Participants then completed a modified computerized Stroop task as a measure of IC and self-report measures of PC (Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]), anxiety, and depression. Linear regression was used to examine independent and joint associations of PC and IC with indices of migraine severity after controlling for age, body mass index (BMI) depression, and anxiety. Participants on average had BMI of 35.1 ± 6.5 kg/m(2)and reported 5.3 ± 2.6 migraine attacks (8.3 ± 4.4 migraine days) over 28 days that produced moderate pain intensity (5.9 ± 1.4 out of 10) with duration of 20.0 ± 14.2 h. After adjusting for covariates, higher PCS total (β = .241, SE = .14, p = .03) and magnification subscale (β = .311, SE = .51, p < .01) scores were significant independent correlates of longer attack duration. IC interacted with total PCS (β = 1.106, SE = .001, p = .03) rumination (β = 1.098, SE = .001, p = .04), and helplessness (β = 1.026, SE = .001, p = .04) subscale scores to predict headache pain intensity, such that the association between PC

  15. Relationship between width of greater trochanters and width of iliac wings in tronchanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Viradia, Neal K; Berger, Alex A; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a common disorder that is characterized by inflammation of the bursa, superficial to the greater trochanter of the femur, leading to pain in the lateral hip, and often occurs because of acute trauma or repetitive friction involving the iliotibial band, the greater trochanter, and the bursa. In the study reported here, we hypothesized that the increased incidence of bursitis may be the result of the increased prominence of the trochanter in relation to the wings of the iliac crest. Distances between the outermost edges of trochanters and iliac wings were measured in 202 patients from the University of North Carolina Health Care System-101 without a known diagnosis and 101 with a clinical diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis. To determine significance, t tests for nonpaired data were used. Mean (SD) difference between trochanter and iliac wing widths was 28 (20) mm in the group diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and 17 (18) mm in the control group. The difference between the groups in this regard was significant (P<.00005). In addition, mean (SD) ratio of trochanter widths to iliac wing widths was 1.09 (.06) in the bursitis group and 1.05 (.06) in the control group. The difference between these groups was significant (P<.0005) in this regard as well. Having trochanters wider in relation to iliac wings was associated with the diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis.

  16. Infrapatellar fat pad volume is greater in individuals with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis and associated with pain.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Sallie M; Hart, Harvi F; Warden, Stuart J; Crossley, Kay M

    2015-08-01

    There is relatively little research specifically investigating patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (PFJ OA). In particular, the source of pain in PFJ OA has not been established. One structure that may be an important contributor is the infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP). This cross-sectional study aimed to: (1) compare IPFP volume in individuals with and without PFJ OA and (2) assess the relationship between IPFP volume and pain in individuals with PFJ OA. Thirty-five participants with symptomatic and radiographic PFJ OA and 11 asymptomatic controls with no radiographic signs of OA were recruited. IPFP volume was measured in both groups from magnetic resonance images, and pain in the PFJ OA group was determined using the pain subscale of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS-pain). The PFJ OA group had 23.6 % greater IPFP volume than the control group (p = 0.04). After the inclusion of covariates, IPFP volume remained 19.6 % greater in the PFJ OA group (p = 0.03). IPFP volume explained 20.1 % of the variance in KOOS-pain in the PFJ OA group, with a larger IPFP being associated with worse pain (p < 0.01). Individuals with PFJ OA had a larger IPFP than controls, and IPFP volume was directly related to PFJ OA pain. These data suggest a role for the IPFP in PFJ OA and highlight a need for further investigation into the casual relationship between IPFP and PFJ changes.

  17. Septic trochanteric bursitis in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Makki, Daoud; Watson, Alex James

    2010-01-01

    Trochanteric bursitis, whether septic or inflammatory in origin, is a condition that affects middle-aged patients. Here we report the rare case of an adolescent with septic trochanteric bursitis (treated successfully with intravenous antibiotics), review the available literature on septic bursitis, illustrate the importance of prompt recognition and treatment of this condition in any age group, and describe the clinical presentation and the radiologic findings.

  18. Gallium scintigraphy in a case of tuberculous trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Etsushi; Kawabe, Joji; Tsumoto, Chikako; Hayashi, Takehiro; Oe, Ai; Kurooka, Hiroko; Kotani, Jin; Higashiyama, Shigeaki; Tsushima, Hiroyuki; Habu, Daiki; Shiomi, Susumu

    2007-06-01

    We report a 67-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic disseminated tuberculosis affecting the femoral trochanteric bursae, a site rarely affected by tuberculosis. For quantification of the inflammation with gallium-67 scintigraphy, we calculated the radioisotope count ratio in the most inflamed areas, the right lateral thorax and bursa of the right greater trochanter. Systemic scanning with this modality allowed evaluation of the extent of lesions and simple quantitative determination of the severity of inflammation, yielding information useful for the follow-up of the patient during the course of tuberculosis treatment.

  19. Home training, local corticosteroid injection, or radial shock wave therapy for greater trochanter pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rompe, Jan D; Segal, Neil A; Cacchio, Angelo; Furia, John P; Morral, Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-10-01

    There are no controlled studies testing the efficacy of various nonoperative strategies for treatment of greater trochanter pain syndrome. Hypothesis The null hypothesis was that local corticosteroid injection, home training, and repetitive low-energy shock wave therapy produce equivalent outcomes 4 months from baseline. Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 2. Two hundred twenty-nine patients with refractory unilateral greater trochanter pain syndrome were assigned sequentially to a home training program, a single local corticosteroid injection (25 mg prednisolone), or a repetitive low-energy radial shock wave treatment. Subjects underwent outcome assessments at baseline and at 1, 4, and 15 months. Primary outcome measures were degree of recovery, measured on a 6-point Likert scale (subjects with rating completely recovered or much improved were rated as treatment success), and severity of pain over the past week (0-10 points) at 4-month follow-up. One month from baseline, results after corticosteroid injection (success rate, 75%; pain rating, 2.2 points) were significantly better than those after home training (7%; 5.9 points) or shock wave therapy (13%; 5.6 points). Regarding treatment success at 4 months, radial shock wave therapy led to significantly better results (68%; 3.1 points) than did home training (41%; 5.2 points) and corticosteroid injection (51%; 4.5 points). The null hypothesis was rejected. Fifteen months from baseline, radial shock wave therapy (74%; 2.4 points) and home training (80%; 2.7 points) were significantly more successful than was corticosteroid injection (48%; 5.3 points). The role of corticosteroid injection for greater trochanter pain syndrome needs to be reconsidered. Subjects should be properly informed about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options, including the economic burden. The significant short-term superiority of a single corticosteroid injection over home training and shock wave therapy

  20. Increased pain intensity is associated with greater verbal communication difficulty and increased production of speech and co-speech gestures.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, Samantha; Wardy, April J; Lloyd, Donna M; Wearden, Alison; Holler, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain communication is essential if adequate treatment and support are to be provided. Pain communication is often multimodal, with sufferers utilising speech, nonverbal behaviours (such as facial expressions), and co-speech gestures (bodily movements, primarily of the hands and arms that accompany speech and can convey semantic information) to communicate their experience. Research suggests that the production of nonverbal pain behaviours is positively associated with pain intensity, but it is not known whether this is also the case for speech and co-speech gestures. The present study explored whether increased pain intensity is associated with greater speech and gesture production during face-to-face communication about acute, experimental pain. Participants (N = 26) were exposed to experimentally elicited pressure pain to the fingernail bed at high and low intensities and took part in video-recorded semi-structured interviews. Despite rating more intense pain as more difficult to communicate (t(25)  = 2.21, p =  .037), participants produced significantly longer verbal pain descriptions and more co-speech gestures in the high intensity pain condition (Words: t(25)  = 3.57, p  = .001; Gestures: t(25)  = 3.66, p =  .001). This suggests that spoken and gestural communication about pain is enhanced when pain is more intense. Thus, in addition to conveying detailed semantic information about pain, speech and co-speech gestures may provide a cue to pain intensity, with implications for the treatment and support received by pain sufferers. Future work should consider whether these findings are applicable within the context of clinical interactions about pain.

  1. A Perspective-Taking Manipulation Leads to Greater Empathy and Less Pain During the Cold Pressor Task.

    PubMed

    Leong, Laura E M; Cano, Annmarie; Wurm, Lee H; Lumley, Mark A; Corley, Angelia M

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to demonstrate that empathy and validation could be increased in an observing partner who received a brief perspective-taking manipulation, resulting in less pain severity and greater pain tolerance in their partner, who experienced experimental pain. In addition, we examined the correlations between perceived empathy/validation and behavioral ratings of validation and invalidation. In 126 pain-free romantic couples, 1 partner was randomly assigned to complete the cold pressor task while the other observed. The couples were randomly assigned to a) a perspective-taking group in which observing partners were privately instructed to take the perspective of the pain participant; or b) a control group in which observing partners received only a description of the task. Compared with the control group, pain participants in the perspective-taking group reported that observing partners had been more validating during the task and they also reported significantly lower pain severity. In addition, pain participants' reports of their partners' validation and observing partners' self-reported empathic feelings were significantly related to lower pain severity over time. The results provide support that perspective taking may induce empathic feelings, in addition to perceptions of validation, which in turn promotes emotion regulation during pain. The experimental evidence in this study suggests that empathic feelings can be induced in significant others with simple instructions, and this manipulation leads to less pain in their partners undergoing a painful task. The results suggest that perspective taking, empathy, and validation should be further investigated as pain intervention targets. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Extended trochanteric osteotomy: planning, surgical technique, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Meek, R M; Greidanus, Nelson V; Garbuz, Donald S; Masri, Bassam A; Duncan, Clive P

    2004-01-01

    The extended trochanteric osteotomy is appropriate for a number of surgical indications. It facilitates removal of well-fixed cement mantles with a loose or well-fixed stem and of extensively porous-coated or tapered cementless stems. This exposure is particularly valuable in the presence of varus remodeling of the proximal femur, permitting correction of proximal femoral deformity and reducing the risk of fracture of the greater trochanter. It is also indicated in the removal of a well-fixed cemented stem that is complicated by infection, where it is vital to extract all foreign material for successful eradication of the infection. In addition, when the osteotomy is required for femoral exposure, it enhances acetabular exposure to allow even the most complex reconstruction. Also, as the soft-tissue attachments to the bone fragment are preserved in this approach, abductor muscle tension can be adjusted.

  3. Piriform and trochanteric fossae. A drawing mismatch or a terminology error? A review.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Stamatios A; Shepherd, Lane; Babourda, Eleni C; Papadakis, Stefanos

    2005-08-01

    The current literature indicates that the standard starting point for intramedullary nailing is the piriform fossa. The accuracy of the entry point for anterograde femoral intramedullary nailing between published texts and relevant illustrations was recorded. The piriform fossa is the site of insertion of the piriform tendon and represents a small, shallow depression located on the tip of the greater trochanter. The trochanteric fossa is a deep depression on the inner surface of the greater trochanter, and in the vast majority of the published data is indicated incorrectly as "piriform fossa". As a result of either a recurrent drawing mismatch or a terminology error, the correct entry point for anterograde femoral intramedullary nailing is confusing and should be indicated in the current literature. The trochanteric fossa appears to be the standard entry point that most surgeons recommend.

  4. Hip Pain: Dry Needling Versus Cortisone Injections.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is chronic, intermittent pain and tenderness on the outside of the hip. The medical community once thought that a swollen hip bursa was the source of such pain, which led to the use of corticosteroid injections to the bursa to help decrease swelling and pain. However, researchers now believe that injuries to the muscles and tendons around the hip are the actual cause of this pain, and that inflammation is often not involved. A study published in the April 2017 issue of JOSPT explores dry needling as an alternative to cortisone injections to reduce pain and improve function in patients with GTPS. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(4):240. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0504.

  5. Association of depression with sleep quality might be greater than that of pain intensity among outpatients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Yu; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hung, Ching-I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose No study to date has compared the associations of pain intensity, depression, and anxiety with insomnia among outpatients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). This study aimed to investigate this issue. Patients and methods A total of 225 outpatients with CLBP were enrolled from a general orthopedics clinic. The Insomnia Severity Index was used to evaluate sleep quality. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision, Axis I Disorders. Two psychometric scales were used to evaluate depression and anxiety. The Visual Analog Scale was employed to assess pain intensity. Multiple linear regressions were performed to determine the association of insomnia with pain intensity, depression, and anxiety. Results Among the 225 subjects, 58 (25.8%) had clinical insomnia; 83 (36.9%) had severe low back pain; 49 (21.8%) had MDD, including 21 (9.3%) with a current major depressive episode (MDE); and 52 (23.1%) had anxiety disorders. More than half (56.9%) of the subjects with CLBP and clinical insomnia had MDD and/or anxiety disorders. Subjects with a current MDE or anxiety disorders had greater severities of pain and insomnia as compared with subjects without these conditions. After controlling for demographic variables, MDE was more strongly associated with insomnia than severe low back pain; moreover, the severity of depression had a greater association with insomnia than pain intensity. Conclusion The association of depression with insomnia was not inferior to that of pain intensity with insomnia. Among patients with CLBP and insomnia, integration of depression and anxiety treatment into treatment of pain might help to improve sleep quality. PMID:27563244

  6. Bursectomy, Curettage, and Chemotherapy in Tuberculous Trochanteric Bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Carro-Fernández, José A.; Santos-Sánchez, José A.; Casas Ramos, Paula; Díez-Romero, Luis J.; Izquierdo-García, Francisco M.

    2016-01-01

    We presented three patients with trochanteric tuberculosis and described the clinical and imaging findings of the infection. Histology revealed a necrotizing granulomatous bursitis and microbiology confirmed tuberculosis. All cases were successfully treated with bursectomy and curettage of the trochanteric lesion and antituberculous chemotherapy including isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin, and ethambutol. PMID:26929807

  7. Bursectomy, Curettage, and Chemotherapy in Tuberculous Trochanteric Bursitis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pascua, Luis R; Carro-Fernández, José A; Santos-Sánchez, José A; Casas Ramos, Paula; Díez-Romero, Luis J; Izquierdo-García, Francisco M

    2016-03-01

    We presented three patients with trochanteric tuberculosis and described the clinical and imaging findings of the infection. Histology revealed a necrotizing granulomatous bursitis and microbiology confirmed tuberculosis. All cases were successfully treated with bursectomy and curettage of the trochanteric lesion and antituberculous chemotherapy including isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin, and ethambutol.

  8. Enhanced cortisol increase upon awakening is associated with greater pain ratings but not salivary cortisol or soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II responses to acute pain.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Burel R; Quinn, Noel B; King, Christopher D; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert R; Stapleton, Laura M; McGuire, Lynanne

    2012-05-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is related to psychosocial factors and health in potentially significant ways, suggesting that it may be a distinctive marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and dysfunction. This study sought to expand upon previous work that examined the association between CAR and ratings of laboratory-evoked acute pain stimulation. In addition to evoked pain ratings, this study also tested whether CAR was prospectively related with salivary cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II responses to acute pain stimulation. This study included 36 healthy, pain-free volunteers of both sexes recruited through posted study flyers. Prior to completion of laboratory pain testing, salivary cortisol samples were obtained at home over the course of a single morning according to the following time frame: upon awakening, and 15, 30, and 60 minute after awakening. After collection of saliva, study participants brought their home saliva samples to the laboratory for assay and subsequently completed acute experimental pain testing procedures. Cluster analysis of CAR revealed two distinct groups with similar patterns of cortisol response to awakening; increased and flattened. Relative to flattened CAR, increased CAR was associated with greater ratings of pain intensity and unpleasantness. Salivary cortisol was significantly increased and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II significantly decreased after pain testing, but neither of these responses differed as a function of increased versus flattened CAR. CAR may be a marker for stress sensitivity and/or the anticipation of impending stress, which could explain why the increased CAR cohort reported greater acute pain ratings.

  9. Hemifacial Pain and Hemisensory Disturbance Referred from Occipital Neuralgia Caused by Pathological Vascular Contact of the Greater Occipital Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-gyu

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a unique case of chronic occipital neuralgia caused by pathological vascular contact of the left greater occipital nerve. After 12 months of left-sided, unremitting occipital neuralgia, a hypesthesia and facial pain developed in the left hemiface. The decompression of the left greater occipital nerve from pathological contacts with the occipital artery resulted in immediate relief for hemifacial sensory change and facial pain, as well as chronic occipital neuralgia. Although referral of pain from the stimulation of occipital and cervical structures innervated by upper cervical nerves to the frontal head of V1 trigeminal distribution has been reported, the development of hemifacial sensory change associated with referred trigeminal pain from chronic occipital neuralgia is extremely rare. Chronic continuous and strong afferent input of occipital neuralgia caused by pathological vascular contact with the greater occipital nerve seemed to be associated with sensitization and hypersensitivity of the second-order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, a population of neurons in the C2 dorsal horn characterized by receiving convergent input from dural and cervical structures. PMID:28331643

  10. Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture during Trochanteric Nailing for the Treatment of Femoral Shaft Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chi Hun; Yi, Ju Won

    2013-01-01

    We report on three cases of subtrochanteric femoral fractures during trochanteric intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. Trochanteric intramedullary nails, which have a proximal lateral bend, are specifically designed for trochanteric insertion. When combined with the modified insertion technique, trochanteric intramedullary nails reduce iatrogenic fracture comminution and varus malalignment. We herein describe technical aspects of trochanteric intramedullary nailing for femoral shaft fractures to improve its application and prevent implant-derived complications. PMID:24009910

  11. Psychological Distress Is Associated with Greater Perceived Disability and Pain in Patients Presenting to a Shoulder Clinic.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Mariano E; Baker, Dustin K; Oladeji, Lasun O; Fryberger, Charles T; McGwin, Gerald; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-12-16

    Shoulder disorders are a common cause of disability and pain. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) is a frequently employed and previously validated measure of shoulder pain and disability. Although the SPADI has high reliability and construct validity, greater differences between individual patients are often observed than would be expected on the basis of diagnosis and pathophysiology alone. This study aims to determine how psychological factors (namely depression, catastrophic thinking, and self-efficacy) affect pain and perceived disability in the shoulder. A cohort of 139 patients completed a sociodemographic survey and elements from the SPADI, Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-2). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association of psychosocial factors, demographic characteristics, and specific diagnosis with shoulder pain and disability. The SPADI score showed medium correlation with the PCS (r = 0.43; p < 0.001), PHQ-2 (r = 0.39; p < 0.001), and PSEQ (r = -0.45; p < 0.001). Current work status (F = 4.35; p = 0.006) and body mass index (r = 0.27; p = 0.002) were also associated with the SPADI score. In the multivariate analysis, greater catastrophic thinking (estimate, 0.003; p = 0.029), lower self-efficacy (estimate, -0.005; p = 0.001), higher body mass index (estimate, 0.006; p = 0.048), and being disabled (estimate, 0.15; p = 0.017) or retired (estimate, 0.16; p < 0.001) compared with being employed were associated with worse SPADI scores. The primary diagnosis did not have a significant relationship (p > 0.05) with the SPADI. Catastrophic thinking and decreased self-efficacy are associated with greater shoulder pain and disability. Our data support the notion that patient-to-patient variation in symptom intensity and magnitude of disability is more strongly related to psychological distress than to the specific shoulder

  12. Subchondral Bone Marrow Edema Had Greater Effect on Postoperative Pain After Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Than Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Cale A; Christensen, Christian P; Karthikeyan, Tharun

    2016-02-01

    Although the relationship between pain and bone marrow edema (BME) in the osteoarthritic knee has been established, little is known about the effect of preoperative BME on postoperative outcomes after knee arthroplasty or if the influence of BME on postoperative outcomes differs between medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to compare pain, patient satisfaction, and revision rates between medial UKA and TKA patients with and without magnetic resonance imaging evidence of BME in the proximal tibia. We identified 71 patients (72 knees) from our prospective outcomes database with magnetic resonance images taken before undergoing either medial UKA or TKA and recorded the absence or presence of tibial BME. We then compared preoperative and postoperative Knee Society pain scores, patient satisfaction, and revisions between groups of UKA and TKA patients with or without preoperative tibial BME. Pain scores for UKA patients with BME were worse both before and after surgery, whereas TKA patients with BME demonstrated greater postoperative improvements in pain scores when compared to TKA patients without BME. Similarly, significantly fewer UKA patients with BME were satisfied with their procedure than those without BME (8/11, 73% vs 17/17, 100%; P = .05), but BME did not affect patient satisfaction after TKA. Preoperative BME did not influence TKA outcomes; however, pain scores for UKA patients with BME were worse both before and after surgery and fewer UKA patients with preoperative tibial BME were satisfied with their surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Alternating frequencies of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation: does it produce greater analgesic effects on mechanical and thermal pain thresholds?

    PubMed

    Tong, K C; Lo, Sing Kai; Cheing, Gladys L

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether alternating frequency transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) at 2 and 100Hz (2/100Hz) has a more potent hypoalgesic effect than a fixed frequency at 2 or 100Hz in healthy participants. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with a convenience sample. University physiotherapy department. Sixty-four healthy volunteers (32 men [mean age, 28.1+/-5.9y], 32 women [mean age, 27.7+/-5.6y]) were recruited and randomly divided into 4 groups. The 4 groups received TENS delivered at (1) 2Hz; (2) 100Hz; (3) 2/100Hz alternating frequency; and (4) no treatment (control group), respectively. Electric stimulation was applied over the anterior aspect of the dominant forearm for 30 minutes. Mechanical pain thresholds (MPTs) and heat pain thresholds (HPTs) were recorded before, during, and after TENS stimulation. The data were analyzed using linear mixed models, with group treated as a between-subject factor and time a within-subject factor. During and shortly after electric stimulation, HPT increased significantly in the alternating frequency stimulation group (P=.024). MPT increased significantly in both the 100Hz (P=.008) and the alternating frequency groups (P=.012), but the increase was substantially larger in the 100Hz group. Alternating frequency stimulation produced a greater elevation in the HPT, but a greater increase in the MPT was achieved using 100Hz stimulation.

  14. Greater pre-operative anxiety, pain and poorer function predict a worse outcome of a total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alattas, Sharifah Adla; Smith, Toby; Bhatti, Maria; Wilson-Nunn, Daniel; Donell, Simon

    2016-10-12

    Around 10-30 % of patients are dissatisfied with the results of their total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This review aimed to identify and evaluate the predictors of outcome measured by the three domains of health-related quality of life (pain, stiffness and function). The focus was on pre-operative psychological factors as related to other patient-related variables. A systematic search was performed using the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, PsychINFO, SciFinder, Scopus, EMBASE, Cochrane, Lilacs, Web of Science and ScienceDirect. The quality of identified studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Cohort checklist. Ten studies met the eligibility criteria. From these, nine patient-related predictors of outcome were identified (depression, anxiety, age at surgery, gender (being female), medical co-morbidities, BMI, level of education, pre-operative pain severity and pre-operative knee function). Greater anxiety, pre-operative pain and function were the most significant factors to predict a poorer outcome of a TKA. The results of depression, gender (female), medical co-morbidities, BMI and level of education were variable among the included studies. There was very little evidence to support older age at operation as a predictor of poorer outcome. Patients experiencing high levels of pain before surgery should be informed of the chances of improvement by having a TKA. A validated psychological screening tool that separates depression and anxiety is recommended as part of the pre-operative assessment stage. Patients presenting with symptoms of depression and anxiety should be identified and consulted before a TKA. II.

  15. PROXIMAL FEMURAL VALGUS SUBTROCHANTERIC OSTEOTOMY FOR NON UNION OF TROCHANTERIC FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paulo; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; Curi, Calim; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; de Moraes, Frederico Barra; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate valgus subtrochanteric osteotomy for the treatment of trochanteric non-union. Methods: A retrospective study of cases series. From 1998 September to 2009 January, seventeen (17) cases with a diagnosis of non-union of trochanteric fracture were re-operated by the hip group of the Ortophaedic And Traumatology service of the Hospital Geral de Goiania (HGG). The patients presented pain at the fracture site, a femoral varus angle of less than 120°, and non-union of the fracture in the 3rd months after the initial surgery. Results: Patients with ages ranging from 30 to 73 years, with a maximum follow-up of 09 years and minimum of 09 years. The mean time from first surgery to osteotomy was six months. Bone union was observed in 16 patients, with a mean union time of 12 weeks after surgery. The mean hip varus angle was 1050 (1200 to 900). After surgery, the mean hip valgus angle was 1440 (1550 to 1350). We had one unsuccessful case; a 78-year old patient who had osteogtomy, fixed with DHS of 1500, with valgization to 1540. After six months of follow-up without union of the fracture, it was decided to perform total cemented hip artroplasthy, without complications. Conclusion: Valgus subtrochanteric osteotomies can be indicated for the treatment of trochanteric treatment of pseudoarthroses, with good final results for bone union, avoiding the need for total hip artroplasthy and maintaining biological fixation, as well as reestablishing the mechanical and anatomical axis of the affected limb. PMID:27027080

  16. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head presenting as trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, B F

    1990-01-01

    Five patients are described with avascular necrosis of the femoral head who presented with ipsilateral trochanteric bursitis, in the absence of clearcut hip joint disease. Avascular necrosis was indicated by magnetic resonance imaging. It is suggested that clinical trochanteric bursitis, especially when refractory to local corticosteroid treatment, may be the initial sign of hip disease. In the patient with risk factor(s) for avascular necrosis that diagnosis should be considered and evaluated with appropriate studies, such as magnetic resonance imaging, to prevent weight bearing at an early stage and permit possible surgical decompression in the hope of postponing or obviating the need for total hip replacement. PMID:2241294

  17. Influence of greater occipital nerve block on pain severity in migraine patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongguo; Kang, Junfang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xuejun

    2017-08-14

    Greater occipital nerve (GON) block may be a promising approach to treat migraine. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy of GON block in migraine patients. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of GON block versus placebo in migraine patients were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. Meta-analysis was performed using the random-effect model. Six RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention in migraine patients, GON block intervention was found to significantly reduce pain score (Std. mean difference=-0.51; 95% CI=-0.81 to -0.21; P=0.0008), number of headache days (Std. mean difference=-0.68; 95% CI=-1.02 to -0.35; P<0.0001), and medication consumption (Std. mean difference=-0.35; 95% CI=-0.67 to -0.02; P=0.04), but demonstrated no influence on duration of headache per four weeks (Std. mean difference=-0.07; 95% CI=-0.41 to 0.27; P=0.70). Compared to control intervention, GON block intervention can significantly alleviate pain, reduce the number of headache days and medication consumption, but have no significant influence on the duration of headache per four weeks for migraine patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Influence of different great trochanteric entry points on the outcome of intertrochanteric fractures: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shuo; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Feng, Tao; Kang, Hui-Jun; Tian, Zhi-Guang; Lou, Chun-Guang

    2017-03-14

    The Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation (PFNA) system for treatment of intertrochanteric fractures is currently widely applied worldwide. However, even though the PFNA has produced good clinical outcomes, a poor introduction technique with an inappropriate entry point can cause surgical complications. Some researchers suggest improving clinical outcomes by modifying the entry point, but no research has focused on this issue. The purpose of the present study is to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of two different trochanteric entry points for the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures using the PFNA system. From May 2010 to October 2015, a total of 212 elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures who were treated with the PFNA-II system were included into this retrospective cohort study. Group LA (98 patients) was treated using a lateral anterior trochanteric entry point, and group MP (114 patients) was treated using a medial posterior trochanteric entry point. All patients underwent follow-up assessments at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Radiographic evaluation was based on the impingement, tip-apex distance (TAD) and the position of the helical blade within the femoral head. Clinical evaluation was based on the surgical time, fluoroscopy time, blood loss, hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS), thigh pain, and Harris hip score. The impingement was significantly reduced (P = 0.011) in group MP. The helical blade positions were significantly lower (P = 0.001) in group MP. The TADs in group LA (22.40 ± 4.43) and group MP (23.39 ± 3.60) were not significantly different (P = 0.075). The fluoroscopy time of group LA (53.26 ± 14.44) was shorter than that of group MP (63.29 ± 11.12, P = 0.000). Five iatrogenic lateral proximal fractures and 3 helical blade cutouts occurred in group LA, but none occurred in group MP. At 1 and 3 months postoperation, the Harris hip scores were significantly higher in group

  19. Cementless modular hip arthroplasty as a salvage operation for failed internal fixation of trochanteric fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Molinier, François; Tricoire, Jean-Louis; Bonnevialle, Nicolas; Chiron, Philippe; Puget, Jean

    2007-12-01

    Failure of internal fixation of trochanteric fractures requires repeat surgery in order to avoid the risks of complications affecting bedridden patients. This study was conducted to assess the results of hemi- or total hip arthroplasty with a cementless modular femoral stem, as a salvage operation following early mechanical failure of internal fixation. Twenty nine patients with a mean age of 81.1 years (70-91) were included in the study. Fractures extending into the diaphysis and pathological fractures were excluded, as well as patients who presented late complications. A cementless modular stem designed for metaphyso-diaphyseal anchorage was used in all cases. Twenty-two patients underwent hemiarthroplasty and seven total hip arthroplasty. Four patients died within one year and two were lost to follow-up. The remaining 23 patients were followed for a mean of 20 months (range: 6-89). At the time of last follow-up, 20 were ambulatory with (11 cases) or without support (9 cases) and three were bedridden. There were no intra- or postoperative femoral fractures. Two patients presented an early dislocation after bipolar hemiarthroplasty. One was successfully treated by closed reduction; the other underwent revision with a dual mobility acetabular component because of recurrent dislocation. All the patients reported significant pain relief and functional improvement. Subsidence of the stem greater than 5 mm was noted in three cases, without clinical consequences. The cementless modular femoral stem used in this study appeared as a reliable implant. Primary arthroplasty with such an implant could be considered in selected cases such as markedly unstable fractures and in osteoporotic elderly patients.

  20. Cement technique for reducing post-operative bursitis after trochanteric fixation.

    PubMed

    Derman, Peter B; Horneff, John G; Kamath, Atul F; Garino, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Post-operative trochanteric bursitis is a known complication secondary to the surgical approach in total hip arthroplasty. This phenomenon may be partially attributable to repetitive microtrauma generated when soft tissues rub against implanted hardware. Significant rates of post-operative trochanteric bursitis have been observed following procedures in which a trochanteric fixation device, such as a bolt-washer mechanism or a cable-grip/claw system, is used to secure the trochanteric fragment after trochanteric osteotomy. We present a simple technique for use with a bolt-washer system or grip plate in which trochanteric components are covered in bone wax followed by a layer of cement to decrease friction and to diminish the risk of post-operative bursitis.

  1. Individuals with incident accelerated knee osteoarthritis have greater pain than those with common knee osteoarthritis progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Eaton, Charles B; Lu, Bing; Lo, Grace H; Lapane, Kate L; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated whether accelerated knee osteoarthritis (AKOA) was associated with greater pain and other outcomes and if outcomes varied over time differently among those with incident AKOA or common knee osteoarthritis (KOA), which we defined as a gradual onset of disease. We conducted longitudinal analyses among participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative who had no radiographic KOA at baseline (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL] <2). Participants were considered AKOA if ≥1 knees progressed to KL grade ≥3 and common KOA if ≥1 knees increased in radiographic scoring within 48 months. We defined the index visit as the study visit when they met the AKOA or common KOA criteria. Our observation period included up to 3 years before and after the index visit. Our primary outcome was WOMAC pain converted to an ordinal scale: none (pain score = 0/1 out of 20), mild (pain score = 2/3), and moderate-severe pain (pain score >3). We explored 11 other secondary outcome measures. We performed an ordinal logistic regression or linear models with generalized estimating equations. The predictors were group (AKOA or common KOA), time (seven visits), and a group-by-time interaction. Overall, individuals with AKOA (n = 54) had greater pain, functional disability, and global rating scale as well as slower chair-stand and walking pace compared with those with common KOA (n = 187). There was no significant interaction between group and time for knee pain; however, there was for chair-stand pace and global rating scale. In conclusion, AKOA may be a painful and disabling phenotype that warrants more attention by clinicians and researchers.

  2. Trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for congenital hip disease.

    PubMed

    Hartofilakidis, G; Babis, G C; Georgiades, G; Kourlaba, G

    2011-05-01

    We studied the effect of trochanteric osteotomy in 192 total hip replacements in 140 patients with congenital hip disease. There was bony union in 158 hips (82%), fibrous union in 29 (15%) and nonunion in five (3%). The rate of union had a statistically significant relationship with the position of reattachment of the trochanter, which depended greatly on the pre-operative diagnosis. The pre-operative Trendelenburg gait substantially improved in all three disease types (dysplasia, low and high dislocation) and all four categories of reattachment position. A persistent Trendelenburg gait post-operatively was noticed mostly in patients with defective union (fibrous or nonunion). Acetabular and femoral loosening had a statistically significant relationship with defective union and the position of reattachment of the trochanter. These results suggest that the complications of trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for patients with congenital hip disease are less important than the benefits of this surgical approach.

  3. Clinical inquiries. How should you treat trochanteric bursitis?

    PubMed

    Rowand, Mark; Chambliss, M Lee; Mackler, Leslie

    2009-09-01

    Conservative measures--followed by corticosteroid injection, if necessary--are best. Conservative therapy includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and stretching exercises focused on the lower back and sacroiliac joints. Patients whose symptoms persist despite conservative therapy are likely to benefit from an injection of 24 mg betamethasone and 1% lidocaine (or equivalent) into the inflamed bursa. In rare cases of intractable symptoms, surgical procedures such as iliotibial band release, subgluteal bursectomy, and trochanteric reduction osteotomy are options.

  4. Augmentation of proximal femoral nail in unstable trochanteric fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gadegone, Wasudeo M.; Shivashankar, Bhaskaran; Lokhande, Vijayanad; Salphale, Yogesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Biomechanically proximal femoral nail (PFN) is a better choice of implant, still it is associated with screw breakage, cut out of screw through femoral head, Z effect, reverse Z effect, and lateral migration of screws. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of augmented PFN in terms of prevention of postoperative complications and failure rates in unstable trochanteric fractures. Material and methods: We carried out a prospective study of 82 cases with unstable trochanteric femoral fractures from April 2010 to December 2015. Forty-two females and 40 males in the age group between 58 and 81 years were included in this study. There were 45 cases of AO 31 A2 (2.2, 2.3) and 37 cases of AO 31 A3 (3.1, 3.2, 3.3). Fractures were fixed by PFN with augmentation by an additional screw from trochanter to inferior quadrant of femoral head or cerclage wire to strengthen the lateral trochanteric wall. Results: The bone healing is observed in all the cases in the mean period of 14.2 weeks. Nine patients developed complications, including lateral migration of neck screws (n = 5), Z effect (n = 1), infection (n = 2), and breakage of distal interlocking bolt in one case. Removal of screws was required in five cases. Patients were followed up for a mean of 8.4 months. At the end of follow-up the Salvati and Wilson hip function was 32 (out of 40) in 88% of patients. Conclusion: The stabilization of lateral trochanteric wall with additional screw or cerclage wire increases the stability of construct. PMID:28186871

  5. Low Vitamin D levels are associated with greater pain and slow walking speed in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The clinical status of patients with knee OA is primarily predicated by their level of pain and their muscle function. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D influences both musculoskeletal health and neuromuscular function. Vitamin D deficiency is common among elders and those with comorbidities....

  6. Deltoid muscle injury scratched by an osteophyte on the greater tuberosity of the humeral head: an unusual cause of shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong-Ik; Park, Jong-Hoon; Jung, Tae-Wan; Jeon, Jin-Ho; Jeong, Woong-Kyo

    2015-09-01

    Few reports to date have discussed acute deltoid muscle injury, including partial or complete deltoid muscle detachment from its origin. The present report describes a different pathomechanism and clinical manifestations of deltoid muscle injury. A 52-year-old man experienced acute severe pain in the right shoulder as a result of abrupt elevation of the arm. The deltoid muscle had apparently been scratched by an osteophyte on the greater tuberosity. After arthroscopic excision of the osteophyte, the symptoms resolved completely.

  7. Femoral offset following trochanteric femoral fractures: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Buecking, Benjamin; Boese, Christoph Kolja; Seifert, Vinzenz; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Frink, Michael; Lechler, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the femoral offset reportedly improves outcome following total hip arthroplasty, but little is known of its influence following hip fractures. We aimed to establish the effect of the femoral offset on the medium-term functional outcome in elderly patients who had sustained trochanteric fractures requiring proximal femoral nailing. We measured the rotation corrected femoral offset (FORC) and relative femoral offset (FORL) on plain anteroposterior radiographs of the hip in 188 patients (58 male, 130 female) with a trochanteric fracture who underwent proximal femoral nailing at our institution. The primary outcome measure was the Harris hip score (HSS) 6 and 12 months postoperatively; the Barthel index was assessed as a secondary outcome. The mean FORC after surgery was 58 mm (±11 mm), while the mean FORL was 1.21 (±0.22). At final follow up, we found significant inverse relationships (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, ρ) between FORC and FORL and the functional outcome assessed by the HSS (FORC: ρ = -0.207, p = 0.036; FORL: ρ = -0.247, p = 0.012), and FORL and the Barthel index (FORC: ρ = -147, p = 0.129; FORL: ρ = -0.192, p = 0.046). A consistent trend was observed after adjustment for confounding variables. Our results underline the biomechanical importance of the femoral offset for medium-term outcomes in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures. In contrast with the published findings on total hip arthroplasty, we found an inverse correlation between functional outcome and the extent of the reconstructed femoral offset. Level I - Prognostic study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural allograft and cemented long-stem prosthesis for complex revision hip arthroplasty: use of a trochanteric claw plate improves final hip function

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Camille Thevenin; Kerboull, Marcel; Courpied, Jean Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Extensive bone loss raises formidable challenges in total hip revision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of reconstruction using a cemented long-stem and massive structural allograft implanted in a filleted proximal femur, with and without the use of a trochanteric claw plate. Between 1988 and 2001, 44 revisions were performed in 42 patients. After a transtrochanteric approach, the femur was cut longitudinally. A long, cemented Charnley-type prosthesis was used, and flaps of the residual femur were folded around the allograft. The greater trochanter was reinserted with wires in all revisions, and with both wires and a claw plate in 20 revisions. Mean follow-up was 7.15 years (range: 3–16); seven patients, died and four were lost to follow-up. The follow-up exceeded five years in 34 patients. The major complication was nonunion of the greater trochanter, which occurred in 25 cases. Six dislocations, one recurrence of infection, two mechanical loosening, and two fractures below the stem were also recorded. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improved final hip stability, even in patients with nonunion. Femoral reconstruction with a massive structural allograft is reliable and long-lived, and serious complications and long-term resorption are uncommon. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improves final hip stability. Level of evidence: Therapeutic study, level III (retrospective comparative study). PMID:18008098

  9. [Episacral lipoma: a treatable cause of low back pain].

    PubMed

    Erdem, Hatice Rana; Nacır, Barış; Özeri, Zuhal; Karagöz, Aynur

    2013-01-01

    Episacral lipoma is a small, tender subcutaneous nodule primarily occurring over the posterior iliac crest. Episacral lipoma is a significant and treatable cause of acute and chronic low back pain. Episacral lipoma occurs as a result of tears in the thoracodorsal fascia and subsequent herniation of a portion of the underlying dorsal fat pad through the tear. This clinical entity is common, and recognition is simple. The presence of a painful nodule with disappearance of pain after injection with anaesthetic, is diagnostic. Medication and physical therapy may not be effective. Local injection of the nodule with a solution of anaesthetic and steroid is effective in treating the episacral lipoma. Here we describe 2 patients with painful nodules over the posterior iliac crest. One patient complained of severe lower back pain radiating to the left lower extremity and this patient subsequently underwent disc operation. The other patient had been treated for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. In both patients, symptoms appeared to be relieved by local injection of anaesthetic and steroid. Episacral lipoma should be considered during diagnostic workup and in differential diagnosis of acute and chronic low back pain.

  10. High volume image-guided injections and structured rehabilitation improve greater trochanter pain syndrome in the short and medium term: a combined retrospective and prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Price, Jessica; Pritchard, Melanie; Crisp, Tom; Perry, John D.; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the aim of this study was to measure the effects of high volume image-guided injections and structured rehabilitation (HVIGI&SR) for greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS). Methods 31 consecutive subjects were recruited (23 retrospectively; 8 prospectively) over 5 months. GTPS was diagnosed based on history and examination findings, alongside radiological examination. The HVI-GI used a 22-gauge spinal needle to administer 10ml of 0.5% Marcaine and 50 mg hydrocortisone just deep to the periosteum underlying the gluteal tendon insertion under ultrasound guidance, followed by structured rehabilitation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain was used as the main outcome measure. Results the mean VAS improved from 81.7 mm (±17.6) to 42.3 mm (±28.3), (p<0.05) in the prospective subjects at a mean of 6 weeks, considered clinically significant. In the retrospective subjects the mean VAS had improved from 74.6 (±10.9) mm to 38.2(±31.2) mm at two weeks (p<0.01) and 31.3 (±27.6) mm at the final time point, a mean of 60 weeks (p<0.01). The Hip and Groin Outcome Score in the prospective group showed a non-significant increase from 173.2 to 296.1 (p=0.12). Conclusion HVIGI&SR should be considered when short- and medium-term pain-relieving treatment for GTPS is required. Controlled studies are warranted to fully establish effectiveness, and assess long term effects. Level of evidence case series. PMID:26261785

  11. A new flap alternative for trochanteric pressure sore coverage: distal gluteus maximus musculocutaneous advancement flap.

    PubMed

    Nisanci, Mustafa; Sahin, Ismail; Eski, Muhitdin; Alhan, Dogan

    2015-02-01

    Management of long-term bedridden patients experiencing pressure sores still represents a surgical challenge due to limited flap alternatives and high recurrence rates after the treatment. Fasciocutaneous, musculocutaneous, local perforator-based flaps, and free flaps have all been used for treatment of trochanteric pressure sores. This study presents a new use of distal gluteus maximus (GM) muscle as an advancement musculocutaneous flap for coverage of trochanteric pressure sores in 7 patients. The technique involves design of a long V-shaped skin island over the distal fibers of the GM muscle, beginning from the inferoposterior wound edge and extending inferomedially, almost parallel to the gluteal crease. After its harvest as an island flap on the distal fibers of the GM muscle, the skin paddle can be advanced onto the trochanteric defect, whereas the muscle itself is rotated after severing its insertion to femur. If a second triangular skin island is designed on the proximal fibers of GM muscle to cover an associated sacral defect, 2 coexisting pressure sores can be reconstructed concomitantly with 2 skin paddles on a single muscle belly at 1 surgical setting. Of the 7 patients, 3 had 3 (bilateral trochanteric and sacral), 2 had 2 (sacral and trochanteric), and 2 had 1 (only trochanteric) pressure sores. All ulcers were closed successfully and all of the flaps survived totally without any complication except the one in which we experienced minimal wound dehiscence in the early postoperative period. Conclusively, our current surgical method provided a reliable coverage for trochanteric pressure sores although it was technically straightforward and fast. Additionally, it offers simultaneous closure of 2 pressure ulcers with 2 skin islands on a single muscle flap.

  12. Internal fixation versus conservative treatment for elderly patients with a trochanteric hip fracture in conjunction with post-stroke hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Li, Kainan; Zheng, Yingjie

    2016-10-01

    To retrospectively evaluated Gamma nail internal fixation in the treatment of elderly patients with post-stroke hemiplegia experiencing trochanteric hip fracture. The patients were obtained consecutively from January 2005 to December 2010 with inclusion criteria. The total number was 138 and allocated to two groups: treated with the Gamma nail (n=72,group A) and continuous skin traction (n=66,group B). Preoperative variables including patient age, gender, duration of cerebrovascular accident, duration of hypertension, ASA risk score, Harris hip score and fracture type were recorded and compared. After treatment, time of patients activity on the bed, ambulation time, Harris hip score, mortality, complications were recorded and used to compare the outcomes. (1) Follow-up was undertaken from 3 to 10 years, with an average of 5.8 years. (2) No statistical difference in preoperative variables was found between the 2 groups. (3) two groups had statistical significance (P=0.000) in the time of patients activity on the bed and ambulation time and group A can activities on the bed and ambulates earlier. (4) There were significant differences between 2 groups in Harris hip score at 1 and 3 years and group A was significantly higher than group B. (5) there were statistically significant differences in mortality of 3 years, 5 years and 10 years and the group B was significantly higher than the group A. (6) There was a statistical significance in complications between 2 groups and group B was higher than group A. Major complications in group A were pain, lag screw cut out, implant infection and distal femoral fractures caused by fall after the surgery. On elderly patients with trochanteric hip fracture on the hemiplegic lower side, Gamma nail internal fixation treatment can achieve better effect, patients can be early activity, fewer complications, and less mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal pain in physical therapy practice: 3 patient cases.

    PubMed

    Rodeghero, Jason R; Denninger, Thomas R; Ross, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Resident's case problem. Abdominal pain is a common symptom, but not a common diagnosis, of patients referred to physical therapists for examination and intervention. For patients with primary symptoms of abdominal pain, a thorough evaluation must be performed to determine if symptoms are musculoskeletal in nature or of a nonmusculoskeletal origin that would warrant a referral to a different healthcare provider. This report describes the management of 3 adults with primary complaints of abdominal pain who were referred for physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Two of the patients had secondary symptoms of hip and/or low back pain and had previously undergone extensive medical testing for their chronic abdominal pain, without a definitive diagnosis having been determined. A physical therapy evaluation was conducted, and treatment, including manual physical therapy and exercise, was administered to address all relative impairments, once the physical therapist had determined that the patients' symptoms were of musculoskeletal origin. The third patient included in this series was referred to a physical therapist with a diagnosis of greater trochanteric versus iliopsoas bursitis. However, the patient had abdominal pain that was more acute in nature and a history and physical examination findings that were concerning for abdominal pain of nonmusculoskeletal origin. Both patients with abdominal pain of musculoskeletal origin showed marked improvement in pain and disability after 7 treatment sessions. The third patient was referred to her primary care physician, and ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed several intrauterine masses that were consistent with uterine fibroids. Following uterine fibroid embolization, the patient was symptom free. Although not routinely managed by physical therapists, abdominal pain is a relatively common patient symptom that can have several causes, both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal. This paper emphasizes the importance

  14. Comparative study of trochanteric fracture treated with the proximal femoral nail anti-rotation and the third generation of gamma nail.

    PubMed

    Yaozeng, Xu; Dechun, Geng; Huilin, Yang; Guangming, Zhu; Xianbin, Wang

    2010-12-01

    To compare the results between the proximal femoral nail anti-rotation (PFNA) and the third generation gamma nail (TGN) in the treatment of trochanteric fractures. Between April 2007 and May 2008, 107 consecutive patients older than 60 years with trochanteric femoral fractures were treated with PFNA or TGN. The preoperative variables including patient age, gender, fracture classification, walking ability and American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) rating of operative risk were summarised. Operative time, fluoroscopy time, blood loss, and any intra-operative complication were recorded for each patient. Follow-up was undertaken at 3, 6, and 12 postoperative months, and yearly thereafter. Plain AP and lateral radiographs were obtained at all visits. All changes in the position of the implant, complications, or fixation failure were recorded. Hip range of motion, pain about the hip and the thigh, walking ability score and return to work status were used to compare the outcomes. There were 55 patients in the PFNA group and 52 in the TGN group. The two groups were comparable with regard to the preoperative variables. The mean follow-up time was 17.5 months (range 12–24). Patients treated with a PFNA experienced a shorter fluoroscopy time and less blood loss. Sixteen patients were lost during the follow-up period. All the other fractures were radiographically healed at the last visit. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of functional outcomes, hospital stay, intra-operative and postoperative complications. PFNA provides less blood loss and shorter fluoroscopy time but no advantages in functional outcome, intra-operative and postoperative complications when compared with TGN. These two implants were comparable in the treatment of trochanteric fractures.

  15. [Resurfacing of a trochanteric pressure sore by a pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, J; Faghahati, S; Burin Des Roziers, B; Daoud, G; Cartier, S

    2013-06-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap is usually used as a free flap for various kinds of reconstruction and resurfacing of distant areas. Cover of a deep trochanteric pressure sore is commonly made by muscular or musculocutaneous flaps such as tensor of fascia lata or vastus lateralis. We report the case of a trochanteric pressure sore covered by a fasciocutaneous pedicled anterolateral thigh flap after negative pressure therapy in a 58-year-old paraplegic patient. After 6 months, a good quality of coverage was obtained with minimal morbidity of donor site. The pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral flap appears as a reliable option for the treatment of trochanteric pressure sore. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between trochanteric bursitis, osteoarthrosis and total hip arthroplasty☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Loss, Felipe; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro; Furian, Roque; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Zanatta, Júlia Mazzuchello; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2014-01-01

    Objective this was an epidemiological study on trochanteric bursitis at the time of performing total hip arthroplasty. Methods sixty-two sequential patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis, without any previous history of trochanteric bursitis, were evaluated. The bursas were collected and evaluated histologically. Results there were 35 female patients (56.5%) and 27 male patients (43.5%), with a mean age of 65 years (±11). Trochanteric bursitis was conformed histologically in nine patients (14.5%), of whom six were female (66.7%) and three were male (33.3%). Conclusions 14.5% of the bursas analyzed presented inflammation at the time that the primary total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis was performed, and the majority of the cases of bursitis were detected in female patients. PMID:26229811

  17. [Application of tensor fascia lata pedicled flap in reconstructing trochanteric pressure sore defects].

    PubMed

    Karabeg, Reuf; Dujso, Vanis; Jakirlić, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Tensor fascia lata pedicled flap is one of the most useful flaps for reconstruction pressure sore defects on trochanteric region. Debate exists on the safe dimension of the flap, as distal tip necrosis can be encountered. The aim of the current study is to report experience of Clinic for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Clinical University Center of Sarajevo, with tensor fascia lata pedicled flap in reconstructing trochanteric pressure sore defects. From January 1993 to December 2007, 39 pedicled TFL flaps were used for reconstruction trochanteric pressure sore defects in 34 patients. We used 3 local flaps for reconstruction of small trochanteric defects and one direct suture. In our study we had 43 trochanteric pressure sores and in 9 patients pressure sores were bilateral. The age ranged from 9 to 65, with average age 41,2. The resulting trochanteric defects in this study were due to debridement of pressure sore. The size of the flaps used ranged from 15 x 6 cm to 30 x 15 cm. All flaps survived. Distal tip necrosis occurred in 4 cases. All 4 cases developed in a very large flap beyond the safe limits. Wound dehiscence occurs in 3 cases. There was minimal donor side morbidity in the form of partial skin loss in 1 case. The average follow up period in this study ranged from 6 months to 15 years. Tensor fascia lata flap is reliable flap. Donor site morbidity is minimal. Problem with the flap can be encountered if the flap is not harvested with the safe limits and properly designed. Proper preoperative preparations must be taken into consideration. Chronic skin ulcers, such as pressure sores, that are refractory to conventional local wound therapies, are good examples of potential beneficiaries of the TFL musculocutaneous flap.

  18. Ultrasonography-Assisted Arthroscopic Proximal Iliotibial Band Release and Trochanteric Bursectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We describe arthroscopic iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy assisted by intraoperative ultrasonography for accurate placement of arthroscopic portals and to ensure adequate decompression of the peritrochanteric space. We have found ultrasonography for endoscopic iliotibial band release a useful tool to assist with localizing the site and length of decompression. PMID:24400195

  19. Ultrasonography-assisted arthroscopic proximal iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We describe arthroscopic iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy assisted by intraoperative ultrasonography for accurate placement of arthroscopic portals and to ensure adequate decompression of the peritrochanteric space. We have found ultrasonography for endoscopic iliotibial band release a useful tool to assist with localizing the site and length of decompression.

  20. Pain.

    PubMed

    Melzack, Ronald; Katz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Pain has many valuable functions. It often signals injury or disease, generates a wide range of adaptive behaviors, and promotes healing through rest. Despite these beneficial aspects of pain, there are negative features that challenge our understanding of the puzzle of pain, including persistent phantom limb pain after amputation or total spinal cord transection. Pain is a personal, subjective experience influenced by cultural learning, the meaning of the situation, attention, and other psychological variables. Pain processes do not begin with the stimulation of receptors. Rather, injury or disease produces neural signals that enter an active nervous system that (in the adult organism) is the substrate of past experience, culture, and a host of other environmental and personal factors. These brain processes actively participate in the selection, abstraction, and synthesis of information from the total sensory input. Pain is not simply the end product of a linear sensory transmission system; it is a dynamic process that involves continuous interactions among complex ascending and descending systems. The neuromatrix theory guides us away from the Cartesian concept of pain as a sensation produced by injury, inflammation, or other tissue pathology and toward the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience produced by multiple influences. These influences range from the existing synaptic architecture of the neuromatrix-which is determined by genetic and sensory factors-to influences from within the body and from other areas in the brain. Genetic influences on synaptic architecture may determine-or predispose toward-the development of chronic pain syndromes. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:1-15. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  1. Influence of Lateral Muscle Loading in the Proximal Femur after Fracture Stabilization with a Trochanteric Gamma Nail (TGN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai; Mahaisavariya, Banchong; Suwanprateeb, Jintamai; Bohez, Erik; Vander Sloten, Jos

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of lateral muscle loading on the stress/strain distributions of the trochanteric Gamma nail (TGN) fixation within the healed, trochanteric and subtrochanteric femoral fractures by means of a finite element method. The effect of three muscle groups, the abductors (ABD), the vastus lateralis (VL) and the iliotibial band (ITB), were investigated. The analytical results showed that addition of lateral muscle forces, iliotibial band and vastus lateralis, produced compensation of forces and reduction of bending moments in the bone and in the trochanteric Gamma nail especially in the lateral aspect. The iliotibial band produced a higher impact as compared to the vastus lateralis. Therefore in the finite element analysis of the proximal femur with the trochanteric Gamma nail fracture fixation should include the lateral muscle forces to simulate load condition with maximal physiological relevance to the closed nailing technique.

  2. [Coxa vara. Isolated growth of the greater trochanter. Prevention-treatment].

    PubMed

    Litt, R; Albassir, A; Willems, S; Debry, R

    1990-01-01

    Prevention of avascular complications is a primary aim. The ischemic insult to the femoral head provokes different types of morphologic deformities depending on its location. When the lateral part of the growth plate is affected, the head will be in valgus with a short neck, on the contrary, when the medial part is affected, a coxa vara occurs. The sooner the growth is stopped, the shorter the neck will be. Nevertheless, the greater trochanter will continue its growth and under certain conditions, will extend beyond the head. The Articulo-Trochanteric Distance is a measurement of the deformity which may be checked regularly. Early recognition permits prevention and adequate treatment. Treatment options include epiphysiodesis of the greater trochanter before the age of 8 to 10 years, trochanteric repositioning with osteotomy, and valgus osteotomy (Pauwels' Y-osteotomy).

  3. Comparing the responsiveness of a brief, multidimensional risk screening tool for back pain to its unidimensional reference standards: the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Timothy H; Hill, Jonathan C; Main, Chris J; Lewis, Martyn; Sullivan, Michael J L; Hay, Elaine M

    2012-11-01

    Back pain is a leading cause of disability. Previous research suggests that modifiable risk factors influence recovery from back pain, and practice guidelines recommend integrating such factors within primary care management. Toward this goal, a brief, multidimensional questionnaire, the STarT Back Tool, was designed to facilitate risk assessment by reducing the need to administer multiple, unidimensional questionnaires. However, aspects of this tool's clinical utility remain unaddressed. For instance, it is unclear whether this tool is responsive to treatment-related changes or whether clinically meaningful information is lost when it replaces multiple risk questionnaires. This study compared the responsiveness of the STarT Back Tool to its corresponding full-length measures, and evaluated its ability to detect clinically meaningful improvement. The study sample included 300 participants that consulted their doctor with disabling back pain. The STarT Back Tool and its reference standard questionnaires (disability, catastrophizing, fear, and depression) were administered at baseline and 4 months later. Regression analyses tested whether, after controlling for its reference standard questionnaires, the STarT Back Tool (independent variable) predicted treatment-related changes in global improvement, pain severity, disability, catastrophizing, fear, and depression (dependent variables). Receiver operating characteristic analyses determined the level of STarT Back change needed for clinically meaningful improvement. STarT Back scores predicted changes in all dependent variables except depression. Reductions in STarT Back scores predicted meaningful improvement on all dependent variables. These findings suggest that the STarT Back Tool, instead of multiple risk questionnaires, can be used to measure recovery from back pain. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  4. [Resurfacing of an ischial and trochanteric recurrent pressure sore by a pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap].

    PubMed

    Moullot, P; Philandrianos, C; Casanova, D

    2014-10-01

    Ischial pressure sores, common in paraplegic patient, are the most difficult to treat, and poor prognosis associated with a high rate of postoperative recurrence. Many surgical techniques by muscular or myocutaneous flap coverage have been described. We report an original use of a fasciocutaneous pedicled anterolateral thigh (ALTp) flap for coverage of an ischial pressure sore combined with a trochanteric pressure sore, exceeded beyond any conventional therapeutic solution. A 45-year-old paraplegic patient suffered from a trochanteric and ischial pressure sore, which had already received coverage by a muscular flap of biceps femoris and gluteus maximus. At 1 year, the result is satisfactory, with good coverage without recurrence. The fasciocutaneous ALTp flap can be a solution to cover recurrent ischial pressure sores beyond conventional methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Rotationally stable screw-anchor versus sliding hip screw plate systems in stable trochanteric femur fractures: a biomechanical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Knobe, Matthias; Gradl, Gertraud; Maier, Klaus-Jürgen; Drescher, Wolf; Jansen-Troy, Arne; Prescher, Andreas; Knechtel, Toralf; Antony, Pia; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2013-06-01

    The rotationally stable screw-anchor plate system (RoSA) is unique in using a novel screw-blade combination. This investigation tested the hypothesis whether RoSA is advantageous over the sliding hip screw plate system (SHS) with regard to stiffness, failure load, displacement, and migration in stable trochanteric femur fractures (OTA 31A1.1). Thirteen femur pairs (mean age = 79 years; range, 64-92 years) received implants of either the RoSA or SHS (Koenigsee Implants, Allendorf, Germany). Beginning with 300 N and under consecutive 300 N load-increase steps (2000 cycles, 0.5 Hz) the femurs were cycled until failure. Specimens were evaluated for fragment displacement in both frontal and rotational planes and for migration. A survival analysis was carried out. With regard to stiffness (526 ± 195 N/mm vs 358 ± 143 N/mm; P = 0.006) and the failure load (2838 ± 781 N vs 2262 ± 863 N; P = 0.012), the RoSA proved superior to the SHS. Furthermore, RoSA demonstrated higher rotational stability in comparison to the SHS (1800 N: 0 ± 0 degrees vs 1.1 ± 1.3 degrees; P = 0.015; failure point: 0 ± 0 degrees vs 2.3 ± 2.6 degrees; P = 0.008), measuring rotation about femoral neck axis over time. Whereas cutout occurred only in the RoSA system (n = 3; P = 0.110), the SHS underwent plastic deformation in 7 cases (n = 7; P = 0.003). In one case (7%), the insertion of the RoSA blade resulted in iatrogenic cut-through caused by a jamming of the screw and the blade. The fixation of stable trochanteric femur fractures with RoSA in cadavers led to greater primary stability under cyclic load, with significant advantages with regard to stiffness, failure load, and rotational stability, compared with the SHS. A detrimental effect was its migration tendency, which began at 1800 N and occurred in the cranial direction. A meticulous insertion technique was a prerequisite to avoid iatrogenic perforation of the femoral head. Our results will have to be substantiated by further

  6. Removal of infused water predominantly during insertion (water exchange) is consistently associated with a greater reduction of pain score - review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of water method colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harker, JO; Leung, JW; Siao-Salera, RM; Mann, SK; Ramirez, FC; Friedland, S; Amato, A; Radaelli, F; Paggi, S; Terruzzi, V; Hsieh, YH

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Variation in the outcomes in RcTs comparing water-related methods and air insufflation during the insertion phase of colonoscopy raises challenging questions regarding the approach. This report reviews the impact of water exchange on the variation in attenuation of pain during colonoscopy by water-related methods. Methods Medline (2008 to 2011) searches, abstracts of the 2011 Digestive Disease Week (DDW) and personal communications were considered to identify RcTs that compared water-related methods and air insufflation to aid insertion of the colonoscope. Results: Since 2008 nine published and one submitted RcTs and five abstracts of RcTs presented at the 2011 DDW have been identified. Thirteen RcTs (nine published, one submitted and one abstract, n=1850) described reduction of pain score during or after colonoscopy (eleven reported statistical significance); the remaining reports described lower doses of medication used, or lower proportion of patients experiencing severe pain in colonoscopy performed with water-related methods compared with air insufflation (Tables 1 and 2). The water-related methods notably differ in the timing of removal of the infused water - predominantly during insertion (water exchange) versus predominantly during withdrawal (water immersion). Use of water exchange was consistently associated with a greater attenuation of pain score in patients who did not receive full sedation (Table 3). Conclusion The comparative data reveal that a greater attenuation of pain was associated with water exchange than water immersion during insertion. The intriguing results should be subjected to further evaluation by additional RcTs to elucidate the mechanism of the pain-alleviating impact of the water method. PMID:22163081

  7. Rice body mass formation mimicking a neoplastic disease around the trochanteric bursae of the hip.

    PubMed

    Uludağ, Serkan; Seyahi, Aksel; Ege, Yaman; Tetik, Onur

    2010-01-01

    Multiple rice body formation is an uncommon inflammatory process. Sometimes it leads to a big mass in unusual locations. Although sometimes associated with bursitis and systemic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, the pathophysiology of this rare entity is still obscure. We present a 29-year-old woman with multiple rice body mass formation in the trochanteric bursa of the left hip. She was operated, and had no recurrence at 18 months after the surgery.

  8. Physical Activity Might Be of Greater Importance for Good Spinal Control Than If You Have Had Pain or Not: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Ulrika; Lundell, Sara; Aasa, Björn; Westerståhl, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Longitudinal design. A cohort followed in 3 waves of data collection. The aim of the study was to describe the relationships between the performance of 2 tests of spinal control at the age of 52 years and low back pain, physical activity level, and fitness earlier in life, as well as to describe the cross-sectional relationships between these measures. Altered spinal control has been linked to pain; however, other stimuli may also lead to inability to control the movements of the spine. Participants answered questions about physical activity and low back pain, and performed physical fitness tests at the age of 16, 34, and 52 years. The fitness test battery included tests of endurance in the back and abdominal muscles, a submaximal bicycle ergometer test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake, and measurements of hip flexion, thoracic spine flexibility, and anthropometrics. Two tests were aggregated to a physical fitness index. At the age of 52, also 2 tests of spinal control, the standing Waiter's bow (WB) and the supine double leg lower (LL) were performed. Logistic regression analyses showed that higher back muscle endurance at the age of 34 years could positively predict WB performance at 52 years and higher physical fitness at the age of 34 could positively predict LL performance at 52 years. Regarding cross-sectional relationships, an inability to perform the WB correctly was associated with lower physical fitness, flexibility and physical activity, and larger waist circumference. An inability to correctly perform the LL was associated with lower physical fitness. One-year prevalence of pain was not significantly associated with WB or LL test performance. An active life resulting in higher physical fitness is related to better spinal control in middle-aged men and women. This further strengthens the importance of physical activity throughout the life span. 3.

  9. Calcar femorale grafting in the hemiarthroplasty of the hip for unstable inter trochanteric fractures

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Chandrashekar J; Thakkar, Savyasachi; Kathalgere, Rajshekhar T; Kumar, Malhar N

    2015-01-01

    Background: The sliding screw-plate devices and cephalo-medullary nail devices have performed well in stable inter-trochanteric fractures in patients with reasonably good quality of bone. However, their suboptimal performance in comminuted fractures in the presence of osteoporotic bone has prompted many surgeons to consider bipolar hemiarthroplasty as the primary modality of management of comminuted inter-trochanteric fractures in elderly patients. However, long term stability of the hemiarthroplasty implant also may be compromised due to the presence of postero-medial bone loss at the area of the calcar. Materials and Methods: We have presented a simple and effective technique of calcar grafting by harvesting cortical bone strut from the neck of the fractured femur. A total of 34 patients with inter-trochanteric fractures of the femur were treated with calcar grafting. The mean age was 79.2 years. The graft was harvested from the calcar region of the head and neck fragment of the femur and wedged between the medial femoral cortex and medial edge of the prosthesis. The mean followup period was 54.5 months. Results: In 32 of 34 (94%) patients in our series, the calcar graft healed well without dislodgement. There was graft resorption in two patients associated with subsidence of the implant and loosening. Conclusion: Calcar grafting using this technique provides stability to the implant in the presence of comminution and incorporates well in the majority of patients. Donor site morbidity of graft harvesting is also avoided. PMID:26806966

  10. Is there a relationship between psoas impingement and increased trochanteric retroversion?

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hoyos, Juan; Schröder, Ricardo; Reddy, Manoj; Palmer, Ian J.; Khoury, Anthony; Martin, Hal David

    2015-01-01

    The concept of psoas impingement secondary to a tight or inflamed iliopsoas tendon causing impingement of the anterior labrum during hip extension has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between the lesser trochanteric version (LTV) in symptomatic patients with psoas impingement as compared with asymptomatic hips. The femoral neck version (FNV) and LTV were evaluated on axial magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the angle between LTV and FNV. Data from 12 symptomatic patients and 250 asymptomatic patients were analysed. The mean, range and standard deviations were calculated. Independent t-tests were used to determine differences between groups. The lesser trochanteric retroversion was significantly increased in patients with psoas impingement as compared with asymptomatic hips (−31.1° SD ± 6.5 versus −24.2° ± 11.5, P < 0.05). The FNV (9° ± 8.8 versus 14.1° ± 10.7, P > 0.05) and the angle between FNV and LTV (40.2° ± 9.7 versus 38.3° ± 9.6, P > 0.05) were not significantly different between groups. In conclusion, the lesser trochanteric retroversion is significantly increased in patients with psoas impingement as compared with asymptomatic hips. PMID:27011834

  11. Circumferential wires as a supplement to intramedullary nailing in unstable trochanteric hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Fixation of unstable trochanteric fractures is challenging. Application of a circumferential wire may facilitate bone contact and avoid postoperative fracture displacement. However, the use of circumferential wires remains controversial due to possible disturbance of the blood supply to the underlying bone. We evaluated the results of applied circumferential wires, concentrating mainly on complications and reoperations. Patients and methods 60 patients with unstable trochanteric fractures and use of circumferential wires (1 or more) and an intramedullary nail were included from 2 centers. We retrospectively assessed complications and reoperation rates within the first postoperative year. Results In 37 of the 60 patients, 2 or more circumferential wires were used. Anatomic reduction was achieved in 24 of the patients and a total cortical displacement of ≤ 10 mm was achieved in 26 other patients. 6 of the 43 patients with radiographic audit after 12 weeks sustained a subsequent fracture displacement of more than 5 mm. 4 patients underwent reoperation: 1 due to deep infection, 1 due to technical failure during osteosynthesis, 1 had a screw cut out, and 1 sustained a new fracture following a new fall. Interpretation Application of circumferential wires as a supplement to intramedullary nails in unstable trochanteric fractures is an option as it provides good primary reduction which, in most patients, is maintained over time—with no apparent increase in reoperation rate. Based on our results and on other reports, the use of circumferential wires does not appear to be harmful as sometimes claimed. PMID:22329672

  12. [Trochanteric bursitis, pelvic enthesopathy and giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Lorléac'h, A; Duffau, P; Michaux, C; Greib, C; Caubet, O; Viallard, J-F; Pellegrin, J-L

    2008-12-01

    Giant cell arteritis, a large-sized vessel vasculitis, may be associated with musculoskeletal proximal (polymyalgia rheumatica) or distal manifestations. A 68-year-old woman, who had inflammatory pelvic girdle pain, was diagnosed with giant cell arteritis and was successfully treated with corticosteroids. The magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed a bilateral bursitis and pelvic girdle enthesopathy. Bursitis is the main anatomic lesion occurring in polymyalgia rheumatica and can be underlined by ultrasonography.

  13. Does a trochanteric lag screw improve fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures? A biomechanical analysis in cadaveric bone.

    PubMed

    Hawks, Michael A; Kim, Hyunchul; Strauss, Joseph E; Oliphant, Bryant W; Golden, Robert D; Hsieh, Adam H; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the biomechanical performances of a trochanteric lag screw construct and a traditional inverted triangle construct in the treatment of simulated Pauwels type 3 femoral neck fractures. An inverted triangle construct (three 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed in inverted triangle orientation) and a trochanteric lag screw construct (two 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed across the superior portion of the femoral neck and one 4.5-mm lag screw placed perpendicular to the fracture in superolateral to inferomedial orientation) were tested in nine matched pairs of non-osteoporotic human cadaveric femora. We used a previously described vertically oriented femoral neck fracture model and testing protocol that incrementally loaded the constructs along the mechanical axis of the femur to 1400 N. Specimens that survived incremental loading underwent cyclic loading. Apparent construct stiffness, force at 3mm of displacement, and survival of incremental loading were recorded. The trochanteric lag screw group had a 70% increase in stiffness (261 N/mm [29 standard deviation] versus 153 N/mm [16 standard deviation]; P=0.026) and a 43% increase in force required for displacement (620 N versus 435 N; P=0.018) compared with the inverted triangle group. One trochanteric lag screw and no inverted triangle specimen survived incremental loading. A trochanteric lag screw construct applied to vertically oriented femoral neck fractures provides marked improvement in mechanical performance compared with the inverted triangle construct. © 2013.

  14. Subluxation of the hip joint after internal fixation of a trochanteric fracture.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuo; Murotani, Rentaroh; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Okahara, Hitoshi; Ohbayashi, Osamu; Iwase, Hideaki; Fujita, Hidemine; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2004-02-01

    The authors report an unusual case of hip subluxation after internal fixation without associated sepsis. We report one recently treated case in which a 75-year-old female experienced subluxation of her hip joint after open reduction and internal fixation for a trochanteric fracture. In this paper, we describe a case of progressive, spontaneous subluxation of the hip joint over several weeks. Most previously reported cases are associated with cerebral palsy. This entity has not been reported previously. Our patient was treated by hemi-arthroplasty and repair of the disrupted capsule, and achieved a good long-term functional result. The cause of this particular condition is discussed.

  15. Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty Involving Trochanteric Osteotomy without Subtrochanteric Shortening for High Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soong Joon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty with subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy is widely performed for high hip dislocation. However, suboptimal leg length discrepancy correction and nonunion of the osteotomy site remain concerns. Although total hip arthroplasty using trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy was introduced, cemented implants have been more commonly used than contemporary cementless implants in this procedure. We evaluated the long-term results of cementless total hip arthroplasty with trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy for high hip dislocation. Methods From 1990 to 2002, 27 cementless total hip arthroplasties using trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy were performed in 26 patients with Crowe III or IV high hip dislocation and a mean age of 36.4 ± 12.9 years. Seven ceramic-on-ceramic, 8 ceramic-on-polyethylene, 10 metal-on-polyethylene, and 2 metal-on-metal bearings were inserted. Mean follow-up was 15.1 ± 3.7 years. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and radiographic data and evaluated the clinical and radiological results including the Harris hip score, implant survival, correction of leg length discrepancy, and occurrence of complications. Results The mean Harris hip score and leg length discrepancy improved significantly from 73.3 to 94.9 points and from 4.3 cm to 1.0 cm, respectively. With revision for loosening set as the end point, implant survival rates at 10 and 15 years postoperatively were 96.0% and 90.9% for stems and 74.1% and 52.3% for cups. In 8 of 10 hips with the metal-on-polyethylene bearing and 4 of 8 hips with the ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing, revision surgery was performed for aseptic loosening. However, no revision was performed in hips with the ceramic-on-ceramic bearing or the metal-on-metal bearing. Implant survival was significantly different by the type of bearing surface. Two permanent neurologic complications occurred in patients with a limb lengthening

  16. [Blind nailing of trochanteric fractures using the Ender method (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Carret, J P; Van Cuyck, A; Bejui, J; Dejour, H; de Mourgues, G; Fischer, L P

    1980-01-01

    After trochanteric fractures, the rate of survival of old patients was best when treated by the Ender method: 15% died during 3 months following the fracture. The procedure is uneasy and an excellent radiologic technique is necessary. The position of the proximal end of the first nail in the femoral head is most important. Excessive external rotation was frequent, but little desabling. Secondary displacement of the nails toward the distal end occurred in 25% of the cases and was difficult to avoid but remained moderate. The procedure is indicated in old people with porotic bones. It should not be done in subtrochanteric fractures.

  17. Use of a trochanteric flip osteotomy improves outcomes in Pipkin IV fractures.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Brian D; Moon, Charles N; Franco, Dennis P

    2009-04-01

    The optimal surgical approach for combined femoral head and acetabular fractures (Pipkin IV) is controversial because of their rarity and lack of definitive reports. Surgical dislocation with trochanteric flip osteotomy (TFO) allows simultaneous exposure of the acetabulum and femoral head. We protected the obturator internus and inferior capsule during repair with a heavy suture at the inferior extent of the traumatic capsulotomy. We retrospectively reviewed 12 patients with Pipkin IV fractures treated using this approach during a 6-year period. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 47 months; range, 24-71 months). Clinical outcomes were measured using the Merle d'Aubigné-Postel and Thompson-Epstein scoring scales. Radiographically, all patients achieved healing of their acetabular fractures; 11 achieved healing of the femoral head fracture and osteonecrosis developed in one patient. The average Merle d'Aubigné-Postel score was 15.6 of 18; using the Thompson-Epstein score, 10 of the 12 patients had good or excellent outcomes, one had a fair outcome, and one had a poor outcome. Trochanteric flip osteotomy allowed for simultaneous exposure and repair of both lesions in Pipkin IV fractures. Using a uniform surgical protocol with TFO rendered clinical results comparable to previously reported outcomes in series of isolated femoral head fractures. Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  18. Risk factors for cervical and trochanteric hip fracture during a fall on the hip.

    PubMed

    Meriläinen, Sanna; Nevalainen, Tanja; Luukinen, Heikki; Jalovaara, Pekka

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate factors related to hip fracture in patients who fall on the hip in order to identify those patients who might benefit from the use of hip protectors. The study was performed by comparing 146 persons who had fallen and sustained a soft tissue injury in the hip region with 146 cervical hip fracture and 146 trochanteric hip fracture patients matched for age, sex and place of residence. The fall group was drawn from a prospectively collected cohort of 1,061 elderly people participating in an epidemiological survey on fall injuries; the fracture group was drawn from a prospectively recorded hip fracture database of the Oulu University Hospital (n = 1,714). Demographic data, place and mechanism of falling, walking ability, associated diseases, medication. In a stepwise polychotomous conditional logistic regression analysis, the following significant and independent risk factors for both fracture types were seen: low weight, tall height, falling from standing height and respiratory disease. Falling indoors was a risk for only trochanteric fractures, while inability to walk alone outdoors was a risk for only cervical hip fractures. Elderly persons with low weight, tall height, respiratory disease, tendency to fall indoors and inability to walk alone outdoors should be candidates for the use of hip protectors.

  19. [Giant recurrent trochanteric pressure sore: A complex medico-surgical care].

    PubMed

    Pesenti, S; Ciceron, C; Toledano, E; Niddam, J; Tournebise, H

    2016-12-01

    Pressure sores are a frequent complication in spinal injured people. Their treatment is often long and complex. We report the case of a 60-year-old man affected with complete paraplegia who developed a right trochanteric pressure ulcer complicated with osteoarthritis of the coxofemoral joint. The treatment was done in three steps. First, a large excision of necrotic tissues and a femoral head-neck resection is performed. Then, the defect is partly covered with a Gluteus Maximus and a Biceps Femoris myocutaneous flaps. Finally, the residual defect is covered with a cutaneous pedicled groin flap called McGregor's flap. Later, the patient showed a right para-scrotal pressure sore on a heterotopic ossification of the ischial tuberosity. McGregor's flap is rarely employed for treating trochanteric pressure sores. It was here the only pedicled flap available. It was necessary to autonomize it in order to get enough length and to place a hip external fixation. The para-scrotal pressure sore illustrates the fact that bone resection surgery lifts the weight-bearing zones and can lead to pressure sores in unusual locations. The surgical treatment of these "giant" pressure sores requires a perfect collaboration between teams of rehabilitation and several surgical areas. Without a good adherence of the patient, the treatment is doomed to fail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. HA-coated screws decrease the incidence of fixation failure in osteoporotic trochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Antonio; Faldini, Cesare; Pegreffi, Francesco; Giannini, Sandro

    2004-08-01

    This study was done to determine if elderly patients with trochanteric fractures and with osteoporosis could benefit from treatment with a dynamic hip screw fixed with HA-coated AO/ASIF screws. One hundred twenty patients with AO, A1, or A2 trochanteric fractures were selected. Patients were divided into two groups and randomized to receive a 135 degree-four-hole dynamic hip screw fixed with either standard lag and cortical AO/ASIF screws (Group A), or HA-coated lag and cortical AO/ASIF screws (Group B). Lag screw cutout occurred in four patients in Group A, but not in any patients in Group B. In Group A, the femoral neck shaft angle was 134 degrees +/- 5 degrees postoperatively and 127 degrees +/- 12 degrees at 6 months. In Group B, the femoral neck shaft angle was 134 degrees +/- 7 degrees postoperatively and 133 degrees +/- 7 degrees at 6 months. The Harris hip score at 6 months was 60 +/- 25 in Group A and 71 +/- 18 in Group B. The superior results of Group B can be attributed to the increased screw fixation provided by the HA-coated screws. We recommend lag screws coated with HA for dynamic hip screw fixation, especially in osteoporotic bone.

  1. Comparison of cutout resistance of dynamic condylar screw and proximal femoral nail in reverse oblique trochanteric fractures: A biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Gursimrat Singh; Rastogi, Amit; Singh, Vakil; Goel, Satish Chandra; Mishra, Diwakar; Arora, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reverse oblique trochanteric fracture of femur is a distinct fracture pattern. 95° Dynamic condylar screw (DCS) and proximal femoral nail (PFN) are currently the most commonly used implants for its fixation. This study aims to biomechanically compare the cutout resistance as well as modes of failure of DCS and PFN in reverse oblique trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Sixteen freshly harvested cadaveric proximal femoral specimens were randomly assigned to three mean bone mineral density matched groups, eight of which were implanted with 95° DCS and the other eight with PFN. The constructs were made unstable to resemble a reverse oblique trochanteric fracture by removing a standard size posteromedial wedge. These constructs were subjected to computer controlled cyclic compressive loading with 200 kg at a frequency of 1 cycle/second (1 Hz) and end points of both the groups were analyzed. Results: The bending moment of the PFN group was approximately 50% less than that of the DCS group (P<0.0001). The PFN group resisted more number of cycles than the DCS group (P=0.03) and showed lesser number of component failures as compared with the DCS group (P=0.003). Conclusions: The PFN is biomechanically superior to DCS for the fixation of reverse oblique trochanteric fractures of femur. PMID:22719110

  2. Dynamic Hip Screw with Trochanteric Stablization Plate Fixation of Unstable Inter-Trochanteric Fractures: A Prospective Study of Functional and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashwin; Sadasivan, Anand Kumar; Hegde, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of unstable intertrochanteric fractures have posed a unique challenge to orthopaedicians over years. Several surgical techniques and implants have been developed for the same. Fractures of the lateral wall have been considered as the major cause of femoral medialization after fixation by Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS). Studies have shown that supplementation of trochanteric stabilization plate reduces the incidence of femoral medialization. Aim To assess the radiological union and hip function after fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures with DHS and Trochanteric Stabilization Plate (TSP). Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted with a total of 32 patients between age groups of 30-70 years with Evan Jensen unstable and very unstable type of intertrochanteric fractures, between August 2013 to March 2015 in the Department of Orthopaedics ARS Hospital, Tirupur, Tamil Nadu, India. They underwent open reduction and DHS and TSP fixation. They were started on full weight bearing mobilization on post op day three. They were reviewed at post-op weeks 3,6,12 and 24. Hip mobilization and rehabilitation exercises were instituted during course of reviews. Radiographs were taken to assess fracture union and hip function was evaluated during follow-ups. At the end of 24 weeks, degree of radiographic union was scored as per Radiological Union Score for Hip (RUSH). Hip function was scored with Harris hip score. Analyses were done using frequency and proportions. Chi-square tests were used to assess the test of association. Results Fifteen patients had RUSH scores between 10-20 and 17 patients had scores between 20-30 points. RUSH score had mean of 21.03+/- 2.132 points. 9 of 32 patients had excellent results as per Harris hip score, 10 had good, nine had fair and four had poor. On comparison of Harris hip score with RUSH score: Interval between 10-20 points, of 15 patients; two had excellent results, five had good, five had fair and three

  3. Treatment of trochanteric fractures with the gamma3 nail - methodology and early results of a prospective consecutive monitored clinical case series.

    PubMed

    A C, Unger; E, Wilde; B, Kienast; C, Jürgens; A P, Schulz

    2014-01-01

    There is only sparse data on clinical results and complications of the third-generation Gamma nailing system (Gamma3, Stryker). Therefore, we started a large multi-centre case series in 2008. The aim of this paper is to present the study design and early results of a single arm of a prospective, consecutive, monitored, post-market follow-up evaluation of Gamma3 nails. From September 2009 to January 2012, 154 consecutive patients with an average age of 80 ± 1.43 years (50-99 years) and a trochanteric femoral fracture were included in the local arm of the trial. All patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were treated with a Gamma3 nail. Preoperative variables included age, gender, fracture classification, walking ability (Merle d'Aubigné score), daily activity level (retrospective Zuckerman score), ASA rating of operative risk, waiting time for operation, use of walker or crutches and body mass index (BMI). Skin-to-skin time, fluoroscopy time, blood loss, intraoperative complications and device information were recorded for each patient. Follow-up postoperative assessment was undertaken at 4, 12 and 24 months. Hip range of motion, pain around the hip and the tight, walking ability (Merle d'Aubigné score, Sahlgrenska mobility score) and management of daily life (Zuckerman score) were used to evaluate the outcome. The descriptive data of age, gender, BMI, ASA classification, fracture type and skin-to-skin time is similar to other studies. Median fluoroscopy time was 62 seconds (range: 4-225 seconds) and significantly shorter in closed reductions. No intraoperative implant-related complication was recorded. A cut-out of the leg-screw during assessment period occurred in 2.6% patients (n = 4). At the 12-month assessment two (1.8%) non-unions were identified and two patients (1.8%) had broken the femoral shaft below the 180 mm nail after a fall. Analysis of the scores showed significantly declined mobility and activity in daily life four months after operation

  4. Giant trochanteric pressure sore: Use of a pedicled chimeric perforator flap for cover

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Pressure sores are increasing in frequency commensurate with an ageing population with multi-system disorders and trauma. Numerous classic options are described for providing stable wound cover. With the burgeoning knowledge on perforator anatomy, recent approaches focus on the use of perforator-based flaps in bedsore surgery. A giant neglected trochanteric pressure sore in a paraplegic is presented. Since conventional options of reconstruction appeared remote, the massive ulcer was successfully managed by a chimeric perforator-based flap. The combined muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were raised as separate paddles based on the anterolateral thigh perforator branches and provided stable cover without complications. Perforators allow versatility in managing complex wounds without compromising on established principles. PMID:19881035

  5. Effects of lag screw design and lubrication on sliding in trochanteric nails.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the sliding characteristics of three lag screw designs used with trochanteric nails and determined the effects of lubrication on sliding. They were tested by an established method to measure initiation and ease of lag screw sliding. These tests were then repeated with calf serum lubrication. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) between the loads required to initiate lag screw sliding that appeared to be related to design. Screw sliding was similar for all three designs; however, the presence of lag screw locking slots affected sliding in that region. Lubrication did not affect either parameter. Lag screw design aspects, such as diameter and, particularly, surface finish, affect sliding. Due to the small contact area between the lag screw and nail creating high interface stresses, lubrication had no effect on lag screw sliding.

  6. Trochanteric fragility fractures : Treatment using the cement-augmented proximal femoral nail antirotation.

    PubMed

    Neuerburg, C; Mehaffey, S; Gosch, M; Böcker, W; Blauth, M; Kammerlander, C

    2016-06-01

    Use of standardized cement augmentation of the proximal femur nail antirotation (PFNA) for the treatment of trochanteric fragility fractures, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality, to achieve safer conditions for immediate full weight-bearing and mobilization, thus, improving preservation of function and independency of orthogeriatric patients. Trochanteric fragility fractures (type 31-A1-3). Ipsilateral arthritis of the hip, leakage of contrast agent into the hip joint, femoral neck fractures. Reduction of the fracture on a fracture table if possible, or minimally invasive open reduction of the proximal femur, i. e., using collinear forceps if necessary. Positioning of guidewires for adjustment of the PFNA and the spiral blade, respectively. Exclusion of leakage of contrast agent and subsequent injection of TRAUMACEM™ V(+) into the femoral head-neck fragment via a trauma needle kit introduced into the spiral blade. Dynamic or static locking of the PFNA at the diaphyseal level. Immediate mobilization of the patients with full weight-bearing and secondary prevention, such as osteoporosis management is necessary to avoid further fractures in the treatment of these patients. A total of 110 patients older than 65 years underwent the procedure. Of the 72 patients available for follow-up (average age 85.3 years), all fractures healed after an average of 15.3 months. No complications related with cement augmentation were observed. Approximately 60 % of patients achieved the mobility level prior to trauma.

  7. Proximal Femur Locking Plate for Sub-Trochanteric Femur Fractures: Factors Associated with Failure.

    PubMed

    Zubairi, Akbar; Rashid, Rizwan Haroon; Zahid, Marij; Hashmi, Pervaiz Mahmood; Noordin, Shahryar

    2017-01-01

    Proximal femur locking compression plates (PF-LCP) have gained popularity since their inception due to superior biomechanical stability and durability but clinical experience has shown conflicting results including implant failure. To study the incidence of implant failure in patients with sub-trochanteric fractures managed with proximal femoral locking compression plate and identify potential risk factors associated with the failure. Fifty patients with sub-trochanteric fractures, operated upon with titanium PF-LCP were included in the study from January 2012 to December 2014. These plates were of two designs including one five 5.0 mm proximal locking screws (implant A) and other with three 6.5 mm proximal locking screws (implant B). Fractures were classified according to AO/OTA and Seinsheimer classification. Patients had regular follow-up visits for at least a year, allowing for clinical and radiological assessment of union and implant-related complications. A total of 13 out of 50 (26%) plates failed of which 7 were implant fractures, 3 screw breakage and 3 screw cut outs. 70% of the failures occurred in elderly females. Overall implant failure was significantly more common in patients >50 years (p 0.04). Comparing the two different designs of implants used, implant A was more likely to fail at a plate screw density of 0.8 or more (p 0.02), whereas implant B was associated with significant failure when less than 4 proximal screws were used (p 0.03). This study revealed a high failure rate (26%) of this implant. Attention to the neck shaft angle difference, number of proximal screws and plate screw density may help reduce failure rates, particularly in elderly osteoporotic females.

  8. Do intramedullary implants improve survival in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures? A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Vermesan, D; Prejbeanu, R; Poenaru, D V; Petrescu, H; Apostol, E; Inchingolo, F; Dipalma, G; Abbinante, A; Caprio, M; Potenza, M A; Cagiano, R; Malcangi, G; Inchingolo, A D; Haragus, H

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding superiority of the intramedullary fixation over the sliding hip screw. Regional variation remains high and not backed up by solid evidence. Given these premises we aimed to analyze weather implant preference can influence the postoperative survival. Secondary objectives were determining the trend for implant choice and confounding factors associated with intramedullary nails compared to sliding hip screws. Retrospective data was obtained from patient charts with the main diagnosis of extracapsular/ trochanteric fractures, corresponding to ICD S72.1 codes. Between 2008-2012, 441 patients underwent osteosynthesis with a dynamic hip screw and 155 with intramedullary nail respectively. The living status was determined by comparing the patient identification number against the national population evidence records. The lifetable shows similar survival for both implants over the 5 year period. The yearly mortality was 19.4% for the dynamic hip screw and 21.8% for the intramedullary implant respectively, even though the later were used predominantly in older patients. This age difference is significant according to both parametric and non-parametric tests whereas duration of hospital stay are similar. We found a clear increase in the proportion of intramedullary implants, for a total of 11.2% over the 5 year period. There is no difference for the one year mortality and overall survival between sliding screw plates and intramedullary constructs. A clear increase in the use of intramedullary implants for trochanteric fractures was observed. This is even more apparent for older ages, presumably due to an higher surgeon confidence with the biomechanical stability of the intramedullary constructs.

  9. Trochanteric bursitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... walking Joint stiffness Swelling and warmth of the hip joint Catching and clicking sensation You may notice the ... physical therapy if you have trouble moving the joint. Other ... your hip will function just fine without the inflamed bursa. ...

  10. Tuberculous bursitis of the greater trochanter mimicking ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Tayfur, Öykü; Kılıç, Levent; Karadağ, Ömer; Akdoğan, Ali; Kerimoğlu, Ülkü; Uzun, Ömrüm

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculous trochanteric bursitis (TTB) is a rare condition that accounts for 1% of musculoskeletal tuberculosis cases. Extrapulmonary TB is usually diagnosed late because of reduced diagnostic suspicion, particularly in the absence of signs of systemic infection. Herein, we report a case of right hip pain that was misdiagnosed as ankylosing spondylitis. The patient had a history of inflammatory back pain with morning stiffness. However, HLA-B27 was negative. Sacroiliac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a giant multiloculated collection (27×16×10 cm). Percutaneous drainage was performed and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in fluid culture. The patient was treated by drainage along with antituberculosis therapy. After 1 year of antituberculosis therapy, control MRI revealed total resolution of the large fluid collection. It is important to emphasize that fever or general symptoms are absent in patients with TTB, as observed in the present case. In endemic countries, TTB should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chronic hip pain without fever, weight loss, and constitutional symptoms.

  11. PROSPECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE CLINICAL, RADIOGRAPHIC AND FUNCTIONAL EVOLUTION OF TREATMENT FOR UNSTABLE TROCHANTERIC FRACTURES OF THE FEMUR USING A CEPHALOMEDULLARY NAIL

    PubMed Central

    Borger, Richard Armelin; Borger, Frederico Araújo; Pires de Araújo, Rodrigo; Pereira, Thiago Ferreira Nunes; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas

    2015-01-01

    To assess the clinical, radiological and functional evolution of osteosynthesis using a cephalomedullary nail, in unstable trochanteric fractures of the femur, over a one-year postoperative follow-up. Methods: Fourteen men and 23 women of mean age 77.7 years were evaluated. Twenty-seven of them had fractures classified as AO/ASIF 31A2 and ten as 31A3. The patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and functionally one week, two weeks, one month, two months, six months and one year after the operation. Results: The clinical complications comprised five cases of death, one case of calcaneal ulcer, one case of acute arterial obstruction and two cases of deep vein thrombosis. The radiographic evaluation showed that the mean cervicodiaphyseal angle in the immediate postoperative period was 132.5°. The mean tip-apex index was 22.8 mm. After one year, the mean cervicodiaphyseal angle was 131.7°. Fracture consolidation was seen in all the patients six months after the operation, except in one case that presented cut-out. There were no cases of fracture below the implant. The functional evaluation using the Harris score after one year showed a mean of 69.3 points. The evaluation of walking progress showed that after one year, 40.6% of the patients had the same ability to walk that they had before the fracture. The visual analogue pain scale showed that a significant decrease in pain complaints occurred, going from 5.19 in the first week to 2.25 after 1 year. Conclusion: Osteosynthesis using a cephalomedullary nail resulted in low rates of clinical and mechanical complications and adequate functional outcomes. PMID:27027025

  12. Increase in the incidence of cervical and trochanteric fractures of the proximal femur in Niigata Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Iga, T; Dohmae, Y; Endo, N; Takahashi, H E

    1999-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence of cervical and trochanteric fractures of the proximal femur in 1994 in Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and to compare this incidence with those previously reported in Niigata in 1985, 1987, and 1989. We visited all hospitals within Niigata Prefecture having an orthopedic department and reviewed the medical records and radiographs of all patients who sustained such fractures in 1994. The population of Niigata Prefecture was determined in 1994 to be 2,483,879 (1,205,151 males and 1,278,728 females). The population over 65 years of age was 428,795 (172,788 males and 256,007 females), representing 17.3% of the total population. In 1994, there were 1,468 cervical or trochanteric fractures in 378 males and 1,090 females, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:2.9. The incidence of these fractures in persons over 65 years of age was 304 fractures per 100,000 population per year. Of 528 cervical and 940 trochanteric fractures, the latter accounted for 64% of the total number. The age-specific incidence of the fractures in Niigata exhibited an exponential increase with age, similar to those reported in Sweden and the United States. However, the incidence was lower than in those countries. When comparing the number of cervical and trochanteric fractures in 1994 with the numbers reported in 1985, 1987, and 1989, it is evident that the overall number and incidence of these fractures has been increasing over this period. Even if the difference of the age-specific population among these years is adjusted, the fractures have been increasing.

  13. Wiring Techniques for the Fixation of Trochanteric Fragments during Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Intertrochanteric Fracture: Clinical Study and Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yongsuk; Kim, Junhyun; Kim, Dong-Won

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Femoral intertrochanteric fractures are common in the elderly. Appropriate surgical fixation of trochanteric fracture fragments can restore normal anatomical structure and ambulation, and can aid in the recovery of biomechanical function of the hip. We evaluated clinical outcomes of bipolar hemiarthroplasty using a wiring technique for trochanteric fracture fragment fixation. Materials and Methods From September 2006 to February 2015, a total of 260 cases underwent simultaneous bipolar hemiarthroplasty and wire fixation. A total of 65 patients (69 hips) with an average age of 78 years and more than one year of follow-up was included in the study. Using pre-, postoperative and follow-up radiograms, we evaluated wire fixation failure and also assessed changes in walking ability. Results Loosening or osteolysis around the stem was not observed; however, we did observe bone growth around the stem (54 cases), cortical hypertrophy (6 cases), a wide range of sclerotic lines but no stem subsidence (1 case), wire breakage (9 cases), and fracture fragment migration with no significant functional deficiency (2 cases). Conclusion Our study showed that additional wiring for trochanteric fracture fragment fixation following bipolar hemiarthroplasty can help restore normal anatomy. The added stability results in faster rehabilitation, and good clinical and radiographic outcomes. We recommend this procedure in this type of fracture. PMID:28316962

  14. Are plasticity models required to predict relative risk of lag screw cut-out in finite element models of trochanteric fracture fixation?

    PubMed

    Goffin, Jérôme M; Pankaj, Pankaj; Simpson, A Hamish

    2014-01-03

    Using a finite element model of unstable trochanteric fracture stabilized with a sliding hip screw, the benefits of two plasticity-based formulations, Drucker-Prager and crushable foam, were evaluated and compared to the commonly used linear elastic model of trabecular bone in order to predict the relative risk of lag screw cut-out for five distinct load cases. The crushable foam plasticity formulation leads to a much greater strain localization, in comparison to the other two models, with large plastic strains in a localized region. The plastic zone predicted with Drucker-Prager is relatively more diffuse. Linear elasticity associated with a minimum principal strain criterion provides the smallest volume of elements susceptible to yielding for all loading modes. The region likely to undergo plastic deformation, as predicted by the linear elastic model, is similar to that obtained from plasticity-based formulations, which indicates that this simple criterion provides an adequate estimate of the risk of cut-out. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Elastic modulus of the femoral trochanteric region measured by scanning acoustic microscopy in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Hiroyuki; Shibano, Junichi; Kobayashi, Michiaki; Nakatsuchi, Yukio; Moriizumi, Tetsuji; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    We have devised a method that can obtain continuous detailed distributions of the elastic modulus along the measurement line in a non-decalcified specimen of human bone tissue. The aim of this study was to determine whether local variations exist in the distribution of mechanical properties within the trochanteric region of the femur of elderly females using a newly developed form of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) technology. Human proximal femurs were harvested from seven female cadavers aged between 67 and 88 years at death. Using data collected with SAM, the elastic modulus of cortical and trabecular bone tissue of the lateral and medial trochanter was calculated and statistically analyzed. The longitudinal and transverse elastic moduli in cortical bone tissue of the lateral trochanter were found to be significantly lower than those of the medial trochanter in all specimens from individuals over age 70 (p < 0.05). Compared to that of the distal region, the longitudinal and transverse elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue of the proximal region of the lateral trochanter were significantly lower in all specimens from individuals over age 80 (p < 0.05). Our new method allows obtaining detailed distributions of the elastic modulus of bone tissue.

  16. Surgical treatment of high-standing greater trochanter.

    PubMed

    Takata, K; Maniwa, S; Ochi, M

    1999-01-01

    Eleven patients with high-standing greater trochanter (13 joints) aged 13-36 years underwent surgery. Distal transfer of the greater trochanter (group T) was performed in 4 patients (5 joints) and lateral displacement osteotomy (group L) in 7 (8 joints). The average follow-up duration was 13.4 years in group T and 5.9 years in group L. Clinical results were evaluated by the hip score according to Merle d'Aubigne. The mean hip score in group T was 13.4 points before operation and 15.4 points after operation, and in group L, 12.8 and 17.4 points, respectively. The postoperative clinical results of group L were significantly better than those of group T (P = 0.0494). In radiological evaluation, although the articulo-trochanteric distance (ATD) increased in both groups in group L it improved remarkably from 9.8 to 24.3, indicating a large descending distance of the greater trochanter. The lever arm ratio (LAR) did not change significantly in group T, but it decreased from 1.97 to 1.60 in group L (P = 0.004). This means that the lever arm of the abductors can certainly be extended by lateral displacement osteotomy. Lateral displacement osteotomy is the most effective procedure for high-standing greater trochanter.

  17. Inadequate treatment practices for pain relief and adverse event management in cancer patients across 10 countries/regions in Asia: a call for greater efforts to improve standards for patient care.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kok Yuen; Ahn, Jin Seok; Calimag, Maria Minerva; Chao, Ta-Chung; Kim, Yong-Chul; Moon, Hanlim; Tho, Lye Mun; Xia, Zhong-Jun; You, Dora

    2017-07-03

    To examine the treatment practices for cancer pain relief and adverse event management, and the factors related to patient outcomes in the participating countries/regions. The study was a cross-sectional survey conducted between September and December 2013 in 10 countries/regions across Asia. Adult patients with a history of cancer pain at least 1 month before study entry completed the survey questionnaire. A total of 1190 patients were included. The mean Box Scale-11 (BS-11) pain score was 6.0 (SD 2.1), with 86.2% experiencing moderate-to-severe pain and 53.2% receiving opioids at time of the survey. The mean BS-11 scores were 5.3 (SD 2.1) in the "others" (single non-opioid medication or untreated) group, 6.3 (SD 2.0) in the ≥2 non-opioids group and 6.7 (SD 1.9) in the opioid group. The proportions of patients experiencing moderate-to-severe pain were 79.1%, 87.3% and 93.7%, respectively. About 70% of patients reported adverse events due to their pain medications, about half had received medications to manage these symptoms. Adverse events were negatively associated with activities of daily living (P < 0.0001). Pain and hindrance to activities of daily living were negatively associated with employment status (P = 0.003 and 0.021). Unemployment was significantly associated with poorer quality of life (P < 0.0001). This analysis demonstrates inadequate management of cancer pain and treatment-related adverse events in the participating cohort. Pain and inadequate management of adverse events were negatively associated with patients' overall well-being. More collaborative efforts should be taken to optimize pain treatment and increase awareness of adverse event management in physicians. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. The OA Trial Bank: meta-analysis of individual patient data from knee and hip osteoarthritis trials show that patients with severe pain exhibit greater benefit from intra-articular glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    van Middelkoop, M; Arden, N K; Atchia, I; Birrell, F; Chao, J; Rezende, M U; Lambert, R G W; Ravaud, P; Bijlsma, J W; Doherty, M; Dziedzic, K S; Lohmander, L S; McAlindon, T E; Zhang, W; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) glucocorticoids for knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) in specific subgroups of patients with severe pain and inflammatory signs using individual patient data (IPD) from existing trials. Randomized trials evaluating one or more IA glucocorticoid preparation in patients with knee or hip OA, published from 1995 up to June 2012 were selected from the literature. IPD obtained from original trials included patient and disease characteristics and outcomes measured. The primary outcome was pain severity at short-term follow-up (up to 4 weeks). The subgroup factors assessed included severe pain (≥70 points, 0-100 scale) and signs of inflammation (dichotomized in present or not) at baseline. Multilevel regression analyses were applied to estimate the magnitude of the effects in the subgroups with the individuals nested within each study. Seven out of 43 published randomized clinical trials (n = 620) were included. Patients with severe baseline pain had a significantly larger reduction in short-term pain, but not in mid- and long-term pain, compared to those with less severe pain at baseline (Mean Difference 13.91; 95% Confidence Interval 1.50-26.31) when receiving IA glucocorticoid injection compared to placebo. No statistical significant interaction effects were found between inflammatory signs and IA glucocorticoid injections compared to placebo and to tidal irrigation at all follow-up points. This IPD meta-analysis demonstrates that patients with severe knee pain at baseline derive more benefit from IA glucocorticoid injection at short-term follow-up than those with less severe pain at baseline. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s).

  20. Kendrick's extrication device and unstable pelvic fractures: Should a trochanteric belt be added? A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Floran A; Flaris, Alexandros N; Simms, Eric R; Rouvière, Olivier; Roy, Pascal; Prat, Nicolas J; Damizet, Jean-Gabriel; Caillot, Jean-Louis; Voiglio, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    Pre-hospital pelvic stabilisation is advised to prevent exsanguination in patients with unstable pelvic fractures (UPFs). Kendrick's extrication device (KED) is commonly used to extricate patients from cars or crevasses. However the KED has not been tested for potential adverse effects in patients with pelvic fractures. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the KED on pubic symphysis diastasis (SyD) with and without the use of a trochanteric belt (TB) during the extraction process following a MVC. Left-sided "open-book" UPFs were created in 18 human cadavers that were placed in seven different positions simulating pre-extraction and extraction positions using the KED with and without a TB in two different positions (through and over the thigh straps). The SyD was measured using anteroposterior radiographs. The effects of the KED with and without TB, on the SyD, were evaluated. The KED alone resulted in a non-significant increase of the SyD compared to baseline, whereas the addition of a TB to the KED resulted in a significant reduction of the SyD (p<0.001). The TB through the straps provided a significantly better reduction than the TB over the straps in the extracted position (p<0.05). Our study demonstrated that a TB in combination with the KED on UPFs is an effective way to achieve early reduction. The addition of the TB in combination with the KED could be considered for Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) training protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating the patient with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Maliha; Östör, Andrew J K

    2015-12-01

    In the UK, low back pain is the most common cause of disability in young adults and every year 6-9% of adults consult their GP about back pain. A thorough history and examination is required to exclude an alternative diagnosis, such as pain arising from the hip or trochanteric bursa and to categorise patients as having: serious spinal pathology, nerve root/radicular pain or non-specific back pain. Inflammatory back pain is often missed, particularly in the early stages when examination may be normal. The primary features are pain arising in patients under 40, thoracolumbar or sacroiliac pain and alternating buttock pain. Stiffness in the early morning and after rest is a hallmark of inflammatory back pain. There may also be peripheral joint involvement with evidence of inflammatory arthritis as well as extra-articular manifestations such as iritis, psoriasis and colitis. Sphincter disturbance leading to loss of bladder or bowel control should also be explored as it is a sign of spinal cord compression or cauda equina syndrome. Both of these are neurosurgical emergencies and need urgent referral for further investigation and possible intervention. The majority of patients with low back pain can be managed in primary care as the pain will usually be self-limiting. Patients with suspected inflammatory back pain should be referred to rheumatology as soon as possible in order to institute early management and prevent long-term deformity and disability. Patients with suspected serious spinal pathology should be referred urgently for further investigation. Red flag symptoms should raise concerns regarding a possible sinister cause such as malignancy and more than one red flag mandates urgent further investigation.

  2. Biomechanical analysis of the cephalomedullary nail versus the trochanteric stabilizing plate for unstable intertrochanteric femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, David; Nicayenzi, Bruce; Kuzyk, Paul Rt; Machin, Alan; Bougherara, Habiba; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan

    2016-10-26

    Unstable intertrochanteric fractures are commonly treated with a cephalomedullary nail due to high failure rates with a sliding hip screw. The Omega3 Trochanteric Stabilizing Plate is a relatively new device that functions like a modified sliding hip screw with a proximal extension; however, its mechanical properties have not been evaluated. This study biomechanically compared a cephalomedullary nail, that is, Gamma3 Nail against the Omega3 plate. Unstable intertrochanteric fractures were created in 24 artificial femurs. Experimental groups were as follows: Nail (i.e. Gamma3 Nail) (n = 8), Plate A (i.e. Omega3 plate with four distal non-locking screws and no proximal locking screws) (n = 8), Plate B (i.e. Plate A plus five proximal locking screws) (n = 8), Plate C (i.e. Omega3 plate with three distal locking screws and no proximal locking screws) (n = 8), and Plate D (i.e. Plate C plus five proximal locking screws) (n = 8). All specimens were stiffness tested, while the Nail and Plate D groups were also strength tested. For lateral bending, Plate B was less stiff than the Nail (p = 0.001) and Plate A (p = 0.009). For torsion, Plate A was less stiff than Plate D (p = 0.020). For axial compression, the Nail was less stiff than Plate A (p = 0.036) and Plate B (p = 0.008). Axial strength for the Nail (5014 ± 308 N) was 66% higher than the Plate D construct (2940 ± 411 N) (p < 0.001). All Nails failed by partial or complete cutout through the femoral head and neck, but Plate D failed by varus collapse and deformation of the lag screw. When the cephalomedullary nail is clinically contra-indicated, this study supports the use of the Omega3 plate, since it had similar stiffness in three test modes to the Gamma3 Nail, but had lower strength. Stability of Omega3 plate constructs was not improved with locked fixation proximally or distally.

  3. The influence of children's pain memories on subsequent pain experience.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T; McGrath, Patrick J; Klein, Raymond M; Stewart, Sherry H

    2012-08-01

    Healthy children are often required to repeatedly undergo painful medical procedures (eg, immunizations). Although memory is often implicated in children's reactions to future pain, there is a dearth of research directly examining the relationship between the 2. The current study investigated the influence of children's memories for a novel pain stimulus on their subsequent pain experience. One hundred ten healthy children (60 boys) between the ages of 8 and 12 years completed a laboratory pain task and provided pain ratings. Two weeks later, children provided pain ratings based on their memories as well as their expectancies about future pain. One month following the initial laboratory visit, children again completed the pain task and provided pain ratings. Results showed that children's memory of pain intensity was a better predictor of subsequent pain reporting than their actual initial reporting of pain intensity, and mediated the relationship between initial and subsequent pain reporting. Children who had negatively estimated pain memories developed expectations of greater pain prior to a subsequent pain experience and showed greater increases in pain ratings over time than children who had accurate or positively estimated pain memories. These findings highlight the influence of pain memories on healthy children's expectations of future pain and subsequent pain experiences and extend predictive models of subsequent pain reporting.

  4. Painful Intercourse Is Significantly Associated with Evoked Pain Perception and Cognitive Aspects of Pain in Women with Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Alappattu, Meryl J; George, Steven Z; Robinson, Michael E; Fillingim, Roger B; Moawad, Nashat; LeBrun, Emily Weber; Bishop, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that painful intercourse, pain-related psychosocial factors, and altered pain processing magnify the pain experience, but it is not clear how these factors are related to each other. Aim The aims were to (i) characterize differences between women with pelvic pain and pain-free women using a battery of pain-related psychosocial measures, clinical pain ratings, and evoked local and remote pain sensitivity; and (ii) examine the relationship between intercourse pain, clinical pain, and local and remote evoked pain sensitivity. Methods Women with pelvic pain lasting at least 3 months and pain-free women completed questionnaires and underwent pain sensitivity testing. Self-report measures included clinical pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear, pain anxiety, depression, sexual function, and self-efficacy. Pain sensitivity measures included threshold and tolerance and temporal summation of pain. Separate analyses of variance (anova) were used to test group differences in self-report and pain sensitivity measures. Correlations were calculated among dyspareunia, psychosocial factors, and evoked pain. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported pain and pain sensitivity measures. Results Twenty-eight pain-free women and 14 women with pelvic pain participated in this study. Women with pelvic pain reported greater pain intensity and greater psychosocial involvement compared with pain-free women. No differences existed between groups for thermal or pressure measures, but women with pelvic pain rated their pain with pain testing significantly higher than pain-free women. Intercourse pain was significantly associated with affective and sensory pain and pressure pain ratings at the puborectalis, vulvar vestibule, adductor longus tendons, and tibialis anterior muscle. Conclusions Differences in local pain ratings suggest that women with pelvic pain perceive stimuli in this region as more painful than pain-free women although the magnitude of

  5. A comparative study of trochanteric and basicervical fractures of the femur treated with the Ender and McLaughlin techniques.

    PubMed

    Indemini, E; Clerico, P; Fenoglio, E; Mariotti, U

    1982-09-01

    Endomedullary nailing as proposed by Ender is an important alternative in the treatment of trochanteric and basicervical fractures of the femur (Amici et al., 1980; Carret et al., 1980; Ender, 1970; Kempf et al., 1979; Zinghi et al., 1979). Rush's concept (Eiffel Tower, for the distal epiphysis) is reproposed with some variations and transposed to the femoral neck. The aim of the operation differs from that of the nail and plate technique in that, instead of trying to achieve anatomical reconstruction, an immediate functional by-pass of the fractured part is attempted. After using this technique for three years, we compared the old method, which we had not abandoned, the McLaughlin nail and plate, with the new Ender nail.

  6. Tuberculosis in greater kudu.

    PubMed

    Himes, E M; LyVere, D B; Thoen, C O; Essey, M A; Lebel, J L; Freiheit, C F

    1976-11-01

    Four greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) died while maintained in captivity at a zoo. Necropsy revealed tuberculous lesions in the lungs, spleen, and thoracic lymph nodes. Histopathologic findings included granulomas with Langhans' giant cells, necrosis, and mineralization. Acid-fast organisms isolated from tissues of each kudu were identified as Mycobacterium bovis.

  7. The use of dry needling for a subject with chronic lateral hip and thigh pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pavkovich, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Lateral thigh pain, commonly referred to as greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) and/ or iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is commonly treated by the physical therapist. Lateral thigh pain is commonly treated by the physical therapist. The sources of lateral thigh pain are commonly attributed to GTPS and/ or ITBS though various pathologies may contribute to this pain, of which trigger points (TrPs) may be an etiology. Dry needling (DN) is an intervention utilized by physical therapists where a monofilament needle is inserted into soft tissue in order to reduce pain to improve range of motion/ motor control dysfunction. This can assist with facilitation of return to prior level of function. The purpose of this case report is to report the outcomes of a patient with lateral hip and thigh pain treated with DN as a primary intervention strategy. The subject was an active 78-year-old female recreational walker who was referred to physical therapy for chronic left lateral hip and thigh pain of greater than one-year duration without a clear mechanism of injury. She had a history of previous physical therapy treatment for the same condition, and previous therapeutic intervention strategies were effective for approximately two to three months duration prior to return of pain symptoms. Physical examination supported a diagnosis of GTPS/ ITBS. Subjective reports denoted sleep deficit due to pain lying on the left side at night and difficulty walking more than five minutes. Objective findings included decreased strength of the hip musculature and reproduction of pain symptoms upon flat palpation in specific locations throughout the lateral hip and thigh regions. She was treated for eight weeks using only DN to determine the effectiveness of DN as a primary intervention strategy, as previous physical therapy interventions were inconsistent and were only beneficial in the short-term. Clinically meaningful improvements were noted in disability and pain, as measured by the

  8. Pain catastrophizing in patients with noncardiac chest pain: relationships with pain, anxiety, and disability.

    PubMed

    Shelby, Rebecca A; Somers, Tamara J; Keefe, Francis J; Silva, Susan G; McKee, Daphne C; She, Lilin; Waters, Sandra J; Varia, Indira; Riordan, Yelena B; Knowles, Verena M; Blazing, Michael; Blumenthal, James A; Johnson, Paige

    2009-10-01

    To examine the contributions of chest pain, anxiety, and pain catastrophizing to disability in 97 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) and to test whether chest pain and anxiety were related indirectly to greater disability via pain catastrophizing. Participants completed daily diaries measuring chest pain for 7 days before completing measures of pain catastrophizing, trait anxiety, and disability. Linear path model analyses examined the contributions of chest pain, trait anxiety, and catastrophizing to physical disability, psychosocial disability, and disability in work, home, and recreational activities. Path models accounted for a significant amount of the variability in disability scales (R(2) = 0.35 to 0.52). Chest pain and anxiety accounted for 46% of the variance in pain catastrophizing. Both chest pain (beta = 0.18, Sobel test Z = 2.58, p < .01) and trait anxiety (beta = 0.14, Sobel test Z = 2.11, p < .05) demonstrated significant indirect relationships with physical disability via pain catastrophizing. Chest pain demonstrated a significant indirect relationship with psychosocial disability via pain catastrophizing (beta = 0.12, Sobel test Z = 1.96, p = .05). After controlling for the effects of chest pain and anxiety, pain catastrophizing was no longer related to disability in work, home, and recreational activities. Chest pain and anxiety were directly related to greater disability and indirectly related to physical and psychosocial disability via pain catastrophizing. Efforts to improve functioning in patients with NCCP should consider addressing pain catastrophizing.

  9. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  10. Pain Catastrophising Affects Cortical Responses to Viewing Pain in Others

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Pain catastrophising is an exaggerated cognitive attitude implemented during pain or when thinking about pain. Catastrophising was previously associated with increased pain severity, emotional distress and disability in chronic pain patients, and is also a contributing factor in the development of neuropathic pain. To investigate the neural basis of how pain catastrophising affects pain observed in others, we acquired EEG data in groups of participants with high (High-Cat) or low (Low-Cat) pain catastrophising scores during viewing of pain scenes and graphically matched pictures not depicting imminent pain. The High-Cat group attributed greater pain to both pain and non-pain pictures. Source dipole analysis of event-related potentials during picture viewing revealed activations in the left (PHGL) and right (PHGR) paraphippocampal gyri, rostral anterior (rACC) and posterior cingulate (PCC) cortices. The late source activity (600–1100 ms) in PHGL and PCC was augmented in High-Cat, relative to Low-Cat, participants. Conversely, greater source activity was observed in the Low-Cat group during the mid-latency window (280–450 ms) in the rACC and PCC. Low-Cat subjects demonstrated a significantly stronger correlation between source activity in PCC and pain and arousal ratings in the long latency window, relative to high pain catastrophisers. Results suggest augmented activation of limbic cortex and higher order pain processing cortical regions during the late processing period in high pain catastrophisers viewing both types of pictures. This pattern of cortical activations is consistent with the distorted and magnified cognitive appraisal of pain threats in high pain catastrophisers. In contrast, high pain catastrophising individuals exhibit a diminished response during the mid-latency period when attentional and top-down resources are ascribed to observed pain. PMID:26186545

  11. Acetabular perforation after medial migration of the helical blade through the femoral head after treatment of an unstable trochanteric fracture with proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA): a case report.

    PubMed

    Takigami, Iori; Ohnishi, Kazuichiro; Ito, Yoshiki; Nagano, Akihito; Sumida, Hisashi; Tanaka, Kaori; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2011-09-01

    The proximal femoral nail antirotation is a new generation of intramedullary device for the treatment of trochanteric femoral fractures, having a helical blade rather than a screw for suggested better purchase in osteoporotic bone. However, it is not free of complications. Few reports are available on postoperative perforation of the helical blade through the femoral head as a unique complication of proximal femoral nail antirotation. We report a 79-year-old woman with acetabular perforation after migration of the helical blade through the femoral head after an unstable trochanteric fracture, which was fixed with a proximal femoral nail antirotation.

  12. New quantitative ultrasound techniques for bone analysis at the distal radius in hip fracture cases: differences between femoral neck and trochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Horii, Motoyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sakai, Ryo; Sawada, Koshiro; Mikami, Yasuo; Toyama, Syogo; Ozaki, Etsuko; Kuriyama, Nagato; Kurokawa, Masao; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Ample evidence on etiological and pathological differences between femoral neck and trochanteric fracture cases suggests the possibility of individualized treatment. There are many issues related to areal bone mineral density and other quantitative computed tomography parameters of the proximal femur. Although osteoporosis is a systemic problem, little has been reported regarding differences in bone structural parameters, including bone mineral density, between them in regions other than the proximal femur. Participants were consecutive female patients >50 years of age admitted to the Saiseikai Suita Hospital (Osaka prefecture, Japan) for their first hip fracture between January 2012 and September 2014. Cortical thickness (CoTh, mm), volumetric trabecular bone mineral density (TBD, mg/cm(3)), and elastic modulus of trabecular bone (EMTb, GPa) were obtained as the new QUS parameters using the LD-100 system (Oyo Electric, Kyoto, Japan). The mean values of these parameters were compared between femoral neck and trochanteric fracture cases. In addition, correlations between age and each QUS parameter were investigated for each fracture type. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the degree of effect each parameter on the fracture types. The area under the curve (AUC) for each parameter was compared to the AUC for age. There were 63 cases of femoral neck fracture (mean age, 78.2 years) and 37 cases of trochanteric fracture (mean age, 85.9 years). Mean TBD and EMTb were significantly higher for femoral neck fractures. There were significant negative correlations between QUS parameters and age for femoral neck fractures (P < 0.005). The regression lines for femoral neck fractures were above those for trochanteric fractures for TBD and EMTb. AUCs were 0.72 for age, and 0.61, 0.65, and 0.65 for CoTh, TBD, and EMTb, respectively. The new QUS parameters indicated that TR fracture cases were more osteoporotic than were FN fracture

  13. Greater trochanter apophysitis in the adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon W; Safran, Marc R

    2015-05-01

    Lower limb traction apophysitis is common in young athletes, occurring at sites such as the tibial tubercle (Osgood-Schlatter disease) and distal patella (Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease). Around the hip, iliac apophysitis is well recognized, but no cases of greater trochanter apophysitis have previously been reported. We describe the case of a 15-year-old male basketball player with a 2-month history of the right hip pain and significant functional limitation. X-rays revealed widening of the greater trochanter apophysis with subchondral sclerosis, consistent with a diagnosis of traction apophysitis. The patient was treated with a period of relative rest and anti-inflammatory medication. He gradually returned to full athletic activity, including basketball, without recurrence of pain or limitation. We describe the first reported case of traction apophysitis of the greater trochanter. The unique muscular anatomy of this apophysis with balanced forces explains the rarity of this condition. If encountered, rest and activity modification is the recommended treatment.

  14. A comparison of the reliability of the trochanteric prominence angle test and the alternative method in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tae-Lim; Park, Kyung-Mi; Choi, Sil-Ah; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Hyo-Jung; Cynn, Heon-Seock

    2014-04-01

    A wide range of intra- and inter-rater reliabilities of the trochanteric prominence angle test (TPAT) has been reported. We introduced the transcondylar angle test (TCAT) as an alternative to the TPAT and using a smartphone as a reliable measurement tool for femoral neck anteversion (FNA) measurement. The reliabilities of the TPAT and the TCAT, the reliability of using a smartphone as a clinical measurement tool, and the correlation between the difference value of medial knee joint space (KJS) between rest and tested positions and the difference value between the TPAT and TCAT were assessed. Two physical therapists independently determined the reliabilities of the TPAT with a digital inclinometer, the TCAT with a digital inclinometer, and the TCAT with a smartphone in 19 hips of 10 healthy subjects (5 male and 5 female, 22.2 ± 1.69 years). The medial KJS in rest and the tested position were assessed using a sonography. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for the intra-rater reliabilities of TPAT with a digital inclinometer (ICC = 0.92), TCAT with a digital inclinometer (ICC = 0.94) and a smartphone (ICC = 0.95) in both testers were substantial. The inter-rater reliability of TPAT with a digital inclinometer was fair (ICC = 0.48) while TCAT with a digital inclinometer (ICC = 0.89) and a smartphone (ICC = 0.85) were substantial. The correlation between the difference value of medial KJS between rest and tested positions and the difference value between TPAT and TCAT was low and statistically non-significant (r = 0.114; p = 0.325). The TCAT would be more reliable than the TPAT in inter-rater test. Using a smartphone is a clinically comparable measuring tool to a digital inclinometer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Distal fascia lata lengthening: an alternative surgical technique for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Pretell, Juan; Ortega, Javier; García-Rayo, Ramón; Resines, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    This article presents a simple technique for fascia lata lengthening that is less aggressive, can be performed under local anaesthetic with little morbidity and disability, and has excellent results. Eleven patients (13 hips) were enrolled in this study. Mean age was 54.6 years, there was one man and ten women. Outcomes were assessed by using a visual analog pain scale, Harris hip score and Lickert scale (satisfaction). There was a mean follow-up time of 43 months (range 15-84). All patients were scored by the Harris hip scale with a mean improvement from 61 (range 48-77) to 91 (range 76-95) after surgery. The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) score improved from 83 (range 60-99) to 13 (range 0-70). We had 12 of 13 patients reporting a good result. Mean surgical time was 15 min, and only one seroma was reported as a complication. No inpatient management was needed. In conclusion, distal "Z" lengthening of the fascia lata appears to be a good alternative for treatment of this condition.

  16. Distal fascia lata lengthening: an alternative surgical technique for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Javier; García-Rayo, Ramón; Resines, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a simple technique for fascia lata lengthening that is less aggressive, can be performed under local anaesthetic with little morbidity and disability, and has excellent results. Eleven patients (13 hips) were enrolled in this study. Mean age was 54.6 years, there was one man and ten women. Outcomes were assessed by using a visual analog pain scale, Harris hip score and Lickert scale (satisfaction). There was a mean follow-up time of 43 months (range 15–84). All patients were scored by the Harris hip scale with a mean improvement from 61 (range 48–77) to 91 (range 76–95) after surgery. The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) score improved from 83 (range 60–99) to 13 (range 0–70). We had 12 of 13 patients reporting a good result. Mean surgical time was 15 min, and only one seroma was reported as a complication. No inpatient management was needed. In conclusion, distal “Z” lengthening of the fascia lata appears to be a good alternative for treatment of this condition. PMID:19214507

  17. Primary torsion of the greater omentum.

    PubMed

    Gul, Y A; Jabbar, M F; Moissinac, K

    2001-01-01

    Primary or idiopathic greater omental torsion remains a rare cause of acute surgical abdomen in adults and children. The aetiology is as yet unknown and the treatment of choice, once diagnosis is established, is resection of the torted omentum. We report our experience with three such cases encountered over the last five years, two of which were diagnosed and subsequently managed laparoscopically. The performance of diagnostic laparoscopy for acute abdominal pain of an undetermined origin may lead to an increased detection of this condition and subsequent therapeutic intervention.

  18. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is does not always reflect the seriousness ...

  19. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  20. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  1. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  2. Extraversion and pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G E

    1975-09-01

    According to Eysenck's (1957, 1960, 1967) theory of personality, extroverts are posited as having higher pain thresholds and greater pain tolerance than introverts. The evidence for these hypothesized relationships is reviewed. Findings appear inconclusive in both cases. Probability pooling (Mosteller & Bush, 1954) is therefore performed, grouping the comparable studies and carrying out overall tests of significance. Results support the hypothesized relationships between extraversion and pain threshold and between extraversion and pain tolerance. Possible reasons why certain studies failed to find these results are discussed.

  3. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  4. Exercise-induced pain intensity predicted by pre-exercise fear of pain and pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D; Horn, Maggie E; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our primary goals were to determine whether pre-existing fear of pain and pain sensitivity contributed to post-exercise pain intensity. Methods Delayed onset muscle pain was induced in the trunk extensors of 60 healthy volunteers using an exercise paradigm. Levels of fear of pain and experimental pain sensitivity were measured before exercise. Pain intensity in the low back was collected at 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. Participants were grouped based on pain intensity. Group membership was used as the dependent variable in separate regression models for 24 and 48 hours. Predictor variables included fear, pain sensitivity, torque lost during the exercise protocol, and demographic variables. Results The final models predicting whether a participant reported clinically meaningful pain intensity at 24 hours only included baseline fear of pain at each level of pain intensity tested. The final model at 48 hours included average baseline pain sensitivity and the loss of muscle performance during the exercise protocol for one level of pain intensity tested (greater than 35mm out of 100). Discussion Combined, these findings suggest that the initial reports of pain after injury maybe more strongly influenced by fear while the inflammatory process and pain sensitivity may play a larger role for later pain intensity reports. PMID:21415719

  5. Absorbable screws through the greater trochanter do not disturb physeal growth: rabbit experiments.

    PubMed

    Gil-Albarova, J; Fini, M; Gil-Albarova, R; Melgosa, M; Aldini-Nicolo, N; Giardino, R; Seral, F

    1998-06-01

    We studied the effect of implantation of self-reinforced polyglycolic acid (SR-PGA) screws through the greater trochanter in rabbits. 15 rabbits aged 10 weeks had an SR-PGA screw inserted through the left trochanter physis. A similar drilling was made through the right greater trochanter without screw implantation. The animals were assigned to 3 groups of 5, and were killed after 1, 2 or 3 months. Radiographs of both femurs were obtained monthly and the articulo-trochanteric distance and the neck-shaft angle were measured. After killing the animals, a histological study was performed. The drilling on the right trochanter generated a bony bridge in all the animals. The SR-PGA screws did not give rise to an epiphysiodesis. The progressive peripheral degradation of the implants gave rise to the formation of only modest bridges, which were smaller in size than those observed in the control trochanter. Our findings suggest that absorbable PGA screws implanted through a growth plate cause only minor bone formation and no epiphyseodesis.

  6. Age-related changes in dynamic compressive properties of trochanteric soft tissues over the hip.

    PubMed

    Choi, W J; Russell, C M; Tsai, C M; Arzanpour, S; Robinovitch, S N

    2015-02-26

    Hip fracture risk increases dramatically with age, and 90% of fractures are due to falls. During a fall on the hip, the soft tissues overlying the hip region (skin, fat, and muscle) act as shock absorbers to absorb energy and reduce the peak force applied to the underlying bone. We conducted dynamic indentation experiments with young women (aged 19-30; n=17) and older women (aged 65-81; n=17) to test the hypothesis that changes occur with age in the stiffness and damping properties of these tissues. Tissue stiffness and damping were derived from experiments where subjects lay sideways on a bed with the greater trochanter contacting a 3.8cm diameter indenter, which applied sinusoidal compression between 5 to 30Hz with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 1mm. Soft tissue thickness was measured using ultrasound. On average, stiffness was 2.9-fold smaller in older than young women (5.7 versus 16.8kN/m, p=0.0005) and damping was 3.5-fold smaller in older than young women (81 versus 282Ns/m, p=0.001). Neither parameter associated with soft tissue thickness. Our results indicate substantial age-related reductions in the stiffness and damping of soft tissues over the hip region, which likely reduce their capacity to absorb and dissipate energy (before "bottoming out") during a fall. Strategies such as wearable hip protectors or compliant flooringmay compensate for age-related reductions in the shock-absorbing properties of soft tissues and decrease the injury potential of falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  8. Autologous Fat Grafting as a Last Resort for Unsustainable Pain in a Woman with Multiple Osteochondromas

    PubMed Central

    Negenborn, Vera Lidwina; Ham, Simon Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is characterized by the formation of osteochondromas throughout the entire body. Although the evidence regarding its pathogenesis is well understood, no curative treatment for the disorder is available. Patients can be treated symptomatically by surgical removal of painful osteochondromas. Unfortunately, some patients still suffer from severe pain, even after surgery. We report on a case concerning a 48-year-old woman with a history of MO who presented with persistent pain after surgical removal of a symptomatic osteochondroma of the left scapula and multiple symptomatic osteochondromas of the left foot and trochanteric region. Several interventions to reduce the pain did not have any lasting effect. Subsequently, she was treated with autologous fat grafting (AFG). After each session she was pain-free for at least one year and reported only partial recurrence of the pain. This is the first case report describing AFG for the treatment of pain after both surgical removal of an osteochondroma and symptomatic osteochondromas in a patient suffering MO with promising results. The treatment is more effective and clearly continues to remain active longer than injection therapy or pain medication. Future studies are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:28352606

  9. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult.

  10. Beyond neuropathic pain: gabapentin use in cancer pain and perioperative pain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Peter Z; Butler, Paul M; Kurowski, Donna; Perloff, Michael D

    2014-07-01

    Gabapentin (GBP), originally an antiepileptic drug, is more commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain. In recent years, GBP has been used as an adjunct or primary therapy in non-neuropathic pain, most commonly for the treatment of perioperative and cancer pain. The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical evidence literature review of GBP's use in perioperative pain and cancer pain. Using PUBMED and OVID Medline databases, keyword searches for surgery and cancer in reference to GBP and pain were carried out. Nonblinded studies and case reports that did not present a unique finding were excluded. Studies that focused only on neuropathic pain were also excluded. An initial 142 references focusing on GBP's use in surgical pain and cancer pain were identified. Of these, 48 studies were quality of evidence at a level of II-2 or higher. Although efficacy varies, multiple well-designed clinical trials have demonstrated reduced pain and analgesic use with otolaryngology, orthopedic, mastectomy, and abdominal/pelvic surgical perioperative use of GBP, whereas there is limited or no efficacy for cardiothoracic surgery. Cancer pain studies have had greater design variability, often nonblinded, with pain benefit being mild to moderate, and more efficacious with partial neuropathic pain quality. Overall, GBP seems to have significant benefit in neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain associated with the perioperative period and cancer. Considering its favorable side effect profile, GBP represents a beneficial pain adjunctive therapy, beyond neuropathic symptoms.

  11. Why Social Pain Can Live on: Different Neural Mechanisms Are Associated with Reliving Social and Physical Pain

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Meghan L.; Williams, Kipling D.; Eisenberger, Naomi I.

    2015-01-01

    Although social and physical pain recruit overlapping neural activity in regions associated with the affective component of pain, the two pains can diverge in their phenomenology. Most notably, feelings of social pain can be re-experienced or “relived,” even when the painful episode has long passed, whereas feelings of physical pain cannot be easily relived once the painful episode subsides. Here, we observed that reliving social (vs. physical) pain led to greater self-reported re-experienced pain and greater activity in affective pain regions (dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula). Moreover, the degree of relived pain correlated positively with affective pain system activity. In contrast, reliving physical (vs. social) pain led to greater activity in the sensory-discriminative pain system (primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and posterior insula), which did not correlate with relived pain. Preferential engagement of these different pain mechanisms may reflect the use of different top-down neurocognitive pathways to elicit the pain. Social pain reliving recruited dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, often associated with mental state processing, which functionally correlated with affective pain system responses. In contrast, physical pain reliving recruited inferior frontal gyrus, known to be involved in body state processing, which functionally correlated with activation in the sensory pain system. These results update the physical-social pain overlap hypothesis: while overlapping mechanisms support live social and physical pain, distinct mechanisms guide internally-generated pain. PMID:26061877

  12. Phantom Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... horizon Newer approaches to relieve phantom pain include virtual reality goggles. The computer program for the goggles mirrors ... Pain Medicine. In press. Accessed Sept. 15, 2014. Virtual reality therapies for phantom limb pain. European Journal of ...

  13. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  14. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  15. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  16. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  17. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  18. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  19. RAB-plate versus sliding hip screw for unstable trochanteric hip fractures: stability of the fixation and modes of failure--radiographic analysis of 218 fractures.

    PubMed

    Buciuto, R; Hammer, R

    2001-03-01

    The sliding hip screw has gained considerable acceptance in the treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures. However, the new type of 120 degrees fixed angle blade-plate with a buttress rod (RAB-plate) showed encouraging clinical results. The purpose of this study was to assess stability of fixation and analyze modes of failure in unstable trochanteric hip fractures treated with these devices. A retrospective radiographic review of 218 unstable fractures was performed. Linear and angular displacements of the major fragments and implant migration into the femoral head during healing were assessed. Additionally, adequacy of the reduction and the location of the implant within the femoral head as predictors of fixation failure were evaluated. The postreduction neck-shaft angle was maintained in the majority of the fractures in both groups. However, there was a significantly higher incidence of varus angulation by 10 degrees or more by the completion of healing among fractures treated with the sliding hip screw (p = 0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in vertical migration of the device into the femoral head between the implants used (p = 0.3). There was a significant relationship between failure of the fixation and varus reduction (p = 0.04) as well as screw/neck angle deviation more than 20 degrees in the lateral projection (p = 0.005) or if the implant was in a superior or posterior position (p = 0.02). The RAB-plate provided a more stable fixation, especially with regard to maintained postoperative alignment. However, positive predictors for fixation failure were identical for both devices. Here, the screw/neck angle deviation has had the strongest significance for prediction of fixation failure.

  20. Comparison and analysis of reoperations in two different treatment protocols for trochanteric hip fractures - postoperative technical complications with dynamic hip screw, intramedullary nail and Medoff sliding plate.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Johnny; Stig, Josefine Corin; Olsson, Ola

    2017-08-24

    In treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures dynamic hip screw and Medoff sliding plate devices are designed to allow secondary fracture impaction, whereas intramedullary nails aim to maintain fracture alignment. Different treatment protocols are used by two similar Swedish regional emergency care hospitals. Dynamic hip screw is used for fractures considered as stable within the respective treatment protocol, whereas one treatment protocol (Medoff sliding plate/dynamic hip screw) uses biaxial Medoff sliding plate for unstable pertrochanteric fractures and uniaxial Medoff sliding plate for subtrochanteric fractures, the second (intramedullary nail/dynamic hip screw) uses intramedullary nail for subtrochanteric fractures and for pertrochanteric fractures with intertrochanteric comminution or subtrochanteric extension. All orthopedic surgeries are registered in a regional database. All consecutive trochanteric fracture operations during 2011-2012 (n = 856) and subsequent technical reoperations (n = 40) were derived from the database. Reoperations were analysed and classified into the categories adjustment (percutaneous removal of the locking screw of the Medoff sliding plate or the intramedullary nail, followed by fracture healing) or minor, intermediate (reosteosynthesis) or major (hip joint replacement, Girdlestone or persistent nonunion) technical complications. The relative risk of intermediate or major technical complications was 4.2 (1.2-14) times higher in unstable pertrochanteric fractures and 4.6 (1.1-19) times higher in subtrochanteric fractures with treatment protocol: intramedullary nail/dynamic hip screw, compared to treatment protocol: Medoff sliding plate/dynamic hip screw. Overall rates of intermediate and major technical complications in unstable pertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures were with biaxial Medoff sliding plate 0.68%, with uniaxial Medoff sliding plate 1.4%, with dynamic hip screw 3.4% and with intramedullary nail 7.2%. The

  1. The Trochanteric Localization is a Mediator of Slower Short-Term Functional Recovery in Overweight and Obese Elderly Women with Recent Hip Fracture: The BREAK Study.

    PubMed

    Gonnelli, Stefano; Caffarelli, Carla; Rossi, Stefania; Siviero, Paola; Maggi, Stefania; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2015-12-01

    The hypothesis tested in this study, carried out on elderly Italian women with recent hip fracture, was to assess the extent to which the effect of a condition of being overweight/obese on short-term functional recovery as evaluated by the "time to permitted load" could be explained by a mediator variable (type of hip fracture). We studied 727 women aged 60 years or over with a recent low trauma surgically treated hip fracture and for whom an information on post-surgery complications and on the time to permitted load was available. To assess for mediation, the statistical analyses were carried out following the procedure described by Baron and Kenny. In this study, 46 % of women with hip fracture presented a time to permitted load of ≥ 10 days. The women with a post-surgery time to permitted load of ≥ 10 days showed a significantly higher proportion of trochanteric fracture localization (72.1 vs 42 %), of total overweight/obesity (46.5 vs 36.8 %) and of post-surgery complications (38.8 vs 18.8 %). The mediating effect of hip fracture localization on the association between overweight/obesity and the time of permitted load was demonstrated and confirmed in a multivariate logistic regression model. This study, carried out using a "mediator" statistical analysis, suggests that in elderly women with hip fracture being overweight/obese is associated with a slower short-term functional recovery as evaluated by the time to permitted load and that this association is mediated by the trochanteric localization of hip fracture.

  2. Memory for stress-associated acute pain.

    PubMed

    Gedney, Jeffrey J; Logan, Henrietta

    2004-03-01

    Negative emotions (eg, tension, anxiety, fear, anger) influence acute pain recall. Given reliance on patient-provided pain reports across the care continuum, an understanding of factors that modulate pain memory processing become important to patients, clinicians, and health care organizations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of negative emotions on the prediction of 6-month pain recall by using an experimental stress manipulation (speech task) + pain (forehead cold pressor) versus nonstress control + pain crossover design (n = 68). Results showed that (1) negative emotions were greater in the stress session than the nonstress session, and experienced pain levels did not differ by condition or sex; (2) the level negative emotions at the time of the pain stimuli mediated the ability of experienced pain to predict pain recall; and (3) women recalled more stress session pain than men, and nonstress pain was accurately recalled. Integrating these findings with those of others, we present a model of acute pain memory recall in which negative emotions influence pain memory processing wherein the level of experienced pain predicts short-term recall and affective state at the time of the experience becomes a powerful predictor for the long-term recall of experienced pain level. After 6 months the level of recalled experimental pain delivered within a stressful context becomes exaggerated. Negative emotions at the time of the painful stimuli and at recall influenced the prediction of the level of recalled pain. Emotional arousal may influence how memory for pain is encoded, processed, and retrieved.

  3. Relationship of child perceptions of maternal pain to children's laboratory and non-laboratory pain.

    PubMed

    Evans, S; Tsao, J Ci; Zeltzer, L K

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has established links between parent and child pain. However, little is known about sex-specific parent-child pain relationships in a nonclinical population. A sample of 186 children aged eight to 18 years (49% female) provided information on maternal and self bodily pain, assessed by asking children about the presence and location of bodily pain experienced. Children also completed three laboratory pain tasks and reported on cold pressor pain intensity, pressure pain intensity and heat pain intensity. The presence of child-reported maternal pain was consistently correlated with daughters' bodily and laboratory pain, but not with sons' pain in bivariate analyses. Multivariate analyses controlling for child age and maternal psychological distress indicated that children of mothers with bodily pain reported more total bodily pain sites as well as greater pressure and cold pain intensity, relative to children of mothers without bodily pain. For cold pain intensity, these results differed for boys versus girls, in that daughters reporting maternal pain evidenced significantly higher cold pain intensity compared with daughters not reporting maternal pain. No such differences were found for boys. The findings suggest that children's perceptions of maternal pain may play a role in influencing children's own experience of pain, and that maternal pain models may affect boys and girls differently.

  4. The effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in common lower limb conditions: a systematic review including quantification of patient-rated pain reduction.

    PubMed

    Korakakis, Vasileios; Whiteley, Rodney; Tzavara, Alexander; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-09-27

    To evaluate extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in treating Achilles tendinopathy (AT), greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS), medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), patellar tendinopathy (PT) and proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT). Systematic review. Randomised and non-randomised studies assessing ESWT in patients with AT, GTPS, MTSS, PT and PHT were included. Risk of bias and quality of studies were evaluated. Moderate-level evidence suggests (1) no difference between focused ESWT and placebo ESWT at short and mid-term in PT and (2) radial ESWT is superior to conservative treatment at short, mid and long term in PHT. Low-level evidence suggests that ESWT (1) is comparable to eccentric training, but superior to wait-and-see policy at 4 months in mid-portion AT; (2) is superior to eccentric training at 4 months in insertional AT; (3) less effective than corticosteroid injection at short term, but ESWT produced superior results at mid and long term in GTPS; (4) produced comparable results to control treatment at long term in GTPS; and (5) is superior to control conservative treatment at long term in PT. Regarding the rest of the results, there was only very low or no level of evidence. 13 studies showed high risk of bias largely due to methodology, blinding and reporting. Low level of evidence suggests that ESWT may be effective for some lower limb conditions in all phases of the rehabilitation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  6. Pain after hip arthroplasty managed by Brennan Healing Science.

    PubMed

    Namavar, Roxanna

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented illustrating the potential effect of Brennan Healing Science on pain following hip arthroplasty for avascular necrosis. A 54-year-old woman experienced anterior groin pain, numbness at the bottom of her foot, and occasional grinding at her hip 22 years after right total hip arthroplasty secondary to avascular necrosis. X-ray films showed signs of osteolysis behind the acetabular cup and asymmetric decreased polyethylene thickness of the acetabular prosthetic. Her orthopedic surgeon advised the patient to follow up every 6-9 months to avoid catastrophic failure of the implant, with plans for surgical revision to be scheduled at the next appointment. The patient sought alternative treatment to avoid an invasive procedure. On presentation, the patient had difficulty walking up the stairs into the treatment room due to pain which she rated a 9/10. She found it painful to rotate, flex, extend her hip, or to sit. Hands-on healing techniques based on the Brennan Healing Science method were initiated, starting at the feet, balancing the energy, and working the way up the joints. Once the work at the hip was completed, the hands-on techniques continued up the centerline of the body and the healing was brought to a close. On completion of a 60-minute healing, the patient was able to stand freely and rated her pain as a 4/10. Flexion, extension, and rotation at the hip were no longer distressing. She was able to walk up and down stairs without distress and denied instability, bursitis, or trochanteric or iliopsoas pain or swelling. Repeat X-rays showed decrease in bone spurs and no hardware problem, and her orthopedic surgeon recommended follow-up after 2 years. It is suggested that Brennan Healing Science techniques could play an effective and cost-efficient role in the treatment of pain following hip arthroplasty.

  7. Future Directions for Pain Management: Lessons from the Institute of Medicine Pain Report and the National Pain Strategy.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Sean

    2016-02-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine Relieving Pain in America Report and the soon to be released National Pain Strategy, pain affects over 100 million Americans and costs our country in over $500 billion per year. We have a greater appreciation for the complex nature of pain and that it can develop into a disease in itself. As such, we need more efforts on prevention of chronic pain and for interdisciplinary approaches. For precision pain medicine to be successful, we need to link learning health systems with pain biomarkers (eg, genomics, proteomics, patient reported outcomes, brain markers) and its treatment.

  8. Experimental pain responses in children with chronic pain and in healthy children: How do they differ?

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie CI; Evans, Subhadra; Seidman, Laura C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extant research comparing laboratory pain responses of children with chronic pain with healthy controls is mixed, with some studies indicating lower pain responsivity for controls and others showing no differences. Few studies have included different pain modalities or assessment protocols. OBJECTIVES: To compare pain responses among 26 children (18 girls) with chronic pain and matched controls (mean age 14.8 years), to laboratory tasks involving thermal heat, pressure and cold pain. Responses to cold pain were assessed using two different protocols: an initial trial of unspecified duration and a second trial of specified duration. METHODS: Four trials of pressure pain and of thermal heat pain stimuli, all of unspecified duration, were administered, as well as the two cold pain trials. Heart rate and blood pressure were assessed at baseline and after completion of the pain tasks. RESULTS: Pain tolerance and pain intensity did not differ between children with chronic pain and controls for the unspecified trials. For the specified cold pressor trial, 92% of children with chronic pain completed the entire trial compared with only 61.5% of controls. Children with chronic pain exhibited a trend toward higher baseline and postsession heart rate and reported more anxiety and depression symptoms compared with control children. CONCLUSIONS: Contextual factors related to the fixed trial may have exerted a greater influence on pain tolerance in children with chronic pain relative to controls. Children with chronic pain demonstrated a tendency toward increased arousal in anticipation of and following pain induction compared with controls. PMID:22518373

  9. Bison in the greater Yellowstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meagher, Mary

    1994-01-01

    In the Greater Yellowstone Area, free-ranging bison occur in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and Yellowstone National Park. The Yellowstone population is discussed, with emphasis on changes in numbers from approximately 400 in 1968 to about 3500 now. Major influences for change initially were natural; more recently the winter road system used by snowmobiles appeared to be the dominant factor. The situation is in a state of flux. Interagency planning is in progress to address management alternatives for conflicts outside the park.

  10. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  11. Predictors of Genital Pain in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of genital pain in healthy young adult women, limited research has addressed genital pain during intercourse using contemporary models of multidimensional sexual function. The objectives of this study were threefold: (1) to identify differences in sexual functioning in women who experience genital pain compared to pain free women; (2) to identify predictors of sexual functioning in women with and without genital pain; and (3) to identify predictors of sexual satisfaction in women with and without genital pain. Sexually active female undergraduates (n = 651) were administered the Female Sexual Function Index and the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory. We evaluated the sexual factors that impact the sexual function of women with any pain (including high and low pain groups) versus women with no history of pain. Women with genital pain reported greater rates of sexual dysfunction as compared to pain-free women; however, sexual functioning in the high versus low pain groups was distinguished primarily by vaginal lubrication. Women in the high pain group showed negative correlations between domains of sexual satisfaction and genital pain frequency and intensity that were not found in the low pain group. For pain-free women, intercourse played a strong role in sexual satisfaction, whereas non-intercourse sexual behavior was central to sexual satisfaction in women who reported pain. The evaluation of levels of genital pain may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the impairment of sexual function, sexual behavior, and sexual satisfaction. PMID:17674182

  12. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  13. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck, shoulder or back pain Dizziness ?xml:namespace> Sleep disorders ; If you have gone through treatment and still experience orofacial pain, you may have a sleep disorder, such as bruxism, or a sleep-related breathing ...

  14. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  15. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  16. Testicle Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... is more common in adolescents. Seek immediate medical attention if you have: Sudden, severe testicle pain Testicle pain accompanied by nausea, fever, chills or blood in your urine Schedule a doctor's visit if you have: Mild ...

  17. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in ... zoster (shingles) or herpes simplex (cold sores) infection Injury to the face Migraine Myofascial pain syndrome Sinusitis or sinus infection ( ...

  18. Breast Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... before your period and sometimes continuing through your menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and ... breasts. Throughout the month, not related to your menstrual cycle. Postmenopausal women sometimes have breast pain, but breast ...

  19. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage or other manual therapies, yoga, herbal and nutritional therapies, or others. This information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of treatment. The goals of the comprehensive pain ...

  20. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, most commonly with the structures of the cervical spine (neck). Only in rare instances is neck pain ... the neck. Pain can be localized to the cervical spine or may travel down an arm (radiculopathy). All ...

  1. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  2. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  3. Feeling pain

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... it to potential or actual damage to the body's tissues. In the example of a bee sting, the pain receptors in the skin detect tissue damage from the bee sting. Then, the peripheral nerves send a pain signal to the brain. The brain analyzes the pain signal. In turn, ...

  4. Ethnicity and interdisciplinary pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Christine M; Matsuura, Justin T; Smith, Clark C; Stanos, Steven P

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify ethnic differences in interdisciplinary pain treatment outcome and whether these differences occur while controlling for the effects of demographics, psychosocial, and secondary gain. We assessed a sample of 116 (Caucasian, African American, and Latino/a) chronic pain patients who participated a 4-week interdisciplinary pain treatment program. Outcome measure included pretreatment, post-treatment, and change scores on the Multidimensional Pain Inventory, Pain Anxiety Symptom Scale 20, Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, Coping Strategies Questionnaire-revised, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-short form. Analysis of covariances revealed that after accounting for educational and sex differences, ethnic minorities differed from Caucasians on a number of treatment outcome measures at pre- and post-treatment [F's ≥ 5.38; P's < 0.01]. At pretreatment, Latino/a's endorsed greater levels of pain-related anxiety, pain severity, and pain catastrophizing than Caucasians. Both Latino/a's and African Americans reported greater use of prayer at pre- and post-treatment, with Caucasians showing the greatest decrease in the use of prayer in response to treatment. At post-treatment, African Americans had higher level of depression and lower levels of reported activity than Caucasians. Results support the notion that ethnic differences in pain treatment outcome exist. Further, ethnic minority groups appear to have greater levels of distress compared to Caucasians. However, African Americans, Latino/a's and Caucasians demonstrated similar improvements on all outcome measures, with exception of the use of prayer. Future studies should begin to explore the mechanisms to explain why ethnic group differences in pain treatment outcome occur. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  5. In vitro comparison of resistance to implant failure in unstable trochanteric fractures fixed with intramedullary single screw versus double screw device

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Amit; Arun, GR; Singh, Vakil; Singh, Anant; Singh, Ashutosh K; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the resistance of intramedullary single screw device (Gamma nail) and double screw device proximal femoral nail (PFN) in unstable trochanteric fractures in terms of the number of cycles sustained, subsidence and implant failure in an axial loading test in cadaveric femora. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 18 dry cadaveric femoral specimens, 9 of these were implanted with a Gamma nail and 9 with PFN. There was no significant difference found in average dual energy X-ray absorptiometry value between both groups. The construct was made unstable (AO type 31A3.3) by removing a standard sized posteromedial wedge. These were tested on a cyclic physiological loading machine at 1 cycle/s with a load of 200 kg. The test was observed for 50,000 loading cycles or until implant failure, whichever occurred earlier. Peak displacements were measured and analysis was done to determine construct stiffness and gap micromotion in axial loading. Result: It was observed that there was statistically significant difference in terms of displacement at the fracture gap and overall construct stiffness of specimens of both groups. PFN construct group showed a mean subsidence of 1.02 mm and Gamma nail construct group showed mean subsidence of 2.36 mm after cycling. The average stiffness of Gamma nail group was 62.8 ± 8.4 N/mm which was significantly lower than average stiffness of the PFN group (80.4 ± 5.9 N/mm) (P = 0.03). In fatigue testing, 1 out of 9 PFN bone construct failed, while 5 of 9 Gamma nail bone construct failed. Conclusion: When considering micromotion (subsidence) and incidence of implant/screw failure, double screw device (PFN) had statistically significant lower micromotion across the fracture gap with axial compression and lower incidence of implant failure. Hence, double screw device (PFN) construct had higher stability compared to single screw device (GN) in an unstable trochanteric fracture femur

  6. The role of sensory signals from the insect coxa-trochanteral joint in controlling motor activity of the femur-tibia joint.

    PubMed

    Akay, T; Bässler, U; Gerharz, P; Büschges, A

    2001-02-01

    Interjoint coordination in multi-jointed limbs is essential for the generation of functional locomotor patterns. Here we have focused on the role that sensory signals from the coxa-trochanteral (CT) joint play in patterning motoneuronal activity of the femur-tibia (FT) joint in the stick insect middle leg. This question is of interest because when the locomotor system is active, movement signals from the FT joint are known to contribute to patterning of activity of the central rhythm-generating networks governing the CT joint. We investigated the influence of femoral levation and depression on the activity of tibial motoneurons. When the locomotor system was active, levation of the femur often induced a decrease or inactivation of tibial extensor activity while flexor motoneurons were activated. Depression of the femur had no systematic influence on tibial motoneurons. Ablation experiments revealed that this interjoint influence was not mediated by signals from movement and/or position sensitive receptors at the CT joint, i.e., trochanteral hairplate, rhombal hairplate, or internal levator receptor organ. Instead the influence was initiated by sensory signals from a field of campaniform sensillae, situated on the proximal femur (fCS). Selective stimulation of these fCS produced barrages of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in tibial extensor motoneurons and activated tibial flexor motoneurons. During pharmacologically activated rhythmic activity of the otherwise isolated mesothoracic ganglion (pilocarpine, 5 x 10(-4) M), deafferented except for the CT joint, levation of the femur as well had an inhibitory influence on tibial extensor motoneurons. However, the influence of femoral levation on the rhythm generated was rather labile and only sometimes a reset of the rhythm was induced. In none of the preparations could entrainment of rhythmicity by femoral movement be achieved, suggesting that sensory signals from the CT joint only weakly affect central

  7. [Autoerotic fatalities in Greater Dusseldorf].

    PubMed

    Hartung, Benno; Hellen, Florence; Borchard, Nora; Huckenbeck, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Autoerotic fatalities in the Greater Dusseldorf area correspond to the relevant medicolegal literature. Our results included exclusively young to middle-aged, usually single men who were found dead in their city apartments. Clothing and devices used showed a great variety. Women's or fetish clothing and complex shackling or hanging devices were disproportionately frequent. In most cases, death occurred due to hanging or ligature strangulation. There was no increased incidence of underlying psychiatric disorders. In most of the deceased no or at least no remarkable alcohol intoxication was found. Occasionally, it may be difficult to reliably differentiate autoerotic accidents, accidents occurring in connection with practices of bondage & discipline, dominance & submission (BDSM) from natural death, suicide or homicide.

  8. Humour and Connecting with Kids in Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digney, John

    2009-01-01

    Emotional pain which manifests itself in problem behaviours is, for many children and youth, a part of their everyday struggle through life. Kids growing up in residential care or in a dysfunctional family or setting suffer this pain. Connecting with kids in pain, the primary task for youth workers, is made all the more difficult, the greater the…

  9. Does Exercise Decrease Pain Via Conditioned Pain Modulation in Adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Stolzman, Stacy; Bement, Marie Hoeger

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pain relief after exercise, exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH), is established across the lifespan. Conditioned pain modulation (CPM: pain inhibits pain) may be a mechanism for EIH. Methods In 55 adolescents, pressure pain thresholds were measured before and after exercise (deltoid, quadriceps, and nail bed) and during CPM at the nail bed and deltoid test stimulus sites. The relation between EIH and CPM was explored. Results EIH occurred at deltoid and quadriceps; CPM occurred at nail bed and deltoid. CPM and EIH correlated at deltoid; adolescents with greater CPM experienced greater pain relief after exercise. At this site, CPM predicted 5.4% of EIH. Arm lean mass did not add a significant effect. Peak exercise pain did not influence EIH. Adolescents with none, minimal, moderate, or severe peak exercise pain experienced similar EIH. Conclusions A potential relation exists between CPM and EIH in adolescents. Pediatric physical therapists should consider the CPM response when prescribing exercise as a pain management tool. PMID:27661245

  10. Longitudinal Perioperative Pain Assessment in Head and Neck Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Buchakjian, Marisa R; Davis, Andrew B; Sciegienka, Sebastian J; Pagedar, Nitin A; Sperry, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate perioperative pain in patients undergoing major head and neck cancer surgery and identify associations between preoperative and postoperative pain characteristics. Patients undergoing head and neck surgery with regional/free tissue transfer were enrolled. Preoperative pain and validated screens for symptoms (neuropathic pain, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia) were assessed. Postoperatively, patients completed a pain diary for 4 weeks. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. Seventy-eight percent had pain prior to surgery, and for 38%, the pain had neuropathic characteristics. Thirteen patients (48%) completed at least 2 weeks of the postoperative pain diary. Patients with moderate/severe preoperative pain report significantly greater pain scores postoperatively, though daily pain decreased at a similar linear rate for all patients. Patients with more severe preoperative pain consumed greater amounts of opioids postoperatively, and this correlated with daily postoperative pain scores. Patients who screened positive for neuropathic pain also reported worse postoperative pain. Longitudinal perioperative pain assessment in head and neck patients undergoing surgery suggests that patients with worse preoperative pain continue to endorse worse pain postoperatively and require more narcotics. Patients with preoperative neuropathic pain also report poor pain control postoperatively, suggesting an opportunity to identify these patients and intervene with empiric neuropathic pain treatment.

  11. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  12. Social pain and physical pain: shared paths to resilience

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, John A; Zautra, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Although clinical models have traditionally defined pain by its consequences for the behavior and internal states of the sufferer, recent evidence has highlighted the importance of examining pain in the context of the broader social environment. Neuroscience research has highlighted commonalities of neural pathways connecting the experience of physical and social pain, suggesting a substantial overlap between these phenomena. Further, interpersonal ties, support and aspects of the social environment can impair or promote effective adaptation to chronic pain through changes in pain perception, coping and emotional states. The current paper reviews the role of social factors in extant psychological interventions for chronic pain, and discusses how greater attention to these factors may inform future research and clinical care. PMID:26678402

  13. Chronic Pain in Adolescence: Parental Responses, Adolescent Coping, and their Impact on Adolescent's Pain Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Claar, Robyn Lewis; Logan, Deirdre L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine relations among parental responses, adolescent pain coping, and pain behaviors in adolescents with chronic pain. Methods This study included 217 adolescents (12–17 years) evaluated at a multidisciplinary pain clinic and their parents. Adolescents completed measures assessing their pain, pain coping responses, functional disability, and somatic symptoms. Parents reported on their responses to their adolescent's pain. Results Passive and active coping interacted with parental protective behavior to predict adolescents’ pain behaviors. Contrary to expectations, among adolescents who reported infrequent use of passive or active coping strategies, higher levels of parental protective behavior were associated with higher levels of disability and somatic symptoms. Discussion Among adolescents who report infrequent use of passive and active coping responses, parental protective responses to pain may inadvertently promote greater disability and symptom complaints. Parental responses to pain may be an important target to treat adolescent chronic pain. PMID:18375447

  14. Chronic pain in adolescence: parental responses, adolescent coping, and their impact on adolescent's pain behaviors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Logan, Deirdre L

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine relations among parental responses, adolescent pain coping, and pain behaviors in adolescents with chronic pain. This study included 217 adolescents (12-17 years) evaluated at a multidisciplinary pain clinic and their parents. Adolescents completed measures assessing their pain, pain coping responses, functional disability, and somatic symptoms. Parents reported on their responses to their adolescent's pain. Passive and active coping interacted with parental protective behavior to predict adolescents' pain behaviors. Contrary to expectations, among adolescents who reported infrequent use of passive or active coping strategies, higher levels of parental protective behavior were associated with higher levels of disability and somatic symptoms. Discussion Among adolescents who report infrequent use of passive and active coping responses, parental protective responses to pain may inadvertently promote greater disability and symptom complaints. Parental responses to pain may be an important target to treat adolescent chronic pain.

  15. [Thigh and leg musculo-cutaneous island flap for giant bilateral trochanteric and perineal pressure sores coverage: Extreme treatment in spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    André, A; Crouzet, C; De Boissezon, X; Grolleau, J-L

    2015-06-01

    Surgical treatment of perineal pressure sores could be done with various fascio-cutaneous or musculo-cutaneous flaps, which provide cover and filling of most of pressure sores after spinal cord injuries. In rare cases, classical solutions are overtaken, then it is necessary to use more complex techniques. We report a case of a made-to-measure lower limb flap for coverage of confluent perineal pressure sores. A 49-year-old paraplegic patient developed multiple pressure sores on left and right ischial tuberosity, inferior pubic bone and bilateral trochanters with hips dislocation. Surgical treatment involved a whole right thigh flap to cover and fill right side lesions, associated to a posterior right leg musculo-cutaneous island flap to cover and fill the left trochanteric pressure sore. The surgical procedure lasted 6.5 hours and required massive blood transfusion. Antibiotics were adapted to bacteriological samples. There were no postoperative complications; complete wound healing occurred after three weeks. A lower limb sacrifice for coverage of a giant perineal pressure sores is an extreme surgical solution, reserved to patients understanding the issues of this last chance procedure. A good knowledge of vascular anatomy is an essential prerequisite, and allows to shape made-to-measure flaps. The success of such a procedure is closely linked to the collaboration with the rehabilitation team (appropriate therapeutic education concerning transfers and positioning). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of the reconstruction trochanteric antigrade nail (TAN) with the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) in the management of reverse oblique intertrochanteric hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Makki, Daoud; Matar, Hosam E; Jacob, Nebu; Lipscombe, Stephen; Gudena, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Reverse oblique intertrochanteric fractures have unique mechanical characteristics and are often treated with intramedullary implants. We compared the outcomes of the reconstruction trochanteric antegrade nail (TAN) with the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). Between July 2008 and February 2014, we reviewed all patients with reverse oblique intertrochanteric fractures treated at our hospital. Patients with pathological fractures and those who were treated with other than TAN and PFNA nailing systems were excluded. Preoperative assessment included the Abbreviated mental test score (AMT), the ASA grade, pre-injury mobility and place of residence. Postoperative outcome measures included the type of implant used, time to fracture union, failures of fixation and revision surgeries. Fifty-eight patients were included and divided into two groups based on the treatment: 22 patients treated with TAN and 36 patients treated with PFNA systems. The two groups were well matched with regards to demographics and fracture type. The overall union rate was similar in both groups but the time to union was shorter in the TAN group. There were 8 implant failures in the PFNA (22.2%) group compare to none in the TAN group. Implant failure was associated with the severity of fracture (AO 31.A3.3) but was not related to fracture malreduction or screw position (Tip-apex-distance). Our study suggests that the use of reconstruction system with two screws such as TAN may be more suitable implant for reverse oblique intertrochanteric hip fractures.

  17. Clinical management of chronic TMD pain.

    PubMed

    Miller, D B

    1998-01-01

    Chronic Pain extracts a "penalty" on society now estimated to be well in excess of $100 million per year. The "penalty" that Chronic Pain extracts from its victims is incalculable. Chronic Pain is a major component of Temporomandibular Disorders. The current neurological theory of the mechanism of chronic TMD pain is explored along with the current modes of treatment. Pharmacological management of Chronic Pain in a clinical setting is outlined. Dentists are involved in pain management on a daily basis. Dentists treat pain both prophylacticly and in response to specific patient symptoms. Most dental treatment involves some type of pain management. We, dentists, have become very adept at managing acute pain. We have much greater difficulty managing chronic pain. The word "pain" derives from the Greek word for penalty, and appeared to them to be a "penalty" inflicted by the gods. In 1984, Bonica estimated that one-third of all Americans suffered from some kind of chronic pain at a "penalty" to society of $65 Billion annually in medical expenses and lost wages and productivity. This figure is certainly much greater now. Chronic pain can be a very complex problem that can require a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. Chronic pain in the dental setting is most frequetly caused by prolonged Temporomandibular Disorders.

  18. Ion channel therapeutics for pain

    PubMed Central

    Skerratt, Sarah E; West, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex disease which can progress into a debilitating condition. The effective treatment of pain remains a challenge as current therapies often lack the desired level of efficacy or tolerability. One therapeutic avenue, the modulation of ion channel signaling by small molecules, has shown the ability to treat pain. However, of the 215 ion channels that exist in the human genome, with 85 ion channels having a strong literature link to pain, only a small number of these channels have been successfully drugged for pain. The focus of future research will be to fully explore the possibilities surrounding these unexplored ion channels. Toward this end, a greater understanding of ion channel modulation will be the greatest tool we have in developing the next generation of drugs for the treatment of pain. PMID:26218246

  19. [Painful lymphocytic subacute thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Cortázar, A; Ruiz de Gordejuela, J; Zabalza, I; Acinas, O; Beitia, J J

    1992-01-25

    Subacute granulomatous thyroiditis (SGT) and subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis (SLT) present a similar evolution during the first year, however, posteriorly, except on rare occasions, SGT maintains normofunction while SLT may present relapse with persistent goiter or permanent hypothyroidism requiring periodic follow up. The presence of spontaneous pain and very elevated VSG have been described accompanying SGT but not SLT histologically proven to be used for differentiating these entities. Two cases with clinical criteria and cytological diagnosis of SLT consulted for spontaneous thyroid pain are presented. VSG greater than 50 mm/1st hour was suggestive of SGT. The importance of cytology for the correct management of subacute thyroiditis is emphasized.

  20. Predictors and social consequences of daily pain expectancy among adults with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Mun, Chung Jung; Thummala, Kirti; Davis, Mary C; Karoly, Paul; Tennen, Howard; Zautra, Alex J

    2017-03-21

    Previous research suggests that for people living with chronic pain, pain expectancy can undermine access to adaptive resources and functioning. We tested and replicated the unique effect of pain expectancy on subsequent pain through 2 daily diary studies. We also extended previous findings by examining cognitive and affective antecedents of pain expectancy and the consequences of pain expectancy for daily social enjoyment and stress. In study 1, 231 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis completed 30 end-of-day diaries. Results of multilevel structural equation model showed that controlling for today's pain, pain expectancy predicted next day pain. In study 2, diary assessments of affective, cognitive, and social factors were collected during the morning, afternoon, and evening for 21 days from a sample of 220 individuals with fibromyalgia. Results showed that both positive affect and the extent to which pain interfered with daily activities in the afternoon predicted evening pain expectancy in the expected direction. However, negative affect and pain coping efficacy were not associated with pain expectancy. Consistent with study 1, more than usual evening pain expectancy was related to greater next morning pain. We also found that next morning pain predicted next afternoon social enjoyment but not social stress. The findings of these 2 studies point to the importance of promoting positive affect and reducing pain expectancy as a way of decreasing the detrimental effect of chronic pain on enjoyable social experiences.

  1. Facial pain.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B

    2009-07-01

    Facial pain is a debilitating disorder if left untreated. Too often, patients are labeled as having psychopathology when face pain etiology is unclear. These patients are categorized as "atypical," "idiopathic," or "psychogenic." Cases of facial pain involving neuropathic, neurovascular, musculoskeletal, as well as intracranial and extracranial systems will be reviewed. Peripheral and central mechanisms associated with these disorders are used to provide an update of these frequently seen clinical issues.

  2. Neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L; Dworkin, Robert H; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2017-02-16

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7-10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain.

  3. Neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7–10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:28205574

  4. Central pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  5. Pain and Function in Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Beissner, Katherine L.; Barrón, Yolanda; Trachtenberg, Melissa A.; Bach, Eileen; Henderson, Charles R.; Sridharan, Sridevi; Reid, M. Carrington

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To describe racial/ethnic group differences in pain presentation and the prevalence of psychosocial factors among patients admitted to home health care, and to determine the extent of racial/ethnic group differences in the association of psychosocial factors with pain intensity and pain-related disability. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data on 588 patients with activity-limiting pain admitted to home care for physical therapy. Three psychosocial factors were assessed: depressive symptoms, pain self-efficacy, and health literacy. Statistical methods included estimation of general linear models of pain intensity and pain-related disability. Results Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks report a greater number of pain sites, worse pain intensity, and higher levels of pain-related disability than non-Hispanic whites and others. Racial/ethnic minority group patients also have a higher prevalence of adverse psychosocial factors than others, with evidence that race/ethnicity interacts with pain self-efficacy and depressive symptoms in their association with mean pain intensity and pain-related disability, respectively. Discussion The substantial racial/ethnic difference in the psychosocial profiles of older adults with activity-limiting pain highlights the importance of screening for these modifiable risk factors and tailoring interventions accordingly. Direct attention to the psychosocial needs of patients could help to address racial/ethnic disparities in pain outcomes. PMID:27518494

  6. Pain experience of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans with comorbid chronic pain and posttraumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Outcalt, Samantha D; Ang, Dennis C; Wu, Jingwei; Sargent, Christy; Yu, Zhangsheng; Bair, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) co-occur at high rates, and Veterans from recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan may be particularly vulnerable to both conditions. The objective of this study was to identify key aspects of chronic pain, cognitions, and psychological distress associated with comorbid PTSD among this sample of Veterans. Baseline data were analyzed from a randomized controlled trial testing a stepped-care intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) Veterans with chronic pain only (n = 173) were compared with those with chronic pain and clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (n = 68). Group differences on pain characteristics, pain cognitions, and psychological distress were evaluated. Results demonstrated that OIF/OEF Veterans with comorbid chronic musculoskeletal pain and PTSD experienced higher pain severity, greater pain-related disability and increased pain interference, more maladaptive pain cognitions (e.g., catastrophizing, self-efficacy, pain centrality), and higher affective distress than those with chronic pain alone. Veterans of recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan may be particularly vulnerable to the compounded adverse effects of chronic pain and PTSD. These results highlight a more intense and disabling pain and psychological experience for those with chronic pain and PTSD than for those without PTSD.

  7. Living Life With My Child's Pain: The Parent Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (PPAQ).

    PubMed

    Smith, Allison M; Sieberg, Christine B; Odell, Shannon; Randall, Edin; Simons, Laura E

    2015-07-01

    Parents' emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses are highly influential on children's pain and functional outcomes. One important response to pediatric pain is acceptance: the degree to which an individual participates in routine daily activities in the presence of pain and is willing to let pain be a part of their life without efforts to control or avoid it. However, no tool currently exists to assess parents' own acceptance of their child's pain. The aim of this study was to validate the Parent Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (PPAQ). The PPAQ was administered to 310 parents of youth with chronic pain in an outpatient pediatric headache program and a day hospital pain rehabilitation program. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 2 factors for the PPAQ: an 11-item Activity Engagement scale and a 4-item Acceptance of Pain-related Thoughts and Feelings scale. The PPAQ total score and subscales demonstrated strong internal consistency. Greater parent pain acceptance was positively associated with child pain acceptance, and was negatively correlated with parent protective behaviors, parent minimizing behaviors, parent and child pain catastrophizing, and child fear of pain. Parent protective behaviors and child pain acceptance both served as mediators of the relationship between parent pain acceptance and child functional disability. The PPAQ is a valid measure of parent pain acceptance and may provide valuable insights into parent responses to child pain and the ways in which parent acceptance influences child outcomes. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  8. The Fixation Method according to the Fracture Type of the Greater Trochanter in Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures Undergoing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Doohoon; Park, Byeong-Seop; Jang, Gun-Il

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a study on patients who underwent hip joint arthroplasty because of unstable femur intertrochanteric fractures with greater trochanter bony fragments. After dividing patients into three groups depending on their fracture patterns, we evaluated the clinical and radiological outcomes of different operation methods applied to each of these groups. Materials and Methods Using Evan's classification, we defined an unstable intertrochanteric fracture as those characterized as stage 4 or 5. Of the 137 patients presenting with an intertrochanteric fracture with osteoporosis (bone mineral density, <−2.5) between March 2014 and October 2015, 63 met the eligibility criteria and were included in this study. Next, patients were divided into three groups based on their greater trochanter fracture patterns (discerned with three-dimensional computed tomography images); different fixation methods were applied to each group by a single orthopaedic surgeon. Results Taken as a whole, 50 out of 63 patients experienced no reduction in walking distance in their daily lives. Harris hip score increased from 74.8 to 85.7 point and we considered this a relatively good result. Radiologically, we observed complete bone union in 62 cases (98.4%); the lone exception was in a patient who experienced osteolysis. There were also 3 cases who removed greater trochanter reattachment device due to broken implant and 1 case of dislocation. Conclusion The different fixation methods applied to three distinct groups with varying fractures patterns were successful in achieving proper reduction and fixation of greater trochanteric fractures. We also observed reduced bone union periods when arthroplasty was performed in patients with unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Lastly, we believe these approaches may also aid in achieving early ambulation and early rehabilitations. PMID:28316964

  9. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a fever or a cough that produces yellow-green phlegm. You have chest pain that is severe and does not go away. You are having problems swallowing. Chest pain lasts longer than 3 to 5 days. What to Expect at Your Office Visit ...

  10. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability.

  11. [Heel pain].

    PubMed

    Cizmár, I; Svizenská, I; Pilný, J; Repko, M; Ira, D

    2005-01-01

    Heel pain is quite frequent clinical symptom in our population. Successful therapy derives from the problem aetiology. The most frequent source of pain is the mechanical basis, both on dorsal and plantar side of calcaneum. Therapy includes a variety of procedures, from routine measures to surgical intervention.

  12. Physical activity behavior predicts endogenous pain modulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Kelly M; Ohlman, Thomas; Naugle, Keith E; Riley, Zachary A; Keith, NiCole R

    2017-03-01

    Older adults compared with younger adults are characterized by greater endogenous pain facilitation and a reduced capacity to endogenously inhibit pain, potentially placing them at a greater risk for chronic pain. Previous research suggests that higher levels of self-reported physical activity are associated with more effective pain inhibition and less pain facilitation on quantitative sensory tests in healthy adults. However, no studies have directly tested the relationship between physical activity behavior and pain modulatory function in older adults. This study examined whether objective measures of physical activity behavior cross-sectionally predicted pain inhibitory function on the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) test and pain facilitation on the temporal summation (TS) test in healthy older adults. Fifty-one older adults wore an accelerometer on the hip for 7 days and completed the CPM and TS tests. Measures of sedentary time, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were obtained from the accelerometer. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to determine the relationship of TS and CPM with levels of physical activity, while controlling for demographic, psychological, and test variables. The results indicated that sedentary time and LPA significantly predicted pain inhibitory function on the CPM test, with less sedentary time and greater LPA per day associated with greater pain inhibitory capacity. Additionally, MVPA predicted pain facilitation on the TS test, with greater MVPA associated with less TS of pain. These results suggest that different types of physical activity behavior may differentially impact pain inhibitory and facilitatory processes in older adults.

  13. Cephalomedullary nails in the treatment of high-energy proximal femur fractures in young patients: a prospective, randomized comparison of trochanteric versus piriformis fossa entry portal.

    PubMed

    Starr, Adam J; Hay, Michael T; Reinert, Charles M; Borer, Drake S; Christensen, Kevin C

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare a cephalomedullary nail that uses a piriformis fossa starting point to one that uses a trochanteric starting point, in the treatment of high-energy proximal femur fractures in young patients. Our hypothesis was that a nail that uses a trochanteric starting point would result in less blood loss than a nail that uses a piriformis fossa starting point. Prospective, randomized. Level 1 trauma center. Thirty-four consecutive patients aged between 18 and 50 years who sustained a subtrochanteric, intertrochanteric, or ipsilateral femoral neck/shaft fracture due to a high-energy injury were enrolled. Patients were randomized to have their fractures repaired with a Russell-Taylor Recon Nail or Howmedica Long Gamma Nail. Surgery was performed on a fracture table, in supine or lateral position according to the surgeon's preference. Direct fracture exposure was avoided. Reduction was obtained through traction, patient positioning, and manual pressure. If necessary, stab-wound incisions were made to introduce instruments to improve reduction. Intramedullary reamers were used, and all nails were statically locked. Bone grafting was not used. Blood loss, incision length, duration of surgery, and body mass index were recorded for each patient. Surgeon's assessment of ease of use of the device and quality of reduction were noted. Patients were to be followed up to assess fracture union. Hip and knee ranges of motion at latest follow-up were measured. Radiographs obtained at the time of union were assessed for varus malalignment. Return to work status was recorded, and the Harris Hip Score was used to assess hip function. There were 17 patients in each group. The 2 groups did not differ with regard to blood loss, incision length, and duration of surgery or intraoperative complications. Body mass index was significantly linked to duration of surgery (P<0.001) and incision length (P<0.001). Surgeon's assessment of ease of use and reduction

  14. Dyadic analysis of child and parent trait and state pain catastrophizing in the process of children's pain communication.

    PubMed

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Chambers, Christine T; Chorney, Jill; Fernandez, Conrad V; McGrath, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    When explored separately, child and parent catastrophic thoughts about child pain show robust negative relations with child pain. The objective of this study was to conduct a dyadic analysis to elucidate intrapersonal and interpersonal influences of child and parent pain catastrophizing on aspects of pain communication, including observed behaviours and perceptions of child pain. A community sample of 171 dyads including children aged 8 to 12 years (89 girls) and parents (135 mothers) rated pain catastrophizing (trait and state versions) and child pain intensity and unpleasantness following a cold pressor task. Child pain tolerance was also assessed. Parent-child interactions during the cold pressor task were coded for parent attending, nonattending, and other talk, and child symptom complaints and other talk. Data were analyzed using the actor-partner interdependence model and hierarchical multiple regressions. Children reporting higher state pain catastrophizing had greater symptom complaints regardless of level of parent state pain catastrophizing. Children reporting low state pain catastrophizing had similar high levels of symptom complaints, but only when parents reported high state pain catastrophizing. Higher child and parent state and/or trait pain catastrophizing predicted their own ratings of higher child pain intensity and unpleasantness, with child state pain catastrophizing additionally predicting parent ratings. Higher pain tolerance was predicted by older child age and lower child state pain catastrophizing. These newly identified interpersonal effects highlight the relevance of the social context to children's pain expressions and parent perceptions of child pain. Both child and parent pain catastrophizing warrant consideration when managing child pain.

  15. Comparisons of catastrophizing, pain attitudes, and cold-pressor pain experience between Chinese and European Canadian young adults.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Annie Y; Tripp, Dean A; Ji, Li-Jun; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2010-11-01

    Experimental pain research indicates ethnic differences in pain experience. Most of the cross-cultural pain research studied African Americans and Hispanics with little data available for Asian groups. This study examined differences in pain catastrophizing, pain attitudes, and pain responses between Chinese and European Canadian young adults. Prior to completing a cold-pressor (CP) task, 80 Chinese and 80 European Canadian undergraduate students were administered measures of pain catastrophizing and pain attitudes, including stoicism and cautiousness. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain intensity were measured during the CP task. The Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire was administered immediately postimmersion to measure sensory and affective pain. While there was no group difference in pain threshold and pain intensity, Chinese participants displayed lower pain tolerance and reported higher SF-MPQ-Affective than European Canadians. Regarding psychological variables, there was no difference in stoicism and cautiousness between groups, but Chinese participants reported greater pain catastrophizing. Mediational analysis indicated that pain catastrophizing mediated the group differences in SF-MPQ-Affective score. The implications of the findings and future research were discussed. The study found ethnic differences in cold-pressor responses, in which Chinese undergraduates reported higher levels of pain compared to their Euro-Canadian counterparts. The finding that pain catastrophizing mediated the ethnic difference in SF-MPQ-Affective scores indicated the importance of examining the role of catastrophizing in pain reports from Chinese and Euro-Canadian patients. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Do design adaptations of a trochanteric nail make sense for Asian patients? Results of a multicenter study of the PFNA-II in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sawaguchi, Takeshi; Sakagoshi, Daigo; Shima, Yosuke; Ito, Takaaki; Goldhahn, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Asian patients with osteoporosis suffer from an increased incidence of hip fracture and a potentially increased risk of fixation failure due to anatomical differences compared to Caucasians. To cope with these differences, an Asian size- and geometry-adapted Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation (PFNA-II) was developed. The objective of this prospective multicenter study was to assess the risk of fracture fixation complications (FFCs), the occurrence of mismatch and the quality of life status of patients treated with the PFNA-II. 176 Japanese patients with an isolated, unstable, closed trochanteric fracture were treated with the PFNA-II. Patients were prospectively screened for anticipated complications and classified accordingly; complications were centrally reviewed by a complication review board to avoid bias by the treating surgeon, and categorized using a standardized reporting system. Outcome measurements included the occurrence and evaluation of FFCs, the radiological assessment of mismatch and quality of life measured with the EQ-5D score. 3 Intraoperative and 15 postoperative complications were found in 16/176 patients. The risk of sustaining any intraoperative or postoperative FFC was 1.7% (3/176; 95% CI: 0.35-4.9) and 8% (14/176; 95% CI: 4.4-13), respectively. The most likely cause for FFCs was the "bone/fracture" factor (9/14 patients). Radiologically detectable contact of the implant with the inner cortex ("mismatch") was reported for 17/173 patients (10%). The reported complication risks and mismatches are reasonable for this patient cohort. The geometry- and size-adapted PFNA-II is relatively safe but requires standardized assessment in a larger target cohort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidimensional Neuropathic Pain Phenotypes after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Widerström-Noga, Eva; Felix, Elizabeth R; Adcock, James P; Escalona, Maydelis; Tibbett, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    Identifying clinical neuropathic pain phenotypes is a first step to better understand the underlying pain mechanisms after spinal cord injury (SCI). The primary purpose of the present study was to characterize multidimensional neuropathic pain phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing (QST), pain intensity, and utilization of catastrophizing coping strategies. Thermal perception, thermal pain, and vibratory perception thresholds were assessed above and below the level of injury (LOI) in 101 persons with SCI and neuropathic pain, 18 persons with SCI and no neuropathic pain, and 50 able-bodied, pain-free controls. Cluster analysis of QST z-scores below the LOI, pain intensity ratings, and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) catastrophizing subscale scores in subjects with neuropathic pain resulted in two phenotypes: severe neuropathic pain (SNP) with greater pain intensity (7.39 ± 1.57) and thermal and vibratory sensitivity compared with the moderate neuropathic pain (MNP; 5.40 ± 1.43). A factor analysis including all CSQ subscales, the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) total score, and thermal pain sensitivity above and below the LOI resulted in three factors: (1) adaptive pain coping including increasing activities, diverting attention, and reinterpreting pain sensations; (2) catastrophizing, neuropathic pain, and thermal sensitivity including greater NPSI total score, thermal pain sensitivity below the LOI, and catastrophizing; and (3) general pain sensitivity including greater thermal pain sensitivity above the LOI and lower catastrophizing. Our results suggest that neuropathic pain symptom severity post-SCI is significantly associated with residual spinothalamic tract function below the LOI and catastrophizing pain coping.

  18. Future Directions for Pain Management: Lessons from the Institute of Medicine Pain Report and the National Pain Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis According to the Institute of Medicine Relieving Pain in America Report and the subsequently released National Pain Strategy, pain affects over 100 million Americans and costs our country in excess of half a trillion dollars per year. We are having a greater appreciation for the complex nature of pain and that it can develop into a disease in itself. As such, we need to focus more efforts on prevention of chronic pain and the need for interdisciplinary approaches particularly for the most persistent pain problems. For the goal of precision pain medicine to be successful, we need to link learning health systems with biomarkers (e.g. genomics, proteomics, patient reported outcomes, brain markers) of chronic pain and its treatment. PMID:26611393

  19. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  20. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  1. Painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, M

    1998-10-01

    Pain following peripheral nerve lesion appears to be a paradox because damage of primary afferent nerve fibres carrying nociceptive information should result in hypoalgesia. The very existence of neuropathic pain therefore implies fundamental changes of nociceptive processing and there have been considerable advances in the understanding of factors that precipitate neuropathic pain. This knowledge has already been harnessed for the development of novel analgesic therapies to supplement traditional treatment with anticonvulsant and antidepressants drugs which has shown clear effectiveness in systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials.

  2. Prevalence of myofascial pain in general internal medicine practice.

    PubMed Central

    Skootsky, S A; Jaeger, B; Oye, R K

    1989-01-01

    Myofascial pain is a regional pain syndrome characterized in part by a trigger point in a taut band of skeletal muscle and its associated referred pain. We examined a series of 172 patients presenting to a university primary care general internal medicine practice. Of 54 patients whose reason for a visit included pain, 16 (30%) satisfied criteria for a clinical diagnosis of myofascial pain. These patients were similar in age and sex to other patients with pain, and the frequency of pain as a primary complaint was similar for myofascial pain as compared with other reasons for pain. The usual intensity of myofascial pain as assessed by a visual analog scale was high, comparable to or possibly greater than pain due to other causes. Patients with upper body pain were more likely to have myofascial pain than patients with pain located elsewhere. Physicians rarely recognized the myofascial pain syndrome. Commonly applied therapies for myofascial pain provided substantial abrupt reduction in pain intensity. The prevalence and severity of myofascial pain in this university internal medicine setting suggest that regional myofascial pain may be an important cause of pain complaints in the practice of general internal medicine. PMID:2788962

  3. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  4. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  5. Thoracolumbar pain among fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, O

    1999-08-01

    High +Gz forces place high stress on the spinal column, and fighter pilots flying high-performance fighter aircraft frequently] report work-related thoracic and lumbar spine pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether +Gz exposure causes work-related thoracolumbar spine pain among fighter pilots. A questionnaire was used to establish the occurrence of thoracic and lumbar spine pain during the preceding 12 months and during duties over the whole working career among 320 fighter pilots and 283 nonflying controls matched for age and sex. Thirty-two percent of the pilots and 19% of the controls had experienced pain in the thoracic spine during the preceding 12 months (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-3.5; p = 0.002 for the pilots). Among the pilots, the OR increased up to 6.1 (95% CI = 1.6-23.1; p = 0.0007) with the number of +Gz flight hours. There was no difference between the groups with regard to lumbar pain during the preceding 12 months, but over their whole working careers fighter pilots (58%) had experienced lumbar pain during their duties more often than controls (48%) (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.3-2.6; p = 0.002). The greater the number of +Gz flight hours, the greater the occurrence of lumbar spine pain when on duty (OR = 26.9; 95% CI = 6.2-116; p = 0.0001 for the most experienced fighter pilots). The same was not true with regard to the number of +Gz flight hours and lumbar pain during the preceding 12 months. Age had no effect on pain in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Fighter pilots flying high-performance aircraft have more work-related thoracic and lumbar spine pain than controls of the same age and sex. The difference is explained by the pilots' exposure to +Gz forces.

  6. [Pain and anesthesiology : aspects of the development of modern pain therapy in the twentieth century].

    PubMed

    Witte, W

    2011-06-01

    developed by the American psychiatrist George Engel, defined chronic pain as an illness rather than a disease. Concurrently, the radical behaviorism of the late 1960s affected both the therapy of chronic and of acute pain. Based on this theory, patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was introduced in the 1970s and 1980s. Acute pain services (APS) in hospitals, were developed beginning in the 1980s using the continuous release of opioids. Regional anesthesia played a greater role than general anesthesia in developing pain therapy in the twentieth century and paved the way for pain therapy. The restriction to nerve blocks in pain centers was overcome by the expansion of theoretical foundations beyond the framework of anesthesiology. Impulses from psychology and psychosomatic medicine were crucial. The evolution of cancer pain therapy was distinct from non-cancer pain therapy.

  7. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org National ...

  8. Differential pain modulation properties in central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gruener, Hila; Zeilig, Gabi; Laufer, Yocheved; Blumen, Nava; Defrin, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    It seems that central neuropathic pain (CNP) is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain; whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution, enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. We investigated the hypothesis that CNP is associated with decreased descending pain inhibition along with increased neuronal excitability and that both traits are associated with spinothalamic tract (STT) damage. Chronic spinal cord injury subjects with CNP (n = 27) and without CNP (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 20) underwent the measurement of pain adaptation, conditioned pain modulation (CPM), tonic suprathreshold pain (TSP), and spatial summation of pain above injury level. Central neuropathic pain subjects also underwent at and below-lesion STT evaluation and completed the questionnaires. Central neuropathic pain subjects showed decreased CPM and increased enhancement of TSP compared with controls. Among CNP subjects, the dysfunction of CPM and pain adaptation correlated positively with the number of painful body regions. The magnitude of TSP and spatial summation of pain correlated positively with CNP intensity. STT scores correlated with CNP intensity and with TSP, so that the more affected the STT below injury level, the greater the CNP and TSP magnitude. It seems that CNP is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain, whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution and enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. Thus, top-down processes may determine the spread of CNP, whereas bottom-up processes may determine CNP intensity. It also seems that the mechanisms of CNP may involve STT-induced hyperexcitability. Future, longitudinal studies may investigate the timeline of this scenario.

  9. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your health care provider may not feel pain medication is the safest option. In this case, distraction techniques such as guided imagery may help your child cope. You could also try progressive ...

  10. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  11. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce pain: ■■ Radiation therapy. Different forms of radiation energy are used to shrink the tumor and reduce ... acupressure.) The goal is to change the body’s energy flow so it can heal itself. When receiving ...

  12. Shoulder Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Exercise and Fitness, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention and WellnessTags: Exercise Prescription, pain relievers, Shoulder Problems, sports medicine Exercise and Fitness, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention and ...

  13. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... lasts less than a few months. Education There's no commonly accepted program to teach people with back pain how to manage the condition effectively. So education might involve a class, a talk with your doctor, written material or ...

  14. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... analgesia, identify new targets for analgesic drugs, and test the efficacy and adverse reactions of newly developed or currently used drugs to treat pain. Researchers are currently using these technologies to discover the mechanisms by which drugs such ...

  15. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  16. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategy Current Research Research Funded by NINDS Basic Neuroscience Clinical Research Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus ... pain has done. Scientists believe that advances in neuroscience will lead to more and better treatments for ...

  17. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  18. Pain (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the PDQ summary on Acupuncture for more information. Hypnosis Hypnosis may help you relax and may be combined with other thinking and behavior methods. Hypnosis to relieve pain works best in people who ...

  19. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Review Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  20. Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heel pain is generally the result of faulty biomechanics (walking gait abnormalities) that place too much stress ... inflammation of the band of fibrous connective tissue (fascia) running along the bottom (plantar surface) of the ...

  1. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... chocolate in your diet helps reduce breast pain. Vitamin E, thiamine, magnesium, and evening primrose oil are not harmful, but most studies have not shown any benefit. Talk to your health care provider before starting ...

  2. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  3. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  4. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  5. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Joshi, G P

    1994-01-01

    Inadequately treated pain is a major cause of unanticipated hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. The ability to provide adequate pain relief by simple methods that are readily available to the day-care patient in his or her home environment is one of the major challenges for providers of ambulatory surgery and anesthesia. The increasing number of extensive and painful surgical procedures (e.g., laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laminectomy, knee construction, hysterectomies) being undertaken on an ambulatory basis presents new challenges with respect to acute postoperative pain. Hence the availability of more sophisticated and effective treatment modalities, such as ambulatory PCA and continuous local and regional anesthetic blocks, with minimal side effects, are necessary to optimize the benefits of ambulatory surgery for both patient and health care provider. However, outcome studies are needed to evaluate the effect of these newer therapeutic approaches with respect to postoperative side effects and other important recovery parameters. Recent studies suggest that factors other than pain per se must be controlled to reduce postoperative morbidity and facilitate the recovery process. Not surprisingly, the anesthetic technique can influence analgesic requirement in the early postoperative period. Although oral analgesic agents will continue to play an important role, the adjunctive use of local anesthetic agents is likely to assume an even greater role in the future. Use of drug combinations (e.g., opiates and local anesthetics, opiates and NSAIDs) may provide improved analgesia with fewer side effects. Finally, safer and simpler analgesic delivery systems are needed to improve our ability to provide cost-effective pain relief after ambulatory surgery. In conclusion, as a result of our enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of acute pain and the physiological basis of nociception, the provision of "stress-free" anesthesia with minimal postoperative

  6. Children's selective attention to pain and avoidance behaviour: the role of child and parental catastrophizing about pain.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated selective attention to pain in children, its implications for child avoidance behaviour, and the moderating role of dimensions comprising child and parental catastrophizing about pain (ie, rumination, magnification, and helplessness). Participants were 59 children (31 boys) aged 10-16 years and one of their parents (41 mothers). Children performed a dot-probe task in which child facial pain displays of varying pain expressiveness were presented. Child avoidance behaviour was indexed by child pain tolerance during a cold-pressor task. Children and parents completed measures of child and parent pain catastrophizing, respectively. Findings indicated that both the nature of child selective attention to pain and the impact of selective attention upon child avoidance behaviour were differentially sensitive to specific dimensions of child and parental catastrophizing. Specifically, findings showed greater tendency to shift attention away from pain faces (i.e.,, attentional avoidance) among children reporting greater pain magnification. A similar pattern was observed in terms of parental characteristics, such that children increasingly shifted attention away from pain with increasing levels of parental rumination and helplessness. Furthermore, child attentional avoidance was associated with greater avoidance behaviour (i.e., lower pain tolerance) among children reporting high levels of pain magnification and those whose parents reported greater rumination about pain. The current findings corroborate catastrophizing as a multidimensional construct that may differentially impact outcomes and attest to the importance of assessing both child and parental characteristics in relation to child pain-related attention and avoidance behaviour. Further research directions are discussed.

  7. Relieving pain with nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Carron, H

    1978-04-01

    Pain syndromes in elderly patients are seldom psychogenic or due merely to "old age." Careful differential diagnosis is important, as judicious use of nerve blocks as adjunctive therapy often can relieve pain and restore activity. In the acute phase of shoulder pain, intrabursal injection of local anesthetic and steroid inhibits the inflammatory process. In the later stages, suprascapular nerve block relieves pain and interrupts afferent pain pathways. The occipital pain and headache of cervical arthritis also often respond to injection of 2 to 3 ml of long-acting anesthetic into the greater and lesser occipital nerves at the sites where they pierce the trapezius. Minor causalgia, shoulder-arm syndrome, or chronic traumatic edema may follow either forearm fracture or inflammation around the shoulder joint. Five stellate ganglion blocks with 1% lidocaine on alternate days, followed by 3 to 4 months of active and passive exercise, is the most effective treatment. This regimen usually produces a fully functional extremity. In degenerative disk disease, osteoarthritis, and metastatic disease, the cause of back pain is essentially the same--edema and inflammation of nerve roots at the intervertebral foramina. Injection of local anesthetic and steroid into the epidural space usually reduces swelling and inflammation. Patients are evaluated in 2 weeks and reblocked if improvement has plateaued. Pain relief most often is prompt and persists for an indefinite period.

  8. Sex differences in endogenous pain modulation by distracting and painful conditioning stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Quiton, Raimi L.; Greenspan, Joel D.

    2007-01-01

    Sex differences in endogenous pain modulation were tested in healthy volunteers (32 men, 30 women). Painful contact heat stimuli were delivered to the right leg alone, and then in combination with various electrical conditioning stimuli delivered to the left forearm. Four conditioning protocols were applied to each subject in separate sessions: mild, nonpainful (control); distracting; stressful-yet-nonpainful; strongly painful. Thermal stimuli were rated on visual analog scales for pain intensity (INT) and unpleasantness (UNP). Distracting and painful conditioning stimuli significantly reduced heat pain INT and UNP ratings for both sexes, with significantly larger distraction effects on INT ratings for men than women (p=0.004). No sex differences in pain-evoked hypoalgesia were detected (p>0.05). The stress protocol did not consistently reduce heat pain ratings, possibly because the protocol was not sufficiently stressful to activate endogenous modulatory systems. Regression analysis revealed that the magnitude of pain-evoked hypoalgesia was predicted by the perceived distraction (p=0.003) and stress (p=0.04) produced by the painful conditioning stimulation, providing evidence that distraction and stress contribute to pain-evoked hypoalgesia. However, the contribution of stress to pain-evoked hypoalgesia differed by sex (p=0.02), with greater perceived stress associated with greater hypoalgesia in men and the opposite trend in women, suggesting sex differences in the mechanisms underlying pain-evoked hypoalgesia. This study provides indirect evidence that multiple neural mechanisms are involved in endogenous pain modulation and suggests that sex-specific aspects of these systems may contribute to greater pain sensitivity and higher prevalence of many chronic pain conditions among women. PMID:17951004

  9. Suppression of pain-related thoughts and feelings during pain-induction: sex differences in delayed pain responses.

    PubMed

    Burns, John W; Elfant, Erin; Quartana, Phillip J

    2010-06-01

    Women tend to report greater acute and chronic pain intensity than men, and various mechanisms have been proposed to account for these sex differences. Suppression has been related to amplified pain intensity, and thus we examined whether sex differences in the use of suppression partly explained the discrepancy between men and women on pain report. Participants (N = 222; women: 55%) underwent a cold pressor, during which half the sample was randomly assigned to suppress pain-related thoughts and feelings and the other half was not. A 2-min recovery period followed the cold pressor. Ten min later, all participants were exposed to another physical stimulus (a massage device). Significant condition x Sex interactions were found for pain intensity, sensory ratings from the McGill Pain Questionnaire and unpleasantness ratings for the massage device, such that: (a) men in the No Suppression condition reported lower pain and unpleasantness than women in the same condition; (b) men in Suppression condition reported greater pain and unpleasantness then men in No Suppression condition, but equivalent pain and unpleasantness to women in No Suppression condition; (c) differences between men and women on pain in No Suppression condition were partly mediated by women's report of greater spontaneous use of avoidance/suppression during the cold pressor. Results using an "addition" paradigm (i.e., manipulating use of suppression) and a "take away" (i.e., mediation) paradigm converge to suggest that women spontaneously use suppression to regulate pain more than men, and that the differential use of suppression partly explains the tendency for women to report greater pain intensity than men.

  10. Characterization of Whole Body Pain in Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome at Baseline – A MAPP Research Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. Henry; Jemielita, Thomas; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Bradley, Catherine S.; Naliboff, Bruce; Williams, David A.; Gereau, Robert W.; Kreder, Karl; Clemens, J. Quentin; Rodriguez, Larissa V.; Krieger, John N.; Farrar, John T.; Robinson, Nancy; Landis, J. Richard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We characterized the location and spatial distribution of whole body pain among patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS) using a body map; and compared the severity of urinary symptoms, pelvic pain, non-pelvic pain, and psychosocial health among patients with different pain patterns. Methods 233 women and 191 men with UCPPS enrolled in a multi-center, one-year observational study completed a battery of baseline measures, including a body map describing the location of pain during the past week. Participants were categorized as having “pelvic pain only” if they reported pain in the abdomen and pelvis only. Participants who reported pain beyond the pelvis were further divided into two sub-groups based on the number of broader body regions affected by pain: an “intermediate” group (1–2 additional regions outside the pelvis) and a “widespread pain” group (3–7 additional regions). Results Of the 424 enrolled patients 25% reported pelvic pain only, and 75% reported pain beyond the pelvis of which 38% reported widespread pain. Participants with greater number of pain locations had greater non-pelvic pain severity (p<0.0001), sleep disturbance (p=0.035), depression (p=0.005), anxiety (p=0.011), psychological stress (p=0.005), negative affect scores (p=0.0004), and worse quality of life (p≤0.021). No difference in pelvic pain and urinary symptom severity were observed by increasing pain distribution. Conclusions Three-quarters of men and women with UCPPS reported pain outside the pelvis. Widespread pain was associated with greater severity of non-pelvic pain symptoms, poorer psychosocial health and worse quality of life, but not worse pelvic pain or urinary symptoms. PMID:28373134

  11. [Pain and coping strategies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Herlin, Troels; Thastum, Mikael

    2008-02-18

    Pain is one of the primary symptoms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). JIA patients have reduced pain tolerance and pain threshold compared to healthy controls. In children with JIA the greater use of coping strategies such as problem-solving, positive self-statements and distraction consistently have predicted less arthritis-related pain, even after controlling for relevant medical and demographic variables. Interventions specifically designed to modify maladaptive pain coping strategies and pain-related health beliefs may be effective in reducing pain in children with JIA.

  12. [Visceral pain].

    PubMed

    Elsenbruch, S; Häuser, W; Jänig, W

    2015-10-01

    Chronic visceral pain is an unresolved neurobiological, medical and socioeconomic challenge. Up to 20% of the adult population suffer from chronic visceral pain and abdominal complaints constitute a prevalent symptom also in children and adolescents. Existing treatment approaches are often unsuccessful and patients typically suffer from multiple somatic and psychological symptoms. This complex situation requires integrative treatment approaches. This review summarizes current basic and clinical research on acute and chronic visceral pain with a focus on research groups in Germany. Despite significant clinical and scientific advances, a number of questions remain open calling for more funding to support research to elucidate the complex pathophysiology of chronic visceral pain and to develop and test new treatment approaches. Research support should focus on interdisciplinary concepts and methodology using expertise from multiple disciplines. The field would also benefit from a broader integration of visceral pain into teaching curricula in medicine and psychology and should aim to motivate young clinicians and scientists to strive for a career within this important and highly fascinating area.

  13. Postoperative Pain Following Foot and Ankle Surgery: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Loretta B.; Wagner, Dominic; Witten, Daniela M.; Martinez-Diaz, Gabriel J.; Brook, Nancy S.; Toussaint, Michele; Carroll, Ian R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Orthopaedic procedures have been reported to have the highest incidence of pain compared to other types of operations. There are limited studies in the literature that investigate postoperative pain. Materials and Methods A prospective study of 98 patients undergoing orthopedic foot and ankle operations was undertaken to evaluate their pain experience. A Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) was administered preoperatively and postoperatively. Results The results showed that patients who experienced pain before the operation anticipated feeling higher pain intensity immediately postoperatively. Patients, on average, experienced higher pain intensity 3 days after the operation than anticipated. The postoperative pain intensity at 3 days was the most severe, while postoperative pain intensity at 6 weeks was the least severe. Age, gender and preoperative diagnosis (acute versus chronic) did not have a significant effect on the severity of pain that patients experienced. Six weeks following the operation, the majority of patients felt no pain. In addition, the severity of preoperative pain was highly predictive of their anticipated postoperative pain and 6-week postoperative pain, and both preoperative pain and anticipated pain predict higher immediate postoperative pain. Conclusion The intensity of patients' preoperative pain was predictive of the anticipated postoperative pain. Patients' preoperative pain and anticipated postoperative pain were independently predictive of the 3-day postoperative pain. The higher pain intensity a patient experienced preoperatively suggested that their postoperative pain severity would be greater. Therefore, surgeons should be aware of these findings when treating postoperative pain after orthopaedic foot and ankle operations. PMID:19026197

  14. Benzodiazepine use in patients with chronic pain in an interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Julie L; Craner, Julia R; Evans, Michele M; Hooten, W Michael

    2017-01-01

    In the context of widespread opioid use, increased emphasis has been placed on the potentially deleterious effects of concurrent benzodiazepine (BZD) and opioid use. Although use of opioids in chronic pain has been a major focus, BZD use is equally concerning. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between BZD and opioid use in adults with chronic pain upon admission to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation (IPR) program. The study cohort involved 847 consecutive patients admitted to a 3-week outpatient IPR program from January 2013 through December 2014. Study variables included baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the pain severity subscale of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory. Upon admission, 248 (29%) patients were taking BZDs. Patients using BZDs were significantly more likely to use opioids and to be female. Additionally, patients using BZDs had significantly greater depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity scores. In univariable logistic regression analysis, opioid use, female sex, and greater scores of depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity were significantly associated with BZD use. In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, pain duration, opioid use, depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity, only female sex and greater depression scores were significantly associated with BZD use. Among patients participating in an outpatient IPR program, female sex and greater depression scores were associated with BZD use. Results identify a high prevalence of BZD use in patients with chronic pain and reinforce the need to weigh the risks versus benefits when prescribing in this patient population.

  15. Benzodiazepine use in patients with chronic pain in an interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Julie L; Craner, Julia R; Evans, Michele M; Hooten, W Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In the context of widespread opioid use, increased emphasis has been placed on the potentially deleterious effects of concurrent benzodiazepine (BZD) and opioid use. Although use of opioids in chronic pain has been a major focus, BZD use is equally concerning. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between BZD and opioid use in adults with chronic pain upon admission to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation (IPR) program. Methods The study cohort involved 847 consecutive patients admitted to a 3-week outpatient IPR program from January 2013 through December 2014. Study variables included baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the pain severity subscale of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory. Results Upon admission, 248 (29%) patients were taking BZDs. Patients using BZDs were significantly more likely to use opioids and to be female. Additionally, patients using BZDs had significantly greater depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity scores. In univariable logistic regression analysis, opioid use, female sex, and greater scores of depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity were significantly associated with BZD use. In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, pain duration, opioid use, depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity, only female sex and greater depression scores were significantly associated with BZD use. Discussion Among patients participating in an outpatient IPR program, female sex and greater depression scores were associated with BZD use. Results identify a high prevalence of BZD use in patients with chronic pain and reinforce the need to weigh the risks versus benefits when prescribing in this patient population. PMID:28223841

  16. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p < .001). Patients with greater pain volatility were less likely to have a good treatment outcome (odds ratio = 0.55, p < .05), controlling for baseline pain severity and rate of change in pain over time. A 1 standard deviation increase in pain volatility was associated with a 44% reduction in the probability of endpoint abstinence. The significant reduction in subjective pain during treatment provides observational support for the analgesic effects of BUP/NLX in patients with chronic pain and opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Pain Volatility and Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Matthew J.; Heinzerling, Keith G.; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (N = 149) who received buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multi-site clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least two of the previous three weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = − 0.36, p < .001). Patients with greater pain volatility were less likely to have a good treatment outcome (OR = 0.55, p < .05), controlling for baseline pain severity and rate of change in pain over time. A one standard deviation increase in pain volatility was associated with a 44% reduction in the probability of endpoint abstinence. The significant reduction in subjective pain during treatment provides observational support for the analgesic effects of BUP-NLX in patients with chronic pain and opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk for returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP-NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. PMID:26302337

  18. The pain paradox: borderline personality disorder features, self-harm history, and the experience of pain.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ryan W; Trull, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), compared to controls, report a relative absence of acute pain. In contrast, BPD is overrepresented among chronic pain patients, suggesting they experience a relative excess of chronic pain. To date, this "pain paradox" has been only partially explored; no study has examined both acute and chronic pain in the same sample. In addition, previous research has not fully examined the effect of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) on either acute or chronic pain experience in BPD. Undergraduates (N = 206), oversampled for those high in BPD features, completed a Cold Pressor Task (CPT), rating their pain every 15 s over a maximum of 4 min. Following the CPT, participants completed measures of BPD features, NSSI history, past-year pain, and perceived pain tolerance. Results did not support the expected negative association between BPD features and acute pain. Multilevel modeling revealed an interaction of BPD features and NSSI history on CPT pain ratings: Among individuals in the no-NSSI group, BPD features were associated with greater acute pain. Among individuals in the NSSI group, BPD features were not significantly associated with acute pain. Results for past-year pain indicated that BPD features were associated with greater past-year pain regardless of NSSI history. This finding, coupled with the difference in the association of BPD features and acute pain between the NSSI and no-NSSI groups provides tentative evidence that the combination of BPD features and NSSI history, among nonclinical samples, is linked to a pain paradox. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Prediction of Postoperative Pain using Path Analysis in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Sakura; Sands, Laura P.; Lim, Eunjung; Paul, Sudeshna; Leung, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Effective postoperative pain management is important for older surgical patients since pain affects perioperative outcomes. A prospective cohort study was conducted to describe the direct and indirect effects of patient risk factors and pain treatment in explaining levels of postoperative pain in older surgical patients. Methods We studied patients who were 65 years of age or older and were scheduled for major non-cardiac surgery with a postoperative hospital stay of at least 2 days. The numeric rating scale (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain) was used to measure pain levels before surgery and once daily for 2 days after surgery. Path analysis was performed to examine the association between predictive variables and postoperative pain levels. Results Three hundred fifty patients were studied. The results reveal that preoperative pain level, use of preoperative opioids, female gender, higher ASA physical status, and postoperative pain control methods were the strongest predictors of postoperative pain as measured the first day after surgery. Younger age, greater preoperative symptoms of depression and lower cognitive function also contributed to higher postoperative pain levels. Pain levels on the second day after surgery were strongly predicted by preoperative pain level, use of preoperative opioids, surgical risk, and pain and opioid dose on postoperative day 1. However, younger age, female gender, higher ASA physical status, greater preoperative symptoms of depression, lower cognitive function and postoperative pain control methods indirectly contributed to pain levels on the second day after surgery. Conclusion Although preoperative pain and use of preoperative opioids have the strongest effects on postoperative pain, clinicians should be aware that other factors such as age, gender, surgical risk, preoperative cognitive impairment and depression also contribute to reported postoperative pain. Based on significant statistical correlations, these

  20. Effects of anger suppression on pain severity and pain behaviors among chronic pain patients: evaluation of an ironic process model.

    PubMed

    Burns, John W; Quartana, Phillip; Gilliam, Wesley; Gray, Erika; Matsuura, Justin; Nappi, Carla; Wolfe, Brandy; Lofland, Kenneth

    2008-09-01

    Evidence for links between anger inhibition or suppression and chronic pain severity is based mostly on studies with correlation designs. Following from ironic process theory, we proposed that attempts to suppress angry thoughts during provocation would increase subsequent pain intensity among chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients, and do so through paradoxically enhanced accessibility of anger. CLBP patients (N = 58) were assigned to suppression and nonsuppression conditions while performing a computer maze task with a harassing confederate. A structured pain behavior task (SPBT) followed. Self-reported anger, anxiety, and sadness following maze task. Self-reported pain severity and number of observed pain behaviors during SPBT. Patients told to suppress during provocation: (a) reported greater anger following the maze task, reported greater pain intensity during the SPBT, and exhibited more pain behaviors than patients not suppressing; (b) postmaze anger levels significantly mediated group differences on pain behaviors. Attempts by CLBP patients to suppress anger may aggravate pain related to their clinical condition through ironically increased feelings of anger. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  2. Pain charts (body maps or manikins) in assessment of the location of pediatric pain

    PubMed Central

    von Baeyer, Carl L; Lin, Vivian; Seidman, Laura C; Tsao, Jennie CI; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY This article surveys the use of pain charts or pain drawings in eliciting information about the location of pain symptoms from children and adolescents. While pain charts are widely used and have been incorporated in multidimensional pediatric pain questionnaires and diaries, they present a number of issues requiring further study. These include, in particular, the number and size of different locations or areas of pain that need to be differentiated; the age at which children are able to complete pain charts unassisted; and whether the intensity and other qualities of pain can be accurately recorded on pain charts by children and adolescents. Based on data currently available, it is suggested that the unassisted use of pain charts be restricted to children aged 8 years or over, while for clinical purposes many younger children can complete pain charts with adult support. Where the investigator’s interest is restricted to a few areas of the body, checklists of body parts may have greater utility than pain charts. A new pain chart adapted for use in studies of pediatric recurrent and chronic pain is presented. PMID:21572558

  3. Integrating Pain Management in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Robert N.; Edwards, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    There is much evidence to suggest that psychological and social issues are predictive of pain severity, emotional distress, work disability, and response to medical treatments among persons with chronic pain. Psychologists can play an important role in the identification of psychological and social dysfunction and in matching personal characteristics to effective interventions as part of a multidisciplinary approach to pain management, leading to a greater likelihood of treatment success. The assessment of different domains using semi-structured clinical interviews and standardized self-report measures permits identification of somatosensory, emotional, cognitive, behavioral and social issues in order to facilitate treatment planning. We briefly describe measures to assess constructs related to pain and intervention strategies for the behavioral treatment of chronic pain and discuss related psychiatric and substance abuse issues. Finally, we offer a future look at the role of integrating pain management in clinical practice in the psychological assessment and treatment for persons with chronic pain. PMID:22383018

  4. Predictors and consequences of multiple persistent postmastectomy pains.

    PubMed

    Kudel, Ian; Edwards, Robert R; Kozachik, Sharon; Block, Brian M; Agarwal, Shefali; Heinberg, Leslie J; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2007-12-01

    Persistent postmastectomy pain is quite common and has been classified into several distinct types. Few studies, however, have investigated either the predictors or functional impact of multiple types of post mastectomy pain. In this investigation, 278 women, who were, on average, several years post mastectomy, completed questionnaires assessing pain, pain-related physical function, and psychosocial distress. We assessed three distinct categories of postmastectomy pain: phantom breast pain, scar pain, and other mastectomy-related pain. Each of the three types of postmastectomy pain was strongly related to one another (i.e., women reporting one type of pain were more likely to report the other types as well). In general, the more types of postmastectomy pain a woman reported, the greater the degree of disability and distress. Collectively, the presence of "other mastectomy-related pain" was a stronger unique predictor of disability and distress than were the other two categories of pain. Interestingly, demographic and surgical factors, including time since surgery, were not consistent predictors of pain or function. The findings suggest that the assessment of postmastectomy pain should include formal evaluation of multiple types of pain, with additional attention paid to the category of "other mastectomy-related pains," and that the number of types of pain reported by women after surgery may be important in predicting functional outcomes.

  5. Trigger points and pressure pain hypersensitivity in people with postmeniscectomy pain.

    PubMed

    Torres-Chica, Bárbara; Núñez-Samper-Pizarroso, César; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Cleland, Joshua A; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Laguarta-Val, Sofía; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) to assess the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) and widespread pressure hyperalgesia; and (2) to assess the relationship between the presence of active TrPs, pain intensity, and widespread pressure hypersensitivity in individuals with postmeniscectomy pain. Thirty-three patients with postmeniscectomy pain, 46 to 60 years of age, and 33 matched controls participated. TrPs were explored bilaterally within the tensor fasciae latae, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, adductor magnus, adductor longus, semitendinosus, biceps femoris, and gastrocnemius muscles in a blinded manner. TrPs were considered active if the referred pain reproduced knee symptoms. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were also assessed bilaterally over the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, patellar tendon, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior. Pain was collected with a numerical pain rate scale (0 to 10). Patients with postmeniscectomy pain showed a greater (P<0.001) number of active TrPs (mean: 2±1) and a similar number (P=0.611) of latent TrPs (mean: 4±4) than pain-free controls (mean latent TrP: 4±1). A greater number of active TrPs was associated with higher pain intensity (r=0.352; P=0.045). Patients also exhibited reduced PPT over the affected vastus medialis and patellar tendon (P<0.05) and bilaterally over the tibialis anterior muscle (P=0.001). A greater the number of active muscle TrPs was also associated with widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia. The referred pain elicited by active TrPs reproduced knee symptoms in patients with postmeniscectomy pain. Patients also showed localized reduction of PPT. The number of TrPs was associated with the intensity of pain and pressure hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest the presence of peripheral sensitization in patients with postmeniscectomy pain could be associated with the presence of active TrPs.

  6. Pain experience after simple tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Taiseer Hussain; Alnahar, Amir

    2008-05-01

    To assess pain experience after simple uncomplicated tooth extraction and to see if there is a need to prescribe analgesic drugs after such a procedure. A random sample of patients presenting for tooth extraction at the Maxillofacial Unit, Jordan University of Science and Technology was included. A baseline assessment of previously experienced general and dental pains using numeric scales was done. Subsequently, tooth extractions were done and telephone interviews were made during evenings for a week. Pain intensity was assessed on a numeric scale, and use of analgesic drugs and pain quality were recorded. At the evening of extraction 81.8% of patients had pain. Female gender predominance in pain reporting was statistically significant on postextraction days 3 and 5. Chronically inflamed teeth caused the highest mean pain intensity scores and nonsmokers showed significantly higher mean pain intensity scores compared with smokers. Mild pain was experienced by most patients (38.6%) on the evening of extraction. It was found that 55.3% of participants (largely females) used analgesic drugs on the evening of extraction, and 6.8% of participants still used analgesic drugs on day 7 postextraction. There was a significant correlation between mean pain intensity score and previous dental injection pain. Patients, notably females, experienced pain of varying intensity after simple uncomplicated tooth extraction maximally at the evening of extraction; and greater than 50% of the patients used analgesic drugs. We recommend offering regular analgesic drugs during the first week after tooth extraction.

  7. Distraction analgesia in chronic pain patients: the impact of catastrophizing.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Kristin L; Campbell, Claudia; Martel, Marc O; Greenbaum, Seth; Wasan, Ajay D; Borsook, David; Jamison, Robert N; Edwards, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    Diverting attention away from noxious stimulation (i.e., distraction) is a common pain-coping strategy. Its effects are variable across individuals, however, and the authors hypothesized that chronic pain patients who reported higher levels of pain catastrophizing would derive less pain-reducing benefit from distraction. Chronic pain patients (n=149) underwent psychometric and quantitative sensory testing, including assessment of the temporal summation of pain in the presence and absence of a distracting motor task. A simple distraction task decreased temporal summation of pain overall, but, surprisingly, a greater distraction analgesia was observed in high catastrophizers. This enhanced distraction analgesia in high catastrophizers was not altered when controlling for current pain scores, depression, anxiety, or opioid use (analysis of covariance [ANCOVA]: F=8.7, P<0.005). Interestingly, the magnitude of distraction analgesia was inversely correlated with conditioned pain modulation (Pearson R=-0.23, P=0.005). Distraction produced greater analgesia among chronic pain patients with higher catastrophizing, suggesting that catastrophizing's pain-amplifying effects may be due in part to greater attention to pain, and these patients may benefit from distraction-based pain management approaches. Furthermore, these data suggest that distraction analgesia and conditioned pain modulation may involve separate underlying mechanisms.

  8. Greater patient confidence yields greater functional outcomes after primary total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Higuera, Carlos A; Strnad, Greg; Iannotti, Joseph P

    2015-08-01

    Patient satisfaction is increasingly being tied to reimbursement rates, and patient satisfaction is often associated with improving functionality and decreasing disability postoperatively. This study sought to determine if a total shoulder arthroplasty patient's preoperative confidence in his or her ability to attain the level of activity desired would influence postoperative functional scores. Patients undergoing a primary total shoulder arthroplasty at a single institution were asked to complete a preoperative questionnaire with multiple items including baseline symptom severity measures and their confidence in reaching their level of desired functionality postoperatively (scored 0-10). Patients then completed an identical postoperative questionnaire at their follow-up visits. Associations between the patient's confidence in attaining treatment goals and functional outcomes was established by multiple linear regression models that were adjusted for gender, age, body mass index, baseline 12-Item Short Form Health Survey mental component scores, college education, smoking status, baseline functional scores, and length of follow-up. Patients had a high level of confidence that their outcome would match their expectations, with an average score of 7.8 (range, 0-10; 28.4% reported a full 10/10 confidence). For every 1-point increase in confidence, patients experienced an average increase in their function score of 2.7 points (P = .039) and improvement in their pain score of 2.0 (P = .033) according to the Penn Shoulder Score. There was no significant association with the patient's 12-Item Short Form Health Survey score postoperatively. Patients with greater preoperative confidence actually have significantly better postoperative functional outcomes than their less confident peers even with adjustment for other known risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The biopsychosocial model in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Novy, Diane M; Aigner, Carrie J

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an up-to-date overview on the biopsychosocial model in cancer pain. This review contains articles published from 2012 to 2014, which advance our understanding of biopsychosocial factors related to the cancer pain experience and psychosocial treatment for cancer pain. Greater depression, anxiety, and distress, and lower quality of life are related to greater pain intensity in cancer patients. Recent publications have expanded on this research by examining how psychosocial factors relate to the development of chronic pain conditions after cancer treatment. Recent publications have also advanced our understanding of psychosocial interventions for cancer pain and symptom management. In the last few years, several reviews have emerged, which have found modest effect sizes for psychosocial interventions in cancer pain management. The biopsychosocial model is a helpful way to comprehensively approach the conceptualization and treatment of pain in cancer patients at all stages of the disease process. We currently have an established base of research on the importance of biopsychosocial model in cancer pain. Our ability to treat patients with cancer pain effectively will improve as we gain a better understanding of which treatments work for which patients.

  10. Characterization of pain, disability, and psychological burden in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Speed, Traci J; Mathur, Vani A; Hand, Matthew; Christensen, Bryt; Sponseller, Paul D; Williams, Kayode A; Campbell, Claudia M

    2017-02-01

    The clinical manifestations of Marfan syndrome frequently cause pain. This study aimed to characterize pain in a cohort of adults with Marfan syndrome and investigate demographic, physical, and psychological factors associated with pain and pain-related disability. Two hundred and forty-five participants (73% female, 89% non-Hispanic white, 90% North American) completed an online questionnaire assessing clinical features of Marfan syndrome, pain severity, pain-related disability, physical and mental health, depressive symptoms, pain catastrophizing, and insomnia. Eighty-nine percent of respondents reported having pain with 28% of individuals reporting pain as a presenting symptom of Marfan syndrome. Almost half of individuals reported that pain has spread from its initial site. Participants in our study reported poor physical and mental health functioning, moderate pain-related disability, and mild levels of depressive symptoms, sleep disturbances, and pain catastrophizing. Those who identified pain as an initial symptom of Marfan syndrome and those who reported that pain had spread from its initial site reported greater psychological burden compared with those without pain as an initial symptom or pain spreading. Physical health is the largest predictor of pain severity and pain-related disability. While pain catastrophizing and worse mental health functioning are significant correlates of pain severity and pain-related disability, respectively. Pain is a significant and persistent problem in Marfan syndrome and is associated with profound disability and psychological burden. Further studies are indicated to better characterize the directionality of pain, pain-related disability, and psychological burden in Marfan syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Illness perceptions, negative emotions, and pain in patients with noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Israel, Jared I; White, Kamila S; Gervino, Ernest V

    2015-03-01

    Illness-specific cognitions are associated with outcomes in numerous health conditions, however, little is known about their role in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). NCCP is prevalent, impairing, and associated with elevated health care utilization. Our objective was to investigate the relations between illness perceptions, emotion, and pain in a sample of 196 adult patients diagnosed with NCCP. We found that negative illness perceptions were associated with greater anxiety, depression, chest pain, and pain-related life interference while controlling for the effects of demographic and pain-related variables. These results expand current NCCP theory and may inform future treatment development.

  12. Ketoprofen Dental Pain Study.

    PubMed

    Levin, L M; Cooper, S A; Betts, N J; Wedell, D; Hermann, D G; Lamp, C; Secreto, S A; Hersh, E V

    1997-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, recently approved as an over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic at a 12.5 mg dosage strength. This is the first published study which explores the analgesic efficacy and safety of ketoprofen 12.5 mg in patients experiencing pain following the removal of impacted third molars. This study was single-dose, double-blind and randomized utilizing a 6-hour in-patient evaluation period. Patients ingested a single dose of ketoprofen 12.5 mg (n = 30), ketoprofen 37.5 mg (n = 32) or placebo (n = 15) when their post-surgical pain reached at least a moderate intensity on a 5-point categorical (CAT) scale and greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measures of pain intensity and relief were gathered every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours, and then hourly from hours 3 through 6. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded as they occurred. Both dosages of ketoprofen were significantly more efficacious than placebo (two way ANOVAs, p < 0.05). For pain intensity difference (PID) and pain relief, the 12.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from hours 1 through 3, while the 37.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from 40 minutes through 4 hours. Ketoprofen 37.5 mg was significantly more efficacious than the 12.5 mg dose only at 40 minutes for PID(VAS) and relief, and at 60 minutes for PID(VAS). Both ketoprofen dosages displayed significantly greater 3-hr, 4-hr and 6-hr summary analgesic measures (SPID(VAS), SPID(CAT), TOTPAR) than placebo, with the exception of the 6-hr SPID(CAT) measure for ketoprofen 12.5 mg. No serious side effects were observed in this study. We conclude that ketoprofen in a dose range of 12.5 mg to 37.5 mg is a safe and effective analgesic for the relief of post-operative dental pain.

  13. Electronic gaming as pain distraction

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Eleanor; Trevena, Judy; Swain, Nic

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether active distraction reduces participants’ experience of pain more than passive distraction during a cold pressor task. In the first experiment, 60 participants were asked to submerge their hand in cold (2°C) water for as long as they could tolerate. They did this with no distraction, and then with active (electronic gaming system) and passive (television) distraction, in randomly assigned order. Tolerance time, pain intensity ratings and task absorption ratings were measured for each condition. A second experiment attempted to control for participants’ expectations about the effects of distraction on pain. Forty participants underwent the same experimental procedure, but were given verbal suggestions about the effects of distraction by the experimenter before each distraction condition. Participants in both experiments had a significantly higher pain tolerance and reported less pain with the active distraction compared with passive or no distraction. Participants reported being more absorbed, and were significantly more willing to do the task again when they had the active distraction compared with both passive distraction and no distraction. They also had more enjoyment, less anxiety and greater reduction in pain with active distraction than with passive distraction. There was no effect of suggestion. These experiments offer further support for the use of electronic games as a method of pain control. PMID:21369538

  14. Electronic gaming as pain distraction.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Eleanor; Trevena, Judy; Swain, Nic

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether active distraction reduces participants' experience of pain more than passive distraction during a cold pressor task. In the first experiment, 60 participants were asked to submerge their hand in cold (2°C) water for as long as they could tolerate. They did this with no distraction, and then with active (electronic gaming system) and passive (television) distraction, in randomly assigned order. Tolerance time, pain intensity ratings and task absorption ratings were measured for each condition. A second experiment attempted to control for participants' expectations about the effects of distraction on pain. Forty participants underwent the same experimental procedure, but were given verbal suggestions about the effects of distraction by the experimenter before each distraction condition. Participants in both experiments had a significantly higher pain tolerance and reported less pain with the active distraction compared with passive or no distraction. Participants reported being more absorbed, and were significantly more willing to do the task again when they had the active distraction compared with both passive distraction and no distraction. They also had more enjoyment, less anxiety and greater reduction in pain with active distraction than with passive distraction. There was no effect of suggestion. These experiments offer further support for the use of electronic games as a method of pain control.

  15. Provocative sacroiliac joint maneuvers and sacroiliac joint block are unreliable for diagnosing sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Labat, Jean-Jacques; Le Goff, Benoît; Gouin, François; Maugars, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Mapping studies of pain elicited by injections into the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) suggest that sacroiliac joint syndrome (SIJS) may manifest as low back pain, sciatica, or trochanteric pain. Neither patient-reported symptoms nor provocative SIJ maneuvers are sensitive or specific for SIJS when SIJ block is used as the diagnostic gold standard. This has led to increasing diagnostic use of SIJ block, a procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the joint under arthrographic guidance. However, several arguments cast doubt on the validity of SIJ block as a diagnostic gold standard. Thus, the effects of two consecutive blocks are identical in only 60% of cases, and the anesthetic diffuses out of the joint in 61% of cases, often coming into contact with the sheaths of the adjacent nerve trunks or roots, including the lumbosacral trunk (which may contribute to pain in the groin or thigh) and the L5 and S1 nerve roots. These data partly explain the limited specificity of SIJ block for the diagnosis of SIJS and the discordance between the pain elicited by the arthrography injection and the response to the block. The limitations of provocative maneuvers and SIJ blocks may stem in part from a contribution of extraarticular ligaments to the genesis of pain believed to originate within the SIJs. These ligaments include the expansion of the iliolumbar ligaments, the dorsal and ventral sacroiliac ligaments, the sacrospinous ligaments, and the sacrotuberous ligaments (sacroiliac joint lato-sensu). They play a role in locking or in allowing motion of the SIJs. Glucocorticoids may diffuse better than anesthetics within these ligaments. Furthermore, joint fusion may result in ligament unloading.

  16. [Elbow pain].

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Miintyselkii, Pekka; Havulinna, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    Pain and disability in the elbow are not as common as in the neck, shoulder or wrist, for example. The elbow may, however, present disorders that may in a prolonged state be difficult and cause significant loss of working capacity. These include epicondylitis, osteoarthritis and entrapment of the ulnar nerve.

  17. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  18. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  19. Characterization of facial pain associated with chronic rhinosinusitis using validated pain evaluation instruments

    PubMed Central

    DeConde, Adam S.; Mace, Jess C.; Ashby, Shaelene; Smith, Timothy L.; Orlandi, Richard R.; Alt, Jeremiah A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prior investigations into facial pain associated with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have yielded important results, but have yet to utilize pain-specific outcome measures. This study seeks to characterize facial pain associated with CRS using validated pain-specific instruments. Methods Adults with CRS were enrolled into a prospective, cross-sectional study along with control participants presenting with non-CRS diagnoses. Facial pain was characterized in both groups using the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). CRS-specific measures of disease were measured including the Sinonasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22), nasal endoscopy, and computed tomography scoring. Results Patients were comprised of CRS with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP; n=25), CRS without nasal polyposis (CRSsNP; n=30), and control participants (n=8). Subjects with CRSwNP and CRSsNP were less likely to be pain free than controls (16.0%, 6.7% and 62.5% respectively, p=0.001) and carried greater burden of pain as measured by the BPI-SF and SF-MPQ than controls (p=0.002 and p=0.017, respectively). Pain in CRS was most commonly located around the eyes and characterized as ‘throbbing’ and ‘aching’. Nasal polyp status was not associated with differences in character, severity, or location of pain. Conclusions Subjects with CRS have a greater burden of facial pain relative to control subjects across several standardized pain measures. Further, facial pain in CRS significantly correlated to QOL and CRS-specific disease severity measures. Study across larger cohorts using standardized pain measures is warranted to clarify the association of facial pain with chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:26074476

  20. Does fear of pain moderate the effects of sensory focusing and distraction on cold pressor pain in pain-free individuals?

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Peters, Madelon L; van der Zijden, Marianne; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2004-06-01

    The present study investigated the influence of sensory focusing and distraction on pain tolerance and self-reported pain intensity in healthy female university students ranking high or low in pain-related fear. Pain was induced experimentally by means of a cold pressor test. Results showed that individuals high in pain-related fear groups had greater pain intensity ratings than those low in pain-related fear groups. A planned comparison analysis showed that distraction produced reduced pain ratings only in low fearful individuals, whereas sensory focusing led to reduced pain ratings only in high fearful individuals. Self-report measures of anxiety sensitivity, pain vigilance, and pain catastrophizing were positively associated with pain intensity, but, except for pain vigilance, no meaningful association was found between these measures and pain tolerance. Implications of the results and directions for future research are provided. In the management of chronic pain, distraction might be especially useful in low fearful individuals. Learning to focus on the sensory aspects (ie, monitoring) of the pain experience might be beneficial for high fearful individuals.

  1. Interrelations between Pain and Alcohol: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Zale, Emily L.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Ditre, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Pain and alcohol use are both highly prevalent in the general population, and pain-alcohol interrelations are of increasing empirical interest. Previous research has identified associations between pain and alcohol dependence, and the current review provides novel contributions to this emerging domain by incorporating studies that have tested relations between pain and low-to-moderate alcohol consumption, and by identifying potential psychosocial mechanisms of action. Specifically, we sought to integrate evidence of pain-alcohol relations derived from two directions of empirical inquiry (i.e., effects of alcohol on pain and effects of pain on alcohol use) across psychological, social, and biological literatures. We observed converging evidence that associations between alcohol consumption and pain may be curvilinear in nature. Whereas moderate alcohol use was observed to be associated with positive pain-related outcomes (e.g., greater quality of life), excessive drinking and alcohol use disorder appear to be associated with deleterious pain-related outcomes (e.g., greater pain severity). We also observed evidence that alcohol administration confers acute pain-inhibitory effects, and that situational pain may motivate alcohol consumption (e.g., drinking for pain-coping). Future research can inform theoretical and clinical applications through examination of temporal relations between pain and alcohol consumption, tests of hypothesized mechanisms, and the development of novel interventions. PMID:25766100

  2. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  3. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Award Recipients Strong Evidence Still Lacking on Medical Marijuana for Pain Fibromyalgia Has Central Nervous System Origins ... Mayday Fund American Pain Society Offers Guidance on Medical Marijuana for Pain Study Shows Pain Often Improves in ...

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  5. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  6. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back Pain During ... FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during pregnancy? How ...

  7. Happiness, Pain Intensity, Pain Interference, and Distress in Individuals with Physical Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rachel; Terrill, Alexandra L; Jensen, Mark P; Molton, Ivan R; Ravesloot, Craig; Ipsen, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how the construct of happiness is related to pain intensity, pain interference, and distress in individuals with physical disabilities. This study involves cross-sectional analyses of 471 individuals with a variety of health conditions reporting at least mild pain. The first hypothesis that happiness mediates the relationship between pain intensity and two outcomes, pain interference and distress, was not supported. The second hypothesis was supported by a good fitting model (χ2(10) = 12.83, P = 0.23, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.025) and indicated that pain intensity significantly mediated the effect of happiness on pain interference (indirect effect: β = -0.13, P < 0.001) and on distress (indirect effect: β = 0.10, P = 0.01). Happiness showed a significant direct effect on pain intensity (β = -0.20, P < 0.001). A third model exploring the happiness components meaning, pleasure, and engagement fitted well (χ2(4) = 9.65, P = 0.05, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.055). Pain intensity acted as a significant mediator but only mediated the effect of meaning on pain interference (indirect effect: β = -0.07, P = 0.05) and on distress (indirect effect via pain interference: β = -0.04, P = 0.05). Only meaning (β = -0.10, P = 0.05), but neither pleasure nor engagement, had a significant direct effect on pain intensity. Participants who reported greater happiness reported lower pain interference and distress through happiness' effects on pain intensity. Experiencing meaning and purpose in life seems to be most closely (and negatively) associated with pain intensity, pain interference, and distress. Findings from this study can lay the groundwork for intervention studies to better understand how to more effectively decrease pain intensity, pain interference, and distress.

  8. Pain sensitivity and tactile spatial acuity are altered in healthy musicians as in chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Anna M.; Riquelme, Inmaculada; Kleber, Boris; Altenmüller, Eckart; Hatem, Samar M.; Montoya, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements, as it occurs in professional classical musicians, may lead to changes in tactile sensitivity and corresponding cortical reorganization of somatosensory cortices. It is also known that professional musicians frequently experience musculoskeletal pain and pain-related symptoms during their careers. The present study aimed at understanding the complex interaction between chronic pain and music training with respect to somatosensory processing. For this purpose, tactile thresholds (mechanical detection, grating orientation, two-point discrimination) and subjective ratings to thermal and pressure pain stimuli were assessed in 17 professional musicians with chronic pain, 30 pain-free musicians, 20 non-musicians with chronic pain, and 18 pain-free non-musicians. We found that pain-free musicians displayed greater touch sensitivity (i.e., lower mechanical detection thresholds), lower tactile spatial acuity (i.e., higher grating orientation thresholds) and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. Moreover, we also found that musicians and non-musicians with chronic pain presented lower tactile spatial acuity and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. The significant increment of pain sensitivity together with decreased spatial discrimination in pain-free musicians and the similarity of results found in chronic pain patients, suggests that the extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements in classical musicians could be considered as a risk factor for developing chronic pain, probably due to use-dependent plastic changes elicited in somatosensory pathways. PMID:25610384

  9. Effectiveness of a multimodal treatment program for somatoform pain disorder.

    PubMed

    Pieh, Christoph; Neumeier, Susanne; Loew, Thomas; Altmeppen, Jürgen; Angerer, Michael; Busch, Volker; Lahmann, Claas

    2014-03-01

    Chronic pain conditions are highly prevalent, with somatoform pain disorder accounting for a large proportion. However, the psychological forms of treatment currently used achieve only small to medium effect sizes. This retrospective study investigated the effectiveness of a 5-week multimodal pain program for patients with somatoform pain disorder. The diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder was confirmed by a specialist for anesthesiology and pain management and a specialist for psychosomatic medicine. Therapy outcome was evaluated with a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the Pain Disability Index (PDI), and the Pain Perception Scale. Within the study sample (n = 100), all parameters showed a significant and clinically relevant improvement at the end of therapy (P values < 0.001). The highest effect sizes (d) were found for reduction in average pain rating (NRS: d = 1.00) and the affective items of the Pain Perception Scale (SES-A: d = 0.07). The lowest effect sizes were found for improvement of pain-related disabilities (PDI: d = 0.42) and sensory items of the Pain Perception Scale (SES-S: d = 0.50). Despite high chronification of pain condition, with average pain duration of greater than 8 years, the multimodal treatment program showed medium to large effect sizes on the outcome of patients with somatoform pain disorder. Compared with previous data with small to moderate effect sizes, a multimodal program seems to be more effective than other interventions to address somatoform pain disorder. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  10. A preliminary investigation of affective interaction in chronic pain couples.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Ayna Beate; Cano, Annmarie

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to examine the extent to which affective marital interaction related to depressive symptoms in persons with chronic pain and their spouses and to pain severity in persons with pain. Couples from the community completed self-report surveys and engaged in a videotaped conversation on a topic of mutual disagreement that was coded for three affect types (i.e., anger/contempt, sadness, humor). Humor was positively related to marital satisfaction in both partners. Spouse anger/contempt and sadness were positively related to depressive symptoms in spouses. Several significant interaction effects between couple pain status (i.e., whether one or both partners reported pain) and affect also emerged. Specifically, sadness in the participant designated as the person with pain was associated with greater depressive symptoms and pain severity when only he or she reported pain whereas sadness was related to fewer depressive symptoms and less pain severity when both partners reported pain. The relationships between spouse anger and spouse depressive symptoms and between spouse humor and pain severity in the person with pain were also moderated by couple pain status. These exploratory findings can be interpreted in light of emotion regulation and pain empathy theories. For example, partners who have not experienced pain themselves may fail to empathize with persons in pain, thus preventing effective emotion regulation. When both spouses report chronic pain, expressions of negative affect may instead promote emotion regulation because the affect is experienced with a spouse who may be more empathetic.

  11. The Epidemiology and Impact of Pain in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neogi, Tuhina

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and a leading cause of disability worldwide, largely due to pain, the primary symptom of the disease. The pain experience in knee osteoarthritis in particular is well-recognized as typically transitioning from intermittent weight-bearing pain to a more persistent, chronic pain. Methods to validly assess pain in osteoarthritis studies have been developed to address the complex nature of the pain experience. The etiology of pain in osteoarthritis is recognized to be multifactorial, with both intra-articular and extra-articular risk factors. Nonetheless, greater insights are needed into pain mechanisms in osteoarthritis to enable rational mechanism-based management of pain. Consequences of pain related to osteoarthritis contribute to a substantial socioeconomic burden. PMID:23973124

  12. Is all pain is treated equally? A multicenter evaluation of acute pain care by age

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ula; Belland, Laura K; Handel, Daniel A; Yadav, Kabir; Heard, Kennon; Rivera, Laura; Eisenberg, Amanda; Noble, Matthew; Mekala, Sudha; Valley, Morgan; Winkel, Gary; Todd, Knox H; Morrison, R Sean

    2014-01-01

    Pain is highly prevalent in healthcare settings, however disparities continue to exist in pain care treatment. Few studies have investigated if differences exist based on patient related characteristics associated with aging. The objective of this study was to determine if there are differences in acute pain care for older versus younger patients. This was a multicenter, retrospective, cross-sectional observation study of 5 emergency departments across the US evaluating the 2 most commonly presenting pain conditions for older adults - abdominal and fracture pain. Multivariable adjusted hierarchical modeling was completed. A total of 6,948 visits were reviewed. Older (≥65 years) and oldest (≥85 years) were less likely to receive analgesics when compared to younger patients (<65 years), yet older patients had greater reductions in final pain scores. When evaluating pain treatment and final pain scores, differences appeared to be based on type of pain. Older abdominal pain patients were less likely to receive pain medications, while older fracture patients were more likely to receive analgesics and opioids when compared to younger patients. Differences in pain care for older patients appear to be driven by type of presenting pain. PMID:25244947

  13. Reduced Cold Pain Tolerance in Chronic Pain Patients Following Opioid Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Younger, Jarred; Barelka, Peter; Carroll, Ian; Kaplan, Kim; Chu, Larry; Prasad, Ravi; Gaeta, Ray; Mackey, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Objective One potential consequence of chronic opioid analgesic administration is a paradoxical increase of pain sensitivity over time. Little scientific attention has been given to how cessation of opioid medication affects the hyperalgesic state. In this study, we examined the effects of opioid tapering on pain sensitivity in chronic pain patients. Design Twelve chronic pain patients on long-term opioid analgesic treatment were observed in a 7- to 14-day inpatient pain rehabilitation program, with cold pain tolerance assessed at admission and discharge. The majority of participants were completely withdrawn from their opioids during their stay. Outcome Measures We hypothesized that those patients with the greatest reduction in daily opioid use would show the greatest increases in pain tolerance, as assessed by a cold pressor task. Results A linear regression revealed that the amount of opioid medication withdrawn was a significant predictor of pain tolerance changes, but not in the direction hypothesized. Greater opioid reduction was associated with decreased pain tolerance. This reduction of pain tolerance was not associated with opioid withdrawal symptoms or changes in general pain. Conclusions These findings suggest that the withdrawal of opioids in a chronic pain sample leads to an acute increase in pain sensitivity. PMID:18564998

  14. Empathy gaps for social pain: why people underestimate the pain of social suffering.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Loran F; Banas, Kasia; MacDonald, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    In 5 studies, the authors examined the hypothesis that people have systematically distorted beliefs about the pain of social suffering. By integrating research on empathy gaps for physical pain (Loewenstein, 1996) with social pain theory (MacDonald & Leary, 2005), the authors generated the hypothesis that people generally underestimate the severity of social pain (ostracism, shame, etc.)--a biased judgment that is only corrected when people actively experience social pain for themselves. Using a social exclusion manipulation, Studies 1-4 found that nonexcluded participants consistently underestimated the severity of social pain compared with excluded participants, who had a heightened appreciation for social pain. This empathy gap for social pain occurred when participants evaluated both the pain of others (interpersonal empathy gap) as well as the pain participants themselves experienced in the past (intrapersonal empathy gap). The authors argue that beliefs about social pain are important because they govern how people react to socially distressing events. In Study 5, middle school teachers were asked to evaluate policies regarding emotional bullying at school. This revealed that actively experiencing social pain heightened the estimated pain of emotional bullying, which in turn led teachers to recommend both more comprehensive treatment for bullied students and greater punishment for students who bully.

  15. Central poststroke pain: correlation of MRI with clinical pain characteristics and sensory abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, D; Leijon, G; Thuomas, K A

    1998-11-01

    To correlate MRI and sensory changes in patients with spontaneous lesions in the cerebral "pain pathway." The authors used MRI and quantitative somatosensory testing in 73 patients with central poststroke pain (CPSP) and in 13 patients with pain-free stroke with sensory deficit. Lesions in any part of the discriminatory somatosensory pathway may or may not produce CPSP. Most CPSP patients have multiple lesions, many probably unrelated to pain. Ventroposterior thalamic nuclear lesions are more likely to produce half-body pain than lesions elsewhere (including the brainstem). In supratentorial lesions, the greatest pain is more likely to be in an extremity, and in infratentorial lesions, the greatest pain is likely to be in the face. Supratentorial CPSP patients have a deficit of sharpness and cold (peripherally mediated by A delta fibers) than pain-free stroke patients, whereas patients with infratentorial CPSP additionally have a deficit of C-fiber-mediated warmth and hot pain. Burning pain is more common than nonburning pain in younger patients. Warmth and cold, but not hot pain, exhibiting central convergence (spatial summation) are more affected in CPSP patients with burning than nonburning pain. Allodynic CPSP patients had a significantly greater deficit for warmth than patients without allodynia. Different stroke sites produce different patterns of sensory deficit. The progression from painless sensory deficit to CPSP is not purely quantitative.

  16. Bogus visual feedback alters onset of movement-evoked pain in people with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Daniel S; Broecker, Markus; Smith, Ross T; Meulders, Ann; Madden, Victoria J; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2015-04-01

    Pain is a protective perceptual response shaped by contextual, psychological, and sensory inputs that suggest danger to the body. Sensory cues suggesting that a body part is moving toward a painful position may credibly signal the threat and thereby modulate pain. In this experiment, we used virtual reality to investigate whether manipulating visual proprioceptive cues could alter movement-evoked pain in 24 people with neck pain. We hypothesized that pain would occur at a lesser degree of head rotation when visual feedback overstated true rotation and at a greater degree of rotation when visual feedback understated true rotation. Our hypothesis was clearly supported: When vision overstated the amount of rotation, pain occurred at 7% less rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback, and when vision understated rotation, pain occurred at 6% greater rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback. We concluded that visual-proprioceptive information modulated the threshold for movement-evoked pain, which suggests that stimuli that become associated with pain can themselves trigger pain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Acute Painful Stress and Inflammatory Mediator Production

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Charles A.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Compton, Peggy; Goldberg, Alyssa; Witarama, Tuff; Kotlerman, Jenny; Irwin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory pathways may be activated under conditions of painful stress, which is hypothesized to worsen the pain experience and place medically-vulnerable populations at risk for increased morbidity. Objectives To evaluate the effects of pain and subjective pain-related stress on pro-inflammatory activity. Methods A total of 19 healthy control subjects underwent a single standard cold-pressor pain test (CPT) and a no-pain control condition. Indicators of pain and stress were measured and related to inflammatory immune responses (CD811a, IL-1RA, and IL-6) immediately following the painful stimulus, and compared to responses under non-pain conditions. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were measured as indicators of sympathetic stimulation. Results CPT was clearly painful and generated an activation of the sympathetic nervous system. CD811a increased in both conditions, but with no statistically significant greater increase following CPT (p < .06). IL-1RA demonstrated a non-statistically significant increase following CPT (p < .07). The change in IL-6 following CPT differed significantly from the response seen in the control condition (p < .02). Conclusions These findings suggest that CP acute pain may affect proinflammatory pathways, possibly through mechanisms related to adrenergic activation. PMID:23407214

  18. Medication management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Slipp, Marlene; Burnham, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of chronic pain is high and increasing. Medication management is an important component of chronic pain management. There is a shortage of physicians who are available and comfortable providing this service. In Alberta, pharmacists have been granted an advanced scope of practice. Given this empowerment, their availability, training and skill set, pharmacists are well positioned to play an expanded role in the medication management of chronic pain sufferers. Objective: To compare the effectiveness and cost of a physician-only vs a pharmacist-physician team model of medication management for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers. Method: Data was analyzed for 89 patients who had received exclusively medication management at a rural Alberta multidisciplinary clinic. 56 were managed by a sole physician. 33 were managed by a team (pharmacist + physician). In the team model, the physician did the medical assessment, diagnosis, and established a treatment plan in consultation with the patient and pharmacist. The pharmacist then provided the ongoing follow-up including education, dose titration and side effect management and consulted with the physician as needed. Change in pain (Numerical Rating Scale) and disability (Pain Interference Questionnaire) over the course of treatment were recorded. The treatment duration and number of visits were used to calculate cost of care. Results: Both models of medication management resulted in significant and comparable improvements in pain, disability and patient perception of medication effectiveness. Patients in the physician-only group were seen more frequently and at a greater cost. The pharmacist-physician team approach was markedly more cost-effective, and patients expressed a high level of satisfaction with their medication management. Conclusions: The pharmacist-physician team model of medication management results in significant reductions of pain and disability for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers

  19. Neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, M; Scadding, J

    2001-10-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves triggers a cascade of events in axotomized sensory neurones that are generally believed to be responsible for the generation of neuropathic pain. Recent data in animal models show that alterations in the properties of undamaged neurones that project into a damaged nerve can also play an important role. These new findings could explain some of the enigmatic clinical signs and symptoms of pain following nerve injury such as the spread of symptoms into areas not affected by the primary lesion. The basis by which uninjured nerves could be affected is a reduced supply of neurotrophic factors, an abnormal interaction in the Remak bundles of partially denervated Schwann cells and unmyelinated axons, or the byproducts of Wallerian degeneration.

  20. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  1. Characteristics of response to experimental pain in sexually abused women.

    PubMed

    Granot, Michal; Somer, Eli; Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Beny, Ahuva; Sadger, Ronit; Mirkin, Ronit; Moont, Ruth; Yovell, Yoram

    2011-09-01

    Women with a history of sexual abuse (SA) commonly report greater pain symptoms. It is still unclear whether enhanced pain susceptibility is the result of altered pain processing and response. Therefore, this pilot study aimed to explore pain sensitivity to experimentally induced pain and associated psychology in women with a history of severe SA. Twenty-one survivors of severe, long-lasting SA and 21 control women underwent experimentally induced heat pain and completed psychological questionnaires. Pain measures included heat pain thresholds, pain intensity ratings, and pain tolerance in response to contact heat, painful stimulation delivered to the volar forearm. Questionnaires included somatization (Brief Symptom Inventory), personality traits including harm avoidance, novelty seeking, and reward dependence (Cloninger tridimensional personality questionnaire), and levels of dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale). SA women had elevated heat pain thresholds (45.7±2.2°C vs. 43.9±3.1°C; P=0.042) and higher pain intensity ratings (on a 0 to 100 scale: 80.0±26.6 vs. 51.2±27.7; P=0.001). In addition, they had lower tolerability to painful tonic stimulation, greater somatization, and larger harm avoidance scores. Regression analyses showed that higher pain intensity ratings in SA women associated with greater tendency for harm avoidance but not with levels of dissociation. Women with a history of severe SA seem to have a paradoxical pattern of experimental pain response, characterized by both higher pain thresholds and increased pain intensity ratings. This pattern is associated with the personality trait of harm avoidance. Models that might account for these findings are discussed.

  2. A randomized controlled trial to assess the pain associated with the debond of orthodontic fixed appliances

    PubMed Central

    Mangnall, Louise A R; Dietrich, Thomas; Scholey, John M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine patient experience of pain during treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances, expectations of pain during debond and whether biting on a soft acrylic wafer during debond decreases pain experience. Design: Multicentre randomized controlled trial. Setting: Three UK hospital based orthodontic departments: Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Dental Hospital and University Hospital of North Staffordshire. Materials and methods: Ninety patients were randomly allocated to either the control (n = 45) or wafer group (n = 45). A visual analogue scale-based questionnaire was completed pre-debond to determine pain experience during treatment and expectations of pain during debond. The appliances were debonded and those in the wafer group bit on a soft acrylic wafer. A second questionnaire was completed post-debond to assess the pain experienced. Results: Biting on an acrylic wafer significantly reduced the pain experienced when debonding the posterior teeth (P≤0·05). Thirty-nine per cent found the lower anterior teeth the most painful. The expected pain was significantly greater than that actually experienced (P≤0·0001). Greater pain during treatment correlated with increased expectations and increased actually experienced pain (P≤0·0001). Conclusions: Biting on a soft acrylic wafer during debond of the posterior teeth reduces the pain experienced. The lower anterior teeth are the most painful. The pain expected is significantly greater than actually experienced. Patients who had greater pain during treatment expected and experienced greater pain at debond. PMID:24009318

  3. Negative beliefs about low back pain are associated with persistent high intensity low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sin Ki; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wluka, Anita E; Fitzgibbon, Bernadette; Urquhart, Donna M

    2016-08-12

    While previous cross-sectional studies have found that negative beliefs about low back pain are associated with pain intensity, the relationship between back beliefs and persistent low back pain is not well understood. This cohort study aimed to examine the role of back beliefs in persistent low back pain in community-based individuals. A hundred and ninety-two participants from a previous musculoskeletal health study were invited to take part in a two-year follow-up study. Beliefs about back pain were assessed by the Back Beliefs Questionnaire (BBQ) at baseline and low back pain intensity was measured by the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. Of the 150 respondents (78.1%), 16 (10.7%) reported persistent high intensity low back pain, 12 (8.0%) developed high intensity low back pain, in 16 (10.7%) their high intensity low back pain resolved and 106 (70.7%) experienced no high intensity low back pain. While participants were generally positive about low back pain (BBQ mean (SD) = 30.2 (6.4)), those with persistent high intensity pain reported greater negativity (BBQ mean (SD) = 22.6 (4.9)). Negative beliefs about back pain were associated with persistent high intensity low back pain after adjusting for confounders (M (SE) = 23.5 (1.6) vs. >30.1 (1.7), p < .001). This study found negative back beliefs were associated with persistent high intensity low back pain over 2 years in community-based individuals. While further longitudinal studies are required, these findings suggest that targeting beliefs in programs designed to treat and prevent persistent high intensity low back pain may be important.

  4. Conscientiousness predicts greater recovery from negative emotion.

    PubMed

    Javaras, Kristin N; Schaefer, Stacey M; van Reekum, Carien M; Lapate, Regina C; Greischar, Lawrence L; Bachhuber, David R; Love, Gayle Dienberg; Ryff, Carol D; Davidson, Richard J

    2012-10-01

    Greater levels of conscientiousness have been associated with lower levels of negative affect. We focus on one mechanism through which conscientiousness may decrease negative affect: effective emotion regulation, as reflected by greater recovery from negative stimuli. In 273 adults who were 35-85 years old, we collected self-report measures of personality including conscientiousness and its self-control facet, followed on average 2 years later by psychophysiological measures of emotional reactivity and recovery. Among middle-aged adults (35-65 years old), the measures of conscientiousness and self-control predicted greater recovery from, but not reactivity to, negative emotional stimuli. The effect of conscientiousness and self-control on recovery was not driven by other personality variables or by greater task adherence on the part of high conscientiousness individuals. In addition, the effect was specific to negative emotional stimuli and did not hold for neutral or positive emotional stimuli.

  5. Incorporation of pain in dreams of hospitalized burn victims.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Isabelle; Nielsen, Tore A; Lavigne, Gilles; Choinière, Manon

    2002-11-01

    It has been shown that realistic, localized painful sensations can be experienced in dreams either through direct incorporation or from past memories of pain. Nevertheless, the frequency of pain dreams in healthy subjects is low. This prospective study was designed to evaluate the occurrence and frequency of pain in the dreams of patients suffering from burn pain. Twenty-eight nonventilated burn victims were interviewed for 5 consecutive mornings during the first week of hospitalization. A structured-interview protocol was used to collect information on dream content, quality of sleep, and pain intensity and location. Patients were also administered the Impact of Event Scale to assess posttraumatic symptoms. Thirty-nine percent of patients reported 19 pain dreams on a total of 63 dreams (30%). Patients with pain dreams showed evidence of worse sleep, more nightmares, higher intake of anxiolytic medication, and higher scores on the Impact of Event Scale than did patents reporting dreams with no pain content. Moreover, patients with pain dreams also had a tendency to report more intense pain during therapeutic procedures. Although more than half of our sample did not report pain dreams, these results suggest that pain dreams do occur at a greater frequency in suffering populations than in normal volunteers. More importantly, dreaming about pain may be an added stress for burn patents and may contribute to both poor sleep and higher pain intensity, which could evolve into a cycle of pain-anxiety-sleeplessness.

  6. The role of painful events and pain perception in blood-injection-injury fears.

    PubMed

    Smith, Noelle B; Meuret, Alicia E

    2012-12-01

    Research suggests that blood, injection, and injury (BII) fears are related to painful experiences; however the role of frequency, intensity, and perceived ability to handle such events remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between BII fears and the frequency and intensity of prior painful experiences with blood, injuries, and injections. The relation of BII fears with self-reported tolerance and avoidance of physical discomfort and pain was also examined. In the context of an undergraduate student survey, 392 participants completed questions about whether they were fearful of blood, injection, and injuries. They also completed questions about experiences with blood and injuries, as well as injections, including pain intensity, frequency of painful experiences, perceived ability to tolerate physical discomfort and pain (pain perception), and avoidance of physical discomfort. Findings indicated that only pain intensity, but not frequency of painful experiences with blood, injuries, and injections, was related to BII fears. Furthermore, there was a significant association between BII fears and pain perception, such that higher levels of discomfort intolerance were related to greater odds of endorsing BII fears. These findings provide preliminary evidence that BII fears are associated with experiences with injections of high pain intensity. Individuals with a lower perceived ability to handle physical pain and discomfort are more likely to endorse BII fears. Clinical considerations and future directions are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of Leptin with Body Pain in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kapphahn, Kristopher; Brennan, Kathleen; Sullivan, Shannon D.; Stefanick, Marcia L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leptin, an appetite-regulatory hormone, is also known to act as a proinflammatory adipokine. One of the effects of increased systemic leptin concentrations may be greater sensitivity to pain. We report the results of two studies examining the association between leptin and pain: a small pilot longitudinal study, followed by a large cross-sectional study. In Study 1, three women with physician-diagnosed fibromyalgia provided blood draws daily for 25 consecutive days, as well as daily self-reported musculoskeletal pain. Daily fluctuations in serum leptin were positively associated with pain across all three participants (F (1,63) = 12.8, p < 0.001), with leptin predicting ∼49% of the pain variance. In Study 2, the relationship between leptin and body pain was examined in a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of 5676 generally healthy postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative. Leptin levels obtained from single blood draws were tested for a relationship with self-reported body pain. Body mass index (BMI) was also included as a predictor of pain. Both leptin and BMI were found to be independently associated with self-reported pain (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), with higher leptin levels and greater BMI each being associated with greater pain. Leptin appears to be a predictor of body pain both within- and between-individuals and may be a driver of generalized pain states such as fibromyalgia. PMID:27028709

  8. [Postoperative pain.].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, H

    1987-07-01

    A short survey about the different methods available for producing postoperative analgesia is given, the goal being to make it clear to the clinician that there are quite a number of techniques to be used although the everyday clinical practice often sticks to simple and not too effective methods of pain treatment following surgery. Initially presenting short informations about the neurophysiology of pain and the pathogenesis and causes of postoperative pain two main groups of producing analgesia are then discussed.Thefirst group deals with the systemic use of analgesics be it nonnarcotic analgesic antipyretics or narcotic analgesics (opioids). As for the first subgroup the peripheral action of these drugs (metamizol, acetylsalicylic acid, paracetamol) is brought about by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins. These substances can only be used for very moderate postoperative pain f.i. following head and neck surgery. The strong acting opioids belong to the second subgroup. Recent informations on receptor sites in the brain and cord and the subgrouping of the receptors throws new light on the understanding of the different effects of these drugs and on the pathomechanisms of agonistic, antagonistic and mixed activities. The clinically used opioids then are mentioned (morphine, fentanyl, methadon, pethidin, piritramide, tilidin, buprenorphin and pentazocine) and dosage, duration of action, antagonisms and untoward side effects are presented. Stress is laid on the recent development of patient-controlled analgesia with all its advantages. Thesecond main group of methods for postoperative analgesia consists of regional anesthesia techniques as there are brachial plexus block, intercostal block and the continuous epidural analgesia using both local anesthetics and spinal opioids. The brachial plexus block in continuous form is absolutely able to prevent pain after operations in the shoulder-arm-region and can be prolonged even for weeks using catheter techniques. The

  9. Patterns and predictors of health service utilization in adolescents with pain: comparison between a community and a clinical pain sample

    PubMed Central

    Toliver-Sokol, Marisol; Murray, Caitlin B.; Wilson, Anna C.; Lewandowski, Amy; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2011-01-01

    There is limited research describing the patterns of healthcare utilization in adolescents with chronic pain. This study describes healthcare utilization in a clinical chronic pain sample, and compares the patterns of service use of this group to a community sample with intermittent pain complaints. We also investigated demographic and clinical factors that predicted healthcare visits and medication use in the clinical sample. Data on 117 adolescents (aged 12-18; n=59 clinical pain sample, n=58 community) were collected. Caregivers and adolescents reported on sociodemographics, medical visits, current medications, pain, activity limitations, and depression. As hypothesized, the clinical pain sample had higher rates of healthcare consultation on all types of medical visits (general, specialty care, complementary medicine, mental health, OT/PT), and higher medication use compared to the community sample. Regression analyses revealed that higher annual income, greater pain frequency, and higher levels of caregiver reported activity limitations were associated with a greater number of healthcare visits for the total sample. Within the clinical pain sample, higher pain frequency and greater activity limitations (caregiver-report) predicted more specialty care visits. Additionally, higher income and greater levels of depressive symptoms predicted a higher number of prescribed medications. Perspective This study contributes to the limited available data on health service and medication use in a clinical chronic pain sample versus a community sample of adolescents. We also identify clinical factors (pain frequency, parent-reported activity limitations, depressive symptoms) and demographic factors (gender, income) associated with healthcare utilization. PMID:21481647

  10. August 2017 Letters to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    Letter to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Manual Therapy: More Than Elaborate Swordplay" with Authors' Response "Comparing Dry Needling to Corticosteroid Injection for Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome" with Authors' Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(8):580-585. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0204.

  11. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Gluteal strain/ tendinitis Greater trochanteritis TOTAL Groin sfrain/ tendinitis Hip/ groin injury other Pelvic sfress fracture 32 19 Thigh...Medial collateral sfrain 79 28 27 Medial plica syndrome 1 Patellar tendinitis 7 Patellofemoral pain syndrome 16 Pes Anserinus tendinitis 1...Knee other 24 Lower leg TOTAL 127 Achilles tendinitis 19 Acute fibular fracture 3 Acute tibial fracture 1 Anterior compartment syndrome 7

  12. Prevalence of postoperative pain in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and the association with preoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Bastrom, Tracey P; Marks, Michelle C; Yaszay, Burt; Newton, Peter O

    2013-10-01

    Review of a prospective database registry of surgical patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of postoperative pain and its impact on patient-reported postoperative outcomes using the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 outcomes questionnaire. Although reportedly rare, postoperative pain can be a devastating situation for the patient with AIS. Most recent studies examining outcomes in AIS surgical treatment use the SRS Pain domain score to assess pain in this population. A prospectively enrolled multicenter database was queried. Patients with minimum 2-year follow-up and 2-year SRS scores were included. Postoperative pain after the acute phase of recovery when reported by the patient to the treating surgeon/clinical team in follow-up is recorded as a complication in the database. Patients included in this series were grouped as either reporting pain or not to the surgeon/clinical team postoperatively. Pre- and postoperative SRS scores were then compared between these 2 groups using analysis of variance (P < 0.05). Five hundred and eighty-four patients meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. Sixty-one (11%) reported pain at sometime between 2 weeks and 2 years postoperatively. Thirteen were within the 6-month postoperative period. Of the remaining 48 reporting pain between 6 and 24 months postoperatively, 41 (7% of the total cohort) had no obvious cause for their pain. More than half of these patients (26/41) were referred for further treatment (physical therapy, referral to pain specialist, further imaging). These 41 patients had significantly decreased 2-year SRS scores in the domains of Pain, Self-image, Mental health, and Total score (P < 0.05). The patients with postoperative pain were found to have significantly lower preoperative Pain domain scores (P < 0.001), indicative of greater pain preoperatively, yet there were no other domains effected preoperatively. For this group the pre

  13. Electronic pain assessment in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Lisa D; Smith, Lauren D; Jamison, Robert N

    2011-07-01

    SUMMARY The assessment and treatment of chronic pain remains an international challenge for healthcare providers among aging patients and rising healthcare costs. This article provides a brief overview of studies on the use of electronic pain diaries and innovative software programs for pain assessment and monitoring among providers and persons with chronic pain. The advent of software pain monitoring programs on smart phones, personal digital assistants and internet-based tracking allow for the collection of large datasets of momentary data to better assist in the management of chronic pain. Electronic tracking in the home and clinic can improve data quality and reduce the biases of recalled information compared with paper diaries and questionnaires. Furthermore, 3D pain mapping programs can enable patients to represent the location and intensity of their pain with greater accuracy. However, despite the benefits, there are a number of barriers to incorporating electronic pain assessment into daily clinical practice. Additional control trials and clinical investigations are needed to demonstrate the efficacy and benefit of electronic pain assessment over and above standard practices.

  14. Pain, Cannabis Species, and Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nicole L.; Heinz, Adrienne J.; Ilgen, Mark; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals who used medical cannabis for chronic pain were at increased risk for cannabis use problems compared with individuals who used medical cannabis for other reasons (e.g., anxiety, insomnia, and muscle spasms). An additional aim was to determine whether individuals who used cannabis for chronic pain, as well as those who reported greater within-group pain levels, demonstrated a species preference (i.e., sativa, indica, hybrids) and the extent to which species preference was associated with cannabis use problems. Method: Participants were 163 medical cannabis users (77% male), recruited from a medical marijuana dispensary in California, who completed assessments of medical cannabis use motives, history, preferences (species type), and problems, as well as current pain level. Results: Individuals who used cannabis to manage chronic pain experienced fewer cannabis use problems than those who did not use it for pain; among those who used it for pain, the average pain level in the past week was not associated with cannabis use problems. Furthermore, individuals who used cannabis for chronic pain were more likely to use indica over sativa. Preference for indica was associated with fewer cannabis use problems than preference for hybrid species. Conclusions: Individuals who use cannabis to manage chronic pain may be at a lower risk for cannabis use problems, relative to individuals who use it for other indications, potentially as a function of their species preference. PMID:27172585

  15. Pain, Cannabis Species, and Cannabis Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nicole L; Heinz, Adrienne J; Ilgen, Mark; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals who used medical cannabis for chronic pain were at increased risk for cannabis use problems compared with individuals who used medical cannabis for other reasons (e.g., anxiety, insomnia, and muscle spasms). An additional aim was to determine whether individuals who used cannabis for chronic pain, as well as those who reported greater within-group pain levels, demonstrated a species preference (i.e., sativa, indica, hybrids) and the extent to which species preference was associated with cannabis use problems. Participants were 163 medical cannabis users (77% male), recruited from a medical marijuana dispensary in California, who completed assessments of medical cannabis use motives, history, preferences (species type), and problems, as well as current pain level. Individuals who used cannabis to manage chronic pain experienced fewer cannabis use problems than those who did not use it for pain; among those who used it for pain, the average pain level in the past week was not associated with cannabis use problems. Furthermore, individuals who used cannabis for chronic pain were more likely to use indica over sativa. Preference for indica was associated with fewer cannabis use problems than preference for hybrid species. Individuals who use cannabis to manage chronic pain may be at a lower risk for cannabis use problems, relative to individuals who use it for other indications, potentially as a function of their species preference.

  16. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  17. Children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndrome: more psychologically distressed than other children in pain?

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Williams, Sara E; Carullo, Veronica P; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Bruehl, Stephen; Berde, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    Historically, in both adult and pediatric populations, a lack of knowledge regarding complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and absence of clear diagnostic criteria have contributed to the view that this is a primarily psychiatric condition. To test the hypothesis that children with CRPS are more functionally disabled, have more pain and are more psychologically distressed than children with other pain conditions. A total of 101 children evaluated in a tertiary care pediatric pain clinic who met the International Association for the Study of Pain consensus diagnostic criteria for CRPS participated in the present retrospective study. Comparison groups included 103 children with abdominal pain, 291 with headache and 119 with back pain. Children and parents completed self-report questionnaires assessing disability, somatization, pain coping, depression, anxiety and school attendance. Children with CRPS reported higher pain intensity and more recent onset of pain at the initial tertiary pain clinic evaluation compared with children with other chronic pain conditions. They reported greater functional disability and more somatic symptoms than children with headaches or back pain. Scores on measures of depression and anxiety were within normal limits and similar to those of children in other pain diagnostic groups. As a group, clinic-referred children with CRPS may be more functionally impaired and experience more somatic symptoms compared with children with other pain conditions. However, overall psychological functioning as assessed by self-report appears to be similar to that of children with other chronic pain diagnoses. Comprehensive assessment using a biopsychosocial framework is essential to understanding and appropriately treating children with symptoms of CRPS.

  18. Children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndrome: More psychologically distressed than other children in pain?

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E; Williams, Sara E; Carullo, Veronica P; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Bruehl, Stephen; Berde, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Historically, in both adult and pediatric populations, a lack of knowledge regarding complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and absence of clear diagnostic criteria have contributed to the view that this is a primarily psychiatric condition. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that children with CRPS are more functionally disabled, have more pain and are more psychologically distressed than children with other pain conditions. METHODS: A total of 101 children evaluated in a tertiary care pediatric pain clinic who met the International Association for the Study of Pain consensus diagnostic criteria for CRPS participated in the present retrospective study. Comparison groups included 103 children with abdominal pain, 291 with headache and 119 with back pain. Children and parents completed self-report questionnaires assessing disability, somatization, pain coping, depression, anxiety and school attendance. RESULTS: Children with CRPS reported higher pain intensity and more recent onset of pain at the initial tertiary pain clinic evaluation compared with children with other chronic pain conditions. They reported greater functional disability and more somatic symptoms than children with headaches or back pain. Scores on measures of depression and anxiety were within normal limits and similar to those of children in other pain diagnostic groups. CONCLUSIONS: As a group, clinic-referred children with CRPS may be more functionally impaired and experience more somatic symptoms compared with children with other pain conditions. However, overall psychological functioning as assessed by self-report appears to be similar to that of children with other chronic pain diagnoses. Comprehensive assessment using a biopsychosocial framework is essential to understanding and appropriately treating children with symptoms of CRPS. PMID:23662291

  19. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  20. Neuropathic Pain After Breast Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-31

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  1. Neuropathic Pain After Lung Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  2. Brain imaging of pain sensitization in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Jesus; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Llorente-Onaindia, Jone; Harrison, Ben J; López-Solà, Marina; López-Ruiz, Marina; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Benito, Pere; Deus, Joan; Monfort, Jordi

    2017-09-01

    A relevant aspect in osteoarthritic pain is neural sensitization. This phenomenon involves augmented responsiveness to painful stimulation and may entail a clinically worse prognosis. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study pain sensitization in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty patients were recruited and pain sensitization was clinically defined on the basis of regional spreading of pain (spreading sensitization) and increased pain response to repeated stimulation (temporal summation). Functional magnetic resonance imaging testing involved assessing brain responses to both pressure and heat stimulation. Thirty-three patients (55%) showed regional pain spreading (simple sensitization) and 19 patients (32%) showed both regional spreading and temporal summation. Sensitized patients were more commonly women. Direct painful pressure stimulation of the joint (articular interline) robustly activated all of the neural elements typically involved in pain perception, but did not differentiate sensitized and nonsensitized patients. Painful pressure stimulation on the anterior tibial surface (sensitized site) evoked greater activation in sensitized patients in regions typically involved in pain and also beyond these regions, extending to the auditory, visual, and ventral sensorimotor cortices. Painful heat stimulation of the volar forearm did not discriminate the sensitization phenomenon. Results confirm the high prevalence of pain sensitization secondary to knee osteoarthritis. Relevantly, the sensitization phenomenon was associated with neural changes extending beyond strict pain-processing regions with enhancement of activity in general sensory, nonnociceptive brain areas. This effect is in contrast to the changes previously identified in primary pain sensitization in fibromyalgia patients presenting with a weakening of the general sensory integration.

  3. Race effects on conditioned pain modulation in youth

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Walker, Lynn; Bruehl, Stephen; Hellman, Natalie; Sherman, Amanda L.; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Race and ethnicity shape the experience of pain in adults, with African Americans typically exhibiting greater pain intensity and evoked pain responsiveness than Non-Hispanic Whites. However, it remains unclear whether there are racial differences in conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and if these are present in youth. CPM refers to a reduction in perceived pain intensity for a test stimulus during application of a conditioning stimulus and may be especially relevant in determining risk for chronic pain. The present study assessed CPM to evoked thermal pain in 78 healthy youth (ages 10 to 17), 51% of whom were African American and 49% were Non-Hispanic White. African-American youth reported lower mean conditioning pain ratings than Non-Hispanic White youth, controlling for mean pre-conditioning pain ratings, which is consistent with stronger CPM. Multilevel models demonstrated stronger CPM effects in African-American than Non-Hispanic White youth, as evident in more rapid within-person decreases in pain ratings during the conditioning phase. These findings suggest that diminished CPM likely does not account for the enhanced responsiveness to evoked thermal pain observed in African-American youth. These results may have implications for understanding racial differences in chronic pain experience in adulthood. Perspective This study evaluated conditioned pain modulation to evoked thermal pain in African-American and Non-Hispanic White youth. Findings could have implications for the development of personalized chronic pain treatment strategies that are informed by race and ethnicity. PMID:26086899

  4. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients’ experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement reduces the likelihood of bleeds and bleed-related pain, whereas on-demand therapy ensures rapid bleed resolution and pain relief. Although use of replacement or bypassing therapy is often the first intervention for pain, additional pain relief strategies may be required. There is an array of analgesic options, but consideration should be paid to the adverse effects of each class. Nevertheless, a combination of medications that act at different points in the pain pathway may be beneficial. Nonpharmacological measures may also help patients and include active coping strategies; rest, ice, compression, and elevation; complementary therapies; and physiotherapy. Joint aspiration may also reduce acute joint pain, and joint steroid injections may alleviate chronic pain. In the longer term, increasing use of prophylaxis or performing surgery may be necessary to reduce the burden of pain caused by the degenerative effects of repeated bleeds. Whichever treatment option is chosen, it is important to monitor pain and adjust patient management accordingly. Beyond specific pain management approaches, ongoing collaboration between multidisciplinary teams, which should include physiotherapists and pain specialists, may improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27439216

  5. Cortical representation of experimental tooth pain in humans.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, H H F; Kemppainen, P; Ringler, R; Handwerker, H O; Forster, C

    2005-12-05

    Cortical processing of electrically induced pain from the tooth pulp was studied in healthy volunteers with fMRI. In a first experiment, cortical representation of tooth pain was compared with that of painful mechanical stimulation to the hand. The contralateral S1 cortex was activated during painful mechanical stimulation of the hand, whereas tooth pain lead to bilateral activation of S1. The S2 and insular region were bilaterally activated by both stimuli. In S2, the center of gravity of the activation during painful mechanical stimulation was more medial/posterior compared to tooth pain. In the insular region, tooth pain induced a stronger activation of the anterior and medial parts. The posterior part of the anterior cingulate gyrus was more strongly activated by painful stimulation of the hand. Differential activations were also found in motor and frontal areas including the orbital frontal cortex where tooth pain lead to greater activations. In a second experiment, we compared the effect of weak with strong tooth pain. A significantly greater activation by more painful tooth stimuli was found in most of those areas in which tooth pain had induced more activation than hand pain. In the medial frontal and right superior frontal gyri, we found an inverse relationship between pain intensity and BOLD contrast. We concluded that tooth pain activates a cortical network which is in several respects different from that activated by painful mechanical stimulation of the hand, not only in the somatotopically organized somatosensory areas but also in parts of the 'medial' pain projection system.

  6. Enhanced pain modulation among triathletes: a possible explanation for their exceptional capabilities.

    PubMed

    Geva, Nirit; Defrin, Ruth

    2013-11-01

    Triathletes and ironman triathletes engage in an extremely intense sport that involves hours of considerable pain, as well as physical and psychological stress, every day. The basic pain modulation properties of these athletes has not been established and therefore it is not clear whether they present with unique features that enable them to engage in such efforts. The aim was to investigate the existence of possible alterations in pain perception and modulation of triathletes, as well as possible underlying factors. Participants were 19 triathletes and 17 non-athletes who underwent measurement of pain threshold, pain tolerance, suprathreshold perceived pain intensity, temporal summation of pain, and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Participants also completed the fear of pain and the pain catastrophizing questionnaires, and rated the amount of perceived stress. Triathletes exhibited higher pain tolerance (P<.0001), lower pain ratings (P<.001), and lower fear of pain values (P<.05) than controls. The magnitude of CPM was significantly greater in triathletes (P<.05), and negatively correlated with fear of pain (P<.05) and with perceived mental stress during training and competition (P<.05). The results suggest that triathletes exhibit greater pain tolerance and more efficient pain modulation than controls, which may underlie their perseverance in extreme physical efforts and pain during training/competitions. This capability may be enhanced or mediated by psychological factors, enabling better coping with fear of pain and mental stress. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Greater Sao Paulo Newer Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Dulce Didio

    1991-01-01

    This followup to a 1981 study presents descriptions of automated projects or activities in academic, public, and special libraries or information centers in the Greater Sao Paulo region that developed from 1981 through 1987. It is noted that an overall increase in the level of automation since 1981 has been observed. (four references) (Author/MAB)

  8. Greater Capital Region Career Pathways Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Strategy Center, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This case study documents the activities of the Greater Capital Region Career Pathways Initiative (CPI), a partnership to develop regional, demand driven career pathways for the biotechnology sector in and around Albany, NY. This document is written for three primary audiences. First, it provides a report to the New York State Department of Labor…

  9. Basidiomycetes of the Greater Antilles project

    Treesearch

    D.J. Lodge; T.J. Baroni; S.A. Cantrell

    2002-01-01

    The inventory of basidiomycetes of the Greater Antilles, with special emphasis on the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research Site, was a 4 year project initiated in 1996 with funding from the USA National Science Foundation's (NSF) Biotic Surveys and Inventories Program. The objective was to survey and inventory all basidiomycetes except rust fungi on the...

  10. Waste Management in Greater Dhaka City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    This study focuses on the environmental degradation of Greater Dhaka City (GDC) resulting from pollution created by the indiscriminate disposal of industrial wastes, open dumping of solid wastes, inadequate treatment and disposal of domestic sewage, and unplanned disposal of leachate from agricultural land. Measures to protect the GDC environment…

  11. Paleotectonic and paleogeographic evolution of greater China

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, P.O.; Norton, I.O. )

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we utilize plate tectonic history of Central Asia to constrain understanding of sedimentary basin development and to show how regional scale tectonic events affect play elements for major basins of greater China. Tectonic framework and paleogeography are used as a constraint on models for basin formation, climate distribution and accommodation which in turn control distribution of reservoir, source, seal and trap. Greater China is an artifact of Phanerozoic tectonics. It has a protracted history of continental deformation as amalgamation of crustal blocks and island arc/subduction and accretion complexes occurred. Early Paleozoic hydrocarbon systems are dominated by extensive carbonate platform and Permian and younger systems are dominated by continental and lacustrine sedimentation. The basement of greater China consists of continental and accretion crust. The crustal blocks include South and North China, Indochina, Tibet and Tarim, and accretion blocks include the Altaids and Manchurides. The relative positions and interactions of these blocks during Paleozic and Mesozoic time resulted in formation of greater China. Final amalgamation and deformation occurred in Eocene time when India collided with Asia. The discussions consist of presentation of a model for tectonic evolution of these blocks and their paleogeography through Phanerozoic time. This is done with maps at 1:8 million scale covering nine time slices, three in the Paleozoic, three in the Mesozoic and three in the Cenozoic.

  12. Waste Management in Greater Dhaka City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    This study focuses on the environmental degradation of Greater Dhaka City (GDC) resulting from pollution created by the indiscriminate disposal of industrial wastes, open dumping of solid wastes, inadequate treatment and disposal of domestic sewage, and unplanned disposal of leachate from agricultural land. Measures to protect the GDC environment…

  13. Spread of English across Greater China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Anwei

    2012-01-01

    Greater China is used in this article to refer to mainland China, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and Macao. While a holistic approach is adopted to present and compare the rapid spread of English and development in English language education in these geographically close, and sociopolitically, culturally and economically interrelated but hugely…

  14. Using geochemistry in the greater Yellowstone area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The greater Yellowstone area lies within adjoining parts of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho (see figure) and includes Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, parts of six national forests, plus State lands, national wildlife refuges, Bureau of Land Management lands, and private lands. This area is known worldwide for its scenic beauty, wildlife, and geologic and geothermal features.

  15. Greater Sao Paulo Newer Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Dulce Didio

    1991-01-01

    This followup to a 1981 study presents descriptions of automated projects or activities in academic, public, and special libraries or information centers in the Greater Sao Paulo region that developed from 1981 through 1987. It is noted that an overall increase in the level of automation since 1981 has been observed. (four references) (Author/MAB)

  16. Greater Huachuca Mountains Fire Management Group

    Treesearch

    Brooke S. Gebow; Carol Lambert

    2005-01-01

    The Greater Huachuca Mountains Fire Management Group is developing a fire management plan for 500,000 acres in southeast Arizona. Partner land managers include Arizona State Parks, Arizona State Lands, Audubon Research Ranch, Coronado National Forest, Coronado National Memorial, Fort Huachuca, The Nature Conservancy, San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area, and...

  17. Occult fractures of the greater tuberosity of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Gumina, S; Carbone, S; Postacchini, F

    2009-02-01

    We studied the highest reported number of patients with occult fracture of the greater tuberosity of the humerus and we analysed why fracture was not diagnosed, shoulder function and prevalence of eventually associated rotator cuff tear (RCT). Twenty-four patients with a missed fracture of the greater tuberosity underwent MR study for a suspect RCT. We evaluated shoulder function and self-assessed comfort with the Constant score (CS) and Simple Shoulder Test (SST). Nine patients showed evidence of cuff tendinosis, 11 of partial (p) RCT (2: subscapularis; 6: supraspinatus and 3: supraspinatus and infraspinatus). All patients with pRCT were older than 40. Initially, the mean CS and SST were 54% and 5/12; at follow-up, values increased to 36% and 5 points. MR should be performed in patients apparently negative for fracture but with painful shoulders and decreased ROM. Of our patients, 45.8% had pRCT; nevertheless function recovery was verified in 16 weeks.

  18. The Influence of Pain Severity and Interference on Satisfaction with Pain Management among Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Krok-Schoen, Jessica L.; O'Connor, Melissa L.; Brooks, Amber K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Health outcomes are often contingent on how effective the individual is able to manage existent illness-related symptoms. This is all the more relevant among chronic pain patients. Objective. This study aimed to identify indicators of pain treatment satisfaction among middle-aged and older adults (N = 150) receiving outpatient treatment from a comprehensive cancer center. Methods. Patients were surveyed on questions assessing pain treatment satisfaction, pain severity, and additional social characteristics. Results. Descriptive data showed that middle-aged adults reported more pain locations, greater pain severity, and less satisfaction with pain treatment. A multivariate model was specified, showing older adults being more satisfied with their pain treatment. For the middle-aged adults, treatment satisfaction was generally lower with greater pain severity. This counters that for the older adults, where treatment satisfaction remained consistent despite increased levels of pain severity. Conclusion. These findings address an important issue regarding how pain is experienced across the life course. This suggests that general assumptions cannot be made about the health outcomes of older adults. Beyond the descriptive definitions of pain, there remains the need to develop models that account for determinants that may account for the pain experience among a diverse adult population. PMID:28100956

  19. Pain in Sleepwalking: A Clinical Enigma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Régis; Jaussent, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleepwalking is a disorder characterized by arousal specifically from slow wave sleep with dissociated brain activity that may be related to lower nociceptive state. Our objectives were to assess the frequency of chronic pain, headache, and migraine in sleepwalkers compared to controls, examine the impact and determinants of pain in sleepwalkers, and report analgesia frequency during injurious parasomnia episodes. Design: Cross-sectional case-control study. Setting: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Montpellier, France. Participants: One hundred patients with sleepwalking were assessed for disease characteristics, sleep (polysomnography, sleepiness, and insomnia), pain (chronic pain, multidimensional pain inventory, headache, and migraine), depressive symptoms, and quality of life compared to 100 adult controls. Pain perception was retrospectively assessed during injurious parasomnia episodes. Measurements and Results: Raw association data showed that lifetime headache, migraine, and chronic pain at time of study were significantly associated with sleepwalking (also called somnambulism). Compared to controls, sleepwalkers reported more frequent daytime sleepiness, and depressive and insomnia symptoms. After adjustments, sleepwalking was associated with increased risk for headache and migraine only. Compared to pain-free sleepwalkers, sleepwalkers with chronic pain were more likely to be older and to have greater daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and depressive symptoms, with no difference in polysomnography assessment. Of the 47 sleepwalkers with at least one previous violent parasomnia episode, 78.7% perceived no pain during episodes, allowing them to remain asleep despite injury. Conclusion: Our results highlight the clinical enigma of pain in sleepwalking patients with complaints of frequent chronic pain, migraine, and headache during wakefulness but who report retrospectively experience of analgesia during severe parasomnia

  20. Prevalence and associations of neuropathic pain in a cohort of multi-ethnic Asian low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kew, Yueting; Tan, Cheng-Yin; Ng, Chong-Jing; Thang, Sue-Sien; Tan, Leong-Hooi; Khoo, Yvonne Khaii; Lim, Jun-Ni; Ng, Jia-Hui; Chan, Chris Yin-Wei; Kwan, Mun-Keong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2017-04-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain differs in different ethnic populations. The aims of the study are to determine its frequency and associations in a multi-ethnic cohort of Asian low back pain patients. This was a cross-sectional study of low back patients seen at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neuropathic low back pain patients were identified using the painDETECT questionnaire and compared with non-neuropathic (unclear or nociceptive) low back pain patients, in terms of socio-demographic and clinical factors, pain severity (numerical pain rating scale, NPRS), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, RMDQ), as well as anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Of 210 patients, 26 (12.4%) have neuropathic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is associated with non-Chinese ethnicity, higher body mass index and pain radiation below the knee. Patients with neuropathic pain have significantly higher NPRS and RMDQ scores, and there are more subjects with anxiety on HADS. However, there are no differences between the groups in age, gender, pain duration or underlying diagnosis of low back pain. The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort is lower than previously reported in other populations with possible differences between ethnic groups. It is associated with greater pain severity, disability and anxiety.

  1. Neuropathic Pain Referrals to a Multidisciplinary Pediatric Cancer Pain Service

    PubMed Central

    Anghelescu, Doralina L.; Faughnan, Lane G.; Popenhagen, Mark P.; Oakes, Linda L.; Pei, Deqing; Burgoyne, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Neuropathic pain (NP) in children with cancer is not well characterized. We describe the prevalence of NP and the characteristics, duration of follow-up, and interventions provided for NP among patients referred to a pediatric oncology center’s pain management service. Methods Retrospective review of patient data from a 3.5-year period. Results Fifteen percent (66/439) of all referrals to our pain service were for NP (56/323 patients, 17%; 34 male, 22 female). The NP patient group had 1401 clinical visits (778 inpatient visits [55.5%] and 623 outpatient visits [44.5%]). Patients with NP had a significantly greater mean number of pain visits per consult (p=0.008) and significantly more days (median) of pain service follow-up (p <0.001) than did other patients. The most common cause of NP was cancer treatment rather than the underlying malignancy. Pharmacological management of NP was complex, often comprising 3 medications. Nonpharmacological approaches were used for 57.6% of NP referrals. Discussion NP is less frequently encountered than non-NP in children with cancer; nevertheless, it is more difficult to treat, requiring longer follow up, more clinical visits, complex pharmacological management, and the frequent addition of non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:24602431

  2. Hydromorphone levels and pain control in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M; Goodman, H; Erle, H; Gray, G; Lorenzo, B; Leipzig, R M; Meyer, B R; Drayer, D E

    1988-10-01

    To better understand the use of narcotic analgesics, the hydromorphone concentration was measured in serum samples from 43 patients with chronic severe pain who were receiving this drug. At the time of blood sampling, pain intensity, mood, and cognitive performance were assessed. There was large individual variation in the dose-drug level relationship. Seven patients with bone or soft tissue pain and drug levels of greater than or equal to 4 ng/ml had good pain control, whereas 10 did not. None of 15 patients with levels less than 4 ng/ml had pain control, despite drug doses similar to those given patients with higher levels. Thus 60% of the patients without control of their pain had hydromorphone levels below the lowest level that produced pain control. No patient with pain from nerve infiltration or compression had good pain control, irrespective of the drug level or dose. Poor mood correlated with high pain intensity and low drug level. Impaired cognitive performance was not related to drug level. Knowing that there is a low concentration of narcotic in the blood of a patient with chronic severe pain who is receiving high drug doses and who shows lack of both efficacy and side effects may reassure health care professionals that further narcotic dosage escalation is appropriate.

  3. Verbally reinforcing pain reports: an experimental test of the operant model of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jolliffe, Christopher D; Nicholas, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    Effective treatments for chronic pain have been based on the operant model for chronic pain, which holds that pain behaviours can be operantly controlled by various reinforcers. Support for the operant model comes primarily from treatment/outcome studies which report significant reductions in pain behaviours in chronic pain patients, but fail to demonstrate the underlying operant thesis that various reinforcers play a significant role in the establishment and maintenance of pain behaviours. In an experimental test of this hypothesis, the pain reports of forty-six healthy undergraduate students were measured over two sets of fifteen trials, in which the pressure from a blood-pressure cuff applied to their arm either remained stable or decreased over time. Half of the subjects received positive verbal reinforcement from the experimenter after each trial if their report of pain intensity exceeded that of the previous trial. Overall, the mean pain reports of reinforced subjects were significantly greater than those of the non-reinforced subjects both when the intensity of the cuff was stable over trials, and when it decreased, as expected. These results provide support for the operant model of chronic pain. The clinical and theoretical implications of these results for the operant model of chronic pain are discussed, and suggestions for future research are made.

  4. Temporomandibular joint pain assessment.

    PubMed

    Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G; Boering, G

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain characteristics of patients with temporomandibular joint-related pain and propose a rationale for the assessment of pain and its impact on patients with temporomandibular disorders. Based on anamnestic information, the 88 patients in the sample were classified according to pain grade: (1) acute/subacute nonrecurrent or recurrent pain, n = 41 (46.6%); (2) persistently recurring pain in relatively high frequency, or nonsevere persistent pain, n = 32 (36.4%); (3) persistent and impairing pain, n = 8 (9.1%); (4) persistent and disabling pain, n = 7 (7.9%); and (5) persistent and handicapping pain, n = 0. Regarding TMJ pain provoked during the clinical examination, there was a significant difference among diagnostic subgroups, subgroups with different pain intensity levels, and pain grade subgroups, but no significant differences could be found based on the duration of the pain symptoms. Subgroups also did not significantly differ in scores on the Multi-dimensional Pain Inventory and the General Health Questionnaire. Based on the results of the study, the assessment of nonchronic TMJ pain may generally be limited to an accurate description of the pain complaint and thorough clinical assessment. Multidimensional assessment may be useful when the TMJ pain persists or is persistently recurring. Depending on individual circumstances, additional assessment procedures may prove to be useful. A general strategy for pain assessment in temporomandibular disorders is proposed.

  5. Pain complaint and the weather: weather sensitivity and symptom complaints in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Shutty, M S; Cundiff, G; DeGood, D E

    1992-05-01

    Chronic pain patients frequently report that weather conditions affect their pain; however, no standardized measures of weather sensitivity have been developed. We describe the development and use of the Weather and Pain Questionnaire (WPQ) which assess patient sensitivity to meteorologic variables defined by the National Weather Service (e.g., temperature, precipitation). Seventy chronic pain patients (59% females) with an average age of 43 years completed the WPQ. The instrument was revised using factor analysis to produce a Weather Sensitivity Index (WSI) (48% of variance) with high internal consistency (0.93) and test-retest reliability (r = 0.89). Reporting patterns suggested that patients could reliably identify which meteorologic variables influenced their pain but could not reliably determine which physical symptoms were consistently affected. The most frequently reported meteorologic variables which affect pain complaint were temperature (87%) and humidity (77%). The most frequently reported physical complaints associated with the weather were joint and muscle aches (82% and 79%, respectively). Patients labeled as being 'weather sensitive', defined by greater than median scores on the WPQ, reported significantly greater pain intensity, greater chronicity of pain problems, and more difficulties sleeping than patients with low scores on the WPQ. No differences in gender, education level, disability status, or global psychological distress were found. Results are discussed with respect to physiological and psychological mediating variables.

  6. Resistance Exercise, Disability, and Pain Catastrophizing in Obese Adults with Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Heather K.; George, Steven Z.; Seay, Amanda N.; Vincent, Kevin R.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two different resistance exercise protocols on self-reported disability, fear avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing and back pain symptoms in obese, older adults with low back pain. Methods Obese adults (N=49; 60–85 years) with chronic low back pain (LBP) were randomized into a total body resistance exercise intervention (TOTRX), lumbar extensor exercise intervention (LEXT) or a control group (CON). Main outcomes included perceived disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire [RMDQ]). Psychosocial measures included the Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB) survey, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). LBP severity was measured during three functional tasks: walking, stair climb and chair rise using an 11 point numerical pain rating scale (NRSpain). Results The TOTRX group had greater reductions in self-reported disability scores due to back pain (ODI, RMDQ) compared to LEXT (p<0.05). The PCS scores decreased in the TOTRX compared to CON by month four (64.3% vs 4.8%, p<0.05). Pain severity during chair rise activity, and walking pain severity was decreased in both LEXT and TOTRX relative to the CON group. Conclusions Greater reductions in perceived disability due to LBP can be achieved with TOTRX compared to LEXT. Pain catastrophizing and pain severity decreased most with TOTRX. The positive change in psychological outlook may assist obese, older adults with chronic back pain re-consider the harmfulness of the pain and facilitate regular participation in other exercise programs. PMID:25133997

  7. Reappraisal mitigates overestimation of remembered pain in anxious individuals.

    PubMed

    Hovasapian, Arpine; Levine, Linda J

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety sensitivity, a trait characterised by fear of anxiety-related body sensations, has been linked to heightened attention to pain, appraising body sensations as threatening, and remembering threat-related information. We assessed whether individuals with greater anxiety sensitivity overestimate in remembering pain. We also assessed whether emotion regulation strategies that direct attention away from pain (distraction), or alter appraisals of pain (reappraisal), alleviate memory bias. Participants (N = 137) were randomly assigned to one of two emotion regulation conditions or to a control condition before taking part in a cold pressor task. Greater anxiety sensitivity was associated with overestimation in remembering pain. Engaging in reappraisal mitigated this memory bias but engaging in distraction did not. This is the first study to examine the relations among anxiety sensitivity, emotion regulation and memory for pain. The findings suggest that health-care practitioners can encourage reappraisal to promote more positive memories of procedural pain, particularly in patients high in anxiety sensitivity.

  8. Trajectories of acute low back pain: a latent class growth analysis.

    PubMed

    Downie, Aron S; Hancock, Mark J; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Williams, Christopher M; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    Characterising the clinical course of back pain by mean pain scores over time may not adequately reflect the complexity of the clinical course of acute low back pain. We analysed pain scores over 12 weeks for 1585 patients with acute low back pain presenting to primary care to identify distinct pain trajectory groups and baseline patient characteristics associated with membership of each cluster. This was a secondary analysis of the PACE trial that evaluated paracetamol for acute low back pain. Latent class growth analysis determined a 5 cluster model, which comprised 567 (35.8%) patients who recovered by week 2 (cluster 1, rapid pain recovery); 543 (34.3%) patients who recovered by week 12 (cluster 2, pain recovery by week 12); 222 (14.0%) patients whose pain reduced but did not recover (cluster 3, incomplete pain recovery); 167 (10.5%) patients whose pain initially decreased but then increased by week 12 (cluster 4, fluctuating pain); and 86 (5.4%) patients who experienced high-level pain for the whole 12 weeks (cluster 5, persistent high pain). Patients with longer pain duration were more likely to experience delayed recovery or nonrecovery. Belief in greater risk of persistence was associated with nonrecovery, but not delayed recovery. Higher pain intensity, longer duration, and workers' compensation were associated with persistent high pain, whereas older age and increased number of episodes were associated with fluctuating pain. Identification of discrete pain trajectory groups offers the potential to better manage acute low back pain.

  9. Could Stress Contribute to Pain-Related Fear in Chronic Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Wolf, Oliver T.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to predict pain based on internal or external cues constitutes a fundamental and highly adaptive process aimed at self-protection. Pain-related fear is an essential component of this response, which is formed by associative and instrumental learning processes. In chronic pain, pain-related fear may become maladaptive, drive avoidance behaviors and contribute to symptom chronicity. Pavlovian fear conditioning has proven fruitful to elucidate associative learning and extinction involving aversive stimuli, including pain, but studies in chronic pain remain scarce. Stress demonstrably exerts differential effects on emotional learning and memory processes, but this has not been transferred to pain-related fear. Within this perspective, we propose that stress could contribute to impaired pain-related associative learning and extinction processes and call for interdisciplinary research. Specifically, we suggest to test the hypotheses that: (1) extinction-related phenomena inducing a re-activation of maladaptive pain-related fear (e.g., reinstatement, renewal) likely occur in everyday life of chronic pain patients and may alter pain processing, impair perceptual discrimination and favor overgeneralization; (2) acute stress prior to or during acquisition of pain-related fear may facilitate the formation and/or consolidation of pain-related fear memories; (3) stress during or after extinction may impair extinction efficacy resulting in greater reinstatement or context-dependent renewal of pain-related fear; and (4) these effects could be amplified by chronic stress due to early adversity and/or psychiatric comorbidity such depression or anxiety in patients with chronic pain. PMID:26733831

  10. Pain acceptance and opiate use disorders in addiction treatment patients with comorbid pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lewei Allison; Bohnert, Amy S B; Price, Amanda M; Jannausch, Mary; Bonar, Erin E; Ilgen, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    Studies from pain treatment settings indicate that poor acceptance of pain may be an important and modifiable risk factor for higher severity of opioid use. However, the degree to which pain acceptance relates to opioid use severity in the addiction treatment population is unknown. In this study of addiction treatment patients with co-morbid pain, we examined correlates of severity of opiate (heroin and prescription opioid) use, with a particular focus on the role of pain acceptance. Patients in residential addiction treatment with comorbid pain (N=501) were stratified into low, moderate and high severity of opiate use. Demographic and clinical characteristics were compared across opiate severity categories. 72% (N=360) of the participants had symptoms that were consistent with an opiate use disorder. Younger age, Caucasian race, female gender, cocaine use and lower pain acceptance were associated with higher severity of opiate use, whereas pain intensity was not. Controlling for demographic and other risk factors, such as substance use and pain intensity, higher pain acceptance was associated with lower odds of severe prescription opioid (AOR 0.50, 95% CI 0.38-0.68 for a one SD increase in pain acceptance) and heroin use (AOR 0.57, 95% CI 0.44-0.75 for a one SD increase in pain acceptance). Problematic opiate use is common in addictions treatment patients with chronic pain. Lower pain acceptance is related to greater opiate use severity, and may be an important modifiable target for interventions to successfully treat both pain and opiate use disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of these medicines can help with chronic low back pain , even if the person does not feel sad ... notices pain. Antidepressants most commonly used for chronic low back pain also help you sleep. Antidepressants most often used ...

  12. Side Effects: Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Controlling pain is an important part of your cancer treatment plan. Learn how to track levels of pain. Find out how pain, a side effect of cancer treatment, is treated using acupuncture, biofeedback, and physical therapy.

  13. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007422.htm Low back pain - chronic To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Low back pain refers to pain that you feel in your ...

  14. How Is Pain Managed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Pain Management Pain is a very common symptom in patients ... significantly reduce a patient’s quality of life. Proper management of this pain is therefore important, and patients ...

  15. Pain Information Brochure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registries IOM Report: Relieving Pain in America HHS Pathways to Safer Oploid Use About About the NIH ... Registries IOM Report: Relieving Pain in America HHS Pathways to Safer Oploid Use Home Health Information Pain ...

  16. Prediction of adaptive self-regulatory responses to arthritis pain anxiety in exercising adults: Does pain acceptance matter?

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Miranda A; Gyurcsik, Nancy C; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercising for ≥150 min/week is a recommended strategy for self-managing arthritis. However, exercise nonadherence is a problem. Arthritis pain anxiety may interfere with regular exercise. According to the fear-avoidance model, individuals may confront their pain anxiety by using adaptive self-regulatory responses (eg, changing exercise type or duration). Furthermore, the anxiety-self-regulatory responses relationship may vary as a function of individuals’ pain acceptance levels. OBJECTIVES: To investigate pain acceptance as a moderator of the pain anxiety-adaptive self-regulatory responses relationship. The secondary objective was to examine whether groups of patients who differed in meeting exercise recommendations also differed in pain-related and self-regulatory responses. METHODS: Adults (mean [± SD] age 49.75±13.88 years) with medically diagnosed arthritis completed online measures of arthritis pain-related variables and self-regulatory responses at baseline, and exercise participation two weeks later. Individuals meeting (n=87) and not meeting (n=49) exercise recommendations were identified. RESULTS: Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that pain acceptance moderated the anxiety-adaptive self-regulatory responses relationship. When pain anxiety was lower, greater pain acceptance was associated with less frequent use of adaptive responses. When anxiety was higher, adaptive responses were used regardless of pain acceptance level. MANOVA findings revealed that participants meeting the recommended exercise dose reported significantly lower pain and pain anxiety, and greater pain acceptance (P<0.05) than those not meeting the dose. CONCLUSIONS: Greater pain acceptance may help individuals to focus their efforts to adapt to their pain anxiety only when it is higher, leaving self-regulatory capacity to cope with additional challenges to exercise adherence (eg, busy schedule). PMID:25621990

  17. Assessment of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeans, Mary-Ellen; Stratford, Joseph G.; Melzack, Ronald; Monks, Richard C.

    1979-01-01

    The assessment of pain presents a major problem in both research and clinical practice. Until recently our methods for evaluating pain were based on a sensory conceptual model of pain and an acute care approach to illness. These traditional views are often inadequate, particularly in relation to chronic pain syndromes. Clinical assessment of chronic pain must include extensive physical and psychological examination. New approaches to pain measurement and clinical assessment of the patient are discussed.

  18. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  19. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java ... of the most frequently asked questions. Ideas about management are one of the frequent topics of conversation ...

  20. Anterior knee pain after a total knee arthroplasty: What can cause this pain?

    PubMed Central

    Breugem, Stéfanus Jacob Martinus; Haverkamp, Daniël

    2014-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty has been shown to be a successful procedure for treating patients with osteoarthritis, and yet approximately 5%-10% of patients experience residual pain, especially in the anterior part of the knee. Many theories have been proposed to explain the etiology of this anterior knee pain (AKP) but, despite improvements having been made, AKP remains a problem. AKP can be described as retropatellar or peripatellar pain, which limits patients in their everyday lives. Patients suffering from AKP experience difficulty in standing up from a chair, walking up and down stairs and riding a bicycle. The question asked was: “How can a ‘perfectly’ placed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) still be painful: what can cause this pain?”. To prevent AKP after TKA it is important to first identify the different anatomical structures that can cause this pain. Greater attention to and understanding of AKP should lead to significant pain relief and greater overall patient satisfaction after TKA. This article is a review of what pain is, how nerve signalling works and what is thought to cause Anterior Knee Pain after a Total Knee Arthroplasty. PMID:25035818

  1. Holocene peatland initiation in the Greater Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Stefan; de Boer, Hugo; Dermody, Brian; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Wassen, Martin; Eppinga, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in the initiation and development of the Greater Everglades peatland ecosystems in South Florida (USA) remain a topic of discussion. In this study, we present an overview of basal ages of peat deposits in South Florida, which shows two major episodes of peatland initiation between 7.0-4.5 kyr and 3.5-2.0 kyr. Our analysis of regional climate proxy datasets led to three alternative hypotheses that may explain the timing and duration of these two peatland initiation episodes: (1) decreased drainage due to relative sea level (RSL) rise during the Holocene (2) gradual increase in precipitation throughout the Holocene, and (3) a combination of increasing precipitation, rising RSL and oscillations in the climate system. We test whether these three hypotheses can explain the pattern of initiation and development of the Greater Everglades peatlands using models that simulate the non-linear processes involved in peat production and decomposition in combination with the local drainage conditions of Southern Florida. The model results suggest that RSL-rise alone cannot predict the onset of peat initiation in the Greater Everglades using our model setup. The model also implies that the climate was wet enough for peat development also during the early Holocene. The first two hypothesized mechanisms in combination with climate oscillations may explain the onset of peat accumulation at 8.2 kyr BP. The two-phased character of peat land initiation may be explained by the spatial distribution of local drainage conditions. As peatland development is highly non-linear, our model uncovers a mechanistic way how peats can suddenly shift from a dry high equilibrium to a wet low equilibrium resulting in lake formation as observed in paleo-ecological studies in the Greater Everglades.

  2. Demographic characteristics, psychosocial measures, and pain in a sample of patients with persistent pain referred to a new zealand tertiary pain medicine center.

    PubMed

    Shipton, Edward; Ponnamperuma, Don; Wells, Elisabeth; Trewin, Bronwyn

    2013-07-01

    Little is known on epidemiology of chronic pain in New Zealand. Its management has been based on data and models in North American/European studies. This project evaluated demographic and psychosocial correlates of pain severity, duration, and disability (PSDD) in chronic pain patients for assessment at a New Zealand tertiary care Pain Medicine Center. This study was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis on existing clinical assessment data (audit) collected over an 18-month period. Pre-admission data were collected on a consecutive series of 874 patients presenting for assessment. This included demographic (gender, educational attainment, ethnicity) and psychosocial data. Pain severity was measured by numerical rating scale and present pain intensity using McGill Pain Questionnaire. Duration was measured in months. Disability was measured by using Pain Disability Index and depression using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Distress was measured using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale and self-efficacy using the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Catastrophizing was measured by Coping Strategies Questionnaire and pain acceptance by the Pain Solutions Questionnaire. No difference was found in mean values of all PSDD between genders and between ethnicities. Years of education did not form an important correlate of PSDD. Catastrophizers experienced more pain and were more disabled. Patients with severe pain experienced greater distress. Depressed patients were more disabled. Patients presenting with a high degree of self-efficacy were likely to have lower pain levels and to be less disabled. Level of acceptance of pain was positively associated with reported duration of pain and negatively associated with total disability. Through this study, more is now known about effects of chronic pain on New Zealanders. The use of validated psychometric testing enables proper assessment and informs clinical management for chronic pain patients

  3. Musculoskeletal pain in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jannini, Suely Nóbrega; Dória-Filho, Ulysses; Damiani, Durval; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of pain, musculoskeletal syndromes, orthopedic disorders and using computers and playing videogames among obese adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study that investigated 100 consecutive obese adolescents and 100 healthy-weight controls using a confidential, self-report questionnaire covering demographic data, sports participation, painful musculoskeletal system symptoms and using computers and playing videogames. The questionnaire's test-retest reliability was tested. Physical examination covered six musculoskeletal syndromes and seven orthopedic disorders. The kappa index for test-retest was 0.724. Pain and musculoskeletal syndromes were equally prevalent in both groups (44 vs. 56%, p = 0.09; 12 vs. 16%, p = 0.541; respectively). Notwithstanding, orthopedic disorders (98 vs. 76%, p = 0.0001), tight quadriceps (89 vs. 44%, p = 0.0001) and genu valgum (87 vs. 24%, p = 0.0001) were significantly more prevalent in obese adolescents than in controls. Median time spent using a computer the day before, on Saturdays and on Sundays were all lower among the obese subjects (30 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.0001; 1 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.001; and 0 vs. 30 minutes, p = 0.02; respectively). Obese adolescents were less likely to play handheld videogames (2 vs. 11%, p = 0.003) and there was no difference in the two groups' use of full-sized videogames (p > 0.05). Comparing obese adolescents with pain to those free from pain revealed that pain was more frequent among females (59 vs. 39%, p = 0.048) and was associated with greater median time spent playing on Sundays [0 (0-720) vs. 0 (0-240) minutes, p = 0.028]. Obesity can cause osteoarticular system damage at the start of adolescence, particularly to the lower limbs. Programs developed specifically for obese female adolescents with musculoskeletal pain are needed.

  4. [Benign chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Serrie, A; Thurel, C

    1994-09-15

    Recent data indicate that 25 to 30% of the population in industrialized countries suffers from benign chronic pain. Among these patients, 50 to 75% are professionally incapable for varied lengths of time, from a few days to some weeks or months, or even definitively. The aetiology and clinical presentation of chronic benign pain are enormously varied because this definition includes such different pathologies as headache, pain of rheumatologic, postsurgical, organic, and post-zoster origin, lombalgia, radiculalgia, post-amputation pain, neuropathologic pain, causalgia, algoneurodystrophic pain, psychosomatic and idiopathic pain. Since these syndromes and causes of pain could not be discussed individually, they have been grouped according to their neurophysiology and pathophysiology.

  5. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  6. Pain anticipatory phenomena in patients with central poststroke pain: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Burgess, Richard C; Lempka, Scott F; Gale, John T; Floden, Darlene P; Machado, Andre G

    2016-09-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is characterized by hemianesthesia associated with unrelenting chronic pain. The final pain experience stems from interactions between sensory, affective, and cognitive components of chronic pain. Hence, managing CPSP will require integrated approaches aimed not only at the sensory but also the affective-cognitive spheres. A better understanding of the brain's processing of pain anticipation is critical for the development of novel therapeutic approaches that target affective-cognitive networks and alleviate pain-related disability. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to characterize the neural substrates of pain anticipation in patients suffering from intractable CPSP. Simple visual cues evoked anticipation while patients awaited impending painful (PS), nonpainful (NPS), or no stimulus (NOS) to their nonaffected and affected extremities. MEG responses were studied at gradiometer level using event-related fields analysis and time-frequency oscillatory analysis upon source localization. On the nonaffected side, significantly greater responses were recorded during PS. PS (vs. NPS and NOS) exhibited significant parietal and frontal cortical activations in the beta and gamma bands, respectively, whereas NPS (vs. NOS) displayed greater activation in the orbitofrontal cortex. On the affected extremity, PS (vs. NPS) did not show significantly greater responses. These data suggest that anticipatory phenomena can modulate neural activity when painful stimuli are applied to the nonaffected extremity but not the affected extremity in CPSP patients. This dichotomy may stem from the chronic effects of pain on neural networks leading to habituation or saturation. Future clinically effective therapies will likely be associated with partial normalization of the neurophysiological correlates of pain anticipation.

  7. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  8. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  9. Pain-Related Fear, Disability, and the Fear-Avoidance Model of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zale, Emily L.; Ditre, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a significant public health concern that imposes substantial burdens on individuals and healthcare systems, and factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of pain-related disability are of increasing empirical and clinical interest. Consistent with the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain, greater pain-related fear has consistently been associated with more severe disability and may predict the progression of disability over time. Recent evidence indicates that treatments designed to reduce pain-related fear are efficacious for improving disability outcomes, and several clinical trials are currently underway to test tailored intervention content and methods of dissemination. Future research in this area is needed to identify factors (e.g., substance use, comorbid psychopathology) that may influence interrelations between pain-related fear, response to treatment, and disability. PMID:25844393

  10. The effect of pain on human sweating.

    PubMed

    Abram, W P; Allen, J A; Roddie, I C

    1973-12-01

    1. Attempts were made to induce emotional sweating in normal subjects by subjecting them to painful stimuli such as compression of pins on the forearm skin, immersion of the fingers in iced water, compression of the thoracic cage by rib calipers and ischaemic exercise of the forearm muscles.2. Changes in sweating were estimated by continuously monitoring the rate of total body weight loss.3. Of the painful stimuli used, only ischaemic forearm exercise significantly increased the rate of sweat secretion.4. Tasks in mental arithmetic caused much greater increases in sweat secretion than any of the pain stimuli except ischaemic pain.5. It is concluded that many varieties of pain, even when severe, do not induce sweating under laboratory conditions.

  11. Relationships between family and parent characteristics and functional abilities in children with recurrent pain syndromes: an investigation of moderating effects on the pathway from pain to disability.

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Scharff, Lisa

    2005-12-01

    To identify family characteristics associated with children's ability to function with recurrent pain. Seventy-eight children ages 7-17 years with recurrent pain syndromes [migraine headache or recurrent abdominal pain (RAP)] were recruited from clinic settings. Children completed pain diaries and the Functional Disability Inventory (FDI). Mothers and fathers completed self-report measures of psychological distress, and mothers reported on family environment. Controlling for the influence of pain intensity, family environment and parental distress jointly predicted children's ability to function with pain. Among children with migraine, family environment moderated the relationship between pain and functional disability; in this group, greater pain associated with more functional disability in children from disruptive family environments, but not in children from more adaptive family environments. For some pediatric recurrent pain sufferers, family characteristics associate with the extent of pain-related disability and may help identify children likely to experience more impaired functioning in response to recurrent pain.

  12. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  13. Present-day challenges and future solutions in postoperative pain management: results from PainForum 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuusniemi, Kristiina; Pöyhiä, Reino

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a summary of presentations on postoperative pain control by the authors at the 2014 PainForum meeting in People’s Republic of China. Postoperative pain is often untreated or undertreated and may lead to subsequent chronic pain syndromes. As more procedures migrate to the outpatient setting, postoperative pain control will become increasingly more challenging. Evidence-based guidelines for postoperative pain control recommend pain assessment using validated tools on a consistent basis. In this regard, consistency may be more important than the specific tool selected. Many hospitals have introduced a multidisciplinary acute pain service (APS), which has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and fewer adverse events. Patient education is an important component of postoperative pain control, which may be most effective when clinicians chose a multimodal approach, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids. Opioids are a mainstay of postoperative pain control but require careful monitoring and management of side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and somnolence. Opioids may be administered using patient-controlled analgesia systems. Protocols for postoperative pain control can be very helpful to establish benchmarks for pain management and assure that clinicians adhere to evidence-based standards. The future of postoperative pain control around the world will likely involve more and better established APSs and greater communication between patients and clinicians about postoperative pain. The changes necessary to implement and move forward with APSs is not a single step but rather one of continuous improvement and ongoing change. PMID:26893579

  14. Greater Sage-Grouse National Research Strategy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.; Manier, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The condition of the sagebrush ecosystem has been declining in the Western United States, and greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a sagebrush-obligate species, has experienced concurrent decreases in distribution and population numbers. This has prompted substantial research and management over the past two decades to improve the understanding of sage-grouse and its habitats and to address the observed decreases in distribution and population numbers. The amount of research and management has increased as the year 2015 approaches, which is when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is expected to make a final decision about whether or not to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act. In 2012, the Sage-Grouse Executive Oversight Committee (EOC) of the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) lead the development of a Greater Sage-Grouse National Research Strategy (hereafter Research Strategy). This request was motivated by a practical need to systematically connect existing research and conservation plans with persisting or emerging information needs. Managers and researchers also wanted to reduce redundancy and help focus limited funds on the highest priority research and management issues. The USGS undertook the development of this Research Strategy, which addresses information and science relating to the greater sage-grouse and its habitat across portions of 11 Western States. This Research Strategy provides an outline of important research topics to ensure that science information gaps are identified and documented in a comprehensive manner. Further, by identifying priority topics and critical information needed for planning, research, and resource management, it provides a structure to help coordinate members of an expansive research and management community in their efforts to conduct priority research.

  15. Holocene peatland initiation in the Greater Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Stefan C.; de Boer, Hugo J.; Dermody, Brian J.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Wassen, Martin J.; Eppinga, Maarten B.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms involved in the initiation and development of the Greater Everglades peatland ecosystems remain a topic of discussion. In this study, we first present an overview of basal ages of peat deposits in South Florida, which shows two major episodes of peatland initiation between 7.0-4.5 kyr and 3.5-2.0 kyr. Our analysis of regional climate proxy data sets led to three alternative hypotheses that may explain the timing and duration of these two peatland initiation episodes: (1) decreased drainage due to relative sea level (RSL) rise during the Holocene, (2) gradual increase in precipitation throughout the Holocene, and (3) a combination of increasing precipitation, rising RSL, and oscillations in the climate system. We test whether these three hypotheses can explain the pattern of initiation and development of the Greater Everglades peatlands using models that simulate the nonlinear processes involved in peat production and decomposition. The model results suggest that RSL rise could explain the onset of peatland initiation and imply that the climate was wet enough for peat development also during the early Holocene. The first two hypothesized mechanisms in combination with climate oscillations may explain the onset of peat accumulation at 8.2 kyr B.P. The two-phased character of peatland initiation maybe explained by the spatial distribution of local drainage conditions. As peatland development is highly nonlinear, our model uncovers a mechanistic way how peats can suddenly shift from a dry high equilibrium to a wet low equilibrium resulting in lake formation as observed in paleoecological studies in the Greater Everglades.

  16. Sex differences and hormonal modulation of deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Richard J.; Ji, Yaping

    2013-01-01

    Women disproportionately suffer from many deep tissue pain conditions. Experimental studies show that women have lower pain thresholds, higher pain ratings and less tolerance to a range of painful stimuli. Most clinical and epidemiological reports suggest female gonadal hormones modulate pain for some, but not all, conditions. Similarly, animal studies support greater nociceptive sensitivity in females in many deep tissue pain models. Gonadal hormones modulate responses in primary afferents, dorsal horn neurons and supraspinal sites, but the direction of modulation is variable. This review will examine sex differences in deep tissue pain in humans and animals focusing on the role of gonadal hormones (mainly estradiol) as an underlying component of the modulation of pain sensitivity. PMID:23872333

  17. Pain and Emotion: A Biopsychosocial Review of Recent Research

    PubMed Central

    Lumley, Mark A.; Cohen, Jay L.; Borszcz, George S.; Cano, Annmarie; Radcliffe, Alison M.; Porter, Laura S.; Schubiner, Howard; Keefe, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective and Method Research on emotion and pain has burgeoned. We review the last decade’s literature, focusing on links between emotional processes and persistent pain. Results Neurobiological research documents the neural processes that distinguish affective from sensory pain dimensions, link emotion and pain, and generate central nervous system pain sensitization. Psychological research demonstrates that greater pain is related to emotional stress and limited emotional awareness, expression, and processing. Social research shows the potential importance of emotional communication, empathy, attachment, and rejection. Conclusions Emotions are integral to the conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of persistent pain. Research should clarify when to eliminate or attenuate negative emotions, and when to access, experience, and express them. Theory and practice should integrate emotion into cognitive-behavioral models of persistent pain. PMID:21647882

  18. Pharmacologic advances in orofacial pain: from molecules to medicine.

    PubMed

    Dionne, R A

    2001-12-01

    The management of chronic orofacial pain often follows a pattern of claims of efficacy based on clinical observations superseded by equivocal findings of effectiveness or belated recognition of toxicity. While therapeutic innovation spurred by genomics and proteomics is likely to result in new drugs for pain, inflammation, and neuropathic pain, the process of drug development and approval takes five to ten years and is often unsuccessful. Therapeutic strategies for improving treatment for chronic orofacial pain are proposed, but recognition of impediments to changing clinical practices suggest the need for interim measures. Greater understanding of the molecular and genetic events that contribute to pain chronicity and interindividual variations in pain responsiveness may eventually result in individualized molecular pain medicine to prevent and treat chronic orofacial pain.

  19. Psychological resilience predicts decreases in pain catastrophizing through positive emotions.

    PubMed

    Ong, Anthony D; Zautra, Alex J; Reid, M Carrington

    2010-09-01

    The study used a daily process design to examine the role of psychological resilience and positive emotions in the day-to-day experience of pain catastrophizing. A sample of 95 men and women with chronic pain completed initial assessments of neuroticism, psychological resilience, and demographic data, and then completed short diaries regarding pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, and positive and negative emotions every day for 14 consecutive days. Multilevel modeling analyses indicated that independent of level of neuroticism, negative emotions, pain intensity, income, and age, high-resilient individuals reported greater positive emotions and exhibited lower day-to-day pain catastrophizing compared with low-resilient individuals. Mediation analyses revealed that psychologically resilient individuals rebound from daily pain catastrophizing through experiences of positive emotion. Implications for research on psychological resilience, pain catastrophizing, and positive emotions are discussed.

  20. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Compared to Usual Care for Pain Relief of Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard D.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Bennett, Maria E.; Chae, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study seeks to establish the efficacy of single-lead, 3-week peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) therapy for pain reduction in stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegic shoulder pain. Design Single-site, pilot, randomized controlled trial for adults with chronic shoulder pain after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive a 3-week treatment of single-lead PNS or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was the worst pain in the last week (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 3) measured at baseline, and weeks 1,4, 12, and 16. Secondary outcomes included pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 9), pain measured by the ShoulderQ Visual Graphic Rating Scales; and health-related quality of life (SF-36v2). Results Twenty-five participants were recruited, 13 to PNS and 12 to UC. There was a significantly greater reduction in pain for the PNS group compared to controls, with significant differences at 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. Both PNS and UC were associated with significant improvements in pain interference and physical health related quality of life. Conclusions Short-term PNS is a safe and efficacious treatment for shoulder pain. Pain reduction is greater than compared to UC and is maintained for at least 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24355994

  1. Ethnicity is associated with alterations in oxytocin relationships to pain sensitivity in women

    PubMed Central

    Grewen, Karen M.; Light, Kathleen C.; Mechlin, Beth; Girdler, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that African Americans (AA) experience greater pain associated with a variety of clinical conditions, and greater pain sensitivity to experimental pain tasks relative to non-Hispanic Whites (W). Notably, African Americans do not show the same relationships involving endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms and pain sensitivity documented in Caucasians, including positive associations between blood pressure, norepinephrine, cortisol and greater pain tolerance. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between plasma oxytocin (OT) and pain sensitivity and to explore the relation of OT to other factors known to influence pain perception. Design OT concentration and sensitivity to ischemic, cold pressor, and thermal pain tasks were assessed in African American (n=25) and non-Hispanic White (n=23) pre-menopausal women. Results African American women demonstrated significantly lower pain tolerance across tasks compared with Whites (F1,46 =6.31, p=0.0156) and also exhibited lower plasma OT levels (AA: 3.90, W: 7.05 pg/mL; p=0.0014). Greater OT levels were correlated with greater tolerance to ischemic pain (r=0.36, p=0.013) and accounted for a marginally significant portion of the ethnic difference in ischemic pain tolerance (B=+0.29, p=0.06). Greater OT was also correlated with greater tolerance of cold pressor pain (r=0.31, p=0.03); however, this association was no longer seen after the variance due to ethnicity was accounted for. Conclusion These data suggest that reduced oxytocinergic function may be one of multiple biological factors contributing to the greater sensitivity to experimental ischemic pain, and to the greater burden of some types of clinical pain experienced by African Americans compared with Whites. PMID:18568974

  2. Interspecific hybridization between greater kudu and nyala.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Desiré L; Tordiffe, Adrian; Luther, Ilse; Duran, Assumpta; van Wyk, Anna M; Brettschneider, Helene; Oosthuizen, Almero; Modiba, Catherine; Kotzé, Antoinette

    2014-06-01

    Hybridization of wildlife species, even in the absence of introgression, is of concern due to wasted reproductive effort and a reduction in productivity. In this study we detail an accidental mating between a female nyala (Tragelaphus angasii) and a male greater kudu (T. strepsiceros). The hybrid was phenotypically nyala and was identified as such based on mitochondrial DNA. Further genetic analysis based on nine microsatellite markers, chromosome number and chromosome morphology however, confirmed its status as an F1 hybrid. Results obtained from a reproductive potential assessment indicated that this animal does not have the potential to breed successfully and can be considered as sterile.

  3. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  4. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If you ... to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each day, ...

  5. Persistent Pain and Frailty: A Case For Homeostenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shega, Joseph W.; Dale, William; Andrew, Melissa; Paice, Judith; Rockwood, Kenneth; Weiner, Debra K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Persistent pain is associated with poorer health outcomes and may lead to increased vulnerability and diminished physiologic reserve, ultimately precipitating frailty. To test for the existence of this process, we compared the association of self-reported moderate to severe pain with the presence of frailty. Design Cross-sectional analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging-Wave 2. Setting Community dwellers Participants Representative sample of persons age 65 and older in Canada. Measurements Pain (exposure) was categorized as no or very mild pain versus moderate or greater pain. Frailty (outcome) was operationalized as the accumulation of 33 possible self-reported health attitudes, illnesses, and functional abilities, subsequently divided into tertiles (i.e. not frail, pre-frail, and frail). Multivariable logistic regression assessed for the association of pain with frailty. Results Of participants who reported moderate or greater pain (35.5% or 1,765 out of 4,968), 16.2% were not frail, 34.1% were pre-frail, and 49.8%were frail. For persons with moderate or greater pain compared to those with mild or no pain, the odds of being pre-frail compared to not frail were higher by a factor of 2.52 (95% confidence interval (CI)=2.13-2.99; p<0.05). For persons with moderate or greater pain compared to those with mild or no pain, the odds of being frail compared to not frail was higher by a factor of 5.52 (CI=4.49-6.64; p<0.05). Conclusion Moderate or higher pain was independently associated with the presence of frailty. While we cannot ascertain causality in a cross-sectional analysis, interventions to improve pain management may help prevent or ameliorate frailty. PMID:22150394

  6. Supporting Self-management of Chronic Pain

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-19

    Chronic Pain Syndrome; Chronic Pain; Chronic Pain Due to Injury; Chronic Pain Due to Trauma; Chronic Pain Due to Malignancy (Finding); Chronic Pain Post-Procedural; Chronic Pain Hip; Chronic Pain, Widespread

  7. Greater body mass index is related to greater self-identified cold tolerance and greater insensible body mass loss.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dahee; Kim, Dami; Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-08-22

    Insensible body mass loss (IBL) from the human body continuously occurs, which is an important component in body heat exchange. The purpose of this study was to examine the relevance of IBL to anthropometric characteristics and self-identified thermal tolerance. A total of 289 healthy young Korean males were chosen and sorted into the following three groups: heat tolerable only (HTO, N = 79), cold tolerable only (CTO, N = 104), neither heat nor cold tolerable (NHC, N = 106). They weighed before and after a 30-min rest under lightly clothed condition at an air temperature of 23 ± 1 °C with a relative humidity 55 ± 5 %RH. (1) The IBL of 289 males had a mean of 90 ± 75 g h(-1) (48 ± 40 g h(-1) m(-2)); (2) No significant difference in IBL among the three groups were found; (3) Significant differences in body weight and body mass index (BMI) among three groups were found (P < 0.05), but insignificance was found for height (P = 0.726) or body surface area (P = 0.059); (4) CTO was approximately 4.1 kg heavier in body weight (P < 0.05) and higher in BMI (P < 0.01) than in HTO; (5) Only for the group CTO, IBL (g h(-1)) showed a positive relationship to BMI (P < 0.05, R (2) = 0.056), but there was no relationship between IBL and body surface area. For healthy young males within normal anthropometric ranges in Korea, IBL was positively related to BMI, and individuals with greater BMI showed greater self-identified cold tolerance, but no direct relationship was found between IBL and self-identified cold tolerance. This suggests that body physique (e.g., BMI) could be an explanatory factor between insensible body heat loss and subjective cognition on cold tolerance.

  8. Mental imagery in chronic pain: prevalence and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gosden, T; Morris, P G; Ferreira, N B; Grady, C; Gillanders, D T

    2014-05-01

    Research into mental imagery has increased our understanding of a range of psychological problems. However, there has been little study into the spontaneous mental images experienced in response to chronic pain. This study aimed to explore the prevalence and characteristics of these pain-related mental images. Four hundred ninety-one people with chronic pain who had attended a pain clinic were sent invites to participate and 105 people responded (21%). A mixed-methods approach (quantitative and qualitative) was used to explore the prevalence of pain-related mental imagery, differences between imagers and non-imagers, and the content of imagery in pain. In our sample, 36% of respondents reported having mental images of their pain, with the majority describing them as clear and vivid (83%), experienced daily (80.5%), and distressing (83%). Participants who experienced mental images reported higher depression scores, higher anxiety and higher pain unpleasantness. Frequency of imagery was associated with greater pain unpleasantness. Content analysis of the pain images revealed emerging themes relating to the sensory qualities of pain, anatomical representations, pain as a form of threat or attack, pain as an object, and pain as an abstract image. This study describes themes and characteristics of pain-related mental imagery and confirms that they are a frequent, vivid and distressing experience for many chronic pain sufferers. The results of this study suggest that pain-related mental imagery could provide an additional route for assessment and intervention. Further research should focus on assessment, measurement and intervention in clinical populations. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  9. Pain, emotion, headache.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed.

  10. Breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew N

    2014-06-01

    Breakthrough pain is a distinct pain state that is common in patients with cancer pain and which is associated with significant morbidity in this group of patients. The aim of this article is to highlight important journal articles relating to breakthrough pain that have been published within the last year, including a systematic review of the epidemiology of breakthrough pain, the largest-ever study of the clinical features of breakthrough pain, and a network meta-analysis of the treatment of breakthrough pain.

  11. Patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Salama-Hanna, Joseph; Chen, Grace

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic pain is important because it may lead to multidisciplinary preoperative treatment of patients' pain and a multimodal analgesia plan for effective pain control. Preoperative multidisciplinary management of chronic pain and comorbid conditions, such as depression, anxiety, deconditioning, and opioid tolerance, can improve patient satisfaction and surgical recovery. Multimodal analgesia using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies shifts the burden of analgesia away from simply increasing opioid dosing. In more complicated chronic pain patients, multidisciplinary treatment, including pain psychology, physical therapy, judicious medication management, and minimally invasive interventions by pain specialists, can improve patients' satisfaction and surgical outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The relationship between medical comorbidity and self-rated pain, mood disturbance, and function in older people with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ian Y; Farrell, Michael J; Helme, Robert D; Gibson, Stephen J

    2007-05-01

    Aging is associated with greater risk for many illnesses and the prospect of multiple, concurrent disease states. Chronic pain is also very common in advanced age, and there is likely to be a relationship with comorbid burden, but few studies have examined this issue. This study tests the hypothesis that comorbid burden is associated with greater levels of self-reported pain and associated disturbance in mood and function. Psychometric and medical data were collected from 562 patients (mean age = 76.3 years) attending a geriatric pain clinic. The number of categories endorsed on the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) score was used to measure accumulated comorbid burden. These groups were tested for differences in the severity of self-reported pain. The predictive capacity of comorbid burden for explaining variance in mood disturbance and functional disability was assessed after controlling for any differences in age and severity of pain. Over 50% of the sample had three or more comorbid problems. Groups with greater levels of comorbidity scored higher on the Present Pain Intensity Index, the sensory and affective subscales of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis showed that the CIRS score explained a significant proportion of the variance in scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale (4.1%), Human Activities Profile (4.8%), and the physical domain of the Sickness Impact Profile (5.9%). Greater levels of comorbidity are associated with reports of more severe pain, more depressive symptoms, reduced activity levels, and higher physical impact from pain.

  13. Multiple sclerosis among immigrants in Greater London.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G; McLoughlin, H; Brady, R; Adelstein, A M; Tallett-Williams, J

    1976-01-01

    Among immigrants resident in greater London from Europe, Ireland, the USSR, the old Commonwealth countries of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, North and South America, Egypt, Turkey, and Iran the incidence of admission to hospital for probable multiple sclerosis (MS) between 1960 and 1972 was high or moderately high. The incidence was the same order as that found in those born in the United Kingdom. Immigrants from India, Pakistan, and other Asian countries and from new Commonwealth Africa and America, which includes the West Indies, had a low incidence of hospital admission for MS. Immigrants from countries where the risk of MS is low whose parents were born in Europe had a reduced incidence of admission to hospital but not the very low incidence found in those parents were also born in these countries. Emigrating to England from low risk parts of the world did not seem to increase the risk of developing MS. PMID:1260384

  14. Health and Greater Manchester in Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    This article maps the history of health organisation across Greater Manchester (GM), primarily since the Second World War, to show how against a continuing backdrop of health inequalities, services have been driven (and constrained) by the needs and the politics of each period. Defining ‘success’ as benefits for patients the article identifies examples such as Salford’s mental health services (1950s and 1960s), public health in North Manchester (1970s and 1980s), the creation of centres for diabetes, sickle-cell and thalassaemia (1980s) and the formation of the Joint Health Unit in 2002. What this history shows is that over the period the common factors influencing the ‘success’ of health organisation across GM have been the championing of particular issues by multi-disciplinary groups working across health and social care and stability in structures and personnel. PMID:27499557

  15. Neuropathic ocular pain due to dry eye is associated with multiple comorbid chronic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Covington, Derek; Levitt, Alexandra E.; McManus, Katherine T.; Seiden, Benjamin; Felix, Elizabeth R.; Kalangara, Jerry; Feuer, William; Patin, Dennis J.; Martin, Eden R.; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Levitt, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate that dry eye (DE) susceptibility and other chronic pain syndromes (CPS) such as chronic widespread pain, irritable bowel syndrome and pelvic pain, may share common heritable factors. Previously, we showed that DE patients describing more severe symptoms tended to report features of neuropathic ocular pain (NOP). We hypothesize that patients with a greater number of CPS would have a different DE phenotype compared to those with fewer CPS. We recruited a cohort of 154 DE patients from the Miami Veterans Affairs Hospital and defined high and low CPS groups by cluster analysis. In addition to worse non-ocular pain complaints and higher PTSD and depression scores (P<0.01), we found that the high CPS group reported more severe neuropathic-type DE symptoms compared to the low CPS group, including worse ocular pain assessed via 3 different pain scales (P<0.05), with similar objective corneal DE signs. This is the first study to demonstrate DE patients who manifest a greater number of comorbid CPS report more severe DE symptoms and features of NOP. These findings provide further evidence that NOP may represent a central pain disorder, and that shared mechanistic factors may underlie vulnerability to some forms of DE and other comorbid CPS. PMID:26606863

  16. Sex differences in pain responses at maturity following neonatal repeated minor pain exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Page, Gayle G; Hayat, Matthew J; Kozachik, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting evidence of long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity in school-age children who were cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Such care involves multiple pain exposures, 70% of which are accounted for by heel lance to monitor physiological well-being. The authors sought to model the repeated brief pain resulting from heel lance by administering repeated paw needle stick to neonatal rat pups. Repeated needle stick during the first 8 days of life was sex-specific in altering responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli, but not to a thermal stimulus, at maturity. Specifically, neonatal paw needle stick males exhibited significantly greater mechanical sensitivity in response to von Frey hair testing, whereas neonatal paw needle stick females exhibited significantly greater pain behavior scores following hindpaw formalin injection. This is the first study to show such sex-dependent changes in pain responsiveness at maturity in animals having experienced repeated neonatal needle stick pain. These findings support existing evidence that there are long-term sensory sequelae following neonatal pain experiences in rats and further suggest that there are sex-linked differences in the nature of the consequences. If these relationships hold in humans, these findings suggest that even mild painful insults early in life are not without sensory consequences.

  17. Gender expression, sexual orientation and pain sensitivity in women.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Rowell, Lauren N; Lutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Despite a growing body of literature investigating sex differences with regard to pain, surprisingly little research has been conducted on the influence of various aspects of self-identity, including gender expression and sexual orientation, on pain sensitivity within each sex, particularly among women. In men, dispositional femininity is linked to greater clinical pain and trait masculinity is associated with higher pain thresholds. To examine whether gender expression and sexual orientation are associated with within-sex differences in ischemic pain sensitivity in healthy young women. A convenience sample of 172 females (mean age 21.4 years; range 18 to 30 years of age; 56.0% white, 89% heterosexual) performed an ischemic pain task in counterbalanced order. Desired levels of dispositional femininity for a preferred romantic partner and self-described levels of personal dispositional femininity were measured. Compared with heterosexual women, lesbian and bisexual women reported lower pain intensity ratings early in the discomfort task. Irrespective of sexual orientation, attraction to more feminine romantic partners and dispositional masculinity were correlated with lower pain intensity, and with higher pain thresholds and tolerance levels. These preliminary findings suggest that within-sex differences in sexual orientation and other aspects of identity, irrespective of biological sex, may be important to consider when examining experimental pain performance and clinical pain experiences. Larger investigations of the psychophysiological relationships among sexual orientation, gender expression and pain sensitivity are warranted. These findings may have implications for differences in clinical pain sensitivity of lesbian and bisexual women compared with heterosexual women.

  18. Barriers to pain management: focus on opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Vellucci, Renato; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Cherubino, Paolo; Labianca, Roberto; Fornasari, Diego

    2012-02-22

    Despite the availability of effective pain treatments, there are numerous barriers to effective management resulting in a large proportion of patients not achieving optimal pain control. Chronic pain is inadequately treated because of a combination of cultural, societal, educational, political and religious constraints. The consequences of inadequately treated pain are physiological and psychological effects on the patient, as well as socioeconomic implications. Unreasonable failure to treat pain is viewed as unethical and an infringement of basic human rights. The numerous barriers to the clinical management of pain vary depending on whether they are viewed from the standpoint of the patient, the physician, or the institution. Identification and acknowledgement of the barriers involved are the first steps to overcoming them. Successful initiatives to overcome patient, physician and institutional barriers need to be multifaceted in their approach. Multidisciplinary initiatives to improve pain management include dissemination of community-based information, education and awareness programmes to attempt to change attitudes towards pain treatment. A better awareness and insight into the problems caused by unrelieved pain and greater knowledge about the efficacy and tolerability of available pain management options should enable physicians to seek out and adhere to treatment guidelines, and participate in interventional and educational programmes designed to improve pain management, and for institutions to implement the initiatives required. Although much work is underway to identify and resolve the issues in pain management, many patients still receive inadequate treatment. Continued effort is required to overcome the known barriers to effective pain management.

  19. Associations Between Cigarette Smoking and Pain Among Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Shawna L. Carroll; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with chronic pain often report using cigarettes to cope, and smoking and chronic pain appear prevalent among US veterans. Pain may be a barrier to cigarette cessation and abstinence in this population. Because of physiological effects, smoking cigarettes may also interfere with pain management. A better understanding of how cigarette use relates to pain may assist in veteran cigarette cessation and pain management efforts. To assist these efforts, we searched the literature using keywords, such as “pain,” “smoking,” and “veteran,” to identify 23 journal articles published from 1993 to 2013 that reported on studies examining pain and smoking variables among military or veteran populations. Studies found that veterans reported using cigarettes to cope with pain, there was greater occurrence of pain and disability among smokers in the military, and smoking increased the odds of veterans receiving an opioid prescription for pain and misusing opioids. Studies also found increased odds of pain and smoking among Veterans Health Administration patients with post-traumatic stress disorder when compared with those without post-traumatic stress disorder. Studies support an interaction between pain and smoking among veterans. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. Future studies focused on this interaction would benefit veteran populations. PMID:25595170

  20. Imaging Athletic Groin Pain.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Annu; Robinson, Philip

    2016-09-01

    This article outlines adductor-related groin pain, pubic-related groin pain, inguinal-related groin pain, and iliopsoas-related groin pain, with a description of the corresponding functional anatomy and imaging findings. The imaging has been described mainly in terms of MR imaging findings as this is the principal imaging modality used to investigate groin pain, although plain radiographs and ultrasound can be very useful adjuncts in specific circumstances, especially if an alternative pathology needs to be excluded.

  1. Muscle pain inhibits cutaneous touch perception.

    PubMed

    Stohler, C S; Kowalski, C J; Lund, J P

    2001-06-01

    The processing of noxious and non-noxious sensations differs between chronic pain syndromes, and we believe that studies of sensory processing in the presence of pain will help to clarify the aetiology of the conditions. Here we measured in humans the threshold-level mechanosensitivity in tonic experimental muscle pain. We found (1) that muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline reduced cutaneous threshold-level mechanosensitivity at the site of pain and at the mirror site in the contralateral face, (2) that this effect outlasted the sensation of pain, (3) that it was more pronounced when the painful area was reported to be large, and (4) that the loss of mechanosensitivity was greater in males than females. Comparing our findings to results obtained with other pain models, all classes of nociceptors do not seem to have the same effect on cutaneous mechanosensitivity. The observed threshold-level hypoesthesia is consistent with the hypothesis that the increased mechanical thresholds found in clinic cases of temporomandibular disorders and cervicobrachialgia are a direct result of the activation of muscle nociceptors.

  2. Characteristics of sensitization associated with chronic pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vierck, Charles J.; Wong, Fong; King, Christopher D.; Mauderli, Andre P.; Schmidt, Siegfried; Riley, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe and understand varieties and characteristics of sensitization contributing to hyperalgesia for patients with chronic pain conditions. Methods Thermal stimulation was delivered to the face, forearm and calf of pain-free subjects and individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), temporomandibular pain disorder (TMD) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Three second contacts of a preheated thermode occurred at 30 sec. intervals in ascending and then descending series (0.7°C steps). Results Thermal pain ratings during ascending series were greater at each site for individuals diagnosed with chronic pain. Strong pain at the time of testing further enhanced the ratings at all sites, but mild or moderate clinical pain did not have this effect. Thermal pain for all subjects was greater during descending series than during ascending series of arm and leg stimulation. The hypersensitivity during descending series was comparable for pain-free, FMS and TMD subjects but was increased in duration for arm or leg stimulation of FMS subjects. Discussion The widespread sensitization for IBS and TMD subjects does not rely on mechanisms of spatial and temporal summation often invoked to explain widespread hyperalgesia associated with chronic pain. Increased sensitivity during descending series during stimulation of an arm or leg but not the face indicates a propensity for sensitization of nociceptive input to the spinal cord. Abnormally prolonged sensitization for FMS patients reveals a unique influence of widespread chronic pain referred to deep somatic tissues. PMID:23629594

  3. Association of restless legs syndrome, pain, and mood disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M; Rahman, Labiba; Jesudasan, Ajantha; Hafez, Kevin K; Rana, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyze the association between Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, and to explore the relationship between mood disorder comorbidity (anxiety and depression), pain, and restless legs syndrome. This study included 123 Parkinson's disease patients and 123 non-Parkinson's disease patients matched for age and gender, and evaluated for anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence. This was performed using semi-structured interviews and a neurological examination through the restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria and the following inventories; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pain Disability Index. Parkinson's disease patients had significantly greater anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence in comparison to controls. In addition, Parkinson's disease patients' comorbid for anxiety and depression had significantly greater pain severity, pain interference, and pain disability, but not RLS prevalence, in comparison to Parkinson's disease only, Parkinson's disease anxiety, and Parkinson's disease depression patients. Pain interference, pain severity, and pain disability is greater among Parkinson's disease patients with anxiety and depression, in comparison to Parkinson's disease patients without anxiety and depression. On the contrary, the prevalence of restless legs syndrome was not found to be relevant.

  4. From Pavlov to pain: How predictability affects the anticipation and processing of visceral pain in a fear conditioning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Labrenz, Franziska; Icenhour, Adriane; Schlamann, Marc; Forsting, Michael; Bingel, Ulrike; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2016-04-15

    Conditioned pain-related fear may contribute to hyperalgesia and central sensitization, but this has not been tested for interoceptive, visceral pain. The underlying ability to accurately predict pain is based on predictive cue properties and may alter the sensory processing and cognitive-emotional modulation of pain thus exacerbating the subjective pain experience. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study using painful rectal distensions as unconditioned stimuli (US), we addressed changes in the neural processing of pain during the acquisition of pain-related fear and subsequently tested if conditioned stimuli (CS) contribute to hyperalgesia and increased neural responses in pain-encoding regions. N=49 healthy volunteers were assigned to one of two groups and underwent 3T fMRI during acquisition of either differential fear conditioning (predictable) or non-contingent presentation of CS and US (unpredictable). During a subsequent test phase, pain stimuli signaled randomly by the CSs were delivered. For the acquisition, results confirmed differential conditioning in the predictable but not the unpredictable group. With regard to activation in response to painful stimuli, the unpredictable compared to the predictable group revealed greater activation in pain-encoding (somatosensory cortex, insula) and pain-modulatory (prefrontal and cingulate cortices, periaqueductal grey, parahippocampus) regions. In the test phase, no evidence of hyperalgesia or central sensitization was found, but the predictable group demonstrated enhanced caudate nucleus activation in response to CS(-)-signaled pain. These findings support that during fear conditioning, the ability to predict pain affects neural processing of visceral pain and alters the associative learning processes underlying the acquisition of predictive properties of cues signaling pain, but conditioned pain-related fear does not result in visceral hyperalgesia or central sensitization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  5. Associations between Neuroticism and Depression in Relation to Catastrophizing and Pain-Related Anxiety in Chronic Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Kadimpati, Sandeep; Zale, Emily L; Hooten, Michael W; Ditre, Joseph W; Warner, David O

    2015-01-01

    Several cognitive-affective constructs, including pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety, have been implicated in the onset and progression of chronic pain, and both constructs have been identified as key targets for multidisciplinary pain treatment. Both neuroticism and depression have been linked to these constructs (and to each other), but how each may contribute to the pain experience is unknown. This study tested associations between neuroticism, depression, and indices of catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety among persons seeking treatment for chronic non-malignant pain. We hypothesized, as a higher-order personality trait, neuroticism would remain uniquely associated with both pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety, even after accounting for current symptoms of depression. A retrospective study design assessed depression (as measured by the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale), neuroticism (measured with the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory), the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the Pain Anxiety Symptom Score in a consecutive series of patients (n=595) admitted to a 3-week outpatient pain treatment program from March 2009 through January 2011. Hierarchical regression indicated that neuroticism was independently associated with greater pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety, above-and-beyond the contributions of sociodemographic characteristics, pain severity, and depression. A depression by neuroticism interaction was not observed, suggesting that associations between neuroticism and cognitive-affective pain constructs remained stable across varying levels of current depression. These findings represent an early but important step towards the clarification of complex associations between trait neuroticism, current depression, and tendencies toward catastrophic and anxiety-provoking appraisals of pain among persons seeking treatment for chronic pain.

  6. A population in pain: report from the Olmsted County health study.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Emmeline A; Wollan, Peter C; Melton, L Joseph; Yawn, Barbara P

    2008-03-01

    Pain is poorly understood on a population level. This study provides updated estimates of the prevalence, location, severity, and impact of pain in a U.S. community and discusses current definitions of "chronic" pain. We mailed four-page surveys to a random sample of 5,897 adult residents of Olmsted County, MN. The survey asked about participant pain (location, duration, severity, and impact), as well as satisfaction with pain-related health care. Of the 3,575 responders (61%), 64.4% reported having chronic pain (>3 months' duration); 6.9% reported subacute pain (1-3 months); and 9.9% reported acute pain (<1 month). Body regions with the highest prevalence of pain were the head (31.9%), lower back (37.7%), and joints (59.5%). Chronic pain sufferers had more days per months with pain, more moderate or severe pain, and greater levels of interference with general activities and sleep than the people with acute and subacute pain. Almost two-thirds of those with chronic pain (63%) reported multiple pain locations. Several chronic pain sufferers gave fair or poor ratings for the quality of care (13.3% of those rating) or the effectiveness of treatment (28.1%) for pain. The prevalence of chronic pain is high, often in more than one location, and over 21% of chronic pain sufferers report dissatisfaction with current care.

  7. Intrarater Reliability of Pain Intensity, Tissue Blood Flow, Thermal Pain Threshold, Pressure Pain Threshold and Lumbo-Pelvic Stability Tests in Subjects with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Paungmali, Aatit; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Taneyhill, Khanittha; Pirunsan, Ubon; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This preliminary study aimed to determine the intrarater reliability of the quantitative tests for the study of non-specific low back pain. Methods Test-retest reliability of the measurements of ratio data was determined by an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurements (SEMs), coefficient of variation (CV), and one-way repeated measures ANOVA using the values collected from 13 young individuals (25.8 ± 6.2 years) with chronic non-specific low back pain on two occasions separated by 2 days. Percent agreement of the ordinal data was also determined by Cohen's Kappa statistics (kappa). The measures consisted of tissue blood flow (BF), average pain visual analog scales (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain threshold (CPT), heat pain threshold (HPT) and lumbo-pelvic stability test (LPST). An acceptable reliability was determined as the ICC values of greater than 0.85, SEMs less than 5%, CV less than 15%, the kappa scores of greater than 80% and no evidence of systematic error (ANOVA, P>0.05). Results ICC of all measures in the lumbo-sacral area were greater than 0.87. The kappa was also greater than 83%. Most measures demonstrated a minimal error of measurements and less potential of systemic error in nature. Only the SEMs and the CV of the CPT exceeded the acceptable level. Conclusions It is concluded that most of the quantitative measurements are reliable for the study of non-specific low back pain, however the CPT should be applied with care as it has a great variation among individuals and potential of measurement error. PMID:22461960

  8. [Imaging of chronic hip pain in adults].

    PubMed

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A

    2000-03-01

    Ti and white in T2, with positive Gadolinium response). Scintigraphy is positive. Staphylococcus location in the hip can be acute or chronic. MRI shows joint effusion, cystic formation and subchondral non specific modifications. Tuberculosis of the hip joint is relatively rare. Greater trochanteric tuberculous involvement is possible under special contexts. Chronic Inflammatory diseases are represented by Rheumatoid Arthritis, Spondylarthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Synovial tumors such as Pigmented Villo Nodular Synovitis, Primary Osteochondromatosis, synovial sarcoma have special presentations. The subchondral bone can be involved by amorphous depositions such as in tophaceous gout, different varieties of lipidosis, amyloidosis, reticulo histiocytosis. Pen arthropathies are enthesopathies in the anterior rectus tendon, calcifying tendonitis (not to be confused with calcifying soft tissue tumor/chondrosarcoma). The pelvis bone and the femur are involved by primary and secondary tumors or by insufficiency fractures which can mislead to hip pathologies.

  9. Self-reported prevalence, pain intensity and risk factors of low back pain in adolescent rowers.

    PubMed

    Ng, Leo; Perich, Debra; Burnett, Angus; Campbell, Amity; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain, the related pain intensity and the rowing-related aggravating factors for low back pain in adolescent rowers who participated in school-level competitions. The secondary objective was to determine whether between-gender differences existed in these data. Retrospective cross-sectional survey 130 adolescent male and 235 adolescent female rowers aged between 14 and 16 years were recruited in this study. Participants completed a questionnaire to determine their lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain, their pain intensity and rowing-related factors that aggravated their low back pain. A high lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain were found in both adolescent male (93.8% and 64.6%, respectively) and female (77.9% and 52.8%, respectively) rowers. A significant between-gender difference was reported for both statistics (p<0.001). A significantly lower (p=0.003) level of pain intensity via a visual analog scale was found for males (4.1/10) when compared to females (5.0/10). Similar rowing-related aggravating factors were reported by males and females although fewer males reported that lifting the rowing shell aggravated their low back pain. A high lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain was reported by the adolescent rowers recruited in this study. While a greater proportion of adolescent male rowers reported low back pain, they reported a lower intensity of pain when compared to their female counterparts. Coaches, clinicians and rowers should be made aware of these findings such that future research and development can focus on promoting pain management strategies in this sport. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Suggestions to Reduce Clinical Fibromyalgia Pain and Experimentally Induced Pain Produce Parallel Effects on Perceived Pain but Divergent Functional MRI–Based Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, Stuart W.G.; Whalley, Matthew G.; Seah, Stanley T.H.; Oakley, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Hypnotic suggestion is an empirically validated form of pain control; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Methods Thirteen fibromyalgia patients received suggestions to alter their clinical pain, and 15 healthy controls received suggestions to alter experimental heat pain. Suggestions were delivered before and after hypnotic induction with blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) activity measured concurrently. Results Across groups, suggestion produced substantial changes in pain report (main effect of suggestion, F2, 312 = 585.8; p < .0001), with marginally larger changes after induction (main effect of induction, F1, 312 = 3.6; p = .060). In patients, BOLD response increased with pain report in regions previously associated with pain, including thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex. In controls, BOLD response decreased with pain report. All changes were greater after induction. Region-of-interest analysis revealed largely linear patient responses with increasing pain report. Control responses, however, were higher after suggestion to increase or decrease pain from baseline. Conclusions Based on behavioral report alone, the mechanism of suggestion could be interpreted as largely similar regardless of the induction or type of pain experience. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data, however, demonstrated larger changes in brain activity after induction and a radically different pattern of brain activity for clinical pain compared with experimental pain. These findings imply that induction has an important effect on underlying neural activity mediating the effects of suggestion, and the mechanism of suggestion in patients altering clinical pain differs from that in controls altering experimental pain. Patient responses imply that suggestions altered pain experience via corresponding changes in pain-related brain regions, whereas control responses imply suggestion engaged cognitive control. PMID:27490850

  11. High Frequency Migraine Is Associated with Lower Acute Pain Sensitivity and Abnormal Insula Activity Related to Migraine Pain Intensity, Attack Frequency, and Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vani A.; Moayedi, Massieh; Keaser, Michael L.; Khan, Shariq A.; Hubbard, Catherine S.; Goyal, Madhav; Seminowicz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a pain disorder associated with abnormal brain structure and function, yet the effect of migraine on acute pain processing remains unclear. It also remains unclear whether altered pain-related brain responses and related structural changes are associated with clinical migraine characteristics. Using fMRI and three levels of thermal stimuli (non-painful, mildly painful, and moderately painful), we compared whole-brain activity between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched controls. Although, there were no significant differences in pain thresholds nor in pre-scan pain ratings to mildly painful thermal stimuli, patients did have aberrant suprathreshold nociceptive processing. Brain imaging showed that, compared to controls, patients had reduced activity in pain modulatory regions including left dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior parietal, and middle temporal cortices and, at a lower-threshold, greater activation in the right mid-insula to moderate pain vs. mild pain. We also found that pain-related activity in the insula was associated with clinical variables in patients, including associations between: bilateral anterior insula and pain catastrophizing (PCS); bilateral anterior insula and contralateral posterior insula and migraine pain intensity; and bilateral posterior insula and migraine frequency at a lower-threshold. PCS and migraine pain intensity were also negatively associated with activity in midline regions including posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortices. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed a negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity; FA) and migraine duration in the right mid-insula and a positive correlation between left mid-insula FA and PCS. In sum, while patients showed lower sensitivity to acute noxious stimuli, the neuroimaging findings suggest enhanced nociceptive processing and significantly disrupted modulatory networks, particularly involving the insula, associated with indices

  12. Measuring parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain: A preliminary validation of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, parent report

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Laura E.; Sieberg, Christine B.; Kaczynski, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    Parent perceptions of and responses to pain have been identified as important factors in understanding pain-related disability among children and adolescents with chronic pain. The ability to “accept” chronic pain rather than focus on ways to avoid or control it has been linked to positive outcomes in chronic pain research. To examine parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain, the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, parent report (CPAQ-P) was developed and administered to 195 parents of children with persistent pain evaluated in a multidisciplinary pain clinic. Analyses support the internal consistency of the CPAQ-P (α= .89) and one-month stability estimates were acceptable for the total scale score (α= .72) and results suggest some responsivity to change. Exploratory factor analysis identified a two-factor model with four items removed from the original 20-item measure. Confirmatory factor analysis strongly supported the modified version. For construct validity, parent beliefs about child acceptance were negatively correlated with parent pain catastrophizing and parent fear of pain. Greater acceptance was also negatively associated protective parent responses to pain. These results support the CPAQ-P as a promising measure for assessing parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain and reinforce the importance of the social context and parental influence on child functioning. PMID:21783324

  13. Sex differences in the relationship between maternal fear of pain and children’s conditioned pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Subhadra; Seidman, Laura C; Lung, Kirsten C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Tsao, Jennie C

    2013-01-01

    Background Parental behaviors, emotions, and cognitions are known to influence children’s response to pain. However, prior work has not tested the association between maternal psychological factors and children’s responses to a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) task. CPM refers to the reduction in perceived pain intensity for a test stimulus following application of a conditioning stimulus to a remote area of the body, and is thought to reflect the descending inhibition of nociceptive signals. Methods The present study examined sex differences in the association between maternal anxiety about pain and children’s CPM responses in 133 healthy children aged 8–17 years. Maternal pain anxiety was assessed using the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20. In addition to the magnitude of CPM, children’s anticipatory anxiety and pain-related fear of the CPM task were measured. Results Sequential multiple linear regression revealed that even after controlling for child age and general maternal psychological distress, greater maternal pain anxiety was significantly related to greater CPM anticipatory anxiety and pain-related fear in girls, and to less CPM (ie, less pain inhibition) in boys. Conclusion The findings indicate sex-specific relationships between maternal pain anxiety and children’s responses to a CPM task over and above that accounted for by the age of the child and the mother’s general psychological distress. PMID:23569396

  14. Pain typology and incident endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Schliep, K.C.; Mumford, S.L.; Peterson, C.M.; Chen, Z.; Johnstone, E.B.; Sharp, H.T.; Stanford, J.B.; Hammoud, A.O.; Sun, L.; Buck Louis, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the pain characteristics among women, with no prior endometriosis diagnosis, undergoing laparoscopy or laparotomy regardless of clinical indication? SUMMARY ANSWER Women with surgically visualized endometriosis reported the highest chronic/cyclic pain and significantly greater dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, and dyschezia compared with women with other gynecologic pathology (including uterine fibroids, pelvic adhesions, benign ovarian cysts, neoplasms and congenital Müllerian anomalies) or a normal pelvis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Prior research has shown that various treatments for pain associated with endometriosis can be effective, making identification of specific pain characteristics in relation to endometriosis necessary for informing disease diagnosis and management. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The study population for these analyses includes the ENDO Study (2007–2009) operative cohort: 473 women, ages 18–44 years, who underwent a diagnostic and/or therapeutic laparoscopy or laparotomy at one of 14 surgical centers located in Salt Lake City, UT or San Francisco, CA. Women with a history of surgically confirmed endometriosis were excluded. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING AND METHODS Endometriosis was defined as surgically visualized disease; staging was based on revised American Society for Reproductive Medicine (rASRM) criteria. All women completed a computer-assisted personal interview at baseline specifying 17 types of pain (rating severity via 11-point visual analog scale) and identifying any of 35 perineal and 60 full-body front and 60 full-body back sites for which they experienced pain in the last 6 months. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was a high prevalence (≥30%) of chronic and cyclic pelvic pain reported by the entire study cohort regardless of post-operative diagnosis. However, women with a post-operative endometriosis diagnosis, compared with women diagnosed with other gynecologic disorders or a normal pelvis

  15. Multisensor Arrays for Greater Reliability and Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Eckhoff, Anthony; Lane, John; Perotti, Jose; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman; Ree, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Arrays of multiple, nominally identical sensors with sensor-output-processing electronic hardware and software are being developed in order to obtain accuracy, reliability, and lifetime greater than those of single sensors. The conceptual basis of this development lies in the statistical behavior of multiple sensors and a multisensor-array (MSA) algorithm that exploits that behavior. In addition, advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and integrated circuits are exploited. A typical sensor unit according to this concept includes multiple MEMS sensors and sensor-readout circuitry fabricated together on a single chip and packaged compactly with a microprocessor that performs several functions, including execution of the MSA algorithm. In the MSA algorithm, the readings from all the sensors in an array at a given instant of time are compared and the reliability of each sensor is quantified. This comparison of readings and quantification of reliabilities involves the calculation of the ratio between every sensor reading and every other sensor reading, plus calculation of the sum of all such ratios. Then one output reading for the given instant of time is computed as a weighted average of the readings of all the sensors. In this computation, the weight for each sensor is the aforementioned value used to quantify its reliability. In an optional variant of the MSA algorithm that can be implemented easily, a running sum of the reliability value for each sensor at previous time steps as well as at the present time step is used as the weight of the sensor in calculating the weighted average at the present time step. In this variant, the weight of a sensor that continually fails gradually decreases, so that eventually, its influence over the output reading becomes minimal: In effect, the sensor system "learns" which sensors to trust and which not to trust. The MSA algorithm incorporates a criterion for deciding whether there remain enough sensor readings that

  16. Triathletes Lose Their Advantageous Pain Modulation under Acute Psychosocial Stress.

    PubMed

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2017-02-01

    Triathletes, who constantly engage in intensely stressful sport, were recently found to exhibit greater pain tolerance and more efficient pain inhibition capabilities than nonathletes. However, pain inhibition correlated negatively with retrospective reports of mental stress during training and competition. The aim of the current study was to test pain inhibition capabilities of triathletes under acute, controlled psychological stress manipulation. Participants were 25 triathletes and ironman triathletes who underwent the measurement of pain threshold, pain intolerance, tonic suprathreshold pain, and conditioned pain modulation before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST). Perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol levels were obtained as indices of stress. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction manifested in the subjective and objective indices. Overall, a significant reduction in pain threshold and in conditioned pain modulation efficacy was observed after the MIST, which reached the baseline levels observed previously in nonathletes. Paradoxically, the magnitude of this stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) correlated negatively with the magnitude of the stress response; low-stress responders exhibited greater SIH than high-stress responders. The results suggest that under acute psychological stress, triathletes not only react with SIH and a reduction in pain modulation but also lose their advantageous pain modulation over nonathletes. The stronger the stress response recorded, the weaker the SIH. It appears that triathletes are not resilient to stress, responding with an increase in the sensitivity to pain as well as a decrease in pain inhibition. The possible effects of athletes' baseline pain profile and stress reactivity on SIH are discussed.

  17. Dysfunctional endogenous pain modulation in patients with functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, C H; Li, X; Shen, L; Cao, Y; Ho, K Y; Wong, R K

    2014-04-01

    Endogenous pain modulation (EPM) is central to the processing of sensory information. Visceral and somatic EPM are abnormal in irritable bowel syndrome, but have not been studied in functional dyspepsia (FD). Visceral EPM was assessed in 34 FD patients and 42 healthy controls. Gastric pain was induced with oral capsaicin and EPM was studied by adding heterotopic thermal foot stimulation or distraction by STROOP test. Somatic EPM was assessed using foot heat stimulation with heterotopic hand electrical stimulation. Endogenous pain modulation by distraction reduced mean gastric pain by 11.9 on the 0-100 visual analog scale (95% CI: 3.8-20.1) in controls (p = 0.006) and by 2.0 (-6.18 to 10.44) in FD (p = 0.6), with greater EPM in controls than in FD (difference -13.3 [-26.1 to -0.5]; p = 0.04). Endogenous pain modulation by heterotopic foot stimulation reduced gastric pain by 6.5 (-0.7 to 13.6) in controls (p = 0.07) and by 7.1 (-2.29 to 16.47) in FD (p = 0.1), with no significant difference in EPM between controls and FD (-2.0 [-14.5 to 10.5]; p = 0.75). In patients with prominent FD pain, greater pain correlated with decreased visceral EPM by distraction (r = 0.51, p = 0.04). Somatic EPM by heterotopic stimulation significantly decreased foot pain in controls (p = 0.004), but not in FD (p = 0.80). In FD, visceral pain modulation by distraction was dysfunctional compared to controls. Somatic pain modulation was also decreased in FD. These data and the correlation of abnormal pain modulation by distraction with clinical pain in pain-predominant FD suggest a potential pathophysiological significance of abnormal pain modulation in FD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Early tectonic history of the Greater Antilles

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.F.; Draper, G.; Mattson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The islands of the Greater Antilles exhibit differing pre-Oligocene tectonic styles and histories, but all display the results of convergent plate activity from the Early Cretaceous to the Middle Eocene. Western and central Cuba consist of autochthonous, Jurassic and older continental crust, which was overthrust by Cretaceous ophiolites in the Early to Middle Eocene. In contrast, eastern Cuba seems to be similar to Northern Hispaniola, and both areas consist of complexes of upper Cretaceous to Eocene magmatic-arc rocks, and trench generated ophiolites and blueschists produced by SW directed subduction. The oldest rocks in central Hispaniola are exposed in NW trending linear fault-bounded belts. Unusual high-Mg greenschists and amphibolites, quartz-feldspathic greenschists, together with N-type MORB basalts and keratophyric volcanics, are juxtaposed against a medial serpentinite belt. Central and eastern Puerto Rico consist of Lower to Upper Cretaceous volcanic rocks intruded by upper Cretaceous to Eocene plutons. Similar Cretaceous volcanics occur in SW Puerto Rico, but they are overthrust by Upper Jurassic cherts, spilites and amphibolites. Jamaica lies along the Nicaraguan Rise to the SW of the other islands and consists of Barremian to Maastrichtian volcanics and volcanogenic sediments intruded by upper Cretaceous calc-alkalic plutons. Blueschists and related rocks in eastern Jamaica, and geochemical zonation in the igneous rocks suggest that the subduction was to the NW. Change in tectonic movements from convergence to left lateral shear took place during the Late Eocene/Early Oligocene.

  19. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  20. Water quality improvement plan for Greater Vancouver

    SciTech Connect

    Foellmi, S.N. . Environmental Div.); Neden, D.G. ); Dawson, R.N. )

    1993-10-01

    The Greater Vancouver Regional District commissioned an 18-month planning and predesign study to define the components in a comprehensive water and predesign study to define the components in a comprehensive water quality improvement plan for its 2,500-ML/d (660-mgd) system. The study included three primary tasks: (1) predesign of disinfection and corrosion control facilities, (2) a 12-month pilot testing program using parallel pilot plants at the Seymour and Capilano water supply reservoirs, and (3) planning for future filtration plants. The results of the study identified chlorine, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, soda ash, and carbon dioxide in a two-stage treatment approach as the recommended disinfection and corrosion control scheme for the low-pH, low-alkalinity water supplies. The pilot-plant studies confirmed that direct filtration using deep-bed monomedium filters operating at a loading rate of 22.5 m/h provided excellent treatment performance and productivity over a wide range of raw-water quality. Ozonation was studied extensively and found not to be beneficial in the overall treatment performance. The phased improvement plan for the disinfection, corrosion control, and filtration facilities has an estimated capital cost of about Can$459 million.

  1. Greater Celandine hepatotoxicity: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Rolf; Frenzel, Christian; Glass, Xaver; Schulze, Johannes; Eickhoff, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Herbal hepatotoxicity is a rare and poorly described disease because reported cases are mostly scattered and lack an appropriate causality assessment. We now describe in detail the clinical picture of herbal hepatotoxicity by extracts of Greater Celandine (GC), syn. Chelidonium majus L. from the Papaveraceae family, which contain more than 20 ingredients including various biologically active isoquinoline alkaloids. For this purpose, we analyzed and reviewed published cases of 16 patients from various European countries. In all patients, herbal hepatotoxicity was of probable and highly probable causality for GC, using the original and updated scale of CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences). GC associated hepatotoxicity usually has an acute clinical course exhibiting a hepatocellular pattern of injury and is correlated to an idiosyncratic reaction with its metabolic subtype. Jaundice combined with high values of serum aminotransferases was present in virtually all cases with favourable outcome despite severe clinical course. In conclusion, GC hepatotoxicity is a typical herbal hepatotoxicity with a sound causality track for GC, but there is uncertainty regarding the respective causative compound(s). The present detailed review of GC hepatotoxicity may serve as an example for clinical causality assessments of future cases of liver injury due to other herbs.

  2. Triatoma infestans in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gajate, P; Pietrokovsky, S; Abramo Orrego, L; Pérez, O; Monte, A; Belmonte, J; Wisnivesky-Colli, C

    2001-05-01

    The Health Administration Agencies of many municipalities in Greater Buenos Aires (GBA) receive frequent reports on triatomines in houses. The aim of this work was to identify and describe the dispersal foci of Triatoma infestans in an urban neighborhood of GBA, and contribute to the knowledge of the epidemiological situation in the region. In June 1998, potentially infested places were entomologically evaluated. T. infestans was only detected in a hen building for egg production, which housed approximately 6,000 birds. A total of 2,930 insects were collected. Density was about 9 triatomines/m(2). The proportions of fifth instar nymphs and adults were significantly higher than those of the other stages (p<0.001). The number of triatomines collected largely exceeded the highest domestic infestation found in one house from rural endemic areas of Argentina. Though triatomines were negative for Trypanosoma cruzi, they could acquire the parasite by coming in contact with infected people living in GBA. Besides, the numerous and widely distributed places housing hens and chickens, would favor the settlement of the vector. Together, both facts may constitute a risk of parasitic vectorial transmission. It is recommended to intensify systematic activities of vector search and case detection in GBA.

  3. A Preliminary Investigation of Affective Interaction in Chronic Pain Couples

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Ayna Beate; Cano, Annmarie

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to examine the extent to which affective marital interaction related to depressive symptoms in persons with chronic pain and their spouses and to pain severity in persons with pain. Couples from the community completed self-report surveys and engaged in a videotaped conversation on a topic of mutual disagreement that was coded for three affect types (i.e., anger/contempt, sadness, humor). Humor was positively related to marital satisfaction in both partners. Spouse anger/contempt and sadness were positively related to depressive symptoms in spouses. Several significant interaction effects between couple pain status (i.e., whether one or both partners reported pain) and affect also emerged. Specifically, sadness in the participant designated as the person with pain was associated with greater depressive symptoms and pain severity when only he or she reported pain whereas sadness was related to fewer depressive symptoms and less pain severity when both partners reported pain. The relationships between spouse anger and spouse depressive symptoms and between spouse humor and pain severity in the person with pain were also moderated by couple pain status. These exploratory findings can be interpreted in light of emotion regulation and pain empathy theories. For example, partners who have not experienced pain themselves may fail to empathize with persons in pain, thus preventing effective emotion regulation. When both spouses report chronic pain, expressions of negative affect may instead promote emotion regulation because the affect is experienced with a spouse who may be more empathetic. PMID:17521810

  4. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sadosky, Alesia; Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Nieshoff, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181) or placebo (n=172) for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT)-based thresholds of pain reduction (<15%, 15% <30%, 30% to <50%, and ≥50%). Outcome measures included modified Brief Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for the pooled studies. Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (P<0.0001) and between pain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory Interference Index and most individual items (P<0.05). Greater functional improvements were generally achieved at higher levels of clinically significant pain reduction. Pregabalin resulted in shifts

  5. Update in cancer pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Janjan, Nora; Jain, Subash; Chau, Chi

    2006-12-01

    Cancer pain assessment and management are integral to palliative medicine. This paper reviews recent publications in the period 1999-2004 in the broad categories of epidemiology, pain assessment, nonpharmacologic approaches to cancer pain (radiation therapy, anesthetic blocks, palliative surgery and chemotherapy, complementary and alternative medicine), and in nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain, visceral pain, and bone pain.

  6. Spirituality, religion, and pain.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Anita M

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the relationships between spirituality and health has become increasingly important in health research, including nursing research. Very little of the research thus far has focused on spirituality, religion, and pain even though spiritual views have been intertwined with beliefs about pain and suffering throughout history. Spiritual views can have a substantial impact on patients' understanding of pain and decisions about pain management. The author reviews the research literature on spirituality and pain from a historical perspective. The analysis is concerned with how spirituality and religion have been used to construct a meaning of pain that shapes appraisal, coping, and pain management. The clinical implications include respectful communication with patients about spirituality and pain, inclusion of spirituality in education and support programs, integration of spiritual preferences in pain management where feasible and appropriate, consultation with pastoral care teams, and reflection by nurses about spirituality in their own lives. A discussion of research implications is included.

  7. Pain, objectivity and history: understanding pain stigma.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel S

    2017-02-21

    The primary claim of this paper is that understanding the stigma so commonly endured by chronic pain sufferers today in the USA and the UK is unlikely without proper appreciation of the history of pain. Ameliorating such stigma is an ethical imperative, and yet most approaches eschew even an attempt to trace connections between historical attitudes, practices and beliefs towards pain and the stigmatisation so many pain sufferers currently endure. The manuscript aims to help fill this gap by framing pain in the modern era in context of two crucial intellectual schemes that waxed in the 19th and 20th centuries: mechanical objectivity and somaticism. The analysis explains these frameworks and applies them to exploration of primary sources connected to contested pain conditions such as railway spine. By properly situating the historical roots of what it means to cite the 'subjectivity' of pain as a problem, the modern roots of stigmatising attitudes and practices towards chronic pain sufferers become much clearer. The manuscript concludes by suggesting that interventions expressly intended to target the root causes of such stigma are much more likely to be successful than approaches that proceed in ignorance of the historical forces shaping and driving pain stigma in the present.

  8. [Pain assessment in dementia].

    PubMed

    Husebø, Bettina Sandgathe

    2009-10-08

    Patients with dementia are often unable to describe their pain because of memory deficiency and speech problems. This may lead to under-diagnosing and suboptimal pain treatment. The article summarises a thesis on development and testing of a new instrument for pain assessment: Mobilisation-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia (MOBID-2) pain scale. 284 nursing home patients (with and without pain), who had been diagnosed with dementia of different types in various stages, were included in the study. Behaviour and intensity of pain was assessed during video-uptakes of clinical examinations and during regular morning care. Psychometric property testing included assessments of reliability, validity and clinical usefulness for the nursing home staff. Observation of pain behaviour during standardised and guided movements, by using the MOBID-2 Pain Scale, provides reliable and valid estimation of intensity of pain associated with the musculoskeletal-system. Pain that is not associated with the musculoskeletal-system is frequently observed, but more challenging to assess. Patients who have severe dementia and/or a combination of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, have a higher risk of suffering from severe and untreated pain than patients without dementia. The MOBID-2 pain scale may help to ensure competent pain treatment, and should be available in all Norwegian nursing homes. A multidisciplinary approach is needed for its implementation and use. Physicians in nursing homes should reconsider the staff's observations, perform additional investigations and find the balance between effects and side effects of pain treatment.

  9. [The pain from burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  10. Anger suppression predicts pain, emotional, and cardiovascular responses to the cold pressor.

    PubMed

    Quartana, Phillip J; Bounds, Sara; Yoon, K Lira; Goodin, Burel R; Burns, John W

    2010-06-01

    Manipulated anger suppression has been shown to heighten pain and anger responses to pain. We examined whether individual differences in self-reported anger suppression predicted pain, anger, and blood pressure responses to acute pain. Healthy participants (N = 47) underwent an anger-provoking speech task followed by a cold pressor pain task. Participants reported their degree of suppression of thoughts and feelings related to the speech. Pain intensity ratings were obtained throughout the cold pressor. Self-reported anger, anxiety and positive emotion, as well as ratings of sensory, general distress, and anger-specific elements of pain were obtained following the cold pressor. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded throughout. Self-reported suppression predicted greater pain intensity ratings, perception of sensory and anger-specific elements of pain, and self-reported anger in response to the cold pressor. Associations between self-reported suppression and pain intensity and ratings of anger-specific elements of pain were statistically mediated by pain-induced changes in self-reported anger, whereas the effect of suppression on sensory pain ratings was not. Self-reported suppression was also correlated inversely with SBP responses to the cold pressor. Consistent with an ironic process model and prior studies involving experimental manipulation of suppression, self-reported suppression of anger predicted greater pain intensity and perception of the anger-specific element of pain. Findings also suggest that suppression might attenuate homeostatic pressor responses to acute pain.

  11. Pain patients and who they live with: a correlational study of coresidence patterns and pain interference.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Pendleton, Patricia; Coulombe, Patrick; Vowles, Kevin E; Alcock, Joe; Smith, Bruce W

    2014-01-01

    Mixed associations have been observed between various aspects of 'social support' and patient pain experiences. To explore the possibility that more basic social factors, namely coresidence patterns, may be associated with variability in patient pain experiences. Relationships between coresidence partners and self-reported pain that interferes with activities were examined in a large representative sample of home health care patients (n=11,436; age range 18 to 107 years, mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.1 years; 55% females). After controlling for sex, age and behavioural risks, compared with living alone, coresidence with an intimate affiliate (eg, spouse, relative) predicted greater pain interference (Cohen's d = 0.10 to 1.72), and coresidence with a less intimate type of affiliate (eg, friend, paid help) predicted lower pain interference (Cohen's d = -0.21 to -0.83). In general, however, coresidence patterns accounted for small proportions of variance in pain interference, and the magnitudes of these effects varied widely according to patients' sex, age and diagnosis. The findings suggest that fundamental components of patient's home-living environment may be associated with potential costs and benefits related to clinically relevant pain functioning for some subgroups of patients. Further research that incorporates quantitative and qualitative assessments of patient pain functioning is warranted to better understand how objective and subjective characteristics of patients' home-living environment may inform the development of more individualized pain treatment options for patients with differing social circumstances.

  12. Older Adults’ Pain Descriptions

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the types of pain information described by older adults with chronic osteoarthritis pain. Pain descriptions were obtained from older adults’ who participated in a posttest only double blind study testing how the phrasing of healthcare practitioners’ pain questions affected the amount of communicated pain information. The 207 community dwelling older adults were randomized to respond to either the open-ended or closed-ended pain question. They viewed and orally responded to a computer displayed videotape of a practitioner asking them the respective pain question. All then viewed and responded to the general follow up question, ““What else can you tell me?” and lastly, “What else can you tell me about your pain, aches, soreness or discomfort?” Audio-taped responses were transcribed and content analyzed by trained, independent raters using 16 a priori criteria from the American Pain Society (2002) Guidelines for the Management of Pain in Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Juvenile Chronic Arthritis. Older adults described important but limited types of information primarily about pain location, timing, and intensity. Pain treatment information was elicited after repeated questioning. Therefore, practitioners need to follow up older adults’ initial pain descriptions with pain questions that promote a more complete pain management discussion. Routine use of a multidimensional pain assessment instrument that measures information such as functional interference, current pain treatments, treatment effects, and side effects would be one way of insuring a more complete pain management discussion with older adults. PMID:19706351

  13. Taking Opioids Before Knee Surgery Could Raise Pain Later

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165871.html Taking Opioids Before Knee Surgery Could Raise Pain Later People ... research found that when people had taken powerful opioid painkillers before knee replacement surgery, they had greater ...

  14. Tooth contact versus clenching: oral parafunctions and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Glaros, Alan G; Williams, Karen

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that estimates of time spent in tooth contact are significantly greater than estimates of time spent clenching, and to test the hypothesis that tooth contact is greater in pain patients, particularly those reporting facial or head pain, than those with pain elsewhere in the body. An anonymous, voluntary, confidential questionnaire was administered to 235 patients seeking care at a general medical clinic. The questionnaire assessed demographic variables, presence and location of pain, and percentage of time spent in tooth contact and in clenching. Analysis of variance was used to examine differences among groups of patients; logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors of pain. All patients reported that the percentage of time spent in tooth contact was significantly greater than the time spent clenching. The same pattern of results emerged for those with and without head pain, and those with and without any chronic pain problem. Both tooth contact and clenching were significantly associated with head pain. Results from the logistic regressions provide convergent validity on the importance of oral parafunctions, specifically tooth contact and clenching, to facial/head pain. For assessment of oral parafunctional behaviors, inquiries that utilize clear behavioral referents (tooth contact versus clenching) are likely to result in more accurate estimates than behaviors with unclear definitions.

  15. Pain Management in Horses.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alonso

    2017-04-01

    There has been great progress in the understanding of basic neurobiologic mechanisms of pain, but this body of knowledge has not yet translated into new and improved analgesics. Progress has been made regarding pain assessment in horses, but more work is needed until sensitive and accurate pain assessment tools are available for use in clinical practice. This review summarizes and updates the knowledge concerning the cornerstones of pain medicine (understand, assess, prevent, and treat). It highlights the importance of understanding pain mechanisms and expressions to enable a rational approach to pain assessment, prevention, and management in the equine patient.

  16. Pain medications and recovery.

    PubMed

    Szalavitz, M

    Pain medication is an important part of healing, and concerns about relapsing into addiction can be destructive. Patients should inform their doctor about previous addictions and can investigate other avenues of pain management, such as acupuncture or massage. If these methods do not prove effective, patients should feel comfortable requesting pain medicine. If pain medicines are taken, a steady dose rather than waiting until the pain is unbearable seems to lessen the association between relief and medicine and decreases the chance of an addiction developing. Other issues should also be considered, such as the possible interactions between HIV drugs and pain medications, which may intensify or weaken each other's effects.

  17. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated.

  18. Central modulation of pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.; Dussor, Gregory O.; Porreca, Frank

    2010-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that the experience of pain is highly variable between individuals. Pain results from activation of sensory receptors specialized to detect actual or impending tissue damage (i.e., nociceptors). However, a direct correlation between activation of nociceptors and the sensory experience of pain is not always apparent. Even in cases in which the severity of injury appears similar, individual pain experiences may vary dramatically. Emotional state, degree of anxiety, attention and distraction, past experiences, memories, and many other factors can either enhance or diminish the pain experience. Here, we review evidence for “top-down” modulatory circuits that profoundly change the sensory experience of pain. PMID:21041960

  19. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie C.I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain. Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity. There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems. Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain. Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  20. Treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain with deep dry needling.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perez, Luis-Miguel; Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Granados-Nuñez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco-Javier

    2012-09-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of deep dry needling in the treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain. We selected 36 patients with myofascial pain located in the external pterygoid muscle (30 women/6 men, mean age=27 years with SD±6.5). We studied differences in pain with a visual analog scale and range of mandibular movements before and after intervention. We found a statistically significant relationship (p<0.01) between therapeutic intervention and the improvement of pain and jaw movements, which continued up to 6 months after treatment. Pain reduction was greater the higher was the intensity of pain at baseline. Although further studies are needed, our findings suggest that deep dry needling in the trigger point in the external pterygoid muscle can be effective in the management of patients with myofascial pain located in that muscle.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine approaches to pain management.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gabriel; Alvarez, Julie A; Jensen, Mark P

    2006-11-01

    This article argues for and illustrates incorporating complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions into pain treatment plans. Two CAM treatments, cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) and self-hypnosis training, are offered in a multidisciplinary pain treatment program. Because these interventions focus on pain relief, they may be of particular interest to patients who have chronic pain who begin treatment with a primary interest in pain reduction. Two cases that illustrate the clinical application of CES and self-hypnosis are presented. When effective, these interventions can help patients have greater confidence in treatments offered by psychologists for pain management and may help make them more open to participating in other psychological interventions that have established efficacy for pain management (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy). Because of their brevity, these treatments also can be offered alone to patients who may not have the resources or time to participate in more time-intensive treatment.

  2. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies.

  3. A population-based study of quantitative sensory testing in adolescents with and without chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Tham, See Wan; Palermo, Tonya M; Holley, Amy Lewandowski; Zhou, Chuan; Stubhaug, Audun; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Nielsen, Christopher Sivert

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been used to characterize pain sensitivity in individuals with and without pain conditions. Research remains limited in pediatric populations, hindering the ability to expand the utility of QST toward its potential application in clinical settings and clinical predictive value. The aims of this study were to examine pain sensitivity using QST in adolescents with chronic pain compared to adolescents without chronic pain and identify predictors of pain sensitivity. A population-based study conducted from 2010 to 2011 provided data on 941 adolescents, 197 were classified as having chronic pain and 744 were classified without chronic pain. Self-reported data on pain characteristics, psychological functioning, and QST responses were examined. The findings revealed lower pressure pain threshold and tolerance on the trapezius (P's = 0.03) in adolescents with chronic pain compared to adolescents without chronic pain, but no differences on heat or cold-pressor pain tasks. Female sex (P's = 0.02) and poorer psychological functioning (P's = 0.02) emerged as significant predictors of greater pain sensitivity across all pain modalities. Exploratory analyses revealed several associations between clinical pain characteristics and QST responses within the chronic pain cohort. Findings from this large pediatric sample provide comprehensive data that could serve as normative data on QST responses in adolescents with and without chronic pain. These findings lay the groundwork toward developing future QST research and study protocols in pediatric populations, taking into consideration sex and psychological distress.

  4. OXYCODONE COMBINATIONS FOR PAIN RELIEF

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, R.B.; Pergolizzi, J.V.; Segarnick, D.J.; Tallarida, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY No single analgesic drug provides the perfect therapeutic/adverse effect profile for every pain condition. In addition to convenience and possibly improved compliance, a combination of analgesic drugs offers the potential, requiring verification, of providing greater pain relief and/or reduced adverse effects than the constituent drugs when used individually. We review here analgesic combinations containing oxycodone. We found surprisingly little preclinical information about the analgesic or adverse effect profiles of the combinations (with acetaminophen, paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, morphine, gabapentin or pregabalin). Clinical experience and studies suggest that the combinations are safe and effective and may offer certain advantages. As with all combinations, the profile of adverse effects must also be determined in order to provide the clinician with the overall benefit/risk assessment. PMID:20571607

  5. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  6. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  7. Expectations of increased and decreased pain explain the effect of conditioned pain modulation in females

    PubMed Central

    Bjørkedal, Espen; Flaten, Magne Arve

    2012-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain is believed to be related to a dysfunction of descending pain modulatory mechanisms. Functioning of descending pain modulation can be assessed by various methods, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM). CPM refers to the inhibition of one source of pain by a second noxious stimulus, termed the conditioning stimulus. This procedure can activate an endogenous pain inhibitory mechanism that inhibits early nociceptive processing. Chronic pain and anxiety disorders are more prevalent among females and it has been hypothesized that females react with more negative emotions towards unpleasant stimuli and this might be part of the explanation of greater pain sensitivity in females. The present study investigated whether expectations modulate the effect of conditioning stimulation on pain, subjective stress, and heart rate. In addition, we investigated whether the modulation of CPM by expectations differed between males and females. Methods Seventy-two subjects (including 36 women) received six noxious heat stimuli to the forearm. During three of these stimuli, a conditioning stimulus (cold-water bath) was applied to the contralateral arm in order to activate CPM. One third of the subjects were told that this would reduce pain (analgesia group), one-third that it would increase pain (hyperalgesia group), and one third received no information about its effect (no info group). Results Information that conditioning stimulation decreased or enhanced pain had the corresponding effect in females, but not in males. Conditioning stimulation increased stress, but not heart rate in females in the hyperalgesia group. A higher expectation of analgesia and lower stress during conditioning stimulation was associated with larger inhibitory CPM. Conclusion These results suggest that reduced inhibitory CPM can be due to contextually induced cognitive and emotional factors and not necessarily a dysfunction of descending inhibitory pathways. PMID:23049277

  8. Shoulder pain in female wheelchair basketball players.

    PubMed

    Curtis, K A; Black, K

    1999-04-01

    Descriptive self-report survey. To assess activity level, medical history, and the prevalence and intensity of shoulder and upper extremity pain experienced during functional activities in female athletes who compete in wheelchairs. Previous studies have documented a high incidence of upper extremity soft tissue disorders in athletes who compete in wheelchairs. None of these studies have specifically focused on female athletes who use wheelchairs. Forty-six female wheelchair basketball players completed an anonymous survey that included demographic data, medical history data, and the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI). The WUSPI is a valid and reliable self-report measure scored from 0 to 150, with higher scores indicating a greater intensity of shoulder pain during functional activities. The average age of the respondents was 33.2 (+/- 9.1) years, with an average of 12.5 (+/- 10.2) years of wheelchair use. Their disabilities included 39% spinal cord injury, 28% various lower extremity musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disabilities, 13% postpolio paralysis, 11% spina bifida, and 9% amputations. Only 14% of the subjects reported shoulder pain prior to wheelchair use. In contrast, 72% of the subjects reported shoulder pain since wheelchair use, with 52% reporting current shoulder pain. Overall, the subjects scored an average +/- SD performance-corrected total WUSPI score of 15.6 +/- 20.5 on a scale of 0 to 150 points, with 0 representing no pain. The highest intensity of shoulder pain was reported during household chores, propulsion on ramps or inclines, lifting overhead, and while sleeping. Shoulder and upper extremity pain was a very common problem reported by over 90% of the subjects in this study. Prevention of pain and chronic disability in athletes who use wheelchairs should be addressed by coaches, players, and health care professionals.

  9. Differences in psychosocial functioning and sleep quality between idiopathic continuous orofacial neuropathic pain patients and chronic masticatory muscle pain patients.

    PubMed

    Porto, Felipe; de Leeuw, Reny; Evans, Daniel R; Carlson, Charles R; Yepes, Juan F; Branscum, Adam; Okeson, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    To examine differences between idiopathic continuous orofacial neuropathic pain (ICONP) patients and chronic masticatory muscle pain (MMP) patients for psychosocial functioning and sleep quality. Archival data were used to compare 81 ICONP patients to 81 age- and sex-matched chronic MMP patients on pain severity, life interference, life control, and affective distress measures from the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI), a global severity index of psychological symptoms from the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C), and overall sleep quality from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). MANOVA, MANCOVA, and chi-square analysis were used to investigate differences between the two groups in the psychosocial and sleep variables. The ICONP group reported greater pain severity (P = .013) and more life interference (P = .032) than the MMP group, while the MMP group reported higher levels of global psychological symptoms (P = .005) than the ICONP group. After controlling for pain severity, however, the MMP group demonstrated greater affective distress (P = .014) than the ICONP group, and life interference was no longer significantly different between the groups. ICONP patients were more likely to report a traumatic life event (P = .007). Although ICONP patients are likely to present more intense pain and report that their pain causes more interference in their lives, MMP patients are more likely to present with higher levels of overall psychological symptoms. The greater levels of pain severity reported by ICONP patients appear to be partially responsible for their higher levels of reported life interference.

  10. Hailstones across the Greater Sydney Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasuly, A. A.; Cheung, K. K. W.; McBurney, B.

    2014-11-01

    This study addresses the recent climatology of hail occurrence in the Greater Metropolitan Severe Thunderstorm Warning Area (GMSTWA) of New South Wales, Australia, which is a sprawling suburban area, with a population of nearly 4.7 million and one of Australia's largest metropolis. The main objective is to highlight the recent temporal-spatial fluctuations of hailstone frequencies and magnitudes for each of recognized and vastly inhabited Local Government Areas (LGAs). The relevant hail event data from 1989 to 2013 were initially derived from the severe storm archive of Australian Bureau of Meteorology. A climatologically oriented GIS technique was applied in the examining and mapping procedure of all hail events and hail days reported throughout the study area. By applying a specific criterion, all severe hails (defined as 2 cm or more in diameter) were cautiously selected and then imported into the ArcGIS software for relevant analysis. Appropriate data layers were stored in a unique database to allow logical integration of the data directly into some geoprocessing functions, mainly for querying, analyzing and mapping purposes in a model-builder setting. The database includes 357 hailstones with sizes 2-11 cm and occurred in 169 hail days across the region during the past 25 years. The models have established that hailstones are neither temporally nor spatially uniform in magnitude throughout the study area. Temporal analysis indicated that most of hail events occurred predominately in the afternoons with peak time of 1-5 p.m. EST. They were particularly common in spring and summer, and reached maximum frequency in November and December. There was an average of 14.3 events each year, but a significant decreasing trend in terms of hail frequency and associated magnitude in the recent years has been identified. In turn, spatial models also established three main distribution patterns over the study area, which include the Sydney Metropolitan, coastal and pronounced

  11. Advanced Innovations for Pain.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Tim J; Deer, Timothy R; Hayek, Salim M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems in terms of both the number of patients afflicted and health care costs. Most patients with chronic pain are treated with medications as the mainstay of therapy, and yet most medically treated patients continue to report ongoing pain. Additionally, adverse effects from pain medications represent a major challenge for clinicians and patients. Spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal drug delivery systems are well-established techniques that have been utilized for over 25 years. Intrathecal drug delivery systems have proven efficacy for a wide variety of intractable pain conditions and fewer adverse effects than systemic medical therapy in patients with refractory cancer-related pain. Spinal cord stimulation is cost-effective and provides improved pain control compared with medical therapy in patients with a variety of refractory pain conditions including complex regional pain syndrome, painful diabetic neuropathy, and chronic radiculopathy. Patients who have intractable pain that has not responded to reasonable attempts at conservative pain care measures should be referred to a qualified interventional pain specialist to determine candidacy for the procedures discussed in this article.

  12. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  13. Prevalence of reported pain, widespread pain, and pain symmetry in veterans of the Persian Gulf War (1990-1991): the use of pain manikins in Persian Gulf War health research.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Nicola J; Unwin, Catherine; Hull, Lisa; David, Tony; Wessely, Simon; Lewis, Glyn

    2006-12-01

    The reporting of pain was compared for U.K. Persian Gulf War veterans, veterans from the Bosnian conflict, and personnel employed in the military at the time of the Persian Gulf War but not deployed (era comparison group). Pain manikins were used to assess the prevalence of the reporting of pain in different body sites and the prevalence of the reporting of widespread pain, in relation to comparison samples. Data from > 8,195 veterans were collected from a previously reported, cross-sectional, population-based, postal questionnaire survey. A greater proportion of Persian Gulf War veterans reported pain in the majority of the 25 areas of the body, compared with the Bosnia and era comparison groups. A greater proportion of Persian Gulf War veterans also fulfilled American College of Rheumatology criteria for widespread pain, compared with the Bosnia and era comparison groups (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-2.20). Participants were much more likely to report pain in an opposite limb if pain was reported in the first limb (odds ratio, 36.9; 95% confidence interval, 31.7-43.0). Widespread pain was also more prevalent in the Persian Gulf War veteran sample compared to the comparison groups. Several years after the end of the Persian Gulf War, veterans still report pain. The mechanisms of this remain unclear. Implications for baseline monitoring of the health of military personnel are discussed.

  14. Anger suppression, ironic processes and pain.

    PubMed

    Quartana, Phillip J; Yoon, K Lira; Burns, John W

    2007-12-01

    Whether anger suppression exerts a causal influence on pain experience, and the mechanisms of such an influence, are not well understood. We report two experimental studies that examine the hypothesis that anger suppression paradoxically increases cognitive accessibility of anger, in turn coloring perceptions of succeeding pain in an anger-congruent fashion. The results of two experimental studies largely confirmed these predictions. Study 1 revealed that participants instructed to suppress emotions during anger-provocation experienced greater cold-pressor pain than those in the control condition. This difference was confined to perception of anger-specific qualities of pain. Study 2 replicated key findings of Study 1, but also provided partial evidence for increased cognitive accessibility of anger tied to anger suppression through self-report and modified dot-probe methodologies. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.

  15. The economics associated with persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ceri J; Harper, Christie

    2011-06-01

    This review aims to assess the economic impact of inadequate, inappropriate and ineffective treatments of persistent pain from the perspective of the individual, their families and communities, healthcare systems, economies and societies in general. The economic impact of persistent and chronic pain poses a substantial burden on individual patients, their families, employers, economies and societies in general. It is recognized that the impact of persistent pain is greater than most other health conditions, due to its effects on rates of absenteeism, reduced levels of productivity and increased risk of leaving the labour market, as well as the costs to the healthcare system and other government agencies. The burden of suffering that pain imposes on individuals and the enormous costs that society has to bear as a result clearly demonstrate that policy makers at governmental level and commissioners, and healthcare decision-makers alike should adopt a broad, strategic and coherent perspective in determining issues relating to service provision and resource allocation.

  16. Abnormal pain response in pain-sensitive opiate addicts after prolonged abstinence predicts increased drug craving

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhen-Yu; Shi, Jie; Epstein, David H.; Wang, Jun; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Craving is a primary feature of opiate addiction and is clinically significant because of its potential to trigger opiate use and relapse. Opiate use can also produce abnormal pain perception. We predicted that for opiate addicts (OAs), there may be an association between these two major features of addiction (drug craving and abnormal pain responses). Objectives To examine pain responses in abstinent opiate addicts in comparison with healthy controls using a cold-pressor test (CPT) and investigate the correlations of cue-induced drug craving with pain responses. Material and methods Fifty-four abstinent OAs and 46 healthy subjects participated in the CPT, and the OAs were also exposed to heroin-related cues the day before the pain test. Outcome measures included pain-tolerance time, VAS ratings of pain intensity and distress, and (in the cue-exposure procedure) VAS ratings of heroin craving and anxiety. Results In the CPT, abstinent addicts showed shorter pain-tolerance time (85.1±14.1 s vs. 133.7±16.7 s, p<0.05) and higher ratings of pain distress (61±3.2 vs. 45.6±3.2, p< 0.01) compared to healthy controls. When we divided the addicts and controls into pain-sensitive (PS) and pain-tolerant (PT) groups by dichotomizing each group in terms of pain-tolerance time, we again found differences between the two PS groups (37.3±3.5 s vs. 57.4±5.1 s, p<0.01 for pain-tolerance time; 66.7±3.2 vs. 52.4±3.3, p<0.01 for distress ratings). For all participants, pain-tolerance time was negatively correlated with VAS ratings for pain intensity and distress. More importantly, the PS addicts reported greater cue-induced craving than the PT addicts (17.8±2.2 vs. 4.5±4.2, p<0.05). For the addict group as a whole, pain distress (the affective aspect of pain) was positively correlated with intensity of cue-induced craving measured on a different day (r=0.33, p=0.01). Conclusions A hyperalgesic state persists for at least 5 months in abstinent OAs and is predictive of

  17. Abnormal pain response in pain-sensitive opiate addicts after prolonged abstinence predicts increased drug craving.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhen-Yu; Shi, Jie; Epstein, David H; Wang, Jun; Lu, Lin

    2009-06-01

    Craving is a primary feature of opiate addiction and is clinically significant because of its potential to trigger opiate use and relapse. Opiate use can also produce abnormal pain perception. We predicted that for opiate addicts (OAs), there may be an association between these two major features of addiction (drug craving and abnormal pain responses). To examine pain responses in abstinent opiate addicts in comparison with healthy controls using a cold-pressor test (CPT) and investigate the correlations of cue-induced drug craving with pain responses. Fifty-four abstinent OAs and 46 healthy subjects participated in the CPT, and the OAs were also exposed to heroin-related cues the day before the pain test. Outcome measures included pain-tolerance time, VAS ratings of pain intensity and distress, and (in the cue-exposure procedure) VAS ratings of heroin craving and anxiety. In the CPT, abstinent addicts showed shorter pain-tolerance time (85.1 +/- 14.1 s vs. 133.7 +/- 16.7 s, p < 0.05) and higher ratings of pain distress (61 +/- 3.2 vs. 45.6 +/- 3.2, p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. When we divided the addicts and controls into pain-sensitive (PS) and pain-tolerant (PT) groups by dichotomizing each group in terms of pain-tolerance time, we again found differences between the two PS groups (37.3 +/- 3.5 s vs. 57.4 +/- 5.1 s, p < 0.01 for pain-tolerance time; 66.7 +/- 3.2 vs. 52.4 +/- 3.3, p < 0.01 for distress ratings). For all participants, pain-tolerance time was negatively correlated with VAS ratings for pain intensity and distress. More importantly, the PS addicts reported greater cue-induced craving than the PT addicts (17.8 +/- 2.2 vs. 4.5 +/- 4.2, p < 0.05). For the addict group as a whole, pain distress (the affective aspect of pain) was positively correlated with intensity of cue-induced craving measured on a different day (r = 0.33, p = 0.01). A hyperalgesic state persists for at least 5 months in abstinent OAs and is predictive of cue

  18. History of pain concepts and pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonica, J J

    1991-05-01

    The development of the concept of pain and its treatment constitutes one of the most interesting and fascinating chapters in the history of medicine. The concept proposed by Aristotle and other ancient Greek philosophers that pain was a passion of the soul remained widely accepted for some 22 centuries, and treatment remained empirical and often ineffective. For a century after the scientific study of pain began, several theories were proposed, and these theories prompted the development of various therapeutic modalities. However, until two decades ago, pain research remained conceptually stagnant; the meager work done was not commensurate with the magnitude and clinical importance of pain. Consequently, pain treatment remained somewhat empirical and ineffective. Whatever knowledge and effective therapeutic modalities were available were not properly applied, primarily because medical students and physicians were not taught the basic principles of pain management. Fortunately, during the past two decades, significant advances have been made in our knowledge of basic mechanisms and a variety of new modalities have been introduced and old ones refined. Although we should be proud of these advances, much more needs to be done if the millions of patients with acute and chronic pain are to be managed effectively. This requires sustaining and expanding research programs; educating and training health professionals; and informing the public.

  19. Predictors of Persistent Disability and Back Pain in Older Adults with a New Episode of Care for Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Sean D; Sherman, Karen J; Heagerty, Patrick J; Mock, Charles N; Dettori, Nathan J; Comstock, Bryan A; Avins, Andrew L; Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Nerenz, David R; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2017-06-01

     To identify predictors of persistent disability and back pain in older adults.  Prospective cohort study.  Back pain outcomes using longitudinal data registry.  Five thousand two hundred twenty adults age 65 years and older with a new primary care visit for back pain.  Baseline measurements included: demographics, health, and back pain characteristics. We abstracted imaging findings from 348 radiology reports. The primary outcomes were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and back pain intensity. We defined persistent disability as RMDQ of 4/24 or higher at both six and 12 months and persistent back pain as pain 3/10 or higher at both six and 12 months.  There were 2,498 of 4,143 (60.3%) participants with persistent disability, and 2,099 of 4,144 (50.7%) had persistent back pain. Adjusted analyses showed the following characteristics most strongly predictive of persistent disability and